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Sample records for dynamic positron autoradiography

  1. Resolution, sensitivity and precision with autoradiography and small animal positron emission tomography: implications for functional brain imaging in animal research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Kathleen C.; Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic methods for in vivo measurement of regional rates of cerebral blood flow, glucose metabolism, and protein synthesis contribute significantly to our understanding of physiological and biochemical responses of the brain to changes in the environment. A disadvantage of these autoradiographic methods is that experimental animals can be studied only once. With the advent of small animal positron emission tomography (PET) and with increases in the sensitivity and spatial resolution of scanners it is now possible to use adaptations of these methods in experimental animals with PET. These developments allow repeated studies of the same animal, including studies of the same animal under different conditions, and longitudinal studies. In this review we summarize the tradeoffs between the use of autoradiography and small animal PET for functional brain imaging studies in animal research

  2. Coincidence Planar Imaging for Dynamic [18F]FDG Uptake in Nude Mice with Tumors and Inflammation: Correlated With Histopathology and Micro-autoradiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ling Sun

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research of Taiwan has developed a dynamic coincidence detection device for positron emitted radiotracer pharmacodynamic study in small mice models. In this study, we set up an experimental paradigm by determining [fluorine-18]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG dynamic uptake in tumors and inflammations in nude mice as the foundation for future applications in therapy development. Histopathology and micro-autoradiography of these tumors and inflammations were obtained for confirmation. Dynamic coincidence planar images of six tumors and two inflammations in nude mice were acquired over 4 hours immediately after injection of 25.9 MBq of [18F]FDG into the right thigh of each animal. After image reconstruction, the lesion-to-background ratios were calculated in regions of interest over the lesion and contralateral thigh to determine the equilibrium status of the radiotracer. All mice were sacrificed for histopathologic examination and six of the mice were examined with micro-autoradiography. [18F]FDG uptake in tumors and inflammations both reached equilibrium about 3 hours after injection. At equilibrium, [18F]FDG uptake into tumors was two to four times higher than the background. Uptake into the 4-day and 8-day inflammations was 2.3 and 5.5 times higher than the background, respectively. Histopathology showed macrophage and neutrophil infiltration around the tumors and in the inflammations. Micro-autoradiography showed dense silver grains in the granulation tissue surrounding the tumors and inflammations. The preliminary results suggested that dynamic [18F]FDG coincidence planar imaging can help in determining the suitable time for static [18F]FDG imaging in nude mice models. The optimal time for static [18F]FDG positron emission tomography imaging was around 3 hours after injection. The paradigm for determining a dynamic [18F]FDG uptake pattern was demonstrated for future new therapeutic drug experimental use.

  3. A study of the seasonal dynamics of three phycoperiphytic communities using nuclear track autoradiography. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pip, E.; Robinson, G.G.C.

    1982-01-01

    Net inorganic carbon uptake was examined for algal periphytic communities on Potamogeton richardsonii, P. praelongus and P. zosteriformis in a shallow lake. Nuclear track autoradiography was used to examine uptake for individual taxa comprising the communities. Net uptake rates per unit cell surface area were strongly correlated during the season for certain algal taxa, particularly diatoms, on the same macrophyte. The correlated taxa formed a different correlation cluster for each macrophyte. Although several of the same algal taxa appeared in the correlation clusters for different macrophytes, the behavior of a given taxon was only rarely correlated on different macrophytes. Each cluster behaved as an independent unit. Such organized behavior may be important in algal succession. Principal component analysis of the species-time uptake matrix isolated 3 main principal components that accounted for > 95% of the seasonal variation on all 3 macrophytes. (orig.)

  4. Detectors for high resolution dynamic positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Tomography is the technique of producing a photographic image of an opaque specimen by transmitting a beam of x-rays or gamma rays through the specimen onto an adjacent photographic film. The image results from variations in thickness, density, and chemical composition, of the specimen. This technique is used to study the metabolism of the human brain. This article examines the design of equipment used for high resolution dynamic positron emission tomography. 27 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  5. Dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Asit, E-mail: asit-saha123@rediffmail.com, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, Rangpo, East-Sikkim 737136 (India); Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India); Pal, Nikhil; Chatterjee, Prasanta, E-mail: asit-saha123@rediffmail.com, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India)

    2014-10-15

    The dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons has been investigated in the framework of perturbed and non-perturbed Kadomtsev-Petviashili (KP) equations. Applying the reductive perturbation technique, we have derived the KP equation in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma with kappa distributed electrons and positrons. Bifurcations of ion acoustic traveling waves of the KP equation are presented. Using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems, the existence of the solitary wave solutions and the periodic traveling wave solutions has been established. Two exact solutions of these waves have been derived depending on the system parameters. Then, using the Hirota's direct method, we have obtained two-soliton and three-soliton solutions of the KP equation. The effect of the spectral index κ on propagations of the two-soliton and the three-soliton has been shown. Considering an external periodic perturbation, we have presented the quasi periodic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas.

  6. Role of vibrational dynamics in resonant positron annihilation on molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A C L; Danielson, J R; Natisin, M R; Surko, C M

    2013-05-31

    Vibrational Feshbach resonances are dominant features of positron annihilation for incident positron energies in the range of the molecular vibrations. Studies in relatively small molecules are described that elucidate the role of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution into near-resonant multimode states, and the subsequent coupling of these modes to the positron continuum, in suppressing or enhancing these resonances. The implications for annihilation in other molecular species, and the necessary ingredients of a more complete theory of resonant positron annihilation, are discussed.

  7. Dynamic positron emission tomography for study of cerebral hemodynamics in a cross section of the head using positron-emitting 68Ga-EDTA and 77Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.L.; Thompson, C.J.; Meyer, E.; Robertson, J.S.; Feindel, W.

    1977-01-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomographic studies were performed on over 120 patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease, arteriovenous malformations, and brain tumors, using the positron section scanner, consisting of a ring of 32 scintillation detectors. The radiopharmaceuticals were nondiffusible 68 Ga-EDTA for transit time and uptake studies and the diffusible tracer, 77 Kr, for quantitative regional cerebral blood flow studies in every square centimeter of the cross section of the head. The results of dynamic positron emission tomography in correlation with the results from the gamma scintillation camera dynamic studies and computed tomography (CT) scans are discussed

  8. Validation of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Derived Vascular Permeability Measurements Using Quantitative Autoradiography in the RG2 Rat Brain Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira C. Ferrier

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI is widely used to evaluate tumor permeability, yet measurements have not been directly validated in brain tumors. Our purpose was to compare estimates of forward leakage Ktrans derived from DCE-MRI to the estimates K obtained using [14C]aminoisobutyric acid quantitative autoradiography ([14C]AIB OAR, an established method of evaluating blood-tumor barrier permeability. Both DCE-MRI and [14C]AIB OAR were performed in five rats 9 to 11 days following tumor implantation. Ktrans in the tumor was estimated from DCE-MRI using the threeparameter general kinetic model and a measured vascular input function. Ki was estimated from OAR data using regions of interest (ROI closely corresponding to those used to estimate Ktrans. Ktrans and Ki correlated with each other for two independent sets of central tumor ROI (R = 0.905, P = .035; R = 0.933, P = .021. In an additional six rats, Ktrans was estimated on two occasions to show reproducibility (intraclass coefficient = 0.9993; coefficient of variance = 6.07%. In vivo blood-tumor permeability parameters derived from DCE-MRI are reproducible and correlate with the gold standard for quantifying blood tumor barrier permeability, [14C]AIB OAR.

  9. The positron excess as a smoking gun for dynamical dark matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Kumar, Jason; Thomas, Brooks

    2014-01-01

    One of the most puzzling aspects of recent data from the AMS-02 experiment is an apparent rise in the cosmic-ray positron fraction as a function of energy. This feature is observed out to energies of approximately 350 GeV. One explanation of these results interprets the extra positrons as arising from the decays of dark-matter particles. This in turn typically requires that such particles have rather heavy TeV-scale masses and not undergo simple two-body decays to leptons. In this talk, by contrast, we show that Dynamical Dark Matter (DDM) can not only match existing AMS-02 data on the positron excess, but also accomplish this feat with significantly lighter dark-matter constituents undergoing simple two-body decays to leptons. We also demonstrate that the Dynamical Dark Matter framework makes a fairly robust prediction that the positron fraction should level off and then remain roughly constant out to approximately 1 TeV, without experiencing any sharp downturns. Thus, if we interpret the positron excess in terms of decaying dark matter, the existence of a plateau in the positron fraction at energies less than 1 TeV may be taken as a “smoking gun” of Dynamical Dark Matter

  10. Autoradiography of metallic matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, N.A.

    1982-04-01

    One of the container designs being considered for the disposal of irradiated CANDU fuel bundles consists of a cylindrical titanium shell approximately 1.10 m in height and 0.84 m in diameter, into which is placed a basket fabricated from a close-packed array of thirty-seven 10 cm (4 in.) schedule 40 steel pipes. Two fuel bundles would be stacked into all but the central pipe, and the entire container filled with a low melting point metal. There is concern that shrinkage during solidification of this metal matrix may result in voids being present in the matrix near the outer shell of the container. One of the methods being considered to determine the presence of such voids is autoradiography. A theoretical study was carried out to determine the limitations of this technique. The results are discussed in detail in this report. It is concluded that while autoradiography appears feasible, it will require using a complex multi-detector system to detect voids of a reasonable size

  11. Quantification in dynamic and small-animal positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Disselhorst, Johannes Antonius

    2011-01-01

    This thesis covers two aspects of positron emission tomography (PET) quantification. The first section addresses the characterization and optimization of a small-animal PET/CT scanner. The sensitivity and resolution as well as various parameters affecting image quality (reconstruction settings, type

  12. Discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masubuchi, Masanori

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography. In this method, the difference in DNA synthetic phase between each chromosome was used as a standard, and the used chromosome was in metaphase, as morphological characteristics were markedly in this phase. Cell cycle and autoradiography with 3 H-thymidine were also examined. In order to discriminate chromosome by autoradiography, it was effective to utilize the labelled pattern in late DNA synthetic phase, where asynchronous replication of chromosome appeared most obviously. DNA synthesis in chromosome was examined in each DNA synthetic phase by culturing the chromosome after the treatment with 3 H-thymidine and altering the time to prepare chromosome specimen. Discrimination of chromosome in plants and animals by autoradiography was also mentioned. It was noticed as a structural and functional discrimination of chromosome to observe amino acid uptake into chromosome protein and to utilize the difference in labelled pattern between the sites of chromosome. (K. Serizawa)

  13. Autoradiography in pharmacology and toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    81 abstracts on autoradiography in pharmacology and toxicology were presented, divided into six sessions concerning: 1) methods 2) hormones and receptors, 3) drugs, 4) toxicology, 5) metals, 6) fetal distribution. (author)

  14. Autoradiography as a safeguards technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumbach, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    Autoradiography gives a simultaneous piece count and attribute check for special nuclear material without, however, a quantitative measurement of fissile material. Applications to fuel elements containing plutonium for fast critical assemblies or uranium for LWRs are discussed. 15 figures

  15. Statistical properties of compartmental model parameters extracted from dynamic positron emission tomography experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazoyer, B.M.; Huesman, R.H.; Budinger, T.F.; Knittel, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past years a major focus of research in physiologic studies employing tracers has been the computer implementation of mathematical methods of kinetic modeling for extracting the desired physiological parameters from tomographically derived data. A study is reported of factors that affect the statistical properties of compartmental model parameters extracted from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) experiments

  16. Vacancy profile in reverse osmosis membranes studied by positron annihilation lifetime measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, A; Shintani, T; Hirose, M; Goto, H; Suzuki, R; Kobayashi, Y

    2013-01-01

    The positron annihilation technique using a slow positron beam can be used for the study of the vacancy profiles in typical reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. In this study, the vacancy profile in the polyamide membrane that exhibits a high permselectivity between ions and water was studied using the positron annihilation technique and molecular dynamics simulations. Ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetimes in the surface region of the membranes were evaluated by using a slow positron beam. The diffusion behavior of Na + and water in the polyamides was simulated by molecular dynamics (MD) methods using the TSUBAME2 supercomputer at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and discussed with the vacancy profile probed by the o-Ps. The results suggested that the large hydration size of Na + compared to the vacancy size in the polyamides contributes to the increased diffusivity selectivity of water/Na + that is related to the NaCl desalination performance of the membrane. Both the hydration size of the ions and the vacancy size appeared to be significant parameters to discuss the diffusivity selectivity of water/ions in typical polyamide membranes.

  17. Application of quantitative autoradiography to the measurement of biochemical processes in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokoloff, L.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography makes it possible to measure the concentrations of isotopes in tissues of animals labeled in vivo. In a few cases, the administration of a judiciously selected labeled chemical compound and a properly designed procedure has made it possible to use this capability to measure the rate of a chemical process in animals in vivo. Emission tomography, and particularly positron emission tomography, provides a means to extend this capability to man and to assay the rates of biochemical processes in human tissues in vivo. It does not, however, obviate the need to adhere to established principles of chemical and enzyme kinetics and tracer theory. Generally, all such methods, whether to be used in man with positron emission tomography or in animals with autoradiography, must first be developed by research in animals with autoradiography, because it is only in animals that the measurements needed to validate the basic assumptions of the methods can be tested and evaluated

  18. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungJoon Cho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995. Magn Reson Med 33, 506– 514 derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  19. Digital image analyser for autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muth, R.A.; Plotnick, J.

    1985-01-01

    The most critical parameter in quantitative autoradiography for assay of tissue concentrations of tracers is the ability to obtain precise and accurate measurements of optical density of the images. Existing high precision systems for image analysis, rotating drum densitometers, are expensive, suffer from mechanical problems and are slow. More moderately priced and reliable video camera based systems are available, but their outputs generally do not have the uniformity and stability necessary for high resolution quantitative autoradiography. The authors have designed and constructed an image analyser optimized for quantitative single and multiple tracer autoradiography which the authors refer to as a memory-mapped charged-coupled device scanner (MM-CCD). The input is from a linear array of CCD's which is used to optically scan the autoradiograph. Images are digitized into 512 x 512 picture elements with 256 gray levels and the data is stored in buffer video memory in less than two seconds. Images can then be transferred to RAM memory by direct memory-mapping for further processing. Arterial blood curve data and optical density-calibrated standards data can be entered and the optical density images can be converted automatically to tracer concentration or functional images. In double tracer studies, images produced from both exposures can be stored and processed in RAM to yield ''pure'' individual tracer concentration or functional images. Any processed image can be transmitted back to the buffer memory to be viewed on a monitor and processed for region of interest analysis

  20. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.L.; Thompson, C.J.; Diksic, M.; Meyer, E.; Feindel, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    One of the most exciting new technologies introduced in the last 10 yr is positron emission tomography (PET). PET provides quantitative, three-dimensional images for the study of specific biochemical and physiological processes in the human body. This approach is analogous to quantitative in-vivo autoradiography but has the added advantage of permitting non-invasive in vivo studies. PET scanning requires a small cyclotron to produce short-lived positron emitting isotopes such as oxygen-15, carbon-11, nitrogen-13 and fluorine-18. Proper radiochemical facilities and advanced computer equipment are also needed. Most important, PET requires a multidisciplinary scientific team of physicists, radiochemists, mathematicians, biochemists and physicians. The most recent trends are reviewed in the imaging technology, radiochemistry, methodology and clinical applications of positron emission tomography. (author)

  1. Whole body autoradiography, ch. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonkman, J.H.G.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of 35 S-ringlabelled thiazinamium methylsulphate has been studied by means of whole body autoradiography in a squirrel and in mice. Accumulation of activity was found in liver, kidney and intestines (the excretion of pathways). High concentrations were also found in organs with high amount of acetylcholine receptors and in the glandular tissue. No radioactivity was seen in the central nervous system, indicating no passage through the 'blood-brain barrier'. This is the most significant difference with its tertiary analogue Prometharine hydrochloride. In pregnant mice, high concentrations were found in the placenta but only low amounts were found in liver and kidneys of the foetuses

  2. Calcium dynamics in the healing of tooth extraction sockets in mice evaluated using 45Ca-autoradiography and Electron Probe Micro Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takeo

    2006-01-01

    The calcium distribution in tooth extraction sockets of mice was examined using 45-Calcium autoradiography (ARG) and Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA). Mice were divided into 8 groups (n=8) according to the number of days (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 20 respectively) after extraction. Frozen sections were taken from mice on each experimental day after injection of 45-Calcium (RI). The process of formation of new bone was observed using ARG. An ultimate analysis was performed by EPMA. Histological analysis was performed with toluidine blue- and alizarin red S-staining. In toluidine blue-staining, an osteoblast was found along the socket wall at 4 days and non-calcified periodontal ligament was recognized until 5 days after extraction. In alizarin red S-staining, new bone was recognized separated from the socket wall at 4 days after extraction. 45 Ca-labeling was detected strongly in the periosteum of the mandible, the surface of cement and periodontal ligament in control animals. 45 Ca-labeling was moved from the bottom to the top of the tooth extraction socket during the period from 1 to 5 days after extraction, but in the periodontal ligament lower than in the granulation tissue. 45 Ca-labeling was detected in the socket at 7, 10 and 20 days. At 4 days, calcium phosphate was observed in the central portion of the socket using EPMA. 45 Ca-labeling showed deposition of calcium phosphate for alveolar bone and new bone. These results suggest that the granulation tissue may be involved in the initial calcification in the tooth extraction socket and lead to the formation of new bone in it. (author)

  3. Assessment of regional tumor hypoxia using 18F-fluoromisonidazole and 64Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) positron emission tomography: Comparative study featuring microPET imaging, PO2 probe measurement, autoradiography, and fluorescent microscopy in the R3327-AT and FaDu rat tumor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donoghue, Joseph A.; Zanzonico, Pat; Pugachev, Andrei; Wen Bixiu; Smith-Jones, Peter; Cai Shangde; Burnazi, Eva; Finn, Ronald D.; Burgman, Paul; Ruan, Shutian; Lewis, Jason S.; Welch, Michael J.; Ling, C. Clifton; Humm, John L.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare two potential positron emission tomography (PET) tracers of tumor hypoxia in an animal model. Methods and Materials: The purported hypoxia imaging agents 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) and 64 Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) were compared by serial microPET imaging of Fisher-Copenhagen rats bearing the R3327-AT anaplastic rat prostate tumor. Probe measurements of intratumoral PO 2 were compared with the image data. At the microscopic level, the relationship between the spatial distributions of 64 Cu (assessed by digital autoradiography) and tumor hypoxia (assessed by immunofluorescent detection of pimonidazole) was examined. 18 F-FMISO and 64 Cu-ATSM microPET images were also acquired in nude rats bearing xenografts derived from the human squamous cell carcinoma cell line, FaDu. Results: In R3327-AT tumors, the intratumoral distribution of 18 F-FMISO remained relatively constant 1-4 h after injection. However, that of 64 Cu-ATSM displayed a significant temporal evolution for 0.5-20 h after injection in most tumors. In general, only when 64 Cu-ATSM was imaged at later times (16-20 h after injection) did it correspond to the distribution of 18 F-FMISO. Oxygen probe measurements were broadly consistent with 18 F-FMISO and late 64 Cu-ATSM images but not with early 64 Cu-ATSM images. At the microscopic level, a negative correlation was found between tumor hypoxia and 64 Cu distribution when assessed at early times and a positive correlation when assessed at later times. For the FaDu tumor model, the early and late 64 Cu-ATSM microPET images were similar and were in general concordance with the 18 F-FMISO scans. Conclusion: The difference in behavior between the R3327-AT and FaDu tumor models suggests a tumor-specific dependence of Cu-ATSM uptake and retention under hypoxic conditions

  4. Experimental validation of granular dynamics simulations of gas-fluidised beds with homogeneous inflow conditions using Positron Emission Particle Tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoomans, B.P.B.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Mohd Salleh, M.; Seville, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    A hard-sphere granular dynamics model of a two-dimensional gas-fluidised bed was experimentally validated using Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT). In the model the Newtonian equations of motion are solved for each solid particle while taking into account the particle¿particle and

  5. Multiple bunch longitudinal dynamics measurements at the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Holtzapple

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring (CESR has a longitudinal dipole-coupled-bunch instability that limits the total amount of current that can be stored in the ring without feedback. As a result, it is one of the major limitations for higher stored current and luminosity. This paper reports the measurements of multiple bunch longitudinal dynamics done on CESR with a streak camera. The camera was used to measure the dependence of the bunch distribution on current and accelerating rf voltage, for multiple bunches stored in CESR, as well as the effects of the longitudinal instability on the bunch distribution. Measurements of the beam's longitudinal bunch distribution with multiple bunches present in the ring help give an understanding of the instability, how it affects the bunch distribution, and possibly give insight into a cure of the instability.

  6. Dynamic study of methionine positron emission tomography in patients with glioblastoma with oligodendroglial components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Hirohito; Ohe, Naoyuki; Nakayama, Noriyuki; Nomura, Yu-Ichi; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Shinoda, Jun; Iwama, Toru

    2015-10-01

    Anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) with necrosis is classified as glioblastoma (GBM) with oligodendroglioma component (GBMO), according to the 2007 World Health Organization classification. The prognosis of GBMO remains controversial because definitive diagnostic criteria regarding the percentage of the oligodendroglial components (OC) in the GBM do not exist. We previously reported dynamic methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with these tumors. A significant decrease in the MET signal was seen in oligodendrocytic tumors, in contrast to a significant MET increase in GBMs. In this study, we analyzed the dynamic MET PET signal in four patients with primary (n = 2) and secondary (n = 2) GBMOs. Static PET scanning was performed in three consecutive phases. Both cases of primary GBMOs and one case of secondary GBMO presented with a gradual decrease in MET PET signal over the consecutive phases. In contrast, the remaining case of secondary GBMO presented with a pattern of slight increase. It is likely that the dynamic change of MET in patients with GBMO resemble those in patients with oligodendroglial tumor, however, further studies are needed to confirm them. We discuss the mechanisms from a viewpoint of pathological findings.

  7. The assessment of tumor blood flow factors using dynamic CT; Comparison with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakawa, Emiko (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-03-01

    The dynamic computed tomography (CT) was performed by using rapid-sequence scanning following an intravenous bolus injection of contrast material. Time-density curve was applied for gamma variate curve fitting and CT attenuation values were applied for two compartment model. The value of 1/CM, k[sub 1] and k[sub 2] were defined as the blood flow factors in this study. The inhalation of C[sup 15]O[sub 2] using positron emission tomography (PET) can be useful for determining regional tumor blood flow (rBF). CT and PET were performed in 12 patients. The diagnosis was malignant lymphoma in four, and others; two liver metastases, one focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver, one dermatofibrosarcoma, one hepatocellular carcinoma, one malignant melanoma, one malignant meningioma, one bone metastasis. The correlations among rBF, 1/CM, and k[sub 1] were good, and better correlations were obtained among tumor blood flow factors and rBF in the case of the tumors which existed far from air way and/or had low blood flow. The distance from air way effected both the value of rBF and tumor blood flow factors. Both the distance from air way and pathology caused conflicting results between rBF and tumor blood flow factors. Dynamic CT was particularly useful for evaluating the blood flow of tumors that had contact with air way. (author).

  8. Alpha autoradiography by cellulose nitrate layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonovic, J.; Vukovic, J.; Antanasijevic, R.

    1977-01-01

    From domestic cellulose nitrate bulk material thin layers for α-particle autoradiography were prepared. An artificial test specimen of a uniformly alpha labelled grid source was used. The efficiency of autoradiography by cellulose nitrate was calculated comparing with data from an Ilford K2 nuclear emulsion exposed under the same conditions as the cellulose nitrate film. The resolution was determined as the distance from grid pitch edge at which the track density fell considerably. (Auth.)

  9. Positron emission tomography and nanotechnology: A dynamic duo for cancer theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Shreya; England, Christopher G; Chen, Feng; Cai, Weibo

    2017-04-01

    Development of novel imaging probes for cancer diagnosis is critical for early disease detection and management. The past two decades have witnessed a surge in the development and evolution of radiolabeled nanoparticles as a new frontier in personalized cancer nanomedicine. The dynamic synergism of positron emission tomography (PET) and nanotechnology combines the sensitivity and quantitative nature of PET with the multifunctionality and tunability of nanomaterials, which can help overcome certain key challenges in the field. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in radionanomedicine, exemplifying the ability to tailor the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials to achieve optimal in vivo pharmacokinetics and targeted molecular imaging in living subjects. Innovations in development of facile and robust radiolabeling strategies and biomedical applications of such radionanoprobes in cancer theranostics are highlighted. Imminent issues in clinical translation of radiolabeled nanomaterials are also discussed, with emphasis on multidisciplinary efforts needed to quickly move these promising agents from bench to bedside. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Three-body dynamical interference in electron and positron collision with positronium atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Ghanbari Adivi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this project, the Faddeev-Watson-Lovelace (FWL formalism is generalized to large scattering angles. The angular range includes 0-180 degrees. Using this method, the charge transfer differential cross-sections are calculated, in a second-order approximation, for collision of energetic positrons and electrons with neutral positronium atoms. In this approximation, the rearrangement amplitude contains two first-order and three second-order partial amplitudes. The first first-order term is the Born amplitude in a first-order approximation. The second one corresponds to capturing the transferred particle without perturbing the state of this particle. This term, in fact, describes a knock-on process. Since the masses of the particles and the absolute values of their charges are equal, one expects that the second-order terms be similar in magnitude. This aspect causes the instructive interference of the partial amplitudes in some angles and destructive interference in some others. However, it is predicted that these amplitudes have local maxima in direction of the recoiling of the projectile. In order to investigate this situation, the second-order partial amplitudes are calculated and their relations with the parity of the initial and final states of the scattering system are analyzed. In particular, the role of dynamical interference of these partial amplitudes in creation of the kinematical peak and the peak corresponding to the knock-on scattering in angular distribution of the differential cross sections is investigated.

  11. Estimation of the input function in dynamic positron emission tomography applied to fluorodeoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouvie, Camille

    2013-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method of functional imaging, used in particular for drug development and tumor imaging. In PET, the estimation of the arterial plasmatic activity concentration of the non-metabolized compound (the 'input function') is necessary for the extraction of the pharmacokinetic parameters. These parameters enable the quantification of the compound dynamics in the tissues. This PhD thesis contributes to the study of the input function by the development of a minimally invasive method to estimate the input function. This method uses the PET image and a few blood samples. In this work, the example of the FDG tracer is chosen. The proposed method relies on compartmental modeling: it deconvoluates the three-compartment-model. The originality of the method consists in using a large number of regions of interest (ROIs), a large number of sets of three ROIs, and an iterative process. To validate the method, simulations of PET images of increasing complexity have been performed, from a simple image simulated with an analytic simulator to a complex image simulated with a Monte-Carlo simulator. After simulation of the acquisition, reconstruction and corrections, the images were segmented (through segmentation of an IRM image and registration between PET and IRM images) and corrected for partial volume effect by a variant of Rousset's method, to obtain the kinetics in the ROIs, which are the input data of the estimation method. The evaluation of the method on simulated and real data is presented, as well as a study of the method robustness to different error sources, for example in the segmentation, in the registration or in the activity of the used blood samples. (author) [fr

  12. Two views of functional mapping and autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEachron, D.L.; Adler, N.T.; Tretiak, O.J.

    1986-01-01

    This chapter is meant to serve as an initial introduction into the use and analysis of functional mapping with radiotracers and film autoradiography. The first section describes functional autoradiography from a biologist's point of view, reviewing the advantages of radiotracers for bridging the gap between behavior and neurophysiology. The physical and chemical assumptions underlying the use of radiotracers in biological systems are then examined. The second section looks at the autoradiogram from an engineering standpoint and investigates how the basic physics of radioactive decay influences the measured parameters of autoradiographs. The problems of video densitometry and the quantification of optical density and isotope concentrations are discussed

  13. Capillaries within compartments: microvascular interpretation of dynamic positron emission tomography data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, O L; Keiding, S; Bass, L

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of exchange of substances between blood and tissue has been a long-lasting challenge to physiologists, and considerable theoretical and experimental accomplishments were achieved before the development of the positron emission tomography (PET). Today, when modeling data from modern PET...

  14. The potential of positron emission tomography for intratreatment dynamic lung tumor tracking: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jaewon; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Mazin, Samuel R.; Graves, Edward E.; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to evaluate the potential and feasibility of positron emission tomography for dynamic lung tumor tracking during radiation treatment. The authors propose a center of mass (CoM) tumor tracking algorithm using gated-PET images combined with a respiratory monitor and investigate the geometric accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Methods: The proposed PET dynamic lung tumor tracking algorithm estimated the target position information through the CoM of the segmented target volume on gated PET images reconstructed from accumulated coincidence events. The information was continuously updated throughout a scan based on the assumption that real-time processing was supported (actual processing time at each frame ≈10 s). External respiratory motion and list-mode PET data were acquired from a phantom programmed to move with measured respiratory traces (external respiratory motion and internal target motion) from human subjects, for which the ground truth target position was known as a function of time. The phantom was cylindrical with six hollow sphere targets (10, 13, 17, 22, 28, and 37 mm in diameter). The measured respiratory traces consisted of two sets: (1) 1D-measured motion from ten healthy volunteers and (2) 3D-measured motion from four lung cancer patients. The authors evaluated the geometric accuracy of the proposed algorithm by quantifying estimation errors (Euclidean distance) between the actual motion of targets (1D-motion and 3D-motion traces) and CoM trajectories estimated by the proposed algorithm as a function of time. Results: The time-averaged error of 1D-motion traces over all trajectories of all targets was 1.6 mm. The error trajectories decreased with time as coincidence events were accumulated. The overall error trajectory of 1D-motion traces converged to within 2 mm in approximately 90 s. As expected, more accurate results were obtained for larger targets. For example, for the 37 mm target, the average error over all 1D

  15. Dynamic positron emission tomography in man using small bismuth germanate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.

    1982-04-01

    Primary considerations for the design of positron emission tomographs for medical studies in humans are the need for high imaging sensitivity, whole organ coverage, good spatial resolution, high maximum data rates, adequate spatial sampling with minimum mechanical motion, shielding against out of plane activity, pulse height discrimination against scattered photons, and timing discrimination against accidental coincidences. We discuss the choice of detectors, sampling motion, shielding, and electronics to meet these objectives.

  16. Dynamic positron emission tomography in man using small bismuth germanate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.

    1982-04-01

    Primary considerations for the design of positron emission tomographs for medical studies in humans are the need for high imaging sensitivity, whole organ coverage, good spatial resolution, high maximum data rates, adequate spatial sampling with minimum mechanical motion, shielding against out of plane activity, pulse height discrimination against scattered photons, and timing discrimination against accidental coincidences. We discuss the choice of detectors, sampling motion, shielding, and electronics to meet these objectives

  17. Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography [PET] in Man Using Small Bismuth Germanate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.; Huesman, R. H.; Cahoon, J. L.

    1982-04-01

    Primary considerations for the design of positron emission tomographs for medical studies in humans are the need for high imaging sensitivity, whole organ coverage, good spatial resolution, high maximum data rates, adequate spatial sampling with minimum mechanical motion, shielding against out of plane activity, pulse height discrimination against scattered photons, and timing discrimination against accidental coincidences. We discuss the choice of detectors, sampling motion, shielding, and electronics to meet these objectives.

  18. Digital autoradiography using silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overdick, M.

    1998-05-01

    Spatially resolving radiation detection systems operating in real time can be used to acquire autoradiographic images. An overview over alternatives to traditional autoradiography is given and the special features of these filmless methods are discussed. On this basis the design of a system for digital autoradiography using silicon strip detectors is presented. Special emphasis is put on the physical background of the detection process in the semiconductor and on the self-triggering read-out technique. The practical performance of the system is analyzed with respect to energy and spatial resolution. This analysis is complemented by case studies from cell biology (especially electrophoresis), botany and mineralogy. Also the results from a time-resolved autoradiographic experiment are presented. (orig.) 80 refs.

  19. Free volume study on the miscibility of PEEK/PEI blend using positron annihilation and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramani, R; Alam, S

    2015-01-01

    High performance polymer blend of poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) and poly(ether imide) (PEI) was examined for their free volume behaviour using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis methods. The fractional free volume obtained from PALS shows a negative deviation from linear additivity rule implying good miscibility between PEEK and PEI. The dynamic modulus and loss tangent were obtained for the blends at three different frequencies 1, 10 and 100 Hz at temperatures close to and above their glass transition temperature. Applying Time-Temperature-Superposition (TTS) principle to the DMTA results, master curves were obtained at a reference temperature T o and the WLF coefficients c 0 1 and c 0 2 were evaluated. Both the methods give similar results for the dependence of fractional free volume on PEI content in this blend. The results reveal that free volume plays an important role in determining the visco-elastic properties in miscible polymer blends. (paper)

  20. Alpha autoradiography by cellulose nitrate layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonovic, J.; Vukovic, J.; Antanasijevic, R.

    1976-01-01

    From domestic cellulose nitrate bulk material thin layers for α-particle autoradiography were prepared. An artifical test specimen of a uniformly alpha labelled grid source was used. The efficiency of autoradiographs by cellulose nitrate was calculated comparing with data from an Ilford K2 nuclear emulsion exposed under the same conditions as the cellulose nitrate film. The resolution was determined as the distance from grid pitch edge at which the track density fell considerably. (orig.) [de

  1. Experimental design optimisation: theory and application to estimation of receptor model parameters using dynamic positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delforge, J.; Syrota, A.; Mazoyer, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    General framework and various criteria for experimental design optimisation are presented. The methodology is applied to estimation of receptor-ligand reaction model parameters with dynamic positron emission tomography data. The possibility of improving parameter estimation using a new experimental design combining an injection of the β + -labelled ligand and an injection of the cold ligand is investigated. Numerical simulations predict remarkable improvement in the accuracy of parameter estimates with this new experimental design and particularly the possibility of separate estimations of the association constant (k +1 ) and of receptor density (B' max ) in a single experiment. Simulation predictions are validated using experimental PET data in which parameter uncertainties are reduced by factors ranging from 17 to 1000. (author)

  2. Modeling and simulation of longitudinal dynamics for Low Energy Ring–High Energy Ring at the Positron-Electron Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rivetta

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A time domain dynamic modeling and simulation tool for beam-cavity interactions in the Low Energy Ring (LER and High Energy Ring (HER at the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II is presented. Dynamic simulation results for PEP-II are compared to measurements of the actual machine. The motivation for this tool is to explore the stability margins and performance limits of PEP-II radio-frequency (RF systems at future higher currents and upgraded RF configurations. It also serves as a test bed for new control algorithms and can define the ultimate limits of the low-level RF (LLRF architecture. The time domain program captures the dynamic behavior of the beam-cavity-LLRF interaction based on a reduced model. The ring current is represented by macrobunches. Multiple RF stations in the ring are represented via one or two macrocavities. Each macrocavity captures the overall behavior of all the 2 or 4 cavity RF stations. Station models include nonlinear elements in the klystron and signal processing. This enables modeling the principal longitudinal impedance control loops interacting via the longitudinal beam model. The dynamics of the simulation model are validated by comparing the measured growth rates for the LER with simulation results. The simulated behavior of the LER at increased operation currents is presented via low-mode instability growth rates. Different control strategies are compared and the effects of both the imperfections in the LLRF signal processing and the nonlinear drivers and klystrons are explored.

  3. Determination of Fatty Acid Metabolism with Dynamic [11C]Palmitate Positron Emission Tomography of Mouse Heart In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinlin Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to establish a quantitative method for measuring fatty acid (FA metabolism with partial volume (PV and spill-over (SP corrections using dynamic [11C]palmitate positron emission tomographic (PET images of mouse heart in vivo. Twenty-minute dynamic [11C]palmitate PET scans of four 18- to 20-week-old male C57BL/6 mice under isoflurane anesthesia were performed using a Focus F-120 PET scanner. A model-corrected blood input function, by which the input function with SP and PV corrections and the metabolic rate constants (k1–k5 are simultaneously estimated from the dynamic [11C]palmitate PET images of mouse hearts in a four-compartment tracer kinetic model, was used to determine rates of myocardial fatty acid oxidation (MFAO, myocardial FA esterification, myocardial FA use, and myocardial FA uptake. The MFAO thus measured in C57BL/6 mice was 375.03 ± 43.83 nmol/min/g. This compares well to the MFAO measured in perfused working C57BL/6 mouse hearts ex vivo of about 350 nmol/g/min and 400 nmol/min/g. FA metabolism was measured for the first time in mouse heart in vivo using dynamic [11C]palmitate PET in a four-compartment tracer kinetic model. MFAO obtained with this model was validated by results previously obtained with mouse hearts ex vivo.

  4. Digital autoradiography using room temperature CCD and CMOS imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabello, Jorge; Bailey, Alexis; Kitchen, Ian; Prydderch, Mark; Clark, Andy; Turchetta, Renato; Wells, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    CCD (charged coupled device) and CMOS imaging technologies can be applied to thin tissue autoradiography as potential imaging alternatives to using conventional film. In this work, we compare two particular devices: a CCD operating in slow scan mode and a CMOS-based active pixel sensor, operating at near video rates. Both imaging sensors have been operated at room temperature using direct irradiation with images produced from calibrated microscales and radiolabelled tissue samples. We also compare these digital image sensor technologies with the use of conventional film. We show comparative results obtained with 14 C calibrated microscales and 35 S radiolabelled tissue sections. We also present the first results of 3 H images produced under direct irradiation of a CCD sensor operating at room temperature. Compared to film, silicon-based imaging technologies exhibit enhanced sensitivity, dynamic range and linearity

  5. Design and construction of the Donner 280-crystal positron ring for dynamic transverse section emission imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Banchero, P.G.; Cahoon, J.L.; Huesman, R.H.; Vuletich, T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1977-09-01

    The design and construction of a medical imaging system for the rapid, accurate, three-dimensional imaging of positron-labeled compounds in the human body are described. Our medical research goals include quantifying blood flow and metabolism in human heart muscle and brain. The system consists of a large gantry containing lead shielding and a ring of 280 NaI(Tl) detectors that completely encircles the patient; 280 photomultiplier tubes, preamplifiers and timing discriminators; circuits that determine whenever a crystal has detected a gamma ray in time coincidence (i.e., within 12 nsec) of any of the opposing 105 crystals and determine the addresses of the crystals involved; 120K words of 12 bit memory for the simultaneous acquisition of data from eight portions of the cardiac cycle; and a hardwired image reconstructor capable of filtering and backprojecting data from 140 views to form a 210 x 210 computed transverse section image in less than 2 sec

  6. Nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Aoutou, Kamel; Younsi, Smain; Amour, Rabia

    2009-01-01

    The problem of nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves involving the dynamics of mobile cold positrons is addressed. A theoretical work is presented to show their existence and possible realization in a simple four-component plasma model. The results should be useful for the understanding of the localized structures that may occur in space and laboratory plasmas as new sources of cold positrons are now well developed.

  7. 13th international symposium on autoradiography (13th ISA '83)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strba, J.

    1983-01-01

    At the conference, 39 papers were heard all of which are included in INIS. Topics covered include: trends in development of solid state track detectors, theory and methods of quantitative autoradiography, equipment for autoradiographs processing and track counting, uses of autoradiography in research of semiconductors, in metallography and in biology

  8. On the fractal nature of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A.; Strauss, L.G.; Mikolajczyk, K.; Burger, C.; Lehnert, T.; Bernd, L.; Ewerbeck, V.

    2003-01-01

    Quantification of dynamic PET Studies is generally based on compartmental methods. This is a report about the implementation and assessment of a new non-compartmental method, the fractal dimension (FD), a parameter based on the box counting (BC) procedure of the chaos theory for the analysis of dynamic PET data. The evaluation included 200 malignant lesions in 159 patients with different tumour entities as well as 57 benign lesions for comparison. 101/200 malignant lesions were treated with chemotherapy, whereas 99/200 malignant lesions as well as all 57 benign lesions were untreated within the last six months prior to the PET study with F-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). The evaluation of the FDG kinetics was performed using the BC based FD for the time-activity data. Visual assessment demonstrated generally different FDG uptake patterns in the conventional images and the parametric images of FD. FD estimates depended on the number of boxes and the maximum cut-off value used for calculation. Based on the discriminant analysis for benign and malignant lesions, FD demonstrated an accuracy of 76.65% for all patients, 67.7% for the untreated patients and 83.44% for the treated group. The use of the BC based FD is a reliable, new method for the quantification of dynamic PET studies and seems to be in particular helpful for the evaluation of treated malignant lesions. (author)

  9. Cholinergic Depletion in Alzheimer’s Disease Shown by [18F]FEOBV Autoradiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime J. Parent

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Alzheimer’s Disease (AD is a neurodegenerative condition characterized in part by deficits in cholinergic basalocortical and septohippocampal pathways. [18F]Fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol ([18F]FEOBV, a Positron Emission Tomography ligand for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT, is a potential molecular agent to investigate brain diseases associated with presynaptic cholinergic losses. Purpose. To demonstrate this potential, we carried out an [18F]FEOBV autoradiography study to compare postmortem brain tissues from AD patients to those of age-matched controls. Methods. [18F]FEOBV autoradiography binding, defined as the ratio between regional grey and white matter, was estimated in the hippocampus (13 controls, 8 AD and prefrontal cortex (13 controls, 11 AD. Results. [18F]FEOBV binding was decreased by 33% in prefrontal cortex, 25% in CA3, and 20% in CA1. No changes were detected in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, possibly because of sprouting or upregulation toward the resilient glutamatergic neurons of the dentate gyrus. Conclusion. This is the first demonstration of [18F]FEOBV focal binding changes in cholinergic projections to the cortex and hippocampus in AD. Such cholinergic synaptic (and more specifically VAChT alterations, in line with the selective basalocortical and septohippocampal cholinergic losses documented in AD, indicate that [18F]FEOBV is indeed a promising ligand to explore cholinergic abnormalities in vivo.

  10. Some examples of the utilization of autoradiography in metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, H.

    1959-01-01

    Although autoradiography has been used for a long time for metallurgic studies, new possibilities are open by a full exploitation of recent progress in nuclear emulsion techniques. A few examples are presented. (author) [fr

  11. Brain banking for immunocytochemistry and autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymin, C.; Jordan, D.; Saint-Pierre, G.; Kopp, N.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of a human brain bank is to establish groups of matched brains (normal control versus pathological groups) for studying human diseases of the nervous system. This bank is obtained by means of autopsy performed with a very short post-mortem delay and from clinically and neuropathologically well-documented patients. According to research protocols, two types of brain tissue storage are performed: fixed tissue or frozen tissue. Brain dissection procedures are performed according to precise anatomical boundaries of each brain region. This paper will center on the questions raised by brain banking in relation to histological and immunocytochemical studies and to biochemistry and autoradiography of binding sites. The lack of neuroanatomical data of the human brain leads us to compare anatomical results obtained in animals to that of the human. Moreover, it is clear that human brains present numerous interindividual differences (Kopp et al., 1977; Jack et al., 1989). Therefore, investigations of the human brain should be made on a large series of brains indicating the necessity of a well-documented brain bank of tissue from normal controls and patients. (authors)

  12. Autoradiography of 90Sr in developing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, I.; Jonsen, J.

    1979-01-01

    The distribution patterns of 90 Sr in five littermate, 8-day-old Wistar rats were studied by whole body autoradiography. Rats were killed 15 min, 1, 4, 24, and 72 h after a single intraperitoneal injection of the isotope. Immediately after administration, 90 Sr was distributed throughout most of the soft tissues of the body. The soft tissue deposits had practically disappeared after 4 h. In the hard tissues of the body 90 Sr accumulated up to 24-72 h. Fifteen minutes after injection the uptake of 90 Sr in the enamel of the teeth was highest in the occlusal and incisal regions. 90 Sr gradually accumulated throughout the enamel and after 72 h its distribution in this layer was fairly uniform. Immediately after injection a narrow zone of radioactivity appeared in the dentin near the pulp. This zone broadened with time towards the dentinoenamel junction and included the intire dentin layer 72 h after injection. Initially, the uptake of 90 Sr was higher in the dentin than in the enamel, particularly in the cervical areas of the crown. This difference became less apparent with time. There was good correlation between the uptake in the teeth and bones, supporting the use of teeth as indicators of the 90 Sr body burden. (author)

  13. Capillaries within compartments: microvascular interpretation of dynamic positron emission tomography data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, O L; Keiding, S; Bass, L

    2003-01-01

    estimation of parameters in models with more physiological realism. We explore the standard compartmental model and find that incorporation of blood flow leads to paradoxes, such as kinetic rate constants being time-dependent, and tracers being cleared from a capillary faster than they can be supplied...... single- and multi-capillary systems and include effects of non-exchanging vessels. They are suitable for analysing dynamic PET data from any capillary bed using either intravascular or diffusible tracers, in terms of physiological parameters which include regional blood flow. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Nov-7...... by blood flow. The inability of the standard model to incorporate blood flow consequently raises a need for models that include more physiology, and we develop microvascular models which remove the inconsistencies. The microvascular models can be regarded as a revision of the input function. Whereas...

  14. A New Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Radioligand for Imaging Sigma-1 Receptors in Living Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    James, Michelle L; Shen, Bin; Zavaleta, Cristina L

    2012-01-01

    ]13 was synthesized by nucleophilic fluorination, affording a product with >99% radiochemical purity (RCP) and specific activity (SA) of 2.6 ± 1.2 Ci/µmol (n = 13) at end of synthesis (EOS). Positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo autoradiography studies of [(18)F]13 in mice showed high uptake...

  15. Dynamic 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography of liver tumours without blood sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, S; Munk, O L; Schiøtt, K M

    2000-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is a useful diagnostic tool for the detection of tumours. Using dynamic FDG PET, net metabolic clearance of FDG, K, can be calculated by Gjedde-Patlak analysis of the time course of the radioactivity concentrations......, and 2.1-8.4:1 (mean, 4.6:1) based on blood sample TACs (P>0.3). We conclude that arterial blood sampling can be replaced by the present AORTA-VOI in the calculation of the net metabolic clearance of FDG in dynamic PET studies of liver tumours in human subjects. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Apr...... in tissue and arterial blood. We examined whether time-activity curves (TACs) based on arterial blood sampling could be replaced by TACs obtained from the descending aorta in dynamic PET scans of patients with liver tumours. The study was performed in two parts, using data from dynamic liver scans...

  16. Atomic collisions involving pulsed positrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J. P.; Bluhme, H.; Field, D.

    2000-01-01

    Conventional slow positron beams have been widely and profitably used to study atomic collisions and have been instrumental in understanding the dynamics of ionization. The next generation of positron atomic collision studies are possible with the use of charged particle traps. Not only can large...... instantaneous intensities be achieved with in-beam accumulation, but more importantly many orders of magnitude improvement in energy and spatial resolution can be achieved using positron cooling. Atomic collisions can be studied on a new energy scale with unprecedented precion and control. The use...

  17. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolwig, T.G.; Haunsoe, S.; Dahlgaard Hove, J.; Hesse, B.; Hoejgard, L.; Jensen, M.; Paulson, O.B.; Hastrup Svendsen, J.; Soelvsten Soerensen, S.

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a method for quantitative imaging of regional physiological and biochemical parameters. Positron emitting radioactive isotopes can be produced by a cyclotron, eg. the biologically important carbon ( 11 C), oxygen ( 15 O), and nitrogen ( 13 N) elements. With the tomographic principles of the PET scanner the quantitative distribution of the administered isotopes can be determined and images can be provided as well as dynamic information on blood flow, metabolism and receptor function. In neurology PET has been used for investigations on numerous physiological processes in the brain: circulation, metabolism and receptor studies. In Parkinson's disease PET studies have been able to localize the pathology specifically, and in early stroke PET technique can outline focal areas with living but non-functioning cells, and this could make it possible to intervene in this early state. With positron emission tomography a quantitative evaluation of myocardial blood flow, glucose and fatty acid metabolism can be made as well as combined assessments of blood flow and metabolism. Combined studies of blood flow and metabolism can determine whether myocardial segments with abnormal motility consist of necrotic or viable tissue, thereby delineating effects of revascularisation. In the future it will probably be possible to characterize the myocardial receptor status in different cardiac diseases. The PET technique is used in oncology for clinical as well as more basic research on tumor perfusion and metabolism. Further, tumor uptake of positron labelled cytotoxic drugs might predict the clinical benefit of treatment. (au) (19 refs.)

  18. Positron emission tomography. Positronemisionstomografi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolwig, T.G.; Haunsoe, S.; Dahlgaard Hove, J.; Hesse, B.; Hoejgard, L.; Jensen, M.; Paulson, O.B.; Hastrup Svendsen, J.; Soelvsten Soerensen, S.

    1994-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a method for quantitative imaging of regional physiological and biochemical parameters. Positron emitting radioactive isotopes can be produced by a cyclotron, eg. the biologically important carbon ([sup 11]C), oxygen ([sup 15]O), and nitrogen ([sup 13]N) elements. With the tomographic principles of the PET scanner the quantitative distribution of the administered isotopes can be determined and images can be provided as well as dynamic information on blood flow, metabolism and receptor function. In neurology PET has been used for investigations on numerous physiological processes in the brain: circulation, metabolism and receptor studies. In Parkinson's disease PET studies have been able to localize the pathology specifically, and in early stroke PET technique can outline focal areas with living but non-functioning cells, and this could make it possible to intervene in this early state. With positron emission tomography a quantitative evaluation of myocardial blood flow, glucose and fatty acid metabolism can be made as well as combined assessments of blood flow and metabolism. Combined studies of blood flow and metabolism can determine whether myocardial segments with abnormal motility consist of necrotic or viable tissue, thereby delineating effects of revascularisation. In the future it will probably be possible to characterize the myocardial receptor status in different cardiac diseases. The PET technique is used in oncology for clinical as well as more basic research on tumor perfusion and metabolism. Further, tumor uptake of positron labelled cytotoxic drugs might predict the clinical benefit of treatment. (au) (19 refs.).

  19. Measurement of absolute myocardial blood flow with H215O and dynamic positron-emission tomography. Strategy for quantification in relation to the partial-volume effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, H.; Kanno, I.; Takahashi, A.

    1988-01-01

    An in vivo technique was developed for measuring the absolute myocardial blood flow with H 2 15 O and dynamic positron-emission tomography. This technique was based on a new model involving the concept of the tissue fraction, which was defined as the fraction of the tissue mass in the volume of the region of interest. The myocardium was imaged dynamically by positron-emission tomography, starting at the time of intravenous bolus injection of H 2 15 O. The arterial input function was measured continuously with a beta-ray detector. A separate image after C 15 O inhalation was also obtained for correction of the H 2 15 O radioactivity in the blood. The absolute myocardial blood flow and the tissue fraction were calculated for 15 subjects with a kinetic technique under region-of-interest analysis. These results seem consistent with their coronary angiographic findings. The mean value of the measured absolute myocardial blood flows in normal subjects was 0.95 +/- 0.09 ml/min/g. This technique detected a diffuse decrease of myocardial blood flow in patients with triple-vessel disease

  20. Statistical parametric maps of 18F-FDG PET and 3-D autoradiography in the rat brain: a cross-validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, Elena; Marti-Climent, Josep M.; Collantes, Maria; Molinet, Francisco; Delgado, Mercedes; Garcia-Garcia, Luis; Pozo, Miguel A.; Juri, Carlos; Fernandez-Valle, Maria E.; Gago, Belen; Obeso, Jose A.; Penuelas, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Although specific positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have been developed for small animals, spatial resolution remains one of the most critical technical limitations, particularly in the evaluation of the rodent brain. The purpose of the present study was to examine the reliability of voxel-based statistical analysis (Statistical Parametric Mapping, SPM) applied to 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images of the rat brain, acquired on a small animal PET not specifically designed for rodents. The gold standard for the validation of the PET results was the autoradiography of the same animals acquired under the same physiological conditions, reconstructed as a 3-D volume and analysed using SPM. Eleven rats were studied under two different conditions: conscious or under inhalatory anaesthesia during 18 F-FDG uptake. All animals were studied in vivo under both conditions in a dedicated small animal Philips MOSAIC PET scanner and magnetic resonance images were obtained for subsequent spatial processing. Then, rats were randomly assigned to a conscious or anaesthetized group for postmortem autoradiography, and slices from each animal were aligned and stacked to create a 3-D autoradiographic volume. Finally, differences in 18 F-FDG uptake between conscious and anaesthetized states were assessed from PET and autoradiography data by SPM analysis and results were compared. SPM results of PET and 3-D autoradiography are in good agreement and led to the detection of consistent cortical differences between the conscious and anaesthetized groups, particularly in the bilateral somatosensory cortices. However, SPM analysis of 3-D autoradiography also highlighted differences in the thalamus that were not detected with PET. This study demonstrates that any difference detected with SPM analysis of MOSAIC PET images of rat brain is detected also by the gold standard autoradiographic technique, confirming that this methodology provides reliable results, although partial volume

  1. Statistical parametric maps of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and 3-D autoradiography in the rat brain: a cross-validation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, Elena; Marti-Climent, Josep M. [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Nuclear Medicine Department, Pamplona (Spain); Collantes, Maria; Molinet, Francisco [Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA) and Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Small Animal Imaging Research Unit, Pamplona (Spain); Delgado, Mercedes; Garcia-Garcia, Luis; Pozo, Miguel A. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Brain Mapping Unit, Madrid (Spain); Juri, Carlos [Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), Movement Disorders Group, Neurosciences Division, Pamplona (Spain); Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Pamplona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Pamplona (Spain); Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Department of Neurology, Santiago (Chile); Fernandez-Valle, Maria E. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, MRI Research Center, Madrid (Spain); Gago, Belen [Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), Movement Disorders Group, Neurosciences Division, Pamplona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Pamplona (Spain); Obeso, Jose A. [Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), Movement Disorders Group, Neurosciences Division, Pamplona (Spain); Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Pamplona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Pamplona (Spain); Penuelas, Ivan [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Nuclear Medicine Department, Pamplona (Spain); Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA) and Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Small Animal Imaging Research Unit, Pamplona (Spain)

    2011-12-15

    Although specific positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have been developed for small animals, spatial resolution remains one of the most critical technical limitations, particularly in the evaluation of the rodent brain. The purpose of the present study was to examine the reliability of voxel-based statistical analysis (Statistical Parametric Mapping, SPM) applied to {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images of the rat brain, acquired on a small animal PET not specifically designed for rodents. The gold standard for the validation of the PET results was the autoradiography of the same animals acquired under the same physiological conditions, reconstructed as a 3-D volume and analysed using SPM. Eleven rats were studied under two different conditions: conscious or under inhalatory anaesthesia during {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. All animals were studied in vivo under both conditions in a dedicated small animal Philips MOSAIC PET scanner and magnetic resonance images were obtained for subsequent spatial processing. Then, rats were randomly assigned to a conscious or anaesthetized group for postmortem autoradiography, and slices from each animal were aligned and stacked to create a 3-D autoradiographic volume. Finally, differences in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake between conscious and anaesthetized states were assessed from PET and autoradiography data by SPM analysis and results were compared. SPM results of PET and 3-D autoradiography are in good agreement and led to the detection of consistent cortical differences between the conscious and anaesthetized groups, particularly in the bilateral somatosensory cortices. However, SPM analysis of 3-D autoradiography also highlighted differences in the thalamus that were not detected with PET. This study demonstrates that any difference detected with SPM analysis of MOSAIC PET images of rat brain is detected also by the gold standard autoradiographic technique, confirming that this methodology provides reliable results, although

  2. Neutron radiography and neutron-induced autoradiography for the classroom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aderhold, H.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Cornell 500-kW MARK II TRIGA reactor at the Ward Laboratory of Nuclear Engineering has been used to illustrate the application of neutron radiography (NR) and neutron-induced autoradiography (NIAR) for solving problems in engineering as well as problems in art history. The applications are described in the paper

  3. Toward a European Network of Positron Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karwasz Grzegorz P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Some applications of controlled-energy positron beams in material studies are discussed. In porous organic polysilicates, measurements of 3γ annihilation by Doppler broadening (DB method at the Trento University allowed to trace pore closing and filling by water vapor. In silicon coimplanted by He+ and H+, DB data combined with positron lifetime measurements at the München pulsed positron beam allowed to explain Si blistering. Presently measured samples of W for applications in thermonuclear reactors, irradiated by W+ and electrons, show vast changes of positron lifetimes, indicating complex dynamics of defects.

  4. Systematics of spontaneous positron lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U.; Reus, T. de; Reinhardt, J.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.

    1985-08-01

    Dynamical and spontaneous positron emission are investigated for heavy-ion collisions with long time delay using a semiclassical description. Numerical results and analytical expressions for the characteristic quantities of the resulting spontaneous positron line, i.e., its position, width, and cross section, are compared. The expected behaviour of the line position and cross section and its visibility against the spectrum of dynamically created positrons is discussed in dependence of the united charge Zsub(u) of projectile and target nucleus in a range of systems from Zsub(u)=180 up to Zsub(u)=188. The results are confronted with presently available experimental data, and possible implications on further experiments are worked out. (orig.)

  5. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  6. Development of digital gamma-activation autoradiography for analysis of samples of large area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolotov, V.P.; Grozdov, D.S.; Dogadkin, N.N.; Korobkov, V.I.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-activation autoradiography is a prospective method for screening detection of inclusions of precious metals in geochemical samples. Its characteristics allow analysis of thin sections of large size (tens of cm2), that favourably distinguishes it among the other methods for local analysis. At the same time, the activating field of the accelerator bremsstrahlung, displays a sharp intensity decrease relative to the distance along the axis. A method for activation dose ''equalization'' during irradiation of the large size thin sections has been developed. The method is based on the usage of a hardware-software system. This includes a device for moving the sample during the irradiation, a program for computer modelling of the acquired activating dose for the chosen kinematics of the sample movement and a program for pixel-by pixel correction of the autoradiographic images. For detection of inclusions of precious metals, a method for analysis of the acquired dose dynamics during sample decay has been developed. The method is based on the software processing pixel by pixel a time-series of coaxial autoradiographic images and generation of the secondary meta-images allowing interpretation regarding the presence of interesting inclusions based on half-lives. The method is tested for analysis of copper-nickel polymetallic ores. The developed solutions considerably expand the possible applications of digital gamma-activation autoradiography. (orig.)

  7. 14C autoradiography with a novel wafer scale CMOS Active Pixel Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M; Wells, K; Anaxagoras, T; Allinson, N M; Larner, J

    2013-01-01

    14 C autoradiography is a well established technique for structural and metabolic analysis of cells and tissues. The most common detection medium for this application is film emulsion, which offers unbeatable spatial resolution due to its fine granularity but at the same time has some limiting drawbacks such as poor linearity and rapid saturation. In recent years several digital detectors have been developed, following the technological transition from analog to digital-based detection systems in the medical and biological field. Even so such digital systems have been greatly limited by the size of their active area (a few square centimeters), which have made them unsuitable for routine use in many biological applications where sample areas are typically ∼ 10–100 cm 2 . The Multidimensional Integrated Intelligent Imaging (MI3-Plus) consortium has recently developed a new large area CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (12.8 cm × 13.1 cm). This detector, based on the use of two different pixel resolutions, is capable of providing simultaneously low noise and high dynamic range on a wafer scale. In this paper we will demonstrate the suitability of this detector for routine beta autoradiography in a comparative approach with widely used film emulsion.

  8. The correlation between the rise of the tumor temperature during the hyperthermia treatment and the tumor blood flow measured by dynamic CT and 15O gas-positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Hideyuki

    1993-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the correlation between the rise of tumor temperature during hyperthermia treatment and the blood flow of the tumors measured by dynamic CT (DCT) and 15 O gas-positron emission tomography. In this report, we observed 20 patients with malignant tumors which underwent hyperthermia treatment. In each case, the temperature of the tumor was monitored with a photofiber sensor. DCT's and 15 O gas-positron emission tomographies were applied before the hyperthermia treatment. During the DCT, the tumor blood flow of each tumor was estimated by analyzing the time-dependent activity curve after a bolus injection. During the 15 O gas-positron emission tomography, the tumor blood flow was estimated by the C 15 O 2 -steady-state method. The value of the tumor blood flow estimated by DCT were proportional to those calculated by the 15 O gas-positron emission tomography. These values were inversely proportional to the rise of the temperature of the tumors during hyperthermia treatment. Our results imply that DCT as well as the 15 O gas-positron emission tomography can be used for the prediction of the tumor temperature rise during the hyperthermia treatment. (author)

  9. A quantitative index of regional blood flow in canine myocardium derived noninvasively with N-13 ammonia and dynamic positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nienaber, C.A.; Ratib, O.; Gambhir, S.S.; Krivokapich, J.; Huang, S.C.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine (USA))

    1991-01-01

    To derive a quantitative index of regional myocardial blood flow, the arterial input function of the flow tracer N-13 ammonia and the regional myocardial N-13 activity concentrations were noninvasively determined in 29 experiments in eight dogs. N-13 ammonia was administered intravenously and cross-sectional images were acquired dynamically using an ECAT III positron emission tomograph with an effective in-plane resolution of 13.46 mm full-width half-maximum. Time-activity curves were derived from the serial images by assigning regions of interest to the left ventricular myocardium and left ventricular blood pool. Tracer net extractions were estimated from the myocardial time-activity concentrations at various times after tracer injection and the integral of the arterial input function. Myocardial blood flow was altered by intravenous dipyridamole, morphine, propranolol and partial or complete occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery, and ranged from 9 to 860 ml/min per 100 g. Estimates of tracer net extractions were most accurate when determined from the myocardial N-13 activity concentrations at 60 s divided by the integral of the arterial input function to that time. These estimates correlated with regional myocardial blood flows determined independently by the microsphere technique by y = x (1 - 0.64(e-114/x); SEE = 22.9; r = 0.94). First pass extraction fractions of N-13 ammonia determined noninvasively with this approach declined with higher flows in a nonlinear fashion and were similar to those determined invasively by direct intracoronary N-13 ammonia injections. The findings indicate that an accurate index of regional myocardial blood flow can be obtained noninvasively by high temporal sampling of arterial and myocardial tracer activity concentrations with positron emission tomography.

  10. Transmission positron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, Masao; Kogure, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Miyoshi; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Oshima, Ryuichiro; Matsuya, Miyuki

    2006-01-01

    Immediate and near-future plans for transmission positron microscopes being built at KEK, Tsukuba, Japan, are described. The characteristic feature of this project is remolding a commercial electron microscope to a positron microscope. A point source of electrons kept at a negative high voltage is changed to a point source of positrons kept at a high positive voltage. Positional resolution of transmission microscopes should be theoretically the same as electron microscopes. Positron microscopes utilizing trapping of positrons have always positional ambiguity due to the diffusion of positrons

  11. Monitoring of Radiochemotherapy in Patients with Glioblastoma Using O-(2-[18F]Fluoroethyl-L-Tyrosine Positron Emission Tomography: Is Dynamic Imaging Helpful?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc D. Piroth

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of radiochemotherapy (RCX in patients with glioblastoma is difficult because unspecific alterations in magnetic resonance imaging with contrast enhancement can mimic tumor progression. Changes in tumor to brain ratios (TBRs in positron emission tomography (PET using O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine (18F-FET after RCX with temozolomide of patients with glioblastoma have been shown to be valuable parameters to predict survival. The kinetic behavior of 18F-FET in the tumors is another promising parameter to analyze tumor metabolism. In this study, we investigated the predictive value of dynamic 18F-FET PET during RCX of glioblastoma. Time-activity curves (TACs of 18F-FET uptake of 25 patients with glioblastoma were evaluated after surgery (FET-1, early (7–10 days after completion of RCX (FET-2, and 6 to 8 weeks later (FET-3. Changes in the time to peak (TTP and the slope of the TAC (10–50 minutes postinjection were analyzed and related to survival. Changes in kinetic parameters of 18F-FET uptake after RCX showed no relationship with survival time. In contrast, the high predictive value of changes of TBR to predict survival was confirmed. We conclude that dynamic 18F-FET PET does not provide additional prognostic information during RCX. Static 18F-FET PET imaging (20–40 minutes postinjection appears to be sufficient for this purpose and reduces costs.

  12. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iio, Masahiro

    1982-01-01

    Utilization of positron emission tomography was reviewed in relation to construction and planned construction of small-size medical cyclotrons, planned construction of positron cameras and utilization of short-lived radionuclides. (Chiba, N.)

  13. Regional myocardial oxygen consumption determined noninvasively in humans with [1-11C]acetate and dynamic positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbrecht, J.J.; Buxton, D.B.; Brunken, R.C.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental studies of animals have previously demonstrated the validity of [1-11C]acetate as a tracer of oxidative metabolism for use with positron emission tomography. The present study was undertaken to define in normal human volunteers the relation between myocardial clearance kinetics of [1-11C]acetate, and the rate-pressure product as an index of myocardial oxygen consumption. Twenty-two studies were performed of 12 volunteers. The rate-pressure product was increased with continuous supine bicycle exercise in six studies. Of the 16 resting studies, seven were performed in the fasted state and nine following an oral glucose load, to define possible effects of substrate availability on the tracer-tissue kinetics. Myocardial tissue time-activity curves were biexponential. Clearance of activity was homogeneous throughout the myocardium. The rate constants k1, obtained from biexponential fitting, and kmono, obtained by monoexponential fitting of the initial linear portion of the time-activity curves, correlated well with the rate-pressure product. Although the correlation coefficient was higher for k1 than for kmono (0.95 vs. 0.91), analysis on a sectorial basis showed less regional variability in kmono. This suggests that kmono, which is more practical than k1 because it requires shorter acquisition times, may be more clinically and experimentally useful for detection of myocardial segments with abnormal oxygen consumption. Overall, changes in myocardial substrate supply were without significant effect on the relation between the rate constants (k1 and kmono) and the rate-pressure product, although a small decrease in kmono/rate-pressure product was observed following oral glucose by paired analysis in four subjects

  14. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 24 selections. Some of the titles are: Positron Emission Tomography Instrumentation, Generator Systems for Positron Emitters, Reconstruction Algorithms, Cerebral Glucose Consumption: Methodology and Validation, Cerebral Blood Flow Tomography Using Xenon-133 Inhalation: Methods and Clinical Applications, PET Studies of Stroke, Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography, and Use of PET in Oncology

  15. Digital autoradiography technique for studying of spatial Impurity distributions Delara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamrayeva, S.

    2001-01-01

    In this report, the possibilities of the digital image processing for autoradiographic investigations of impurity distributions in the different objects (crystals, biology, geology et al) are shown. Activation autoradiography based on the secondary beta-irradiation is the method spread widely for investigations of the spatial distribution of chemical elements in the different objects. The analysis of autoradiography features is connected with the elucidation of optical density distribution of photoemulsion by means of photometry. The photoemulsion is used as detector of secondary beta irradiation. For different technological and nature materials to have elemental shifts the fine structure of chemical element distribution is often interested. But photometry makes it difficult to study the inhomogeneous chemical elements with the little gradient of concentration (near 20%). Therefore, the suppression of the background and betterment of linear solvability are the main problems of autoradiographic analysis. Application of the fast-acting digital computers and the technical means of signals treatment are allowed to spread the possibilities and the resolution of activation autoradiography. Mechanism of creation of autoradiographic features is described. The treatment of autoradiograms was conducted with the help of the dialogue system having matrix in 512 x 512 elements. For the interpretation of the experimental data clustering analysis methodology was used. Classification of the zones on the minimum of the square mistake was conducted according to the data of histograms of the optical densities of the studying autoradiograms. It was proposed algorithm for digital treatment for reconstruction of autoradiographic features. At a minimal contrast the resolution of the method has been enhanced on the degree by adaptation of methods of digital image processing (DIP) to suppress background activity. Results of the digital autoradiographic investigations of spatial impurity

  16. Efficiency enhancements for MCP-based beta autoradiography imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lees, J E

    2002-01-01

    We describe three approaches to increase the beta detection efficiency of microchannel plate detectors for biological beta autoradiography:(a)reversing the microchannel plate (MCP) bias polarity, changing the conventional high negative voltage on the input MCP to a grounded input, (b) a reduction in MCP pore size from 12.5 to 6 mu m, (c) using a CsI coating as an efficient secondary electron emitter. We also present our first measurements of double-tracer ( sup 3 H and sup 1 sup 4 C) imaging using pulse height analysis to distinguish between isotopes.

  17. Positron imaging system for plant study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Hiroshi; Omura, Tomohide; Yamashita, Takaji

    2000-01-01

    The positron imaging system, which we have developed, is composed of two planar detectors which detect gamma-rays. These are placed on either side of a plant onto which tracers labeled with positron emitting nuclides have been fed. A pair of gamma rays produced by the annihilation of the positrons and electrons is measured simultaneously from both directions, to identify the tracer position. This measurement method enables dynamic movements of substances within the plant to be obtained as a two-dimensional image, without contact. (author)

  18. An evaluation of an improved method for computing histograms in dynamic tracer studies using positron-emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollinger, J.M.; Snyder, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    A method for computing approximate minimum-mean-square-error estimates of histograms from list-mode data for use in dynamic tracer studies is evaluated. Parameters estimated from these histograms are significantly more accurate than those estimated from histograms computed by a commonly used method

  19. Evaporation process in histological tissue sections for neutron autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espector, Natalia M; Portu, Agustina; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A; Saint Martin, Gisela

    2018-05-01

    The analysis of the distribution and density of nuclear tracks forming an autoradiography in a nuclear track detector (NTD) allows the determination of 10 B atoms concentration and location in tissue samples from Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) protocols. This knowledge is of great importance for BNCT dosimetry and treatment planning. Tissue sections studied with this technique are obtained by cryosectioning frozen tissue specimens. After the slicing procedure, the tissue section is put on the NTD and the sample starts drying. The thickness varies from its original value allowing more particles to reach the detector and, as the mass of the sample decreases, the boron concentration in the sample increases. So in order to determine the concentration present in the hydrated tissue, the application of corrective coefficients is required. Evaporation mechanisms as well as various factors that could affect the process of mass variation are outlined in this work. Mass evolution for tissue samples coming from BDIX rats was registered with a semimicro analytical scale and measurements were analyzed with software developed to that end. Ambient conditions were simultaneously recorded, obtaining reproducible evaporation curves. Mathematical models found in the literature were applied for the first time to this type of samples and the best fit of the experimental data was determined. The correlation coefficients and the variability of the parameters were evaluated, pointing to Page's model as the one that best represented the evaporation curves. These studies will contribute to a more precise assessment of boron concentration in tissue samples by the Neutron Autoradiography technique.

  20. Depolarization in the ILC Linac-To-Ring Positron beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Valentyn; Ushakov, Andriy [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Riemann, Sabine [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    To achieve the physics goals of future Linear Colliders, it is important that electron and positron beams are polarized. The positron source planned for the International Linear Collider (ILC) is based on a helical undulator system and can deliver a polarised beam with vertical stroke Pe{sup +} vertical stroke {>=} 60%. To ensure that no significant polarization is lost during the transport of the electron and positron beams from the source to the interaction region, spin tracking has to be included in all transport elements which can contribute to a loss of polarization. These are the positron source, the damping ring, the spin rotators, the main linac and the beam delivery system. In particular, the dynamics of the polarized positron beam is required to be investigated. The results of positron spin tracking and depolarization study at the Positron-Linac-To-Ring (PLTR) beamline are presented. (orig.)

  1. Parametric images via dynamic {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic data acquisition in predicting midterm outcome of liver metastases secondary to gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolopoulos, Dimitris J. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Patras Medical School, University of Patras, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Patras, Rion, Patras (Greece); Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Roumia, Safwan; Strauss, Ludwig G. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Hohenberger, Peter [University of Heidelberg, Division of Surgical Oncology and Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) may underestimate viable tumour tissue in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) treated with molecular targeted agents. The aim of the present study was to investigate the value of parametric images generated after dynamic data acquisition for the detection of active liver metastases. The analysis included 65 dynamic FDG PET studies in 34 patients with liver metastases from GIST who were treated with imatinib or sunitinib. Parametric images of intercept and slope were calculated by dedicated software using a voxel-based linear regression of time-activity data. Intercept images represent the tracer's distribution volume and the slope its overall metabolic turnover. All images were assessed visually and semi-quantitatively. Liver disease status was established 12 months after each PET study. Dichotomous variables of visual interpretation and various quantitative parameters were entered in a statistical model of linear discriminant analysis. Visual analysis of slope images was more sensitive than the standard 1-h FDG uptake evaluation (70.6 vs 51.0%, p = 0.016) in detecting cases with liver disease progression (n = 51). Specificity did not differ. Combination of all variables in the discriminant analysis model correctly classified 87.7% of cases as progressive or non-progressive disease. Sensitivity was raised to 88.2%. Parametric images of intercept and slope add a new dimension to the interpretation of FDG PET studies, by isolating visually and quantifying the perfusion and phosphorylation-dependent part of tracer uptake. In treated GIST patients, integration of this information with the 1-h uptake data achieves better characterization of hepatic lesions with respect to disease activity. (orig.)

  2. Positron emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, M.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Regional mycardial blood flow and substrate metabolism can be non-invasively evaluated and quantified with positron emission computed tomography (Positron-CT). Tracers of exogenous glucose utilization and fatty acid metabolism are available and have been extensively tested. Specific tracer kinetic models have been developed or are being tested so that glucose and fatty acid metabolism can be measured quantitatively by Positron-CT. Tracers of amino acid and oxygen metabolism are utilized in Positron-CT studies of the brain and development of such tracers for cardiac studies are in progress. Methods to quantify regional myocardial blood flow are also being developed. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of Positron-/CT to document myocardial infarction. Experimental and clinical studies have begun to identify metabolic markers of reversibly ischemic myocardium. The potential of Positron-CT to reliably detect potentially salvageable myocardium and, hence, to identify appropriate therapeutic interventions is one of the most exciting applications of the technique

  3. Cardiac positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, M.; Ejmalian, G.

    2003-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is an intrinsically tool that provide a unique and unparalleled approach for clinicians and researchers to interrogate the heart noninvasively. The ability to label substances of physiological interest with positron-emitting radioisotopes has permitted insight into normal blood flow and metabolism and the alterations that occur with disease states. Positron emission tomography of the heart has evolved as a unique, noninvasive approach for the assessment of myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and function. Because of the intrinsic quantitative nature of positron emission tomography measurements as well as the diverse compounds that can be labeled with positron- emitting radioisotopes, studies with positron emission tomography have provided rich insight into the physiology of the heart under diverse conditions

  4. High energy positron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shengzu

    2003-01-01

    The technique of High Energy Positron Imaging (HEPI) is the new development and extension of Positron Emission Tomography (PET). It consists of High Energy Collimation Imaging (HECI), Dual Head Coincidence Detection Imaging (DHCDI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). We describe the history of the development and the basic principle of the imaging methods of HEPI in details in this paper. Finally, the new technique of the imaging fusion, which combined the anatomical image and the functional image together are also introduced briefly

  5. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paans, A.M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals have special applications in in-vivo studies of biochemical processes. The combination of a cyclotron for the production of radionuclides and a positron emission tomograph for the registration of the distribution of radioactivity in the body enables the measurement of local radioactivity concentration in tissues, and opens up new possibilities in the diagnosis and examination of abnormalities in the metabolism. The principles and procedures of positron emission tomography are described and the necessary apparatus considered, with emphasis on the positron camera. The first clinical applications using 55 Co bloemycine for tumor detection are presented. (C.F.)

  6. Positrons and positronium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean, Y.C.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography includes articles, proceedings, abstracts, reports and patents published between 1930 and 1984 on the subject of positrons, positron annihilation and positronium. The subject covers experimental and theoretical results in the areas of physics and chemistry of low and intermediate energy (< 0.6 MeV) positrons and positronium. The topics of interest are: fundamental properties, interactions with matter, nuclear technology, the history and philosophy of antimatter, the theory of the universe, and the applications of positrons in the chemical, physical, and biomedical sciences

  7. Boron autoradiography method applied to the study of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugelmeier, R.; Barcelo, G.N.; Boado, J.H.; Fernandez, C.

    1986-01-01

    The boron state, contained in the steel microestructure, is determined. The autoradiography by neutrons is used, permiting to obtain boron distribution images by means of additional information which is difficult to acquire by other methods. The application of the method is described, based on the neutronic irradiation of a polished steel sample, over which a celulose nitrate sheet or other appropriate material is fixed to constitute the detector. The particles generated by the neutron-boron interaction affect the detector sheet, which is subsequently revealed with a chemical treatment and can be observed at the optical microscope. In the case of materials used for the construction of nuclear reactors, special attention must be given to the presence of boron, since owing to the exceptionaly high capacity of neutron absorption, lowest quantities of boron acquire importance. The adaption of the method to metallurgical problems allows the obtainment of a correlation between the boron distribution images and the material's microstructure. (M.E.L.) [es

  8. Localization of IAA transporting tissue by tissue printing and autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee-Rye Cha; Evans, M.L.; Hangarter, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    Tissue printing on nitrocellulose membranes provides a useful technique for visualizing anatomical details of tissue morphology of cut ends of stem segments. Basal ends of Coleus stem and corn coleoptile segments that were transporting 14 C-IAA were gently blotted onto DEAE-nitrocellulose for several minutes to allow 14 C-IAA to efflux from the tissue. Because of the anion exchange properties of DEAE-nitrocellulose the 14 C-IAA remains on the membrane at the point it leaves the transporting tissue. Autoradiography of the DEAE membrane allowed indirect visualization of the tissues preferentially involved in auxin transport. The authors observed that polar transport through the stem segments occurred primarily through or in association with vascular tissues. However, in Coleus stems, substantial amounts of the label appeared to move through the tissue by diffusion as well as by active transport

  9. Mucopolysaccharides in the trabecular meshwork. Light and electron microscopic autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Yoshitaka; Yamana, Yasuo; Abe, Masahiro (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1982-09-01

    The localization of /sup 35/S-sulfate and /sup 3/H-glucosamine in the trabecular region of the hamster was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography after the intraperitoneal injection. Exposed silver grains of /sup 35/S-sulfate were concentrated in the trabecular meshwork, sclera and cornea, and grains of /sup 35/H-glucosamine were localized in the trabecular region. The radioactivity of both isotopes was observed in the Golgi apparatuses of the endothelial cells and fibroblasts in Schlemm's canal and the trabecular meshwork. Thereafter, the grains were noted over the entire cytoplasm, except for the nucleus, and then were incorporated into the amorphous substance and collagen fibers in the juxtacanalicular connective tissue. These results suggest that endothelial cells in the trabecular region synthesize and secrete the sulfated mucopolysaccharides and hyaluronic acid.

  10. Choline Autoradiography of Human Prostate Cancer Xenograft: Effect of Castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of castration and tracer uptake time interval on the level of radiolabeled choline accumulation in murine-implanted human prostate tumor xenografts using quantitative autoradiography. We implanted androgen-dependent (CWR22 and androgen-independent (PC3 human prostate cancer cells in castrated (n = 9 and noncastrated (n = 9 athymic male mice and allowed tumors to grow to 1 cm3. The mice were euthanized at 5, 10, and 20 minutes after injection of 5 µCi [14C]-choline. Mice were prepared for quantitative autoradiography with density light units of viable tumor sections converted to units of radioactivity (nCi/mm2 using calibration. Two-group comparisons were performed using a two-tailed Student t-test with unequal variance and with a significance probability level of less than .05. Two-group comparisons between the means of the tracer uptake level for each tumor type at each of three time points for each of two host types showed that (1 the level of tracer localization in the two tumor types was affected little in relation to the host type and (2 PC3 tumor uptake level tended to increase slowly with time only in the noncastrated host, whereas this was not observed in the castrated host or with CWR22 tumor in either host type. The uptake time interval and castration do not appear to significantly affect the level of radiolabeled choline uptake by the human prostate cancer xenograft.

  11. Positron emission tomography with Positome, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nukui, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Y.L.; Thompson, C.J.; Feindel, W.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with Positome II using 68 Ga-EDTA was performed in cases with brain tumor and cerebral arteriovenous malformation. A significant focal uptake in static study and hemodynamic changes in dynamic study were noted in all cases except one case with intracranial lipoma. Comparing this method with sup(99m) Tc-pertechnetate cerebral image study and computerized axial tomography, the diagnostic rate for detecting brain tumor was almost equal in all of these three methods. However, detecting and localizing was easier and clearer in static positron emission tomography with 68 Ga-EDTA than in sup(99m) Tc-pertechnetate cerebral image and computerized axial tomography without infusion of contrast medium. Furthermore, static positron emission tomography with 68 Ga-EDTA was superior to computerized axial tomography without infusion of contrast medium for detecting cerebral arteriovenous malformation. Concerning dynamic positron emission tomography with 68 Ga-EDTA, semiquantitative values obtained by this method correlated well with findings of computerized axial tomography and was thought to be more precise and in detail than the findings of sup(99m) Tc-pertechnetate cerebral image study. Summation of the previous studies about dynamic positron emission tomography with 77 Kr in occlusive cerebrovascular disease is also reported. In conclusion, static positron emission tomography with 68 Ga-EDTA is a very useful diagnostic method for detecting and localizing brain tumor and cerebral arteriovenous malformation without any attendant complications. Furthermore, a good combination of static and dynamic positron emission tomography and computerized axial tomography appear to be outstandingly effective for not only detecting the lesion but also understanding the pathophysiological aspect in cases with various intracranial lesions. (author)

  12. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Microenvironment Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and 18F-Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in Neck Nodal Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, Jacobus; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Wang Ya

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess noninvasively the tumor microenvironment of neck nodal metastases in patients with head-and-neck cancer by investigating the relationship between tumor perfusion measured using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and hypoxia measured by 18 F-fluoromisonidazole ( 18 F-FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: Thirteen newly diagnosed head-and-neck cancer patients with metastatic neck nodes underwent DCE-MRI and 18 F-FMISO PET imaging before chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The matched regions of interests from both modalities were analyzed. To examine the correlations between DCE-MRI parameters and standard uptake value (SUV) measurements from 18 F-FMISO PET, the nonparametric Spearman correlation coefficient was calculated. Furthermore, DCE-MRI parameters were compared between nodes with 18 F-FMISO uptake and nodes with no 18 F-FMISO uptake using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: For the 13 patients, a total of 18 nodes were analyzed. The nodal size strongly correlated with the 18 F-FMISO SUV (ρ = 0.74, p ep (redistribution rate constant) value (ρ = -0.58, p = 0.042) and the 18 F-FMISO SUV. Hypoxic nodes (moderate to severe 18 F-FMISO uptake) had significantly lower median K trans (volume transfer constant) (p = 0.049) and median k ep (p = 0.027) values than did nonhypoxic nodes (no 18 F-FMISO uptake). Conclusion: This initial evaluation of the preliminary results support the hypothesis that in metastatic neck lymph nodes, hypoxic nodes are poorly perfused (i.e., have significantly lower K trans and k ep values) compared with nonhypoxic nodes.

  13. Positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, AMJ

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for determining biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides as C-11, N-13, O-15 and F-18 and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a

  14. Positron annihilation microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canter, K.F. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Advances in positron annihilation microprobe development are reviewed. The present resolution achievable is 3 {mu}m. The ultimate resolution is expected to be 0.1 {mu}m which will enable the positron microprobe to be a valuable tool in the development of 0.1 {mu}m scale electronic devices in the future. (author)

  15. SPM: Scanning positron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Dickmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Munich scanning positron microscope, operated by the Universität der Bundeswehr München and the Technische Universität München, located at NEPOMUC, permits positron lifetime measurements with a lateral resolution in the µm range and within an energy range of 1 – 20 keV.

  16. Positrons in ionic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareja, R.

    1988-01-01

    Positron annihilation experiments in ionic crystals are reviewed and their results are arranged. A discussion about the positron states in these materials is made in the light of these results and the different proposed models. The positronium in alkali halides is specially considered. (Author)

  17. Application of positron emitters to studies on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishioka, N.S.; Matsuoka, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Sekine, T. [and others

    1998-10-01

    A newly developed positron emitting tracer imaging system enables us to study dynamically the physiological function of plants, although this system covers, at present, a limited area in a plant. Production of the positron emitters {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N, {sup 18}F and {sup 48}V for this application, using an AVF cyclotron, is described. (author)

  18. GaAs pixel radiation detector as an autoradiography tool for genetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolucci, E. [Physics Department, Universita' di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Napoli (Italy); Conti, M. [Physics Department, Universita' di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Napoli (Italy); Mettivier, G. [Physics Department, Universita' di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Napoli (Italy); Russo, P. [Physics Department, Universita' di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Napoli (Italy); Amendolia, S.R. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Bisogni, M.G. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Bottigli, U. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Ceccopieri, A. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Ciocci, M.A. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Delogu, P. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Fantacci, M.E. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Maestro, P. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Marzulli, V.M. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Pernigotti, E. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Romeo, N. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Rosso, V. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Stefanini, A. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Stumbo, S. [Physics Department, Universita' di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy)

    1999-02-11

    We present an autoradiography tool to be used mainly for genetic studies. It performs a quantitative analysis of radioactivity and can follow a dynamic process. We designed several applications, in particular one aimed at detecting hybridization of radio-labeled DNA fragments with known DNA-probes deposited on a micro-array. The technique is based on GaAs pixel array detector and low threshold, large dynamic range and good sensitivity integrated electronics developed for medical applications, suitable to detect markers (gamma or beta) such as {sup 14}C, {sup 35}S, {sup 33}P, {sup 32}P, {sup 125}I, even at very low activities. A Monte Carlo simulation of {beta}{sup -} detection in GaAs is presented here in order to study the spatial resolution characteristics of such a system. For several biological applications, the electronics is required to perform at high temperatures (from 37 deg. to 68 deg. ): we present here studies of noise and minimum threshold as a function of the temperature.

  19. Autoradiography of neutron activated plant samples using imaging plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Motoko; Maeno, Tomokazu; Tanizaki, Yoshiyuki [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-12-01

    Autoradiography is a convenient and qualitative method to study two-dimensional distribution of radioisotopes in various materials. Imaging Plate (IP), which is a new radiography apparatus of applying a photostimulable luminescence, has some advantages in comparison with X-ray film, for example, high sensitivity, wide latitude and high fidelity for any radiations. The high sensitivity of IP makes it possible to observe the distribution of short-lived nuclides, such as {sup 28}Al, {sup 56}Mn. The intensity of autoradiograms for neutron irradiated Al- and Mn-standard samples decreased according to {sup 28}Al and {sup 56}Mn half-lives, respectively. It was proportional to the contents of Al- and Mn-standard. More autoradiograms of Al- and Mn-treated cuttings from plants were obtained in high intensitive imaging than those of the water-treated cuttings. This showed that Al and Mn were taken in by the plant bodies from solutions. High intensitive imaging was recognized in the leaf vein and epicotyls. This indicates that Mn tends to accumulate in the vascular system. The imaging of the apices region for all samples showed high intensities. It seems that high elemental concentrations exist in shoot apices. The autoradiographic intensities corresponded to the measurement results by {gamma}-ray spectrometry. (author)

  20. Autoradiography of plant samples exposed to neutron activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Motoko; Maeno, Tomokazu; Tanizaki, Yoshiyuki [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Inst. (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    Distribution of short half-life nuclides in seedlings of Vigna angularis exposed to neutron activation was investigated by autoradiography using image plate, which is highly sensitive. A seedling 13 cm in height was cut and cultured in Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} or Mn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} for several days. The upper part of the seedling was exposed to neutron radiation in PN3 facility of KURRI and applied onto image plate (Fuji Film Co. Ltd., BAS-5000 MAC) as well as {gamma}-ray spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of short half-life nuclides. Thus obtained PSL intensities were compared among three parts of seedling; terminal bud, epicotyl and first leaf. The incorporated Al and Mn were indicated to accumulate mainly in the first leaf and the terminal bud, whereas their accumulations were less in the epicotyl, which is a conductive tissue. With regards to other short half-life nuclides such as Ca, K, Mg, Cl, etc., Ca level of the first leaf was decreased by the presence of Mn or Al, whereas Mn level of terminal bud was decreased in the presence of Mn. These results indicate that it became possible by the use of image plate to analyze short half-life nuclides in samples exposed to neutron activation. (M.N.)

  1. Inhibition of tissue angiotensin converting enzyme. Quantitation by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, K.; Chai, S.Y.; Jackson, B.; Johnston, C.I.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in serum and tissues of rats was studied after administration of lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor. Tissue ACE was assessed by quantitative in vitro autoradiography using the ACE inhibitor [ 125 I]351A, as a ligand, and serum ACE was measured by a fluorimetric method. Following oral administration of lisinopril (10 mg/kg), serum ACE activity was acutely reduced but recovered gradually over 24 hours. Four hours after lisinopril administration, ACE activity was markedly inhibited in kidney (11% of control level), adrenal (8%), duodenum (8%), and lung (33%; p less than 0.05). In contrast, ACE in testis was little altered by lisinopril (96%). In brain, ACE activity was markedly reduced 4 hours after lisinopril administration in the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ (16-22%) and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (7%; p less than 0.05). In other areas of the brain, including the choroid plexus and caudate putamen, ACE activity was unchanged. Twenty-four hours after administration, ACE activity in peripheral tissues and the circumventricular organs of the brain had only partially recovered toward control levels, as it was still below 50% of control activity levels. These results establish that lisinopril has differential effects on inhibiting ACE in different tissues and suggest that the prolonged tissue ACE inhibition after a single oral dose of lisinopril may reflect targets involved in the hypotensive action of ACE inhibitors

  2. Neutron induced autoradiography of some minerals from the Allchar mine

    CERN Document Server

    Lazaru, A; Skvarc, J; Kristof, E S; Stafilov, T

    1999-01-01

    The mineral lorandite from the Allchar mine (Kavadarci, Macedonia) will be used to estimate the average solar neutrino flux. Here, the amount of sup 2 sup 0 sup 5 Pb isotope induced by the sup 2 sup 0 sup 5 Tl(nu sub e , e sup -) sup 2 sup 0 sup 5 Pb reaction is measured and converted to neutrino flux. To determine the few sup 2 sup 0 sup 5 Pb atoms that are produced by solar neutrinos in the Tl ore it is necessary to know all the interfering reactions and/or impurities producing sup 2 sup 0 sup 5 Pb. The concentration and/or spatial distribution of some impurities such as U in lorandite should be known as accurately as possible. In the present work uranium and boron concentrations in some minerals from the Allchar mine (lorandite, realgar, stibnite, orpiment and dolomite) were measured by neutron induced autoradiography. The tracks of sup 1 sup 0 B(n, alpha) and sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U(n, f) reaction products were recorded by CR-39 and phosphate glass (PSK-50) etched track detectors, respectively. Results showed...

  3. Evaluation of Inhibitory Effect of Recreational Drugs on Dopaminergic Terminal Neuron by PET and Whole-Body Autoradiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skye Hsin-Hsien Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is little investigation for the functional roles of peripheral dopamine. [18F]FDOPA has been used in cancer imaging (i.e., neuroendocrine and tumors pancreatic tumors and neuroimaging (i.e., Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Here, we accessed side effects of recreational drugs such as ketamine, cocaine, and methamphetamine on dopamine neurons in peripheral organs by using positron emission tomography (PET imaging and quantitative whole-body autoradiography (QWBAR with [18F]FDOPA. The images were applied for the measurement of specific binding ratios (SBRs of striatum with the cerebellum as the reference region. Clear striatal [18F]FDOPA-derived radioactivity was observed. Moderate level of radiotracer accumulation was presented in the mucosal layers of the stomach and small intestine. The medulla layers of kidney had higher radioactivity than that of the cortex. Blocking images markedly eliminated the specific binding of [18F]FDOPA in the striatum and in peripheral organs such as stomachs, intestines, and kidney. Ketamine showed the highest inhibitory effect on striatal [18F]FDOPA-derived radioactivity followed by cocaine and methamphetamine. The current results demonstrated a useful crossing-validating tool that enhances the capability of [18F]FDOPA for further investigations of the alteration of dopaminergic neurons in the brain disorder or cancer diseases in peripheral tissues.

  4. Positron Scattering from Molecules: An Experimental Cross Section Compilation for Positron Transport Studies and Benchmarking Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Ratnavelu, K.

    2017-06-01

    We present a compilation of recommended positron-molecule cross sections for a range of scattering processes including elastic scattering, vibrational excitation, discrete electronic-state excitation, positronium formation, ionization, and also for the grand total cross section. Where possible, in particular for possible application in positron transport simulations for a given molecule, we try and list data for energies in the range 0.1-1000 eV although in practice the actual energy is highly target-molecule and scattering process specific. Aside from being relevant to positron transport studies, through, for example, Monte Carlo simulations, the present compilation should also be germane for benchmarking the validity and accuracy of positron-molecule scattering calculations and, just as importantly, to allow a comparison with corresponding electron scattering results. That latter comparison can shed real light on the projectile-target interactions that underpin the scattering dynamics.

  5. Correlation of [18F]FMISO autoradiography and pimonidazole [corrected] immunohistochemistry in human head and neck carcinoma xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troost, Esther G C; Laverman, Peter; Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Lok, Jasper; van der Kogel, Albert J; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Bussink, Johan

    2008-10-01

    Tumour cell hypoxia is a common feature in solid tumours adversely affecting radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Positron emission tomography (PET) using the tracer [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole ([(18)F]FMISO) is most frequently used for non-invasive evaluation of hypoxia in human tumours. A series of ten human head and neck xenograft tumour lines was used to validate [(18)F]FMISO as hypoxia marker at the microregional level. Autoradiography after injection of [(18)F]FMISO was compared with immunohistochemical staining for the hypoxic cell marker pimonidazole in the same tumour sections of ten different human head and neck xenograft tumour lines. The methods were compared: first, qualitatively considering the microarchitecture; second, by obtaining a pixel-by-pixel correlation of both markers at the microregional level; third, by measuring the signal intensity of both images; and fourth, by calculating the hypoxic fractions by pimonidazole labelling. The pattern of [(18)F]FMISO signal was dependent on the distribution of hypoxia at the microregional level. The comparison of [(18)F]FMISO autoradiography and pimonidazole immunohistochemistry by pixel-by-pixel analysis revealed moderate correlations. In five tumour lines, a significant correlation between the mean [(18)F]FMISO and pimonidazole signal intensity was found (range, r(2)=0.91 to r(2)=0.99). Comparison of the tumour lines with respect to the microregional distribution pattern of hypoxia revealed that the correlation between the mean signal intensities strongly depended on the microarchitecture. Overall, a weak but significant correlation between hypoxic fractions based on pimonidazole labeling and the mean [(18)F]FMISO signal intensity was observed (r(2)=0.18, p=0.02). For the three tumour models with a ribbon-like microregional distribution pattern of hypoxia, the correlation between the hypoxic fraction and the mean [(18)F]FMISO signal intensity was much stronger

  6. Digital positron annihilation spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Bin; Weng Huimin; Han Rongdian; Ye Bangjiao

    2010-01-01

    With the high speed development of digital signal process, the technique of the digitization and processing of signals was applied in the domain of a broad class of nuclear technique. The development of digital positron lifetime spectrometer (DPLS) is more promising than the conventional positron lifetime spectrometer equipped with nuclear instrument modules. And digital lifetime spectrometer has many advantages, such as low noise, long term stability, flexible online or offline digital processing, simple setup, low expense, easy to setting, and more physical information. Digital constant fraction discrimination is for timing. And a new method of optimizing energy windows setting for digital positron lifetime spectrometer is also developed employing the simulated annealing for the convenient use. The time resolution is 220ps and the count rate is 200cps. (authors)

  7. Noninvasive quantitation of regional myocardial oxygen consumption in vivo with [1-11C]acetate and dynamic positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxton, D.B.; Nienaber, C.A.; Luxen, A.; Ratib, O.; Hansen, H.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The usefulness of [1-11C]acetate as a tracer of overall myocardial oxidative metabolism for use with positron emission tomography has been investigated in 12 closed-chest dogs. Myocardial 11C activity clearance kinetics after intravenous administration of [1-11C]acetate in dogs have been determined noninvasively by positron emission tomography. Biexponential fitting of regional myocardial 11C time-activity curves was performed to give clearance half-times and fractional distribution. The rate constant k1 for the early rapid phase of 11C activity clearance was found to correlate linearly with myocardial oxygen consumption (y = 0.0156x + 0.039; SEE = 0.023; r = 0.95). k1 was approximately 7% lower in septal sectors compared with the left ventricular free wall, suggesting that regional oxygen consumption in the septum was lower; a concomitant regional attenuation of blood flow in the septum relative to the left ventricular free wall was also observed. In dogs using carbohydrates as the predominant fuel, k1 oxygen consumption was somewhat more than in dogs using predominantly free fatty acids (0.021 +/- 0.002 compared with 0.018 +/- 0.002, p less than 0.01), indicating that increased carbohydrate consumption is associated with a small increase in k1 at constant oxygen consumption. It is concluded that measurement of myocardial [1-11C]acetate kinetics allows noninvasive determination of cardiac oxygen consumption by positron emission tomography and that the technique is relatively insensitive to myocardial fuel selection

  8. Dynamic, adaptive changes in MAO-A binding after alterations in substrate availability: an in vivo [11C]-harmine positron emission tomography study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacher, Julia; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Clark, Michael; Rusjan, Pablo; Soliman, Alexandra; Boskovic, Rada; Kish, Stephen J; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2012-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) is an important target in the pathophysiology and therapeutics of major depressive disorder, aggression, and neurodegenerative conditions. We measured the effect of changes in MAO-A substrate on MAO-A binding in regions implicated in affective and neurodegenerative disease with [11C]-harmine positron emission tomography in healthy volunteers. Monoamine oxidase A VT, an index of MAO-A density, was decreased (mean: 14%±9%) following tryptophan depletion in prefrontal cortex (PMAO-A in maintaining monoamine neurotransmitter homeostasis by rapidly compensating fluctuating monoamine levels. PMID:22186668

  9. Clinical evaluation of iterative reconstruction (ordered-subset expectation maximization) in dynamic positron emission tomography: quantitative effects on kinetic modeling with N-13 ammonia in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Jens Dahlgaard; Rasmussen, R.; Freiberg, J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate the quantitative properties of ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) on kinetic modeling with nitrogen 13 ammonia compared with filtered backprojection (FBP) in healthy subjects. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiac N-13 ammonia positron...... and OSEM flow values were observed with a flow underestimation of 45% (rest/dipyridamole) in the septum and of 5% (rest) and 15% (dipyridamole) in the lateral myocardial wall. CONCLUSIONS: OSEM reconstruction of myocardial perfusion images with N-13 ammonia and PET produces high-quality images for visual...

  10. 50 years of positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    This year marks the 50th anniversary of one of the major landmarks of modern physics - the discovery of the positron, the antimatter counterpart of the electron. This provided the first evidence for antimatter, and it was also unprecedented for the existence of a new particle to have been predicted by theory. The positron and the concepts behind it were to radically change our picture of Nature. It led to the rapid advancement or our understanding, culminating some fifteen years later with the formulation of quantum electrodynamics as we now know it. (orig./HSI).

  11. Positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Paans, A M J

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This includes also the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labelled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Also deviations of normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained. At present the combined PET/CT scanner is the most frequently used scanner for whole-body scanning in the field of oncology.

  12. Positron annihilation near fractal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, C.W.; Deng, K.M.; Xiong, L.Y.

    1991-07-01

    A model for positron annihilation in the sub-surface region near a fractal surface is proposed. It is found that the power law relationship between the mean positron implantation depth and incident positron energy can be used to measure the fractal dimension of the fractal surface in materials. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs

  13. Solvated Positron Chemistry. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.

    1979-01-01

    The reaction of the hydrated positron, eaq+ with Cl−, Br−, and I− ions in aqueous solutions was studied by means of positron The measured angular correlation curves for [Cl−, e+], [Br−, e+, and [I−, e+] bound states were in good agreement with th Because of this agreement and the fact that the ca......The reaction of the hydrated positron, eaq+ with Cl−, Br−, and I− ions in aqueous solutions was studied by means of positron The measured angular correlation curves for [Cl−, e+], [Br−, e+, and [I−, e+] bound states were in good agreement with th Because of this agreement and the fact...... reactive. The rate constants were 3.9 × 1010 M−1 s−1, 4.4 × 1010 M−1 s−1, and 6.3 × 1010 M−1 s−1 for Cl−, Br−, and I−, respectively, at low (less, approximate 0.03 M) X− concentrations. A 25% decrease in the rate constant caused by the addition of 1 M ethanol to the I− solutions was i The influence...

  14. The Theory of Positrons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 12. The Theory of Positrons. Richard P Feynman. Classics Volume 2 Issue 12 December 1997 pp 107-107. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/12/0107-0107. Author Affiliations.

  15. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindback, Stig

    1995-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an advanced nuclear medicine technique used for research at major centres. Unique diagnostic information is obtained from tomographic measurements of the biochemistry and physiology of tissues and organs. In theory, diseases are related to biochemical changes and these can be observed with PET long before any anatomical changes are detectable. In PET the radioactive component is a positron-emitting isotope or 'tracer'. The positrons annihilate with electrons in the body to produce two gamma rays 180° apart; coincidence detection of these gammas provides a very efficient method of determining the spatial distribution of the radioisotope tracer. Because physiological measurements are usually required in a single imaging session, very short-lived isotopes are used to label the tracer molecules; isotope production and labelling is usually carried out in situ. The most commonly used radionuclides are carbon- 11 (half-life 20 minutes), nitrogen-13 (10 minutes), oxygen-15 (2 minutes), and fluorine-18 (110 minutes). A PET system has three major components: - a particle accelerator with targets for production of the positron-emitting isotopes; - chemistry modules for synthesis and labelling of the desired tracers; - and a PET camera for in-vivo measurements of the distribution of the tracer in the body

  16. Positron annihilation processes update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guessoum, Nidhal; Skibo, Jeffrey G.; Ramaty, Reuven

    1997-01-01

    The present knowledge concerning the positron annihilation processes is reviewed, with emphasis on the data of the cross sections of the various processes of interest in astrophysical applications. Recent results are presented including results on reaction rates and line widths, the validity of which is verified.

  17. High current pulsed positron microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.H.; Stoeffl, W.; Kumar, A.; Sterne, P.A.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.

    1997-01-01

    We are developing a low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopy to provide a new defect analysis capability at the 10 10 e + s -l beam at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron linac. When completed, the pulsed positron microprobe will enable defect specific, 3-dimensional maps of defect concentrations with sub-micron resolution of defect location. By coupling these data with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes and positron implantation profiles we will both map the identity and concentration of defect distributions

  18. Positron annihilation in boron nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Amrane

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron and positron charge densities are calculated as a function of position in the unit cell for boron nitride. Wave functions are derived from pseudopotential band structure calculations and the independent particle approximation (IPM, respectively, for electrons and positrons. It is observed that the positron density is maximum in the open interstices and is excluded not only from ion cores but also to a considerable degree from valence bonds. Electron-positron momentum densities are calculated for (001,110 planes. The results are used in order to analyse the positron effects in BN.

  19. Polarized positron sources for the future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaikovska, I.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis introduces the polarized positron source as one of the key element of the future Linear Collider (LC). In this context, the different schemes of the polarized positron source are described highlighting the main issues in this technology. In particular, the main focus is on the Compton based positron source adopted by the CLIC as a preferred option for the future positron source upgrade. In this case, the circularly polarized high energy gamma rays resulting from Compton scattering are directed to a production target where an electromagnetic cascade gives rise to the production of positrons by e + -e - pair conversion. To increase the efficiency of the gamma ray production stage, a multiple collision point line integrated in energy recovery linac is proposed. The simulations of the positron production, capture and primary acceleration allow to estimate the positron production efficiency and provide a simple parametrization of the Compton based polarized positron source in the view of the future LC requirements. The storage ring based Compton source option, so-called Compton ring, is also described. The main constraint of this scheme is given by the beam dynamics resulting in the large energy spread and increased bunch length affecting the gamma ray production rate. An original theoretical contribution is shown to calculate the energy spread induced by Compton scattering. Moreover, an experiment to test the gamma ray production by Compton scattering using a state-of-art laser system developed at LAL has been conducted in the framework of the 'Mighty Laser' project at the ATF, KEK. The experimental layout as well as the main results obtained are discussed in details. The studies carried out in this thesis show that the polarized positron source based on Compton scattering is a promising candidate for the future LC polarized positron source. (author)

  20. Assignment of two ultrastructures formed by a mixture of hexonamides using autoradiography and electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boettcher, Christoph; Boekema, Egbert J.; Fuhrhop, Juergen-H.

    1990-01-01

    The combined application of autoradiography and electron microscopy allowed the assignment of molecular components to individual micellar fibres in a mixed gel. Resolution was of the order of 0·1 µm. As a result, it was shown that bimolecular sheets of N-dodecyl-L-mannonamide (= L-Man-12) completely

  1. Study using macroscopic autoradiography of the distribution of vanadium 48 in the rat and mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serhrouchni, M.

    1982-07-01

    Study of vanadium 48 distribution in the laboratory animal by macroscopic autoradiography. Vanadium 48 bioavailability is zero after oral administration and good after pulmonary administration. It is distributed throughout the body with a particular affinity for bone and teeth. Study of perinatal metabolism [fr

  2. Thymidine plaque autoradiography of thymidine kinase-positive and thymidine kinase-negative herpesviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenser, R.B.; Jones, J.C.; Ressel, S.J.; Fralish, F.A.

    1983-01-01

    Plaques formed by herpes simplex virus (HSV), pseudorabies virus, and varicella-zoster virus were studied by plaque autoradiography after [ 14 C]thymidine labeling. Standard thymidine kinase-positive (TK+) viruses and TK- mutants of HSV types 1 and 2 and pseudorabies virus were studied, including cell cultured viruses and viruses isolated from animals. Autoradiography was performed with X-ray film with an exposure time of 5 days. After development of films, TK+ plaques showed dark rims due to isotope incorporation, whereas TK- plaques were minimally labeled. Plaque autoradiography of stock TK- viruses showed reversion frequencies to the TK+ phenotype of less than 10(-3). Autoradiography indicated that TK- virus retained the TK- phenotype after replication in vivo. In addition, it was shown that TK- HSV could be isolated from mouse trigeminal ganglion tissue after corneal inoculation of TK- HSV together with TK+ HSV. The plaque autoradiographic procedure was very useful to evaluate proportions of TK+ and TK- virus present in TK+-TK- virus mixtures

  3. Tomography by positrons emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosconi, Sergio L.

    1999-01-01

    The tomography by positrons emission is a technology that allows to measure the concentration of positrons emission in a tri dimensional body through external measurements. Among the isotope emissions have carbon isotopes are ( 11 C), of the oxygen ( 15 O), of the nitrogen ( 13 N) that are three the element that constitute the base of the organic chemistry. Theses have on of the PET's most important advantages, since many biological interesting organic molecules can be tracer with these isotopes for the metabolism studies 'in vivo' through PET, without using organic tracers that modify the metabolism. The mentioned isotopes, also possess the characteristic of having short lifetime, that constitute on of PET's advantages from the dosimetric point of view. Among 11 C, 15 O, and 13 N, other isotopes that can be obtained of a generator as the 68 Ga and 82 Rb

  4. Positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of detector rings positioned side-by-side or offset by one-half of the detector cross section around a patient area to detect radiation therefrom. Each ring contains a plurality of scintillation detectors which are positioned around an inner circumference with a septum ring extending inwardly from the inner circumference along each outer edge of each ring. An additional septum ring is positioned in the middle of each ring of detectors and parallel to the other septa rings, whereby the inward extent of all the septa rings may be reduced by one-half and the number of detectors required in each ring is reduced. The additional septa reduces the costs of the positron camera and improves its performance

  5. Efficient Cryosolid Positron Moderators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    A.P. Mills Jr., K.G. Lynn, C.M. Surko, and D.M. Schrader for their patient explanations and helpful conversations. Any remaining misconceptions are... Chemistry and Physics, (Kluwer, Dordrecht, Netherlands, 2001). 3. Y.C. Jean, P.E. Mallon, and D.M. Schrader, eds., Principles and Applications of...Positron & Positronium Chemistry , (World Scientific Publishing, Singapore, 2003). 4. R.L. Forward and J. Davis, Mirror Matter, (iUniverse.com, Inc

  6. Positron emission mammography imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Moses, William W.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and x-ray mammogra...

  7. Generation of monoenergetic positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Dale, J.M.; Miller, P.D. Jr.; Moak, C.D.; Pendyala, S.; Triftshaeuser, W.; Howell, R.H.; Alvarez, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments have been performed in the generation and application of monoenergetic positron beams using annealed tungsten moderators and fast sources of 58 Co, 22 Na, 11 C, and LINAC bremstrahlung. This paper will compare the degrees of success from our various approaches. Moderators made from both single crystal and polycrystal tungsten have been tried. Efforts to grow thin films of tungsten to be used as transmission moderators and brightness enhancement devices are in progress

  8. Biodistribution study of [I-123] ADAM in mice brain using quantitative autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, K.J.; Yen, T.C.; Tzen, K.Y.; Ye, X.X.; Hwang, J.J.; Wey, S.P.; Ting, G.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Autoradiography with radioluminography is a delicate method to characterize newly developed radiotracers and to apply them to pharmacological studies. Herein, we reported a biodistribution result of [I-123] ADAM (2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5- iodophenylamine) in mice brain quantitatively using imaging plates. Materials and Methods: 1mCi [I-123] ADAM was injected into male ICR mice through tail veins. Brains were removed at sequential time points ranging from 0.5hr to 4hr after injection. The whole brain was cut into 14mm thick coronal sections using a cyrotome. The sections were thaw-mounted on glass plate and apposed placed on an imaging plate with filter paper standards for 24 hours. Imaging reading was done by a Fuji FLA5000 device. Regions of interest were placed on the globus pallidus, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, raphe nuclei and cerebellum corresponding to the sterotaxic atlas, and the PSL/mm 2 values were measured. The specific binding was expressed as the ratios of (targets - cerebellum) to cerebellum. Results: Autoradiography study of brain showed that the [I-123] ADAM was accumulated at serotonin transporter rich sites, including the olfactory tubercle, globus pallidus, thalamus nuclei, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, interpeduncular nucleus, amygdala and raphe nuclei. Biodistribution of [I-123] ADAM in mice brain using quantitative autoradiography method showed a high specific binding in the substantia nigra and hypothalamus and the time-activity curve peaked at 120 min post-injection. Compatible specific binding result was achieved in the region of hypothalamus as compared with previous study by other group using conventional tissue micro-dissection method (Synapse 38:403-412, 2000). However, higher specific binding was observed in certain small brain regions including substantia nigra, raphe nuclei due to improved spatial resolution of the quantitative autoradiography technique. Conclusion: Our result showed that the

  9. Applications of positron depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM)

  10. Applications of positron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-12-23

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM).

  11. Positron lifetimes in deformed copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinode, Kenji; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Doyama, Masao

    1976-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were performed for Cu samples with different densities of lattice defects. The lifetime spectra were successfully resolved into two components with the help of the well established analysis program. Obtained results were quite consistent with those expected from the trapping model. The positron trapping mechanism from free to trapped states and the initial condition of the model were especially checked. Deduced values obtained for tau sub(c) (lifetime of free positrons) and tau sub(t) (lifetime of trapped positrons) were 122+-5 psec and 176+-5 psec, respectively. (auth.)

  12. Positron emission tomography of FDG in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, T. III; Kusubov, N.

    1986-01-01

    The use of the Donner dynamic positron emission tomograph to study fluorodeoxyglucose labelled 18 F uptake in the brain of six patients with schizophrenia is reported. The glucose metabolic rate and the local cerebral metabolic rate were calculated. The dynamic brain uptake data and the blood input function were used to calculate rate constants by an iterative least squares fitting program for all regions of interest chosen in the brain. Although the number of patients was small, differences in k3 were statistically significant in several brain regions compared with normal controls

  13. Positron scattering and annihilation from hydrogenlike ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, S.A.; Bromley, M.W.J.; Mitroy, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Kohn variational method is used with a configuration-interaction-type wave function to determine the J=0 and J=1 phase shifts and annihilation parameter Z eff for positron-hydrogenic ion scattering. The phase shifts are within 1-2% of the best previous calculations. The values of Z eff are small and do not exceed unity for any of the momenta considered. At thermal energies Z eff is minute with a value of order 10 -50 occurring for He + at k=0.05a 0 -1 . In addition to the variational calculations, analytic expressions for the phase shift and annihilation parameters within the Coulomb wave Born approximation are derived and used to help elucidate the dynamics of positron collisions with positive ions

  14. Peripheral and central localization of the nesfatin-1 receptor using autoradiography in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prinz, Philip [Charité Center for Internal Medicine and Dermatology, Department for Psychosomatic Medicine, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin (Germany); Goebel-Stengel, Miriam [Department of Internal Medicine, Martin-Luther Krankenhaus, Caspar-Theyß-Str. 27-31, 14193 Berlin (Germany); Teuffel, Pauline; Rose, Matthias; Klapp, Burghard F. [Charité Center for Internal Medicine and Dermatology, Department for Psychosomatic Medicine, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin (Germany); Stengel, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.stengel@charite.de [Charité Center for Internal Medicine and Dermatology, Department for Psychosomatic Medicine, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-02-12

    Nesfatin-1 was recently identified and introduced as food intake-regulatory hormone. Soon thereafter, mounting evidence indicated a much broader role for nesfatin-1 with an involvement in the regulation of food intake, gastrointestinal motility, glucose homeostasis, blood pressure and stress. Despite the growing knowledge on the physiological regulation and functions of nesfatin-1, the receptor mediating these effects remains to be characterized. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the peripheral and central localization of the nesfatin-1 receptor by autoradiography. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were used and peripheral as well as brain tissue was processed for {sup 125}I-nesfatin-1 autoradiography. In peripheral tissues, an autoradiographic signal was observed in the gastric mucosa of corpus and antrum, in duodenum, jejunum and ileum, while no signal was detected in the colon. Preabsorption of {sup 125}I-nesfatin-1 with non-labeled nesfatin-1 greatly diminished the autoradiographic signal in the stomach indicating specificity (−32%, p < 0.001). A displacement assay showed an effective concentration by which 50% of {sup 125}I-nesfatin-1 bound to the receptor (EC{sub 50}) in the gastric corpus of 80 pM. Moreover, autoradiography was observed in endocrine tissues including the pituitary, pancreas, adrenal gland, testis and visceral adipose tissue. In addition, also heart, skeletal muscle, lung, liver and kidney showed autoradiographic signals. In the brain, strong {sup 125}I-nesfatin-1 autoradiography was detected in the cortex, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, area postrema, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve and cerebellum. Based on the distribution of nesfatin-1 autoradiography, nesfatin-1 is a pleiotropic hormone that is involved in the regulation of several homeostatic functions. - Highlights: • Although our knowledge on nesfatin-1 is increasing, the receptor is still unknown. • {sup 125}I-nesfatin-1 autoradiography was

  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs

  17. Correlation of [{sup 18}F]FMISO autoradiography and pimonodazole immunohistochemistry in human head and neck carcinoma xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troost, Esther G.C.; Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Lok, Jasper; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Bussink, Johan [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Laverman, Peter; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands). Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine

    2008-10-15

    Tumour cell hypoxia is a common feature in solid tumours adversely affecting radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Positron emission tomography (PET) using the tracer [{sup 18}F]fluoromisonidazole ([{sup 18}F]FMISO) is most frequently used for non-invasive evaluation of hypoxia in human tumours. A series of ten human head and neck xenograft tumour lines was used to validate [{sup 18}F]FMISO as hypoxia marker at the microregional level. Autoradiography after injection of [{sup 18}F]FMISO was compared with immunohistochemical staining for the hypoxic cell marker pimonidazole in the same tumour sections of ten different human head and neck xenograft tumour lines. The methods were compared: first, qualitatively considering the microarchitecture; second, by obtaining a pixel-by-pixel correlation of both markers at the microregional level; third, by measuring the signal intensity of both images; and fourth, by calculating the hypoxic fractions by pimonidazole labelling. The pattern of [{sup 18}F]FMISO signal was dependent on the distribution of hypoxia at the microregional level. The comparison of [{sup 18}F]FMISO autoradiography and pimonidazole immunohistochemistry by pixel-by-pixel analysis revealed moderate correlations. In five tumour lines, a significant correlation between the mean [{sup 18}F]FMISO and pimonidazole signal intensity was found (range, r{sup 2}=0.91 to r {sup 2}=0.99). Comparison of the tumour lines with respect to the microregional distribution pattern of hypoxia revealed that the correlation between the mean signal intensities strongly depended on the microarchitecture. Overall, a weak but significant correlation between hypoxic fractions based on pimonidazole labeling and the mean [{sup 18}F]FMISO signal intensity was observed (r{sup 2}=0.18, p=0.02). For the three tumour models with a ribbon-like microregional distribution pattern of hypoxia, the correlation between the hypoxic fraction and the mean

  18. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs

  19. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  20. Quantitative carbon-14 autoradiography at the cellular level: principles and application for cell kinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doermer, P.

    1981-01-01

    Amounts of radio-labelled substances as low as 10 -18 moles incorporated into individual cells can be measured by utilizing techniques of quantitative autoradiography. The principles and application of quantitative carbon-14 autoradiography are reviewed. Silver grain densities can be counted by automated microphotometry allowing on-line data processing by an interfaced computer. Rate measurements of 14 C-thymidine incorporation into individual cells yield values of the DNA synthesis rate and the DNA synthesis time of a cell compartment can be derived. This is an essential time parameter for the evaluation of kinetic events in proliferating cell populations. This method is applicable to human cells without radiation hazard to man and provides an optimal source of detailed information on the kinetics of normal and diseased human haematopoiesis. Examples of application consist of thalassaemia, malaria infection, iron deficiency anaemia and acute myelogenous leukaemia. (author)

  1. Neutron autoradiography: working-out method and application in investigations of test paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalicki, A.; Panczyk, E.; Rowinska, L.; Sartowska, B.; Walis, L.; Pytel, K.; Pytel, B.; Koziel, A.; Dabkowski, L.; Wierzchnicka, M.; Strzalkowski, L.; Ostrowski, T.

    2001-01-01

    Neutron-induced autoradiography was carried out at MARIA research reactor in Poland. The paintings were exposed to the thermal neutrons. As a result, the radionuclides emitting beta particles and gamma rays were created from some of the elements existing in the painting. Beta particles were detected during successive exposure to a series of X-ray medical-sensitive films. The obtained images--blackening of the films depends mainly on the nuclear characteristic of recorded radionuclides and exposure parameters. The main purpose of this work was to work out a method, build a special stand and test sample paintings using neutron autoradiography. Samples of paintings were investigated and according to the obtained results, optimum test parameters have been selected: neutron irradiation conditions and autoradiographs exposure conditions

  2. Coating sections for electron microscopic autoradiography: a stripping technique using liquid emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burry, R.W.; Lasher, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    A coating technique for electron microscope autoradiography is described which combines the advantage of forming an emulsion film by a dripping method with the ease of coating sections already on grids. Sections are coated so that a formvar support film separates the section and the emulsion crystals. This intermediate layer of formvar ensures a random distribution of the emulsion crystals. Using light gold sections, Ilford L-4 emulsion and Microdol-X development, the resolution of this technique, as determined by the half distance method, was 150 nm. The additional layer of formvar slightly reduced the image quality with biological samples in the electron microscope. This technique has a minimal loss of resolution and image quality for moderate resolution electron microscope autoradiography. (author)

  3. A Southern African positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, D.T.; Haerting, M.; Teemane, M.R.B.; Mills, S.; Nortier, F.M.; Van der Walt, T.N.

    1997-01-01

    The first stage of a state of the art positron beam, being constructed at the University of Cape Town, is currently being brought into operation. This is the first positron beam on the African continent, as well as being the first positron beam dedicated to solid and surface studies in the southern hemisphere. The project also contains a high proportion of local development, including the encapsulated 22 Na positron source developed by our collaboration. Novel features in the design include a purely magnetic in-line deflector, working in the solenoidal guiding field, to eliminate unmoderated positrons and block the direct line of sight to the source. A combined magnetic projector and single pole probe forming lens is being implemented in the second phase of construction to achieve a spot size of 10 μm without remoderation

  4. Localization of 125I-insulin binding sites in the rat hypothalamus by quantitative autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corp, E.S.; Woods, S.C.; Figlewicz, D.P.; Porte, D. Jr.; Baskin, D.G.; Dorsa, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro autoradiography and computer video densitometry were used to localize and quantify binding of 125 I-insulin in the hypothalamus of the rat brain. Highest specific binding was found in the arculate, dorsomedial, suprachiasmatic, paraventricular and periventricular regions. Significantly lower binding was present in the ventromedial nucleus and median eminence. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that insulin modulates the neural regulation of feeding by acting at sites in the hypothalamus. (author)

  5. Size and number of DNA molecules from Chinese hamster ovary cells determined by molecular autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, M.B.

    1980-06-01

    A new method for visualization of separable subunits of DNA is described. Autoradiography of tritium-labeled DNA from one or a few nuclei, lysed with detergent, moderate salt, and proteases, and gently deposited on a filter, allows determination of subunit molecular weight, size distribution, number per nucleus, and organization. The shape of the size distribution of CHO subunit images is similar to that of CHO mitotic chromosomes, and the numbers of subunits per nucleus supports a model of eight subunits per chromosome

  6. High speed quantitative digital beta autoradiography using a multi-step avalanche detector and an Apple-II microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.; Stephenson, R.

    1985-04-01

    The development of an electronic, digital beta autoradiography system is described. Using a Multi-Step Avalanche/Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MSA/MWPC) detector system fitted with delay line readout, high speed digital imaging is demonstrated with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. Good proportionality of observed counting rate relative to the known tritium activity is demonstrated. The application of the system to autoradiography in immunoelectrophoresis, histopathology and DNA sequencing is described. (author)

  7. 64Cu-ATSM and 18FDG PET uptake and 64Cu-ATSM autoradiography in spontaneous canine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Elias; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylsemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) and (18)FDG PET uptake characteristics and (64)Cu-ATSM autoradiography to pimonidazole immunohistochemistry in spontaneous canine sarcomas and carcinomas.......The aim of this study was to compare (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylsemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) and (18)FDG PET uptake characteristics and (64)Cu-ATSM autoradiography to pimonidazole immunohistochemistry in spontaneous canine sarcomas and carcinomas....

  8. WE-G-BRF-06: Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-Guided Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Cancer Radiotherapy: First Patient Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Loo, B; Graves, E; Yamamoto, T; Keall, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: PET-guided dynamic tumor tracking is a novel concept of biologically targeted image guidance for radiotherapy. A dynamic tumor tracking algorithm based on list-mode PET data has been developed and previously tested on dynamic phantom data. In this study, we investigate if dynamic tumor tracking is clinically feasible by applying the method to lung cancer patient PET data. Methods: PET-guided tumor tracking estimates the target position of a segmented volume in PET images reconstructed continuously from accumulated coincidence events correlated with external respiratory motion, simulating real-time applications, i.e., only data up to the current time point is used to estimate the target position. A target volume is segmented with a 50% threshold, consistently, of the maximum intensity in the predetermined volume of interest. Through this algorithm, the PET-estimated trajectories are quantified from four lung cancer patients who have distinct tumor location and size. The accuracy of the PET-estimated trajectories is evaluated by comparing to external respiratory motion because the ground-truth of tumor motion is not known in patients; however, previous phantom studies demonstrated sub-2mm accuracy using clinically derived 3D tumor motion. Results: The overall similarity of motion patterns between the PET-estimated trajectories and the external respiratory traces implies that the PET-guided tracking algorithm can provide an acceptable level of targeting accuracy. However, there are variations in the tracking accuracy between tumors due to the quality of the segmentation which depends on target-to-background ratio, tumor location and size. Conclusion: For the first time, a dynamic tumor tracking algorithm has been applied to lung cancer patient PET data, demonstrating clinical feasibility of real-time tumor tracking for integrated PET-linacs. The target-to-background ratio is a significant factor determining accuracy: screening during treatment planning would

  9. Characterization of dynamics in complex lyophilized formulations: II. Analysis of density variations in terms of glass dynamics and comparisons with global mobility, fast dynamics, and Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS)

    OpenAIRE

    Chieng, Norman; Cicerone, Marcus T.; Zhong, Qin; Liu, Ming; Pikal, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous HES/disaccharide (trehalose or sucrose) formulations, with and without added polyols (glycerol and sorbitol) and disaccharide formulations of human growth hormone (hGH), were prepared by freeze drying and characterized with particular interest in methodology for using high precision density measurements to evaluate free volume changes and a focus on comparisons between “free volume” changes obtained from analysis of density data, fast dynamics (local mobility), and PALS characteriza...

  10. Fundamental study on brain receptor mapping by neuronuclear medicine imaging. Quantitation of receptor autoradiography in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Shiro

    1988-04-01

    The usefulness of autoradiography in the quantitation of the rat brain receptor was evaluated. H-3 spiperone, H-3 quinuclidinyl benzylate (QNB), H-3 muscimol, H-3 diprenorphine, H-3 ketanserin, and H-3 dihydroalprenolol hydrochloride were used for autoradiography. Satisfactory autoradiograms with these H-3 labeled ligants were obtained for incubation time, washing time, and binding curve. The video digitizer system was the most suitable in autoradiography. Using appropriate conditions for the ligand-receptor interaction, receptor autoradiography and in vitro receptor assay were concordant as for the the number of maximum binding sites (Bmax) of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of its antagonist, H-3 QNB. Receptor autoradiography with high spatial resolution allowed the comparison of Bmax and Kd in the brain. To improve conventional Scatchard analysis, used in the estimation of Bmax and Kd, a new mathematical method was developed for estimating individual rate constants and Bmax on the basis of time courses of association and dissociation. Using the new mathematical method, apparent equilibrium dissociation rate constant was in good agreement with that from a non-isomerization model. Autoradiography may provide a clue for the basic data on brain receptor mapping by a promising emission computerized tomography in neuropsychiatric diseases. (Namekawa, K.).

  11. Evaluation of micro-homogeneity in plutonium based nuclear reactor fuel pellets by alpha-autoradiography technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghra, Chetan, E-mail: chetanbaghra.barc@gmail.com [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Tarapur Complex, Maharashtra, 401502 (India); Sathe, D.B.; Sharma, Jitender; Walinjkar, Nilima; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, Mohd [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Tarapur Complex, Maharashtra, 401502 (India); Kumar, Arun [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Maharashtra, 400094 (India)

    2015-12-15

    Alpha-autoradiography is a fast and non-destructive technique which is used at Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (India) to evaluate micro-homogeneity of plutonium in uranium and plutonium mixed oxide (U–Pu)O{sub 2} fuel pellets fabricated for both thermal and fast breeder reactors. In this study, various theoretical calculations to understand effect of alpha autoradiography process parameters and limiting conditions for measuring micro-homogeneity of plutonium in the pellets having different concentrations of plutonium were reported. Experiments were carried out to establish the procedure to evaluate micro-homogeneity of plutonium in (U-x%Pu)O{sub 2} pellets where x varies from 0.4 to 44% and to measure the size of agglomerates, if any, present in the pellet. An attempt had been made to measure plutonium content in the agglomerate using alpha-autoradiography. This study can also be useful for carrying out alpha-autoradiography of spent fuel pellets during post-irradiation examination. - Highlights: • Alpha-Autoradiography of (U–Pu)O{sub 2} oxide pellet having 0.4–44% PuO{sub 2} was done. • Exposure and etching time required for alpha-autoradiography was optimized. • Size of Pu agglomerate was measured using micro-homogeneity profiling.

  12. Basic principles of 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standke, R.

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography uses photons to receive regional information about dynamic, physiologic, and biochemical processes in the living body. A positron decay is measured indirectly by the simultaneous registration of both gamma rays created by the annihilation. The event is counted, if two directly opposite located detectors register gamma rays in coincidence. Unfortunately the detectors of a positron emission tomography system do not register only true coincident events. There are also scattered and random coincidences. Different types of positron tomographs are presented and scintillation crystals, which are in use for positron emission tomography are discussed. The 2D- and 3D-acquisition methods are described as well as preprocessing methods, such as correction for attenuation, scatter and dead time. For quantification the relative parameter standard uptake value (SUV) is explained. Finally hybrid systems, such as combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanners and the use of computed tomography data for attenuation correction are introduced. (author)

  13. Positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of detector planes positioned side-by-side around a patient area to detect radiation. Each plane includes a plurality of photomultiplier tubes and at least two rows of scintillation crystals on each photomultiplier tube extend across to adjacent photomultiplier tubes for detecting radiation from the patient area. Each row of crystals on each photomultiplier tube is offset from the other rows of crystals, and the area of each crystal on each tube in each row is different than the area of the crystals on the tube in other rows for detecting which crystal is actuated and allowing the detector to detect more inter-plane slides. The crystals are offset by an amount equal to the length of the crystal divided by the number of rows. The rows of crystals on opposite sides of the patient may be rotated 90 degrees relative to each other

  14. Positron Emission Mammography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, W.W. E-mail: wwmoses@lbl.gov

    2004-06-01

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and X-ray mammography, as well as PEM and X-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Positron emission mammography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.

    2003-10-02

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and x-ray mammography, as well as PEM and x-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Characterization of dynamics in complex lyophilized formulations: II. Analysis of density variations in terms of glass dynamics and comparisons with global mobility, fast dynamics, and Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieng, Norman; Cicerone, Marcus T.; Zhong, Qin; Liu, Ming; Pikal, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous HES/disaccharide (trehalose or sucrose) formulations, with and without added polyols (glycerol and sorbitol) and disaccharide formulations of human growth hormone (hGH), were prepared by freeze drying and characterized with particular interest in methodology for using high precision density measurements to evaluate free volume changes and a focus on comparisons between “free volume” changes obtained from analysis of density data, fast dynamics (local mobility), and PALS characterization of “free volume” hole size. Density measurements were performed using a helium gas pycnometer, and fast dynamics was characterized using incoherent neutron scattering spectrometer. Addition of sucrose and trehalose to hGH decreases free volume in the system with sucrose marginally more effective than trehalose, consistent with superior pharmaceutical stability of sucrose hGH formulations well below Tg relative to trehalose. We find that density data may be analyzed in terms of free volume changes by evaluation of volume changes on mixing and calculation of apparent specific volumes from the densities. Addition of sucrose to HES decreases free volume, but the effect of trehalose is not detectable above experimental error. Addition of sorbitol or glycerol to HES/trehalose base formulations appears to significantly decrease free volume, consistent with the positive impact of such additions on pharmaceutical stability (i.e., degradation) in the glassy state. Free volume changes, evaluated from density data, fast dynamics amplitude of local motion, and PALS hole size data generally are in qualitative agreement for the HES/disaccharide systems studied. All predict decreasing molecular mobility as disaccharides are added to HES. Global mobility as measured by enthalpy relaxation times, increases as disaccharides, particularly sucrose, are added to HES. PMID:23623797

  17. Characterization of dynamics in complex lyophilized formulations: II. Analysis of density variations in terms of glass dynamics and comparisons with global mobility, fast dynamics, and Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieng, Norman; Cicerone, Marcus T; Zhong, Qin; Liu, Ming; Pikal, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Amorphous HES/disaccharide (trehalose or sucrose) formulations, with and without added polyols (glycerol and sorbitol) and disaccharide formulations of human growth hormone (hGH), were prepared by freeze drying and characterized with particular interest in methodology for using high precision density measurements to evaluate free volume changes and a focus on comparisons between "free volume" changes obtained from analysis of density data, fast dynamics (local mobility), and PALS characterization of "free volume" hole size. Density measurements were performed using a helium gas pycnometer, and fast dynamics was characterized using incoherent neutron scattering spectrometer. Addition of sucrose and trehalose to hGH decreases free volume in the system with sucrose marginally more effective than trehalose, consistent with superior pharmaceutical stability of sucrose hGH formulations well below Tg relative to trehalose. We find that density data may be analyzed in terms of free volume changes by evaluation of volume changes on mixing and calculation of apparent specific volumes from the densities. Addition of sucrose to HES decreases free volume, but the effect of trehalose is not detectable above experimental error. Addition of sorbitol or glycerol to HES/trehalose base formulations appears to significantly decrease free volume, consistent with the positive impact of such additions on pharmaceutical stability (i.e., degradation) in the glassy state. Free volume changes, evaluated from density data, fast dynamics amplitude of local motion, and PALS hole size data generally are in qualitative agreement for the HES/disaccharide systems studied. All predict decreasing molecular mobility as disaccharides are added to HES. Global mobility as measured by enthalpy relaxation times, increases as disaccharides, particularly sucrose, are added to HES. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Recent technologic developments on high-resolution beta imaging systems for quantitative autoradiography and double labeling applications

    CERN Document Server

    Barthe, N; Chatti, K; Coulon, P; Maitrejean, S; 10.1016/j.nima.2004.03.014

    2004-01-01

    Two novel beta imaging systems, particularly interesting in the field of radiopharmacology and molecular biology research, were developed these last years. (1) a beta imager was derived from research conducted by Pr Charpak at CERN. This parallel plate avalanche chamber is a direct detection system of beta radioactivity, which is particularly adapted for qualitative and quantitative autoradiography. With this detector, autoradiographic techniques can be performed with emitters such as /sup 99m/Tc because this radionuclide emits many low-energy electrons and the detector has a very low sensitivity to low-range gamma -rays. Its sensitivity (smallest activity detected: 0.007 cpm/mm/sup 2/ for /sup 3/H and 0.01 for /sup 14/C), linearity (over a dynamic range of 10/sup 4/) and spatial resolution (50 mu m for /sup 3/H or /sup 99m/Tc to 150 mu m for /sup 32/P or /sup 18/F ( beta /sup +/)) gives a real interest to this system as a new imaging device. Its principle of detection is based on the analysis of light emitte...

  19. Progress toward magnetic confinement of a positron-electron plasma: nearly 100% positron injection efficiency into a dipole trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, Matthew

    2017-10-01

    The hydrogen atom provides the simplest system and in some cases the most precise one for comparing theory and experiment in atomics physics. The field of plasma physics lacks an experimental counterpart, but there are efforts underway to produce a magnetically confined positron-electron plasma that promises to represent the simplest plasma system. The mass symmetry of positron-electron plasma makes it particularly tractable from a theoretical standpoint and many theory papers have been published predicting modified wave and stability properties in these systems. Our approach is to utilize techniques from the non-neutral plasma community to trap and accumulate electrons and positrons prior to mixing in a magnetic trap with good confinement properties. Ultimately we aim to use a levitated superconducting dipole configuration fueled by positrons from a reactor-based positron source and buffer-gas trap. To date we have conducted experiments to characterize and optimize the positron beam and test strategies for injecting positrons into the field of a supported permanent magnet by use of ExB drifts and tailored static and dynamic potentials applied to boundary electrodes and to the magnet itself. Nearly 100% injection efficiency has been achieved under certain conditions and some fraction of the injected positrons are confined for as long as 400 ms. These results are promising for the next step in the project which is to use an inductively energized high Tc superconducting coil to produce the dipole field, initially in a supported configuration, but ultimately levitated using feedback stabilization. Work performed with the support of the German Research Foundation (DFG), JSPS KAKENHI, NIFS Collaboration Research Program, and the UCSD Foundation.

  20. Validation of noninvasive quantification of rCBF compared with dynamic/integral method by using positron emission tomography and oxygen-15 labeled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, H.; Itoh, M.; Mejia-R.M.; Fujiwara, T.; Jones, T.; Nakamura, T.

    1995-01-01

    This study proposes a new solution for the quantification of rCBF pixel-by-pixel using PET and 15 O-H 2 O. The method represents an application of weighted integration that uses PET image only, requiring no input function of arterial blood. It generates the rCBF image quickly and automatically. Simulation studies revealed that the calculation of rCBF was fairly stable as long as a relatively shorter scan frame time and longer scan time were selected. Calculated images of actual PET study by this method correlated significantly with those identified by the dynamic/integral method. Because this procedure could detect whole brain CBF change between different studies as accurately as by the dynamic/integral method, this procedure may be the most suitable for brain activation studies. (author)

  1. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration of an Intense Positron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, B

    2004-04-21

    The Plasma Wakefield Accelerator (PWFA) is an advanced accelerator concept which possess a high acceleration gradient and a long interaction length for accelerating both electrons and positrons. Although electron beam-plasma interactions have been extensively studied in connection with the PWFA, very little work has been done with respect to positron beam-plasma interactions. This dissertation addresses three issues relating to a positron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator. These issues are (a) the suitability of employing a positron drive bunch to excite a wake; (b) the transverse stability of the drive bunch; and (c) the acceleration of positrons by the plasma wake that is driven by a positron bunch. These three issues are explored first through computer simulations and then through experiments. First, a theory is developed on the impulse response of plasma to a short drive beam which is valid for small perturbations to the plasma density. This is followed up with several particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations which study the experimental parameter (bunch length, charge, radius, and plasma density) range. Next, the experimental setup is described with an emphasis on the equipment used to measure the longitudinal energy variations of the positron beam. Then, the transverse dynamics of a positron beam in a plasma are described. Special attention is given to the way focusing, defocusing, and a tilted beam would appear to be energy variations as viewed on our diagnostics. Finally, the energy dynamics imparted on a 730 {micro}m long, 40 {micro}m radius, 28.5 GeV positron beam with 1.2 x 10{sup 10} particles in a 1.4 meter long 0-2 x 10{sup 14} e{sup -}/cm{sup 3} plasma is described. First the energy loss was measured as a function of plasma density and the measurements are compared to theory. Then, an energy gain of 79 {+-} 15 MeV is shown. This is the first demonstration of energy gain of a positron beam in a plasma and it is in good agreement with the predictions

  2. Fundamentals of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostertag, H.

    1989-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is a modern radionuclide method of measuring physiological quantities or metabolic parameters in vivo. The methods is based on: (1) Radioactive labelling with positron emitters; (2) the coincidence technique for the measurement of the annihilation radiation following positron decay; (3) analysis of the data measured using biological models. The basic aspects and problems of the method are discussed. The main fields of future research are the synthesis of new labelled compounds and the development of mathematical models of the biological processes to be investigated. (orig.) [de

  3. Study on low-energy positron polarimetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A polarised positron source has been proposed for the design of the international linear collider (ILC). In order to optimise the positron beam, a measurement of its degree of polarisation close to the positron creation point is desired. In this contribution, methods for determining the positron polarisation at low energies are ...

  4. Development of Electron-positron Screened Pseudopotential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the jellium model, for electron-positron annihilation to take place, the positron must overcome the screened potential of the valence electrons. In this paper, we develop electron-positron screened pseudopotential to explain positron annihilation rate in metals. The results obtained show that there is a trend in the variation ...

  5. Nonmedical applications of a positron camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkesworth, M.R.; Parker, D.J.; Fowles, P.; Crilly, J.F.; Jefferies, N.L.; Jonkers, G.

    1991-01-01

    The positron camera in the School on Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, is based on position-sensitive multiwire γ-ray detectors developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The current characteristics of the camera are discussed with particular reference to its suitability for flow mapping in industrial subjects. The techniques developed for studying the dynamics of processes with time scales ranging from milliseconds to days are described, and examples of recent results from a variety of industrial applications are presented. (orig.)

  6. Contribution of positron emission tomography in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, E.; Franck, G.

    1992-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a scanner technique using tracers labelled with shortlived radioisotopes which allows to study and quantify human metabolic processes or drug pharmacology in vivo. The technique is first applied in physiological studies. Sleep, normal brain metabolism or cerebral activations have been studied. The pharmacological approach concerns both drug distribution in the human brain and blood flow or metabolic variations under treatment. Main neurological applications in pathology are cerebrovascular disorders, diseases leading to dementia, epilepsy, movement disorders, and brain tumors. In each field of application, PET gives unique and frequently early informations. It nicely combines both dynamic informations and measurement precision. (author)

  7. Positron annihilation in superconductive metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekhtjar, I.J.

    1969-03-10

    A correlation is shown between the parameters of superconductive metals and those of positron annihilation. Particular attention is paid to the density states obtained from the electron specific heat.

  8. Parkinson disease and positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.C.

    1984-10-01

    Physiopathologic investigations of Parkinson disease and parkinsonian syndrome using positron tomography are briefly reviewed: study of cerebral blood flow and metabolism; effects of L-DOPA; study of dopaminergic receptors and of 18 F-Fluoro-L-DOPA incorporation [fr

  9. Deconvolution of Positrons' Lifetime spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderin Hidalgo, L.; Ortega Villafuerte, Y.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we explain the iterative method previously develop for the deconvolution of Doppler broadening spectra using the mathematical optimization theory. Also, we start the adaptation and application of this method to the deconvolution of positrons' lifetime annihilation spectra

  10. Actinide bioimaging in tissues: Comparison of emulsion and solid track autoradiography techniques with the iQID camera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Lamart

    Full Text Available This work presents a comparison of three autoradiography techniques for imaging biological samples contaminated with actinides: emulsion-based, plastic-based autoradiography and a quantitative digital technique, the iQID camera, based on the numerical analysis of light from a scintillator screen. In radiation toxicology it has been important to develop means of imaging actinide distribution in tissues as these radionuclides may be heterogeneously distributed within and between tissues after internal contamination. Actinide distribution determines which cells are exposed to alpha radiation and is thus potentially critical for assessing absorbed dose. The comparison was carried out by generating autoradiographs of the same biological samples contaminated with actinides with the three autoradiography techniques. These samples were cell preparations or tissue sections collected from animals contaminated with different physico-chemical forms of actinides. The autoradiograph characteristics and the performances of the techniques were evaluated and discussed mainly in terms of acquisition process, activity distribution patterns, spatial resolution and feasibility of activity quantification. The obtained autoradiographs presented similar actinide distribution at low magnification. Out of the three techniques, emulsion autoradiography is the only one to provide a highly-resolved image of the actinide distribution inherently superimposed on the biological sample. Emulsion autoradiography is hence best interpreted at higher magnifications. However, this technique is destructive for the biological sample. Both emulsion- and plastic-based autoradiography record alpha tracks and thus enabled the differentiation between ionized forms of actinides and oxide particles. This feature can help in the evaluation of decorporation therapy efficacy. The most recent technique, the iQID camera, presents several additional features: real-time imaging, separate imaging of

  11. Actinide bioimaging in tissues: Comparison of emulsion and solid track autoradiography techniques with the iQID camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamart, Stephanie; Miller, Brian W; Van der Meeren, Anne; Tazrart, Anissa; Angulo, Jaime F; Griffiths, Nina M

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a comparison of three autoradiography techniques for imaging biological samples contaminated with actinides: emulsion-based, plastic-based autoradiography and a quantitative digital technique, the iQID camera, based on the numerical analysis of light from a scintillator screen. In radiation toxicology it has been important to develop means of imaging actinide distribution in tissues as these radionuclides may be heterogeneously distributed within and between tissues after internal contamination. Actinide distribution determines which cells are exposed to alpha radiation and is thus potentially critical for assessing absorbed dose. The comparison was carried out by generating autoradiographs of the same biological samples contaminated with actinides with the three autoradiography techniques. These samples were cell preparations or tissue sections collected from animals contaminated with different physico-chemical forms of actinides. The autoradiograph characteristics and the performances of the techniques were evaluated and discussed mainly in terms of acquisition process, activity distribution patterns, spatial resolution and feasibility of activity quantification. The obtained autoradiographs presented similar actinide distribution at low magnification. Out of the three techniques, emulsion autoradiography is the only one to provide a highly-resolved image of the actinide distribution inherently superimposed on the biological sample. Emulsion autoradiography is hence best interpreted at higher magnifications. However, this technique is destructive for the biological sample. Both emulsion- and plastic-based autoradiography record alpha tracks and thus enabled the differentiation between ionized forms of actinides and oxide particles. This feature can help in the evaluation of decorporation therapy efficacy. The most recent technique, the iQID camera, presents several additional features: real-time imaging, separate imaging of alpha particles and

  12. Positron diffusion in noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromswold, D.C.; Lee, Y.K.

    1975-01-01

    Positron diffusion in helium, neon, and argon has been observed and the lifetimes of free positrons in these gases have been calculated on the basis of assumed theoretical behavior. The results are summarized for various gas pressures at room temperature. Reported lifetimes are comparable to the extrapolated values of 1.4 μsec in He and 0.2 μsec in Ar obtained at one atmosphere by Falk. (7 figures, 2 tables) (U.S.)

  13. Syntheses and in vitro evaluation of fluorinated naphthoxazines as dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonists: radiosynthesis, ex vivo biodistribution and autoradiography of [18F]F-PHNO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasdev, Neil; Seeman, Philip; Garcia, Armando; Stableford, Winston T.; Nobrega, Jose N.; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Carbon-11-labeled (+)-4-propyl-3,4,4a,5,6,10b-hexahydro-2H-naphtho[1,2-b][1,4]oxazin-9-ol ([ 11 C]-(+)-PHNO) is a dopamine D2/D3 agonist radioligand that is currently used to image the high-affinity state of dopamine receptors in humans with positron emission tomography (PET). The present study reports the preparation and evaluation of fluorinated (+)-PHNO derivatives. Methods: Five fluorinated (+)-PHNO derivatives were synthesized and tested in vitro for inhibition of binding of [ 3 H]domperidone in homogenates of rat striatum and inhibition of binding to [ 3 H]-(+)-PHNO in homogenates of human-cloned D2Long receptors in Chinese hamster ovary cells and rat striatum. Radiolabeling with fluorine-18 was carried out for the most promising candidate, N-fluoropropyl-(+)-HNO (F-PHNO), and ex vivo biodistribution and autoradiography studies with this radiopharmaceutical were performed in rodents. Results: (+)-PHNO and the fluorinated analogs inhibited binding of [ 3 H]domperidone and [ 3 H]-(+)-PHNO to the high- and low-affinity states of dopamine D2 receptors, consistent with D2 agonist behavior. The average dissociation constant at the high-affinity state of D2, K i High , was 0.4 nM for F-PHNO and proved to be equipotent with (+)-PHNO (0.7 nM). All other fluorinated derivatives were significantly less potent (K i High =2-102 nM). The most promising candidate, F-PHNO, was labeled with fluorine-18 in 5% uncorrected radiochemical yield, with respect to starting fluoride. Ex vivo biodistribution and autoradiography studies in rodents revealed that [ 18 F]F-PHNO rapidly enters the rodent brain. However, this radiotracer does not reveal specific binding in the brain and is rapidly cleared. Conclusions: Five novel dopamine D2/D3 agonists based on (+)-PHNO were synthesized and evaluated in vitro. F-PHNO was shown to behave as a potent D2 agonist in vitro and was therefore radiolabeled with fluorine-18. Despite the promising in vitro pharmacological profile, [ 18

  14. Investigation of silicon dioxide films by neutron activation analysis and autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, H.

    1978-01-01

    Activation analysis and surface autoradiography were used to determine the concentration distribution and precipitation of contaminants in the internal part of the films and on the surfaces. The origin of the contaminants was studied by sampling each technological product following oxidation doped oxide deposition, heating and metallizing. Samples were irradiated at a thermal neutron flux of 3.2 . 10 13 n . cm -2 . s -1 . Irradiation times of 30 hrs and cooling times of about 24 hrs were used. After irradiation, samples were treated by 3N hydrochloric acid at 60 deg C to remove the surface contamination. The removal of the successive regions of the oxide films was carried out by chemical etching, using an NH 4 F-HF-H 2 O solution (90 cm 3 conc. HF, 300 g NH 4 F, 600 cm 3 H 2 O, NH 4 OH to ph=4.5), which has an etching rate of 200 A/min at 0 deg C. By this technique picein coating is used to protect parts other than the analyzed oxide film. For NAA measurements, slices were etched in 25 ml polyethene beakers containing 10 cm 3 of solution in which the etchant was to be gamma-counted. For the autoradiography, Kodak AR 10 Striping film and ORWO RD 3-4 dosimeter film were used. The exposure times varied in the range of 24-72 hrs according to the activity of the samples. The distribution of the density of the autoradiography was determined by microdensitometry. Under the given conditions, the following detection limits of impurities could be obtained in silicon dioxide films: Na=80 ppb, Cu=20 ppb and Au=5 ppb. (T.G.)

  15. Characterization of a double-sided silicon strip detector autoradiography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Örbom, Anders, E-mail: anders.orbom@med.lu.se; Ahlstedt, Jonas; Östlund, Karl; Strand, Sven-Erik [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, Lund SE-22185 (Sweden); Serén, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro; Kotiluoto, Petri [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo FI-02044 (Finland); Hauge, Håvard [Biomolex AS, Oslo NO-0319 (Norway); Olafsen, Tove; Wu, Anna M.; Dahlbom, Magnus [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The most commonly used technology currently used for autoradiography is storage phosphor screens, which has many benefits such as a large field of view but lacks particle-counting detection of the time and energy of each detected radionuclide decay. A number of alternative designs, using either solid state or scintillator detectors, have been developed to address these issues. The aim of this study is to characterize the imaging performance of one such instrument, a double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSD) system for digital autoradiography. A novel aspect of this work is that the instrument, in contrast to previous prototype systems using the same detector type, provides the ability for user accessible imaging with higher throughput. Studies were performed to compare its spatial resolution to that of storage phosphor screens and test the implementation of multiradionuclide ex vivo imaging in a mouse preclinical animal study. Methods: Detector background counts were determined by measuring a nonradioactive sample slide for 52 h. Energy spectra and detection efficiency were measured for seven commonly used radionuclides under representative conditions for tissue imaging. System dead time was measured by imaging {sup 18}F samples of at least 5 kBq and studying the changes in count rate over time. A line source of {sup 58}Co was manufactured by irradiating a 10 μm nickel wire with fast neutrons in a research reactor. Samples of this wire were imaged in both the DSSD and storage phosphor screen systems and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) measured for the line profiles. Multiradionuclide imaging was employed in a two animal study to examine the intratumoral distribution of a {sup 125}I-labeled monoclonal antibody and a {sup 131}I-labeled engineered fragment (diabody) injected in the same mouse, both targeting carcinoembryonic antigen. Results: Detector background was 1.81 × 10{sup −6} counts per second per 50 × 50 μm pixel. Energy spectra and

  16. Quantitative autoradiography of semiconductor materials by means of diffused phosphorus standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treutler, H.C.; Freyer, K.

    1983-01-01

    A suitable standard sample was developed and tested on the basis of phosphorus for the quantitative autoradiography of elements of interest in semiconductor technology. By the aid of silicon disks with a phosphorus concentration of 6x10 17 atomsxcm - 2 the error of the quantitative autoradiogprahic method is determined. The relative mean error of the density measurement is at best +-4%; the relative mean error of the determination of phosphorus concentration by use of an error-free standard sample is about +-15%. The method will be extended to other elements by use of this standard sample of phosphorus. (author)

  17. Quantitative autoradiography of (/sup 125/I) apamin binding sites in the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janicki, P.K.; Horvath, E.; Habermann, E. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Rudolf-Buchheim-Institut fuer Pharmakologie); Seibold, G. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Strahlenzentrum)

    1984-12-01

    The binding sites for (/sup 125/I) apamin in the central nervous system of rat, guinea-pig, chicken and frog were assessed by quantitative autoradiography on X-ray film. In rat and guinea-pig brain apamin labels preferentially the limbic-olfactory system, i.e. nucleus olfactorius, nuclei septi, habenula and hippocampus. In the rat spinal cord the peptide binds preferentially to the substantia gelatinosa. Tectum opticum and nuclei isthmi are labelled in chicken brain. In frog brain no preferentially 'apamin-stained' area was found. The role of the cerebral binding sites is still unknown, whereas the spinal sites may be involved in apamin poisoning.

  18. Variation in thickness of the large cryosections cut for whole-body autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tsunao; Brill, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    A method to assess variation in thickness of the large cryosections for whole-body autoradiography (WBARG) was described, and the degree of intraslice and interslice variations were determined for our cryomicrotome system (LKB PMV-2250). Intraslice variation in thickness of the 180 x 80 mm cryosection was 0.72-0.92 μm within the range of section thickness for WBARG (15-50 μm), and interslice variation was 0.89-1.21 μm. These potential variations in section thickness should be kept in mind whenever working with quantitative WBARG. (author)

  19. Neutron-induced autoradiography for determining the boron distribution in plant organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, R.; Podlesak, W.

    1982-01-01

    As could be shown in preliminary tests with potato leaves, the distribution of boron in plant organs can be displayed qualitatively and determined quantitatively by neutron-induced autoradiography using dielectric track detectors. The detection limit is some ppm B in absolutely dry plant tissue. Semiquantitative interpretation of the autoradiograms by classing track densities with the aid of the image processing instrument 'Densitron' offers favourable possibilities for survey analyses. In this way boron concentration ranges can be determined with the aid of standards and a justifiable effort, so that a sufficiently precise assessment of the boron distribution in plant organs becomes possible. (author)

  20. Method for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2006-06-06

    A non-destructive testing method comprises providing a specimen having at least one positron emitter therein; determining a threshold energy for activating the positron emitter; and determining whether a half-life of the positron emitter is less than a selected half-life. If the half-life of the positron emitter is greater than or equal to the selected half-life, then activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater than the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons in the specimen. If the half-life of the positron emitter is less then the selected half-life, then alternately activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater then the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by positron annihilation within the specimen.

  1. Evaluation of the incorporation of bone grafts used in maxillofacial surgery with [18F]fluoride ion and dynamic positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berding, G.; Burchert, W.; Hoff, J. van den; Pytlik, C.; Neukam, F.W.; Meyer, G.J.; Gratz, K.F.; Hundeshagen, H.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigates the incorporation of bone grafts used in maxillofacial surgery by means of 18 F-fluoride ion and PET. It considers patients who received pedicle grafts for mandibular reconstruction or onlay grafts for alveolar ridge augmentation. Dynamic PET images and arterialized venous blood samples were obtained within a 1-h period after i.v. injection of 18 F-fluoride. Assuming a three-compartment model and applying multilinear least squares fitting, bone blood flow and fluoride influx (K mlf ) were determined. Additionally Patlak plot analysis was used to calculate fluoride influx (K pat ). Early after surgery a significant increase in flow and influx compared to vertebral bodies was observed in the regions of osteosyntheses between grafts used for reconstruction and recipient bone. At the same time pedicle grafts showed a significant increase in flow but not in influx. Furthermore K pat was significantly lower in pedicle grafts than in onlay grafts. In follow-up studies a significant decrease in flow occurred in pedicle grafts and the regions of osteosyntheses. Moreover the latter showed a significant decrease in K mlf as well. It is concluded that 18 F - PET depicted increased blood flow and osteoblastic activity in onlay grafts and regions of osteosyntheses, indicating bone repair in the graft and adjacent host bone early after surgery. For the regions of osteosyntheses the decrease in both parameters corresponded to uncomplicated healing. The lack of increased influx, although flow was increased in pedicle grafts, most likely indicates that some necrosis occurred in these grafts despite patency of anastomoses. It may be concluded that 18 F - PET provides further insight into the biology of graft incorporation. (orig./MG)

  2. Evaluation of the incorporation of bone grafts used in maxillofacial surgery with [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion and dynamic positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berding, G. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Biophysik, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover (Germany); Burchert, W. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Biophysik, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover (Germany); Hoff, J. van den [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Biophysik, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover (Germany); Pytlik, C. [Klinik und Poliklink fuer Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover (Germany); Neukam, F.W. [Klinik und Poliklink fuer Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover (Germany); Meyer, G.J. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Biophysik, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover (Germany); Gratz, K.F. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Biophysik, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover (Germany); Hundeshagen, H. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Biophysik, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    This study investigates the incorporation of bone grafts used in maxillofacial surgery by means of {sup 18}F-fluoride ion and PET. It considers patients who received pedicle grafts for mandibular reconstruction or onlay grafts for alveolar ridge augmentation. Dynamic PET images and arterialized venous blood samples were obtained within a 1-h period after i.v. injection of {sup 18}F-fluoride. Assuming a three-compartment model and applying multilinear least squares fitting, bone blood flow and fluoride influx (K{sub mlf}) were determined. Additionally Patlak plot analysis was used to calculate fluoride influx (K{sub pat}). Early after surgery a significant increase in flow and influx compared to vertebral bodies was observed in the regions of osteosyntheses between grafts used for reconstruction and recipient bone. At the same time pedicle grafts showed a significant increase in flow but not in influx. Furthermore K{sub pat} was significantly lower in pedicle grafts than in onlay grafts. In follow-up studies a significant decrease in flow occurred in pedicle grafts and the regions of osteosyntheses. Moreover the latter showed a significant decrease in K{sub mlf} as well. It is concluded that {sup 18}F{sup -} PET depicted increased blood flow and osteoblastic activity in onlay grafts and regions of osteosyntheses, indicating bone repair in the graft and adjacent host bone early after surgery. For the regions of osteosyntheses the decrease in both parameters corresponded to uncomplicated healing. The lack of increased influx, although flow was increased in pedicle grafts, most likely indicates that some necrosis occurred in these grafts despite patency of anastomoses. It may be concluded that {sup 18}F{sup -} PET provides further insight into the biology of graft incorporation. (orig./MG)

  3. Multi-pair states in electron–positron pair creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Wöllert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultra strong electromagnetic fields can lead to spontaneous creation of single or multiple electron–positron pairs. A quantum field theoretical treatment of the pair creation process combined with numerical methods provides a description of the fermionic quantum field state, from which all observables of the multiple electron–positron pairs can be inferred. This allows to study the complex multi-particle dynamics of electron–positron pair creation in-depth, including multi-pair statistics as well as momentum distributions and spin. To illustrate the potential benefit of this approach, it is applied to the intermediate regime of pair creation between nonperturbative Schwinger pair creation and perturbative multiphoton pair creation where the creation of multi-pair states becomes nonnegligible but cascades do not yet set in. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how spin and helicity of the created electrons and positrons are affected by the polarization of the counterpropagating laser fields, which induce the creation of electron–positron pairs.

  4. Substance P and substance K receptor binding sites in the human gastrointestinal tract: localization by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, T.S.; Zimmerman, R.P.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Maggio, J.E.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to localize and quantify the distribution of binding sites for 125 I-radiolabeled substance P (SP), substance K (SK) and neuromedin K (NK) in the human GI tract using histologically normal tissue obtained from uninvolved margins of resections for carcinoma. The distribution of SP and SK binding sites is different for each gastrointestinal (GI) segment examined. Specific SP binding sites are expressed by arterioles and venules, myenteric plexus, external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, muscularis mucosa, epithelial cells of the mucosa, and the germinal centers of lymph nodules. SK binding sites are distributed in a pattern distinct from SP binding sites and are localized to the external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, and the muscularis mucosa. Binding sites for NK were not detected in any part of the human GI tract. These results demonstrate that: (1) surgical specimens from the human GI tract can be effectively processed for quantitative receptor autoradiography; (2) of the three mammalian tachykinins tested, SP and SK, but not NK binding sites are expressed in detectable levels in the human GI tract; (3) whereas SK receptor binding sites are expressed almost exclusively by smooth muscle, SP binding sites are expressed by smooth muscle cells, arterioles, venules, epithelial cells of the mucosa and cells associated with lymph nodules; and (4) both SP and SK binding sites expressed by smooth muscle are more stable than SP binding sites expressed by blood vessels, lymph nodules, and mucosal cells

  5. Neutron-induced autoradiography used in the investigation of modern pigments in paintings of known composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aderhold, H.C.; Taft, W.S.

    1992-01-01

    Neutron-Induced Autoradiography is an effective analytical technique for mapping the location of a number of specified pigments in paintings. Most paintings which have been examined through neutron-induced autoradiography to date were painted prior to the introduction of the most common of modern pigments. By understanding die nuclear properties of these pigments, as revealed by this technique, a more informed analysis of modem paintings may result This investigation is part of an ongoing program to develop case studies for presentation to an undergraduate class at Cornell University, 'Art, Isotopes and Analysis'. We have found that this technique is a graphic and effective method of presenting nuclear reactions and radioactivity to non-specialists. Sample paintings are produced using pigments of known composition. A sequence of discreet layers, each a separate image, is documented in order to establish a reference for accurately interpreting the autoradiographs. The painting is then activated in the Cornell TRIGA reactor and a series of autoradiographs produced Gamma spectra taken before and after each film exposure gives us detailed information on which radioisotopes (and therefore, which pigments), are active. (author)

  6. Demonstration of epidermal growth factor binding sites in the adult rat pancreas by light microscopic autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabot, J.G.; Walker, P.; Pelletier, G.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors was studied in the pancreas using light microscopic autoradiography, which was performed at different time intervals (2-60 min) after injecting 125 I-labeled EGF intravenously into the adult rat. In the exocrine pancreas, a labeling was found to occur over the pyramidal cells of the acini and cells lining the intercalated ducts. Moreover, substantial binding of EGF to cells of the islets of Langerhans was also revealed. At the 2-min time interval, most silver grains were found at the periphery of the target cells. The localization, as well as the diminution of silver grains over the cytoplasm of these cells, between 7 and 60 min, suggested the internalization and degradation of 125 I-labeled EGF. Control experiments indicated that the autoradiography reaction was due to specific interaction of 125 I-labeled EGF with its receptor. These results clearly indicate that EGF receptors are present in the acinar cells and the cells of intercalated ducts of the exocrine pancreas, as well as the cells of the endocrine pancreas. Finding that there are EGF binding sites in pancreatic acinar cells supports the physiological role of EGF in the regulation of pancreatic exocrine function. The presence of EGF receptors in cells of the islets of Langerhans suggests that EGF may play a role in the regulation of the endocrine pancreas

  7. Study of a positron generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Kazuo; Enomoto, A.; Ikeda, M.; Ohsawa, S.; Kamitani, T.; Hosoyama, K.; Takei, H.; Emoto, T.; Tani, S.

    1998-03-01

    In the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), the following are examined as part of an application technology using a high power electron linac: monochromatic gamma ray sources, free electron lasers, and intense positron sources. This report presents the study of an intense positron source, which has been developed jointly by High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) and PNC. In this report, we describe following items for an adaptive estimate of a superconducting magnet in order to efficiently converge a positron beam. (1) The cryostat which included the superconducting magnet is manufactured. (2) An excitement test of the superconducting magnet is carried out with a magnetic substance such as the electromagnet yoke. (author)

  8. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imagining and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography

  9. Positron emission tomography in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the current and potential uses of positron emission tomography in clinical medicine and research related to oncology. Assessment will be possible of metabolism and physiology of tumors and their effects on adjacent tissues. Specific probes are likely to be developed for target sites on tumors, including monoclonal antibodies and specific growth factors that recognize tumors. To date, most oncological applications of positron emission tomography tracers have been qualitative; in the future, quantitative metabolic measurements should aid in the evaluation of tumor biology and response to treatment

  10. Micrometer positron beam characterization at the Scanning Positron Microscope Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteneder, J.; Dickmann, M.; Kögel, G.; Egger, W.; Sperr, P.; Dollinger, G.

    2017-01-01

    For the investigation of inhomogeneous defect distributions the Scanning Positron Microscope (SPM) of the Universität der Bundeswehr München provides a pulsed positron beam with a diameter of about 1 µm and a time resolution of 250 ps (FWHM). To increase the count-rate the SPM is currently transferred to the intense positron source NEPOMUC. To connect the SPM to the NEPOMUC source a special interface was build, which transforms the NEPOMUC beam to the requirements of the SPM. In this contribution we will give an overview of the SPM interface, and its performance. The beam is characterized at the finale stage of the interface, the positron elevator, where the potential energy of the beam is increased, without altering other beam parameters. From our measurements we are able to predict the performance of the SPM at NEPOMUC. In future position resolved measurements will be possible with an improved spatial resolution of about 0.3 µm and an event rate of about 3.7 kHz.

  11. Studies of positron induced luminescence from polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Lewis, T.A.; Tolk, N.H.

    1994-01-01

    Light emission from polymers (anthracene dissolved in polystryrene) induced by low-energy positrons and electrons has been studied. Results indicate a clear difference between optical emissions under positron and electron bombardment. The positron-induced luminescence spectrum is believed to be generated by both collisional and annihilation processes

  12. Positron Spectroscopy of Hydrothermally Grown Actinide Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    POSITRON SPECTROSCOPY OF HYDROTHERMALLY GROWN ACTINIDE OXIDES THESIS Edward C. Schneider...United States Government. AFIT-ENP-14-M-33 POSITRON SPECTROSCOPY OF HYDROTHERMALLY GROWN ACTINIDE OXIDES THESIS...33 POSITRON SPECTROSCOPY OF HYDROTHERMALLY GROWN ACTINIDE OXIDES Edward C. Schneider, BS Captain, USAF Approved

  13. Study on low-energy positron polarimetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    degree of polarisation close to the positron creation point is desired. In this contribution, methods for ... The spin is transferred to the pair-produced electrons and positrons. The positrons are captured right behind .... to be separated from Mott scattering and annihilation in flight processes. Analysing only final-state electrons ...

  14. Opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney: Radioligand homogenate binding and autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissanayake, V.U.; Hughes, J.; Hunter, J.C. (Parke-Davis Research Unit, Addenbrookes Hospital Site, Cambridge (England))

    1991-07-01

    The specific binding of the selective {mu}-, {delta}-, and {kappa}-opioid ligands (3H)(D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5)enkephalin ((3H) DAGOL), (3H)(D-Pen2,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((3H)DPDPE), and (3H)U69593, respectively, to crude membranes of the guinea pig and rat whole kidney, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla was investigated. In addition, the distribution of specific 3H-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney was visualized by autoradiography. Homogenate binding and autoradiography demonstrated the absence of {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig kidney. No opioid binding sites were demonstrable in the rat kidney. In the guinea pig whole kidney, cortex, and medulla, saturation studies demonstrated that (3H)DPDPE bound with high affinity (KD = 2.6-3.5 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding sites (Bmax = 8.4-30 fmol/mg of protein). Competition studies using several opioid compounds confirmed the nature of the {delta}-opioid binding site. Autoradiography experiments demonstrated that specific (3H)DPDPE binding sites were distributed radially in regions of the inner and outer medulla and at the corticomedullary junction of the guinea pig kidney. Computer-assisted image analysis of saturation data yielded KD values (4.5-5.0 nM) that were in good agreement with those obtained from the homogenate binding studies. Further investigation of the {delta}-opioid binding site in medulla homogenates, using agonist ((3H)DPDPE) and antagonist ((3H)diprenorphine) binding in the presence of Na+, Mg2+, and nucleotides, suggested that the {delta}-opioid site is linked to a second messenger system via a GTP-binding protein. Further studies are required to establish the precise localization of the {delta} binding site in the guinea pig kidney and to determine the nature of the second messenger linked to the GTP-binding protein in the medulla.

  15. WORKSHOP: Electron-positron mystery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokemeyer, H.; Mueller, B.

    1989-01-01

    The tightly correlated electron-positron pairs seen in experiments at the GSI Darmstadt heavy ion Laboratory and elsewhere have yet to be explained. New particle or new effect? The question was highlighted at a recent Moriond workshop held at Les Arcs in the French Alps in January

  16. Autoradiography of the bacterial colony. Application to the effects of polymyxin on the colony of Ps. aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyrolle, Jean; Letellier, Francois; Kauffmann, Jacques

    1975-01-01

    The autoradiography of a colony of Ps.a. which has been transferred, during growth, on a medium added with polymyxin and tritiate leucin makes it possible to locate an upper zone with a high metabolic activity and a basal zone with no metabolic activity. The latter, which consist of lysed cells, acts probably as a selective filter against the drug [fr

  17. Quantitative autoradiography measurement of CA-MoV18 antigen concentration in ovarian carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Peiyong; Vecchio, S. Del; Lastoria, S.; Colnaghi, MI.; Salvatore, M.

    1995-01-01

    Concentrations of CA-MoV18 antigen in ovarian tumor and normal ovarian tissue samples were measured. Quantitative autoradiography was performed in 33 ovarian tissue samples with radiolabeled MoV18 monoclonal antibodies. Among them 22 samples were ovarian carcinomas, 7 samples were benign ovarian tumors and 4 samples were normal ovarian tissues. Among 19 serous ovarian carcinomas, 17 had MoV 18 antigen expression, ranging from 1.30 to 59.28 pmol/g tissue, 3 mutinous ovarian carcinomas and 11 nonmalignant ovaries (7 benign tumors and 4 normal tissues) were not detectable MoV 18 antigen. CA-MoV18 antigen was expressed in serous ovarian carcinomas. The concentration of CA-MoV 18 antigen was correlated with labelled antibodies (%ID/g) in tumor tissue

  18. Application of the autoradiography method for study of the Semipalatinsk test site's lichens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajdarkhanova, G.S.; Poltavtseva, V.P.

    2003-01-01

    The preliminary results of the Semipalatinsk test site's lichens study with help of the autoradiography method are presented. The lichens selected in 1999 on the experimental sites situated in two areas (20 km southerly from Kurchatov town and on of the Degelen mountain south side) have served as the examined objects. Radiation background of the lichens dwelling areas make up 15-17 and 300 μR/h respectively. For receiving of autoradiograms the FT-41MD film with two-side emulsion layer was used. Exposition time is 48 and 744 hours. From visual analysis of photographic image with this autoradiogram one can draw the conclusion about uniform distribution of the radionuclides. Received results testify about the necessity for continuance of the researches in this direction with expansion lichen species content and geography of their scattering

  19. Whole-body autoradiography of 63Ni in mice throughout gestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, I.; Jonsen, J.

    1979-01-01

    Whole-body autoradiography was used to study nickel uptake and retention in mice throughout gestation. After an intraperitoneal injection of 50μCi 63 NiCl 2 into a 16-day-pregnant mouse, nickel appeared rapidly in connective tissues. Prominent sites of radioactivity 72 h after injection included the visceral yolk sac, lung, gastrointestinal tract and kidney. Nickel crossed the placental barriers throughout gestation, i.e. the visceral yolk sac during early gestation, the visceral yolk sac and chorioallantoic placenta during late gestation. A marked uptake of nickel was seen already in the 5-and 6-day embryo. Fetal accumulation of nickel took place up to 16 days gestation. Whereas nickel was distributed throughout the early embryo, distribution became more differentiated with increasing gestation, imitating that in the mother. Penetration of nickel into the mouse conceptus makes possible a similar ability in the human conceptus. (author)

  20. Quantitative autoradiography of hippocampal GABAB and GASAA receptor changes in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, D.C.M.; Penney, J.B. Jr.; Young, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    GABA B and GABA A receptors were examined by quantitative [ 3 H] GABA autoradiography in postmortem human hippocampus from 6 histopathologically verified cases of dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) and 6 normal controls. Significant decrements in the B max for both types of GABA receptors were observed in DAT hippocampus as compared to normal controls. No significant differences in K d values were revealed. As compared to controls, DAT hippocampus exhibited fewer GABA B receptors in stratum moleculare of the denate gyrus, stratum lacunosum-molecular and stratum pyramidale of CA 1 . Significant loss of GABA A receptors in DAT hippocampus was also observed in the CA 1 pyramidal cell region. These changes could not be correlated with differences in age nor in postmortem delay between the two groups. These findings may reflect the neuronal pathologies in CA 1 region in dentate gyrus, and in projections from the entorhinal cortex which are associated with the memory impairment of DAT. 29 refs. (Author)

  1. Minicyclotron-based technology for the production of positron-emitting labelled radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrio, J.R.; Bida, G.; Satyamurthy, N.; Padgett, H.C.; MacDonald, N.S.; Phelps, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    The use of short-lived positron emitters such as carbon 11, fluorine 18, nitrogen 13, and oxygen 15, together with positron-emission tomography (PET) for probing the dynamics of physiological and biochemical processes in the normal and diseased states in man is presently an active area of research. One of the pivotal elements for the continued growth and success of PET is the routine delivery of the desired positron emitting labelled compounds. To date, the cyclotron remains the accelerator of choice for production of medically useful radionuclides. The development of the technology to bring the use of cyclotrons to a clinical setting is discussed

  2. Minicyclotron-based technology for the production of positron-emitting labelled radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, J.R.; Bida, G.; Satyamurthy, N.; Padgett, H.C.; MacDonald, N.S.; Phelps, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    The use of short-lived positron emitters such as carbon 11, fluorine 18, nitrogen 13, and oxygen 15, together with positron-emission tomography (PET) for probing the dynamics of physiological and biochemical processes in the normal and diseased states in man is presently an active area of research. One of the pivotal elements for the continued growth and success of PET is the routine delivery of the desired positron emitting labelled compounds. To date, the cyclotron remains the accelerator of choice for production of medically useful radionuclides. The development of the technology to bring the use of cyclotrons to a clinical setting is discussed. (ACR)

  3. The cryogenic source of slow monochromatic positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkov, I.N.; Pavlov, V.N.; Sidorin, A.O.; Yakovenko, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic source of slow monochromatic positrons based on the 22 Na isotope has been designed and constructed at JINR. Positrons emitted from radioactive source 22 Na have a very broad energy spectrum up to 0.5 MeV. To generate monochromatic beam of slow positrons the solid neon is used as a moderator. The solid neon allows forming slow positron beam of the energy of 1.2 eV at the spectrum width of 1 eV. The efficiency of moderation is 1 % of total positron flux

  4. Demonstration of lactogenic receptors in rat endocrine pancreases by quantitative autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polak, M.; Scharfmann, R.; Ban, E.; Haour, F.; Postel-Vinay, M.C.; Czernichow, P.

    1990-01-01

    A direct effect of growth hormone and/or prolactin on the growth of the pancreatic beta-cell has been proposed. This study assessed the presence of human growth hormone (hGH)-binding sites in male adult rat endocrine pancreas via quantitative autoradiography. The binding of 125I-labeled hGH was evaluated by receptor autoradiography on frozen-pancreas cryostat cut sections. The sections were incubated with 125I-hGH (10(-10) M) for 75 min at room temperature, and nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of excess native hGH (5 X 10(-7) M). The specificity of the binding was assessed in competition experiments with bovine GH and ovine prolactin. The autoradiograms were quantified with a computer-assisted image-processing system. The sections were then stained to visualize the endocrine islets. Nondiabetic control and streptozocin (STZ)-injected rats were used. Our results show that (1) there is specific binding of iodinated hGH in small areas of the pancreas, which appear as the Langerhans islets when the autoradiogram and the stained sections are superimposed; (2) the specificity of hGH binding in rat islets is lactogenic; (3) the density of the hGH-binding sites in the endocrine pancreas is estimated at 4.8 fmol/mg protein, with IC50 ranging from 0.98 to 2.50 nM; and (4) binding sites may be present on the beta-cell, because specific binding disappears in STZ-injected rats. In conclusion, by use of a quantitative autoradiographic technique, we provide evidence for the presence of lactogenic receptors on rat beta-cells

  5. Uptake and processing of [3H]retinoids in rat liver studied by electron microscopic autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, H.F.; Elhanany, E.; Brouwer, A.; de Leeuw, A.M.; Knook, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The role of rat liver cell organelles in retinoid uptake and processing was studied by electron microscopic autoradiography. [ 3 H]Retinoids were administered either orally, to make an inventory of the cell organelles involved, or intravenously as chylomicron remnant constituents to study retinoid processing by the liver with time. No qualitative differences were observed between the two routes of administration. Time-related changes in the distribution of grains were studied using chylomicron remnant [ 3 H]retinoids. The percentages of grains observed over cells and the space of Disse at 5 and 30 min after administration were, respectively: parenchymal cells, 72.6 and 70.4%; fat-storing cells, 5.0 and 18.1%, and the space of Disse, 14.4 and 8.9%. Low numbers of grains were observed over endothelial and Kupffer cells. The percentages of grains observed over parenchymal cell organelles were, respectively: sinusoidal area, 59.6 and 34.4%; smooth endoplasmic reticulum associated with glycogen, 13.8 and 13.4%; mitochondria, 5.4 and 13.6%; rough endoplasmic reticulum, 4.2 and 7.3%, and rough endoplasmic reticulum associated with mitochondria, 3.7 and 6.5%. It is concluded that chylomicron remnant [ 3 H]retinoids in combination with electron microscopic autoradiography provide a good system to study the liver processing of retinoids in vivo. These results, obtained in the intact liver under physiological conditions, further substantiate that retinoids are processed through parenchymal cells before storage occurs in fat-storing cell lipid droplets, that retinoid uptake is not mediated through lysosomes and that the endoplasmic reticulum is a major organelle in retinoid processing

  6. Image guided interstitial laser thermotherapy: a canine model evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muacevic, A; Peller, M; Ruprecht, L; Berg, D; Fend, L; Sroka, R; Reulen, H J; Reiser, M; Tonn, J Ch; Kreth, F W

    2005-02-01

    To determine the applicability and safety of a new canine model suitable for correlative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and morphological/pathophysiological examination over time after interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILTT) in brain tissue. A laser fibre (Diode Laser 830 nm) with an integrated temperature feedback system was inserted into the right frontal white matter in 18 dogs using frameless navigation technique. MRI thermometry (phase mapping i.e. chemical shift of the proton resonance frequency) during interstitial heating was compared to simultaneously recorded interstitial fiberoptic temperature readings on the border of the lesion. To study brain capillary function in response to ILTT over time quantitative autoradiography was performed investigating the unidirectional blood-to-tissue transport of carbon-14-labelled alpha amino-isobutyric acid (transfer constant K of AIB) 12, 36 hours, 7, 14 days, 4 weeks and 3 months after ILTT. All laser procedures were well tolerated, laser and temperature fibres could be adequately placed in the right frontal lobe in all animals. In 5 animals MRI-based temperature quantification correlated strongly to invasive temperature measurements. In the remaining animals the temperature fibre was located in the area of susceptibility artifacts, therefore, no temperature correlation was possible. The laser lesions consisted of a central area of calcified necrosis which was surrounded by an area of reactive brain tissue with increased permeability. Quantitative autoradiography indicated a thin and spherical blood brain barrier lesion. The magnitude of K of AIB increased from 12 hours to 14 days after ILTT and decreased thereafter. The mean value of K of AIB was 19 times (2 times) that of normal white matter (cortex), respectively. ILTT causes transient, highly localised areas of increased capillary permeability surrounding the laser lesion. Phase contrast imaging for MRI thermomonitoring can currently not be used for

  7. Beta Autoradiography. An analytical technique to investigate radionuclides contamination on surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficher, P.; Goutelard, F.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.

    2012-01-01

    In decommissioning of old buildings and after disposal of nuclear facilities (materials, glove boxes,...), the inventory of the radioactive contamination of various building materials needs to be obtained in order to fix the working condition for dismantling. The challenge of this study was to classify different building materials of a whole research laboratory that was dedicated to research on organic molecules labeled with H-3 and C-14. The problem of waste classification is essential for safety treatment of waste and also for its cost. The analytical technique of beta autoradiography particularly well known for biological researches has been tested to investigate radionuclides contamination on surface. This technique is mainly interesting for beta and alpha emitters but also sensitive to gamma radiation. The first step of this technique is the deposit of a film on the surface of material to be analyzed. Films can be deposited on the ground or also fixed on the walls or even on the ceiling. The film is a plastic sheet covered with an emulsion containing photostimulable crystals and Eu that is activated when the film is exposed on radioactive source. The exposed films are then scanned with the Cyclone Plus equipment to get a digitized image. This image represents the radioactivity of the surface studied. The possibility to re-use the films is very important to investigate a large area. This autoradiography technique has retained our attention for its sensitivity and moreover the possibility of 2-dimensional investigation has been found as a real advantage. However it remains now as a qualitative technique and new studies must be launched to prove its quantitative potentialities. The high spatial resolution was not as important as in biological observation, and the mm resolution is totally sufficient

  8. High intensity positron program at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Howell, R.H.; Stoeffl, W.

    1998-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of the world's highest current beam of keV positrons. The potential for establishing a national center for materials analysis using positron annihilation techniques around this capability is being actively pursued. The high LLNL beam current will enable investigations in several new areas. We are developing a positron microprobe that will produce a pulsed, focused positron beam for 3-dimensional scans of defect size and concentration with submicron resolution. Below we summarize the important design features of this microprobe. Several experimental end stations will be available that can utilize the high current beam with a time distribution determined by the electron linac pulse structure, quasi-continuous, or bunched at 20 MHz, and can operate in an electrostatic or (and) magnetostatic environment. Some of the planned early experiments are: two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation of thin films and buried interfaces, positron diffraction holography, positron induced desorption, and positron induced Auger spectra

  9. Co-60 and Ca-45 autoradiography in cerebral ischemia in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, H; Krop-van Gastel, W; Korf, J

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotopes of divalent Co (Co-57 in Single photon emission tomography (SPECT)and Co-55 in positron emission tomography (PET) have clinically been applied to visualize Ca related brain damage. The cerebral uptake of Ca-45 and Co-60 in a unilateral stroke model in the rat was compared; 100 mu Ci

  10. Uptake and transport of positron-emitting tracer in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Matsuhashi, Shinpei; Shimazu, Masamitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The transport of a positron-emitting isotope introduced into a plant was dynamically followed by a special observation apparatus called `Positron-Emitting Tracer Imaging System`. In the system, annihilation {gamma}-rays from the positron emitter are detected with two planer detectors (5 x 6 cm square). The water containing ca. 5 MBq/ml of {sup 18}F was fed to the cut stem of soybean for 2 min and then the images of tracer activity were recorded for 30 - 50 min. When the midrib of a leaf near the petiole was cut just before measurement, the activity in the injured leaf was decreased but detected even at the apex. This result suggests that the damaged leaf recovered the uptake of water through the lamina. Maximum tracer activities in leaves of unirradiated plant were observed within 10 min, whereas those of irradiated plant at 100 Gy were observed after over 25 min. The final activity of irradiated plant after 30 min was lower than that of unirradiated plant. In case of beans, there was a difference in the absorption behavior of the {sup 18}F-labeled water between unirradiated and irradiated samples. These results show that the system is effective to observe the uptake and transportation of water containing positron emitting tracer for the study of damage and recovery functions of plants. (author)

  11. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husband, P; Selim, F A; Bartošová, I; Slugeň, V

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics. (paper)

  12. Positron scattering from vinyl acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiari, L; Brunger, M J; Zecca, A; Blanco, F; García, G

    2014-01-01

    Using a Beer–Lambert attenuation approach, we report measured total cross sections (TCSs) for positron scattering from vinyl acetate (C 4 H 6 O 2 ) in the incident positron energy range 0.15–50 eV. In addition, we also report an independent atom model with screening corrected additivity rule computation results for the TCSs, differential and integral elastic cross sections, the positronium formation cross section and inelastic integral cross sections. The energy range of these calculations is 1–1000 eV. While there is a reasonable qualitative correspondence between measurement and calculation for the TCSs, in terms of the energy dependence of those cross sections, the theory was found to be a factor of ∼2 larger in magnitude at the lower energies, even after the measured data were corrected for the forward angle scattering effect. (paper)

  13. PEBS - Positron Electron Balloon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    von Doetinchem, P.; Kirn, T.; Yearwood, G.Roper; Schael, S.

    2007-01-01

    The best measurement of the cosmic ray positron flux available today was performed by the HEAT balloon experiment more than 10 years ago. Given the limitations in weight and power consumption for balloon experiments, a novel approach was needed to design a detector which could increase the existing data by more than a factor of 100. Using silicon photomultipliers for the readout of a scintillating fiber tracker and of an imaging electromagnetic calorimeter, the PEBS detector features a large geometrical acceptance of 2500 cm^2 sr for positrons, a total weight of 1500 kg and a power consumption of 600 W. The experiment is intended to measure cosmic ray particle spectra for a period of up to 20 days at an altitude of 40 km circulating the North or South Pole. A full Geant 4 simulation of the detector concept has been developed and key elements have been verified in a testbeam in October 2006 at CERN.

  14. Positron-atom dispersion relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumbrajs, O.; Martinis, M.

    1983-01-01

    The singularity structure of the forward positron-atom scattering amplitude is studied within the framework of perturbation theory with the use of the Landau rules. The unphysical and anomalous regions in the positron-atom forward dispersion relations are discussed. It is shown that the unphysical region starts at E 0 = -Vertical BarE(Ps)Vertical Bar+Vertical BarE 1 Vertical Bar and the anomalous region at E/sub a/ = -(√2Vertical BarE(Ps)Vertical Bar - √Vertical BarE 1 Vertical Bar ) 2 , where E(Ps) and E 1 are correspondingly the positronium and the atomic-electron binding energies. The anomalous region is on the physical sheet if Vertical BarE(Ps)Vertical Bar/2>Vertical BarE 1 Vertical Bar

  15. Electron-Positron Accumulator (EPA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1986-01-01

    After acceleration in the low-current linac LIL-W, the electrons and positrons are accumulated in EPA to obtain a sufficient intensity and a suitable time-structure, before being passed on to the PS for further acceleration to 3.5 GeV. Electrons circulate from right to left, positrons in the other direction. Dipole bending magnets are red, focusing quadrupoles blue, sextupoles for chromaticity-control orange. The vertical tube at the left of the picture belongs to an optical transport system carrying the synchrotron radiation to detectors for beam size measurement. Construction of EPA was completed in spring 1986. LIL-W and EPA were conceived for an energy of 600 MeV, but operation was limited to 500 MeV.

  16. Positrons in biomolecular systems. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, J.C.; Graf, G.; Costabal, H.; Ewert, D.H.; English, L.

    1982-01-01

    Pickoff-annihilation parameters, as related to the free volume model, are shown to be indicators of structural fluctuations in membranes and membrane bound proteins. Nitrous oxide anesthetic induces lateral rigidity in a membrane, and an anesthetic mechanism is suggested. Conformational changes of (Na + ,K + )ATPase in natural membrane are observed with ATP and Mg-ion binding. New positron applications to active transport and photosynthetic systems are suggested. (Auth.)

  17. Analysis of 18F-labelled synthesis products on TLC plates: Comparison of radioactivity scanning, film autoradiography, and a phosphoimaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaemaeraeinen, Eeva-Liisa; Haaparanta, Merja; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Koivula, Teija; Lipponen, Tiina; Solin, Olof

    2006-01-01

    We compared radioactivity scanning, film autoradiography, and digital photostimulated luminescence (PSL) autoradiography (phosphoimaging technique) in detection of radioactivity on thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. TLC combined with radioactivity detection is rapid, simple, and relatively flexible. Here, 18 F-labelled synthesis products were analyzed by TLC and the radioactivity distribution on the plates determined using the three techniques. Radioactivity scanning is appropriate only with good chromatographic resolution and previously validated scanning parameters. Film autoradiography exhibits poor linearity if radioactivity varies greatly. PSL provides high sensitivity and resolution and superior linearity compared with the other methods

  18. Design of a transmission electron positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, Masao; Inoue, M.; Kogure, Y.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshii, T.; Kurihara, T.; Tsuno, K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the plans and design of positron-electron microscopes being built at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan. A used electron microscope is altered. The kinetic energies of positrons produced by accelerators or by nuclear decays are not a unique value but show a spread over in a wide range. Positron beam is guided to a transmission electron microscope (JEM100SX). Positrons are moderated by a tungsten foil, are accelerated and are focused on a nickel sheet. The monochromatic focused beam is injected into an electron microscope. The focusing and aberration of positrons are the same as electrons in a magnetic system which are used in commercial electron microscopes. Imaging plates are used to record positron images for the transmission electron microscope. (author)

  19. A positron accumulator for antihydrogen synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Jørgensen, L V; Fine, K S; Watson, T L; Van der Werf, D P; Charlton, M

    2001-01-01

    A positron accumulator based on the modified Penning-Malmberg design of Surko and co-workers at UCSD has been constructed and undergone testing in preparation for the ATHENA experiment now under way at CERN. This experiment aims to produce and characterize atomic anti- hydrogen. The positron accumulator utilises nitrogen buffer gas to cool and trap a continuous beam of positrons emanating from a /sup 22 /Na radioactive source. A solid neon moderator slows the positrons from the source down to epithermal energies of a few eV before being injected into the trap. It is estimated that around 10/sup 7/ positrons can be trapped and cooled to ambient temperature within a couple of minutes in this scheme using a 6 mCi source. Preliminary tests have so far demonstrated trapping of approximately 3*10/sup 6/ positrons and an efficiency of the Ne moderator of nearly 1%. (8 refs).

  20. Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Alex; Koymen, A. R.; Mehl, David; Jensen, K. O.; Lei, Chun; Lee, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, Weiss et al. have demonstrated that it is possible to excite Auger transitions by annihilating core electrons using a low energy (less than 30eV) beam of positrons. This mechanism makes possible a new electron spectroscopy, Positron annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES). The probability of exciting an Auger transition is proportional to the overlap of the positron wavefunction with atomic core levels. Since the Auger electron energy provides a signature of the atomic species making the transition, PAES makes it possible to determine the overlap of the positron wavefunction with a particular element. PAES may therefore provide a means of detecting positron-atom complexes. Measurements of PAES intensities from clean and adsorbate covered Cu surfaces are presented which indicate that approx. 5 percent of positrons injected into CU at 25eV produce core annihilations that result in Auger transitions.

  1. Positron annihilation in the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guessoum, Nidhal; Ramaty, Reuven; Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    Positronium formation and annihilation are studied in a model for the interstellar medium consisting of cold cloud cores, warm partially ionized cloud envelopes, and hot intercloud gas. The gamma-ray spectra resulting from positron annihilation in these components of the interstellar medium are calculated. The spectra from the individual components are then combined, using two limiting assumptions for the propagation of the positrons, namely, that the positrons propagate freely throughout the interstellar medium, and that the positrons are excluded from the cold cloud cores. In the first case, the bulk of the positrons annihilate in the cloud cores and the annihilation line exhibits broad wings resulting from the annihilation of positronium formed by charge exchange in flight. In the second case, the positrons annihilate mainly in the warm envelopes, and the line wings are suppressed.

  2. Positron emission tomography imaging--technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehllehner, G.; Karp, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Positron imaging instrumentation has improved rapidly in the last few years. Scanners currently under development are beginning to approach fundamental limits set by positron range and noncolinearity effects. This report reviews the latest developments in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation, emphasizing the development of coding schemes that reduce the complexity and cost of high-resolution scanners. The relative benefits of using time-of-flight (TOF) information is discussed as well. 68 references

  3. Solvated Positron Chemistry. The Reaction of Hydrated Positrons with Chloride Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Shantarovich, V. P.

    1974-01-01

    The reaction of hydrated positrons (caq+ with cloride ions in aqueous solutions has been studied by means of positron annihilation angular correlation measurements. A rate constant of k = (2.5 ± 0.5) × 1010 M−1 s−1 was found. Probably the reacting positrons annihilated from an e+ Cl− bound state...... resulting in an angular correlation curve 8% narrower than for the hydrated positron. Carbontetrachloride in benzene seems to give similar, but smaller effect....

  4. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, T.; Wada, K.; Yagishita, A.; Kosuge, T.; Saito, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Shirakawa, A.; Sanami, T.; Ikeda, M.; Ohsawa, S.; Kakihara, K.; Shidara, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps-). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a 22Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  5. Determination of Active Marine Bacterioplankton: a Comparison of Universal 16S rRNA Probes, Autoradiography, and Nucleoid Staining

    OpenAIRE

    Karner, M.; Fuhrman, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    We compared several currently discussed methods for the assessment of bacterial numbers and activity in marine waters, using samples from a variety of marine environments, from aged offshore seawater to rich harbor water. Samples were simultaneously tested for binding to a fluorescently labeled universal 16S rRNA probe; (sup3)H-labeled amino acid uptake via autoradiography; nucleoid-containing bacterial numbers by modified DAPI (4(prm1),6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining; staining with 5-cy...

  6. Post-operative observation of ilio-apophyseal transplants on the basis of radiography, computed tomography, autoradiography and histological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klatt, U.

    1987-01-01

    A study in 25 rabbits, in which the acetabular roof was reinforced by inserting a wedge-shaped autologous tissue fragment of the apophysis, led to the following conclusions: That complete healing and ossification of the implant took place within the observation period; that radiography, computed tomography, autoradiography and histology consistently provided evidence in confirmation of ossification; that a wedge-shaped fragment of apophyseal cartilage is a suitable material for plastic surgery in the acetabular roof. (TRV) [de

  7. 3H-TdR autoradiography in vitro incubation for the evaluation of the therapeutic effect in chronic atrophic gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Jie

    1988-01-01

    This paper discussed with the feasibility of using 3 H-TdR autoraoiography in vitro incubation to evaluate the therapeutic effect of atrophic gastritis. The results showed that gastric mucosa labelling indices measured by autoradiography can reflect the property, severity and clincal conditions of chronic gastritis quantitatively. The methodology is raliable and reproducible. It was suggested that labelling indices may serve as a cytokinetic parameter to evaluate the therapeutic effect of atrophic gastritis

  8. Down-regulation of rat kidney calcitonin receptors by salmon calcitonin infusion evidence by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouizar, Z.; Rostene, W.H.; Milhaud, G.

    1987-01-01

    In treating age-related osteoporosis and Paget disease of bone, it is of major importance to avoid an escape phenomenon that would reduce effectiveness of the treatment. The factors involved in the loss of therapeutic efficacy with administration of large pharmacological doses of the hormone require special consideration. Down-regulation of the hormone receptors could account for the escape phenomenon. Specific binding sites for salmon calcitonin (sCT) were characterized and localized by autoradiography on rat kidney sections incubated with 125 I-labeled sCT. Autoradiograms demonstrated a heterogeneous distribution of 125 I-labeled sCT binding sites in the kidney, with high densities in both the superficial layer of the cortex and the outer medulla. Infusion of different doses of unlabeled sCT by means of Alzet minipumps for 7 days produced rapid changes in plasma calcium, phosphate, and magnesium levels, which were no longer observed after 2 or 6 days of treatment. Besides, infusion of high doses of sCT induced down-regulation of renal sCT binding sites located mainly in the medulla, where calcitonin (CT) has been shown to exert it physiological effects on water and ion reabsorption. These data suggest that the resistance to high doses of sCT often observed during long-term treatment of patients may be the consequence of not only bone-cell desensitization but also down-regulation of CT-sensitive kidney receptor sites

  9. Speciation of radioactive soil particles in the Fukushima contaminated area by IP autoradiography and microanalyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Hiroki; Hatta, Tamao; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Yamada, Hirohisa; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2014-11-18

    Radioactive soil particles several tens of micrometers in size were collected from litter soil in the radiation contaminated area by the Fukushima nuclear plant accident and characterized using electron and X-ray microanalyses. The radioactive particles were discriminated by autoradiography using imaging plates (IP) on which microgrids were formed by laser ablation in order to find the particles under microscopy. Fifty radioactive particles were identified and classified into three types from their morphology and chemical composition, namely: (1) aggregates of clay minerals, (2) organic matter containing clay mineral particulates, and (3) weathered biotite originating from local granite. With respect to the second type, dissolution of the organic matter did not reduce the radiation, suggesting that the radionuclides were also fixed by the clay minerals. The weathered biotite grains have a plate-like shape with well-developed cleavages inside the grains, and kaolin group minerals and goethite filling the cleavage spaces. The reduction of the radiation intensity was measured before and after the trimming of the plate edges using a focused ion beam (FIB), to examine whether radioactive cesium primarily sorbed at frayed edges. The radiation was attenuated in proportion to the volume decrease by the edge trimming, implying that radioactive cesium was sorbed uniformly in the porous weathered biotite.

  10. Quantitative Digital Autoradiography for Environmental Swipe Sample Prioritization: System design, Characterization, and Initial Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Benjamin S.; Zalavadia, Mital A.; Miller, Brian W.; Bliss, Mary; Olsen, Khris B.; Kasparek, Dustin M.; Clarke, Ardelia M.

    2017-07-17

    Environmental sampling and sample analyses by the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL) is a critical technical tool used to detect facility misuse under a Comprehensive Safeguards Agreement and to verify the absence of undeclared nuclear material activities under an Additional Protocol. Currently all environmental swipe samples (ESS) are screened using gamma spectrometry and x-ray fluorescence to estimate the amount of U and/or Pu in the ESS, to guide further analysis, and to assist in the shipment of ESS to the NWAL. Quantitative Digital Autoradiography for Environmental Samples (QDARES) is being developed to complement existing techniques through the use of a portable, real-time, high-spatial-resolution camera called the Ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). The iQID constructs a spatial map of radionuclides within a sample or surface in real-time as charged particles (betas) and photons (gamma/x-rays) are detected and localized on an event-by-event basis. Knowledge of the location and nature of radioactive hot spots on the ESS could provide information for subsequent laboratory analysis. As a nondestructive technique, QDARES does not compromise the ESS chain of custody or subsequent laboratory analysis. In this paper we will present the system design and construction, characterization measurements with calibration sources, and initial measurements of ESS.

  11. Statistical evaluation of methods for quantifying gene expression by autoradiography in histological sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazic Stanley E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situ hybridisation (ISH combined with autoradiography is a standard method of measuring the amount of gene expression in histological sections, but the methods used to quantify gene expression in the resulting digital images vary greatly between studies and can potentially give conflicting results. Results The present study examines commonly used methods for analysing ISH images and demonstrates that these methods are not optimal. Image segmentation based on thresholding can be subject to floor-effects and lead to biased results. In addition, including the area of the structure or region of interest in the calculation of gene expression can lead to a large loss of precision and can also introduce bias. Finally, converting grey level pixel intensities to optical densities or units of radioactivity is unnecessary for most applications and can lead to data with poor statistical properties. A modification of an existing method for selecting the structure or region of interest is introduced which performs better than alternative methods in terms of bias and precision. Conclusion Based on these results, suggestions are made to reduce bias, increase precision, and ultimately provide more meaningful results of gene expression data.

  12. Ontogeny of phorbol ester receptors in rat brain studied by in vitro autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, R.; Kito, S.

    1990-01-01

    The ontogeny of phorbol ester receptors, which have been considered to correspond to protein kinase C, in the rat brain was studied through in vitro autoradiography with 3 H-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate ( 3 H-PDBu). The distribution of 3 H-PDBu binding sites in the adult rat brain was similar to the previous reports by other researchers. The developmental pattern of 3 H-PDBu binding sites varried with brain region. 3 H-PDBu binding sites in the amygdala, thalamus, stratum pyramidale of CA 1 of the hippocampus, dentate gyrus, superior colliculus, substantia nigra, interpeduncular nucleus and cerebellar molecular layer were postnatally increased to adult levels and after that they remained constant. On the other hand, in the stratum oriens and stratum radiatum of CA 1 of the hippocampus, and in the lateral and medial geniculate bodies, 3 H-PDBu binding sites reached peaks at 21 or 28 days of postnatal age and after that they declined to adult levels. The cerebellar granular layer showed a low level of 3 H-PDBu binding sites throughout all the ontogenetic stages. A distinct ontogenetic pattern of phorbol ester receptors in various regions of the brain may reflect a role of protein kinase C in the neural development of each discrete area. (Authors)

  13. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors subtypes in rat cerebellar cortex: light microscope autoradiography of age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebati, S K; Vitali, D; Scordella, S; Amenta, F

    2001-01-19

    Muscarinic cholinergic M1-M5 receptor subtypes were investigated in the cerebellar cortex of Fischer 344 rats aged 6 (young), 15 (adult) and 22 months (senescent) by combined kinetic and equilibrium binding and light microscope autoradiography. In young rats the rank order of receptor density was M5M4M4 in the molecular and granular layers, respectively. M1, M2, M4 and M5 receptors were also observed within Purkinje neurons. M1 receptor did not show age-related changes as well as the M2 receptor in the molecular layer. In this layer, M3-M5 receptors were increased in senescent compared to younger rats. In the granular layer the expression of M2 and M5 muscarinic receptors was similar in young and senescent rats and higher in adult rats. M3 and M4 receptors were more in adult and senescent rats compared to young animals. In Purkinje neurons, a slight-to-moderate age-related increase of M1 and M5 receptor expression was observed.

  14. Thallium-201: Autoradiography in pigmented mice and melanin-binding in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjaelve, H.; Nilsson, M.; Larsson, B. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden))

    1982-01-01

    Autoradiography with /sup 201/Tl/sup +/ in C57Bl mice showed a strong labelling of the eye melanin and of pigmented hair follicles. An analysis of the affinity of thallium for pigment from cow eyes indicated a binding to three groups of sites and showed a marked sensitivity to the addition of H/sup +/-ions. The results are consistent with the conception that a binding of thallium occurs to the free carboxyl groups of the melanin and that the structure of the polymer has a marked influence on the affinity. Similar results have previously been obtained with other cations. There was no indication that the strong in vivo affinity of thallium to melanin is due to a more firm binding than for other cations which do not localize on melanin in vivo. Instead, the ability of cations to pass the melanocyte membranes and reach the melanin granules is probably decisive for whether a melanin-binding will take place in vivo. Toxic effects on the eye and epilation are symptoms of thallium intoxication which may be related to its melanin-binding. The fate of /sup 201/Tl/sup +/ in some other tissues is also described and discussed.

  15. The distribution of a new /sup 111/In-Bleomycin complex in tumor cells by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, D.Y.; Maruyama, Y.

    1987-01-01

    A new radioactive form of Bleomycin (/sup 111/In-BLMC) was effective for tumor imaging and therapy in mouse glioma and human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells. The distribution of drug in tumor cells was investigated by autoradiography. Human small cell lung cancer (N417 and H526, NCI) were exposed to /sup 111/ InCl/sub 3/ and (25-150 μCi/ml) or /sup 111/In-BLMC (25-150 μCi) carried by 15-25 μg BLM/ml) in 37 0 C for 1 hr, 3 hr or 24 hr, washed with fresh medium, and spread. The slides were smeared with NTB/sub 2/ or NTB/sub 3/ emulsion by using wet-mounting or dry-mounting technique and developed 3-14 days. The /sup 111/In-BLMC localized on the cell nucleus (47.8%) and nuclear membrane (29.2%); /sup 111/InCl/sub 3/ located mainly in the cytoplasm (45.8%). This indicates that the mechanism of killing of tumor cells may be related to the drug uptake and distribution of /sup 111/In-BLMC. A nuclear and nuclear membrane localization would favor damage to chromosomes and DNA

  16. GABA and benzodiazepine receptors in the gerbil brain after transient ischemia: demonstration by quantitative receptor autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, H.; Sato, G.; Kogure, K.

    1987-01-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to measure the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and benzodiazepine receptors after ischemia by means of transient occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries in the gerbil. [ 3 H]Muscimol was used to label the GABAA receptors and [ 3 H]flunitrazepam to label central type benzodiazepine receptors. In the superolateral convexities of the frontal cortices, [ 3 H]muscimol binding was increased in 60% of the animals killed 3 days after ischemia, and decreased in 67% of the animals killed 27 days after ischemia. Twenty-seven days after ischemia, [ 3 H]flunitrazepam binding in the substantia nigra pars reticulata increased to 252% of the control, though the increase in [ 3 H]muscimol binding was not significant. In the dorsolateral region of the caudate putamen, marked neuronal necrosis and depletion of both [ 3 H]muscimol and [ 3 H]flunitrazepam binding sites were observed 27 days after ischemia, the ventromedial region being left intact. In spite of the depletion of pyramidal cells in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, both [ 3 H]muscimol and [ 3 H]flunitrazepam binding sites were preserved 27 days after ischemia. Since our previous study revealed that adenosine A1 binding sites were depleted in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus after ischemia correlating with neuronal damage, GABAA and benzodiazepine receptors may not be distributed predominantly on the pyramidal cells in the CA1 region

  17. An automated blood sampling system used in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.; Bohm, C.; Kesselberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    Fast dynamic function studies with positron emission tomography (PET), has the potential to give accurate information of physiological functions of the brain. This capability can be realised if the positron camera system accurately quantitates the tracer uptake in the brain with sufficiently high efficiency and in sufficiently short time intervals. However, in addition, the tracer concentration in blood, as a function of time, must be accurately determined. This paper describes and evaluates an automated blood sampling system. Two different detector units are compared. The use of the automated blood sampling system is demonstrated in studies of cerebral blood flow, in studies of the blood-brain barrier transfer of amino acids and of the cerebral oxygen consumption. 5 refs.; 7 figs

  18. NMF on positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bödvarsson, Bjarni; Hansen, Lars Kai; Svarer, Claus

    2007-01-01

    In positron emission tomography, kinetic modelling of brain tracer uptake, metabolism or binding requires knowledge of the cerebral input function. Traditionally, this is achieved with arterial blood sampling in the arm or as shown in (Liptrot, M, et al., 2004) by non-invasive K-means clustering...... is calculated from the NMF solution. The method is tested on a [18F]-Altanserin tracer ligand data set consisting of 5 healthy subjects. The results from using K-means clustering and NMF are compared to a sampled arterial TAC. The comparison is done by calculating the correlation with the arterial sampled TAC....

  19. Positron tomography. Methodology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellershohn, C.; Comar, D.

    1979-01-01

    Whereas single photon tomography provides a new and rewarding dimension to conventional nuclear medicine, positron tomography makes a new original approach possible of the analysis in vivo of fundamental biological and physiological processes. The main object of both is the sectional representation of the distribution of a radioactive indicator injected into the body system; compared with conventional detectors (gamma cameras and scintigraphic systems) they provide much greater accuracy in localization. The characteristics of these two methods can be presented schematically by comparing their respective advantages and drawbacks [fr

  20. Positron emission tomography takes lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simms, R.

    1989-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)'s ability to detect functional abnormalities before they manifest anatomically is examined and some of its most common applications are outlined. It is emphasised that when PET facility and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization's national cyclotron are established at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, the availability of short-lived tracers such as oxygen 15, nitrogen 13 and fluorine 18 would improve the specificity of tests(e.g. for brain tumors or cardiac viability) further. Construction of the cyclotron will start shortly and is due to be completed and operating by the end of 1991

  1. PLEPS: Pulsed low energy positron system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Egger

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available PLEPS, operated by the Universität der Bundeswehr München, located at NEPOMUC, is a unique tool for depth profiling of defects with positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using a pulsed positron beam of variable energy.

  2. Slow positron beam at the JINR, Dubna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horodek Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Low Energy Positron Toroidal Accumulator (LEPTA at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR proposed for generation of positronium in flight has been adopted for positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS. The positron injector generates continuous slow positron beam with positron energy range between 50 eV and 35 keV. The radioactive 22Na isotope is used. In distinction to popular tungsten foil, here the solid neon is used as moderator. It allows to obtain the beam intensity of about 105 e+/s width energy spectrum characterized by full width at half maximum (FWHM of 3.4 eV and a tail to lower energies of about 30 eV. The paper covers the characteristic of variable energy positron beam at the LEPTA facility: parameters, the rule of moderation, scheme of injector, and transportation of positrons into the sample chamber. Recent status of the project and its development in the field of PAS is discussed. As an example, the measurement of the positron diffusion length in pure iron is demonstrated.

  3. Positron Emission Mammotomography with Dual Planar Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Smith; Raymond Raylman; Stanislaw Majewski

    2003-06-29

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) is usually performed with two stationary planar detectors above and below a compressed breast. There is image blurring normal to the detectors due to the limited angular range of the lines of response. Positron emission mammotomography (PEM-T) with dual planar detectors rotating about the breast can obtain complete angular sampling and has the potential to improve activity estimation.

  4. Positrons trapped in polyethylene: Electric field effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolaccini, M.; Bisi, A.; Gambarini, G.; Zappa, L.

    1978-01-01

    The intensity of the iot 2 -component of positrons annihilated in polyethylene is found to increase with increasing electric field, while the formation probability of the positron state responsible for this component remains independent of the field. (orig.) 891 HPOE [de

  5. Nondestructive examination using neutron activated positron annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Douglas W.; Denison, Arthur B.

    2001-01-01

    A method is provided for performing nondestructive examination of a metal specimen using neutron activated positron annihilation wherein the positron emitter source is formed within the metal specimen. The method permits in situ nondestructive examination and has the advantage of being capable of performing bulk analysis to determine embrittlement, fatigue and dislocation within a metal specimen.

  6. Applications for positron emission mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Irving N

    2006-01-01

    High resolution positron emission mammography (PEM) can address the current clinical needs of breast cancer patients and the requirements for future translational work. Combining the quantitative capabilities of positron emission tomography (PET) with millimeter resolution, PEM can image the earliest in situ forms of breast cancer as well as putative cancer precursor lesions (e.g., atypical ductal hyperplasia) whose behavior is important for prevention studies. The importance of the ability to detect intraductal cancer cannot be overemphasized, for several reasons: at least one-third of new cancers are detected at this intraductal stage, intervention at this stage represents the best opportunity for complete cure, and a significant number of invasive cancers contain an intraductal component. Without knowledge of the extent of the intraductal component, surgeons are unable to completely excise cancers about a third of the time, leading to unnecessary re-excisions or radiation therapy. Current investigations aimed at specifying best practices in radiotherapy of DCIS patients are stymied by the lack of objective quantitative methods of rapidly assessing response. Other future applications of PEM are suggested, including an information technology project built on PEM that promises to individualize therapy and facilitate surveillance of high risk populations. The high overall accuracy of PEM (i.e., both specificity and sensitivity) is an unusual and welcome development in the history of breast imaging. With this high accuracy, and continued technical innovation to reduce radiation dose, PEM may someday replace X-ray mammography as a first line approach to breast cancer detection.

  7. Positronic complexes with unnatural parity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromley, M. W. J.; Mitroy, J.; Varga, K.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the unnatural parity states of PsH, LiPs, NaPs, and KPs are investigated with the configuration interaction and stochastic variational methods. The binding energies (in hartree) are found to be 8.17x10 -4 , 4.42x10 -4 , 15.14x10 -4 , and 21.80x10 -4 , respectively. These states are constructed by first coupling the two electrons into a configuration which is predominantly 3 P e , and then adding a p-wave positron. All the active particles are in states in which the relative angular momentum between any pair of particles is at least L=1. The LiPs state is Borromean since there are no three-body bound subsystems (of the correct symmetry) of the (Li + , e - , e - , e + ) particles that make up the system. The dominant decay mode of these states will be radiative decay into a configuration that autoionizes or undergoes positron annihilation

  8. Experimentation with low-energy positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, A.P. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The capability of studying the interactions of positrons with surfaces has recently been exploited by using ultra-high-vacuum techniques. The result has been a new understanding of how positrons interact with surfaces and because of this we are now able to make much stronger fluxes of slow positrons. The higher beam strengths in turn are opening up new possibilities for experimentation on surfaces and solids and for studying the atomic physics of positronium and positron-molecule scattering at low energies. The lectures are intended to review some of the history of this subject and to outline the present state of our knowledge of experimentation with low-energy positron beams. (orig./TW)

  9. Simulation of a Positron Source for CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Golge; A. Freyberger; C. Hyde-Wright

    2007-01-01

    A positron source for the 6 GeV (or the proposed 12 GeV upgrade) recirculating linacs at Jefferson Lab is presented. The proposed 100nA CW positron source has several unique characteristics; high incident beam power (100kW), 10 MeV incident electron beam energy, CW incident beam and CW production. Positron production with 10 MeV electrons has several advantages; the energy is below neutron threshold so the production target will not become activated during use and the absolute energy spread is bounded by the low incident energy. These advantages are offset by the large angular distribution of the outgoing positrons. Results of simulations of the positron production, capture, acceleration and injection into the recirculating linac are presented. Energy flow and thermal management of the production target present a challenge and are included in the simulations

  10. Development of in vitro and ex vivo positron-emitting tracer techniques and their application to neurotrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihver, Sven

    2000-07-01

    The use of positron-emitting tracers has been extended beyond tomographic facilities in the last few years, giving rise to a general positron-emitting tracing technique. The methodological part of the present thesis involved the evaluation of the performance of storage phosphor (SP) plates, with tracers labeled with high-energy, short-lived, positron-emitting radionuclides, using homogenized tissue specimens and autoradiography with frozen brain sections. The SP plates showed superior sensitivity and a linear response over a wide radioactivity range. Autoradiography provided reliable results due to (a) adequate sensitivity for low radioactivity concentration, (b) an excellent linear range, and (c) satisfactory resolution. Though equilibration time of receptor-ligand interaction was dependent upon section thickness, quantification was possible with thinner sections. An initial finding using frozen section autoradiography of rat brain and spinal cord showed preferential binding of [{sup 11}C]4-NMPB, a muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor antagonist, to the M4 subtype of mACh receptors. Further work to ascertain this specificity, by use of binding studies on cell membranes from CHO-K1 cells expressing individual subtypes of human mACh receptors, suggested lack of subtype selectivity. With respect to the possible clinical use in glutamatergic neuropathology, [{sup 11}C]cyano-dizocilpine, as a potential PET tracer for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors, was studied. The in vivo visualization of specific binding could not be achieved, though in vitro binding demonstrated good specificity and preferential binding to the activated form of the NMDA receptors. The use of the glucose analogue [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to study glucose utilization was evaluated in experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). A trauma-induced increased uptake of FDG was seen, whereas the uptake of [1-{sup 14}C]glucose remained unchanged. This discrepancy

  11. Measurement of P-Glycoprotein expression in human neuroblastoma xenografts using in vitro quantitative autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonti, Rosa; Levchenko, Andrey; Mehta, Bipin M.; Zhang Jiaju; Tsuruo, Takashi; Larson, Steven M

    1999-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has a role in multidrug resistance (MDR) encountered in human cancers. In this study, we used the colchicine-resistant cell line BE(2)-C/CHCb(0.2), a strain of neuroblastoma cell line BE(2)-C, as a model to measure variations of P-gp expression in cells grown in vitro and in vivo. Cells were cultured in the medium supplemented with colchicine. At the beginning of the study the drug was withdrawn and, after 22 days, added back to the culture medium. Cells were harvested at various time points and xenografted in nude mice. P-gp content in cells was measured by self-competitive binding assay and in tumors, by quantitative autoradiography (QAR). Both assays were carried out using {sup 125}I-labeled monoclonal antibody MRK16, reactive with P-gp. Concentration of P-gp in cells varied from a maximum of 1,361 pmol/g in the presence of colchicine to a minimum of 374 pmol/g in the absence of colchicine in the culture medium. P-gp concentration in the tumors ranged from 929 to 188 pmol/g, which correlated with P-gp content in the cells at the time of their injection in the mice. QAR is an accurate and reliable method to quantify P-gp expression in tumors. Changes in colchicine concentration in the ambient medium of BE(2)-C/CHCb(0.2) cells growing in vitro resulted in a change in phenotype of P-gp expression, which was stable under conditions of in vivo growth over approximately 9 cell divisions in nude mice xenografts. Therefore, P-gp content in xenografts depends only on the level of resistance of the cells at the time of their injection in the mice.

  12. Atomic force microscopic neutron-induced alpha-autoradiography for boron imaging in detailed cellular histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, K.; Takahashi, H.; Fujita, K.; Nakazawa, M.; Yanagie, H.; Eriguchi, M.; Nakagawa, Y.; Sakurai, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The information on subcellular microdistribution of 10 B compounds a cell is significant to evaluate the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) because the damage brought by the released alpha/lithium particles is highly localized along their path, and radiation sensitivity is quite different among each cell organelles. In neutron-induced alpha-autoradiography (NIAR) technique, 10 B can be measured as tracks for the energetic charged particles from 10 B(n, alpha) 7 Li reactions in solid state track detectors. To perform the NIAR at intracellular structure level for research of 10 B uptake and/or microdosimetry in BNCT, we have developed high-resolution NIAR method with an atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM has been used for analyses of biological specimens such as proteins, DNAs and surface of living cells have, however, intracellular detailed histology of cells has been hardly resolved with AFM since flat surface of sectioned tissue has quite less topographical contrast among each organelle. In our new sample preparation method using UV processing, materials that absorb UV in a semi-thin section are selectively eroded and vaporized by UV exposure, and then fine relief for cellular organelles such as mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, filament structure and so on reveals on flat surface of the section, which can be observed with an AFM. The imaging resolution was comparable to TEM imaging of cells. This new method provides fast and cost-effective observation of histological sections with an AFM. Combining this method with NIAR technique, intracellular boron mapping would be possible. (author)

  13. Laminar pattern of cholinergic and adrenergic receptors in rat visual cortex using quantitative receptor autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schliebs, R.; Walch, C.

    1989-01-01

    The laminar distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, including the M1-receptor subtype, of beta-adrenergic receptors, and noradrenaline uptake sites, was studied in the adult rat visual, frontal, somatosensory and motor cortex, using quantitative receptor autoradiography. In the visual cortex, the highest density of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was found in layer I. From layer II/III to layer V binding decreases continueously reaching a constant binding level in layers V and VI. This laminar pattern of muscarinic receptor density differs somewhat from that observed in the non-visual cortical regions examined: layer II/III contained the highest receptor density followed by layer I and IV: lowest density was found in layer V and VI. The binding profile of the muscarinic cholinergic M1-subtype through the visual cortex shows a peak in cortical layer II and in the upper part of layer VI, whereas in the non-visual cortical regions cited the binding level was high in layer II/III, moderate in layer I and IV, and low in layer VI. Layers I to IV of the visual cortex contained the highest beta-adrenergic receptor densities, whereas only low binding levels were observed in the deeper layers. A similar laminar distribution was found also in the frontal, somatosensory and motor cortex. The density of noradrenaline uptake sites was high in all layers of the cortical regions studied, but with noradrenaline uptake sites somewhat more concentrated in the superficial layers than in deeper ones. The distinct laminar pattern of cholinergic and noradrenergic receptor sites indicates a different role for acetylcholine and noradrenaline in the functional anatomy of the cerebral cortex, and in particular, the visual cortex. (author)

  14. In situ hybridization at the electron microscope level: hybrid detection by autoradiography and colloidal gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, N J; Langer-Safer, P R; Ward, D C; Hamkalo, B A

    1982-11-01

    In situ hybridization has become a standard method for localizing DNA or RNA sequences in cytological preparations. We developed two methods to extend this technique to the transmission electron microscope level using mouse satellite DNA hybridization to whole mount metaphase chromosomes as the test system. The first method devised is a direct extension of standard light microscope level using mouse satellite DNA hybridization to whole mount metaphase chromosomes as the test system. The first method devised is a direct extension of standard light microscope in situ hybridization. Radioactively labeled complementary RNA (cRNA) is hybridized to metaphase chromosomes deposited on electron microscope grids and fixed in 70 percent ethanol vapor; hybridixation site are detected by autoradiography. Specific and intense labeling of chromosomal centromeric regions is observed even after relatively short exposure times. Inerphase nuclei present in some of the metaphase chromosome preparations also show defined paatterms of satellite DNA labeling which suggests that satellite-containing regions are associate with each other during interphase. The sensitivity of this method is estimated to at least as good as that at the light microscope level while the resolution is improved at least threefold. The second method, which circumvents the use of autoradiogrphic detection, uses biotin-labeled polynucleotide probes. After hybridization of these probes, either DNA or RNA, to fixed chromosomes on grids, hybrids are detected via reaction is improved at least threefold. The second method, which circumvents the use of autoradiographic detection, uses biotin-labeled polynucleotide probes. After hybridization of these probes, either DNA or RNA, to fixed chromosomes on grids, hybrids are detected via reaction with an antibody against biotin and secondary antibody adsorbed to the surface of over centromeric heterochromatin and along the associated peripheral fibers. Labeling is on average

  15. Application of positron emission tomography in industrial research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonkers, G.; van den Bergen, E.A.; Vonkeman, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    Positron Emission computed Tomography (PET) is a relatively new imaging technique, exploiting the 511 keV annihilation radiation characteristic of positron emitters. Although exclusively used till now in the field of nuclear medicine, the application of PET for the non-invasive, in-situ visualisation of processes of industrial interest is challenging, because PET can in principle be used to obtain quantitative, 2D/3D images of the flow and distribution of fluids inside process units, whose steel walls may be up to several centimeters thick. With the aid of a NeuroECAT positron tomographer the PET technique has been utilised to image important (model) processes in the petrochemical industry, using physical labelling of the phase to be imaged. First, the displacement of a brine/surfactant phase, labelled with 66 Ga-EDTA, in a piece of reservoir rock was imaged. Secondly, the dehydration of water-in-oil emulsions was monitored dynamically by labelling the water phase with 68 Ga-EDTA. The second study in particular demonstrates that in the presence of noisy data the image reconstruction method utilised strongly influences the results obtained. With the advent of PET in nuclear medicine the availability of short-lived positron emitting nuclides like 11 C (t1/2 = 20 min), 13 N (t1/2 = 10 min) and 15 0 (t1/2 = 2 min) has increased considerably, allowing the investigation of industrially important reactions by chemical labelling. Utilising the NeuroECAT in a special mode, the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide could be imaged in a model tubular reactor by using 11 C-labelled CO, providing information about the kinetics of the individual reaction steps and interactions and about the degree of occupation of catalytically active sites. (author)

  16. Positron emission tomography and migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabriat, H.

    1992-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a brain imaging technique that allows in vivo studies of numerous physiological parameters. There have been few PET studies in migraine patients. Cerebral blood flow changes with no variations in brain oxygen consumption have been reported in patients with prolonged neurologic manifestations during migraine attacks. Parenteral administration of reserpine during migraine headache has been followed by a fall in the overall cerebral uptake of glucose. The small sample sizes and a number of methodologic problems complicate the interpretation of these results. Recent technical advances and the development of new PET tracers can be expected to provide further insight into the pathophysiology of migraine. Today cerebral cortex 5 HT 2 serotonin receptors can be studied in migraine patients with PET

  17. Positron emission tomography basic sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, D W; Valk, P E; Maisey, M N

    2003-01-01

    Essential for students, science and medical graduates who want to understand the basic science of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), this book describes the physics, chemistry, technology and overview of the clinical uses behind the science of PET and the imaging techniques it uses. In recent years, PET has moved from high-end research imaging tool used by the highly specialized to an essential component of clinical evaluation in the clinic, especially in cancer management. Previously being the realm of scientists, this book explains PET instrumentation, radiochemistry, PET data acquisition and image formation, integration of structural and functional images, radiation dosimetry and protection, and applications in dedicated areas such as drug development, oncology, and gene expression imaging. The technologist, the science, engineering or chemistry graduate seeking further detailed information about PET, or the medical advanced trainee wishing to gain insight into the basic science of PET will find this book...

  18. Functional cardiac imaging: positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullani, N.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Dynamic cardiovascular imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease by providing information about the function of the heart. During the past 30 years, cardiovascular imaging has evolved from the simple chest x-ray and fluoroscopy to such sophisticated techniques as invasive cardiac angiography and cinearteriography and, more recently, to noninvasive cardiac CT scanning, nuclear magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography, which reflect more complex physiologic functions. As research tools, CT, NMR, and PET provide quantitative information on global as well as regional ventricular function, coronary artery stenosis, myocardial perfusion, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, or oxygen utilization, with little discomfort or risk to the patient. As imaging modalities become more sophisticated and more oriented toward clinical application, the prospect of routinely obtaining such functional information about the heart is becoming realistic. However, these advances are double-edged in that the interpretation of functional data is more complex than that of the anatomic imaging familiar to most physicians. They will require an enhanced understanding of the physiologic and biochemical processes, as well as of the instrumentation and techniques for analyzing the data. Of the new imaging modalities that provide functional information about the heart, PET is the most useful because it quantitates the regional distribution of radionuclides in vivo. Clinical applications, interpretation of data, and the impact of PET on our understanding of cardiac pathophysiology are discussed. 5 figures

  19. Scintillators for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Like most applications that utilize scintillators for gamma detection, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) desires materials with high light output, short decay time, and excellent stopping power that are also inexpensive, mechanically rugged, and chemically inert. Realizing that this ''ultimate'' scintillator may not exist, this paper evaluates the relative importance of these qualities and describes their impact on the imaging performance of PET. The most important PET scintillator quality is the ability to absorb 511 keV photons in a small volume, which affects the spatial resolution of the camera. The dominant factor is a short attenuation length (≤ 1.5 cm is required), although a high photoelectric fraction is also important (> 30% is desired). The next most important quality is a short decay time, which affects both the dead time and the coincidence timing resolution. Detection rates for single 511 keV photons can be extremely high, so decay times ≤ 500 ns are essential to avoid dead time losses. In addition, positron annihilations are identified by time coincidence so ≤5 ns fwhm coincidence pair timing resolution is required to identify events with narrow coincidence windows, reducing contamination due to accidental coincidences. Current trends in PET cameras are toward septaless, ''fully-3D'' cameras, which have significantly higher count rates than conventional 2-D cameras and so place higher demands on scintillator decay time. Light output affects energy resolution, and thus the ability of the camera to identify and reject events where the initial 511 keV photon has undergone Compton scatter in the patient. The scatter to true event fraction is much higher in fully-3D cameras than in 2-D cameras, so future PET cameras would benefit from scintillators with a 511 keV energy resolution < 10--12% fwhm

  20. Positron emission tomography studies of brain receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziere, B.; Maziere, M.

    1991-01-01

    Probing the regional distribution and affinity of receptors in the brain, in vivo, in human and non human primates has become possible with the use of selective ligands labelled with positron emitting radionuclides and positron emission tomography (PET). After describing the techniques used in positron emission tomography to characterize a ligand receptor binding and discussing the choice of the label and the limitations and complexities of the in vivo approach, the results obtained in the PET studies of various neurotransmission systems: dopaminergic, opiate, benzodiazepine, serotonin and cholinergic systems are reviewed

  1. Prototyping of the ILC Baseline Positron Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronberg, J; Brooksby, C; Piggott, T; Abbott, R; Javedani, J; Cook, E

    2012-02-29

    The ILC positron system uses novel helical undulators to create a powerful photon beam from the main electron beam. This beam is passed through a titanium target to convert it into electron-positron pairs. The target is constructed as a 1 m diameter wheel spinning at 2000 RPM to smear the 1 ms ILC pulse train over 10 cm. A pulsed flux concentrating magnet is used to increase the positron capture efficiency. It is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures to maximize the flatness of the magnetic field over the 1 ms ILC pulse train. We report on prototyping effort on this system.

  2. Multimode vibrational couplings in resonant positron annihilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'A Sanchez, Sergio; Lima, Marco A P; Varella, Márcio T do N

    2011-09-02

    The mechanisms for multimode vibrational couplings in resonant positron annihilation are not well understood. We show that these resonances can arise from positron-induced distortions of the potential energy surface (target response to the positron field). Though these distortions can transfer energy into single- and multiquantum vibrations, they have so far been disregarded as a pathway to resonant annihilation. We also compare the existing annihilation theories and show that the currently accepted model can be cast as a special case of the Feshbach annihilation theory.

  3. Porous silicon investigated by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, R.M. de la; Pareja, R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the anodic conversion in silicon single crystals is investigated by positron lifetime measurements. Anodization at constant current induces changes in the positron lifetime spectrum of monocrystalline silicon samples. It is found that theses changes are primarily dependent on the silicon resistivity. The annihilation parameter behaviour of anodized samples, treated at high temperature under reducing conditions, is also investigated. The results reveal that positron annihilation can be a useful technique to characterize porous silicon formed by anodizing as well as to investigate its thermal behaviour. (author)

  4. Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Positron emission tomography (PET) ... Emission Tomography – Computed Tomography (PET/CT)? What is Positron Emission Tomography – Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Scanning? Positron emission tomography, ...

  5. On the electron-positron cascade in AGN central engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Alex; Keenan, Brett; Medvedev, Mikhail

    2016-03-01

    Processes around spinning supermassive black holes (BH) in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to determine how relativistic jets are launched and how the BH energy is extracted. The key ``ingredient'' is the origin of plasma in BH magnetospheres. In order to explore the process of the electron-positron plasma production, we developed a numerical code which models a one-dimensional (along a magnetic field line) dynamics of the cascade. Our simulations show that plasma production is controlled by the spectrum of the ambient photon field, the B-field strength, the BH spin and mass. Implications of our results to the Galactic Center and AGNs are discussed.

  6. A transmission positron microscope and a scanning positron microscope being built at KEK, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, M.; Inoue, M.; Kogure, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Yagishita, A.; Shidara, T.; Nakahara, K.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshiie, T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the plans of positron microscopes being built at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan improving used electron microscopes. The kinetic energies of positron produced by accelerators or by nuclear decays have not a unique value but show a spread over in a wide range. Positron beam will be guided near electron microscopes, a transmission electron microscope (JEM100S) and a scanning electron microscope (JSM25S). Positrons are slowed down by a tungsten foil, accelerated and focused on a nickel sheet. The monochromatic focused beam will be injected into an electron microscope. The focusing of positrons and electrons is achieved by magnetic system of the electron microscopes. Imaging plates are used to record positron images for the transmission electron microscope. (orig.)

  7. Quantitative autoradiography of ligands for dopamine receptors and transporters in brain of Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minuzzi, Luciano; Olsen, Aage Kristian; Bender, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    the presence of DAT in rat and ferret brain. The distribution volume (Vd) of the selective DAT ligand [11C]NS2214 ([11C]Brasofensine) was mapped in groups of normal and MPTP-lesioned Göttingen miniature pigs. The in vivo pattern of Vd matched the distribution of SERT in vitro, and did not differ between...... the normal pigs and the lesioned animals with documented 60% DA depletions. However, the pattern of specific binding of the selective noradrenaline transporter ligand (S,S)-[11C]MeNER in a single Landrace pig showed that, of the three monoamine transporters, only DAT could not be detected in pig brain. We......The pig has been used as animal model for positron emission tomography (PET) studies of dopamine (DA) receptors and pharmacological perturbations of DA neurotransmission. However, the binding properties of DA receptors and transporters in pig brain have not been characterized in vitro. Therefore...

  8. A radiotracer and autoradiography aided study of chloride diffusion profiles in mortar and cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perego, R.C.; Hollander, W. den; Kolar, Z.I.; Manera, M.

    2002-01-01

    One of the problems affecting the durability of concrete structures is the corrosion of the steel bars due to the penetration of chloride ions. In order to predict the durability of these materials it is helpful to evaluate the diffusion of chloride in such structures. This is normally done by sample destruction followed by chemical analysis of the portions of interest. In this study a radiotracer-based method is applied to follow the chloride transport in mortar and cement paste samples. The use of a radioactive chloride isotope offers the possibility of performing non-destructive measurements of the evolving chloride distribution within the samples locally exposed to aqueous sodium chloride solution (3.5 % NaCl). To this end NaCl labeled with radioactive 36 Cl is used. It is a long-lived radioisotope decaying by emitting β - radiation with a maximal energy of 0.7 MeV. Portland, blast furnace and limestone cements are used to cast prisms that, after curing, are sliced in 2.5 mm thick samples. Each sample is covered with wax to prevent contact with air moisture and with the NaCl solution. From one side of the sample the wax layer is removed and the sample is then put in contact with the 36 Cl-labeled NaCl solution. After a given time the samples are taken out of the solution and, after complete removal of the wax layer, placed on a beta particle sensitive film for the autoradiography. The beta radiation emitted by 36 Cl causes blackening of the film that becomes visible after film development. Darker parts of the image indicate higher 36 Cl, i.e. chloride concentration in the layer adjacent to the sample surface. Densitometry, i.e. measurement of the degree of blackening of the film provides quantitative data on the two-dimensional diffusion profile attained. Image processing and automatic data evaluation may speed up the whole measurement procedure. The present method has a number of advantages if compared with the current methods for chloride analysis, namely (i

  9. Compact Positron Tomograph for Prostate Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huber, Jennifer S

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project is to construct a functioning compact positron tomograph, whose geometry is optimized for detecting prostate tumors with molecular tracers such as 11Ccholine (carbon-11 choline...

  10. Radiopharmaceutical chemistry for positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, PH

    Radiopharmaceutical chemistry includes the selection, preparation, and preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled compounds. This paper describes selection criteria for candidates for positron emission tomography (PET) investigations. Practical aspects of nucleophilic and electrophilic

  11. Compact Positron Tomograph for Prostate Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huber, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project is to construct a functioning compact positron tomograph, whose geometry is optimized for detecting prostate tumors with molecular tracers such as 11Ccholine (carbon-11 choline...

  12. Compact Positron Tomograph for Prostate Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Derenzo, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this project is to construct a functioning compact positron tomography, whose geometry is optimized for detecting prostate tumors with molecular tracers such as 11Ccholine (carbon-11 choline...

  13. New Possibilities of Positron-Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volobuev, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    The reasons for the emergence of the angular distribution of photons generated as a result of annihilation of an electron and a positron in a positron-emission tomograph are investigated. It is shown that the angular distribution of the radiation intensity (i.e., the probability of photon emission at different angles) is a consequence of the Doppler effect in the center-of-mass reference system of the electron and the positron. In the reference frame attached to the electron, the angular distribution of the number of emitted photons does not exists but is replaced by the Doppler shift of the frequency of photons. The results obtained in this study make it possible to extend the potentialities of the positron-emission tomograph in the diagnostics of diseases and to obtain additional mechanical characteristics of human tissues, such as density and viscosity.

  14. Ionization and positron emission in giant quasiatoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soff, G.; Reinhardt, J.; Reus, T. de; Wietschorke, K.H.; Schaefer, A.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.; Mueller, U.; Schlueter, P.

    1985-07-01

    Electron excitation processes in superheavy quasiatoms are treated within a relativistic framework. Theoretical results on K-hole production rates as well as delta-electron and positron spectra are compared with experimental data. It is demonstrated that the study of heavy ion collisions with nuclear time delay promises a signature for the spontaneous positron formation in overcritical systems. Corresponding experimental results are confronted with our theoretical hypothesis. Recent speculations on the origin of the observed peak structures in positron spectra are critically reviewed. Atomic excitations are also employed to obtain information on the course of a nuclear reaction. Using a semiclassical picture we calculate the emission of delta-electrons and positrons in deep-inelastic nuclear reactions. Furthermore some consequences of conversion processes in giant systems are investigated. (orig.)

  15. Polymeric membrane studied using slow positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, W.-S.; Lo, C.-H.; Cheng, M.-L.; Chen Hongmin; Liu Guang; Chakka, Lakshmi; Nanda, D.; Tung, K.-L.; Huang, S.-H.; Lee, Kueir-Rarn; Lai, J.-Y.; Sun Yiming; Yu Changcheng; Zhang Renwu; Jean, Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    A radioisotope slow positron beam has been built at the Chung Yuan Christian University in Taiwan for the research and development in membrane science and technology. Doppler broadening energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime have been measured as a function of positron energy up to 30 keV in a polyamide membrane prepared by the interfacial polymerization between triethylenetetraamine (TETA) and trimesoyl chloride (TMC) on modified porous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) asymmetric membrane. The multilayer structures and free-volume depth profile for this asymmetric membrane system are obtained. Positron annihilation spectroscopy coupled with a slow beam could provide new information about size selectivity of transporting molecules and guidance for molecular designs in polymeric membranes

  16. Characterization of lacunar defects by positrons annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Barthe, M F; Blondiaux, G

    2003-01-01

    Among the nondestructive methods for the study of matter, the positrons annihilation method allows to sound the electronic structure of materials by measuring the annihilation characteristics. These characteristics depend on the electronic density as seen by the positon, and on the electron momentums distribution which annihilate with the positon. The positon is sensible to the coulombian potential variations inside a material and sounds preferentially the regions away from nuclei which represent potential wells. The lacunar-type defects (lack of nuclei) represent deep potential wells which can trap the positon up to temperatures close to the melting. This article describes the principles of this method and its application to the characterization of lacunar defects: 1 - positrons: matter probes (annihilation of electron-positon pairs, annihilation characteristics, positrons sources); 2 - positrons interactions in solids (implantation profiles, annihilation states, diffusion and trapping, positon lifetime spec...

  17. Elastic scattering of slow positrons by helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Cherepkov, N.A.; Chernysheva, L.V.; Shapiro, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    The s-, p-, d- and f-wave phaseshifts for elastic scattering of slow positrons by He are calculated using a simplified version of the random phase approximation with exchange, with virtual positronium formation effect taken into account. (author)

  18. Positron lifetime experiments in indium selenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, R.M. de la; Pareja, R.

    1988-01-01

    Positron lifetime experiments have been performed on as-grown samples which had been isochronally annealed up to 820 K and plastically deformed and these experiments yield a constant lifetime of 282 ± 2 ps which is attributed to bulk positron states in InSe. Electron-irradiated samples exhibit a two-component spectrum, revealing the presence of positron traps which anneal out at about 330 K. The nature of the native shallow donors in InSe is discussed in the light of the results, which support the idea that native donor centres are probably interstitial In atoms rather than Se vacancies. Positron trapping observed in the electron-irradiated samples is attributed to defects related to In vacancies. (author)

  19. Hypoxia positron emission tomography imaging: combining information on perfusion and tracer retention to improve hypoxia specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Morten; Munk, Ole L; Jakobsen, Steen S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Static positron emission tomography (PET) allows mapping of tumor hypoxia, but low resolution and slow tracer retention/clearance results in poor image contrast and the risk of missing areas where hypoxic cells and necrosis are intermixed. Fully dynamic PET may improve accuracy but scan...

  20. Organ hierarchy during low blood flow on-pump: a randomized experimental positron emission tomography study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Sisse Anette; Kjærgaard, Benedict; Frøkiær, Jørgen

    ].The purpose of this animal study is to investigate the organ hierarchy of brain, liver, kidney and muscle at normal and low blood flows by using dynamic positron tomography (PET-CT) during CPB. Methods CPB at different blood flows will be investigated in an experimental model of six 70 kg pigs...

  1. Quantitative imaging of the T cell antitumor response by positron-emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Purnima; Su, Helen; Adonai, Nona; Du, Shouying; Rosato, Antonio; Braun, Jonathan; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Witte, Owen N.

    2003-02-01

    We describe a noninvasive, quantitative, and tomographic method to visualize lymphocytes within the whole animal. We used positron-emission tomography (PET) to follow the localization of adoptively transferred immune T lymphocytes. Splenic T cells from animals that had rejected a Moloney murine sarcoma virus/Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MSV/M-MuLV)-induced tumor were marked with a PET reporter gene, injected into tumor-bearing mice, and imaged in a microPET by using a substrate specific for the reporter. Specific localization of immune T cells to the antigen-positive tumor was detected over time, by sequential imaging of the same animals. Naive T cells did not localize to the tumor site, indicating that preimmunization was required. Autoradiography and immunohistochemistry analysis corroborated the microPET data. The method we have developed can be used to assess the effects of immunomodulatory agents intended to potentiate the immune response to cancer, and can also be useful for the study of other cell-mediated immune responses, including autoimmunity.

  2. Low energy positron scattering from helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, J.P.; Jones, A.; Caradonna, P.; Makochekanwa, C.; Buckman, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    A new experiment has been developed for high resolution studies of positron scattering from atoms and molecules. Based on the Surko trap technology, a pulsed positron beam has been used to obtain preliminary measurements of low energy, differential elastic scattering cross sections from helium. The operation of the beamline is described and preliminary absolute cross section values for scattering energies of 5, 10 and 15 eV are presented and compared with contemporary theoretical calculations

  3. NEPOMUC: Neutron induced positron source Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hugenschmidt

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available NEPOMUC, operated by the Technische Universität München and the Universität der Bundeswehr München, provides a high-intensity low-energy positron beam for applications in solid state and surface physics as well as for fundamental research in nuclear and atomic physics. The intensity amounts to > 109 moderated positrons per second at a beam energy of E = 1 keV.

  4. Clinical utility of positron emission mammography

    OpenAIRE

    Glass, Shannon B.; Shah, Zeeshan A.

    2013-01-01

    Several imaging modalities have been introduced over recent years to better screen for and stage breast cancer. Positron emission mammography (PEM) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and introduced into clinical use as a diagnostic adjunct to mammography and breast ultrasonography. PEM has higher resolution and a more localized field of view than positron emission tomography–computed tomography and can be performed on patients to stage a newly diagnosed malignancy. Revie...

  5. Positron annihilation at grain boundaries in metals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuriplach, J.; Melikhova, O.; Hou, M.; Van Petegem, S.; Zhurkin, E.; Šob, Mojmír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 10 (2007), s. 3461-3464 ISSN 1862-6351. [International Conference on Positron Annihilation /14./. Hamilton, Ontario, 23.07.2006-28.07.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1041302; GA MŠk OC 147 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : positron annihilation * grain boundaries * electronic structure Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  6. Positron astronomy with SPI/INTEGRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenspointner, G.; Diehl, R.; Strong, A.; Weidenspointner, G.; Skinner, G.K.; Skinner, G.K.; Jean, P.; Knoedlseder, J.; Von Ballmoos, P.; Cordier, B.; Schanne, S.; Winkler, C.

    2008-01-01

    We provide an overview of positron astronomy results that have been obtained using the INTEGRAL spectrometer SPI, and discuss their implications for the still mysterious origin of positrons in our Galaxy. It has long been known that the 511 keV positron annihilation emission is strongest from the central region of our Galaxy. Recently, it has been discovered with the SPI spectrometer that the weaker 511 keV line emission from the inner Galactic disk appears to be asymmetric, with the emission to the west of the Galactic center being about twice as strong than that to the east. This distribution of positron annihilation resembles that of low mass X-ray binaries as observed with the INTEGRAL imager IBIS at hard X-ray energies, suggesting that these systems could provide a significant portion of the positrons in our Galaxy. In addition, the spectrometer SPI has permitted unprecedented spectroscopy of annihilation radiation from the bulge and disk regions of the Galaxy, which commences to yield important insights into the conditions of the medium in which the positrons annihilate. (authors)

  7. Boron concentration measurements by alpha spectrometry and quantitative neutron autoradiography in cells and tissues treated with different boronated formulations and administration protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolussi, Silva; Ciani, Laura; Postuma, Ian; Protti, Nicoletta; Luca Reversi; Bruschi, Piero; Ferrari, Cinzia; Cansolino, Laura; Panza, Luigi; Ristori, Sandra; Altieri, Saverio

    2014-06-01

    The possibility to measure boron concentration with high precision in tissues that will be irradiated represents a fundamental step for a safe and effective BNCT treatment. In Pavia, two techniques have been used for this purpose, a quantitative method based on charged particles spectrometry and a boron biodistribution imaging based on neutron autoradiography. A quantitative method to determine boron concentration by neutron autoradiography has been recently set-up and calibrated for the measurement of biological samples, both solid and liquid, in the frame of the feasibility study of BNCT. This technique was calibrated and the obtained results were cross checked with those of α spectrometry, in order to validate them. The comparisons were performed using tissues taken form animals treated with different boron administration protocols. Subsequently the quantitative neutron autoradiography was employed to measure osteosarcoma cell samples treated with BPA and with new boronated formulations. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Generation of a high-brightness pulsed positron beam for the Munich scanning positron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piochacz, Christian

    2009-11-20

    Within the present work the prerequisites for the operation of the Munich scanning positron microscope (SPM) at the high intense neutron induced positron source Munich (NEPOMUC) were established. This was accomplished in two steps: Firstly, a re-moderation device was installed at the positron beam facility NEPOMUC, which enhances the brightness of the positron beam for all connected experiments. The second step was the design, set up and initial operation of the SPM interface for the high efficient conversion of the continuous beam into a bunched beam. The in-pile positron source NEPOMUC creates a positron beam with a diameter of typically 7 mm, a kinetic energy of 1 keV and an energy spread of 50 eV. The NEPOMUC re-moderator generates from this beam a low energy positron beam (20 - 200 eV) with a diameter of less than 2 mm and an energy spread well below 2.5 eV. This was achieved with an excellent total efficiency of 6.55{+-}0.25 %. The re-moderator was not only the rst step to implement the SPM at NEPOMUc, it enables also the operation of the pulsed low energy positron beam system (PLEPS). Within the present work, at this spectrometer rst positron lifetime measurements were performed, which revealed the defect types of an ion irradiated uranium molybdenum alloy. Moreover, the instruments which were already connected to the positron beam facility bene ts considerably of the high brightness enhancement. In the new SPM interface an additional re-moderation stage enhances the brightness of the beam even more and will enable positron lifetime measurements at the SPM with a lateral resolution below 1 {mu}m. The efficiency of the re-moderation process in this second stage was 24.5{+-}4.5 %. In order to convert high efficiently the continuous positron beam into a pulsed beam with a repetition rate of 50 MHz and a pulse duration of less than 50 ps, a sub-harmonic pre-bucher was combined with two sine wave bunchers. Furthermore, the additional re-moderation stage of the

  9. Generation of a high-brightness pulsed positron beam for the Munich scanning positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piochacz, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Within the present work the prerequisites for the operation of the Munich scanning positron microscope (SPM) at the high intense neutron induced positron source Munich (NEPOMUC) were established. This was accomplished in two steps: Firstly, a re-moderation device was installed at the positron beam facility NEPOMUC, which enhances the brightness of the positron beam for all connected experiments. The second step was the design, set up and initial operation of the SPM interface for the high efficient conversion of the continuous beam into a bunched beam. The in-pile positron source NEPOMUC creates a positron beam with a diameter of typically 7 mm, a kinetic energy of 1 keV and an energy spread of 50 eV. The NEPOMUC re-moderator generates from this beam a low energy positron beam (20 - 200 eV) with a diameter of less than 2 mm and an energy spread well below 2.5 eV. This was achieved with an excellent total efficiency of 6.55±0.25 %. The re-moderator was not only the rst step to implement the SPM at NEPOMUc, it enables also the operation of the pulsed low energy positron beam system (PLEPS). Within the present work, at this spectrometer rst positron lifetime measurements were performed, which revealed the defect types of an ion irradiated uranium molybdenum alloy. Moreover, the instruments which were already connected to the positron beam facility bene ts considerably of the high brightness enhancement. In the new SPM interface an additional re-moderation stage enhances the brightness of the beam even more and will enable positron lifetime measurements at the SPM with a lateral resolution below 1 μm. The efficiency of the re-moderation process in this second stage was 24.5±4.5 %. In order to convert high efficiently the continuous positron beam into a pulsed beam with a repetition rate of 50 MHz and a pulse duration of less than 50 ps, a sub-harmonic pre-bucher was combined with two sine wave bunchers. Furthermore, the additional re-moderation stage of the SPM

  10. Autoradiography of [14C]paraquat or [14C]diquat in frogs and mice: accumulation in neuromelanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindquist, N.G.; Larsson, B.S.; Lyden-Sokolowski, A.

    1988-01-01

    The herbicide paraquat has been suggested as a causative agent for Parkinson's disease because of its structural similarity to a metabolite of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which may induce a parkinsonism-like condition. MPTP as well as its metabolite 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine have melanin affinity, and the parkinsonism-inducing potency of MPTP is much stronger in species with melanin in the nerve cells. Autoradiography of [ 3 H]MPTP in experimental animals has shown accumulation in melanin-containing tissues, including pigmented neurons. In the present whole body autoradiographic study accumulation and retention was seen in neuromelanin in frogs after i.p. injection of [ 14 C]paraquat or[ 14 C]diquat. By means of whole body autoradiography of [ 14 C]diquat in mice (a species with no or very limited amounts of neuromelanin) a low, relatively uniformly distributed level of radioactivity was observed in brain tissue. Accumulation of toxic chemical compounds, such as paraquat, in neuromelanin may ultimately cause lesions in the pigmented nerve cells, leading to Parkinson's disease

  11. Hippocampal development in the rat: cytogenesis and morphogenesis examined with autoradiography and low-level x-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, S.A.; Altman, J.

    1974-01-01

    The cytogenesis and morphogenesis of the rat hippocampus was examined with the techniques of 3 H-thymidine autoradiography, cell pyknosis produced by low-level x-irradiation, and quantitative histology. The procedure of progressively delayed cumulative labelling was used for autoradiography. Groups of rats were injected with four successive daily doses of 3 H-thymidine during non-overlapping periods ranging from birth to day 19. They were killed at 60 days of age, and the percentage of labelled cells was determined. Cell pyknosis in Ammon's horn reaches a maximal level prenatally and declines rapidly during the early postnatal period. Cell pyknosis in the dentate gyrus reaches its highest level during the second postnatal week and declines gradually with some radiosensitive cells still present in the adult. Immature granule cells are also at their highest level during the second postnatal week, while mature granule cells gradually accumulate to attain asymptotic levels at around two months of age. The alignment of the pyramidal cells to form the characteristic curvature of Ammon's horn occurs shortly after pyramidal cell cytogenesis is completed. Mechanisms for the morphological development of the dentate gyrus along with a consideration of the possible migratory route of granule cell precursors are discussed. (U.S.)

  12. Positron emission tomography of hepatic first-pass metabolism of ammonia in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, S; Munk, O L; Roelsgaard, K

    2001-01-01

    Hepatic first-pass metabolism plays a key role in metabolic regulation and drug metabolism. Metabolic processes can be quantified in vivo by positron emission tomography scanning (PET). We wished to develop a PET technique to measure hepatic first-pass metabolism of ammonia. Seven anaesthetised...... pigs were given positron-labelled ammonia, (13)NH(3), into the portal vein and into the vena cava as successive 2-min infusions followed by 22-min dynamic liver scanning. Vena cava infusion data were used to account for recirculation of tracer and metabolites following the portal vein infusion...

  13. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism during sevoflurane anaesthesia in healthy subjects studied with positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlünzen, L; Juul, N; Hansen, K V

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The precise mechanism by which sevoflurane exerts its effects in the human brain remains unknown. In the present study, we quantified the effects of sevoflurane on regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rGMR) in the human brain measured with positron emission tomography. METHODS: Eight...... volunteers underwent two dynamic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) scans. One scan assessed conscious-baseline metabolism and the other scan assessed metabolism during 1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) sevoflurane anaesthesia. Cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were...... areas by 48-71% of the baseline (Pmetabolic reduction of GMR in all regions...

  14. Positron emission tomography in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, R.; Bentourkia, M.; Benard, F.

    2002-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography is a sophisticated molecular imaging technique, using a special scanner, that displays the functional status of tissues in the body at the cellular level (their metabolism). It is a diagnostic scan that provides the physician with information not available with traditional anatomic studies such as CT or MRI. PET can detect changes in cell function (disease) long before they are evident as physical (anatomic) changes seen on CT or MRI. In this way PET can add important information about many diseases allowing the physician to make a diagnosis often much earlier than with anatomic imaging techniques such as CT or MRI alone. In addition, in cases where an abnormality is noted on CT or MRI, PET can help differentiate benign changes from changes due to disease. PET scanning also typically images the entire body, unlike CT/MRI which is usually broken up into specific limited body section scans. All cells use glucose as an energy source but cancer cells use much more since they are growing much faster and out of control. This is the basis of imaging with F-18 FDG glucose, the radiotracer agent use in a PET oncology study. The abnormal, accelerated glucose used by cancer cells is detected by the PET scanner that processes the emissions from the F-18 FDG glucose by abnormally high levels of metabolism (tumor)

  15. Positron in nuclear medicine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, S.

    2012-01-01

    The last two decades have witnessed a rapid expansion of clinical indications of positron emission tomography (PET) based imaging in assessing a wide range of disorders influencing their clinical management. This is primarily based upon a large dataset of evidence that has been generated over the years. The impact has been most remarkable in the field of cancer, where it takes a pivotal role in the decision making (at initial diagnosis, early response assessment and following completion of therapeutic intervention) of a number of important malignancies. The concept of PET based personalized cancer medicine is an evolving and attractive proposition that has gained significant momentum in recent years. The non-oncological applications of PET and PET/CT are in (A) Cardiovascular Diseases (e.g. Myocardial Viability, Flow reserve with PET Perfusion Imaging and atherosclerosis imaging); (B) Neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g. Dementia, Epileptic Focus detection, Parkinson's Disease, Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders and Psychiatric diseases); (C) Infection and Inflammatory Disorders (e.g. Pyrexia of Unknown origin, complicated Diabetic Foot, Periprosthetic Infection, Tuberculosis, Sarcoidosis, Vasculitic disorders etc). Apart from these, there are certain novel clinical applications where it is undergoing critical evaluation in various large and small scale studies across several centres across the world. The modality represents a classical example of a successful translational research of recent times with a revolutionary and far-reaching impact in the field of medicine. (author)

  16. Positron emission tomography in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi; Goto, Ikuo

    1989-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed with the 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose method on 29 patients with epilepsy (generalized epilepsy, 4; partial epilepsy, 24; undetermined type, 1). The subjects were restricted to patients with epilepsy without focal abnormality on X-CT. All the patients with generalized epilepsy showed a normal pattern on PET. Fourteen out of the 24 patients with partial epilepsy and the 1 with epilepsy of undermined type showed focal hypometabolism on PET. The hypometabolic zone was localized in areas including the temporal cortex in 11 patients, frontal in 2 and thalamus in 1. The location of hypometabolic zone and that of interictal paroxysmal activity on EEG were well correlated in most patients. The patients with poorly-controlled seizure showed a higher incidence of PET abnormality (12 out of 13) than those with well-controlled seizures (2 out of 11). The incidence of abnormality on PET and MRI and the location of both abnormality were not necessarily coincident. These results indicated that the PET examination in epilepsy provides valuable information about the location of epileptic focus, and that the findings on PET in patients with partial epilepsy may be one of the good indicators about the intractability of partial epilepsy, and that PET and MRI provide complementary information in the diagnosis of epilepsy. (author)

  17. Solvated Positron Chemistry. Competitive Positron Reactions with Halide Ions in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Palle; Pedersen, Niels Jørgen; Andersen, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown by means of the angular correlation technique that the binding of positrons to halides is strongly influenced by solvation effects. For aqueous solutions we find increasing values for the binding energies between the halide and the positron with increasing mass of the halide...

  18. Cerebral metabolic data obtained by positron emission tomography in physiological aging. A review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellat, J.; Hommel, M.

    1987-01-01

    Following a summary of the general principles and limitations of metabolic measurements by positron emission tomography and of the different indices used to interpret the data, the authors review the results of published studies on physiological aging. Globally, with strict inclusion criteria absolute metabolic values at rest and under partial sensorial deprivation are little or not modified by age. In contrast, functional interactions between regions, as deduced from metabolic intercorrelations, are perhaps different in elderly people. In any case, positron emission tomography seems to discriminate between normal aging and different patterns of pathological aging. Technical improvements, more refined neuropsychological correlations and the use of dynamic activation paradigms will no doubt provide, in the future, a better definition of normal and pathological aging as positron tomography [fr

  19. Positron lifetimes and microhardness in thermal fatigued 4Cr5MoSiV steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, C.Q.; Xia, Z.C.; Li, X.Z.; Yao, B.T.

    2000-01-01

    Positron lifetimes and microhardness have been measured as a function of the thermal fatigue cycle number (N) in 4Cr5MoSiV steel. It is found that with increasing N: (a) the positron lifetime parameters τ 1 , τ 2 , I 1 , I 2 and τ and the microhardness parameter MH all exhibit quasi-periodic up-and-down variation; (b) these parameters have the same period of variation; and (c) the period of up-and-down variation becomes gradually longer. The variation of MH reveals that fatigue hardening and fatigue softening occur alternately in the process of thermal fatigue. The variations of positron lifetime parameters reveal variations of defects in the fatigued materials. These variations are attributed to microdeformation and dynamic recovery dominating alternately in the process of thermal fatigue. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Australia

  20. Autoradiography study and SPECT imaging of reporter gene HSV1-tk expression in heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Xiaoli [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China)], E-mail: LXL730724@hotmail.com; Liu Ying; He Yong; Wu Tao; Zhang Binqing; Gao Zairong; An Rui [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China); Zhang Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China)], E-mail: zhyx1229@163.com

    2010-04-15

    Aim: To demonstrate the feasibility and optimal conditions of imaging herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene transferred into hearts with {sup 131}I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ({sup 131}I-FIAU) using autoradiography (ARG) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in animal models. Methods: HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (Ad5-tk) and adenovirus (Ad5-null) was prepared. Rats or rabbits were divided into a study group receiving intramyocardial injection of Ad5-tk, and a control group receiving Ad-null injection. In the study group of rats, two sets of experiments, time-course study and dose-dependence study, were performed. In time-course experiments, rats were injected with {sup 131}I-FIAU on Days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7, after transfection of 1x10{sup 8} pfu Ad5-tk, to study the feasibility and suitable time course for reporter gene imaging. In dose-dependence study, various titers of Ad5-tk (5x10{sup 8}, 1x10{sup 8}, 5x10{sup 7} and 1x10{sup 7} pfu) were used to determine the threshold and optimal viral titer needed for detection of gene expression. The gamma counts of hearts were measured. The rat myocardium was analyzed by ARG and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SPECT whole-body planar imaging and cardiac tomographic imaging were performed in the rabbit models. Results: From the ARG images, rats injected with Ad5-tk showed significant {sup 131}I-FIAU activity in the anterolateral wall compared with background signals seen in the control Ad5-null rats. In time-course study, the highest radioactivity in the focal myocardium could be seen on Day 1, and then progressively declined with time. In dose-dependence study, the level of {sup 131}I-FIAU accumulation in the transfected myocardium declined with the decrease of Ad viral titers. From the ARG analysis and gamma counting, the threshold viral titer was 5x10{sup 7} pfu, and the optimal Ad titer was 1x10{sup 8} pfu

  1. Validating novel tau positron emission tomography tracer [F-18]-AV-1451 (T807) on postmortem brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquié, Marta; Normandin, Marc D; Vanderburg, Charles R; Costantino, Isabel M; Bien, Elizabeth A; Rycyna, Lisa G; Klunk, William E; Mathis, Chester A; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Debnath, Manik L; Vasdev, Neil; Dickerson, Bradford C; Gomperts, Stephen N; Growdon, John H; Johnson, Keith A; Frosch, Matthew P; Hyman, Bradley T; Gómez-Isla, Teresa

    2015-11-01

    To examine region- and substrate-specific autoradiographic and in vitro binding patterns of positron emission tomography tracer [F-18]-AV-1451 (previously known as T807), tailored to allow in vivo detection of paired helical filament-tau-containing lesions, and to determine whether there is off-target binding to other amyloid/non-amyloid proteins. We applied [F-18]-AV-1451 phosphor screen autoradiography, [F-18]-AV-1451 nuclear emulsion autoradiography, and [H-3]-AV-1451 in vitro binding assays to the study of postmortem samples from patients with a definite pathological diagnosis of Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration-tau, frontotemporal lobar degeneration-transactive response DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43), progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, cerebral amyloid angiopathy and elderly controls free of pathology. Our data suggest that [F-18]-AV-1451 strongly binds to tau lesions primarily made of paired helical filaments in Alzheimer brains (eg, intraneuronal and extraneuronal tangles and dystrophic neurites), but does not seem to bind to a significant extent to neuronal and glial inclusions mainly composed of straight tau filaments in non-Alzheimer tauopathy brains or to lesions containing β-amyloid, α-synuclein, or TDP-43. [F-18]-AV-1451 off-target binding to neuromelanin- and melanin-containing cells and, to a lesser extent, to brain hemorrhagic lesions was identified. Our data suggest that [F-18]-AV-1451 holds promise as a surrogate marker for the detection of brain tau pathology in the form of tangles and paired helical filament-tau-containing neurites in Alzheimer brains but also point to its relatively lower affinity for lesions primarily made of straight tau filaments in non-Alzheimer tauopathy cases and to the existence of some [F-18]-AV-1451 off-target binding. These findings provide important insights for interpreting in vivo patterns of [F-18]-AV-1451 retention

  2. Validation of 3'-deoxy-3'-fluorine-18-fluorothymidine positron emission tomography for image-guidance in biologically adaptive radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axente, Marian

    Accelerated tumor cell repopulation during radiation therapy is one of the leading causes for low survival rates of head-and-neck cancer patients. The therapeutic effectiveness of radiotherapy could be improved by selectively targeting proliferating tumor subvolumes with higher doses of radiation. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 3'-deoxy-3 '-18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) has shown great potential as a non-invasive approach to characterizing the proliferation status of tumors. This thesis focuses on histopathological validation of FLT PET imaging specifically for image-guidance applications in biologically adaptive radiotherapy. The lack of experimental data supporting the use of FLT PET imaging for radiotherapy guidance is addressed by developing a novel methodology for histopathological validation of PET imaging. Using this new approach, the spatial concordance between the intratumoral pattern of FLT uptake and the spatial distribution of cell proliferation is demonstrated in animal tumors. First, a two-dimensional analysis is conducted comparing the microscopic FLT uptake as imaged with autoradiography and the distribution of active cell proliferation markers imaged with immunofluorescent microscopy. It was observed that when tumors present a pattern of cell proliferation that is highly dispersed throughout the tumor, even high-resolution imaging modalities such as autoradiography could not accurately determine the extent and spatial distribution of proliferative tumor subvolumes. While microscopic spatial coincidence between high FLT uptake regions and actively proliferative subvolumes was demonstrated in tumors with highly compartmentalized/aggregated features of cell proliferation, there were no conclusive results across the entire set of utilized tumor specimens. This emphasized the need for addressing the limited resolution of FLT PET when imaging microscopic patterns of cell proliferation. This issue was emphasized in the second part of the

  3. Positron sources for electron-positron colliders application to the ILC and CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    The increased demanding qualities for positron sources dedicated to e+e- colliders pushed on investigations oriented on new kinds of e+ sources. The different kinds of positron sources polarized and no polarized are considered. Their main features (intensity, emittance) are described and analysed. Comparison between the different sources is worked out. The characteristics of the positron beam available in the collision point are greatly depending on the capture device and on the positron accelerator. Different kinds of capture systems are considered and their qualities, compared. Intense positron sources which are necessary for the colliders require intense incident beams (electrons or photons). The large number of pairs created in the targets leads to important energy deposition and so, thermal heating, which associated to temperature gradients provoke mechanical stresses often destructive. Moreover, the important Coulomb collisions, can affect the atomic structure in crystal targets and the radiation resist...

  4. On the modulation of ionic velocity in electron–positron–ion plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.K. El-Shewy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ion-acoustic structures in electron–positron–ion (e-p-i plasma are examined by algebraic analysis of model equations. The dynamic of solitary waves are studied through direct approach. The system energy is obtained in terms of velocity of ions. It is founded that, ion-acoustic solitary waves existence are sensitive to densities and temperatures ratio of electrons and positrons. A small but finite amplitude approximation for soliton and shock waves are studied. The effect of positron parameters on solitonic wave and shocks are also inspected. Keywords: Field equations, Sagdeev potential, Electron–positron–ion plasma, Solitons, Nonlinear waves, Shock waves

  5. Clinical application of positron CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Tsuneo; Yamaura, Akira; Shishido, Fumio; Tateno, Yukio.

    1981-01-01

    A newley designed positron CT has been applied for neurosurgical patients. The radiopharmaceuticals administered are 13 N-ammonia, 11 C-CO, and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose, which are produced and synthesized in the institute using the cyclotron. 13 N-ammonia and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose are administered by intravenous injection but 11 C-CO is administered by inhaling. 13 N-ammonia acts as a diffusible tracer and is readily metabolized to glutamine in the brain tissue, but the extraction fraction of the glutamine is so slow that the 13 N-ammonia imaging reflects the distribution of the crebral perfusion. 11 C-CO is combined with the hemoglobin and undiffusible in behavior. This makes the 11 C-CO images conduct the cerebral blood pooling distribution. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose is an analogous substance of glucose and is transported within the brain tissue competitively. Then, fluorodeoxyglucose is metabolized to fluorodeoxyglucose-6-phosphate but no further. This characteristic property of fluorodeoxyglucose let 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose images convey the local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose. In normal volunteer subjects, the distribution of 13 N-ammonia and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose appeared in a similar fashion, and was in accordance with the brain tissue. Both tracers were accumulated in particularly high concentrations in the gray matter and the basal ganglia. 11 C-CO activity was prominently accumulated in various dural sinuses and the vascular areas. In stroke patients, old lesions showed a lack of perfusion but fresh lesions showed hyperperfusion surrounded by a decreased perfused area. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose activity was decreased in the lesion in spite of the hyperperfusion. (J.P.N.)

  6. Positron research in neuropsychiatric disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namura, Ikuro; Inoue, Osamu; Yamasaki, Toshiro.

    1984-01-01

    The principal findings revealed by our 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ( 18 FDG) and 15 O-oxygen study were reviewed in the former part of this paper. (1) The effect of surgical severing of fiber connections on the terminal gray matter was clearly demonstrated in the following examples. A patient with the injured left optic radiation showed a markedly decreased 18 FDG uptake in the ipsilateral primary visual cortex. The extent of the decrease was larger in the secondary visual cortex (--60%). The patient with bilateral frontal leukotomy (lobotomy) showed about 30% decrease of oxygen accumulation not only in the frontal cortex but in the anterior half of the temporal cortex. (2) The effect of electrical stimulation of the left median nerve can be detected as an increased 18 FDG accumulation in the corresponding sensory and motor areas in the right precentral and postcentral cortices. The slight to moderate increase in the right striatal region was though to be related to the muscle movement caused by the stimulation. (3) The neuro-degenerative disorders such as Huntington's chorea and Parkinsonism could be diagnosed by demonstrating the decrease of 18 FDG in the degenerating focus or the increase in the secondarily affected area. An example was provided by a case of Huntington's chorea patient who showed a markedly decreased 18 FDG uptake in the striatal region in spite that 13 N-ammonia visualized this area. (4) Dementia gives another field where the 18 FDG and 15 O 2 studies are demonstrated to be quite useful. (5) The 18 FDG studies on the intrinsic psychoses are also reviewed. But consistent results seemed to be very difficult in this area by using labeled sugars and oxygens which are nonspecific gray matter imagers. Therefore, new tracers and new techniques in positron emission tomography are briefly described in the latter part of this paper. (author)

  7. Energy-resolved positron annihilation for molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, L.D.; Gilbert, S.J.; Surko, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study designed to address the long-standing question regarding the origin of very large positron annihilation rates observed for many molecules. We report a study of the annihilation, resolved as a function of positron energy (ΔE∼25 meV, full width at half maximum) for positron energies from 50 meV to several eV. Annihilation measurements are presented for a range of hydrocarbon molecules, including a detailed study of alkanes, C n H 2n+2 , for n=1-9 and 12. Data for other molecules are also presented: C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 4 ; CD 4 ; isopentane; partially fluorinated and fluorinated methane (CH x F 4-x ); 1-fluorohexane (C 6 H 13 F) and 1-fluorononane (C 9 H 19 F). A key feature of the results is very large enhancements in the annihilation rates at positron energies corresponding to the excitation of molecular vibrations in larger alkane molecules. These enhancements are believed to be responsible for the large annihilation rates observed for Maxwellian distributions of positrons in molecular gases. In alkane molecules larger than ethane (C 2 H 6 ), the position of these peaks is shifted downward by an amount ∼20 meV per carbon. The results presented here are generally consistent with a physical picture recently considered in detail by Gribakin [Phys. Rev. A 61, 022720 (2000)]. In this model, the incoming positron excites a vibrational Feshbach resonance and is temporarily trapped on the molecule, greatly enhancing the probability of annihilation. The applicability of this model and the resulting enhancement in annihilation rate relies on the existence of positron-molecule bound states. In accord with this reasoning, the experimental results presented here provide the most direct evidence to date that positrons bind to neutral molecules. The shift in the position of the resonances is interpreted as a measure of the binding energy of the positron to the molecule. Other features of the results are also discussed, including large

  8. On LCAO positron wavefunctions in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obermayr, W; Sznajder, M

    2006-01-01

    In this work we deal with the construction of delocalized positron wavefunctions in crystalline solids within the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) scheme. The present method leads to an accurate wavefunction of a positron, both in the core and in the interstitial region of a crystal. Furthermore, its representation by a superposition of atomic orbitals is simple enough for the application to calculations of expectation values, like e.g. of accurate electron-positron annihilation rates (high momentum components). The representation of the positron wavefunction can be optimized with respect to the two points of view: firstly, the number of orbitals in the LCAO representation can be minimized (e.g. within the localized spherical orbitals (LSO) method) or, secondly, the orbitals can be chosen to be well-localized around their atoms and vanishing near all others: this leads to the computational advantage, that three- or multicenter integrals arising during numerical calculations can be replaced by oneand two-center integrals which are treated using standard numerical techniques in spherical polar or elliptic coordinates. The transformation from the first into the second representation can be performed via a 'fuzzy' cellular partitioning of the crystal volume via an analytically continuous shape-function. Finally we demonstrate our method in the case of a positron in lithium

  9. Astrocytosis precedes amyloid plaque deposition in Alzheimer APPswe transgenic mouse brain: a correlative positron emission tomography and in vitro imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Ni, Ruiqing; Gulyás, Balázs; Tóth, Miklós; Häggkvist, Jenny; Halldin, Christer; Voytenko, Larysa; Marutle, Amelia; Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-06-01

    Pathological studies suggest that neuroinflammation is exacerbated by increased beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels in the brain early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The time course and relationships between astrocytosis and Aβ deposition were examined using multitracer in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in an AD transgenic mouse model, followed by postmortem autoradiography and immunohistochemistry analysis. PET imaging with the amyloid plaque tracer (11)C-AZD2184 and the astroglial tracer (11)C-deuterium-L-deprenyl ((11)C-DED) was carried out in APPswe mice aged 6, 8-15 and 18-24 months (4-6 animals/group) and in wild-type (wt) mice aged 8-15 and 18-24 months (3-6 animals/group). Tracer uptake was quantified by region of interest analysis using PMOD software and a 3-D digital mouse brain atlas. Postmortem brain tissues from the same APPswe and wt mice in all age groups were analysed for Aβ deposition and astrocytosis by in vitro autoradiography using (3)H-AZD2184, (3)H-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and (3)H-L-deprenyl and immunostaining performed with antibodies for Aβ42 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in sagittal brain sections. (11)C-AZD2184 PET retention in the cerebral cortices of APPswe mice was significantly higher at 18-24 months than in age-matched wt mice. Cortical and hippocampal (11)C-DED PET binding was significantly higher at 6 months than at 8-15 months or 18-24 months in APPswe mice, and it was also higher than at 8-15 months in wt mice. In vitro autoradiography (3)H-AZD2184 and (3)H-PIB binding confirmed the in vivo findings with (11)C-AZD2184 and demonstrated age-dependent increases in Aβ deposition in APPswe cortex and hippocampus. There were no significant differences between APPswe and wt mice in (3)H-L-deprenyl autoradiography binding across age groups. Immunohistochemical quantification demonstrated more Aβ42 deposits in the cortex and hippocampus and more GFAP(+) reactive astrocytes in the hippocampus at 18-24 months than

  10. Astrocytosis precedes amyloid plaque deposition in Alzheimer APPswe transgenic mouse brain: a correlative positron emission tomography and in vitro imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Ni, Ruiqing; Voytenko, Larysa; Marutle, Amelia [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Centre for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Gulyas, Balazs; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Nanyang Technological University, NTU - Imperial College, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Singapore (Singapore); Toth, Miklos; Haeggkvist, Jenny [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Centre for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-04-17

    Pathological studies suggest that neuroinflammation is exacerbated by increased beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels in the brain early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The time course and relationships between astrocytosis and Aβ deposition were examined using multitracer in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in an AD transgenic mouse model, followed by postmortem autoradiography and immunohistochemistry analysis. PET imaging with the amyloid plaque tracer {sup 11}C-AZD2184 and the astroglial tracer {sup 11}C-deuterium-L-deprenyl ({sup 11}C-DED) was carried out in APPswe mice aged 6, 8-15 and 18-24 months (4-6 animals/group) and in wild-type (wt) mice aged 8-15 and 18-24 months (3-6 animals/group). Tracer uptake was quantified by region of interest analysis using PMOD software and a 3-D digital mouse brain atlas. Postmortem brain tissues from the same APPswe and wt mice in all age groups were analysed for Aβ deposition and astrocytosis by in vitro autoradiography using {sup 3}H-AZD2184, {sup 3}H-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and {sup 3}H-L-deprenyl and immunostaining performed with antibodies for Aβ{sub 42} and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in sagittal brain sections. {sup 11}C-AZD2184 PET retention in the cerebral cortices of APPswe mice was significantly higher at 18-24 months than in age-matched wt mice. Cortical and hippocampal {sup 11}C-DED PET binding was significantly higher at 6 months than at 8-15 months or 18-24 months in APPswe mice, and it was also higher than at 8-15 months in wt mice. In vitro autoradiography {sup 3}H-AZD2184 and {sup 3}H-PIB binding confirmed the in vivo findings with {sup 11}C-AZD2184 and demonstrated age-dependent increases in Aβ deposition in APPswe cortex and hippocampus. There were no significant differences between APPswe and wt mice in {sup 3}H-L-deprenyl autoradiography binding across age groups. Immunohistochemical quantification demonstrated more Aβ{sub 42} deposits in the cortex and hippocampus and more

  11. Modification in the assembly technique of histological sections for analysis of spatial distribution of boron by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portu, A; Carpano, M; Dagrosa, A; Pozzi, E; Thorp, S; Curotto, P; Cabrini, R L; Saint Martin, G

    2012-01-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a modality for the treatment of cancer, based on the capture reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li. The emitted particles are highly transferred linear of energy and have a short range in tissue (10 μ). Therefore, if the boron is selectively accumulates in tumor cellulo, the damage will be limited to preserving normal cellulo. Thus, the knowledge of the location of 10 B in the different structures of biological tissues as tumor and surrounding tissue, is essential when considering BNCT treatment (Barth et al., 2005). Neutron autoradiography is one of the few methods that allow studying the distribution spatial of elements emitters in a material containing such. As part of BNCT, the first step in performing autoradiography involves placing a freeze tissue section on a nuclear track detector (SSNTD) (Wittig et al., 2008). For this purpose, tissue samples are fixed in N 2 (liq) when they are resected after infusion boronated compound. The sample-detector arrangement is irradiated with thermal neutrons and elements cast in the capture reaction zones produce latent damage SSNTD. Chemically attacking the detector, this latent trace level can be amplified by optical microscopy. Thus, the distribution of 10 B in biological samples can be evaluated, so that this technique is suitable for studying the uptake of boron compounds for the different histological structures. In our laboratory, we have developed neutron autoradiography and has been applied to the study of different biological models (Portu et al., 2011a). In particular, the study conducted by the micro-distribution 10 B in tumors from nude mice model of cutaneous melanomas injected with boronophenylalanine (BPA) (Carpano et al, 2010;. Portu et al, 2011b.). Still using means of support for the sample to be cut, as OCTTM, the lack of structure of necrotic areas of tumors such causes tearing of these regions in the cutting process, which prevents achieving adequate for analysis sections

  12. 64Cu-ATSM and 18FDG PET uptake and 64Cu-ATSM autoradiography in spontaneous canine tumors: comparison with pimonidazole hypoxia immunohistochemistry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, A.E.; Kristensen, A.T.; Jorgensen, J.T.; McEvoy, F.J.; Busk, M.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Bussink, J.; Engelholm, S.A.; Kjaer, A.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare 64Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylsemicarbazone) (64Cu-ATSM) and 18FDG PET uptake characteristics and 64Cu-ATSM autoradiography to pimonidazole immunohistochemistry in spontaneous canine sarcomas and carcinomas. METHODS: Biopsies were collected

  13. (64)Cu-ATSM and (18)FDG PET uptake and (64)Cu-ATSM autoradiography in spontaneous canine tumors: comparison with pimonidazole hypoxia immunohistochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, A.E.; Kristensen, A.T.; Jorgensen, J.T.; McEvoy, F.J.; Busk, M.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Bussink, J.; Engelholm, S.A.; Kjaer, A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylsemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) and (18)FDG PET uptake characteristics and (64)Cu-ATSM autoradiography to pimonidazole immunohistochemistry in spontaneous canine sarcomas and carcinomas. METHODS: Biopsies were collected

  14. Positron beam production with a deuteron accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Cassidy, D B; Shefer, R E; Klinkowstein, R; Hughey, B J

    2002-01-01

    A graphite target was bombarded with 1.5 MeV deuterons, producing the isotope sup 1 sup 3 N, which is a positron emitter. Using the activated material a slow positron beam with an intensity of 0.7 (0.14)x10 sup 5 s sup - sup 1 was produced. A (saturated) sup 1 sup 3 N yield of 63 (11) MBq/mu A was observed, with 1.5 MeV deuterons, which is consistent with previous calculations and experiments. Our results show that, with the method we outline, positron beams with an average intensity of up to 1x10 sup 8 s sup - sup 1 may be produced.

  15. Positron Annihilation in the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbrecht, Jason

    2017-04-01

    While there are a variety of undergraduate laboratory experiments in the literature, they tend to focus on specific positron experiments and use specialized equipment that limit their flexibility. Here we present a positron spectroscopy experimental apparatus designed for the undergraduate lab. Rather than specialized pulse processing the apparatus utilizes a PC oscilloscope as its primary data acquisition utility with pulse processing happening in software instead of hardware. This allows the apparatus to explore a variety of physical phenomena with the positron annihilation including material science, 2 and 3 gamma annihilation properties, polarimetry via Compton scattering, QED tests, and local hidden variable theories. The supporting software is flexible and allows students to pursue these experiments through exploration rather than simply supporting data acquisition. St. Olaf College.

  16. Positron Spectroscopy of Nanodiamonds after Hydrogen Sorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Nikitina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure and defects of nanodiamonds influence the hydrogen sorption capacity. Positronium can be used as a sensor for detecting places with the most efficient capture of hydrogen atoms. Hydrogenation of carbon materials was performed from gas atmosphere. The concentration of hydrogen absorbed by the sample depends on the temperature and pressure. The concentration 1.2 wt % is achieved at the temperature of 243 K and the pressure of 0.6 MPa. The hydrogen saturation of nanodiamonds changes the positron lifetime. Increase of sorption cycle numbers effects the positron lifetime, as well as the parameters of the Doppler broadening of annihilation line. The electron-positron annihilation being a sensitive method, it allows detecting the electron density fluctuation of the carbon material after hydrogen saturation.

  17. Association of Coronary Perivascular Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Drug-Eluting Stent-Induced Coronary Hyperconstricting Responses in Pigs: 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Kazuma; Matsumoto, Yasuharu; Amamizu, Hirokazu; Uzuka, Hironori; Nishimiya, Kensuke; Morosawa, Susumu; Hirano, Michinori; Watabe, Hiroshi; Funaki, Yoshihito; Miyata, Satoshi; Takahashi, Jun; Ito, Kenta; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2017-09-01

    Although coronary perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) may play important roles as a source of inflammation, the association of coronary PVAT inflammation and coronary hyperconstricting responses remains to be examined. We addressed this important issue in a porcine model of coronary hyperconstricting responses after drug-eluting stent implantation with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomographic imaging. An everolimus-eluting stent (EES) was randomly implanted in pigs into the left anterior descending or the left circumflex coronary artery while nonstented coronary artery was used as a control. After 1 month, coronary vasoconstricting responses to intracoronary serotonin (10 and 100 μg/kg) were examined by coronary angiography in vivo, followed by in vivo and ex vivo 18 F-FDG positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic imaging. Coronary vasoconstricting responses to serotonin were significantly enhanced at the EES edges compared with the control site ( P <0.01; n=40). Notably, in vivo and ex vivo 18 F-FDG positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic imaging and autoradiography showed enhanced 18 F-FDG uptake and its accumulation in PVAT at the EES edges compared with the control site, respectively (both P <0.05). Furthermore, histological and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that inflammatory changes of coronary PVAT were significantly enhanced at the EES edges compared with the control site (all P <0.01). Importantly, Rho-kinase expressions (ROCK1/ROCK2) and Rho-kinase activity (phosphorylated myosin phosphatase target subunit-1) at the EES edges were significantly enhanced compared with the control site. These results indicate for the first time that inflammatory changes of coronary PVAT are associated with drug-eluting stent-induced coronary hyperconstricting responses in pigs in vivo and that 18 F-FDG positron emission tomographic imaging is useful for assessment of coronary PVAT inflammation.

  18. Acute effects of three club drugs on the striatum of rats: Evaluation by quantitative autoradiography with [18F]FDOPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Chun-Kai; Chen, Hong-Wen; Wang, Wei-Hsun; Liu, Ren-Shen; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we used quantitative autoradiography to study the acute effect of cocaine, methamphetamine, and ketamine on the uptake of [ 18 F]FDOPA in the striatum of rats. Drugs were treated 0.5 h before (pre-treated), and 1.5 h after (post-treated) [ 18 F]FDOPA injections, rats were then sacrificed at 2 h post [ 18 F]FDOPA injections to determine the striatum/frontal cortex binding ratios in the striatum. The ratios were lower in the post-treated groups than those of the pre-treated groups, suggesting a net effect of inhibition of trapping of the tracer. The order of uptake inhibition is: ketamine>methamphetamine>cocaine

  19. A digital autoradiography system based on the Medipix2 chip: images of {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C microscales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mettivier, Giovanni; Montesi, Maria C. E-mail: montesi@na.infn.it; Russo, Paolo

    2004-02-01

    In the framework of the MAMA project, funded by INFN, we have assembled a digital imaging system for beta and gamma autoradiography based on the Medipix2 single photon counting read-out chip bump-bonded to a 300 {mu}m thick silicon pixel detector. This system has 256x256 square pixels of 55 {mu}m pitch for a total sensitive area of 14x14 mm{sup 2}. Each pixel contains two discriminators and a 13-bit counter. The detection threshold is about 6 keV and a noise is about 10{sup -3} cps/mm{sup 2}. Real time images have been obtained of {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C autoradiographic scales. The minimum detectable activity is 0.32 Bq in 14 h for {sup 3}H and 0.012 Bq in 10 h for {sup 14}C.

  20. High resolution alpha-autoradiography for measurement of 10B distribution in subcellular scale using CR-39 and AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, K.; Takahashi, H.; Yasuda, N.

    2000-01-01

    In order to measure 10 B distribution in tumor tissues for BNCT at subcellular scale, we have developed a new method for high resolution alpha-autoradiography using contact X-ray microscopy technique with CR-39 plastic track detectors. Sliced sections of boron-injected brain tumors in rats were mounted on CR-39 and irradiated with thermal neutrons at KUR. Then the samples were exposed to soft X-rays from a laser plasma source. After etching the CR-39 in NaOH solution for a short time (1-5 min.), transmission X-ray image of tumor cells appeared as relief on CR-39 surface, and could be observed with the atomic force microscopy (AFM). Very small etch pits of about 100 nm in diameter corresponding to particle tracks from 10 B(n, α) 7 Li reactions were also observed in the image simultaneously. This method provides an accurate distribution of 10 B inside the cell. (author)

  1. Development of Texas intense positron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeymen, A.R.; Uenlue, K.; Jacobsen, F.M.; Goektepeli, S.; Wehring, B.W.

    1999-01-01

    The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) is a reactor-based low-energy positron beam facility utilizing some novel techniques in positron beam production. This facility will be located at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) and is being developed by UT Austin and UT Arlington researchers. TIPS will use a large area (total area of 900-1800 cm 2 ) 64 Cu source to supply fast β + particles for subsequent moderation to form an intense monoenergetic positron beam in the energy range of 0-50 keV with an expected intensity of 10 8 e + /s. Natural copper will be neutron activated near the core of the NETL 1 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor to produce the 64 Cu isotope. The activated source will be transported to the moderator/remoderator assembly, outside the biological shield of the reactor. This assembly combines the primary moderation and posterior remoderation of the fast β + particles into one stage using solid Kr to produce a low-energy positron source of a few eV with a diameter of 8 mm. The low-energy positron beam is then extracted by an electrostatic modified SOA gun and after further acceleration to 5 keV, the beam is focused onto the object slit of a 90 deg. bending magnet. After further focusing and another 90 deg. bend, the beam enters the main accelerator/decelerator that transports the beam onto the target for experimentation. The components of TIPS have been manufactured and are currently being optimized. In this communication we present some of the details of the TIPS facility and furthermore briefly discuss its intended applications

  2. Theory, development, and applications of the scanning positron microbeam and positron reemission microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandes, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    The theory, design, development, and applications of two new imaging instruments, the scanning positron microbeam (SPM) and positron reemission microscope (PRM), are discussed. The SPM consists of a sectored lens which focuses and rasters the positrons from the beam across the sample. The results of rastering the 10μm x 50μm beam across a test grid demonstrate the SPM's ability to scan a 500μm diameter region and to resolve features with ∼ 5μm resolution. The SPM was used to examine the location of defects in a Si-on-SiO 2 sample. Possible applications to three dimensional defect spectroscopy and the observation of small samples are considered. In the PRM, the positrons from the brightness-enhanced beam are focused at 5keV to an 8/Am diameter spot (FWHM) onto a thin metal single crystal. An image of the opposing side of the film is formed by accelerating and focusing the reemitted thermalized positrons with a cathode lens objective and a projector lens. The final image (real) is a record of the thermal positron emission intensity versus position. Images of surface and subsurface defect structures, taken at magnifications up to 4400x and with a resolution up to 80nm, are presented and discussed. The ultimate resolution capabilities and possible applications of the PRM are examined. The implantation and diffusion process of positrons was studied with the PRM by examining the positron emission profile of 3-9keV positrons implanted into a 2200 angstrom thick Ni single crystal

  3. Muscarinic receptors in the prenatal mouse embryo. Comparison of M35-immunohistochemistry with [3H]quinuclidinyl benzylate autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerding-Köppel, M; Greiner-Schröder, A; Drews, U

    1995-04-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors are widespread in nervous tissue and smooth muscle or paracrine epithelial cells of various organs. In the embryo, muscarinic receptors are transitorily expressed in the early blastoderm and later on in blastemic tissues during morphogenesis. Recently, a monoclonal antibody (M35) against muscarinic receptor from calf brain became available. In the present study the use of M35-immunohistochemistry is compared to autoradiographic localization of muscarinic binding sites in the mouse embryo. The aim of the study is to test the suitability of the antibody for localization of muscarinic receptors in embryonic tissues. For autoradiography whole-body sagittal cryostat sections of the 17- and 18-day mouse embryo were covered with LKB-Ultrofilm after incubation with the radioactive ligand [3H] quinuclidinyl benzylate (QNB). For immunohistochemistry cryostat sections of formalin fixed tissues were used. In general, all tissues exhibiting ligand binding were also recognized by the antibody. M35-immunohistochemistry resulted in higher spatial resolution of receptor localization than [3H]QNB autoradiography. Definitive muscarinic receptors were observed in smooth muscle and the epithelial lining of the vasuclar, intestinal, respiratory and urinary system, in the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerves. The embryonic type of the muscarinic receptor was detected in the mesothelium of lung and liver, in the nephrogenic blastema of the metanephros, and in lung mesenchyme. A large amount of embryonic muscarinic receptors was found in the remnants of the notochord and in the nucleus pulposus of the developing vertebral column. A function in morphogenesis is discussed of the embryonic muscarinic receptor.

  4. Features and applications of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Mingwu

    1997-01-01

    Positron emission tomography, the so-called world's smartest camera, is based on a NaI or BGO detector and imaging of positron-emitting radioisotopes which are introduced as a tracer into the regional tissue or organ of interest. With the aid of a computer visual images of a series of these distributions can be built into a picture of the functional status of the tissue or organ being imaged. This highly accurate imaging technique is already widely used for clinical diagnostics heart disease, brain disorder, tumors and so on

  5. Recent considerations of the GSI positron peaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soff, G.; Reinhardt, J.; Reus, J. de; Ionescu, D.; Schramm, S.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.

    1987-08-01

    In this report we examine various attempts to explain the GSI positron peaks. After the presentation of recent experimental data we briefly sketch theoretical investigations concerning the new particle hypothesis. The failure of standard models employing a linear coupling led to more exotic scenarios for particle production. One exciting recent idea is outlined. After that we treat the possible formation of a resonance in ordinary Bhabha scattering which could represent a time-reversed channel to the observations in heavy-ion collisions. Finally we discuss the poly-positronium model and a purely atomic physics model to interprete the GSI positron events. (orig./HSI)

  6. Heuristic theory of positron-helium scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachman, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An error in a previous modified adiabatic approximation (Drachman, 1966), due to a lack of generality in the form of the short-range correlation part of the wave function for L greater than zero, is corrected heuristically by allowing the monopole suppression parameter to depend on L. An L-dependent local potential is constructed to fit the well-known positron-hydrogen s, p, and d wave phase shifts below the rearrangement threshold. The same form of potential yields a positron-helium cross-section in agreement with a recent experimental measurement near threshold.

  7. Positron emission tomography imaging of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua

    2001-01-01

    The merging of molecular biology and nuclear medicine is developed into molecular nuclear medicine. Positron emission tomography (PET) of gene expression in molecular nuclear medicine has become an attractive area. Positron emission tomography imaging gene expression includes the antisense PET imaging and the reporter gene PET imaging. It is likely that the antisense PET imaging will lag behind the reporter gene PET imaging because of the numerous issues that have not yet to be resolved with this approach. The reporter gene PET imaging has wide application into animal experimental research and human applications of this approach will likely be reported soon

  8. Positron trapping at dislocations in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergersen, B.; McMullen, T.

    1977-01-01

    The trapping rate of positrons at dislocations in metals, and its temperature dependence, are calculated. Two different trapping processes, with the excess energy absorbed in either electron-hole pair formation or by phonon creation, are considered and the former is found to be the most important. An extension of the theory to include depletion of the positron density around the dislocations in a diffusion approximation is included. The trapping is found to be transition limited if the temperature is low or the trap potential shallow. At room temperature diffusion is important for deep traps. (author)

  9. Clinical utility of positron emission mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Shannon B; Shah, Zeeshan A

    2013-07-01

    Several imaging modalities have been introduced over recent years to better screen for and stage breast cancer. Positron emission mammography (PEM) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and introduced into clinical use as a diagnostic adjunct to mammography and breast ultrasonography. PEM has higher resolution and a more localized field of view than positron emission tomography-computed tomography and can be performed on patients to stage a newly diagnosed malignancy. Review of mammograms together with magnetic resonance or PEM images improves detection of disease.

  10. Observation of diffraction effects in positron channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palathingal, J.C.; Peng, J.P.; Lynn, K.G.; Wu, X.Y.; Schultz, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental investigation of positron channeling was made with a high-angular resolution apparatus, employing positrons of kinetic energy 1 MeV, derived from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Dynamitron. The pattern of transmission through a Si (100) single crystal of thickness 0.245 μm was investigated for a number of major planes. The authors have observed for the first time, in excellent detail, the fine structure of the channeling pattern expected to arise from the particle diffraction effects, theoretically explainable in terms of the quantum-mechanical many-beam calculations

  11. Apparatus for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Douglas W [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-06-12

    Non-destructive testing apparatus according to one embodiment of the invention comprises a photon source. The photon source produces photons having predetermined energies and directs the photons toward a specimen being tested. The photons from the photon source result in the creation of positrons within the specimen being tested. A detector positioned adjacent the specimen being tested detects gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons with electrons. A data processing system operatively associated with the detector produces output data indicative of a lattice characteristic of the specimen being tested.

  12. Measurement of positron annihilation lifetimes for positron burst by multi-detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B. Y.; Kuang, P.; Liu, F. Y.; Han, Z. J.; Cao, X. Z.; Zhang, P.

    2018-03-01

    It is currently impossible to exploit the timing information in a gamma-ray pulse generated within nanoseconds when a high-intensity positron burst annihilation event occurs in a target using conventional single-detector methods. A state-of-the-art solution to the problem is proposed in this paper. In this approach, a multi-detector array composed of many independent detection cells mounted spherically around the target is designed to detect the time distribution of the annihilated gamma rays generated following, in particular, a positron burst emitting huge amounts of positrons in a short pulse duration, even less than a few nano- or picoseconds.

  13. Positron astrophysics and areas of relation to low-energy positron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guessoum, N.

    2014-01-01

    I briefly review our general knowledge of positron astrophysics, focusing mostly on the theoretical and modelling aspects. The experimental/observational aspects of the topic have recently been reviewed elsewhere [E. Churazov et al., Mon. Nat. R. Astron. Soc. 411, 1727 (2011); N. Prantazos et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 83, 1001 (2011)]. In particular, I highlight the interactions and cross sections of the reactions that the positrons undergo in various cosmic media. Indeed, these must be of high interest to both the positron astrophysics community and the low-energy positron physics community in trying to find common areas of potential collaboration for the future or areas of research that will help the astrophysics community make further progress on the problem. The processes undergone by positrons from the moments of their birth to their annihilation (in the interstellar medium or other locations) are thus examined. The physics of the positron interactions with gases and solids (dust grains) and the physical conditions and characteristics of the environments where the processes of energy loss, positronium formation, and annihilation take place, are briefly reviewed. An explanation is given about how all the relevant physical information is taken into account in order to calculate annihilation rates and spectra of the 511 keV emission in the ISM; special attention is paid to positron interactions with dust and with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In particular, an attempt is made to show to what extent the interactions between positrons and interstellar dust grains are similar to laboratory experiments in which beams of low-energy positrons impinge upon solids and surfaces. Sample results are shown for the effect of dust grains on positron annihilation spectra in some phases of the ISM which, together with high resolution spectra measured by satellites, can be used to infer useful knowledge about the environment where the annihilation is predominantly taking place

  14. beta sup + -gamma coincidence positron lifetime spectrometer with positron energy selection by electromagnetic lens

    CERN Document Server

    Chalermkarnnon, P; Araki, H; Shirai, Y; Shishido, I

    2002-01-01

    A beta sup + -gamma coincidence positron lifetime spectrometer equipped with two electromagnetic lenses was constructed. The electromagnetic lens was used to have energy-selected positron beam. It accomplished a time resolution of 385 ps (FWHM) for the total system with a Pilot U plastic scintillator. By using a silicon avalanche diode instead of Pilot U plastic scintillator to initiate start timing signals, the time resolution was improved to 345 ps (FWHM). With this method, in-situ positron lifetime measurements at high temperatures or under high stresses can be attained easily. (author)

  15. Solvated Positron Chemistry - Positron Reactions with Pseudo-Halide Ions in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Pedersen, Niels Jørgen; Andersen, Jan Rud

    1982-01-01

    The hydrated positron e+aq reactions with SCN−, OCN−, CN−, S2− were studied by means of the angular correlation technique. The positron forms bound states with SCN−, CN−, and S2− but not with OCN−. Apparently, the e+aq reaction with SH− results in a positron bound state with S2−. It was difficult...... to determine the shapes of the bound-state angular correlation curves. Only in the SCN− case could a very rough estimate of the rate constant be obtained. Estimates of the binding energies relative to those of the corresponding halide ion states could be determined for SCN− and S2−....

  16. Positron annihilation studies of mesoporous silica films using a slow positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Chunqing; Muramatsu, Makoto; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Kinomura, Atsushi; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ito, Kenji; Kabayashi, Yoshinori

    2006-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectra were measured for mesoporous silica films, which were synthesized using triblock copolymer (EO 106 PO 70 EO 106 ) as a structure-directing agent. Different positron lifetime spectra for the deposited and calcined films indicated the formation of meso-structure after calcination, which was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) observation. Open porosity or pore interconnectivity of a silica film might be evaluated by a two-dimensional positron annihilation lifetime spectrum of an uncapped film. Pore sizes and their distributions in the silica films were found to be affected by thermal treatments

  17. Next generation of electron-positron colliding beam machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1979-03-01

    The contribution of electron-positron colliding beam experiments to high-energy physics in the 1970's has been prodigious. From the research done with the two highest-energy e + e - machines of the present generation of these devices, have come such things as the discovery and illumination of the properties of the psi family, charmed particles, a new heavy lepton, non-ambigious evidence for hadronic jets, etc. The rapid pace of new developments in physics from such machines comes about for two reasons. First, the electron-positron annihilation process at present energies is particularly simple and well understood, making the problem of determining the quantum numbers and properties of new particles particularly simple. Second, in electron-positron annihilation all final states are on a relatively equal footing, and small production cross sections are compensated for by a lack of confusing background. For example, the rate of production of charmed particles at the SPEAR storage ring at SLAC and the DORIS storage ring at DESY is 3 or 4 orders of magnitude less than the rate of production at FNAL and the SPS. Yet these particles were first found at the storage rings where the background cross sections are comparable to the signal cross section, and have not yet been observed directly by their hadronic decays at the proton machines where the background cross sections are 4 orders of magnitude larger than the signal cross sections. The machines PEP at SLAC and PETRA at DESY will soon be operating at 35 to 40 GeV cm to explore new regions of energy. Studies of electron-positron annihilation at much higher energies than presently planned have a great deal to teach, not only about particle structure and dynamics, but also about the nature of the weak interaction. Some of the physics which can be done with such machines is discussed with a view toward getting an idea of the minimum required energy for the new generation of colliding beam devices

  18. Imaging hypoxia after oxygenation-modification: comparing [18F]FMISO autoradiography with pimonidazole immunohistochemistry in human xenograft tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, E.G.C.; Laverman, P.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Philippens, M.E.P.; Lok, J.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Boerman, O.C.; Bussink, J.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hypoxia is one of the reasons for radiation therapy resistance. Positron emission tomography using (18)F-labeled misonidazole ([(18)F]FMISO) is a non-invasive method of imaging tumor hypoxia. Aim of this study was to validate [(18)F]FMISO against the clinically most widely used hypoxic cell

  19. Positron Emission Tomography Application to Drug Development and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Piero A.

    The research for the identification and development of new drugs represents a very complex process implying long times and massive investments. This process was not able to parallel the rate of discoveries made in the field of genomic and molecular biology and a gap created between demand of new drugs and the ability of pharmaceutical companies to select good candidates. Positron Emission Tomography, among the different Molecular Imaging modalities, could represent a new tool for the early assessment and screening of new drug candidates and, due to its physical performances and the characteristics of positron-labeled tracers, gain the role of "Biomarker" accepted by the Companies and the Regulatory Bodies of Drug Agencies. To fulfil this task PET has to exploit all of its special features such as data absolute quantification and modelling, high spatial resolution and dynamic imaging. Relevant efforts need to be directed to the careful design and validation of experimental protocols with the main goal of achieving consistency in multi- centric trials.

  20. Depth profiling of aluminium metal using slow positron beam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Slow positron beam Doppler-broadening technique was used to study depth profiling of aluminium metals sample. The variation of the line-shape parameters with incident positron energy was studied. Also, the depth profile of the S parameter was investigated. The positron implantation profile and backscattering fraction for ...

  1. Production of slow-positron beams with an electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.H.; Alvarez, R.A.; Stanek, M.

    1982-01-01

    Intense, pulsed beams of low-energy positrons have been produced by a high-energy beam from an electron linac. The production efficiency for low-energy positrons has been determined for electrons with 60 to 120 MeV energy, low-energy positron beams from a linac can be of much higher intensity than those beams currently derived from radioactive sources

  2. Positron Transport and Annihilation in the Galactic Bulge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Helen Panther

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The annihilation of positrons in the Milky Way Galaxy has been observed for ∼50 years; however, the production sites of these positrons remains hard to identify. The observed morphology of positron annihilation gamma-rays provides information on the annihilation sites of these Galactic positrons. It is understood that the positrons responsible for the annihilation signal originate at MeV energies. The majority of sources of MeV positrons occupy the star-forming thin disk of the Milky Way. If positrons propagate far from their sources, we must develop accurate models of positron propagation through all interstellar medium (ISM phases in order to reveal the currently uncertain origin of these Galactic positrons. On the other hand, if positrons annihilate close to their sources, an alternative source of MeV positrons with a distribution that matches the annihilation morphology must be identified. In this work, I discuss the various models that have been developed to understand the origin of the 511 keV line from the direction of the Galactic bulge, and the propagation of positrons in the ISM.

  3. Direct evidence for positron annihilation from shallow traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren; Hidalgo, C.

    1987-01-01

    For deformed Ag the temperature dependence of the positron lifetime parameters is followed between 12 and 300 K. Clear direct evidence for positron trapping and annihilation at shallow traps, with a positron binding energy of 9±2 meV and annihilation characteristics very similar to those...

  4. Construction report of the PF slow-positron source. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, Atsushi; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi

    1993-12-01

    The slow positron source utilizing the electron beam of the 2.5 GeV electron beam accelerator which is the synchrotron radiation injector is being constructed. The outline of the project and the present state of construction are reported. As of November, 1993, by injecting the electron beam of about 10 W to the targets for producing positrons, the slow positrons of 4 x 10 4 e + /s has been obtained in the laboratory. Finally, with the electron beam of 30 kW, it is aimed at to obtain the slow positron beam of 2 x 10 9 e + /s. In the slow positron source, the electron beam from the 2.5 GeV linear accelerator is used as the primary beam. This beam is led to the target with electromagnets. Radiation shields were strengthened, and the electrostatic lens system was attached to efficiently extract and send out slow positrons. The conveying system for slow positrons is explained. Primary electron beam, target and moderator for producing slow positrons, the change to continuous current of pulsed slow positron beam and the heightening of luminance of slow positron beam, and the experiment on the utilization of slow positron beam, and the control system for positron conveyance path are reported. (K.I.)

  5. Change of Maximum Standardized Uptake Value Slope in Dynamic Triphasic [{sup 18}F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Distinguishes Malignancy From Postradiation Inflammation in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Prospective Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Carryn M., E-mail: carryn-anderson@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Chang, Tangel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Graham, Michael M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Marquardt, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Button, Anna; Smith, Brian J. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Menda, Yusuf [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Sun, Wenqing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Pagedar, Nitin A. [Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dynamic [{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake methodology as a post–radiation therapy (RT) response assessment tool, potentially enabling accurate tumor and therapy-related inflammation differentiation, improving the posttherapy value of FDG–positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT). Methods and Materials: We prospectively enrolled head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma patients who completed RT, with scheduled 3-month post-RT FDG-PET/CT. Patients underwent our standard whole-body PET/CT scan at 90 minutes, with the addition of head-and-neck PET/CT scans at 60 and 120 minutes. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of regions of interest were measured at 60, 90, and 120 minutes. The SUV{sub max} slope between 60 and 120 minutes and change of SUV{sub max} slope before and after 90 minutes were calculated. Data were analyzed by primary site and nodal site disease status using the Cox regression model and Wilcoxon rank sum test. Outcomes were based on pathologic and clinical follow-up. Results: A total of 84 patients were enrolled, with 79 primary and 43 nodal evaluable sites. Twenty-eight sites were interpreted as positive or equivocal (18 primary, 8 nodal, 2 distant) on 3-month 90-minute FDG-PET/CT. Median follow-up was 13.3 months. All measured SUV endpoints predicted recurrence. Change of SUV{sub max} slope after 90 minutes more accurately identified nonrecurrence in positive or equivocal sites than our current standard of SUV{sub max} ≥2.5 (P=.02). Conclusions: The positive predictive value of post-RT FDG-PET/CT may significantly improve using novel second derivative analysis of dynamic triphasic FDG-PET/CT SUV{sub max} slope, accurately distinguishing tumor from inflammation on positive and equivocal scans.

  6. High energy resolution and first time-dependent positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    It was the aim of this thesis to improve the existing positron annihilation induced Auger spectrometer at the highly intense positron source NEPOMUC (NEutron induced POsitron source MUniCh) in several ways: Firstly, the measurement time for a single spectrum should be reduced from typically 12 h to roughly 1 h or even less. Secondly, the energy resolution, which amounted to ΔE/E∼10%, should be increased by at least one order of magnitude in order to make high resolution positron annihilation induced Auger spectroscopy (PAES)-measurements of Auger transitions possible and thus deliver more information about the nature of the Auger process. In order to achieve these objectives, the PAES spectrometer was equipped with a new electron energy analyzer. For its ideal operation all other components of the Auger analysis chamber had to be adapted. Particularly the sample manipulation and the positron beam guidance had to be renewed. Simulations with SIMION registered ensured the optimal positron lens parameters. After the adjustment of the new analyzer and its components, first measurements illustrated the improved performance of the PAES setup: Firstly, the measurement time for short overview measurements was reduced from 3 h to 420 s. The measurement time for more detailed Auger spectra was shortened from 12 h to 80 min. Secondly, even with the reduced measurement time, the signal to noise ratio was also enhanced by one order of magnitude. Finally, the energy resolution was improved to ΔE/E 2,3 VV-transition with PAES. Thus, within this thesis two objectives were achieved: Firstly, the PAES spectrometer was renewed and improved by at least one order of magnitude with respect to the signal to noise ratio, the measurement time and the energy resolution. Secondly, several measurements have been carried out, demonstrating the high performance of the spectrometer. Amongst them are first dynamic PAES measurements and a high resolution measurement of the CuM 2,3 VV

  7. Photoluminescence and positron annihilation spectroscopic investigation on a H(+) irradiated ZnO single crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, A; Chakrabarti, Mahuya; Sanyal, D; Bhowmick, D; Dechoudhury, S; Chakrabarti, A; Rakshit, Tamita; Ray, S K

    2012-08-15

    Low temperature photoluminescence and room temperature positron annihilation spectroscopy have been employed to investigate the defects incorporated by 6 MeV H(+) ions in a hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystal. Prior to irradiation, the emission from donor bound excitons is at 3.378 eV (10 K). The irradiation creates an intense and narrow emission at 3.368 eV (10 K). The intensity of this peak is nearly four times that of the dominant near band edge peak of the pristine crystal. The characteristic features of the 3.368 eV emission indicate its origin as a 'hydrogen at oxygen vacancy' type defect. The positron annihilation lifetime measurement reveals a single component lifetime spectrum for both the unirradiated (164 ± 1 ps) and irradiated crystal (175 ± 1 ps). It reflects the fact that the positron lifetime and intensity of the new irradiation driven defect species are a little higher compared to those in the unirradiated crystal. However, the estimated defect concentration, even considering the high dynamic defect annihilation rate in ZnO, comes out to be ∼4 × 10(17) cm(-3) (using SRIM software). This is a very high defect concentration compared to the defect sensitivity of positron annihilation spectroscopy. A probable reason is the partial filling of the incorporated vacancies (positron traps), which in ZnO are zinc vacancies. The positron lifetime of ∼175 ps (in irradiated ZnO) is consistent with recent theoretical calculations for partially hydrogen-filled zinc vacancies in ZnO. Passivation of oxygen vacancies by hydrogen is also reflected in the photoluminescence results. A possible reason for such vacancy filling (at both Zn and O sites) due to irradiation has also been discussed.

  8. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree of ...

  9. Tomography of positrons with SPECT systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoardi, Roberto A.

    1999-01-01

    The tomography for emissions of positrons (PET) demonstrate the clinical uses to provide information in the area of neurology, cardiology and principally, in oncology. This chapter describes the principles of the functioning and instrumentation, clinical applications and the state of the art

  10. Is positron emission tomography useful in stroke?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeReuck, J; Leys, D; DeKeyser, J

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in the study of stroke and related cerebrovascular diseases. It has shown the various stages leading to cerebral infarction and defined the significance of the ischaemic penumbra. PET scan can predict the clinical outcome of patients with acute

  11. Positron emission tomography in malignant haematological disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, Bartholomeus Wilhelmus

    2007-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a diagnostic technique with a promising role especially in the haemato-oncology. Although its use in the management ; of malignant lymphoma seems to be established already, much about the true potential and drawbacks of FDG-PET in this disease are still unknown.

  12. The Story of Large Electron Positron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 11. The Story of Large Electron Positron Collider - Experiments done at LEP. S N Ganguli. General Article Volume 7 Issue 11 November 2002 pp 18-34. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. The Story of Large Electron Positron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Story of Large Electron Positron Collider. 2. Experiments done at LEP. S N Ganguli is at the Tata. Institute of Fundamental. Research, Mumbai. He is ...... team of engineers and technicians of CERN. The preci- sion measurements at LEP left no one in doubt that the understanding of physics through the standard model is.

  14. The Story of Large Electron Positron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vertex. This is followed by a general tracking detec- tor to measure momentum of charged particles from the curvature of the tracks in a magnetic field. Electrons, positrons and photons are then detected via their en- ergy deposits iIi electromagnetic calorimeter (like crys- tals, lead-glass, lead-scintillators, etc.); these detectors.

  15. Progress Towards a Practical Multicell Positron Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    The physics and technology of positron confinement is central to a range of applications at the forefront of antimatter science. Progress in this area has been driven by the development of a suite of novel non-neutral plasma techniques whereby up to 4 ×109 positrons have now been trapped and stored. However the next generation of experiments will require orders of magnitude more positrons. This talk describes techniques to increase storage capacity to >=1012 using a novel multi-cell trap architecture. Plasmas will be stored in separate Penning-Malmberg traps (``cells'') arranged in parallel off the magnetic axis to maximize use of the magnetic field volume while minimizing the required confinement voltages. Experiments with electrons in a test structure will be described to explore the basic physics and technology of the multicell concept and to set the design of a 21-cell trap for 1012 positrons. Over 50% of a trapped plasma has been injected into an off-axis cell, and hour-long confinement of 2 ×108 particles has been achieved using rotating electric fields. Experiments are under way to identify the limits of the injection process and demonstrate confinement >1010 particles in a single off-axis cell using kilovolt confinement potentials. In collaboration with N. C. Hurst, C. J. Baker, and C. M. Surko. This work is supported by U.S. DTRA and the U.S. DOE/NSF plasma partnership.

  16. Principles and applications of positron & positronium chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jean, Y. C; Mallon, P. E; Schrader, D. M

    2003-01-01

    ... Chemistry," offered at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC). Instructors were those scientists most active in positronium chemistry, P. Coleman, J. Duplatre, H. Stoll, D.M. Schrader, R.M. Nieminen, and Y.C. Jean who served as the official instructor at UMKC. During the positron summer school, the idea of publishing a graduate-level te...

  17. Positron emission tomography of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollmer, P.

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography enables the distribution of positron emitting isotopes to be imaged in a transverse plane through the body and the regional concentration of the isotope to be measured quantitatively. This thesis reports some applications of positron emission tomography to studies of pulmonary pathophysiology. Measurements in lung phantoms showed that regional lung density could be measured from a transmission tomogram obtained with an external source of positron emitting isotope. The regional, fractional blood volume was measured after labelling the blood with carbon-11-monoxide. Regional extravascular lung density (lung tissue and interstitial water per unit thoracic volume) was obtained by subtracting fractional blood volume from lung density. Measurements in normal subjects revealed large regional variations in lung density and fractional blood volume in the supine posture. Extravascular lung density showed a more uniform distribution. The technique has been used to study patients with chronic interstitial pulmonary oedema, pulmonary sarcoidosis and fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension and patients with intracardiac, left-to-right shunt. Tomographic measurements of pulmonary tissue concentration of radionuclides are difficult, since corrections for the blood content and the inflation of the lung must be applied. A simultaneous measurement of lung density and fractional blood volume allows such corrections to be made and the extravascular tracer concentration to be calculated. This has been applied to measurements of the tissue penetration of carbon-11-labelled erythromycin in patients with lobar pneumonia. (author)

  18. Study on low-energy positron polarimetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Physics Department, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel. 3Physics Department ... pends on the orientation of the electron/positron spin in a magnetic field have been successfully demonstrated at the ... The cross-section for Bhabha scattering may be written in the center-of-mass system as dσ. dΩ. ∼. (1 + cos θ)2.

  19. Positron emission tomography : measurement of transgene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vaalburg, W

    Noninvasive and repetitive imaging of transgene expression can play a pivotal role in the development of gene therapy strategies, as it offers investigators a means to determine the effectiveness of their gene transfection protocols. In the last decade, imaging of transgene expression using positron

  20. Positron Interactions with Atoms and Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2012-01-01

    Dirac, in 1928, combining the ideas of quantum mechanics and the ideas of relativity invented the well-known relativistic wave equation. In his formulation, he predicted an antiparticle of the electron of spin n-bar/2. He thought that this particle must be a proton. Dirac published his interpretation in a paper 'A theory of electrons and protons.' It was shown later by the mathematician Hermann Weyl that the Dirac theory was completely symmetric between negative and positive particles and the positive particle must have the same mass as that of the electron. In his J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Prize Acceptance Speech, Dirac notes that 'Blackett was really the first person to obtain hard evidence for the existence of a positron but he was afraid to publish it. He wanted confirmation, he was really over cautious.' Positron, produced by the collision of cosmic rays in a cloud chamber, was detected experimentally by Anderson in 1932. His paper was published in Physical Review in 1933. The concept of the positron and its detection were the important discoveries of the 20th century. I have tried to discuss various processes involving interactions of positrons with atoms and ions. This includes scattering, bound states and resonances. It has not been possible to include the enormous work which has been carried out during the last 40 or 50 years in theory and measurements.

  1. Positron annihilation spectroscopy in condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, G.

    1982-09-01

    The topic of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the investigation of all aspects connected with the annihilation of slow positrons. This work deals with the application of PAS to different problems of materials science. The first chapter is an introduction to fundamental aspects of positron annihilation, as far as they are important to the different experimental techniques of PAS. Chapter 2 is concerned with the information obtainable by PAS. The three main experimental techniques of PAS (2γ-angular correlation, positron lifetime and Doppler broadening) are explained and problems in the application of these methods are discussed. Chapter 3 contains experimental results. According to the different fields of application it was subgrouped into: 1. Investigations of crystalline solids. Detection of structural defects in Cu, estimation of defect concentrations, study of the sintering of Cu powders as well as lattice defects in V 3 Si. 2. Chemical investigations. Structure of mixed solvents, selective solvation of mixed solvents by electrolytes as well as the micellization of sodium dodecylsulphate in aqueous solutions. 3. Investigations of glasses. Influence of heat treatment and production technology on the preorder of X-amorphous silica glass as well as preliminary measurements of pyrocerams. 4. Investigations of metallic glasses. Demonstration of the influence of production technology on parameters measurable by PAS. Chapter 4 contains a summary as well as an outlook of further applications of PAS to surface physics, medicine, biology and astrophysics. (author)

  2. Positron Annihilation Study of Defects in Succinonitrile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Pedersen, Niels Jørgen; Sherwood, J. N.

    1979-01-01

    Positron lifetime and angular correlation measurements have been made on the plastic crystal succinonitrile. They confirm the phase transition at 234 ± 1 K. In the plastic phase the average orthopositronium lifetime increases with temperature and saturates at the highest temperatures. This is int...

  3. PAES: Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hugenschmidt

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES is a newly developed application for surface studies with high elemental selectivity and exceptional surface sensitivity. The instrument is operated by the Technische Universität München and is located at NEPOMUC.

  4. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...

  5. Evaluation of blood--brain barrier permeability changes in rhesus monkeys and man using 82Rb and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, C.K.; Budinger, T.F.

    1981-01-01

    Dynamic positron tomography of the brain with 82 Rb, obtained from a portable generator [ 82 Sr (25 days) -- 82 Rb (76 sec)], provides a means of studying blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in physiological and clinical investigations. The BBB in rhesus monkeys was opened unilaterally by intracarotid infusion of 3 M urea. This osmotic barrier opening allowed entry into the brain of intravenously administered rubidium chloride. The BBB opening was demonstrated noninvasively using 82 Rb and positron emission tomography and corroborated by the accumulation of 86 Rb in tissue samples. Positron emission tomography studies can be repeated every 5 min and indicate that dynamic tomography or static imaging can be used to study BBB permeability changes induced by a wide variety of noxious stimuli. Brain tumors in human subjects are readily detected because of the usual BBB permeability disruption in and around the tumors

  6. Study of radiation damage in metals by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauster, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Positron annihilation is a sensitive technique for probing defects in metals and it has recently been shown to be a valuable tool for the study of radiation damage. After an introduction to the three basic experimental methods (angular correlation, Doppler broadening, and lifetime measurements), the interaction of positrons with lattice defects is reviewed. Results for the annealing of damage after low temperature irradiation are used to show that positron annihilation has provided new information on annealing kinetics. The role of positron techniques in characterizing complex defect structures resulting from high-temperature neutron irradiation is reviewed and the possible utility of positron annihilation as a nondestructive monitor of property changes is pointed out

  7. Improved source and transport of monoenergetic MeV positrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, F. A.; Hunt, A. W.; Golovchenko, J. A.; Howell, R. H.; Haakenaasen, R.; Lynn, K. G.

    2000-08-01

    A new monoenergetic MeV positron beam source was designed and constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) positron facility. The positron source provides a low emittance beam with high energy resolution for channeling, scattering, and in-flight annihilation experiments. New beam optics for extracting slow positrons from a moderator mounted in a Pelletron electrostatic accelerator is presented. A beam line was designed and constructed to energy analyze the output of the accelerator and to provide adjustable size and angular divergence beams to a target station. A post target large angle acceptance magnet separates positrons transmitted through the target from forward gamma ray emission.

  8. Experimental Study of a Positron\\\\ Source Using Channeling

    CERN Multimedia

    Gavrykov, V; Kulibaba, V; Baier, V; Beloborodov, K; Bojenok, A; Bukin, A; Burdin, S; Dimova, T; Druzhinin, V; Dubrovin, M; Seredniakov, S; Shary, V; Strakhovenko, V; Keppler, P; Major, J; Bogdanov, A V; Potylitsin, A; Vnoukov, I; Artru, X; Lautesse, P; Poizat, J-C; Remillieux, J

    2002-01-01

    Many simulations have predicted that the yield of positrons, resulting from the interaction of fast electrons in a solid target, increases if the target is a crystal oriented with a major axis parallel to the electron beam. Tests made at Orsay and Tokyo confirmed these expectations. The experiment WA 103 concerns the determination of the main characteristics (emittance, energy spread) of a crystal positron source which could replace advantageously the conventional positron converters foreseen in some linear collider projects. The main element of the set-up is a magnetic spectrometer, using a drift chamber, where the positron trajectories are reconstructed (see Figure 1) A first run has been operated in july 2000 and the first results showed, as expected, a significant enhancement in photon and positron generation along the $$ axis of the tungsten crystal. Indications about a significant increase in the number of soft photons and positrons were also gathered : this point is of importance for the positron colle...

  9. Ultrarelativistic electron and positron radiation in planar channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikov, N.P.; Olchack, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    The coherent electromagnetic radiation from channeling electrons and positrons is given by similar expression. However for the channeling positrons the close collisions are suppressed due to the fact that the positron wave function is exponentially small near the atoms of the crystal lattice. It follows that the coherent bremsstrahlung decreases for the channeling positrons. We have investigated the ultrarelativistic channeling electron and positron radiations, connected with the electromagnetic transitions from the continuum spectrum states to the quasi-bound spectrum states and between the different quasi-bound spectrum states. The radiation probabilities are calculated by using the model continuum planar potential. It is shown that the radiation from the channeling electrons is several orders of magnitude larger than the positron radiation, while the electron and positron radiation have similar characteristics such as frequency limitation and angular distribution of the radiation. (orig.)

  10. Theory of positrons in solids and on solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska, M.J.; Nieminen, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Various experimental methods based on positron annihilation have evolved into important tools for researching the structure and properties of condensed matter. In particular, positron techniques are useful for the investigation of defects in solids and for the investigation of solid surfaces. Experimental methods need a comprehensive theory for a deep, quantitative understanding of the results. In the case of positron annihilation, the relevant theory includes models needed to describe the positron states as well as the different interaction processes in matter. In this review the present status of the theory of positrons in solids and on solid surfaces is given. The review consists of three main parts describing (a) the interaction processes, (b) the theory and methods for calculating positron states, and (c) selected recent results of positron studies of condensed matter

  11. Positron annihilation in germanium in thermal equilibrium at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Moriya, Tsuyoshi; Komuro, Naoyuki; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Kawano, Takao; Ikari, Atsushi

    1996-09-01

    Annihilation characteristics of positrons in Ge in thermal equilibrium at high temperature were studied using a monoenergetic positron beam. Precise measurements of Doppler broadening profiles of annihilation radiation were performed in the temperature range between 300 K and 1211 K. The line shape parameters of Doppler broadening profiles were found to be almost constant at 300-600 K. The changes in these parameters were observed to start above 600 K. This was attributed to both the decrease in the fraction of positrons annihilating with core electrons and the lowering of the crystal symmetry around the region detected by positron-electron pairs. This suggests that behaviors of positrons are dominated by some form of positron-lattice coupling in Ge at high temperatures. The temperature dependence of the diffusion length of positrons was also discussed. (author)

  12. Positron simulations of defects in tungsten containing hydrogen and helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troev, T.; Popov, E.; Staikov, P.; Nankov, N.; Yoshiie, T.

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of the behavior of defects containing hydrogen or helium in tungsten is an important issue. Here the properties of defects in tungsten containing hydrogen or helium atoms have been investigated by model positron lifetime quantum-mechanical simulations. The electron and positron wave functions have been obtained in the local density approximation to the two-component density-functional theory. The calculated values of the positron lifetime correlate with the magnitude of the electron density. The vacancy-clusters without hydrogen or helium are active positron traps. The lattice relaxation of atoms around vacancy reduces the effective vacancy volume and decrease the positron lifetime at a vacancy. The hydrogen and helium atoms are trapped in tungsten by lattice vacancies and nano-voids. It was established that positron lifetime depends on the density of gas atoms inside the nano-void. Hydrogen and helium presence in the larger nano-voids considerably decrease the positron lifetime.

  13. Probing Positron Cooling in Noble Gases via Annihilation γ Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D G

    2017-11-17

    γ spectra for positron annihilation in noble-gas atoms are calculated using many-body theory for positron momenta up to the positronium-formation threshold. These data are used, together with time-evolving positron-momentum distributions determined in the preceding Letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 203403 (2017)PRLTAO0031-9007], to calculate the time-varying γ spectra produced during positron cooling in noble gases. The γ spectra and their S[over ¯] and W[over ¯] shape parameters are shown to be sensitive probes of the time evolution of the positron momentum distribution and thus provide a means of studying positron cooling that is complementary to positron lifetime spectroscopy.

  14. The positron beam at the stuttgart pelletron accelerator and its applications to β +γ positron lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, W.; Maier, K.; Major, J.; Schaefer, H.-E.; Seeger, A.; Carstanjen, H.-D.; Decker, W.; Diehl, J.; Stoll, H.

    1987-08-01

    A slow-positron source has been installed in the therminal of an electrostatic 6.5 MeV accelerator and provides a monoenergetic positron beam in the few-MeV range. It will be used to operate a “fast” positron lifetime spectrometer based on β + γ coincidences. The properties of the beam, the expected performance of the spectrometer, its advantages over conventional γγ lifetime measurements, a number of intended applications, as well as recent positron-electron scattering experiments and plans for positron channelling and channelling-radiation studies are outlined.

  15. Calculation of Positron Distribution in the Presence of a Uniform Magnetic Field for the Improvement of Positron Emission Tomography (PET Imaging Using GEANT4 Toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mashayekhi

    2015-05-01

    Application of a magnetic field perpendicular to the positron diffusion plane prevented the scattering of positrons, and consequently, improved the intrinsic spatial resolution of PET imaging, caused by positron range effects.

  16. Clinical applications with the HIDAC positron camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, P.; Schaller, G.; Christin, A.; Townsend, D.; Tochon-Danguy, H.; Wensveen, M.; Donath, A.

    1988-06-01

    A high density avalanche chamber (HIDAC) positron camera has been used for positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging in three different human studies, including patients presenting with: (I) thyroid diseases (124 cases); (II) clinically suspected malignant tumours of the pharynx or larynx (ENT) region (23 cases); and (III) clinically suspected primary malignant and metastatic tumours of the liver (9 cases, 19 PET scans). The positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals used for the three studies were Na 124I (4.2 d half-life) for the thyroid, 55Co-bleomycin (17.5 h half-life) for the ENT-region and 68Ga-colloid (68 min half-life) for the liver. Tomographic imaging was performed: (I) 24 h after oral Na 124I administration to the thyroid patients, (II) 18 h after intraveneous administration of 55Co-bleomycin to the ENT patients and (III) 20 min following the intraveneous injection of 68Ga-colloid to the liver tumour patients. Three different imaging protocols were used with the HIDAC positron camera to perform appropriate tomographic imaging in each patient study. Promising results were obtained in all three studies, particularly in tomographic thyroid imaging, where a significant clinical contribution is made possible for diagnosis and therapy planning by the PET technique. In the other two PET studies encouraging results were obtained for the detection and precise localisation of malignant tumour disease including an estimate of the functional liver volume based on the reticulo-endothelial-system (RES) of the liver, obtained in vivo, and the three-dimensional display of liver PET data using shaded graphics techniques. The clinical significance of the overall results obtained in both the ENT and the liver PET study, however, is still uncertain and the respective role of PET as a new imaging modality in these applications is not yet clearly established. To appreciate the clinical impact made by PET in liver and ENT malignant tumour staging needs further investigation

  17. Irbesartan Attenuates Atherosclerosis in Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic Rabbits: Noninvasive Imaging of Inflammation by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET in evaluating the antiatherogenic effects of irbesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker. Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits were divided into the irbesartan-treated group (75 mg/kg/d; n = 14 and the control group (n = 14. After a 9-month treatment, rabbits underwent 18F-FDG PET. Using the aortic lesions, autoradiography and histologic examinations were performed. PET imaging clearly visualized the thoracic lesions of control rabbits and showed a significant decrease in the 18F-FDG uptake level of irbesartan-treated rabbits (78.8% of controls; p < .05. Irbesartan treatment significantly reduced the plaque size (43.1% of controls and intraplaque macrophage infiltration level (48.1% of controls. The 18F-FDG uptake level in plaques positively correlated with the plaque size (r = .65, p < .05 and macrophage infiltration level (r = .57, p < .05. Noninvasive imaging by 18F-FDG PET is useful for evaluating the therapeutic effects of irbesartan and reflects inflammation, a key factor involved in the therapeutic effects.

  18. Development of a New Positron Emission Tomography Tracer for Targeting Tumor Angiogenesis: Synthesis, Small Animal Imaging, and Radiation Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Lalush

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis plays a key role in cancer progression and correlates with disease aggressiveness and poor clinical outcomes. Affinity ligands discovered by screening phage display random peptide libraries can be engineered to molecularly target tumor blood vessels for noninvasive imaging and early detection of tumor aggressiveness. In this study, we tested the ability of a phage-display-selected peptide sequence recognizing specifically bone marrow- derived pro-angiogenic tumor-homing cells, the QFP-peptide, radiolabeled with 64Cu radioisotope to selectively image tumor vasculature in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET. To prepare the targeted PET tracer we modified QFP-phage with the DOTA chelator and radiolabeled the purified QFP-phage-DOTA intermediate with 64Cu to obtain QFP-targeted radioconjugate with high radiopharmaceutical yield and specific activity. We evaluated the new PET tracer in vivo in a subcutaneous (s.c. Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC mouse model and conducted tissue distribution, small animal PET/CT imaging study, autoradiography, histology, fluorescence imaging, and dosimetry assessments. The results from this study show that, in the context of the s.c. LLC immunocompetent mouse model, the QFP-tracer can target tumor blood vessels selectively. However, further optimization of the biodistribution and dosimetry profile of the tracer is necessary to ensure efficient radiopharmaceutical applications enabled by the biological specificity of the QFP-peptide.

  19. Tomography by positrons: methodology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellershohn, C.; Comar, D.

    1979-01-01

    Whereas gamma tomography (single photon) provides a new and fruitful dimension to conventional nuclear medicine, tomography by positrons makes possible a novel approach to the in-vivo analysis of fundamental and biological processes. The main object of both is the cross sectional representation of the distribution of a radioactive marker injected into the organism and in comparison with conventional detectors (gamma cameras and scintigraphs) they afford a much improved accuracy in position finding. The characteristics of these two methods may be represented diagrammatically by comparing their respective advantages and drawbacks. The method of fabricating positron emitting radioelements, the preparation of the radopharmeutics and the detection appliances are then examined in turn. To conclude, the medical uses: anatomical autoradiographs, as well as physiological, metabolic and pharmacological autoradiographs are described [fr

  20. Positron annihilation characterization of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alinger, M.J.; Glade, S.C.; Wirth, B.D.; Odette, G.R.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) were produced by mechanically alloying Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti and 0.25Y 2 O 3 (wt%) powders followed by hot isostatic pressing consolidation at 850, 1000 and 1150 deg. C. Positron annihilation lifetime and orbital momentum spectroscopy measurements are in qualitative agreement with small angle neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography observations, indicating that up to 50% of the annihilations occur at high densities of Y-Ti-O enriched nm-scale features (NFs). Some annihilations may also occur in small cavities. In Y-free control alloys, that do not contain NFs, positrons primarily annihilate in the Fe-Cr matrix and at features such as dislocations, while a small fraction annihilate in large cavities or Ar bubbles.

  1. Cold Positrons from Decaying Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boubekeur, Lotfi [Universitate de Valencia (Spain); Dodelson, Scott [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Vives, Oscar [Universitate de Valencia (Spain)

    2012-11-01

    Many models of dark matter contain more than one new particle beyond those in the Standard Model. Often heavier particles decay into the lightest dark matter particle as the Universe evolves. Here we explore the possibilities that arise if one of the products in a (Heavy Particle) $\\rightarrow$ (Dark Matter) decay is a positron, and the lifetime is shorter than the age of the Universe. The positrons cool down by scattering off the cosmic microwave background and eventually annihilate when they fall into Galactic potential wells. The resulting 511 keV flux not only places constraints on this class of models but might even be consistent with that observed by the INTEGRAL satellite.

  2. Image reconstruction methods in positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, D.W.; Defrise, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the two decades since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology, medical imaging techniques have become widely established as essential tools in the diagnosis of disease. As a consequence of recent technological and mathematical advances, the non-invasive, three-dimensional imaging of internal organs such as the brain and the heart is now possible, not only for anatomical investigations using X-ray but also for studies which explore the functional status of the body using positron-emitting radioisotopes. This report reviews the historical and physical basis of medical imaging techniques using positron-emitting radioisotopes. Mathematical methods which enable three-dimensional distributions of radioisotopes to be reconstructed from projection data (sinograms) acquired by detectors suitably positioned around the patient are discussed. The extension of conventional two-dimensional tomographic reconstruction algorithms to fully three-dimensional reconstruction is described in detail. (orig.)

  3. 64Cu-ATSM and 18FDG PET uptake and 64Cu-ATSM autoradiography in spontaneous canine tumors: comparison with pimonidazole hypoxia immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Anders E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare 64Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylsemicarbazone (64Cu-ATSM and 18FDG PET uptake characteristics and 64Cu-ATSM autoradiography to pimonidazole immunohistochemistry in spontaneous canine sarcomas and carcinomas. Methods Biopsies were collected from individual tumors between approximately 3 and 25 hours after the intravenous injection of 64Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole. 64Cu-ATSM autoradiography and pimonidazole immunostaining was performed on sectioned biopsies. Acquired 64Cu-ATSM autoradiography and pimonidazole images were rescaled, aligned and their distribution patterns compared. 64Cu-ATSM and 18FDG PET/CT scans were performed in a concurrent study and uptake characteristics were obtained for tumors where available. Results Maximum pimonidazole pixel value and mean pimonidazole labeled fraction was found to be strongly correlated to 18FDG PET uptake levels, whereas more varying results were obtained for the comparison to 64Cu-ATSM. In the case of the latter, uptake at scans performed 3 h post injection (pi generally showed strong positive correlated to pimonidazole uptake. Comparison of distribution patterns of pimonidazole immunohistochemistry and 64Cu-ATSM autoradiography yielded varying results. Significant positive correlations were mainly found in sections displaying a heterogeneous distribution of tracers. Conclusions Tumors with high levels of pimonidazole staining generally displayed high uptake of 18FDG and 64Cu-ATSM (3 h pi.. Similar regional distribution of 64Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole was observed in most heterogeneous tumor regions. However, tumor and hypoxia level dependent differences may exist with regard to the hypoxia specificity of 64Cu-ATSM in canine tumors.

  4. Autoradiography of H-3-pirenzepine and H-3-AFDX-384 in Mouse Brain Regions: Possible Insights into M-1, M-2, and M-4 Muscarinic Receptors Distribution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valuskova, P.; Farar, V.; Forczek, Sándor; Křížová, I.; Mysliveček, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 9, FEB 20 (2018), č. článku 124. ISSN 1663-9812 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : 3 h-afdx-384 * 3 H-pirenzepine * 3 h-qnb * Autoradiography * M muscarinic receptor 1 * M muscarinic receptor 2 * M muscarinic receptor 4 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 4.400, year: 2016

  5. Positron emission tomography in movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Positron emission tomography provides a method for the quantitation of regional function within the living human brain. Studies of cerebral metabolism and blood flow in patients with Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and focal dystonia have revealed functional abnormalities within substructures of the basal ganglia. Recent developments permit assessment of both pre-synaptic and post-synaptic function ion dopaminergic pathways. These techniques are now being applied to studies of movement disorders in human subjects

  6. Cosmic-ray Positrons from Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.; Büsching, I.

    2015-07-01

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of γ-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ∼10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new MSPs, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and redback (RB) systems. Since MSPs are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of MSPs are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by BWs and RBs may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.

  7. COSMIC-RAY POSITRONS FROM MILLISECOND PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.; Büsching, I. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Harding, A. K. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gonthier, P. L. [Hope College, Department of Physics, Holland, MI (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of γ-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ∼10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new MSPs, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and redback (RB) systems. Since MSPs are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of MSPs are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by BWs and RBs may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.

  8. Positron studies of defected metals, metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansil, A.

    1991-01-01

    Specific problems proposed under this project included the treatment of electronic structure and momentum density in various disordered and defected systems. Since 1987, when the new high-temperature superconductors were discovered, the project focused extensively on questions concerning the electronic structure and Fermiology of high-T c superconductors, in particular, (i) momentum density and positron experiments, (ii) angle-resolved photoemission intensities, (iii) effects of disorder and substitutions in the high-T c 's

  9. Cerebral blood flow measurement using 123I-IMP graph plot method with SPECT. Comparison with autoradiography method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Yuki; Kamitani, Hideki; Ishibashi, Minako; Ito, Satoru; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) values using 123 I-iodoamphetamine (IMP) graph plot (GP) method with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), compared with autoradiography (ARG) method. IMP-SPECT by GP combined with ARG method at rest was performed in 40 patients to determine the equation of linear regression for GP method in our institution. In addition, we compared regional CBF (rCBF) values at rest between GP and ARG methods in 10 other patients. Among all 50 patients, acetazolamide (ACZ)-challenged SPECT by GP combined with ARG method using 2-day protocol was performed in 10 patients. We also compared the rCBF values after ACZ challenge between GP and ARG methods in these 10 patients. The equation of linear regression for GP method in our institution was y=1.945x+20.36 (R 2 =0.586, P 2 =0.624, P 2 =0.150, P<0.001). IMP-SPECT by GP method at rest is useful to measure reliable rCBF values without arterial blood sampling, although we need pay attention to interpret the result of 2-day protocol ACZ-challenged SPECT by GP method. (author)

  10. Localization of substance P binding sites in submucous plexus of guinea pig ileum, using whole-mount autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burcher, E.; Bornstein, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Whole mounts of guinea pig ileum submucosa were incubated with radiolabeled tachykinins, and binding sites were visualized using autoradiography. Very dense specific binding for (/sup 125/I)-Bolton-Hunter substance P (BHSP) was observed over ganglia of the submucous plexus, with weaker binding over internodal strands. Dense specific binding was also seen over occasional strands of circular muscle, with weak binding over clumps of mucosa. Although very weak binding was seen over some large blood vessels, no binding was associated with smaller blood vessels. Localization of binding was absent in whole-mounts coincubated with 1 microM substance P, used to define nonspecific binding. Localization of BHSP-specific binding was also abolished in whole-mounts coincubated with 1 nM substance P, but not with 1 nM neurokinin B, suggesting that binding was probably to an NK-1 tachykinin receptor. In whole-mounts incubated in (/sup 125/I)-iodohistidyl neurokinin A (INKA) or (/sup 125/I)-Bolton-Hunter neurokinin B (BHNKB), no specific binding over ganglia was observed. These binding sites for BHSP are probably identical with the neuronal substance P receptors mediating mucosal ion transport.

  11. Autoradiography in mice after intravenous and intragastric administration of phenolphthalein and desacetylated bisacodyl, two laxative diphenols of the diphenylmethane group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sund, R.B.; Hetland, H.S.; Nafstad, I.

    1986-01-01

    Mice were injected with 14-C-labelled phenolphthalein (I) and desacetylated bisacodyl (II), or given the drugs by gastric tube. Whole-body autoradiography made at different survival times, and evaluated by densitometry, showed that the tissues of peripheral organs either had radioactivity levels similar to, or, in most cases, lower than the blood. The only exception was renal tissue, in which 14-C-activity accumulated above blood levels when II was given. Radioactivity was not demonstrated in the central nervous system, except for low levels transitory present following the injection of II. Substantially higher levels than in blood were on the other hand noted in bile and intestinal contents, and in urine. The experiments showed that both drugs are absorbed from the GI tract, and subsequently in part excreted in bile, in analogy with previous findings in the rat. Autoradiographic evidence was obtained that renal excretion rates were greater for II than for I. This was supported by liquid scintillation counting on solubilised remnants for the kidney. Both I and II were excreted mainly as metabolites. TLC of extracts of organ and excreta remnants indicated that glucuronides were the main metabolites present

  12. The distribution of ( sup 14 C)acrylamide in rainbow trout studied by whole-body autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddell, W.J.; Lech, J.J.; Marlowe, C.; Kleinow, K.M.; Friedman, M.A. (Univ. of Louisville, KY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of (2,3-{sup 14}C)acrylamide was studied in fingerling rainbow trout by whole-body autoradiography. Fish weighing approximately 7 g were injected ip with 3.2 mg/kg ({sup 14}C)acrylamide (0.1 microCi/g). One group of fish was kept in a fresh flowing water tank and frozen in dry ice/hexane 22 hr after injection; another group was placed in a separate tank of fresh flowing water and frozen 120 hr after treatment. A third group of fish served as nontreated controls. The autoradiographs of the fish at 22 hr show the highest concentration of radioactivity in the kidney, urinary bladder, blood, gallbladder, intestinal contents, and lens of eye. Lesser amounts of radioactivity are seen in the CNS, liver, and gills. Very low concentrations are seen in muscle. By 120 hr the only high concentrations are seen in gallbladder and lens of the eye. Lesser amounts are seen in the sclera, vertebrae, CNS, kidney, wall of intestine, and discrete spots in subcutaneous tissue presumed to be chromatophores. Low amounts are seen in muscle, the tissue usually consumed by man.

  13. Spinal cord blood flow measured by 14C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography during and after graded spinal cord compression in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtz, A.; Nystroem, B.G.; Gerdin, B.

    1989-01-01

    The relations between degree of thoracic spinal cord compression causing myelographic block, reversible paraparesis, and extinction of the sensory evoked potential on one hand, and spinal cord blood flow on the other, were investigated. This was done in rats using the blocking weight-technique and 14 C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. A load of 9 g caused myelographic block. Five minutes of compression with that load caused a reduction of spinal cord blood flow to about 25%, but 5 and 60 minutes after the compression spinal cord blood flow was restored to 60% of the pretrauma value. A load of 35 g for 5 minutes caused transient paraparesis. Recovery to about 30% was observed 5 and 60 minutes thereafter. During compression at a load of 55 g, which caused almost total extinction of sensory evoked potential and irreversible paraplegia, spinal cord blood flow under the load ceased. The results indicate that myelographic block occurs at a load which does not cause irreversible paraparesis and that a load which permits sensory evoked potential to be elicited results in potentially salvageable damage

  14. Differential visualization of dopamine and norepinephrine uptake sites in rat brain using [3H]mazindol autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javitch, J.A.; Strittmatter, S.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    Mazindol is a potent inhibitor of neuronal dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) uptake. DA and NE uptake sites in rat brain have been differentially visualized using [ 3 H]mazindol autoradiography. At appropriate concentrations, desipramine (DMI) selectively inhibits [ 3 H]mazindol binding to NE uptake sites without significantly affecting binding to DA uptake sites. The localization of DMI-insensitive specific [ 3 H] mazindol binding, reflecting DA uptake sites, is densest in the caudate-putamen, the nucleus accumbens, the olfactory tubercle, the subthalamic nucleus, the ventral tegmental area, the substantia nigra (SN) pars compacta, and the anterior olfactory nuclei. In contrast, the localization of DMI-sensitive specific [ 3 H]mazindol binding, representing NE uptake sites, is densest in the locus coeruleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, and the anteroventral thalamus. The distribution of DMI-insensitive specific [ 3 H]mazindol binding closely parallels that of dopaminergic terminal and somatodendritic regions, while the distribution of DMI-sensitive specific [ 3 H]mazindol binding correlates well with the regional localization of noradrenergic terminals and cell bodies. Injection of 6-hydroxydopamine, ibotenic acid, or colchicine into the SN decreases [ 3 H]mazindol binding to DA uptake sites in the ipsilateral caudate-putamen by 85%. In contrast, ibotenic acid lesions of the caudate-putamen do not reduce [ 3 H]mazindol binding to either the ipsilateral or contralateral caudate-putamen

  15. Development and applications of the positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Progress on the positron microscope during the past year has been steady, and we currently project that initial microscope images can be collected during mid to late summer of 1992. Work during the year has mainly been divided among four areas of effort: hardware construction; power supply and control system development; radioactive source fabrication; and planning of initial experimental projects. Details of progress in these areas will be given below. An initial optical design of the microscope was completed during 1990, but during the past year, significant improvements have been made to this design, and several limiting cases of microscope performance have been evaluated. The results of these evaluations have been extremely encouraging, giving us strong indications that the optical performance of the microscope will be better than originally anticipated. In particular, we should be able to explore ultimate performance capabilities of positron microscopy using our currently planned optical system, with improvements only in the image detector system, and the positron-source/moderator configuration. We should be able to study imaging reemission microscopy with resolutions approaching 10 Angstrom and be able to produce beam spots for rastered microscope work with diameters below the 1000 Angstrom diffusion limit. Because of these exciting new possibilities, we have decided to upgrade several microscope subsystems to levels consistent with ultimate performance earlier in our construction schedule than we had previously intended. In particular, alignment facilities in the optical system, vibration isolation, and power supply and control system flexibility have all been upgraded in their design over the past year

  16. Advances in positron and electron scattering*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limão-Vieira, Paulo; García, Gustavo; Krishnakumar, E.; Petrović, Zoran; Sullivan, James; Tanuma, Hajime

    2016-10-01

    The topical issue on Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering" combines contributions from POSMOL 2015 together with others devoted to celebrate the unprecedented scientific careers of our loyal colleagues and trusted friends Steve Buckman (Australian National University, Australia) and Michael Allan (University of Fribourg, Switzerland) on the occasion of their retirements. POSMOL 2015, the XVIII International Workshop on Low-Energy Positron and Positronium Physics and the XIX International Symposium on Electron-Molecule Collisions and Swarms, was held at Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal, from 17-20 July 2015. The international workshop and symposium allowed to achieve a very privileged forum of sharing and developing our scientific expertise on current aspects of positron, positronium and antiproton interactions with electrons, atoms, molecules and solid surfaces, and related topics, as well as electron interactions with molecules in both gaseous and condensed phases. Particular topics include studies of electron interactions with biomolecules, electron induced surface chemistry and the study of plasma processes. Recent developments in the study of swarms are also fully addressed.

  17. Dark matter "transporting" mechanism explaining positron excesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doojin; Park, Jong-Chul; Shin, Seodong

    2018-04-01

    We propose a novel mechanism to explain the positron excesses, which are observed by satellite-based telescopes including PAMELA and AMS-02, in dark matter (DM) scenarios. The novelty behind the proposal is that it makes direct use of DM around the Galactic Center where DM populates most densely, allowing us to avoid tensions from cosmological and astrophysical measurements. The key ingredients of this mechanism include DM annihilation into unstable states with a very long laboratory-frame life time and their "retarded" decay near the Earth to electron-positron pair(s) possibly with other (in)visible particles. We argue that this sort of explanation is not in conflict with relevant constraints from big bang nucleosynthesis and cosmic microwave background. Regarding the resultant positron spectrum, we provide a generalized source term in the associated diffusion equation, which can be readily applicable to any type of two-"stage" DM scenarios wherein production of Standard Model particles occurs at completely different places from those of DM annihilation. We then conduct a data analysis with the recent AMS-02 data to validate our proposal.

  18. Positron annihilation in gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1990-01-01

    Emission features appear at energies of 350 to 450 keV in the spectra of a number of gamma ray burst sources. These features were interpreted as electron-positron annihilation lines, redshifted by the gravitational field near the surface of a neutron star. Evidence that gamma ray bursts originate at neutron stars with magnetic field strengths of approx. 10(exp 12) Gauss came from recent observations of cyclotron scattering harmonics in the spectra of two bursts. Positrons could be produced in gamma ray burst sources either by photon-photon pair production or by one-photon pair production in a strong magnetic field. The annihilation of positrons is affected by the presence of a strong neutron star magnetic field in several ways. The relaxation of transverse momentum conservation causes an intrinsic broadening of the two-photon annihilation line and there is a decrease in the annihilation cross section below the free-space value. An additional channel for one-photon annihilation also becomes possible in high magnetic fields. The physics of pair production and annihilation near strongly magnetized neutron stars will be reviewed. Results from a self-consistent model for non-thermal synchrotron radiation and pair annihilation are beginning to identify the conditions required to produce observable annihilation features from strongly magnetized plasmas.

  19. Positron Cooling and Annihilation in Noble Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D G

    2017-11-17

    Positron cooling and annihilation in room temperature noble gases is simulated using accurate scattering and annihilation cross sections calculated with many-body theory, enabling the first simultaneous probing of the energy dependence of the scattering and annihilation cross sections. A strikingly small fraction of positrons is shown to survive to thermalization: ∼0.1 in He, ∼0 in Ne, ∼0.15 in Ar, ∼0.05 in Kr, and ∼0.01 in Xe. For Xe, the time-varying annihilation rate Z[over ¯]_{eff}(τ) is shown to be highly sensitive to the depletion of the momentum distribution due to annihilation, conclusively explaining the long-standing discrepancy between gas-cell and trap-based measurements. Overall, the use of the accurate atomic data gives Z[over ¯]_{eff}(τ) in close agreement with experiment for all noble gases except Ne, the experiment for which is proffered to have suffered from incomplete knowledge of the fraction of positrons surviving to thermalization and/or the presence of impurities.

  20. Detection of hypoxia in microscopic tumors using 131I-labeled iodo-azomycin galactopyranoside (131I-IAZGP) digital autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Sun, Xiaorong; Ma, Yuanyuan; Suehiro, Makiko; Zhang, Mutian; Russell, James; Humm, John L.; Ling, C.C.; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that tumors less than 1 mm diameter derived from HT29 colorectal cancer cells are extremely hypoxic when grown intraperitoneally or intradermally in nude mice, whereas those of greater size (approximately 1-4 mm diameter) are not significantly hypoxic. The object of this study was to determine if digital autoradiography using the radiolabeled hypoxia imaging tracer iodo-azomycin galactopyranoside ( 131 I-IAZGP) could detect hypoxia in this model. Microscopic HT29 tumors were grown as disseminated peritoneal disease and intradermally in nude mice. Tumors ranged in size from a few hundred microns to several millimeters in diameter. Animals were intravenously administered 131 I-IAZGP and pimonidazole 2 h before sacrifice. Following sacrifice, the intratumoral distribution of 131 I-IAZGP was assessed by digital autoradiography and compared with immunofluorescence microscopic images of pimonidazole binding and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression. The distributions of 131 I-IAZGP, pimonidazole, and CAIX expression were similar. Tumors less than 1 mm diameter displayed high 131 I-IAZGP uptake; these tumors also stained strongly for pimonidazole and CAIX. Larger tumors (approximately 1-4 mm diameter) were not significantly hypoxic and had low 131 I-IAZGP accumulation. 131 I-IAZGP can detect hypoxia in microscopic tumors. Microscopic tumors are useful models for the validation of hypoxia radiotracers, and digital autoradiography is an appropriate technique for studying the distribution of hypoxia radiotracers in microscopic tumors. (orig.)

  1. Low energy elastic scattering of positrons by CO: An application of continued fractions and Schwinger variational iterative methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arretche, F.; Mazon, K.T.; Michelin, S.E.; Fujimoto, M.M.; Iga, I.; Lee, M.-T.

    2008-01-01

    Iterative Schwinger variational methods and the method of continued fractions, widely used for electron-molecule scattering, are applied for the first time to investigate positron-molecule interactions. Specifically, integral and differential cross sections for elastic positron scattering by CO in the (0.5-20) eV energy range are calculated and reported. In our calculation, a static plus correlation-polarization potential is used to represent the collisional dynamics. Our calculated results are in general agreement with the theoretical and experimental data available in the literature

  2. Generation and application of slow positrons based on a electron LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Kurihara, T

    2002-01-01

    History of slow positron in Institute of Materials Structure Science High Energy Accelerator Research Organization is explained. The principle of generation and application of intense positron beam is mentioned. Two sources of intense positron are radioactive decay of radioactive isotopes emitting positron and electron-positron pair creation. The radioactive decay method uses sup 5 sup 8 Co, sup 6 sup 4 Cu, sup 1 sup 1 C, sup 1 sup 3 N, sup 1 sup 5 O and sup 1 sup 8 F. The electron-positron pair creation method uses nuclear reactor or electron linear accelerator (LINAC). The positron experimental facility in this organization consists of electron LINAC, slow positron beam source, positron transport and experimental station. The outline of this facility is started. The intense slow positron beam is applied to research positronium work function, electron structure of surface. New method such as combination of positron lifetime measurement and slow positron beam or Auger electron spectroscopy by positron annihil...

  3. Positron emitting radionuclides for South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynchbank, S.; Van der Walt, T.N.; Sharpey-Shafer, J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In South Africa there are currently two projects underway to supply and utilise positron emitting radionuclides for imaging in clinical nuclear medicine facilities. The advantages and applications of such radio nuclides are numerous and well known. However the premier initial application will be to employ 1BF, at first in the compound fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F)-FDG, for patients with cancers and neoplasms. The two projects are sited at iThemba LABS, where production of a generator supplying 66 Ga and the provision of ( 18 F]-FDG, are in an advanced state of planning; the former already fully financed by the Innovation Fund of the National Research Foundation. The two positron emitting radionuclides, 18 F and 68 Ge, will be produced using a cyclotron induced reaction on 1802 and Ga, respectively, at iThemba LABS. The 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator consists of an anion exchanger loaded with 68 Ge, which decays to 68 Ga. The resulting radiopharmaceuticals, ( 18 F]-FDG and 68 Ga citrate, will be produced by the Radionuclide Production Group of iThemba LABS, using well described methods. However the structures and processes to be used in the generator to provide 68 Ga are novel and will be explained. Initially provision of the CBF]-FDG will be to selected clinical medicine facilities in the Western Cape and Gauteng. It should be noted that the logistical problems of providing this radiopharmaceutical (which are much complicated by its short half life of 109.7 min) to Gauteng, were shown to be surmountable in the 1970s, by a regular delivery of 18 F between Gauteng and Cape Town, after the advent of a commercial service using jet aircraft. The obvious requirement that there should be appropriate nuclear medicine facilities to image patients, at the sites to which the positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals will be supplied, has been addressed. Proposed solutions will be outlined, in terms of a dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) camera and a gamma

  4. Positron lifetime measurements on electron irradiated amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, P.; Hautojaervi, P.; Chamberod, A.; Yli-Kauppila, J.; Van Zurk, R.

    1981-08-01

    Great advance in understanding the nature of point defects in crystalline metals has been achieved by employing positron annihilation technique. Positrons detect vacancy-type defects and the lifetime value of trapped positrons gives information on the size of submicroscopic vacancy aglomerates and microvoids. In this paper it is shown that low-temperature electron irradiations can result in a considerable increase in the positron lifetimes in various amorphous alloys because of the formation of vacancy-like defects which, in addition of the pre-existing holes, are able to trap positrons. Studied amorphous alloys were Fe 80 B 20 , Pd 80 Si 20 , Cu 50 Ti 50 , and Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 . Electron irradiations were performed with 3 MeV electrons at 20 K to doses around 10 19 e - /cm 2 . After annealing positron lifetime spectra were measured at 77 K

  5. Intense positron beam and its application to surface science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Y.; Hirose, M.; Kanazawa, I.; Sueoka, O.; Takamura, S.; Okada, S.

    1992-01-01

    Intense pulsed slow positron beam has been produced using the 100 MeV electron LINAC of JAERI · Tokai. In order to use the beam for surface studies such as positron diffraction and positron microscopy, it was transferred from the solenoid magnetic field to field free region and then was brightness-enhanced. The beam size was reduced from 10 mmφ (in the magnetic field) to 0.5 mmφ after two stages of re-moderation. Using the intense brightness-enhanced positron beam we have observed for the first time RHEPD (Reflection High-Energy Positron Diffraction) patterns. A design of re-emission positron microscopy is also described. (author)

  6. Positron annihilation in the nuclear outflows of the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panther, Fiona H.; Crocker, Roland M.; Birnboim, Yuval; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Ruiter, Ashley J.

    2018-02-01

    Observations of soft gamma rays emanating from the Milky Way from SPI/INTEGRAL reveal the annihilation of ˜2 × 1043 positrons every second in the Galactic bulge. The origin of these positrons, which annihilate to produce a prominent emission line centred at 511 keV, has remained mysterious since their discovery almost 50 yr ago. A plausible origin for the positrons is in association with the intense star formation ongoing in the Galactic centre. Moreover, there is strong evidence for a nuclear outflow in the Milky Way. We find that advective transport and subsequent annihilation of positrons in such an outflow cannot simultaneously replicate the observed morphology of positron annihilation in the Galactic bulge and satisfy the requirement that 90 per cent of positrons annihilate once the outflow has cooled to 104 K.

  7. Fluorinated tracers for imaging cancer with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Olivier; Luxen, André; Chatal, Jean-François; Vuillez, Jean-Philippe; Rigo, Pierre; Hustinx, Roland

    2004-08-01

    2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 is considered the ideal radioisotope for PET imaging owing to the low positron energy (0.64 MeV), which not only limits the dose rate to the patient but also results in a relatively short range of emission in tissue, thereby providing high-resolution images. Further, the 110-min physical half-life allows for high-yield radiosynthesis, transport from the production site to the imaging site and imaging protocols that may span hours, which permits dynamic studies and assessment of potentially fairly slow metabolic processes. The synthesis of fluorinated tracers as an alternative to FDG was initially tested using nucleophilic fluorination of the molecule, as performed when radiolabelling with iodine-124 or bromide-76. However, in addition to being long, with multiple steps, this procedure is not recommended for bioactive molecules containing reactive groups such as amine or thiol groups. Radiochemical yields are also often low. More recently, radiosynthesis from prosthetic group precursors, which allows easier radiolabelling of biomolecules, has led to the development of numerous fluorinated tracers. Given the wide availability of 18F, such tracers may well develop into important routine tracers. This article is a review of the literature concerning fluorinated radiotracers recently developed and under investigation for possible PET imaging in cancer patients. Two groups can be distinguished. The first includes "generalist" tracers, i.e. tracers amenable to use in a wide variety of tumours and indications, very similar in this respect to FDG. These are tracers for non-specific cell metabolism, such as protein synthesis, amino acid transport, nucleic acid synthesis or membrane component synthesis. The second group consists of "specific" tracers for receptor expression (i.e. oestrogens or somatostatin), cell hypoxia or

  8. Fluorinated tracers for imaging cancer with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couturier, Olivier; Chatal, Jean-Francois [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Hotel Dieu, CHU, Nantes (France); Luxen, Andre [Centre de Recherche du Cyclotron, University of Liege, Liege (Belgium); Vuillez, Jean-Philippe [Division of Nuclear Medicine, CHU, Grenoble (France); Rigo, Pierre [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Hopital Princesse Grace, Monte Carlo (Monaco); Hustinx, Roland [Division of Nuclear Medicine, CHU, Liege (Belgium)

    2004-08-01

    2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 is considered the ideal radioisotope for PET imaging owing to the low positron energy (0.64 MeV), which not only limits the dose rate to the patient but also results in a relatively short range of emission in tissue, thereby providing high-resolution images. Further, the 110-min physical half-life allows for high-yield radiosynthesis, transport from the production site to the imaging site and imaging protocols that may span hours, which permits dynamic studies and assessment of potentially fairly slow metabolic processes. The synthesis of fluorinated tracers as an alternative to FDG was initially tested using nucleophilic fluorination of the molecule, as performed when radiolabelling with iodine-124 or bromide-76. However, in addition to being long, with multiple steps, this procedure is not recommended for bioactive molecules containing reactive groups such as amine or thiol groups. Radiochemical yields are also often low. More recently, radiosynthesis from prosthetic group precursors, which allows easier radiolabelling of biomolecules, has led to the development of numerous fluorinated tracers. Given the wide availability of{sup 18}F, such tracers may well develop into important routine tracers. This article is a review of the literature concerning fluorinated radiotracers recently developed and under investigation for possible PET imaging in cancer patients. Two groups can be distinguished. The first includes ''generalist'' tracers, i.e. tracers amenable to use in a wide variety of tumours and indications, very similar in this respect to FDG. These are tracers for non-specific cell metabolism, such as protein synthesis, amino acid transport, nucleic acid synthesis or membrane component synthesis. The second group consists of ''specific'' tracers for receptor

  9. Positrons, Positronium, Positron and Positronium Complexes in Crystal. Features of Their Properties in Phonon Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene P. Prokopev

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article, Basing on the example of ionic crystals shows that polarization of crystal framework by oppositely charged polarons (positronium atom (ps invokes the change of positronium binding energy and leads to the renormalization of electron and positron effective masses as well. Such interaction of electron and positronium atom of positron with optical phonons leads to additional repelling interaction, besides coulomb attractive. Furthermore, the existence of positronium atom with major and minor radius is possible in the atmosphere of crystal phonons.

  10. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy study of minerals commonly found in shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsleben, Helge; Ameena, Fnu; Bufkin, James; Chun, Joah; Quarles, C. A.

    2018-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Lifetime and Doppler Broadening spectroscopies are used to investigate twenty-three different rock-forming minerals that are commonly found in shale. Doppler Broadening provides information about the positron and positronium (Ps) trapping sites for comparison among the various minerals. Correlations of positron lifetime and Doppler Broadening are observed for different groups of minerals. Finally, Ps formation, or lack thereof, in the various minerals has been determined.

  11. Positron production using a 1.7 MV pelletron accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, K. F.; Crivelli, P.; Santos, A. C. F.

    2013-04-01

    We report the foremost phase of a fourth generation positron source, being constructed at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Positron yields are reported by making use of the 19F(p,αe+e-)16O reaction, where the fluorine target is in the form of a CaF2 pellet. Positron production has been observed by detecting 511 keV annihilation gamma rays emerging from the irradiated CaF2 target.

  12. 2-(2'-((Dimethylamino)methyl)-4'-(3-[{sup 18}F]fluoropropoxy)-phenylthio)benzenamine for positron emission tomography imaging of serotonin transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Julie L. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Parhi, Ajit K.; Oya, Shunichi; Lieberman, Brian; Kung, Mei-Ping [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, Hank F. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: kunghf@gmail.com

    2008-05-15

    Introduction: A new {sup 18}F ligand, 2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4'-(3-[{sup 18}F]fluoropropoxy) -phenylthio)benzenamine ([{sup 18}F]1), for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of serotonin transporters (SERT) was evaluated. Methods: Binding affinity was determined through in vitro binding assays with LLC-PK1 cells overexpressing SERT, NET or DAT (LLC-SERT, LLC-NET and LLC-DAT) and with rat cortical homogenates. Localization and selectivity of [{sup 18}F]1 binding in vivo were evaluated by biodistribution, autoradiography and A-PET imaging studies in rats. Results: This compound displayed excellent binding affinity for SERT in vitro with K{sub i}=0.33 and 0.24 nM in LLC-SERT and rat cortical homogenates, respectively. Biodistribution studies with [{sup 18}F]1 showed good brain uptake (1.61% dose/g at 2 min postinjection), high uptake into the hypothalamus (1.22% dose/g at 30 min) and a high target-to-nontarget (hypothalamus to cerebellum) ratio of 9.66 at 180 min postinjection. Pretreatment with a SERT selective inhibitor considerably inhibited [{sup 18}F]1 binding in biodistribution studies. Ex vivo autoradiography reveals [{sup 18}F]1 localization to brain regions with high SERT density, and this binding was blocked by pretreatment with SERT selective inhibitors. Small animal PET (A-PET) imaging in rats provided clear images of tracer localization in the thalamus, midbrain and striatum. In A-PET chasing experiments, injecting a SERT selective inhibitor 75 min post-tracer injection causes a dramatic reduction in regional radioactivity and the target-to-nontarget ratio. Conclusion: The results of the biological studies and the ease of radiosynthesis with moderately good radiochemical yield (RCY=10-35%) make [{sup 18}F]1 an excellent candidate for SERT PET imaging.

  13. Investigation of highly activated materials by conventional positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabelova, V.; Petriska, M.; Slugen, V.; Krsjak, V.

    2013-01-01

    Positron annihilation process is helpful tool for material microstructure study. Many useful methods for detecting vacancies and their clusters in various alloys use its principle. Experimental procedure of positron source preparation (radioactive 22 Na) for these methods is difficult task. The unusual small sample dimensions of studied irradiated Eurofer 97 alloy form difficult conditions for its manufacturing. The unique sodium positron source proper preparation is confirmed by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) in Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. (authors)

  14. Absorbed dose in polymers during a positron annihilation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Namito, Y.; Oki, Y.; Numajiri, M.; Miura, T.; Hirayama, H.; Kondo, K.; Ito, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) technique has been recognized as being a useful method to study the characteristics of polymers. However, radiation effects due to positrons used as a probe have been raised as being a problem, since positrons emitted from 22 Na have sufficient energy to induce radiation damage in polymers. In this study, the radiation dose induced by positrons emitted from 22 Na was estimated for such polymers like polyethylenes and polypropylenes using the EGS4 code. The radiation damage during PAL measurements is also discussed. It has been shown that the calculated dose is consistent with that estimated from an empirical equation of the mass-attenuation coefficient. (author)

  15. Positron lifetime study of neutron-irradiated molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinode, Kenji; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Kumakura, Hiroaki; Doyama, Masao; Shiraishi, Kensuke.

    1978-01-01

    Annealing behavior of fast-neutron-irradiated molybdenum was studied by means of positron lifetime technique. It was found that Stage III annealing can be mainly identified as the vacancy migration process from the detailed analyses of data. The void growth after successive high temperature annealings was clearly detected through the changes of positron lifetime parameters. An attempt to analyse the size distribution of voids from positron lifetime spectra was presented, and discussions on the evaluation of void concentration from positron data are also given. (author)

  16. Theory of the temperature dependence of positron bulk lifetimes-implications for vacancy formation enthalpy measurements via positron experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, S.W.; Sinha, S.K.; Siegel, R.W.

    1977-02-01

    Temperature dependent effects, which may have a bearing on determinations of vacancy formation enthalpies in metals by positron annihilation, have been observed in certain metals. These effects have been observed to occur both at temperatures below those at which positron annihilation is most sensitive to equilibrium vacancies and at temperatures well within the vacancy-sensitive region. The effect of thermal lattice displacements on positron lifetimes in metals was investigated to help understand these phenomena

  17. Electroweak interactions between intense neutrino beams and dense electron-positron magneto-plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tsintsadze, N L; Stenflo, L

    2003-01-01

    The electroweak coupling between intense neutrino beams and strongly degenerate relativistic dense electron-positron magneto-plasmas is considered. The intense neutrino bursts interact with the plasma due to the weak Fermi interaction force, and their dynamics is governed by a kinetic equation. Our objective here is to develop a kinetic equation for a degenerate neutrino gas and to use that equation to derive relativistic magnetohydrodynamic equations. The latter are useful for studying numerous collective processes when intense neutrino beams nonlinearly interact with degenerate, relativistic, dense electron-positron plasmas in strong magnetic fields. If the number densities of the plasma particles are of the order of 10 sup 3 sup 3 cm sup - sup 3 , the pair plasma becomes ultra-relativistic, which strongly affects the potential energy of the weak Fermi interaction. The new system of equations allows several neutrino-driven streaming instabilities involving new types of relativistic Alfven-like waves, The re...

  18. Revealing Fundamental Interactions: the Role of Polarized Positrons and Electrons at the Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke,; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv

    2005-07-06

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  19. The Role of polarized positrons and electrons in revealing fundamental interactions at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke,; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv

    2005-07-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  20. [Fluorinated analogs of nucleosides and fluorinated tracers of gene expression for positron emission tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Olivier; Chatal, Jean-François; Hustinx, Roland

    2004-09-01

    18F-FDG is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine 18 is considered as the ideal radioisotope for PET, thanks to a low positron energy, which not only limits the dose rate to the patients but also provides high-resolution images. Furthermore, the 110 min. physical half-life allows for high-yield radiosynthesis, transport from the production site to the imaging site, and imaging protocols that could span hours, which permits dynamic studies and assessing metabolic processes that may be fairly slow. Recently, synthesis of fluorinated tracers from prosthetic group precursors, which allows easier radiolabeling of biomolecules, has given a boost to the development of numerous fluorinated tracers. Given the wide availability of fluorine 18, such tracers may well develop into important routine tracers. This article is a review of the literature concerning fluorinated analogs of nucleosides and fluorinated radiotracers of gene expression recently developed and under investigation.

  1. Digital Autoradiography as a novel complementary technique for the investigation of radioactive contamination in nuclear facilities under dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haudebourg, Raphael; Fichet, Pascal; Goutelard, Florence

    2015-01-01

    The detection (location and quantification) of nuclear facilities to be dismantled possible contamination with low-range particles emitters ( 3 H, other low-energy β emitters, a emitters) remains a tedious and expensive task. Indeed, usual remote counters show a too low sensitivity to these non-penetrating radiations, while conventional wipe tests are irrelevant for fixed radioactivity evaluation. The only method to accurately measure activity levels consists in sampling and running advanced laboratory analyses (spectroscopy, liquid scintillation counting, pyrolysis...). Such measurements generally induce sample preparation, waste production (destructive analyses, solvents), nuclear material transportation, long durations, and significant labor mobilization. Therefore, the search for the limitation of their number and cost easily conflicts with the necessity to perform a dense screening for sampling (to maximize the representativeness of the samples), in installations of thousands of square meters (floors, wells, ceilings), plus furniture, pipes, and other wastes. To overcome this contradiction, Digital Autoradiography (D. A.) was re-routed from bio molecular research to radiological mapping of nuclear installations under dismantling and to waste and sample analysis. After in-situ exposure to the possibly-contaminated areas to investigate, commercial reusable radiosensitive phosphor screens (of a few 100 cm 2 ) were scanned in the proper laboratory device and sharp quantitative images of the radioactivity could be obtained. The implementation of geostatistical tools in the data processing software enabled the exhaustive characterization of concrete floors at a rate of 2 weeks / 100 m 2 , at lowest costs. Various samples such as drilled cores, or tank and wood pieces, were also successfully evaluated with this method, for decisive results. Thanks to the accurate location of potential contamination spots, this approach ensures relevant and representative sampling

  2. Digital Autoradiography as a novel complementary technique for the investigation of radioactive contamination in nuclear facilities under dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haudebourg, Raphael; Fichet, Pascal [Laboratory of Analyses and Operators Support, French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commision (CEA), Saclay Center, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex, (France); Goutelard, Florence [NucLab, CEA Marcoule Center, (France)

    2015-07-01

    The detection (location and quantification) of nuclear facilities to be dismantled possible contamination with low-range particles emitters ({sup 3}H, other low-energy β emitters, a emitters) remains a tedious and expensive task. Indeed, usual remote counters show a too low sensitivity to these non-penetrating radiations, while conventional wipe tests are irrelevant for fixed radioactivity evaluation. The only method to accurately measure activity levels consists in sampling and running advanced laboratory analyses (spectroscopy, liquid scintillation counting, pyrolysis...). Such measurements generally induce sample preparation, waste production (destructive analyses, solvents), nuclear material transportation, long durations, and significant labor mobilization. Therefore, the search for the limitation of their number and cost easily conflicts with the necessity to perform a dense screening for sampling (to maximize the representativeness of the samples), in installations of thousands of square meters (floors, wells, ceilings), plus furniture, pipes, and other wastes. To overcome this contradiction, Digital Autoradiography (D. A.) was re-routed from bio molecular research to radiological mapping of nuclear installations under dismantling and to waste and sample analysis. After in-situ exposure to the possibly-contaminated areas to investigate, commercial reusable radiosensitive phosphor screens (of a few 100 cm{sup 2}) were scanned in the proper laboratory device and sharp quantitative images of the radioactivity could be obtained. The implementation of geostatistical tools in the data processing software enabled the exhaustive characterization of concrete floors at a rate of 2 weeks / 100 m{sup 2}, at lowest costs. Various samples such as drilled cores, or tank and wood pieces, were also successfully evaluated with this method, for decisive results. Thanks to the accurate location of potential contamination spots, this approach ensures relevant and representative

  3. Quantitative autoradiography of 14C-D-glucose metabolism of normal and traumatized rat brain using micro-absorption photometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonorden, S.

    1980-01-01

    It could be shown using 14 C-glucose as energy-providing substrate for brain tissue metabolism that for bolus type application a retarded and even channelling of the substrate into the metabolic process takes place. The presence of tracer in the tissue was established using autoradiography. A linear correlation between the amount of tissue-incorporated 14 C section thickness and exposure time could be established by means of densitometric measurement of brain sections of various thicknesses, by applying various 14 C-activities and by different exposure times. From these correlations direct conclusions may be made regarding the specific activity of the tissue provided that exposure time and section thickness of the sample are known. Comparative studies between cortex and narrow and between traumatized and non-traumatized brain tissue show that the rate of metabolism in brain cortex is markedly higher than in the marrow and that 14 C-incorporation is higher in traumatized tissue than in non-traumatized tissue. Whilst the difference in rate of metabolism between brain cortex and marrow can be clearly related to the differing cell count/unit surface area for cortex and marrow, the different energy conversion rates for functionally damaged and normal brain tissue is a specific characteristic of injury. Apart from the fact that an increased 14 C-deposition is in no way indicative of an increased metabolic activity, the possibility of quantifying 14 C-tissue content provides a basis for estimating therapeutic effects e.g. in the treatment of trauma-caused brain edema. (orig.) [de

  4. Neuroanatomical patterns of the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain as determined by quantitative in vitro autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempel, A.; Zukin, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Highly specific radioligands and quantitative autoradiography reveal strikingly different neuroanatomical patterns for the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain. The mu receptors are most densely localized in patches in the striatum, layers I and III of the cortex, the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampal formation, specific nuclei of the thalamus, the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, the interpeduncular nucleus, and the locus coeruleus. In contrast, delta receptors are highly confined, exhibiting selective localization in layers I, II, and VIa of the neocortex, a diffuse pattern in the striatum, and moderate concentration in the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra and in the interpeduncular nucleus. delta receptors are absent in most other brain structures. This distribution is unexpected in that the enkephalins, the putative endogenous ligands of the delta receptor, occur essentially throughout the brain. The kappa receptors of rat brain exhibit a third pattern distinct from that of the mu and delta receptors. kappa receptors occur at low density in patches in the striatum and at particularly high density in the nucleus accumbens, along the pyramidal and molecular layers of the hippocampus, in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus, specific midline nuclei of the thalamus, and hindbrain regions. kappa receptors appear to be uniformly distributed across regions in the neocortex with the exception of layer III, which revealed only trace levels of binding. An important conclusion of the present study is that delta receptors occur at high density only in the forebrain and in two midbrain structures, whereas mu and kappa receptors exhibit discrete patterns in most major brain regions

  5. Differential visualization of dopamine and norepinephrine uptake sites in rat brain using [3H]mazindol autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javitch, J A; Strittmatter, S M; Snyder, S H

    1985-06-01

    Mazindol is a potent inhibitor of neuronal dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) uptake. DA and NE uptake sites in rat brain have been differentially visualized using [3H]mazindol autoradiography. At appropriate concentrations, desipramine (DMI) selectively inhibits [3H]mazindol binding to NE uptake sites without significantly affecting binding to DA uptake sites. The localization of DMI-insensitive specific [3H] mazindol binding, reflecting DA uptake sites, is densest in the caudate-putamen, the nucleus accumbens, the olfactory tubercle, the subthalamic nucleus, the ventral tegmental area, the substantia nigra (SN) pars compacta, and the anterior olfactory nuclei. In contrast, the localization of DMI-sensitive specific [3H]mazindol binding, representing NE uptake sites, is densest in the locus coeruleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, and the anteroventral thalamus. The distribution of DMI-insensitive specific [3H]mazindol binding closely parallels that of dopaminergic terminal and somatodendritic regions, while the distribution of DMI-sensitive specific [3H]mazindol binding correlates well with the regional localization of noradrenergic terminals and cell bodies. Injection of 6-hydroxydopamine, ibotenic acid, or colchicine into the SN decreases [3H]mazindol binding to DA uptake sites in the ipsilateral caudate-putamen by 85%. In contrast, ibotenic acid lesions of the caudate-putamen do not reduce [3H]mazindol binding to either the ipsilateral or contralateral caudate-putamen. Thus, the DA uptake sites in the caudate-putamen are located on the presynaptic terminals of dopaminergic axons originating from the SN.

  6. Effects of high-dose fenfluramine treatment on monoamine uptake sites in rat brain: Assessment using quantitative autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, N.M.; Mitchell, W.M.; Contrera, J.F.; De Souza, E.B. (NIDA Addiction Research Center, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Fenfluramine is an amphetamine derivative that in humans is used primarily as an anorectic agent in the treatment of obesity. In rats, subchronic high-dose d,l-fenfluramine treatment (24 mg/kg subcutaneously, twice daily for 4 days) causes long-lasting decreases in brain serotonin (5HT), its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and high-affinity 5HT uptake sites. Moreover, this high-dose treatment regimen causes both selective long-lasting decreases in fine-caliber 5HT-immunoreactive axons and appearance of other 5HT-immunoreactive axons with morphology characteristic of degenerating axons. Determination of the potential neurotoxic effects of fenfluramine treatment using immunohistochemistry is limited from the perspectives that staining is difficult to quantify and that it relies on presence of the antigen (in this case 5HT), and the 5HT-depleting effects of fenfluramine are well known. In the present study, we used quantitative in vitro autoradiography to assess, in detail, the density and regional distribution of (3H)paroxetine-labeled 5HT and (3H)mazindol-labeled catecholamine uptake sites in response to the high-dose fenfluramine treatment described above. Because monoamine uptake sites are concentrated on monoamine-containing nerve terminals, decreases in uptake site density would provide a quantitative assessment of potential neurotoxicity resulting from this fenfluramine treatment regimen. Marked decreases in densities of (3H)paroxetine-labeled 5HT uptake sites occurred in brain regions in which fenfluramine treatment decreased the density of 5HT-like immunostaining when compared to saline-treated control rats. These included cerebral cortex, caudate putamen, hippocampus, thalamus, and medial hypothalamus.

  7. Differential visualization of dopamine and norepinephrine uptake sites in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)mazindol autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javitch, J.A.; Strittmatter, S.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1985-06-01

    Mazindol is a potent inhibitor of neuronal dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) uptake. DA and NE uptake sites in rat brain have been differentially visualized using (/sup 3/H)mazindol autoradiography. At appropriate concentrations, desipramine (DMI) selectively inhibits (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding to NE uptake sites without significantly affecting binding to DA uptake sites. The localization of DMI-insensitive specific (/sup 3/H) mazindol binding, reflecting DA uptake sites, is densest in the caudate-putamen, the nucleus accumbens, the olfactory tubercle, the subthalamic nucleus, the ventral tegmental area, the substantia nigra (SN) pars compacta, and the anterior olfactory nuclei. In contrast, the localization of DMI-sensitive specific (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding, representing NE uptake sites, is densest in the locus coeruleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, and the anteroventral thalamus. The distribution of DMI-insensitive specific (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding closely parallels that of dopaminergic terminal and somatodendritic regions, while the distribution of DMI-sensitive specific (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding correlates well with the regional localization of noradrenergic terminals and cell bodies. Injection of 6-hydroxydopamine, ibotenic acid, or colchicine into the SN decreases (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding to DA uptake sites in the ipsilateral caudate-putamen by 85%. In contrast, ibotenic acid lesions of the caudate-putamen do not reduce (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding to either the ipsilateral or contralateral caudate-putamen.

  8. Effects of high-dose fenfluramine treatment on monoamine uptake sites in rat brain: Assessment using quantitative autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, N.M.; Mitchell, W.M.; Contrera, J.F.; De Souza, E.B.

    1990-01-01

    Fenfluramine is an amphetamine derivative that in humans is used primarily as an anorectic agent in the treatment of obesity. In rats, subchronic high-dose d,l-fenfluramine treatment (24 mg/kg subcutaneously, twice daily for 4 days) causes long-lasting decreases in brain serotonin (5HT), its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and high-affinity 5HT uptake sites. Moreover, this high-dose treatment regimen causes both selective long-lasting decreases in fine-caliber 5HT-immunoreactive axons and appearance of other 5HT-immunoreactive axons with morphology characteristic of degenerating axons. Determination of the potential neurotoxic effects of fenfluramine treatment using immunohistochemistry is limited from the perspectives that staining is difficult to quantify and that it relies on presence of the antigen (in this case 5HT), and the 5HT-depleting effects of fenfluramine are well known. In the present study, we used quantitative in vitro autoradiography to assess, in detail, the density and regional distribution of [3H]paroxetine-labeled 5HT and [3H]mazindol-labeled catecholamine uptake sites in response to the high-dose fenfluramine treatment described above. Because monoamine uptake sites are concentrated on monoamine-containing nerve terminals, decreases in uptake site density would provide a quantitative assessment of potential neurotoxicity resulting from this fenfluramine treatment regimen. Marked decreases in densities of [3H]paroxetine-labeled 5HT uptake sites occurred in brain regions in which fenfluramine treatment decreased the density of 5HT-like immunostaining when compared to saline-treated control rats. These included cerebral cortex, caudate putamen, hippocampus, thalamus, and medial hypothalamus

  9. A new high rate positron lifetime measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedwell, M.O.; Paulus, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    Positron lifetime measuring system, a technique to perform non-destructive studies on the internal structure of materials, has many components common to those used for nuclear time spectroscopy systems. In each case, a timing coincidence curve is measured for the energy range of interest, and this is accomplished in a typical timing coincidence system. The paper first describes the conventional timing coincidence system, then a new fast timing system is introduced. Comparing to the conventional fast/slow timing system, the fast timing technique offers reduced complexity, lower system cost, and improved high data rate capability. Experimental results show that the FWHM timing resolution ranges from 190 ps for a 1.1 : 1 dynamic range to 337 ps for a 100 : 1 dynamic range of signals with 60 Co. As for the timing resolution as a function of energy, the FWHM resolution for each channel ranges from 124 ps at 1 MeV to 400 ps at 100 keV. Since the excellent timing performance is maintained even at very high input rate, the experimenters can use much more active sources to increase the true coincidence rate and reduce data accumulation time. This method has the added advantage of minimizing long term drift effects since the experiments can be conducted in less time. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Relevance of slow positron beam research to astrophysical studies of positron interactions and annihilation in the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guessoum, N.; Jean, P.; Gillard, W.

    2006-01-01

    The processes undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium (ISM) from the moments of their birth to their annihilation are examined. Both the physics of the positron interactions with gases and solids (dust grains), and the physical conditions and characteristics of the environments where the processes of energy loss, positronium formation, and annihilation taking place, are reviewed. An explanation is given as to how all the relevant physical information are taken into account in order to calculate annihilation rates and spectra of the 511 keV emission for the various phases of the ISM; special attention is paid to positron interactions with dust and with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. An attempt is made to show to what extent the interactions between positrons and interstellar dust grains are similar to laboratory experiments in which beams of slow positrons impinge upon solids and surfaces. Sample results are shown for the effect of dust grains on positron annihilation spectra in some phases of the ISM which, together with high resolution spectra measured by satellites, can be used to infer useful knowledge about the environment where the annihilation is predominantly taking place and ultimately about the birth place and history of positrons in the Galaxy. The important complementarity between work done by the astrophysical and the solid-state positron communities is strongly emphasized and specific experimental work is suggested which could assist the modeling of the interaction and annihilation of positrons in the ISM

  11. Positron CT findings of chronic schizophrenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Junzo; Miyazaki, Chihiro; Sugai, Yuichi; Iio, Masaaki.

    1983-01-01

    Positron CT images of 15 chronic schizophrenics (2 females and 13 males) were examined in contrast to 5 male controls. Average age of controls was 36 years and that of schizophrenics was 42 years. Schizophrenic cases were ill over 6 years, averaging 17 years. All were under antipsychotic drug therapy. Tracer compounds were 11 C-CO2 and 11 C-glucose photosynthesised, the former being inhalated once just before and the latter being administered orally 10-15 minutes before examinations. On positron CT images of all normal controls, hyper-radioactivities in frontal regions were observed. Some asymmetries of activities were observed but not remarkable. There wes no difference between the images with 11 C-CO2 and those with 11 C-glucose. In schizophrenic cases, (1) 7 out of 15 cases showed hypo-activities in the frontal regions both with 11 C-CO2 and 11 C-glucose. (2) With 11 C-glucose, relative activities in the brain were lower than those in the soft tissues around the scalp, suggesting the lowered selective uptake of 11 C-glucose by the brain. (3) With 11 C-CO 2, 4 cases showed higher activities in the right temporal regions and their subcortex than the left. By consideration of relationships between these positron CT findings and clinical data such as present age, age of onset of illness, duration of illness, psychiatric symptoms, present drug amount, summed drug amount from administration, EEG and X-ray CT findings, significant correlation was recognized only between low frontal radioactivities and apathy-abulia as main symptom. Limitation on the explanation of the findings with the image alone was discussed. (author)

  12. 77 FR 8262 - Draft Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ...] Draft Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs... Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' The draft guidance is intended to assist... draft guidance entitled ``Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET...

  13. Positron annihilation and polymerization of epoxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Ito, Y.; Endo, K.; Fujita, S.

    1989-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurement has been applied to the investigation of solidification from the liquid state to the solid state in epoxy with different mixing ratios of resin and hardener. It has been shown that the mixing ratios and the physical states of liquid, gel, and solid affect positronium formation. In samples with an excess of hardener, long-lived components were observed in the liquid and gel states, while they disappeared after solidification. Positronium formation in epoxy is strongly affected by the heating process of epoxy samples. (author)

  14. DHCAL with Minimal Absorber: Measurements with Positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Freund, B; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Antequera, J.Berenguer; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H.L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Morin, L.; Besson, D.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kolk, N.van der; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Corriveau, F.; Blazey, G.C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-01-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  15. Methods and instrumentation for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandelkern, M.A.; Phelps, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on positron emission tomography (PET), a technique for the noninvasive measurement of local tissue concentrations of injected radioactive tracers. Tracer kinetics techniques can be applied to this information to quantify physiologic function in human tissue. In the tracer method, a pharmaceutical is labeled by a radioactive atom. When introduced into the subject that molecule follows a physiologic pathway. The space- and time-dependent distribution of the radionuclide is obtained via an imaging technique. If the radiopharmaceutical is sufficiently analogous to a natural substrate or other substance of interest, a quantitative image can be translated into a physiologic measurement

  16. DHCAL with minimal absorber: measurements with positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, B.; Neubüser, C.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Antequera, J. Berenguer; Alamillo, E. Calvo; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.

    2016-01-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  17. Positron scattering from noble gases future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A C L; Caradonna, P; Makochekanwa, C; Slaughter, D S; Sullivan, J P; Buckman, S J [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Mitroy, J, E-mail: acj107@rsphysse.anu.edu.a [Faculty of Education Health and Science, Charles Darwin University, NT (Australia)

    2009-11-01

    Recent results for positron scattering from noble gases over an energy range from 0.5 to 60eV are presented. Measurements include the grand total ({sigma}{sub GT}), Ps formation ({sigma}{sub Ps}) and Grand total - Ps formation (({sigma}{sub GT}-P{sub s}) cross sections. Some preliminary DCS results will also be presented. Work on a formulation of modified effective range theory (MERT) is being undertaken to determine the value of the scattering length which may be useful for identifying a bound state. Plans for experiments on metal atoms will be outlined.

  18. Semiempirical potentials for positron scattering by atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assafrao, Denise; Walters, H. R. J.; Arretche, Felipe; Dutra, Adriano; Mohallem, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, 29075-910, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, 89223-100, Joinville, SC (Brazil); Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, PO Box 702, 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    We report calculations of differential and integral cross sections for positron scattering by noble gas and alkaline-earth atoms within the same methodology. The scattering potentials are constructed by scaling adiabatic potentials so that their minima coincide with the covalent radii of the target atoms. Elastic differential and integral cross sections are calculated for Ne, Ar, Be, and Mg, and the results are very close to experimental and best theoretical data. Particularly, elastic differential cross sections for Be and Mg at low energies are reported.

  19. Validation of an 18F-labeled biphenylalkyne as a positron emission tomography imaging agent for β-amyloid plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wey, S.-P.; Weng, C.-C.; Lin, K.-J.; Yao, C.-H.; Yen, T.-C.; Kung, Hank F.; Skovronsky, Daniel; Kung, M.-P.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Recently, the feasibility of detecting amyloid plaques in the living brain by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been successfully demonstrated. As such, imaging β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in the brain may further advance the differential diagnosis of the disease and allow clinicians to measure the effectiveness of therapeutic drugs aimed at lowering plaques in the brain. We report herein the preclinical validation of a potential 18 F-labeled biphenylalkyne, AV-138, as a preliminary step toward developing the imaging agent for patients suspected of having Alzheimer's disease. Methods: In vitro binding was carried out in the homogenates prepared from postmortem AD brains with [ 125 I]IMPY as the radioligand. [ 18 F]AV-138 was successfully prepared using a tosylate precursor and Sumitomo modules for radiosynthesis. Similarly, specific binding of [ 18 F]AV-138 (0.02-0.05 nM) to homogenates, prepared from gray and white matters of pooled AD patients and control subjects, was performed. Specific binding to Aβ plaques was measured by autoradiography in AD brain sections (n=11), and the same brain sections were fluorescently stained with thioflavin-S (TF-S). Images of both radiolabeling and fluorescent staining of plaques obtained by a phosphor imager were used for correlation image analysis. Results: As expected, AV-138 displayed a high binding affinity (K i =2.4±0.7 nM) in AD gray matter homogenates (due to its high level of Aβ plaque accumulation). Specific binding can be clearly measured in the AD gray matter homogenates, but not in the AD white matters. Control brain homogenates, due to a lack of Aβ plaques, also showed no specific binding. Furthermore, in vitro autoradiography of postmortem AD brain sections showed that the high binding signal of [ 18 F]AV-138 was specifically due to Aβ plaques. Fluorescent staining of plaques with TF-S correlated well with the radiolabeling of [ 18 F]AV-138 in AD brain sections (r>0.90). Conclusion: Taken

  20. Polarization Study for NLC Positron Source Using EGS4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, James C

    2000-09-20

    SLAC is exploring a polarized positron source to study new physics for the NLC project. The positron source envisioned in this paper consists of a polarized electron source, a 50-MeV electron accelerator, a thin target less-than-or-equal-to 0.2 radiation length for positron production, and a capture system for high-energy, small angular divergence positrons. The EGS4 code was used to study the yield, energy spectra, emission-angle distribution, and the mean polarization of the positrons emanating from W-Re and Ti targets hit by longitudinally polarized electron and photon beams. To account for polarization within the EGS4 code a method devised by Flottmann was used, which takes into account polarization transfer for pair production, bremsstrahlung, and Compton interactions. A mean polarization of 0.85 for positrons with energies greater than 25 MeV was obtained. Most of the high-energy positrons were emitted within a forward angle of 20 degrees. The yield of positrons above 25 MeV per incident photon was 0.034, which was about 70 times higher than that obtained with an electron beam.

  1. Positron emission tomography in drug development and drug evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, AMJ; Vaalburg, W

    2000-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an imaging modality which can determine biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitting radionuclides as C-11, N-13, O-15 and F-18 and by measuring the annihilation radiation

  2. Development of an undulator-based polarized positron source for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    at KEK [1a], Compton backscattering is used [2], the E166 experiment uses a helical undulator to produce polarized photons. An undulator-based positron source for the ILC has been proposed in [3,4]. The proposed scheme for an ILC positron source is illustrated in figure 1. In this scheme, a 150 GeV electron beam passes.

  3. Positron interactions and transport in biologically relevant molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makochekanwa, C; Jones, A; Caradonna, P; Slaughter, D; Sullivan, J; Buckman, S; Bankovic, A; Petrovic, Z; Malovic, G; Dujko, S; Marler, J; Nixon, K; Brunger, M

    2009-01-01

    We present new, high-resolution measurements of positron scattering from biologically relevant molecules, such as water and formic acid. The measurements include absolute determinations of total scattering and positronium formation and they have enabled us to assemble a set of cross sections for these molecules which can be used in an investigation of positron transport in these systems.

  4. Simulation of the annihilation emission of galactic positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, W.

    2008-01-01

    Positrons annihilate in the central region of our Galaxy. This has been known since the detection of a strong emission line centered on an energy of 511 keV in the direction of the Galactic center. This gamma-ray line is emitted during the annihilation of positrons with electrons from the interstellar medium. The spectrometer SPI, onboard the INTEGRAL observatory, performed spatial and spectral analyses of the positron annihilation emission. This thesis presents a study of the Galactic positron annihilation emission based on models of the different interactions undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium. The models are relied on our present knowledge of the properties of the interstellar medium in the Galactic bulge, where most of the positrons annihilate, and of the physics of positrons (production, propagation and annihilation processes). In order to obtain constraints on the positrons sources and physical characteristics of the annihilation medium, we compared the results of the models to measurements provided by the SPI spectrometer. (author)

  5. Formation of a high intensity low energy positron string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Syresin, E. M.; Itahashi, T.; Dubinov, A. E.

    2004-05-01

    The possibility of a high intensity low energy positron beam production is discussed. The proposed Positron String Trap (PST) is based on the principles and technology of the Electron String Ion Source (ESIS) developed in JINR during the last decade. A linear version of ESIS has been used successfully for the production of intense highly charged ion beams of various elements. Now the Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) concept is under study and this opens really new promising possibilities in physics and technology. In this report, we discuss the application of the tubular-type trap for the storage of positrons cooled to the cryogenic temperatures of 0.05 meV. It is intended that the positron flux at the energy of 1-5 eV, produced by the external source, is injected into the Tubular Positron Trap which has a similar construction as the TESIS. Then the low energy positrons are captured in the PST Penning trap and are cooled down because of their synchrotron radiation in the strong (5-10 T) applied magnetic field. It is expected that the proposed PST should permit storing and cooling to cryogenic temperature of up to 5×109 positrons. The accumulated cooled positrons can be used further for various physics applications, for example, antihydrogen production.

  6. Positron imaging system with improved count rate and tomographic capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A system with improved count rate capability for detecting the radioactive distribution of positron events within an organ of interest in a living subject is described. Objects of the invention include improving the scintillation crystal and pulse processing electronics, avoiding the limitations of collimators and provide an Arger camera positron imaging system that avoids the use of collimators. (U.K.)

  7. Positron ionization mass spectrometry: An organic mass spectrometrist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glish, G.L.; Donohue, D.L.; McLuckey, S.A.; Eckenrode, B.A.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    We are currently engaged in a research program to study the ionization of polyatomic molecules by positrons. We refer to the technique herein as positron ionization mass spectrometry which includes all of the possible ionization mechanisms. In the course of this work we will attempt to characterize each of the important ionization mechanisms. Our ultimate objective is to explore the use of positron ionization mass spectrometry for chemical analysis. Several other groups have also begun to pursue aspects of positron ionization in parallel with our efforts although with somewhat different approaches and, perhaps with slightly different emphases. Recently, for example, Passner et al. have acquired mass spectra in a Penning trap resulting from the ionization of several different polyatomic molecules by near thermal kinetics energy positrons. Our research involves studying the different types of ionizing interactions of positrons with organic molecules, as a function of positron kinetic energy. For ionization of polyatomic molecules by positrons, several possible mechanisms are apparent from lifetime and scattering cross-section data. These mechanisms are discussed

  8. Synthesis of the radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biricova, V.; Kuruc, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper is shown a short overview of the biogenic positron radiopharmaceuticals production and a brief summary of some PET preparation synthesis. At the end the overview of some forward-looking positron radionuclides, which can be used for a preparation of the PET radiopharmaceuticals is said. A short review of diagnostic use of PET radiopharmaceuticals is presented (authors)

  9. Studies of defects and defect agglomerates by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Singh, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    A brief introduction to positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), and in particular lo its use for defect studies in metals is given. Positrons injected into a metal may become trapped in defects such as vacancies, vacancy clusters, voids, bubbles and dislocations and subsequently annihilate from...

  10. Positron annihilation studies of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, G.; Liszkay, L.; Molnar, B.

    1988-01-01

    Several annealing studies by positron annihilation (Doppler broadening, lifetime) on neutron irradiated Cr-Mo-V reactor pressure vessel steels (Soviet type 15Kh2MFA) regarding the influences of irradiation temperature, fluence of fast neutrons as well as different impurity contents are presented and discussed. A possibility of explaining the positron annihilation data by irradiation induced carbide formation is proposed. (author)

  11. Formation of a high intensity low energy positron string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donets, E.D.; Donets, E.E.; Syresin, E.M.; Itahashi, T.; Dubinov, A.E.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of a high intensity low energy positron beam production is discussed. The proposed Positron String Trap (PST) is based on the principles and technology of the Electron String Ion Source (ESIS) developed in JINR during the last decade. A linear version of ESIS has been used successfully for the production of intense highly charged ion beams of various elements. Now the Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) concept is under study and this opens really new promising possibilities in physics and technology. In this report, we discuss the application of the tubular-type trap for the storage of positrons cooled to the cryogenic temperatures of 0.05 meV. It is intended that the positron flux at the energy of 1-5 eV, produced by the external source, is injected into the Tubular Positron Trap which has a similar construction as the TESIS. Then the low energy positrons are captured in the PST Penning trap and are cooled down because of their synchrotron radiation in the strong (5-10 T) applied magnetic field. It is expected that the proposed PST should permit storing and cooling to cryogenic temperature of up to 5x10 9 positrons. The accumulated cooled positrons can be used further for various physics applications, for example, antihydrogen production

  12. Digital positron lifetime: the influence of noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krille, Arnold; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Anwand, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the world around where everything seems to go digital as soon as possible, positron lifetime spectrometers are kind of a 'last sanctuary' for analog measurements. Only a few of the newer spectrometers use the analog-digital-converters directly after the photomultipliers and extract the timing information via computer. Judging from their results it seems as if the current available converters and the timing mathematics are only as good as the conventional analog setup in the timing resolution. As it is decided that EPOS [1] will use digital positron lifetime, we try to find some reasons for limited timing resolution by simulating anode pulses from the photomultipliers and measuring the FWHM. We create pulses similar to current state-of-the-art 4GS/s digitizers but can control the level of noise and the bit-depth independently. We found that especially the noise (that would come from the analog electronics in/before the converters) has a great influence on the timing resolution. Also we try to use lowpass filtering to reduce that influence with great success.

  13. The Positron Emission Tomography. A diagnostic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, P.

    2001-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a new imaging modality, which is able to assess non-invasively the biochemical mechanisms, underlying physiological and pathophysiological processes in vivo in humans. The technique relies on the administration of radioactive tracers labeled with short-lived positron emitters, which need to be produced on site via a particle accelerator (cyclotron). Radionuclides are produced upon request and formulated into biologically active organic molecules having precise pharmacokinetics and specificity. The radiotracer can be detected by the PET scanner and represented as tomographic sections (images of body sections) showing its regional distribution and concentration. This makes it possible to address clinical questions concerning occurrence and evolution of many diseases as well as their response to therapy. The ability to image (measure) biological processes and not only anatomy enables PET to explore diseases in the very early stage, including those diseases which are not related to modifications of organ structure (e.g. psychiatric diseases, metabolic disorders, biochemical disfunction). PET plays a major role, in conjunction with the other imaging modalities, to improve diagnosis capabilities and disease mechanism understanding [it

  14. First positron annihilation lifetime measurement of Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colmenares, C.; Howell, R.H.; Ancheta, D.; Cowan, T.; Hanafee, J.; Sterne, P.

    1996-01-01

    We have made the first measurement of defects in an aged sample of δ phase, Ga stabilized Pu, using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. This measurement validates the procedure necessary to perform measurements on this highly toxic material and obtain data representative of sample conditions. Comparison of the positron annihilation lifetime analysis of the data with calculated values suggests that He filled vacancies or vacancy clusters dominate the defect population. Such defects are the necessary precursor to void growth and swelling. The evolution of defects resulting from the radioactive decay of Pu during its life in the stockpile is one of the unknown quantities affecting our confidence in predictions of the limit on stockpile components. Radiation damage leads to changes in the size and strength of metals studied for reactor and accelerator use and similar effects may be expected in Pu. The evolution of radiation produced vacancies into larger void structures and accompanying macroscopic swelling may occur in Pu at some age. A detailed understanding of the defects in self irradiated Pu is required to predict the time scale of void swelling and related radiation effects. 1 fig

  15. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  16. F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joerg, L.; Langsteger, W.

    2002-01-01

    Whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiolabeled glucose analog F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) is a sensitive diagnostic tool that images tumors based on increased uptake of glucose. Several recent publications have shown that F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is more sensitive than computed-tomography (CT) in detecting colorectal cancer. In patients with increasing CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) and no evidence of recurrent disease on CT F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography often detects recurrent cancer. In all, patient management seems to be changed in about 25 % of patients who undergo F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in addition to standard staging procedure. Limited reports to date on both chemotherapy and radiotherapy support the role of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in assessing treatment response. Also regarding preoperative staging of primary colorectal cancer the literature is very limited. (author)

  17. Testing of a nuclear-reactor-based positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Veen, A.; Labohm, F.; Schut, H.; De Roode, J.; Heijenga, T.; Mijnarends, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the testing of a positron beam which is primarily based on copper activation near the core of a nuclear reactor and extraction of the positrons through a beam guide tube. An out-of-core test with a 22 Na source and an in-core test with the reactor at reduced power have been performed. Both tests indicated a high reflectivity of moderated positrons at the tungsten surfaces of the moderation discs which enhanced the expected yield. Secondary electrons generated in the source materials during the in-core test caused electrical field distortions in the electrode system of the system by charging of the insulators. At 100 kW reactor power during one hour, positrons were observed with an intensity of 4.4x10 4 e + s -1 of which 90% was due to positrons created by pair formation and 10% by copper activation

  18. Design of an intense positron source for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, H.; Yamada, K.; Funahashi, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Japan Linear Collider (JLC) requires an intense positron source of 8x10 11 particles per rf-pulse. A computer simulation reveals the possibility of such an intense positron source using 'conventional' technology. In order to relax the limitation of the incident electron energy density due to thermal stress in the converter target, the incident beam radius is enlarged within the range so as not to reduce the positron capture efficiency. A pre-damping ring and beam transport system to the pre-damping ring, which have a large transverse acceptance, play important roles for a high capture efficiency. A prototype positron source has been designed and installed at downstream of 1.54 GeV S-band linac in Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in order to carry out experiments to develop the essential technology for JLC. The simulated results will be tested in experiments with the prototype positron source. (author)

  19. The interaction of positrons and positronium with small atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drachman, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    This is a report on recent progress in the theory of small atomic systems including a positron. The author first considers the two-channel region in e + -H scattering which lies between 6.8 and 10.2 eV, and reports the results of positronium-formation and resonant-scattering calculations. Second, he introduces the concept of 'iso-leptonic families' with fixed electron and positron numbers and discusses in detail the two-electron, one-positron family. This family includes several interesting bound and resonant states. Next, he derives a new method of calculating positron annihilation rates and cross-sections from approximate wave functions. Although more difficult to apply than the direct method, this technique is more accurate. Finally, he shows the applicability of many positron calculations to currently interesting astrophysical problems, especially the recent observations of annihilation radiation coming from the direction of the galactic center

  20. Organic synthesis with short-lived positron-emitting radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, V.W.

    1988-01-01

    Chemistry with short-lived positron-emitting radioisotopes of the non-metals, principally 11 C, 13 N and 18 F, has burgeoned over the last decade. This has been almost entirely because of the emergence of positron emission tomography (PET) as a powerful non-invasive technique for investigating pathophysiology in living man. PET is essentially an external technique for the rapid serial reconstruction of the spatial distribution of any positron-emitting radioisotope that has been administered in vivo. Such a distribution is primarily governed by the chemical form in which the positron-emitting radioisotope is incorporated, and importantly for clinical research, is often perturbed by physical, biological or clinical factors. Judicious choice of the chemical form enables specific biological information to be obtained. For example, the labelling of glucose with a positron-emitting radioisotope could be expected to provide a radiopharmaceutical for the study of glucose utilisation in both health and disease. (author)

  1. Electron-positron pair creation in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienle, P.

    1987-08-01

    We review here the status of experiments to study the electron positron pair creation in heavy ion atom collisions at bombarding energies close to the Coulomb barrier. The disentanglement and characterisation of various sources of positrons observed in such collisions are described with a focus on the monoenergetic electron positron pairs observed. They seem to originate from the two-body decay of a family of neutral particles with masses of about 3 m e and life times in the range of 6x10 -14 s -10 s, produced by high Coulomb fields. First attempts were made to create these particles by resonant Bhabha scattering. First we present some experimental methods for high efficiency positron spectroscopy in heavy ion collisions. Then we describe the discovery of positron creation induced by strong time changing Coulomb fields. (orig./HSI)

  2. Quantum resonances in reflection of relativistic electrons and positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eykhorn, Yu.L.; Korotchenko, K.B.; Pivovarov, Yu.L.; Takabayashi, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Calculations based on the use of realistic potential of the system of crystallographic planes confirm earlier results on existence of resonances in reflection of relativistic electrons and positrons by the crystal surface, if the crystallographic planes are parallel to the surface.The physical reason of predicted phenomena, similar to the band structure of transverse energy levels, is connected with the Bloch form of the wave functions of electrons (positrons) near the crystallographic planes, which appears both in the case of planar channeling of relativistic electrons (positrons) and in reflection by a crystal surface. Calculations show that positions of maxima in reflection of relativistic electrons and positrons by crystal surface specifically depend on the angle of incidence with respect to the crystal surface and relativistic factor of electrons/positrons. These maxima form the Darwin tables similar to that in ultra-cold neutron diffraction

  3. Development of a Positron Source for JLab at the IAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forest, Tony [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2013-10-12

    We report on the research performed towards the development of a positron sour for Jefferson Lab's (JLab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, VA. The first year of work was used to benchmark the predictions of our current simulation with positron production efficiency measurements at the IAC. The second year used the benchmarked simulation to design a beam line configuration which optimized positron production efficiency while minimizing radioactive waste as well as design and construct a positron converter target. The final year quantified the performance of the positron source. This joint research and development project brought together the experiences of both electron accelerator facilities. Our intention is to use the project as a spring board towards developing a program of accelerator based research and education which will train students to meet the needs of both facilities as well as provide a pool of trained scientists.

  4. ANTICOOL: Simulating positron cooling and annihilation in atomic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D. G.

    2018-03-01

    The Fortran program ANTICOOL, developed to simulate positron cooling and annihilation in atomic gases for positron energies below the positronium-formation threshold, is presented. Given positron-atom elastic scattering phase shifts, normalised annihilation rates Zeff, and γ spectra as a function of momentum k, ANTICOOL enables the calculation of the positron momentum distribution f(k , t) as a function of time t, the time-varying normalised annihilation rate Z¯eff(t) , the lifetime spectrum and time-varying annihilation γ spectra. The capability and functionality of the program is demonstrated via a tutorial-style example for positron cooling and annihilation in room temperature helium gas, using accurate scattering and annihilation cross sections and γ spectra calculated using many-body theory as input.

  5. Positron annihilation radiation from the Galactic center region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Observations show that there are two components of positron annihilation radiation from the region of the Galactic center: a variable component resulting from one or just a few compact sources at or near the Galactic center and a steady, diffuse component resulting from positron annihilation in the Galactic disk. The diffuse component is modeled using the observed longitude distributions of 70-150 MeV gamma rays, CO, and hot plasma revealed by Fe line emission. Recent results on positron annihilation in the interstellar medium are reviewed and the implications of the annihilation processes on the fraction of positrons annihilating via positronium and on the shape of the 511 keV annihilation line are discussed. The sources of diffuse Galactic positrons are also reviewed and the nature of the compact source of annihilation radiation near the Galactic center is discussed.

  6. Investigation of Figopitant and Its Metabolites in Rat Tissue by Combining Whole-Body Autoradiography with Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schadt, S.; Kallbach, S.; Almeida, R.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the combination of whole-body autoradiography with liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) and mass spectrometry (MS) to study the distribution of the tachykinin neurokinin-1 antagonist figopitant and its metabolites in tissue sections of rats after intravenous...... tissue extraction, sample cleanup, and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The parent drug and the N-dealkylated metabolite M474(1) (BIIF 1148) in varying ratios were the predominant compounds in all tissues investigated. In addition, several metabolites formed by oxygenation, dealkylation...

  7. The jellyfish and its polyp: a comparative study of gene expression monitored by the protein patterns using two-dimensional gels with double-label autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bally, Andreas; Schmid, Volker

    1988-01-01

    The life cycle of Podocoryne carnea (Coelenterata. Anthomedusae) shows several distinct stages which differ considerably in terms of their ecology, morphology, cellular composition and ultra structure. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and a new method of double-label autoradiography, we show here for the first time for metagenic hydrozoans that only minor differences in gene expression exist between the various life cycle stages. Our results demonstrate the high resolution power of these techniques and show that the different life stages of P. carnea remain rather similar on the protein level (author)

  8. Quantitative autoradiography of brain binding sites for the vesicular acetylcholine transport blocker 2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (AH5183)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marien, M.R.; Parsons, S.M.; Altar, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    2-(4-Phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (AH5183) is a noncompetitive and potent inhibitor of high-affinity acetylcholine transport into cholinergic vesicles. It is reported here that [ 3 H]AH5183 binds specifically and saturably to slide-mounted sections of the rat forebrain (Kd = 1.1 to 2.2 X 10(-8) M; Bmax = 286 to 399 fmol/mg of protein). The association and dissociation rate constants for [ 3 H]AH5183 binding are 8.6 X 10(6) M-1 X min-1 and 0.18 min-1, respectively. Bound [ 3 H]AH5183 can be displaced by nonradioactive AH5183 and by the structural analog (2 alpha,3 beta,4A beta,8A alpha)-decahydro-3-(4-phenyl-1-piperidinyl)-2- naphthalenol but not by 10 microM concentrations of the cholinergic drugs acetylcholine, choline, atropine, hexamethonium, eserine, or hemicholinium-3 or by the structurally related compounds 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine, (+/-)-N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10,047), levoxadrol, or dexoxadrol. Quantitative autoradiography reveals that [ 3 H]AH5183 binding sites are distributed heterogenously throughout the rat forebrain and are highly localized to cholinergic nerve terminal regions. At the level of the caudate nucleus-putamen, the highest concentrations of saturable [ 3 H]AH5183 binding (713-751 fmol/mg of protein) are found in the vertical limb of the diagonal band and the olfactory tubercle, with lesser amounts (334-516 fmol/mg of protein) in the caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, superficial layers of the cerebral cortex, and the primary olfactory cortex. At day 7 after transsection of the left fimbria, [ 3 H]AH5183 binding and choline acetyltransferase activity in the left hippocampus were reduced by 33 +/- 6% and 61 +/- 7%, respectively. These findings indicate that [ 3 H]AH5183 binds to a unique recognition site in rat brain that is topographically associated with cholinergic nerve terminals

  9. Can positrons be guided by insulating capillaries?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuBois, R.D.; Toekesi, K.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Investigations of guiding of few hundred eV antiparticles by macroscopic insulating capillaries have been described. Using subfemtoamp positron and electron beams, we demonstrated that a portion of the entering beams were transmitted and emerged in the direction of the capillary. We also demonstrated that the transmitted intensities decreased as the capillary tilt angle was increased (see Fig. 1). Both of these are indications of guiding. However, a comparison with transmitted photon data implies that the positron transmission may result from geometric factors associated with our diffuse beams and tapered capillary used in these studies. For electrons, the comparison indicates differences which could imply that even very low intensity beams can be guided. Measurements of the transmitted intensity as a function of charge entering the capillary were inconclusive as no major increases in the transmitted intensity were observed. 2D static simulations imply that our beam intensities, although extremely small with respect to previous guiding experiments, were capable of supplying sufficient charge for guiding to occur. Although not definitive, our study implies that sub-femtoamp beam intensities are sufficient to form charge patches and produce guiding. This may have been observed for electrons with the question remaining open for positrons. That guiding was not clearly seen may have been due to the capillary geometry used or it may indicate that although sufficient charge is being supplied, the surface and bulk resistivities of glass permit this charge to dissipate faster than it is formed. This aspect was not taken into consideration in our simulations but a crude estimate of the discharge rate implies that beam intensities on the order of pA, rather than fA as used here, may be required for guiding to occur in the capillaries used here. Additional studies are required to definitively answer the question as to whether antiparticles

  10. Development of positron emitting radionuclides for imaging with improved positron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Y.

    1976-10-01

    Recent advances in positron cameras and positron ring detectors for transverse section reconstruction have created renewed interest in positron emitting radionuclides. This paper reports on: generator-produced 82 Rb; cyclotron-produced 62 Zn; and reactor-produced 64 Cu. Investigation of the 82 Sr (25 d)-- 82 Rb (75 s) generator determined the elution characteristics for Bio-Rex 70, a weakly acidic carboxylic cation exchanger, using 2% NaCl as the eluent. The yield of 82 Rb and the breakthrough of 82 Sr were determined for newly prepared columns and for long term elution conditions. Spallation-produced 82 Sr was used to charge a compact 82 Rb generator to obtain multi-millicurie amounts of 82 Rb for myocardial imaging. Zinc accumulates in the islet cells of the pancreas and in the prostate. Zinc-62 was produced by protons on Cu foil and separated by column chromatography. Zinc-62 was administered as the amino acid chelates and as the ZnCl 2 to tumor and normal animals. Tissue distribution was determined for various times after intravenous injection. Pancreas-liver images of 62 Zn-histidine uptake were obtained in animals with the gamma camera and the liver uptake of /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid was computer subtracted to image the pancreas alone. The positron camera imaged uptake of 62 Zn-histidine in the prostate of a dog at 20 h. 64 Cu was chelated to asparagine, a requirement of leukemic cells, and administered to lymphoma mice. Uptake in tumor and various tissues was determined and compared with the uptake of 67 Ga citrate under the same conditions. 64 Cu-asparagine had better tumor-to-soft tissue ratios than 67 Ga-citrate

  11. Motion correction in thoracic positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gigengack, Fabian; Dawood, Mohammad; Schäfers, Klaus P

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion leads to image degradation in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which impairs quantification. In this book, the authors present approaches to motion estimation and motion correction in thoracic PET. The approaches for motion estimation are based on dual gating and mass-preserving image registration (VAMPIRE) and mass-preserving optical flow (MPOF). With mass-preservation, image intensity modulations caused by highly non-rigid cardiac motion are accounted for. Within the image registration framework different data terms, different variants of regularization and parametric and non-parametric motion models are examined. Within the optical flow framework, different data terms and further non-quadratic penalization are also discussed. The approaches for motion correction particularly focus on pipelines in dual gated PET. A quantitative evaluation of the proposed approaches is performed on software phantom data with accompanied ground-truth motion information. Further, clinical appl...

  12. Positron Emission Tomography of the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease.

  13. Progress towards a practical multicell positron trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielson, J. R. [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093-0319 (United States); Hurst, N. C.; Surko, C. M. [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093-0319 (United States)

    2013-03-19

    Described here is progress in an experimental program to develop a 21 cell multicell trap for the accumulation and storage of {approx} 10{sup 12} positrons. The basic architecture is an arrangement of multiple Penning-Malmberg (PM) trapped plasmas (i.e., cells) arranged in parallel in a common vacuum system and magnetic field. Experiments are described that are intended to address several key issues, including the effects of large space charge potentials and high plasma densities on: plasma heating, deterioration of confinement, and decreased efficiency of rotating electric fields in producing plasma compression. The confinement of PM plasmas displaced both radially and toward the ends of the uniform magnetic field region will also be investigated.

  14. Positron emission tomography in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, R. H.; Fischman, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    There are four kinds of measurements that can be carried out with positron emission tomography (PET) that can contribute significantly to the process of drug development: pharmacodynamic measurement of tissue metabolism influenced by a given drug; precise measurements of tissue blood flow; tissue pharmacokinetics of a given drug following administration of a particular dose; and the temporal course of ligand-receptor interaction. One or more of these measurements can greatly improve the decision making involved in determining the appropriate dose of a drug, the clinical situations in which a drug might be useful, and the linkage of pharmacokinetics with pharmacodynamics, which is at the heart of effective drug development. The greater the potential of a particular compound as a therapeutic agent, the greater the potential for PET to contribute to the drug development process

  15. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease.

  16. Present state and development of positron tomographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemand, R.; Gariod, R.; Laval, M.; Tournier, F.

    1979-01-01

    This document presents the main characteristics of positron tomographs and analyses the relative importance of the parameters to be taken into consideration in the design of a tomograph: on the one hand, the physical parameters linked to the measurement of the annihilation photons by time coincidence and, on the other, the geometrical and technological parameters of prime importance in minimizing the many spurious effects. The last part endeavours to show this sort of instrumentation has evolved. Using the results obtained in our laboratory by mathematical simulation, the expected advantages are presented on the picture quality of the time of flight measurement of annihilation photons. Where the physical aspects of this method are concerned, the advantage of using cesium fluoride as scintillator is demonstrated [fr

  17. Instrumentation optimization for positron emission mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W. E-mail: wwmoses@lbl.gov; Qi Jinyi

    2004-07-11

    The past several years have seen designs for PET cameras optimized to image the breast, commonly known as Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) cameras. The guiding principal behind PEM instrumentation is that a camera whose field of view is restricted to a single breast has higher performance and lower cost than a conventional PET camera. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules, although geometries that encircle the breast have also been proposed. The ability of the detectors to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) is also a relevant feature. This paper finds that while both the additional solid angle coverage afforded by encircling the breast and the decreased blurring afforded by the DOI measurement improve performance, for small lesions the ability to measure DOI is more important than the ability to encircle the breast.

  18. Positron emission tomography and basal ganglia functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Taniwaki, Koukyo; Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi

    1990-01-01

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), studies on the human brain function and pathophysiology of brain damage have been extremely progressed. It is well-known that the basal ganglia plays an important role as one of the central nervous system involved in exercise regulation. More recently, the potential involvement of the basal ganglia in psychological processes, such as cognitive function, has been pointed out, receiving much attention. In spite of such a lot of studies, however, basal ganglia function remains unclear. This paper describes the relationships between PET findings and basal ganglia function. PET findings are discussed in relation to brain energy metabolism and striatal dopamine function. Pathophysiology of the basal ganglia are described in terms of the following diseases: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. Physiological backgrounds of the basal ganglia for PET images are also referred to. (N.K.) 75 refs

  19. Fundamental limits of positron emission mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2001-01-01

    We explore the causes of performance limitation in positron emission mammography cameras. We compare two basic camera geometries containing the same volume of 511 keV photon detectors, one with a parallel plane geometry and another with a rectangular geometry. We find that both geometries have similar performance for the phantom imaged (in Monte Carlo simulation), even though the solid angle coverage of the rectangular camera is about 50 percent higher than the parallel plane camera. The reconstruction algorithm used significantly affects the resulting image; iterative methods significantly outperform the commonly used focal plane tomography. Finally, the characteristics of the tumor itself, specifically the absolute amount of radiotracer taken up by the tumor, will significantly affect the imaging performance

  20. Image-reconstruction methods in positron tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, David W; CERN. Geneva

    1993-01-01

    Physics and mathematics for medical imaging In the two decades since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology, medical imaging techniques have become widely established as essential tools in the diagnosis of disease. As a consequence of recent technological and mathematical advances, the non-invasive, three-dimensional imaging of internal organs such as the brain and the heart is now possible, not only for anatomical investigations using X-rays but also for studies which explore the functional status of the body using positron-emitting radioisotopes and nuclear magnetic resonance. Mathematical methods which enable three-dimentional distributions to be reconstructed from projection data acquired by radiation detectors suitably positioned around the patient will be described in detail. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simpleradiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo boichemistry. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function that are cur...

  1. Applications of positron emission tomography to psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkow, N.D.; Brodie, J.D.; Gomez-mont, F.

    1985-01-01

    The brain's inaccessibility has hampered investigation of the metabolic changes underlying the behavioral and psychological symptoms of psychiatric patients. Using positron emission transaxial tomography (PET) to study the functioning human brain opens the possibility of directly investigating the patterns of activity associated with mental illness. A major focus of present-day research in psychiatry has been to identify etiological agents that fit a medical model of psychiatric illness. Experiments seeking pathophysiological indices that would permit objective classification of psychiatric illnesses have failed to reveal consistent abnormalities. The lack of consistency is explained in part by research designs that deal with the brain as if it were a homogeneous organ. PET offers a unique technique for monitoring the regional biochemical activity that is associated with the different ''brain states'' and ''brain traits'' of normal subjects and psychiatric patients

  2. Fundamental limits of positron emission mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2001-06-01

    We explore the causes of performance limitation in positron emission mammography cameras. We compare two basic camera geometries containing the same volume of 511 keV photon detectors, one with a parallel plane geometry and another with a rectangular geometry. We find that both geometries have similar performance for the phantom imaged (in Monte Carlo simulation), even though the solid angle coverage of the rectangular camera is about 50 percent higher than the parallel plane camera. The reconstruction algorithm used significantly affects the resulting image; iterative methods significantly outperform the commonly used focal plane tomography. Finally, the characteristics of the tumor itself, specifically the absolute amount of radiotracer taken up by the tumor, will significantly affect the imaging performance.

  3. Instrumentation optimization for positron emission mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2003-06-05

    The past several years have seen designs for PET cameras optimized to image the breast, commonly known as Positron Emission Mammography or PEM cameras. The guiding principal behind PEM instrumentation is that a camera whose field of view is restricted to a single breast has higher performance and lower cost than a conventional PET camera. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules, although geometries that encircle the breast have also been proposed. The ability of the detector modules to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) is also a relevant feature. This paper finds that while both the additional solid angle coverage afforded by encircling the breast and the decreased blurring afforded by the DOI measurement improve performance, the ability to measure DOI is more important than the ability to encircle the breast.

  4. Instrumentation optimization for positron emission mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2003-01-01

    The past several years have seen designs for PET cameras optimized to image the breast, commonly known as Positron Emission Mammography or PEM cameras. The guiding principal behind PEM instrumentation is that a camera whose field of view is restricted to a single breast has higher performance and lower cost than a conventional PET camera. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules, although geometries that encircle the breast have also been proposed. The ability of the detector modules to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) is also a relevant feature. This paper finds that while both the additional solid angle coverage afforded by encircling the breast and the decreased blurring afforded by the DOI measurement improve performance, the ability to measure DOI is more important than the ability to encircle the breast

  5. Thermal Shock Structural Analyses of a Positron Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In the positron source of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), the electron beam collides with a tungsten-rhenium target. As the beam passes into the material, thermal energy is created that heats the material to several hundred degrees centigrade on a time scale of nanoseconds. The heating of the material results in thermal stresses that may be large enough to cause material failure. The analyses calculate the thermal shock pressure and stress pulses as they move throughout the material due to the rapid energy deposition. Failure of the target occurred after three years of operation with an elevated power deposition toward the end of the three years. The calculations were made with the LLNL coupled heat transfer and dynamic solid mechanics analysis codes, TOPAZ3D and DYNA3D, and the thermal energy deposition was calculated with the SLAC Electron Gamma Shower (EGS) code simulating the electron-induced cascade. Material fatigue strength, experimentally measured properties for the non-irradiated and irradiated material, as well as the calculated stress state are evaluated in assessing the cause for the target failure

  6. Simultaneous laser speckle imaging and positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramer, M.; Feuerstein, D.; Backes, H.; Takagaki, M.; Kumagai, T.; Graf, R.

    2013-06-01

    Complex biological systems often require measurements of multiple parameters with high temporal and spatial resolution. Multimodal approaches and the combination of methods are therefore a powerful tool to address such scientific questions. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is an optical method that monitors dynamic changes in cortical blood flow (CBF) with high temporal resolution. Positron emission tomography (PET) allows for quantitative imaging of physiological processes and is a gold standard method to determine absolute cerebral blood flow. We developed a setup that allows simultaneous measurement with both modalities. Here, we simultaneously measured CBF with PET and LSI in rats and analyzed how the correlation of PET and LSI is modified when (1) different methods are used for the calculation of speckle inverse correlation time (ICT), (2) speckle data is acquired through thinned or craniectomized skull, (3) influence of surface vessels is removed from the speckle data. For the latter, a method for automated vessel segmentation from LSI data was developed. We obtained the best correlation (R² = 0.890, pICT. Thus, LSI provides CBF in absolute units at high temporal resolution.

  7. Utilisation of spatial and temporal correlations in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sureau, F.

    2008-06-01

    In this thesis we propose, implement, and evaluate algorithms improving spatial resolution in reconstructed images and reducing data noise in positron emission tomography imaging. These algorithms have been developed for a high resolution tomograph (HRRT) and applied to brain imaging, but can be used for other tomographs or studies. We first developed an iterative reconstruction algorithm including a stationary and isotropic model of resolution in image space, experimentally measured. We evaluated the impact of such a model of resolution in Monte-Carlo simulations, physical phantom experiments and in two clinical studies by comparing our algorithm with a reference reconstruction algorithm. This study suggests that biases due to partial volume effects are reduced, in particular in the clinical studies. Better spatial and temporal correlations are also found at the voxel level. However, other methods should be developed to further reduce data noise. We then proposed a maximum a posteriori de-noising algorithm that can be used for dynamic data to de-noise temporally raw data (sino-grams) or reconstructed images. The a priori modeled the coefficients in a wavelet basis of all the signals without noise (in an image or sinogram). We compared this technique with a reference de-noising method on replicated simulations. This illustrates the potential benefits of our approach of sinogram de-noising. (author)

  8. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, G.

    1996-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is a technique which makes use of the anti- particle of the electron, the positron (e + ), first predicted by Dirac in 1931. This talk will concentrate on the use of PALS as a technique in characterising macromolecules. PALS has been used by various groups to evaluate many properties that one associates with free volume such as physical ageing, gas permeability, the glass transition, uptake of a solvent, crystallinity, crosslinking, molecular mobility. One area of much interest has been the use of this technique in looking at miscibility of polymer blends. In miscible blends, the interactions of the different polymers may be expected to lead to a negative free volume of mixing because of the strong attraction between the different chains. This may influence the free volume properties. Conversely, if a material is partially miscible or totally immiscible, this should influence both the size and total content of free volume. This should be related to other properties such as mechanical properties and molecular mobility, such as measured by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. Variations on this involve copolymerization of crosslinked materials or linear thermoplastics (the ultimate 'molecular' miscibility) and this will also be discussed. Multiphase systems such as water uptake in polymers can vary polymer properties by filling molecular voids, as well as disturbing chain conformations and, in the case of polar polymers, associating with the polymer chains. The effect of polymer molecular structure on free volume - particularly in rigid polymer chains such as substituted poly(phenylenes) and liquid crystalline polymers will also be presented. Indeed, the unusual packing which arises from such anisotropic molecules leads to unusual behaviours both of the homolpolymers and subsequent liquid crystal polymer - liquid crystal polymer blends

  9. Low-energy positron interactions with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surko, C M; Gribakin, G F; Buckman, S J

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a review of low-energy positron interactions with atoms and molecules. Processes of interest include elastic scattering, electronic and vibrational excitation, ionization, positronium formation and annihilation. An overview is presented of the currently available theoretical and experimental techniques to study these phenomena, including the use of trap-based positron beam sources to study collision processes with improved energy resolution. State-resolved measurements of electronic and vibrational excitation cross sections and measurement of annihilation rates in atoms and molecules as a function of incident positron energy are discussed. Where data are available, comparisons are made with analogous electron scattering cross sections. Resonance phenomena, common in electron scattering, appear to be less common in positron scattering. Possible exceptions include the sharp onsets of positron-impact electronic and vibrational excitation of selected molecules. Recent energy-resolved studies of positron annihilation in hydrocarbons containing more than a few carbon atoms provide direct evidence that vibrational Feshbach resonances underpin the anomalously large annihilation rates observed for many polyatomic species. We discuss open questions regarding this process in larger molecules, as well as positron annihilation in smaller molecules where the theoretical picture is less clear. (topical review)

  10. Three dimensional positron-CT: 3D-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, K.

    2000-01-01

    Positron-CT, namely the positron emission tomograph (PET) provides us the metabolism images obtained by the administration of the drug labeled by the positron emission nuclide in the human body. For example, the carbohydrate metabolism image is obtained by the administration of glucose labelled by 18 F-radioisotopes, and it can be applied to early detection of the cancer and research of high-order function of the brain. As well as X-ray CT, the examine receives the exposure in the positron CT. 3D-PET is based on the solid measurement of γ-rays, therefore, the detection sensitivity of 3D-PET becomes very high and it is possible to drastically reduce the dose of the positron emission nuclide. Because the exposure is reduced to the utmost, the positron CT diagnosis would be possible for the child and the exposure of positron CT doctor in charge can be also reduced. This ideal functional diagnostic imaging equipment, namely, 3D-PET is introduced here. (author)

  11. Positron scattering measurements for application to medical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, James

    2015-09-01

    While the use of positrons in medical imaging is now well established, there is still much to learn regarding the transport of positrons through the body, and the subsequent damage induced. Current models of dosimetry use only a crude approximation of the collision physics involved, and at low energies misrepresent the thermalisation process to a considerable degree. Recently, collaborative work has commenced to attempt to refine these models, incorporating a better representation of the underlying physics and trying to gain a better understanding of the damage done after the emission of a positron from a medical radioisotope. This problem is being attacked from several different angles, with new models being developed based upon established techniques in plasma and swarm physics. For all these models, a realistic representation of the collision processes of positrons with relevant molecular species is required. At the Australian National University, we have undertaken a program of measurements of positron scattering from a range of molecules that are important in biological systems, with a focus on analogs to DNA. This talk will present measurements of positron scattering from a range of these molecules, as well as describing the experimental techniques employed to make such measurements. Targets have been measured that are both liquid and solid at room temperature, and new approaches have been developed to get absolute cross section data. The application of the data to various models of positron thermalisation will also be described.

  12. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy: appendix a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, R. H., LLNL

    1997-11-05

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory jointly sponsored by the DOE-Division of Materials Science, The Materials Research Institute at LLNL and the University of California Presidents Office. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques will play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. There were general discussions lead by review talks on positron analysis techniques, and their applications to problems in semiconductors, polymers and composites, metals and engineering materials, surface analysis and advanced techniques. These were followed by focus sessions on positron analysis opportunities in these same areas. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of science based stockpile stewardship. There was a detailed discussion of the LLNL capabilities and a tour of the facilities. The Livermore facilities now include the worlds highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. This document is a supplement to the written summary report. It contains a complete schedule, list of attendees and the vuegraphs for the presentations in the review and focus sessions.

  13. Analysis of solute transport in plants using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partelova, D.

    2016-01-01

    In the first part of the work, geometrically and radiochemically characterized standards (phantoms) imitating the plant tissues and allowing the exact quantification of visualised radioindicator in plant tissues were designed and prepared within the study of visual and analytical characteristics of used positron emission tomograph (microPET system) commercially developed for animal objects at visualization of thin objects. Individual experiments carried out by exposure of excised leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) or radish (Raphanus sativus L.) in solutions of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose labelled with positron emitter 18 F (2-[ 18 F]FDG) containing 10-, 100-, or 1000-times higher concentrations of D-glucose (c glu ) in comparison with the original 2-[ 18 F]FDG solution showed that the significant changes in visualisation of 2-[ 18 F]FDG distribution as well as in chemical portion of 2-[ 18 F]FDG within the leaf blade were observed as result of increased c glu . In the experiments with the whole plants of tobacco or radish exposed in 2-[ 18 F]FDG solution through the root system, only minimal translocation of 18 F radioactivity into the above-ground parts of plants, also in the case of increased c glu , was observed, which suggest the role of root system as a selective barrier of 2-[ 18 F]FDG transport from roots to the above-ground parts. On the basis of mentioned knowledge and analytical approaches (application of prepared phantoms), the dynamic study of 2-[ 18 F]FDG uptake and transport within the excised leaf of tobacco or whole radish plant was carried out. The description of these processes was realized through the 3D PET images and through the quantification of 2-[ 18 F]FDG distribution within the chosen regions of interest from the point of view of accumulated 18 F radioactivity (in Bq) or amount of D-glucose (in μg) as well. Application of methods of multivariate analysis allows to found the similarities between studied objects mainly from the point

  14. [Serial assessment of myocardial thallium perfusion and fatty acid utilization in spontaneously hypertensive rats: assessment by autoradiography and pin-hole imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sago, M; Nishimura, T

    1989-07-01

    To evaluate the advantage of free fatty acid imaging on the detection of hypertrophied myocardium, we compared sequentially myocardial thallium and BMIPP (15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methyl pentadecanoic acid) distribution in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) using dual tracer autoradiography and in vivo pin-hole imaging. Autoradiography and pin-hole imaging showed uniform myocardial distribution of BMIPP and thallium within less than 27 weeks age SHR. In 40 weeks age SHR, thallium myocardial distribution showed uniform, however, BMIPP had focal decreases. Quantitative analysis of pin-hole images showed that myocardial BMIPP and thallium uptake ratio decreased according to the ages of SHR. Our data suggest that hypertension is associated with uniform myocardial perfusion and focal alternation in the substrate used for the performance of myocardial work. Based on the above autoradiographic and in vivo pin-hole imagings, I-123 BMIPP imaging may have a potential for early detection on hypertrophic myocardium compared to thallium perfusion in clinically hypertensive patients.

  15. A study on compatibilities on transgenic herbicide-resistant rice with wild relatives by using autoradiography of 32P labeled pollen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Linli; Qiang Sheng; Song Xiaoling

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the possibility of gene flow through observation of the sexual compatibilities of transgenic herbicide-resistant rice with wild relative by using isotope tracer to label pollen grains, the experiments on radioactivity, tracer mode, autoradiography film and time were conducted. Better procedure was to label pollen grains of transgenic herbicide-resistant rice by culturing the rice in a 1.48 x 10 7 Bq/L 32 P nutrient liquid, to pollinate the labelled pollen grains on the stigmas of barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli var. mitis), Oryza officinalis and weedy rice (Oryza sativa) respectively, and then 3 hour later, to fix these pistils on a piece of glass plate and cover the film of Luck 400 on it for autoradiography. The autoradiographs show that the tube of the transgenic rice's pollens cannot penetrate the stigma of barnyard grass and arrive at embryo sacs to fertilize, so that the possibility of gene flow between them is the lowest; the tube of the labelled pollens can penetrate the stigma of O officinalis and enter the style but can not arrive at embryo sacs to fertilize, so the possibility of gene flow between them is relatively low; and the pollen tube can arrive at the embryo sacs of the weedy rice, so that the possibility of gene flow is relatively high from transgenic herbicide-resistant rice to weedy rice. (authors)

  16. Analysis of experimental positron-molecule binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, J R; Surko, C M; Young, J A

    2010-01-01

    Experiments show that positron annihilation on molecules frequently occurs via capture into vibrational Feshbach resonances. In these cases, the downshifts in the annihilation spectra from the vibrational mode spectra provide measures of the positron-molecule binding energies. An analysis of these binding energy data is presented in terms of the molecular dipole polarizability, the permanent dipole moment, and the number of π bonds in aromatic molecules. The results of this analysis are in reasonably good agreement with other information about positron-molecule bound states. Predictions for other targets and promising candidate molecules for further investigation are discussed.

  17. Near-Threshold Ionization of Argon by Positron Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babij, T. J.; Machacek, J. R.; Murtagh, D. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2018-03-01

    The direct single-ionization cross section for Ar by positron impact has been measured in the region above the first ionization threshold. These measurements are compared to semiclassical calculations which give rise to a power law variation of the cross section in the threshold region. The experimental results appear to be in disagreement with extensions to the Wannier theory applied to positron impact ionization, with a smaller exponent than that calculated by most previous works. In fact, in this work, we see no difference in threshold behavior between the positron and electron cases. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

  18. Progress toward positron-electron pair plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenson, E. V.; Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald and Garching (Germany); Saitoh, H. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald and Garching (Germany); Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa (Japan); Niemann, H.; Pedersen, T. Sunn [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald and Garching (Germany); Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Marx, G. H.; Schweikhard, L. [Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany); Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA USA (United States); Hugenschmidt, C. [Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2015-06-29

    Electron-positron plasmas have been of theoretical interest for decades, due to the unique plasma physics that arises from all charged particles having precisely identical mass. It is only recently, though, that developments in non-neutral plasma physics (both in linear and toroidal geometries) and in the flux of sources for cold positrons have brought the goal of conducting electron-positron pair plasma experiments within reach. The APEX/PAX collaboration is working on a number of projects in parallel toward that goal; this paper provides an overview of recent, current, and upcoming activities.

  19. Positron production using a 1.7 MV pelletron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcantara, K. F.; Santos, A. C. F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Crivelli, P. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-04-19

    We report the foremost phase of a fourth generation positron source, being constructed at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Positron yields are reported by making use of the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}e{sup +}e{sup -}){sup 16}O reaction, where the fluorine target is in the form of a CaF{sub 2} pellet. Positron production has been observed by detecting 511 keV annihilation gamma rays emerging from the irradiated CaF{sub 2} target.

  20. Positive muon and the positron as probes of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, K.G.

    1980-01-01

    The positive muon and the positron are each being used nowadays to investigate defects in condensed matter. A brief summary of the experimental methods employed with each particle is given in this paper. Similarities and differences between the behavior of the two leptons when implanted in consensed matter are pointed out, and by means of a comparison between muon and positron data in Al it is shown that the combination of muon and positron experiments can serve as a useful new probe of defects in solids