WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamic neutron imaging

  1. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Kang, Misun [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Cheng, Chu-Lin [ORNL; Horita, Jusuke [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  2. Imaging with Scattered Neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    Ballhausen, H.; Abele, H.; Gaehler, R.; Trapp, M.; Van Overberghe, A.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-re...

  3. THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

    2004-10-16

    Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

  4. Dynamic infrared imaging for biological and medical applications in Boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; González, Sara J.; Dagrosa, Alejandra; Schwint, Amanda E.; Carpano, Marina; Trivillin, Verónica A.; Boggio, Esteban F.; Bertotti, José; Marín, Julio; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Molinari, Ana J.; Albero, Miguel

    2011-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality, currently focused on the treatment of cancer, which involves a tumor selective 10B compound and a specially tuned neutron beam to produce a lethal nuclear reaction. BNCT kills target cells with microscopic selectivity while sparing normal tissues from potentially lethal doses of radiation. In the context of the Argentine clinical and research BNCT projects at the National Atomic Energy Commission and in a strong collaboration with INVAP SE, we successfully implemented Dynamic Infrared Imaging (DIRI) in the clinical setting for the observation of cutaneous melanoma patients and included DIRI as a non invasive methodology in several research protocols involving small animals. We were able to characterize melanoma lesions in terms of temperature and temperature rate-of-recovery after applying a mild cold thermal stress, distinguishing melanoma from other skin pigmented lesions. We observed a spatial and temporal correlation between skin acute reactions after irradiation, the temperature pattern and the dose distribution. We studied temperature distribution as a function of tumor growth in mouse xenografts, observing a significant correlation between tumor temperature and drug uptake; we investigated temperature evolution in the limbs of Wistar rats for a protocol of induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA), DIRI being especially sensitive to RA induction even before the development of clinical signs and studied surface characteristics of tumors, precancerous and normal tissues in a model of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch.

  5. Neutron beam imaging at neutron spectrometers at Dhruva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Shraddha S.; Rao, Mala N.

    2012-06-01

    A low efficiency, 2-Dimensional Position Sensitive Neutron Detector based on delay line position encoding is developed. It is designed to handle beam flux of 106-107 n/cm2/s and for monitoring intensity profiles of neutron beams. The present detector can be mounted in transmission mode, as the hardware allows maximum neutron transmission in sensitive region. Position resolution of 1.2 mm in X and Y directions, is obtained. Online monitoring of beam images and intensity profile of various neutron scattering spectrometers at Dhruva are presented. It shows better dynamic range of intensity over commercial neutron camera and is also time effective over the traditionally used photographic method.

  6. Coded source neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100 m) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100um and 10um aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  7. Coded source neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Philip; Santos-Villalobos, Hector; Tobin, Ken

    2011-03-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100μm) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100μm and 10μm aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  8. Pixelated neutron image plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlapp, M.; Conrad, H.; von Seggern, H.

    2004-09-01

    Neutron image plates (NIPs) have found widespread application as neutron detectors for single-crystal and powder diffraction, small-angle scattering and tomography. After neutron exposure, the image plate can be read out by scanning with a laser. Commercially available NIPs consist of a powder mixture of BaFBr : Eu2+ and Gd2O3 dispersed in a polymer matrix and supported by a flexible polymer sheet. Since BaFBr : Eu2+ is an excellent x-ray storage phosphor, these NIPs are particularly sensitive to ggr-radiation, which is always present as a background radiation in neutron experiments. In this work we present results on NIPs consisting of KCl : Eu2+ and LiF that were fabricated into ceramic image plates in which the alkali halides act as a self-supporting matrix without the necessity for using a polymeric binder. An advantage of this type of NIP is the significantly reduced ggr-sensitivity. However, the much lower neutron absorption cross section of LiF compared with Gd2O3 demands a thicker image plate for obtaining comparable neutron absorption. The greater thickness of the NIP inevitably leads to a loss in spatial resolution of the image plate. However, this reduction in resolution can be restricted by a novel image plate concept in which a ceramic structure with square cells (referred to as a 'honeycomb') is embedded in the NIP, resulting in a pixelated image plate. In such a NIP the read-out light is confined to the particular illuminated pixel, decoupling the spatial resolution from the optical properties of the image plate material and morphology. In this work, a comparison of experimentally determined and simulated spatial resolutions of pixelated and unstructured image plates for a fixed read-out laser intensity is presented, as well as simulations of the properties of these NIPs at higher laser powers.

  9. First application of dynamic infrared imaging in boron neutron capture therapy for cutaneous malignant melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Cruz, G. A.; Gonzalez, S. J.; Bertotti, J.; Marin, J. [Departamento de Instrumentacion y Control, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Instrumentacion y Control, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina) and CONICET, Avenida Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Favaloro, Solis 453, 1078 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the potential of dynamic infrared imaging (DIRI) as a functional, noninvasive technique for evaluating the skin acute toxicity and tumor control within the framework of the Argentine boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) program for cutaneous malignant melanoma. Methods: Two patients enrolled in the Argentine phase I/II BNCT clinical trial for cutaneous malignant melanoma were studied with DIRI. An uncooled infrared camera, providing a video output signal, was employed to register the temperature evolution of the normal skin and tumor regions in patients subjected to a mild local cooling (cold stimulus). In order to study the spatial correlation between dose and acute skin reactions, three-dimensional representations of the superficial dose delivered to skin were constructed and cameralike projections of the dose distribution were coregistered with visible and infrared images. Results: The main erythematous reaction was observed clinically between the second and fifth week post-BNCT. Concurrently, with its clinical onset, a reactive increase above the basal skin temperature was observed with DIRI in the third week post-BNCT within regions that received therapeutic doses. Melanoma nodules appeared as highly localized hyperthermic regions. 2 min after stimulus, these regions reached a temperature plateau and increased in size. Temperature differences with respect to normal skin up to 10 deg. C were observed in the larger nodules. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that DIRI, enhanced by the application of cold stimuli, may provide useful functional information associated with the metabolism and vasculature of tumors and inflammatory processes related to radiation-induced changes in the skin as well. These capabilities are aimed at complementing the clinical observations and standard imaging techniques, such as CT and Doppler ultrasound.

  10. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Tremsin, A S; Tittelmeier, K; Schillinger, B; Schulz, M; Lerche, M; Feller, W B

    2015-01-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and...

  11. NEUTRON IMAGING, RADIOGRAPHY AND TOMOGRAPHY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMITH,G.C.

    2002-03-01

    Neutrons are an invaluable probe in a wide range of scientific, medical and commercial endeavors. Many of these applications require the recording of an image of the neutron signal, either in one-dimension or in two-dimensions. We summarize the reactions of neutrons with the most important elements that are used for their detection. A description is then given of the major techniques used in neutron imaging, with emphasis on the detection media and position readout principle. Important characteristics such as position resolution, linearity, counting rate capability and sensitivity to gamma-background are discussed. Finally, the application of a subset of these instruments in radiology and tomography is described.

  12. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  13. Neutron Imaging Developments at LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ron; Hunter, James; Schirato, Richard; Vogel, Sven; Swift, Alicia; Ickes, Tim; Ward, Bill; Losko, Adrian; Tremsin, Anton

    2015-10-01

    Neutron imaging is complementary to x-ray imaging because of its sensitivity to light elements and greater penetration of high-Z materials. Energy-resolved neutron imaging can provide contrast enhancements for elements and isotopes due to the variations with energy in scattering cross sections due to nuclear resonances. These cross section differences exist due to compound nuclear resonances that are characteristic of each element and isotope, as well as broader resonances at higher energies. In addition, multi-probe imaging, such as combined photon and neutron imaging, is a powerful tool for discerning properties and features in materials that cannot be observed with a single probe. Recently, we have demonstrated neutron imaging, both radiography and computed tomography, using the moderated (Lujan Center) and high-energy (WNR facility) neutron sources at LANSCE. Flat panel x-ray detectors with suitable scintillator-converter screens provide good sensitivity for both low and high neutron energies. Micro-Channel-Plate detectors and iCCD scintillator camera systems that provide the fast time gating needed for energy-resolved imaging have been demonstrated as well. Examples of recent work will be shown including fluid flow in plants and imaging through dense thick objects. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, and performed by Los Alamos National Security LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  14. Neutron Imaging Developments at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hunter, James F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schirato, Richard C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vogel, Sven C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swift, Alicia L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ickes, Timothy Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ward, William Carl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Losko, Adrian Simon [University of California at Berkeley; Tremsin, Anton [University of California at Berkeley; Sevanto, Sanna Annika [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dickman, Lee Thoresen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Malone, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-10-29

    Thermal, epithermal, and high-energy neutrons are available from two spallation sources at the 800 MeV proton accelerator. Improvements in detectors and computing have enabled new capabilities that use the pulsed beam properties at LANSCE; these include amorphous Si (aSi) detectors, intensified charge-coupled device cameras, and micro-channel plates. Applications include water flow in living specimens, inclusions and fission products in uranium oxide, and high-energy neutron imaging using an aSi flat panel with ZnS(Ag) scintillator screen. images of a metal/plastic cylinder from photons, low-energy and high-energy neutrons are compared.

  15. Neutron imaging of radioactive sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, F.; Karimzadeh, S.; Zawisky, M.

    2008-08-01

    Isotopic neutron sources have been available for more than six decades. At the Atomic Institute in Vienna, operating a 250 kW TRIGA reactor, different neutron sources are in use for instrument calibration and fast neutron applications but we have only little information about their construction and densities. The knowledge of source design is essential for a complete MCNP5 modeling of the experiments. Neutron radiography (NR) and neutron tomography (NT) are the best choices for the non-destructive inspection of the source geometry and homogeneity. From the transmission analysis we gain information about the shielding components and the densities of the radio-isotopes in the cores. Three neutron sources, based on (alpha, n) reaction, have been investigated, two 239PuBe sources and one 241AmBe source. In the NR images the internal structure was clearly revealed using high-resolving scintillation and imaging plate detectors. In one source tablet a crack was detected which causes asymmetric neutron emission. The tomography inspection of strong absorbing materials is more challenging due to the low beam intensity of 1.3x105 n/cm2s at our NT instrument, and due to the beam hardening effect which requires an extension of reconstruction software. The tomographic inspection of a PuBe neutron source and appropriate measures for background and beam hardening correction are presented.

  16. Forming images with thermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanier, Peter E.; Forman, Leon

    2003-01-01

    Thermal neutrons passing through air have scattering lengths of about 20 meters. At further distances, the majority of neutrons emanating from a moderated source will scatter multiple times in the air before being detected, and will not retain information about the location of the source, except that their density will fall off somewhat faster than 1/r2. However, there remains a significant fraction of the neutrons that will travel 20 meters or more without scattering and can be used to create an image of the source. A few years ago, a proof-of-principle "camera" was demonstrated that could produce images of a scene containing sources of thermalized neutrons and could locate a source comparable in strength with an improvised nuclear device at ranges over 60 meters. The instrument makes use of a coded aperture with a uniformly redundant array of openings, analogous to those used in x-ray and gamma cameras. The detector is a position-sensitive He-3 proportional chamber, originally used for neutron diffraction. A neutron camera has many features in common with those designed for non-focusable photons, as well as some important differences. Potential applications include detecting nuclear smuggling, locating non-metallic land mines, assaying nuclear waste, and surveying for health physics purposes.

  17. Tomographic Neutron Imaging using SIRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregor, Jens [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Neutron imaging is complementary to x-ray imaging in that materials such as water and plastic are highly attenuating while material such as metal is nearly transparent. We showcase tomographic imaging of a diesel particulate filter. Reconstruction is done using a modified version of SIRT called PSIRT. We expand on previous work and introduce Tikhonov regularization. We show that near-optimal relaxation can still be achieved. The algorithmic ideas apply to cone beam x-ray CT and other inverse problems.

  18. Neutron transport study of a beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaial, Anas M.

    Neutron radiography has the ability to differentiate between gas and liquid in two-phase flow due both to the density difference and the high neutron scattering probability of hydrogen. Previous studies have used dynamic neutron radiography -- in both real-time and high-speed -- for air-water, steam-water and gas-liquid metal two-phase flow measurements. Radiography with thermal neutrons is straightforward and efficient as thermal neutrons are easier to detect with relatively higher efficiency and can be easily extracted from nuclear reactor beam ports. The quality of images obtained using neutron radiography and the imaging speed depend on the neutron beam intensity at the imaging plane. A high quality neutron beam, with thermal neutron intensity greater than 3.0x 10 6 n/cm2-s and a collimation ratio greater than 100 at the imaging plane, is required for effective dynamic neutron radiography up to 2000 frames per second. The primary objectives of this work are: (1) to optimize a neutron radiography facility for dynamic neutron radiography applications and (2) to investigate a new technique for three-dimensional neutron radiography using information obtained from neutron scattering. In this work, neutron transport analysis and experimental validation of a dynamic neutron radiography facility is studied with consideration of real-time and high-speed neutron radiography requirements. A beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility, for a target thermal neutron flux of 1.0x107 n/cm2-s, has been analyzed, constructed and experimentally verified at the McMaster Nuclear Reactor. The neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance is evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes using copper activation flux-mapping technique. The development of different facility components, such as beam tube liner, gamma ray filter, beam shutter and biological shield, is achieved analytically using neutron attenuation and divergence theories. Monte

  19. Dynamic imaging with a triggered and intensified CCD camera system in a high-intensity neutron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vontobel, P.; Frei, G.; Brunner, J.; Gildemeister, A. E.; Engelhardt, M.

    2005-04-01

    When time-dependent processes within metallic structures should be inspected and visualized, neutrons are well suited due to their high penetration through Al, Ag, Ti or even steel. Then it becomes possible to inspect the propagation, distribution and evaporation of organic liquids as lubricants, fuel or water. The principle set-up of a suited real-time system was implemented and tested at the radiography facility NEUTRA of PSI. The highest beam intensity there is 2×107 cm s, which enables to observe sequences in a reasonable time and quality. The heart of the detection system is the MCP intensified CCD camera PI-Max with a Peltier cooled chip (1300×1340 pixels). The intensifier was used for both gating and image enhancement, where as the information was accumulated over many single frames on the chip before readout. Although, a 16-bit dynamic range is advertised by the camera manufacturers, it must be less due to the inherent noise level from the intensifier. The obtained result should be seen as the starting point to go ahead to fit the different requirements of car producers in respect to fuel injection, lubricant distribution, mechanical stability and operation control. Similar inspections will be possible for all devices with repetitive operation principle. Here, we report about two measurements dealing with the lubricant distribution in a running motorcycle motor turning at 1200 rpm. We were monitoring the periodic stationary movements of piston, valves and camshaft with a micro-channel plate intensified CCD camera system (PI-Max 1300RB, Princeton Instruments) triggered at exactly chosen time points.

  20. Characterization of a neutron imaging setup at the INES facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durisi, E.A., E-mail: elisabettaalessandra.durisi@unito.it [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Visca, L. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Albertin, F.; Brancaccio, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Corsi, J. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dughera, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Ferrarese, W. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Giovagnoli, A.; Grassi, N. [Fondazione Centro per la Conservazione ed il Restauro dei Beni Culturali “La Venaria Reale”, Piazza della Repubblica, 10078 Venaria Reale, Torino (Italy); Grazzi, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Lo Giudice, A.; Mila, G. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); and others

    2013-10-21

    The Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) located at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (Didcot, United Kingdom) provides a thermal neutron beam mainly used for diffraction analysis. A neutron transmission imaging system was also developed for beam monitoring and for aligning the sample under investigation. Although the time-of-flight neutron diffraction is a consolidated technique, the neutron imaging setup is not yet completely characterized and optimized. In this paper the performance for neutron radiography and tomography at INES of two scintillator screens read out by two different commercial CCD cameras is compared in terms of linearity, signal-to-noise ratio, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution. In addition, the results of neutron radiographies and a tomography of metal alloy test structures are presented to better characterize the INES imaging capabilities of metal artifacts in the cultural heritage field. -- Highlights: A full characterization of the present INES imaging set-up was carried out. Two CCD cameras and two scintillators (ZnS/{sup 6}LiF) of different thicknesses were tested. Linearity, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution were determined. Radiographies of steep wedges were performed using the highest dynamic range setup. Tomography of a bronze cube was performed using the best spatial resolution setup.

  1. Development of a new electronic neutron imaging system

    CERN Document Server

    Brenizer, J S; Gibbs, K M; Mengers, P; Stebbings, C T; Polansky, D; Rogerson, D J

    1999-01-01

    An electronic neutron imaging camera system was developed for use with thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons in applications that include nondestructive inspection of explosives, corrosion, turbine blades, electronics, low Z components, etc. The neutron images are expected to provide information to supplement that available from X-ray tests. The primary camera image area was a 30x30 cm field-of-view with a spatial resolution approaching 1.6 line pairs/mm (lp/mm). The camera had a remotely changeable second lens to limit the field-of-view to 7.6x7.6 cm for high spatial resolution (at least 4 lp/mm) thermal neutron imaging, but neutron and light scatter will limit resolution for fast neutrons to about 0.5 lp/mm. Remote focus capability enhanced camera set-up for optimum operation. The 75 dB dynamic range camera system included sup 6 Li-based screens for imaging of thermal and epithermal neutrons and ZnS(Ag)-based screens for fast neutron imaging. The fast optics was input to a Super S-25 Gen II image intensifi...

  2. Neutron detection with imaging plates Part II. Detector characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Thoms, M

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the physical processes described in Neutron detection with imaging plates - part I: image storage and readout [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 424 (1999) 26-33] detector characteristics, such as quantum efficiency, detective quantum efficiency, sensitivity to neutron- and gamma-radiation, readout time and dynamic range are predicted. It is estimated that quantum efficiencies and detective quantum efficiencies close to 100% can be reached making these kind of detectors interesting for a wide range of applications.

  3. Application of imaging plate neutron detector to neutron radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Fujine, S; Kamata, M; Etoh, M

    1999-01-01

    As an imaging plate neutron detector (IP-ND) has been available for thermal neutron radiography (TNR) which has high resolution, high sensitivity and wide range, some basic characteristics of the IP-ND system were measured at the E-2 facility of the KUR. After basic performances of the IP were studied, images with high quality were obtained at a neutron fluence of 2 to 7x10 sup 8 n cm sup - sup 2. It was found that the IP-ND system with Gd sub 2 O sub 3 as a neutron converter material has a higher sensitivity to gamma-ray than that of a conventional film method. As a successful example, clear radiographs of the flat view for the fuel side plates with boron burnable poison were obtained. An application of the IP-ND system to neutron radiography (NR) is presented in this paper.

  4. The neutron imaging diagnostic at NIF (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, F E; Bower, D; Buckles, R; Clark, D D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H; Wilson, D C

    2012-10-01

    A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

  5. Neutron imaging — Detector options in progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, E. H.; Tremsin, A.; Grünzweig, C.; Johnson, I.; Boillat, P.; Josic, L.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron imaging is a non-invasive method for material research on the macroscopic level. It is carried out at laboratories equipped with powerful neutron sources, suitable neutron beam lines and neutron detection systems. Decades ago neutron radiography began capturing images with film techniques. These techniques yielded excellent spatial resolution even over large fields of view. In the recent years, improvements in the detection techniques and their digitization have been the main forces driving successes in neutron imaging. Several detector options have been developed, implemented and used in practical applications in order to achieve digital information from the neutron transmission process which is needed for a quantitative evaluation of image data by sophisticated methods like neutron tomography, phase contrast imaging, neutron interferometry and time dependent studies. The most common approach in digital neutron imaging is a conversion of the neutron field information into visible light by a scintillation process, where a neutron converter is needed because neutrons do not excite directly due to their neutral charge. Low level light signals can be observed either with sensitive camera systems or by using amorphous silicon based semiconductor plate devices. However, these now established detection techniques are still limited in respect to spatial and time resolution. The best possible spatial resolution which can be achieved today is available by a system built at PSI with about 10 μm pixel size. Recently, it was upgraded with a tilted option for an increased resolution by a factor of 4 in one direction. Scintillator based techniques are limited by the dissipation of the secondary particles. This limitation has motivated the search for new detector options. One approach is a pixilated system where the readout per incoming neutron can be used to calculate precisely the position of its impact. Such devices are realized as the TIMEPIX system already. The

  6. Neutron imaging and applications a reference for the imaging community

    CERN Document Server

    McGreevy, Robert L; Bilheux, Hassina Z

    2009-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the basics of neutron beam production in addition to the wide scope of techniques that enhance imaging application capabilities. This title features a section that describes imaging single grains in polycrystalline materials, neutron imaging of geological materials and other materials science and engineering areas.

  7. Characterization of the image quality in neutron radioscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J.; Engelhardt, M.; Frei, G.; Gildemeister, A.; Lehmann, E.; Hillenbach, A.; Schillinger, B.

    2005-04-01

    Neutron radioscopy, or dynamic neutron radiography, is a non-destructive testing method, which has made big steps in the last years. Depending on the neutron flux, the object and the detector, for single events a time resolution down to a few milliseconds is possible. In the case of repetitive processes the object can be synchronized with the detector and better statistics in the image can be reached by adding radiographies of the same phase with a time resolution down to 100 μs. By stepwise delaying the trigger signal a radiography movie can be composed. Radiography images of a combustion engine and an injection nozzle were evaluated quantitatively by different methods trying to characterize the image quality of an imaging system. The main factors which influence the image quality are listed and discussed.

  8. New feature of the neutron color image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittoh, Koichi; Konagai, Chikara; Noji, Takashi; Miyabe, Keisuke

    2009-06-01

    We developed prototype neutron color image intensifiers with high-sensitivity, wide dynamic range and long-life characteristics. In the prototype intensifier (Gd-Type 1), a terbium-activated Gd 2O 2S is used as the input-screen phosphor. In the upgraded model (Gd-Type 2), Gd 2O 3 and CsI:Na are vacuum deposited to form the phosphor layer, which improved the sensitivity and the spatial uniformity. A europium-activated Y 2O 2S multi-color scintillator, emitting red, green and blue photons with different intensities, is utilized as the output screen of the intensifier. By combining this image intensifier with a suitably tuned high-sensitive color CCD camera, higher sensitivity and wider dynamic range could be simultaneously attained than that of the conventional P20-phosphor-type image intensifier. The results of experiments at the JRR-3M neutron radiography irradiation port (flux: 1.5×10 8 n/cm 2/s) showed that these neutron color image intensifiers can clearly image dynamic phenomena with a 30 frame/s video picture. It is expected that the color image intensifier will be used as a new two-dimensional neutron sensor in new application fields.

  9. Neutron Imaging by Boric Acid

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, Fabio; Perconti, Walter; Petrucci, Andrea; Rosada, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a new type of passive neutron detector based on the already existing one, CR39, is described. Its operation was verified by three different neutron sources: an Americium-Beryllium (Am241-Be) source; a TRIGA type nuclear reactor; and a fast neutron reactor called TAPIRO. The obtained results, reported here, positively confirm its operation and the accountability of the new developed detecting technique.

  10. Neutron Star Crust and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, C J; Schneider, A; Berry, D K

    2011-01-01

    In this book chapter we review plasma crystals in the laboratory, in the interior of white dwarf stars, and in the crust of neutron stars. We describe a molecular dynamics formalism and show results for many neutron star crust properties including phase separation upon freezing, diffusion, breaking strain, shear viscosity and dynamics response of nuclear pasta. We end with a summary and discuss open questions and challenges for the future.

  11. Dynamics of Rotating, Magnetized Neutron Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Liebling, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Using a fully general relativistic implementation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics with no assumed symmetries in three spatial dimensions, the dynamics of magnetized, rigidly rotating neutron stars are studied. Beginning with fully consistent initial data constructed with Magstar, part of the Lorene project, we study the dynamics and stability of rotating, magnetized polytropic stars as models of neutron stars. Evolutions suggest that some of these rotating, magnetized stars may be minimally uns...

  12. Modeling gated neutron images of THD capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Douglas Carl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grim, Gary P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tregillis, Ian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilke, Mark D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morgan, George L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Loomis, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilde, Carl H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oertel, John A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fatherley, Valerie E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clark, David D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmitt, Mark J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merrill, Frank E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Tai - Sen F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Danly, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batha, Steven H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patel, M [LLNL; Sepke, S [LLNL; Hatarik, R [LLNL; Fittinghoff, D [LLNL; Bower, D [LLNL; Marinak, M [LLNL; Munro, D [LLNL; Moran, M [LLNL; Hilko, R [NSTEC; Frank, M [LLNL; Buckles, R [NSTEC

    2010-01-01

    Time gating a neutron detector 28m from a NIF implosion can produce images at different energies. The brighter image near 14 MeV reflects the size and symmetry of the capsule 'hot spot'. Scattered neutrons, {approx}9.5-13 MeV, reflect the size and symmetry of colder, denser fuel, but with only {approx}1-7% of the neutrons. The gated detector records both the scattered neutron image, and, to a good approximation, an attenuated copy of the primary image left by scintillator decay. By modeling the imaging system the energy band for the scattered neutron image (10-12 MeV) can be chosen, trading off the decayed primary image and the decrease of scattered image brightness with energy. Modeling light decay from EJ399, BC422, BCF99-55, Xylene, DPAC-30, and Liquid A leads to a preference from BCF99-55 for the first NIF detector, but DPAC 30 and Liquid A would be preferred if incorporated into a system. Measurement of the delayed light from the NIF scintillator using implosions at the Omega laser shows BCF99-55 to be a good choice for down-scattered imaging at 28m.

  13. Optics for Advanced Neutron Imaging and Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moncton, David E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Khaykovich, Boris [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    During the report period, we continued the work as outlined in the original proposal. We have analyzed potential optical designs of Wolter mirrors for the neutron-imaging instrument VENUS, which is under construction at SNS. In parallel, we have conducted the initial polarized imaging experiment at Helmholtz Zentrum, Berlin, one of very few of currently available polarized-imaging facilities worldwide.

  14. Development of energy selective neutron imaging system at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongyul; Kim, Jeong ho; Lee, Suhyun; Moon, Myung Kook; Kim, TaeJoo; Shin, Eun Joo; Woo, Wanchuck [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Energy selective neutron imaging is one of advanced neutron imaging techniques because it is critical to examine the crystallographic phase distribution and spatial phase transformation for the development and application of new grade high-strength steels using energy selective neutron imaging. In this work, we are developing the energy selective neutron imaging system at the Ex-core Neutron irradiation Facility (ENF) for thermal neutron beam and the 18m Small Angle Neutron Scattering (18mSANS) beam line for cold neutron beam at HANARO. The energy selective neutron imaging system is being developed at the ENF and 18mSANS beam line at HANARO. We are expecting to get neutron radiographic images which can distinguish bcc and fcc phases in the prepared sample. The result of energy selective neutron imaging will provide the spatial distribution of the new deformation induced phase, which is important to make a relationship between phase transformation and mechanical behavior of the sample.

  15. Neutron Imaging Calibration to Measure Void Fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Sharma, Vishaldeep [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Void fraction is an intuitive parameter that describes the fraction of vapor in a two-phase flow. It appears as a key variable in most heat transfer and pressure drop correlations used to design evaporating and condensing heat exchangers, as well as determining charge inventory in refrigeration systems. Void fraction measurement is not straightforward, however, and assumptions on the invasiveness of the measuring technique must be made. Neutron radiography or neutron imaging has the potential to be a truly non-invasive void fraction measuring technique but has until recently only offered qualitative descriptions of two-phase flow, in terms of flow maldistributions, for example. This paper describes the calibration approach necessary to employ neutron imaging to measure steady-state void fraction. Experiments were conducted at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold Guide 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN, USA.

  16. A neutron-sensitive image intensifier-television system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, J.B.; Smith, H.G.; Willems, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    A neutron-sensitive, image intensifier-digital television system has been developed for area recording of weak patterns in neutron scattering studies. It can also be used as a low resolution neutron radiography instrument. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  17. LISe pixel detector for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel; Wiggins, Brenden; Milburn, Rob; Burger, Arnold; Bilheux, Hassina; Santodonato, Louis; Chvala, Ondrej; Stowe, Ashley; Lukosi, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Semiconducting lithium indium diselenide, 6LiInSe2 or LISe, has promising characteristics for neutron detection applications. The 95% isotopic enrichment of 6Li results in a highly efficient thermal neutron-sensitive material. In this study, we report on a proof-of-principle investigation of a semiconducting LISe pixel detector to demonstrate its potential as an efficient neutron imager. The LISe pixel detector had a 4×4 of pixels with a 550 μm pitch on a 5×5×0.56 mm3 LISe substrate. An experimentally verified spatial resolution of 300 μm was observed utilizing a super-sampling technique.

  18. High frame-rate neutron radiography of dynamic events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, R.H.; Robinson, A.H.; Barton, J.P.

    1981-11-20

    A system has been developed to perform neutron radiographic analysis of dynamic events having a duration of several milliseconds. The system has been operated in the range of 2000 to 10,000 frames/second. Synchronization has provided high-speed-motion neutron radiographs for evaluation of the firing cycle of 7.62 mm munition rounds within a steel rifle barrel. The system has also been used to demonstrate the ability to produce neutron radiographic movies of two-phase flow. The equipment uses the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor capable of pulsing to 3000 MW peak power, a neutron beam collimator, a scintillator neutron conversion screen coupled to an image intensifier, and a 16 mm high speed movie camera. The peak neutron flux incident at the object position is approximately 4 x 10/sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/s with a pulse, full width at half maximum, of 9 ms. Special studies have been performed on the scintillator conversion screens and on the effects of statistical limitations on the image quality. Modulation transfer function analysis has been used to assist in the evaluation of the system performance.

  19. Thermal neutron imaging using microchannel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, George W.; Pearson, James F.; Al-Horayess, O. S.; Feller, W. Bruce; Cook, Lee M.

    1993-02-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) are compact electron multipliers of high gain, widely used for the high resolution imaging of charged particles and photons. In this paper, we consider the use of lead glass MCPs for the imaging of thermal neutrons. Two contrasting techniques are described. The first method involves direct neutron detection within a special channel plate structure containing lithium and/or boron. We review the constraints of glass chemistry on the attainable lithium oxide and boron oxide fractions and, hence, on the maximum neutron detection efficiency. The second method involves the detection, using MCPs of standard glass composition, of the internal conversion electrons from a thin gadolinium foil. We present the first measurements of the detection efficiency, pulse height resolution and imaging properties of a pulse-counting MCP/Gd detector system.

  20. Development of imaging techniques for fast neutron radiography in Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Fujine, S; Yoshii, K; Kamata, M; Tamaki, M; Ohkubo, K; Ikeda, Y; Kobayashi, H

    1999-01-01

    Neutron radiography with fast neutron beams (FNR) has been studied at the fast neutron source reactor 'YAYOI' of the University of Tokyo since 1986. Imaging techniques for FNR have been developed for CR-39 track-etch detector, electronic imaging system (television method), direct film method, imaging plate and also fast and thermal neutron concurrent imaging method. The review of FNR imaging techniques and some applications are reported in this paper.

  1. Neutron beam imaging with GEM detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, G.; Croci, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Cavenago, M.; Claps, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2015-04-01

    Neutron GEM-based detectors represent a new frontier of devices in neutron physics applications where a very high neutron flux must be measured such as future fusion experiments (e.g. ITER Neutral beam Injector) and spallation sources (e.g. the European Spallation source). This kind of detectors can be properly adapted to be used both as beam monitors but also as neutron diffraction detectors that could represent a valid alternative for the 3He detectors replacement. Fast neutron GEM detectors (nGEM) feature a cathode composed by one layer of polyethylene and one of aluminium (neutron scattering on hydrogen generates protons that are detected in the gas) while thermal neutron GEM detectors (bGEM) are equipped with a borated aluminium cathode (charged particles are generated through the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction). GEM detectors can be realized in large area (1 m2) and their readout can be pixelated. Three different prototypes of nGEM and one prototype of bGEM detectors of different areas and equipped with different types of readout have been built and tested. All the detectors have been used to measure the fast and thermal neutron 2D beam image at the ISIS-VESUVIO beamline. The different kinds of readout patterns (different areas of the pixels) have been compared in similar conditions. All the detectors measured a width of the beam profile consitent with the expected one. The imaging property of each detector was then tested by inserting samples of different material and shape in the beam. All the samples were correctly reconstructed and the definition of the reconstruction depends on the type of readout anode. The fast neutron beam profile reconstruction was then compared to the one obtained by diamond detectors positioned on the same beamline while the thermal neutron one was compared to the imaged obtained by cadmium-coupled x-rays films. Also efficiency and the gamma background rejection have been determined. These prototypes represent the first step towards the

  2. The pin pixel detector--neutron imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Marsh, A S; Rhodes, N J; Schooneveld, E M; Simmons, J E; Stephenson, R

    2002-01-01

    The development and testing of a neutron gas pixel detector intended for application in neutron diffraction studies is reported. Using standard electrical connector pins as point anodes, the detector is based on a commercial 100 pin connector block. A prototype detector of aperture 25.4 mmx25.4 mm has been fabricated, giving a pixel size of 2.54 mm which matches well to the spatial resolution typically required in a neutron diffractometer. A 2-Dimensional resistive divide readout system has been adapted to permit the imaging properties of the detector to be explored in advance of true pixel readout electronics. The timing properties of the device match well to the requirements of the ISIS-pulsed neutron source.

  3. Advanced digital detectors for neutron imaging.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Neutron interrogation provides unique information valuable for Nonproliferation & Materials Control and other important applications including medicine, airport security, protein crystallography, and corrosion detection. Neutrons probe deep inside massive objects to detect small defects and chemical composition, even through high atomic number materials such as lead. However, current detectors are bulky gas-filled tubes or scintillator/PM tubes, which severely limit many applications. Therefore this project was undertaken to develop new semiconductor radiation detection materials to develop the first direct digital imaging detectors for neutrons. The approach relied on new discovery and characterization of new solid-state sensor materials which convert neutrons directly to electronic signals via reactions BlO(n,a)Li7 and Li6(n,a)T.

  4. Dynamics of dissipative multifluid neutron star cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haskell, B.; Andersson, N.; Comer, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    We present a Newtonian multifluid formalism for superfluid neutron star cores, focusing on the additional dissipative terms which arise when one takes into account the individual dynamical degrees of freedom associated with the coupled "fluids." The problem is of direct astrophysical interest as the

  5. Probing neutron-proton dynamics by pions

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeno, Natsumi; Nara, Yasushi; Ohnishi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the nuclear symmetry energy at high density, we study the pion production in central collisions of neutron-rich nuclei ${}^{132}\\mathrm{Sn}+{}^{124}\\mathrm{Sn}$ at 300 MeV/nucleon using a new approach by combining the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) and a hadronic cascade model (JAM). The dynamics of neutrons and protons is solved by AMD, and then pions and $\\Delta$ resonances in the reaction process are handled by JAM. We see the mechanism how the $\\Delta$ resonance and pions are produced reflecting the dynamics of neutrons and protons. We also investigate the impacts of cluster correlations as well as of the high-density symmetry energy on the nucleon dynamics and consequently on the pion ratio. We find that the $\\Delta^-/\\Delta^{++}$ production ratio agrees very well with the neutron-proton squared ratio $(N/Z)^2$ in the high-density and high-momentum region. We show quantitatively that $\\Delta$ production ratio, and therefore $(N/Z)^2$, are directly reflected in the $\\pi^-...

  6. 3D imaging of neutron tracks using confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Flowers, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Neutron detection and neutron flux assessment are important aspects in monitoring nuclear energy production. Neutron flux measurements can also provide information on potential biological damage from exposure. In addition to the applications for neutron measurement in nuclear energy, neutron detection has been proposed as a method of enhancing neutrino detectors and cosmic ray flux has also been assessed using ground-level neutron detectors. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (or SSNTDs) have been used extensively to examine cosmic rays, long-lived radioactive elements, radon concentrations in buildings and the age of geological samples. Passive SSNTDs consisting of a CR-39 plastic are commonly used to measure radon because they respond to incident charged particles such as alpha particles from radon gas in air. They have a large dynamic range and a linear flux response. We have previously applied confocal microscopy to obtain 3D images of alpha particle tracks in SSNTDs from radon track monitoring (1). As a charged particle traverses through the polymer it creates an ionisation trail along its path. The trail or track is normally enhanced by chemical etching to better expose radiation damage, as the damaged area is more sensitive to the etchant than the bulk material. Particle tracks in CR-39 are usually assessed using 2D optical microscopy. In this study 6 detectors were examined using an Olympus OLS4100 LEXT 3D laser scanning confocal microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan). The detectors had been etched for 2 hours 50 minutes at 85 °C in 6.25M NaOH. Post etch the plastics had been treated with a 10 minute immersion in a 2% acetic acid stop bath, followed by rinsing in deionised water. The detectors examined had been irradiated with a 2mSv neutron dose from an Am(Be) neutron source (producing roughly 20 tracks per mm2). We were able to successfully acquire 3D images of neutron tracks in the detectors studied. The range of track diameter observed was between 4

  7. Neutron imaging on the VR-1 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crha, J.; Sklenka, L.; Soltes, J.

    2016-09-01

    Training reactor VR-1 is a low power research reactor with maximal thermal power of 1 kW. The reactor is operated by the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering of the Czech Technical University in Prague. Due to its low power it suits as a tool for education of university students and training of professionals. In 2015, as part of student research project, neutron imaging was introduced as another type of reactor utilization. The low available neutron flux and the limiting spatial and construction capabilities of the reactor's radial channel led to the development of a special filter/collimator insertion inside the channel and choosing a nonstandard approach by placing a neutron imaging plate inside the channel. The paper describes preliminary experiments carried out on the VR-1 reactor which led to first radiographic images. It seems, that due to the reactor construction and low reactor power, the neutron imaging technique on the VR-1 reactor is feasible mainly for demonstration or educational and training purposes.

  8. Investigations of stone consolidants by neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hameed, F. [Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: hameed@ati.ac.at; Schillinger, B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, FRM II and Physics Department E21, Garching (Germany); Rohatsch, A. [Institute for Engineering Geology, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Zawisky, M.; Rauch, H. [Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2009-06-21

    The chemical preservation and structural reintegration of natural stones applied in historical buildings is carried out by the use of different stone strengtheners. As these agents contain hydrogen, they offer good properties for neutron imaging. The main interest in the restoration process is the development of a suitable stone consolidant. In cooperation with the St. Stephans Cathedral and the geologists at Vienna University of Technology, we are investigating the penetration depth and distribution of different stone consolidants. These studies are being carried out with different stone samples, mostly porous natural building stones, limestones and sandstones. The two strengtheners used in this study are ethyl silicate ester (Wacker OH100) and dissolved polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA, Paraloid B72). Neutron radiography and neutron tomography can be used successfully to visualize the distribution of consolidants both in two and three dimensions.

  9. Investigations of stone consolidants by neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, F.; Schillinger, B.; Rohatsch, A.; Zawisky, M.; Rauch, H.

    2009-06-01

    The chemical preservation and structural reintegration of natural stones applied in historical buildings is carried out by the use of different stone strengtheners. As these agents contain hydrogen, they offer good properties for neutron imaging. The main interest in the restoration process is the development of a suitable stone consolidant. In cooperation with the St. Stephans Cathedral and the geologists at Vienna University of Technology, we are investigating the penetration depth and distribution of different stone consolidants. These studies are being carried out with different stone samples, mostly porous natural building stones, limestones and sandstones. The two strengtheners used in this study are ethyl silicate ester (Wacker OH100) and dissolved polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA, Paraloid B72). Neutron radiography and neutron tomography can be used successfully to visualize the distribution of consolidants both in two and three dimensions.

  10. The method of neutron imaging as a tool for the study of the dynamics of water movement in wet aramid-based ballistic body armour panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifler, Felix A.; Lehmann, Eberhard H.; Frei, Gabriel; May, Hans; Rossi, René

    2006-07-01

    A new non-destructive method based on neutron imaging (neutron radiography) to determine the exact water content in aramid-based soft body armour panels is presented. While investigating the ballistic resistance of aramid-based body armour panels under a wet condition, it is important to precisely determine their water content and its chronological development. Using the presented method, the influence of water amount and location on impact testing as well as its time dependence was shown. In the ballistic panels used, spreading of water strongly depended on the kind of quilting. Very fast water migration could be observed when the panels were held vertically. Some first results regarding the water distribution in wet panels immediately after the impact are presented. On the basis of the presented results, requirements for a standard for testing the performance of ballistic panels in the wet state are deduced.

  11. Fast-neutron, coded-aperture imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolf, Richard S., E-mail: richard.woolf@nrl.navy.mil; Phlips, Bernard F., E-mail: bernard.phlips@nrl.navy.mil; Hutcheson, Anthony L., E-mail: anthony.hutcheson@nrl.navy.mil; Wulf, Eric A., E-mail: eric.wulf@nrl.navy.mil

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a large-scale, coded-aperture imager for fast neutrons, building off a proof-of concept instrument developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The Space Science Division at the NRL has a heritage of developing large-scale, mobile systems, using coded-aperture imaging, for long-range γ-ray detection and localization. The fast-neutron, coded-aperture imaging instrument, designed for a mobile unit (20 ft. ISO container), consists of a 32-element array of 15 cm×15 cm×15 cm liquid scintillation detectors (EJ-309) mounted behind a 12×12 pseudorandom coded aperture. The elements of the aperture are composed of 15 cm×15 cm×10 cm blocks of high-density polyethylene (HDPE). The arrangement of the aperture elements produces a shadow pattern on the detector array behind the mask. By measuring of the number of neutron counts per masked and unmasked detector, and with knowledge of the mask pattern, a source image can be deconvolved to obtain a 2-d location. The number of neutrons per detector was obtained by processing the fast signal from each PMT in flash digitizing electronics. Digital pulse shape discrimination (PSD) was performed to filter out the fast-neutron signal from the γ background. The prototype instrument was tested at an indoor facility at the NRL with a 1.8-μCi and 13-μCi 252Cf neutron/γ source at three standoff distances of 9, 15 and 26 m (maximum allowed in the facility) over a 15-min integration time. The imaging and detection capabilities of the instrument were tested by moving the source in half- and one-pixel increments across the image plane. We show a representative sample of the results obtained at one-pixel increments for a standoff distance of 9 m. The 1.8-μCi source was not detected at the 26-m standoff. In order to increase the sensitivity of the instrument, we reduced the fastneutron background by shielding the top, sides and back of the detector array with 10-cm-thick HDPE. This shielding configuration led

  12. Neutron Ghost Imaging Technology Research on CARR Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Ghost imaging is also known as quantum imaging. Different from the classical imaging, the neutron ghost imaging is based on the quantum mechanics properties of light field and its intrinsic parallel characteristic, and developed by new optical

  13. Status of the Neutron Imaging and Diffraction Instrument IMAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockelmann, Winfried; Burca, Genoveva; Kelleher, Joe F.; Kabra, Saurabh; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Rhodes, Nigel J.; Schooneveld, Erik M.; Sykora, Jeff; Pooley, Daniel E.; Nightingale, Jim B.; Aliotta, Francesco; Ponterio, Rosa C.; Salvato, Gabriele; Tresoldi, Dario; Vasi, Cirino; McPhate, Jason B.; Tremsin, Anton S.

    A cold neutron imaging and diffraction instrument, IMAT, is currently being constructed at the ISIS second target station. IMAT will capitalize on time-of-flight transmission and diffraction techniques available at a pulsed neutron source. Analytical techniques will include neutron radiography, neutron tomography, energy-selective neutron imaging, and spatially resolved diffraction scans for residual strain and texture determination. Commissioning of the instrument will start in 2015, with time-resolving imaging detectors and two diffraction detector prototype modules. IMAT will be operated as a user facility for material science applications and will be open for developments of time-of-flight imaging methods.

  14. Neutron spin precession in samples of polarised nuclei and neutron spin phase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piegsa, Florian Michael

    2009-07-09

    The doublet neutron-deuteron (nd) scattering length b{sub 2,d}, which is at present only known with an accuracy of 5%, is particularly well suited to fix three-body forces in novel effective field theories at low energies. The understanding of such few-nucleon systems is essential, e.g. for predictions of element abundances in the big-bang and stellar fusion. b{sub 2,d} can be obtained via a linear combination of the spin-independent nd scattering length b{sub c,d} and the spin-dependent one, b{sub i,d}. The aim of this thesis was to perform a high-accuracy measurement of the latter to improve the relative accuracy of b{sub 2,d} below 1%. The experiment was performed at the fundamental neutron physics beam line FUNSPIN at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. It utilises the effect that the spin of a neutron passing through a target with polarised nuclei performs a pseudomagnetic precession proportional to the spin-dependent scattering length of the nuclei. An ideal method to measure this precession angle very accurately is Ramsey's atomic beam technique, adapted to neutrons. The most crucial part of the experimental setup is the so-called frozen spin target, which consists of a specially designed dilution refrigerator and contains a sample with dynamically polarised nuclear spins. The polarisation of the sample is determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. It turned out that the relaxation of the nuclear spins during the necessary ''cross-calibration'' of the two employed NMR systems is ultimately limiting the achievable accuracy of b{sub i,d}. During the extensive use of the Ramsey resonance method in the neutron-deuteron experiment, an idea emerged that the applied technique could be exploited in a completely different context, namely polarised neutron radiography. Hence, the second part of the thesis covers the development of a novel neutron radiography technique, based on the spin-dependent interaction of the

  15. A dynamical description of neutron star crusts

    CERN Document Server

    de la Mota, V; Eudes, Ph

    2012-01-01

    Neutron Stars are natural laboratories where fundamental properties of matter under extreme conditions can be explored. Modern nuclear physics input as well as many-body theories are valuable tools which may allow us to improve our understanding of the physics of those compact objects. In this work the occurrence of exotic structures in the outermost layers of neutron stars is investigated within the framework of a microscopic model. In this approach the nucleonic dynamics is described by a time-dependent mean field approach at around zero temperature. Starting from an initial crystalline lattice of nuclei at subnuclear densities the system evolves toward a manifold of self-organized structures with different shapes and similar energies. These structures are studied in terms of a phase diagram in density and the corresponding sensitivity to the isospin-dependent part of the equation of state and to the isotopic composition is investigated.

  16. Results from neutron imaging of ICF experiments at NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, F. E.; Danly, C. R.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    In 2011 a neutron imaging diagnostic was commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system has been used to collect neutron images to measure the size and shape of the burning DT plasma and the surrounding fuel assembly. The imaging technique uses a pinhole neutron aperture placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two-dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic collects two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically one image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons, and the other image measures the distribution of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core. Images have been collected for the majority of the experiments performed as part of the ignition campaign. Results from this data have been used to estimate a burn-averaged fuel assembly as well as providing performance metrics to gauge progress towards ignition. This data set and our interpretation are presented.

  17. Electronic imaging system for neutron radiography at a low power research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, F.J.O., E-mail: fferreira@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Caixa Postal 68550, CEP 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva, A.X.; Crispim, V.R. [PEN/COPPE-DNC/POLI CT, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-08-15

    This paper describes an electronic imaging system for producing real time neutron radiography from a low power research reactor, which will allow inspections of samples with high efficiency, in terms of measuring time and result analysis. This system has been implanted because of its potential use in various scientific and industrial areas where neutron radiography with photographic film could not be applied. This real time system is installed in neutron radiography facility of Argonauta nuclear research reactor, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, in Brazil. It is adequate to perform real time neutron radiography of static and dynamic events of samples.

  18. Digital image processing in neutron radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Körner, S

    2000-01-01

    automated neutron tomography facility has been built at the Atominstitut with this detector. Digital Image Processing: Due to special detector properties of the CCD-camera NR detector, a standard image processing procedure has been developed that always has to be applied, when the CCD-detector is used. It consists of the following steps: white spot correction - dark frame correction and flat field correction. Radiation, which hits the CCD-chip causes an overflow of one or several pixels, which appears in the image as white spots. These disturbing spots have to be removed by means of digital image processing. Several filters have been tested, but the results were insufficient. Therefore, a new threshold-median-mean value filter was designed and a proper code was written in IDL (interactive data language). The new filter removes white spots very well by hardly blurring the images. A dark frame is an image made with closed camera shutter. It contains undesired detector signal caused by read out noise and dark cu...

  19. DUNBID, the Delft University neutron backscattering imaging detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bom, V.R. [Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)]. E-mail: vb@iri.tudelft.nl; Eijk, C.W.E. van [Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Ali, M.A. [Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Research Center, Reactor and Neutron Physics Department, P.O. Box 13759, Abu Zabal, Cairo (Egypt)

    2005-12-01

    In the search for low-metallic land mines, the neutron backscattering technique may be applied if the soil is sufficiently dry. An advantage of this method is the speed of detection: the scanning speed may be made comparable to that of a metal detector. A two-dimensional position sensitive detector is tested to obtain an image of the back scattered thermal neutron radiation. Results of experiments using a radionuclide neutron source are presented. The on-mine to no-mine signal ratio can be improved by the application of a window on the neutron time-of-flight. Results using a pulsed neutron generator are also presented.

  20. The STING imaging system based on using neutrons and gammas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, H.B. [SubAtomic Technologies, Inc., 4929 Hidden Meadow Way, Antelope, CA 95843 (United States); Maier, M.R. [SubAtomic Technologies, Inc., 4929 Hidden Meadow Way, Antelope, CA 95843 (United States)]. E-mail: mmaier@SubatomicInc.com

    2005-04-21

    We present a novel method for three-dimensional imaging of contrast agents in different specimens using neutrons. The contrast agent is an element with a high neutron capture cross section-e.g. B{sup 10}. This element emits a {gamma}-ray-478keV in the case of B{sup 10}-upon capturing a neutron. The {gamma}-rays are then imaged with suitable tomographic imaging methods. We present a method of using a shadow mask technique for imaging which needs only one exposure and can yield depth information in addition to the two-dimensional projection.

  1. The STING imaging system based on using neutrons and gammas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, H. B.; Maier, M. R.

    2005-04-01

    We present a novel method for three-dimensional imaging of contrast agents in different specimens using neutrons. The contrast agent is an element with a high neutron capture cross section—e.g. B 10. This element emits a γ-ray—478 keV in the case of B 10—upon capturing a neutron. The γ-rays are then imaged with suitable tomographic imaging methods. We present a method of using a shadow mask technique for imaging which needs only one exposure and can yield depth information in addition to the two-dimensional projection.

  2. Neutron imaging data processing using the Mantid framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouzols, Federico M.; Draper, Nicholas; Nagella, Sri; Yang, Erica; Sajid, Ahmed; Ross, Derek; Ritchie, Brian; Hill, John; Burca, Genoveva; Minniti, Triestino; Moreton-Smith, Christopher; Kockelmann, Winfried

    2016-09-01

    Several imaging instruments are currently being constructed at neutron sources around the world. The Mantid software project provides an extensible framework that supports high-performance computing for data manipulation, analysis and visualisation of scientific data. At ISIS, IMAT (Imaging and Materials Science & Engineering) will offer unique time-of-flight neutron imaging techniques which impose several software requirements to control the data reduction and analysis. Here we outline the extensions currently being added to Mantid to provide specific support for neutron imaging requirements.

  3. Fractional neutron point kinetics equations for nuclear reactor dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto, E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Polo-Labarrios, Marco-A. [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Espinosa-Martinez, Erick-G. [Retorno Quebec 6, Col. Burgos de Cuernavaca 62580, Temixco, Mor. (Mexico); Valle-Gallegos, Edmundo del [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, Mexico, D.F. 07738 (Mexico)

    2011-02-15

    The fractional point-neutron kinetics model for the dynamic behavior in a nuclear reactor is derived and analyzed in this paper. The fractional model retains the main dynamic characteristics of the neutron motion in which the relaxation time associated with a rapid variation in the neutron flux contains a fractional order, acting as exponent of the relaxation time, to obtain the best representation of a nuclear reactor dynamics. The physical interpretation of the fractional order is related with non-Fickian effects from the neutron diffusion equation point of view. The numerical approximation to the solution of the fractional neutron point kinetics model, which can be represented as a multi-term high-order linear fractional differential equation, is calculated by reducing the problem to a system of ordinary and fractional differential equations. The numerical stability of the fractional scheme is investigated in this work. Results for neutron dynamic behavior for both positive and negative reactivity and for different values of fractional order are shown and compared with the classic neutron point kinetic equations. Additionally, a related review with the neutron point kinetics equations is presented, which encompasses papers written in English about this research topic (as well as some books and technical reports) published since 1940 up to 2010.

  4. FNIT: the fast neutron imaging telescope for SNM detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravar, Ulisse; Bruillard, Paul J.; Flückiger, Erwin O.; Macri, John R.; McConnell, Mark L.; Moser, Michael R.; Ryan, James M.

    2006-05-01

    We report on recent progress in the development of the Fast Neutron Imaging Telescope (FNIT), a detector with both imaging and energy measurement capabilities, sensitive to neutrons in the 2-20 MeV range. FNIT was initially conceived to study solar neutrons as a candidate design for the Solar Sentinels program under formulation at NASA. This instrument is now being configured to locate fission neutron sources for homeland security purposes. By accurately identifying the position of the neutron source with imaging techniques and reconstructing the energy spectrum of fission neutrons, FNIT can locate problematic amounts of Special Nuclear Material (SNM), including heavily shielded and masked samples. The detection principle is based on multiple elastic neutron-proton (n-p) scatterings in organic scintillators. By reconstructing the n-p event locations and sequence and measuring the recoil proton energies, the direction and energy spectrum of the primary neutron flux can be determined and neutron point sources identified. The performance of FNIT is being evaluated through a series of Monte Carlo simulations and lab tests of detector prototypes. The Science Model One (SM1) of this instrument was recently assembled and is presently undergoing performance testing.

  5. Visualisation of diesel injector with neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.; Jollet, S.; Kaiser, M.; Hansen, H.; Dinkelacker, F.

    2015-12-01

    The injection process of diesel engines influences the pollutant emissions. The spray formation is significantly influenced by the internal flow of the injector. One of the key parameters here is the generation of cavitation caused by the geometry and the needle lift. In modern diesel engines the injection pressure is established up to 3000 bar. The details of the flow and phase change processes inside the injector are of increasing importance for such injectors. With these experimental measurements the validation of multiphase and cavitation models is possible for the high pressure range. Here, for instance, cavitation effects can occur. Cavitation effects in the injection port area destabilize the emergent fuel jet and improve the jet break-up. The design of the injection system in direct-injection diesel engines is an important challenge, as the jet breakup, the atomization and the mixture formation in the combustion chamber are closely linked. These factors have a direct impact on emissions, fuel consumption and performance of an engine. The shape of the spray at the outlet is determined by the internal flow of the nozzle. Here, geometrical parameters, the injection pressure, the injection duration and the cavitation phenomena play a major role. In this work, the flow dependency in the nozzles are analysed with the Neutron-Imaging. The great advantage of this method is the penetrability of the steel structure while a high contrast to the fuel is given due to the interaction of the neutrons with the hydrogen amount. Compared to other methods (optical with glass structures) we can apply real components under highest pressure conditions. During the steady state phase of the injection various cavitation phenomena are visible in the injector, being influenced by the nozzle geometry and the fuel pressure. Different characteristics of cavitation in the sac and spray hole can be detected, and the spray formation in the primary breakup zone is influenced.

  6. Development Progress of the Neutron Imaging Station in CPHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongshun; Chen, Zhiqiang; Yang, Yigang; Wang, Xuewu

    The neutron imaging station based on the proton-linac-driven neutron source at CPHS, is presently under construction at Tsinghua University. Itis driven by a high-intensity proton linac (ECR proton source, LEBT, RFQ, DTL and HEBT) with a 13-MeV proton beam and a beryllium target station for neutron production. The facility has achieved its mid-term objective to deliver a 3 MeV proton beam directly from the RFQ output to the neutron target station by the HEBT, with a peak current of 22 mA and a pulse length of 100 μs.In addition the neutron imaging station of the first stage to provide neutron radiography is installed. In this paper, the instrument design and engineering construction status of the neutron imaging station of CPHS is presented, including the preliminary neutron imaging experiments and the results. The beam energy of the CPHS will be enhanced to 13 MeV after the DTL is ready in 2015.

  7. Displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zujun Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The experiments of displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The CMOS APS image sensors are manufactured in the standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The flux of neutron beams was about 1.33 × 108 n/cm2s. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron equivalent-fluence of 1 × 1011, 5 × 1011, and 1 × 1012 n/cm2, respectively. The mean dark signal (KD, dark signal spike, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU, noise (VN, saturation output signal voltage (VS, and dynamic range (DR versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors are analyzed. The mean dark signal increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The dark images from CMOS APS image sensors irradiated by neutrons are presented to investigate the generation of dark signal spike.

  8. Comparing neutron and X-ray images from NIF implosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson D.C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Directly laser driven and X-radiation driven DT filled capsules differ in the relationship between neutron and X-ray images. Shot N110217, a directly driven DT-filled glass micro-balloon provided the first neutron images at the National Ignition Facility. As seen in implosions on the Omega laser, the neutron image can be enclosed inside time integrated X-ray images. HYDRA simulations show the X-ray image is dominated by emission from the hot glass shell while the neutron image arises from the DT fuel it encloses. In the absence of mix or jetting, X-ray images of a cryogenically layered THD fuel capsule should be dominated by emission from the hydrogen rather than the cooler plastic shell that is separated from the hot core by cold DT fuel. This cool, dense DT, invisible in X-ray emission, shows itself by scattering hot core neutrons. Germanium X-ray emission spectra and Ross pair filtered X-ray energy resolved images suggest that germanium doped plastic emits in the torus shaped hot spot, probably reducing the neutron yield.

  9. Neutron diffractometer for bio-crystallography (BIX) with an imaging plate neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    We have constructed a dedicated diffractometer for neutron crystallography in biology (BIX) on the JRR-3M reactor at JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute). The diffraction intensity from a protein crystal is weaker than that from most inorganic materials. In order to overcome the intensity problem, an elastically bent silicon monochromator and a large area detector system were specially designed. A preliminary result of diffraction experiment using BIX has been reported. An imaging plate neutron detector has been developed and a feasibility experiment was carried out on BIX. Results are reported. An imaging plate neutron detector has been developed and a feasibility test was carried out using BIX.

  10. Implementation of neutron phase contrast imaging at FRM-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Klaus

    2008-11-12

    At ANTARES, the beam line for neutron imaging at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) in Garching, the option to do phase contrast imaging besides conventional absorption based neutron imaging was implemented and successfully used for the non-destructive testing of various types of objects. The used propagation-based technique is based on the interference of neutron waves in the detector plane that were differently strong diffracted by the sample. A comparison with other phase-sensitive neutron imaging techniques highlights assets and drawbacks of the different methods. In preliminary measurements at ANTARES and the spallation source SINQ at PSI in Villigen, the influence of the beam geometry, the neutron spectrum and the detector on the quality of the phase contrast measurements were investigated systematically. It was demonstrated that gamma radiation and epithermal neutrons in the beam contribute severely to background noise in measurements, which motivated the installation of a remotely controlled filter wheel for a quick and precise positioning of different crystal filters in the beam. By the installation of a similar aperture wheel, a quick change between eight different beam geometries was made possible. Besides pinhole and slit apertures, coded apertures based on non redundant arrays were investigated. The possibilities, which arise by the exploitation of the real part of the refractive index in neutron imaging, were demonstrated in experiments with especially designed test samples and in measurements with ordinary, industrial components. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic Dynamics of Fine Particles Studied by Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen;

    2000-01-01

    We give an introduction to inelastic neutron scattering and the dynamic scattering function for magnetic nanoparticles. Differences between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles are discussed and we give a review of recent results on ferromagnetic Fe nanoparticles and canted antiferro......We give an introduction to inelastic neutron scattering and the dynamic scattering function for magnetic nanoparticles. Differences between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles are discussed and we give a review of recent results on ferromagnetic Fe nanoparticles and canted...

  12. Thermal Neutron Imaging Using A New Pad-Based Position Sensitive Neutron Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dioszegi I.; Vanier P.E.; Salwen C.; Chichester D.L.; Watson S.M.

    2016-10-29

    Thermal neutrons (with mean energy of 25 meV) have a scattering mean free path of about 20 m in air. Therefore it is feasible to find localized thermal neutron sources up to ~30 m standoff distance using thermal neutron imaging. Coded aperture thermal neutron imaging was developed in our laboratory in the nineties, using He-3 filled wire chambers. Recently a new generation of coded-aperture neutron imagers has been developed. In the new design the ionization chamber has anode and cathode planes, where the anode is composed of an array of individual pads. The charge is collected on each of the individual 5x5 mm2 anode pads, (48x48 in total, corresponding to 24x24 cm2 sensitive area) and read out by application specific integrated circuits (ASICs). The high sensitivity of the ASICs allows unity gain operation mode. The new design has several advantages for field deployable imaging applications, compared to the previous generation of wire-grid based neutron detectors. Among these are the rugged design, lighter weight and use of non-flammable stopping gas. For standoff localization of thermalized neutron sources a low resolution (11x11 pixel) coded aperture mask has been fabricated. Using the new larger area detector and the coarse resolution mask we performed several standoff experiments using moderated californium and plutonium sources at Idaho National Laboratory. In this paper we will report on the development and performance of the new pad-based neutron camera, and present long range coded-aperture images of various thermalized neutron sources.

  13. Inelastic neutron scattering and lattice dynamics of minerals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narayani Choudhury; S L Chaplot

    2008-10-01

    We review current research on minerals using inelastic neutron scattering and lattice dynamics calculations. Inelastic neutron scattering studies in combination with first principles and atomistic calculations provide a detailed understanding of the phonon dispersion relations, density of states and their manifestations in various thermodynamic properties. The role of theoretical lattice dynamics calculations in the planning, interpretation and analysis of neutron experiments are discussed. These studies provide important insights in understanding various anomalous behaviour including pressure-induced amorphization, phonon and elastic instabilities, prediction of novel high pressure phase transitions, high pressure{temperature melting, etc.

  14. Neutron imaging for geothermal energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Philip; Polsky, Yarom; Anovitz, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems extract heat energy from the interior of the earth using a working fluid, typically water. Three components are required for a commercially viable geothermal system: heat, fluid, and permeability. Current commercial electricity production using geothermal energy occurs where the three main components exist naturally. These are called hydrothermal systems. In the US, there is an estimated 30 GW of base load electrical power potential for hydrothermal sites. Next generation geothermal systems, named Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), have an estimated potential of 4500 GW. EGSs lack in-situ fluid, permeability or both. As such, the heat exchange system must be developed or "engineered" within the rock. The envisioned method for producing permeability in the EGS reservoir is hydraulic fracturing, which is rarely practiced in the geothermal industry, and not well understood for the rocks typically present in geothermal reservoirs. High costs associated with trial and error learning in the field have led to an effort to characterize fluid flow and fracturing mechanisms in the laboratory to better understand how to design and manage EGS reservoirs. Neutron radiography has been investigated for potential use in this characterization. An environmental chamber has been developed that is suitable for reproduction of EGS pressures and temperatures and has been tested for both flow and precipitations studies with success for air/liquid interface imaging and 3D reconstruction of precipitation within the core.

  15. Neutron Imaging Developments at LANSCE [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hunter, James F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schirato, Richard C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogel, Sven C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Swift, Alicia L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ickes, Timothy Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ward, William Carl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Losko, Adrian Simon [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Tremsin, Anton [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Sevanto, Sanna Annika [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dickman, Lee Thoresen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Malone, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-29

    Thermal, epithermal, and high-energy neutrons are available from two spallation sources at the 800-MeV proton accelerator. Improvements in detectors and computing have enabled new capabilities that use the pulsed beam properties at LANSCE; these include amorphous Si (aSi) detectors, intensified charge-coupled device cameras, and micro-channel plates. Applications include water flow in living specimens, inclusions and fission products in uranium oxide, and high-energy neutron imaging using an aSi flat panel with ZnS(Ag) scintillator screen. images of a metal/plastic cylinder from photons, low-energy and high-energy neutrons are compared.

  16. Advanced Scintillator Detectors for Neutron Imaging in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert-Kleinrath, Verena; Danly, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Simpson, Raspberry; Volegov, Petr; Wilde, Carl

    2016-10-01

    The neutron imaging team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been providing two-dimensional neutron imaging of the inertial confinement fusion process at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for over five years. Neutron imaging is a powerful tool in which position-sensitive detectors register neutrons emitted in the fusion reactions, producing a picture of the burning fuel. Recent images have revealed possible multi-dimensional asymmetries, calling for additional views to facilitate three-dimensional imaging. These will be along shorter lines of sight to stay within the existing facility at NIF. In order to field imaging capabilities equivalent to the existing system several technological challenges have to be met: high spatial resolution, high light output, and fast scintillator response to capture lower-energy neutrons, which have scattered from non-burning regions of fuel. Deuterated scintillators are a promising candidate to achieve the timing and resolution required; a systematic study of deuterated and non-deuterated polystyrene and liquid samples is currently ongoing. A test stand has been implemented to measure the response function, and preliminary data on resolution and light output have been obtained at the LANL Weapons Neutrons Research facility.

  17. Assessment of Electromagnetic Stirrer Agitated Liquid Metal Flows by Dynamic Neutron Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ščepanskis, Mihails; Sarma, Mārtiņš; Vontobel, Peter; Trtik, Pavel; Thomsen, Knud; Jakovičs, Andris; Beinerts, Toms

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents qualitative and quantitative characterization of two-phase liquid metal flows agitated by the stirrer on rotating permanent magnets. The stirrer was designed to fulfill various eddy flows, which may have different rates of solid particle entrapment from the liquid surface and their homogenization. The flow was characterized by visualization of the tailored tracer particles by means of dynamic neutron radiography, an experimental method well suited for liquid metal flows due to low opacity of some metals for neutrons. The rather high temporal resolution of the image acquisition (32 Hz image acquisition rate) allows for the quantitative investigation of the flows up to 30 cm/s using neutron particle image velocimetry. In situ visualization of the two-phase liquid metal flow is also demonstrated.

  18. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Nevzat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT filled cryogenic plastic (CH capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13–15 MeV and downscattered (10–12 MeV neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  19. Dynamics of a self-gravitating magnetized neutron source

    CERN Document Server

    Paret, D Manreza

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of a self-gravitating neutron gas in presence of a magnetic field is being studied taking the equation of state of a magnetized neutron gas obtained in a previous study [1]. We work in a Bianchi I spacetime characterized by a Kasner metric, this metric allow us to take into account the anisotropy that introduces the magnetic field. The set of Einstein-Maxwell field equations for this gas becomes a dynamical system in a 4-dimensional phase space. We get numerical solutions of the system. In particular there is a unique point like solution for different initial conditions. Physically this singular solution may be associated with the collapse of a local volume of neutron material within a neutron star.

  20. Neutron Scattering Collimation Wheel Instrument for Imaging Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Every, E.; Deyhim, A.

    2016-09-01

    The design of a state-of-the-art selector wheel instrument to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/ tomography) is discussed. The selector wheel is installed on the DINGO Radiography instrument at the Bragg Institute HB2 beamline at ANSTO in Sidney Aus. The selector wheel consists of a single axis drum filled with a wax/steel shielding mixture and six square cutouts for neutron optics and a larger solid shielding sector to act as a shutter. This paper focuses on the details of design and shielding of the selector wheel.

  1. Recent improvements in the methodology of neutron imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eberhard H Lehmann

    2008-10-01

    The focus of this article is on further improvements of methods in neutron imaging: the increased spatial resolution for microtomography and options for energy- selective neutron imaging. Before going into details, some common statements are given in respect to the state-of-the-art in neutron imaging. A relation to the X-ray methods is mentioned, where complementary results are obtained. The potential for the energy selection is of particular interest for future installations at the new pulsed sources, based on spallation (SNS, J-PARC, ISIS-TS2). First results from preliminary studies look very promising for future material and industrial research. Therefore, statements about the set-up of the best possible imaging systems are included in the article.

  2. Water imaging in living plant by nondestructive neutron beam analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, M. Tomoko [Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    Analysis of biological activity in intact cells or tissues is essential to understand many life processes. Techniques for these in vivo measurements have not been well developed. We present here a nondestructive method to image water in living plants using a neutron beam. This technique provides the highest resolution for water in tissue yet obtainable. With high specificity to water, this neutron beam technique images water movement in seeds or in roots imbedded in soil, as well as in wood and meristems during development. The resolution of the image attainable now is about 15um. We also describe how this new technique will allow new investigations in the field of plant research. (author)

  3. The character and application of a neutron imaging plate (NIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Y.; Kumazawa, S.; Miimura, N.

    We have developed a neutron imaging plate (NIP) as a new neutron detector and already reported the fundamental features of the NIP. The optimization of the NIP was carried out by changing a molar ratio of converter materials to PSL (Photostimulated luminescence) materials and thickness of the NIP. Some problems such as γ-ray sensitivity and irradiation effect for the practical use of the NIP were discussed. Several examples of application of the NIP were introduced.

  4. Present and Future Activities on Neutron Imaging in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglione, Aureliano; Blostein, Jerónimo; Cantargi, Florencia; Marín, Julio; Baruj, Alberto; Meyer, Gabriel; Santisteban, Javier; Sánchez, Fernando

    We present here a short review of the main work which has been done in the latest years in neutron imaging in Argentina, and the future plans for the development of this technique in the country, mainly focused in the design of a new neutron imaging instrument to be installed in the future research reactor RA10. We present here the results of the implementation of the technique in samples belonging to the Argentinean cultural heritage and experiments related with hydrogen storage. At the same time, the Argentinean RA10 project for the design and construction of a 30 MW multipurpose research reactor is rapidly progressing. It started to be designed by the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) and the technology company INVAP SE, both from Argentina, in June 2010. The construction will start in the beginning of 2015 in the Ezeiza Atomic Center, at 36 km from Buenos Aires City, and is expected to be finished by 2020. One of the main aims of the project is to offer to the Argentinean scientific and technology system new capabilities based on neutron techniques. We present here the conceptual design of a neutron imaging facility which will use one of the cold neutron beams, and will be installed in the reactor hall. Preliminary simulation results show that at the farthest detection position, at about 17 m from the cold source, a uniform neutron beam on a detection screen with an intensity of about 108 n/cm2/s is expected.

  5. Secure High Dynamic Range Images

    OpenAIRE

    Med Amine Touil; Noureddine Ellouze

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a tone mapping algorithm is proposed to produce LDR (Limited Dynamic Range) images from HDR (High Dynamic Range) images. In the approach, non-linear functions are applied to compress the dynamic range of HDR images. Security tools will be then applied to the resulting LDR images and their effectiveness will be tested on the reconstructed HDR images. Three specific examples of security tools are described in more details: integrity verification using hash function to compute loc...

  6. Neutron detection with imaging plates Part I. Image storage and readout

    CERN Document Server

    Thoms, M; Wilkinson, C

    1999-01-01

    The detection of neutrons with imaging plates is based on a sequence of physical processes, which are happening during the neutron exposure and the readout of the image information. These processes are investigated in detail starting with the neutron absorption and conversion to secondary radiation by various neutron converter materials and ending with the detection of the photostimulated luminescence, which is emitted during the readout. It is shown that these processes can be quantified by several key parameters, such as i.e. the neutron absorption cross section, the emitted secondary energy and the conversion efficiency of released secondary energy to storage centers in the storage phosphor. The resulting detector characteristics are described in the second part, namely, Neutron detection with imaging plates - part II: detector characteristics [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 424 (1999) 34-39].

  7. Neutron detection with imaging plates Part I. Image storage and readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, M.; Myles, D.; Wilkinson, C.

    1999-11-01

    The detection of neutrons with imaging plates is based on a sequence of physical processes, which are happening during the neutron exposure and the readout of the image information. These processes are investigated in detail starting with the neutron absorption and conversion to secondary radiation by various neutron converter materials and ending with the detection of the photostimulated luminescence, which is emitted during the readout. It is shown that these processes can be quantified by several key parameters, such as i.e. the neutron absorption cross section, the emitted secondary energy and the conversion efficiency of released secondary energy to storage centers in the storage phosphor. The resulting detector characteristics are described in the second part, namely, Neutron detection with imaging plates - part II: detector characteristics [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 424 (1999) 34-39].

  8. Neutron Imaging of Rapid Water Imbibition in Fractured Sedimentary Rock Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chu-Lin; Perfect, Edmund; Donnelly, Brendan; Bilheux, Hassina; Tremsin, Anton; McKay, Larry; Distefano, Victoria; Cai, Jianchao; Santodonato, Lou

    2015-03-01

    Advances in nondestructive testing methods, such as neutron, nuclear magnetic resonance, and x-ray imaging, have significantly improved experimental capabilities to visualize fracture flow in various important fossil energy contexts, e.g. enhanced oil recovery and shale gas. We present a theoretical framework for predicting the rapid movement of water into air-filled fractures within a porous medium based on early-time capillary dynamics and spreading over rough fracture surfaces. The theory permits estimation of sorptivity values for the matrix and fracture zone, as well as a dispersion parameter which quantifies the extent of spreading of the wetting front. Dynamic neutron imaging of water imbibition in unsaturated fractured Berea sandstone cores was employed to evaluate the proposed model. The experiments were conducted at the Neutron Imaging Prototype Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Water uptake into both the matrix and fracture zone exhibited square-root-of-time behavior. Both theory and neutron imaging data indicated that fractures significantly increase imbibition in unsaturated sedimentary rock by capillary action and surface spreading on rough fracture faces. Fractures also increased the dispersion of the wetting front.

  9. GEANT4 used for neutron beam design of a neutron imaging facility at TRIGA reactor in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouardi, A.; Machmach, A.; Alami, R.; Bensitel, A.; Hommada, A.

    2011-09-01

    Neutron imaging has a broad scope of applications and has played a pivotal role in visualizing and quantifying hydrogenous masses in metallic matrices. The field continues to expand into new applications with the installation of new neutron imaging facilities. In this scope, a neutron imaging facility for computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography is currently being developed around 2.0MW TRIGA MARK-II reactor at Maamora Nuclear Research Center in Morocco (Reuscher et al., 1990 [1]; de Menezes et al., 2003 [2]; Deinert et al., 2005 [3]). The neutron imaging facility consists of neutron collimator, real-time neutron imaging system and imaging process systems. In order to reduce the gamma-ray content in the neutron beam, the tangential channel was selected. For power of 250 kW, the corresponding thermal neutron flux measured at the inlet of the tangential channel is around 3×10 11 ncm 2/s. This facility will be based on a conical neutron collimator with two circular diaphragms with diameters of 4 and 2 cm corresponding to L/D-ratio of 165 and 325, respectively. These diaphragms' sizes allow reaching a compromise between good flux and efficient L/D-ratio. Convergent-divergent collimator geometry has been adopted. The beam line consists of a gamma filter, fast neutrons filter, neutron moderator, neutron and gamma shutters, biological shielding around the collimator and several stages of neutron collimator. Monte Carlo calculations by a fully 3D numerical code GEANT4 were used to design the neutron beam line ( http://www.info.cern.ch/asd/geant4/geant4.html[4]). To enhance the neutron thermal beam in terms of quality, several materials, mainly bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al 2O 3) were examined as gamma and neutron filters respectively. The GEANT4 simulations showed that the gamma and epithermal and fast neutron could be filtered using the bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al 2O 3) filters, respectively. To get a good cadmium ratio, GEANT 4 simulations were used to

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of landmine detection using neutron backscattering imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datema, Cor P. E-mail: c.datema@iri.tudelft.nl; Bom, Victor R.; Eijk, Carel W.E. van

    2003-11-01

    Neutron backscattering is a technique that has successfully been applied to the detection of non-metallic landmines. Most of the effort in this field has concentrated on single detectors that are scanned across the soil. Here, two new approaches are presented in which a two-dimensional image of the hydrogen distribution in the soil is made. The first method uses an array of position-sensitive {sup 3}He-tubes that is placed in close proximity of the soil. The second method is based on coded aperture imaging. Here, thermal neutrons from the soil are projected onto a detector which is typically placed one to several meters above the soil. Both methods use a pulsed D/D neutron source. The Monte Carlo simulation package GEANT 4 was used to investigate the performance of both imaging systems.

  11. Development of scintillation imaging device for cold neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Gorin, A; Manuilov, I V; Morimoto, K; Oku, T; Ryazantsev, A; Shimizu, H M; Suzuki, J I; Tokanai, F

    2002-01-01

    As an application of the wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber technique recently developed in the field of high-energy physics, a novel type of imaging device for neutrons has been successfully investigated; a space resolution of 1 mm FWHM with detection efficiency of 55% for 10 A neutrons has been experimentally confirmed with a prototype made of a 0.5-mm-thick ZnS(Ag)+ sup 6 LiF scintillator plate optically coupled to WLS fiber arrays. In addition to promising results obtained in this study, its simple structure and reliable operation allow us to foresee a new generation of imaging devices to meet the increasing demand for large-area and high space-resolution imaging devices for several new projects on spallation neutron sources in the world.

  12. Neutron Scattering and Computer Simulation Studies of Ice Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Shunle; YU Xinsheng

    2002-01-01

    In this article we describe a range of simulations (lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics) of the inelastic inco-herent neutron scattering spectra of ices (normal ice, ice Ⅱ and ice Ⅷ ). These simulations use a variety of different inter-molecular potentials from simple classic pair-wise (rigid and non-rigid molecule) potentials to sophisticated polarisable poten-tials. It was found that MCY makes stretching and bending interactions too weak while others do them well. We demon-strate that in order to reproduce the measured neutron spectrum, greater anisotropy (or orientational variation) is requiredthan these potentials presently provide.

  13. A New Neutron Radiography / Tomography / Imaging Station DINGO at OPAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbe, U.; Randall, T.; Hughes, C.; Davidson, G.; Pangelis, S.; Kennedy, S. J.

    A new neutron radiography / tomography / imaging instrument DINGO was built to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/tomography) at ANSTO. The instrument is designed for an international user community and for routine quality control for defense, industrial, cultural heritage and archaeology applications. In the industrial field it provides a useful tool for studying cracking and defects in steel or other metals. The instrument construction was completed at the end of June 2013 and it is currently in the hot commissioning stage. The usable neutron flux is mainly determined by the neutron source, but it depends on the instrument position and the resolution. The instrument position for DINGO is the thermal neutron beam port HB-2 in the reactor hall. The measured flux (using gold foil) for an L/D of approximately 500 at HB-2 is 5.3*107 [n/cm2s], which is in a similar range to other facilities. A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator position in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/D of 500 and 1000. A secondary collimator separates the two beams by blocking one and positions another aperture for the other beam. The whole instrument operates in two different positions, one for high resolution and one for high speed. In the current configuration DINGO measured first radiography and tomography data sets on friendly user test samples.

  14. Neutron laminography-a novel approach to three-dimensional imaging of flat objects with neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfen, L., E-mail: Lukas.Helfen@kit.edu [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation (ISS/ANKA), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Kaiserstr. 12, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Xu, F. [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation (ISS/ANKA), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Kaiserstr. 12, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Schillinger, B.; Calzada, E. [FRM-II, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 1, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Zanette, I. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Weitkamp, T. [Synchrotron Soleil, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, 91190 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Baumbach, T. [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation (ISS/ANKA), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Kaiserstr. 12, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-09-21

    Computed tomography (CT) is a three-dimensional (3D) imaging method which, for compact or prolate (i.e. rather isotropically extended around the rotation axis) specimens, can yield artefact-free reconstructed cross-sections. Laterally extended specimens like plate-like objects, however, are much less amenable to CT since reliable projection data cannot be acquired from angles where the plate is oriented parallel to the irradiation direction. To overcome this drawback, computed laminography (CL) was introduced recently to imaging set-ups at synchrotron storage rings. Here, we report on the first implementation of computed laminography with neutron radiation, showing measurements that were performed at the ANTARES neutron imaging facility at the FRM II research reactor of Technische Universitaet Muenchen. In general, neutrons are highly interesting probes for imaging since they provide a sensitivity to chemical elements very different from X-rays, yielding complementary information about the specimens investigated. Like for X-ray laminography, we avoid the projection directions where the beam is parallel to the long extensions of the specimen. We accomplish this by tilting of the rotation axis with respect to the transmitted-beam to an angle smaller than 90{sup o} (which would be the limiting case of CT) and roughly aligning the specimen's surface normal parallel to this rotation axis. The principles of neutron laminography are introduced and first test experiments are described.

  15. Neutron imaging with the short-pulse laser driven neutron source at the Trident laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Favalli, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Falk, K.; Jung, D.; Tybo, J. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Croft, S.; Danly, C.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, D.; Johnson, R. P.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Taddeucci, T.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Roth, M.

    2016-10-01

    Emerging approaches to short-pulse laser-driven neutron production offer a possible gateway to compact, low cost, and intense broad spectrum sources for a wide variety of applications. They are based on energetic ions, driven by an intense short-pulse laser, interacting with a converter material to produce neutrons via breakup and nuclear reactions. Recent experiments performed with the high-contrast laser at the Trident laser facility of Los Alamos National Laboratory have demonstrated a laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism operating in the regime of relativistic transparency, featuring a volumetric laser-plasma interaction. This mechanism is distinct from previously studied ones that accelerate ions at the laser-target surface. The Trident experiments produced an intense beam of deuterons with an energy distribution extending above 100 MeV. This deuteron beam, when directed at a beryllium converter, produces a forward-directed neutron beam with ˜5 × 109 n/sr, in a single laser shot, primarily due to deuteron breakup. The neutron beam has a pulse duration on the order of a few nanoseconds with an energy distribution extending from a few hundreds of keV to almost 80 MeV. For the experiments on neutron-source spot-size measurements, our gated neutron imager was setup to select neutrons in the energy range of 2.5-35 MeV. The spot size of neutron emission at the converter was measured by two different imaging techniques, using a knife-edge and a penumbral aperture, in two different experimental campaigns. The neutron-source spot size is measured ˜1 mm for both experiments. The measurements and analysis reported here give a spatial characterization for this type of neutron source for the first time. In addition, the forward modeling performed provides an empirical estimate of the spatial characteristics of the deuteron ion-beam. These experimental observations, taken together, provide essential yet unique data to benchmark and verify theoretical work into the

  16. Neutron imaging systems utilizing lithium-containing semiconductor crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Burger, Arnold

    2017-04-25

    A neutron imaging system, including: a plurality of Li-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor crystals arranged in an array, wherein III represents a Group III element and VI represents a Group VI element; and electronics operable for detecting and a charge in each of the plurality of crystals in the presence of neutrons and for imaging the neutrons. Each of the crystals is formed by: melting the Group III element; adding the Li to the melted Group III element at a rate that allows the Li and Group III element to react, thereby providing a single phase Li-III compound; and adding the Group VI element to the single phase Li-III compound and heating. Optionally, each of the crystals is also formed by doping with a Group IV element activator.

  17. Magnetic dynamics of fine particles studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, M F; Moerup, S; Lefmann, K; Clausen, K N; Lindgaard, P A

    2000-01-01

    We give an introduction to inelastic neutron scattering and the dynamic scattering function for magnetic nanoparticles. Differences between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles are discussed and we give a review of recent results on ferromagnetic Fe nanoparticles and canted antiferromagnetic alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 nanoparticles.

  18. Dynamics of liquid N2 studied by neutron inelastic scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karen Schou; Carneiro, Kim; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1982-01-01

    Neutron inelastic-scattering data from liquid N2 at wave-vector transfer κ between 0.18 and 2.1 Å-1 and temperatures ranging from T=65-77 K are presented. The data are corrected for the contribution from multiple scattering and incoherent scattering. The resulting dynamic structure factor S (κ,ω)...

  19. Molecular dynamics using quasielastic neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, S

    2003-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is well suited to study the molecular motions (rotations and translations) in solids or liquids. It offers a unique possibility of analysing spatial dimensions of atomic or molecular processes in their development over time. We describe here some of the systems studied using the QENS spectrometer, designed, developed and commissioned at Dhruva reactor in Trombay. We have studied a variety of systems to investigate the molecular motion, for example, simple molecular solids, molecules adsorbed in confined medium like porous systems or zeolites, monolayer-protected nano-sized metal clusters, water in Portland cement as it cures with time, etc. (author)

  20. A new compact, high sensitivity neutron imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF,F-91297 Arpajon (France); Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Park, H. S.; Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We have developed a new small neutron imaging system (SNIS) diagnostic for the OMEGA laser facility. The SNIS uses a penumbral coded aperture and has been designed to record images from low yield (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} neutrons) implosions such as those using deuterium as the fuel. This camera was tested at OMEGA in 2009 on a rugby hohlraum energetics experiment where it recorded an image at a yield of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}. The resolution of this image was 54 {mu}m and the camera was located only 4 meters from target chamber centre. We recently improved the instrument by adding a cooled CCD camera. The sensitivity of the new camera has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source. The calibration showed that the signal-to-noise ratio could be improved by using raw binning detection.

  1. Progress Update on Iterative Reconstruction of Neutron Tomographic Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausladen, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gregor, Jens [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-09-15

    This report satisfies the fiscal year 2016 technical deliverable to report on progress in development of fast iterative reconstruction algorithms for project OR16-3DTomography-PD2Jb, "3D Tomography and Image Processing Using Fast Neutrons." This project has two overall goals. The first of these goals is to extend associated-particle fast neutron transmission and, particularly, induced-reaction tomographic imaging algorithms to three dimensions. The second of these goals is to automatically segment the resultant tomographic images into constituent parts, and then extract information about the parts, such as the class of shape and potentially shape parameters. This report addresses of the component of the project concerned with three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction.

  2. Neutron dynamics and materials damage in inertial fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlado, J.M.; Malerba, L.; Marian, J.; Lodi, D. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, DENIM (Spain); Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Alonso, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Chemistry and Materials Science Div., CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Energy, tritium breeding, damage and activation in IFE blankets are affected by the neutron dynamics in the target, and the type of protection. The time-dependent structure of neutron transport (pulsed and very high intensity) led to new consequences in some key parameters (damage). A basic simulation on damage on SiC reveals an opposite response of the two sublattices: ductile Si, and fragile C. Radiation induced amorphization (accumulation of damage) is investigated and only argued for very low temperatures, and simulations of damage in metallic alloys show precipitates formation in a initial phase. (authors)

  3. Penumbral imaging and numerical evaluation of large area source neutron imaging system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The fusion neutron penumbral imaging system Monte Carlo model was established. The transfer functions of the two discrete units in the neutron source were obtained in two situations:Imaging in geometrical near-optical and real situation. The spatial resolutions of the imaging system in two situations were evaluated and compared. The penumbral images of four units in the source were obtained by means of 2-dimensional (2D) convolution and Monte Carlo simulation. The penumbral images were reconstructed with the same method of filter. The same results were confirmed. The encoding essence of penumbral imaging was revealed. With MCNP(Monte Carlo N-particle) simulation,the neutron penumbral images of the large area source (200 μm×200 μm) on scintillation fiber array were obtained. The improved Wiener filter method was used to reconstruct the penumbral image and the source image was obtained. The results agree with the preset neutron source image. The feasibility of the neutron imaging system was verified.

  4. Penumbral imaging and numerical evaluation of large area source neutron imaging system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU YueLei; HU HuaSi; ZHANG BoPing; LI LinBo; CHEN Da; SHAN Qing; ZHU Jie

    2009-01-01

    The fusion neutron penumbral imaging system Monte Carlo model was established. The transfer func-tions of the two discrete units in the neutron source were obtained in two situations: Imaging in geo-metrical near-optical and real situation. The spatial resolutions of the imaging system in two situations were evaluated and compared. The penumbral images of four units in the source were obtained by means of 2-dimensional (2D) convolution and Monte Carlo simulation. The penumbral images were reconstructed with the same method of filter. The same results were confirmed. The encoding essence of penumbral imaging was revealed. With MCNP(Monte Carlo N-particle) simulation, the neutron pen-umbral images of the large area source (200 μm×200 μm) on scintillation fiber array were obtained. The improved Wiener filter method was used to reconstruct the penumbral image and the source image was obtained. The results agree with the preset neutron source image. The feasibility of the neutron imaging system was verified.

  5. Measurements of neutron distribution in neutrons-gamma-rays mixed field using imaging plate for neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2010-01-01

    The imaging plate (IP) technique is tried to be used as a handy method to measure the spatial neutron distribution via the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction for neutron capture therapy (NCT). For this purpose, IP is set in a water phantom and irradiated in a mixed field of neutrons and gamma-rays. The Hiroshima University Radiobiological Research Accelerator is utilized for this experiment. The neutrons are moderated with 20-cm-thick D(2)O to obtain suitable neutron field for NCT. The signal for IP doped with Gd as a neutron-response enhancer is subtracted with its contribution by gamma-rays, which was estimated using IP without Gd. The gamma-ray response of Gd-doped IP to non-Gd IP is set at 1.34, the value measured for (60)Co gamma-rays, in estimating the gamma-ray contribution to Gd-doped IP signal. Then measured distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate agrees within 10% with the calculated value based on the method that has already been validated for its reproducibility of Au activation. However, the evaluated distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate is so sensitive to gamma-ray energy, e.g. the discrepancy of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate between measurement and calculation becomes 30% for the photon energy change from 33keV to 1.253MeV.

  6. Measurements of neutron distribution in neutrons-{gamma}-rays mixed field using imaging plate for neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Kenichi [Center of Medical Education, Sapporo Medical University, 17, Minami 1 Jo, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan)], E-mail: tanakaken@sapmed.ac.jp; Endo, Satoru [Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Hoshi, Masaharu [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    The imaging plate (IP) technique is tried to be used as a handy method to measure the spatial neutron distribution via the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}){sup 158}Gd reaction for neutron capture therapy (NCT). For this purpose, IP is set in a water phantom and irradiated in a mixed field of neutrons and {gamma}-rays. The Hiroshima University Radiobiological Research Accelerator is utilized for this experiment. The neutrons are moderated with 20-cm-thick D{sub 2}O to obtain suitable neutron field for NCT. The signal for IP doped with Gd as a neutron-response enhancer is subtracted with its contribution by {gamma}-rays, which was estimated using IP without Gd. The {gamma}-ray response of Gd-doped IP to non-Gd IP is set at 1.34, the value measured for {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays, in estimating the {gamma}-ray contribution to Gd-doped IP signal. Then measured distribution of the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}){sup 158}Gd reaction rate agrees within 10% with the calculated value based on the method that has already been validated for its reproducibility of Au activation. However, the evaluated distribution of the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}){sup 158}Gd reaction rate is so sensitive to {gamma}-ray energy, e.g. the discrepancy of the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}){sup 158}Gd reaction rate between measurement and calculation becomes 30% for the photon energy change from 33 keV to 1.253 MeV.

  7. Image reconstruction technique using projection data from neutron tomography system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Abd el Bar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutron tomography is a very powerful technique for nondestructive evaluation of heavy industrial components as well as for soft hydrogenous materials enclosed in heavy metals which are usually difficult to image using X-rays. Due to the properties of the image acquisition system, the projection images are distorted by several artifacts, and these reduce the quality of the reconstruction. In order to eliminate these harmful effects the projection images should be corrected before reconstruction. This paper gives a description of a filter back projection (FBP technique, which is used for reconstruction of projected data obtained from transmission measurements by neutron tomography system We demonstrated the use of spatial Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT and the 2D Inverse DFT in the formulation of the method, and outlined the theory of reconstruction of a 2D neutron image from a sequence of 1D projections taken at different angles between 0 and π in MATLAB environment. Projections are generated by applying the Radon transform to the original image at different angles.

  8. Neutron Imaging of Lithium Concentration in Battery Pouch Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Street, San Francisco, CA, USA June 29 - July 01, 2011 978-1-4577-0079-8/11/$26.00 ©2011 AACC 376 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...erroneous estimate of the change in lithium concentration. Therefore methods developed in subsection III-C are used to estimate and correct for the...Boillat, G. Scherrer, and G. Frei, “Fuel cell studies with neutrons at the psi’s neutron imaging facilities,” Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A

  9. Inelastic neutron scattering and lattice dynamics studies in complex solids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mala N Rao; R Mittal; Narayani Choudhury; S L Chaplot

    2004-07-01

    At Trombay, lattice dynamics studies employing coherent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments have been carried out at the two research reactors, CIRUS and Dhruva. While the early work at CIRUS involved many elemental solids and ionic molecular solids, recent experiments at Dhruva have focussed on certain superconductors (cuprates and intermetallics), geophysically important minerals (Al2SiO5, ZrSiO4, MnCO3) and layered halides (BaFCl, ZnCl2). In most of the studies, theoretical modelling of lattice dynamics has played a significant role in the interpretation and analysis of the results from experiments. This talk summarises the developments and current activities in the field of inelastic neutron scattering and lattice dynamics at Trombay.

  10. Macromolecular Dynamics in Red Blood Cells Investigated Using Neutron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadler, Andreas Maximilian; Demmel, Franz; Artmann, Gerhard; 10.1098/rsif.2010.0306

    2011-01-01

    We present neutron scattering measurements on the dynamics of hemoglobin (Hb) in human red blood cells in vivo. Global and internal Hb dynamics were measured in the ps to ns time- and {\\AA} length-scale using quasielastic neutron backscattering spectroscopy. We observed the cross-over from global Hb short-time to long-time self-diffusion. Both short- and long-time diffusion coefficients agree quantitatively with predicted values from hydrodynamic theory of non-charged hard-sphere suspensions when a bound water fraction of around 0.23g H2O/ g Hb is taken into account. The higher amount of water in the cells facilitates internal protein fluctuations in the ps time-scale when compared to fully hydrated Hb powder. Slower internal dynamics of Hb in red blood cells in the ns time-range were found to be rather similar to results obtained with fully hydrated protein powders, solutions and E. coli cells.

  11. Secure High Dynamic Range Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Med Amine Touil

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a tone mapping algorithm is proposed to produce LDR (Limited Dynamic Range images from HDR (High Dynamic Range images. In the approach, non-linear functions are applied to compress the dynamic range of HDR images. Security tools will be then applied to the resulting LDR images and their effectiveness will be tested on the reconstructed HDR images. Three specific examples of security tools are described in more details: integrity verification using hash function to compute local digital signatures, encryption for confidentiality, and scrambling technique.

  12. Recent developments in neutron imaging with applications for porous media research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Anders P.; Trtik, Pavel; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kazantsev, Daniil; Snehota, Michal; Dobson, Katherine J.; Lehmann, Eberhard H.

    2016-09-01

    Computed tomography has become a routine method for probing processes in porous media, and the use of neutron imaging is especially suited to the study of the dynamics of hydrogenous fluids, and of fluids in a high-density matrix. In this paper we give an overview of recent developments in both instrumentation and methodology at the neutron imaging facilities NEUTRA and ICON at the Paul Scherrer Institut. Increased acquisition rates coupled to new reconstruction techniques improve the information output for fewer projection data, which leads to higher volume acquisition rates. Together, these developments yield significantly higher spatial and temporal resolutions, making it possible to capture finer details in the spatial distribution of the fluid, and to increase the acquisition rate of 3-D CT volumes. The ability to add a second imaging modality, e.g., X-ray tomography, further enhances the feature and process information that can be collected, and these features are ideal for dynamic experiments of fluid distribution in porous media. We demonstrate the performance for a selection of experiments carried out at our neutron imaging instruments.

  13. Biomolecular Deuteration for Neutron Structural Biology and Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertlein, Michael; Moulin, Martine; Devos, Juliette M; Laux, Valerie; Dunne, Orla; Forsyth, V Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Neutron scattering studies provide important information in structural biology that is not accessible using other approaches. The uniqueness of the technique, and its complementarity with X-ray scattering, is greatest when full use is made of deuterium labeling. The ability to produce tailor-made deuterium-labeled biological macromolecules allows neutron studies involving solution scattering, crystallography, reflection, and dynamics to be optimized in a manner that has major impact on the scope, quality, and throughput of work in these areas. Deuteration facilities have now been developed at many neutron centres throughout the world; these are having a crucial effect on neutron studies in the life sciences and on biologically related studies in soft matter. This chapter describes methods that have been developed for the efficient production of deuterium-labeled samples for a wide range of neutron scattering applications. Examples are given that illustrate the use of these samples for each of the main techniques. Perspectives for biological deuterium labeling are discussed in relation to developments at current facilities and those that are planned in the future.

  14. Cold neutron imaging detection with a GSO scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Tokanai, F; Oku, T; Ino, T; Suzuki, J I; Ikeda, T; Ootani, W; Otani, C; Sato, H; Shimizu, H M; Kiyanagi, Y; Hirota, T

    2000-01-01

    The pulse-height spectrum and two-dimensional image of a 0.5 mm thick GSO scintillator were investigated for a 6 A cold neutron beam. The 31 and 81 keV peaks resulting from neutron absorption by Gd nuclei were identified in the pulse-height spectrum by using a photomultiplier tube. Images of 1.5 and 2.1 mm (FWHM) in diameter were observed for 1 and 2 mm diameter incident beams with an image intensifier and viewed by a CCD camera, corresponding to a position resolution of 1.3 mm (FWHM). The result implies that a position resolution of better than 100 mu m would be achievable by employing a GSO scintillator thinner than 20 mu m.

  15. Scatter rejection in quantitative thermal and cold neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kardjilov, N; Dawson, M; Strobl, M.; Manke, I. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany); McPhate, J.B.; Vallerga, J.V.; Siegmund, O.H.W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Feller, W.B. [Nova Scientific, Inc., 10 Picker Road, Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States)

    2011-09-21

    The accuracy of quantitative neutron transmission radiography can be substantially decreased if highly scattering materials, such as water or plastics, exist in the sample. There are currently two main solutions to this problem: either performing experiments at a large distance between the detector and the sample or employ some numerical correction techniques. In the former case, the spatial resolution is substantially reduced by the limited beam divergence, while the latter correction requires a priori information about the sample and is limited to distances of above {approx}2 cm. We demonstrate the feasibility of another technique, namely the possibility to remove the scattered neutron component from the transmitted neutron beam by a very compact polycapillary collimator. These {approx}1 mm thick devices can be placed between the sample and the detector and remove most of the neutrons scattered at angles larger than the acceptance angle of the collimator (typically 1{sup o}). No image distortions above {approx}10 {mu}m scales are introduced by these collimators. The neutron transmission of highly scattering samples (water and plexiglass) is measured in our experiments with and without scatter rejection. In the latter case, the accuracy of measured transmission coefficient was substantially improved by our collimators.

  16. A novel type epithermal neutron radiography detecting and imaging system

    CERN Document Server

    Balasko, M; Svab, E; Eoerdoegh, I

    1999-01-01

    The transfer technique is widely used for epithermal neutron radiography (ENR) for making images upon the object to be investigated. We propose to use instead of the photosensitive film a gamma sensitive scintillation screen (NaCe single crystal), that is monitored by a computer controlled low light level TV camera. The exposure time has been reduced to a duration of only a short fraction of that needed for the conventional transfer process. The presented ENR images consist of electronic signals that are handled by an advanced image processing and analyzing program, the Iman 1.4 version, using a task oriented video grabber.

  17. Analysis of a measured neutron background below 6 MeV for fast-neutron imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, K.; Becchetti, M. F.; Flaska, M.; Poitrasson-Riviere, A.; Hamel, M. C.; Polack, J. K.; Lawrence, C. C.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Detailed and accurate information on the neutron background is relevant for many applications that involve radiation detection, both for non-coincidence and coincidence countings. In particular, for the purpose of developing advanced neutron-detection techniques for nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear safeguards, the energy-dependent, ground-level, neutron-background information is needed. There are only a few previous studies available about the neutron background below 10 MeV, which is a typical neutron energy range of interest for nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear-safeguards applications. Thus, there is a potential for further investigation in this energy range. In this paper, neutron-background measurement results using organic-liquid scintillation detectors are described and discussed, with a direct application in optimization simulations of a fast-neutron imager based on liquid scintillators. The measurement was performed in summer 2011 in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, and the measurement setup consisted of several EJ-309 liquid scintillators and a fast waveform digitizer. The average neutron flux below 6 MeV was measured to be approximately 4e-4 counts/cm2/s. In addition, the relationship between the neutron-background count rate and various environmental quantities, such as humidity, at Earth's ground level was investigated and the results did not reveal any straightforward dependences. The measured pulse height distribution (PHD) was unfolded to determine the energy spectrum of the background neutrons. The unfolded neutron-background spectrum was implemented to a previously-created MCNPX-PoliMi model of the neutron-scatter camera and simple-backprojection images of the background neutrons were acquired. Furthermore, a simulated PHD was obtained with the MCNPX-PoliMi code using the "Cosmic-Ray Shower Library" (CRY) source sub-routine which returns various types of radiation, including neutrons and photons at a surface, and accounts for solar cycle

  18. Polarised neutron scattering from dynamic polarised targets in biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, W.; Hirai, M.; Olah, G.; Meerwinck, W.; Schink, H.-J.; Stuhrman, H. B.; Wagner, R.; Wenkow-EsSouni, M.; Zhao, J.; Schärpf, O.; Crichton, R. R.; Krumpolc, M.; Nierhaus, K. H.; Niinikoski, T. O.; Rijllart, A.

    1991-10-01

    The contrast giving rise to neutron small-angle scattering can be enhanced considerably by polarisation of the hydrogen nuclei [J. des Coizeaux and G. Jannink, Les Polymères en Solution, Les Editions de Physique, F-91944 Les Ulis, France (1987)]. Using polarised neutrons the scattering from protonated labels in a deuterated matrix will increase by an order of magnitude. This is the basis of nuclear spin contrast variation, a method which is of particular interest for the in situ structure determination of macromolecular components. A new polarised target for neutron scattering has been designed by CERN and tested successfully at FRG-1 of the GKSS research centre. For the purpose of thermal-neutron scattering the frozen solutions of biomolecules are immersed in liquid helium 4, which is thermally coupled to the cooling mixture of helium 3/helium 4 of the dilution refrigerator. The nuclear spins are aligned with respect to the external magnetic field-parallel or antiparallel-by dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP). The gain in neutron scattering compared to earlier experiments using direct cooling of the sample by helium 3 is a factor of 30. Another factor of 30 arises from the installation of the cold source and the beryllium reflector in FRG-1 [W. Knop et al., J. Appl. Cryst. 22 (1989) 352]. Pure nuclear spin targets are produced from dynamic polarised targets by selective depolarisation. In biological material only the hydrogen isotopes contribute significantly to polarised neutron scattering. Thus, saturation of the proton NMR yields a deuteron target, provided the target material has been enriched by the latter isotope. A proton target is obtained from the dynamic polarised target by saturation of deuteron NMR. This leads to six additional scattering functions reflecting the proton and deuteron spin densities and the correlations between the polarised isotopes. Polarised neutron scattering from nuclear spin targets of apoferritin and various derivatives of the

  19. Bubble masks for time-encoded imaging of fast neutrons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, Erik; Brennan, James S.; Marleau, Peter; Nowack, Aaron B.; Steele, John T.; Sweany, Melinda; Throckmorton, Daniel J.

    2013-09-01

    Time-encoded imaging is an approach to directional radiation detection that is being developed at SNL with a focus on fast neutron directional detection. In this technique, a time modulation of a detected neutron signal is inducedtypically, a moving mask that attenuates neutrons with a time structure that depends on the source position. An important challenge in time-encoded imaging is to develop high-resolution two-dimensional imaging capabilities; building a mechanically moving high-resolution mask presents challenges both theoretical and technical. We have investigated an alternative to mechanical masks that replaces the solid mask with a liquid such as mineral oil. Instead of fixed blocks of solid material that move in pre-defined patterns, the oil is contained in tubing structures, and carefully introduced air gapsbubblespropagate through the tubing, generating moving patterns of oil mask elements and air apertures. Compared to current moving-mask techniques, the bubble mask is simple, since mechanical motion is replaced by gravity-driven bubble propagation; it is flexible, since arbitrary bubble patterns can be generated by a software-controlled valve actuator; and it is potentially high performance, since the tubing and bubble size can be tuned for high-resolution imaging requirements. We have built and tested various single-tube mask elements, and will present results on bubble introduction and propagation as a function of tubing size and cross-sectional shape; real-time bubble position tracking; neutron source imaging tests; and reconstruction techniques demonstrated on simple test data as well as a simulated full detector system.

  20. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of protein dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rorschach, H.E.

    1991-03-20

    The techniques of X-ray and neutron scattering that have been so successfully applied to the study of the structure of biological macromolecules have in recent years been also used for the study of the thermal motion of these molecules. The diffraction of X-rays has been widely used to investigate the high-frequency motion of the heavy-atom residues of proteins. In these studies, the mean-square thermal amplitudes can be determined from the intensities of the sharp structural lines obtained from single crystals of the hydrated proteins. Similar information can be obtained on lighter atoms from the study of the neutron scattering from single crystals. The results of these measurements are coupled closely to the rapidly developing field of theoretical molecular dynamics which is now being applied to study the dynamics of large biological molecules. This report discusses research in this area.

  1. High resolution neutron imaging capabilities at BOA beamline at Paul Scherrer Institut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Morgano, M.; Panzner, T.; Lehmann, E.; Filgers, U. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Vallerga, J.V.; McPhate, J.B.; Siegmund, O.H.W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Feller, W.B. [NOVA Scientific, Inc., 10 Picker Rd., Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The cold neutron spectrum of the Beamline for neutron Optics and other Applications (BOA) at Paul Scherrer Institut enables high contrast neutron imaging because neutron cross sections for many materials increase with neutron wavelength. However, for many neutron imaging applications, spatial resolution can be as important as contrast. In this paper the neutron transmission imaging capabilities of an MCP/Timepix detector installed at the BOA beamline are presented, demonstrating the possibilities for studying sub-20 µm features in various samples. In addition to conventional neutron radiography and microtomography, the high degree of neutron polarization at the BOA beamline can be very attractive for imaging of magnetic fields, as demonstrated by our measurements. We also show that a collimated cold neutron beamline combined with a high resolution detector can produce image artifacts, (e.g. edge enhancements) due to neutron refraction and scattering. The results of our experiments indicate that the BOA beamline is a valuable addition to neutron imaging facilities, providing improved and sometimes unique capabilities for non-destructive studies with cold neutrons.

  2. Dynamical mass ejection from black hole-neutron star binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Kyutoku, Koutarou; Okawa, Hirotada; Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    We investigate properties of material ejected dynamically in the merger of black hole-neutron star binaries by numerical-relativity simulations. We systematically study dependence of ejecta properties on the mass ratio of the binary, spin of the black hole, and equation of state of the neutron-star matter. Dynamical mass ejection is driven primarily by tidal torque, and the ejecta is much more anisotropic than that from binary neutron star mergers. In particular, the dynamical ejecta is concentrated around the orbital plane with a half opening angle of 10deg--20deg and often sweeps only a half of the plane. The ejecta mass can be as large as ~0.1M_sun, and the velocity is subrelativistic with ~0.2--0.3c for typical cases. The ratio of the ejecta mass to the bound mass (disk and fallback components) becomes high and the ejecta velocity is large when the binary mass ratio is large, i.e., the black hole is massive. The remnant black hole-disk system receives a kick velocity of O(100)km/s due to the ejecta linear...

  3. Dynamic measurement of temperature using neutron resonance spectroscopy (NRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, D.J.; Asay, B.W.; Bennett, B.I.; Bowman, J.D.; Boat, R.M.; Dickson, P.M.; Henson, B.F.; Hull, L.M.; Idar, D.J.; Laabs, G.W.; London, R.K.; Mace, J.L.; Morgan, G.L.; Murk, D.M.; Rabie, R.L.; Ragan, C.E.; Stacy, H.L.; Yuan, V.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Accurate temperature measurements in dynamic systems have been pursued for decades and have usually relied on optical techniques. These approaches are generally hampered by insufficient information regarding the emissivity of the system under study. We are developing NRS techniques to measure temperature in dynamic systems and overcome these limitations. Many neutron resonances have narrow intrinsic Breit-Wigner widths such that the resonance is substantially broadened by the atomic motion even at room temperature. Thus, accurate measurement of the Doppler contribution allows one to infer the material temperature, and for the conditions achieved using standard high explosives, the probe itself is not perturbed by the high temperature and pressure. Experiments are conducted using a pulsed spallation source at LANSCE with time-of-flight measurement of the neutron spectra. In initial experiments, we have demonstrated that measurements with ten percent accuracy are possible. We have fielded dynamic tests, most of which were neutron-flux limited. An overview of the approach and the status of our experimental campaign are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makowska, Malgorzata G.; Kuhn, Luise Theil; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2015-01-01

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible w...

  5. Comparison of polystyrene scintillator fiber array and monolithic polystyrene for neutron imaging and radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R.; Cutler, T. E.; Danly, C. R.; Espy, M. A.; Goglio, J. H.; Hunter, J. F.; Madden, A. C.; Mayo, D. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Nelson, R. O.; Swift, A. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Zocco, T. G.

    2016-11-01

    The neutron imaging diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility has been operating since 2011 generating neutron images of deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at peak compression. The current design features a scintillating fiber array, which allows for high imaging resolution to discern small-scale structure within the implosion. In recent years, it has become clear that additional neutron imaging systems need to be constructed in order to provide 3D reconstructions of the DT source and these additional views need to be on a shorter line of sight. As a result, there has been increased effort to identify new image collection techniques that improve upon imaging resolution for these next generation neutron imaging systems, such as monolithic deuterated scintillators. This work details measurements performed at the Weapons Neutron Research Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory that compares the radiographic abilities of the fiber scintillator with a monolithic scintillator, which may be featured in a future short line of sight neutron imaging systems.

  6. Neutron-antineutron transition as a test-bed for dynamical CPT violations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addazi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    We show a simple mechanism for a dynamical CPT violation in the neutron sector. In particular, we show a CPT-violating see-saw mechanism, generating a Majorana mass and a CPT-violating mass for the neutron. CPT-violating see-saw involves a sterile partner of the neutron, living in a hidden sector, in which CPT is spontaneously broken. In particular, neutrons (antineutrons) can communicate with the hidden sector through nonperturbative quantum gravity effects called exotic instantons. Exotic instantons dynamically break R-parity, generating one effective vertex between the neutron and its sterile partner. In this way, we show how a small CPT-violating mass term for the neutron is naturally generated. This model can be tested in the next generation of experiments in neutron-antineutron physics. This strongly motivates researches of CPT-violating effects in neutron-antineutron physics as a test-bed for dynamical CPT-violations in SM.

  7. Dynamical Mass Ejection from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Radice, David; Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F; Ott, Christian D; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    We present fully general-relativistic simulations of binary neutron star mergers with a temperature and composition dependent nuclear equation of state. We study the dynamical mass ejection from both quasi-circular and dynamical-capture eccentric mergers. We systematically vary the level of our treatment of the microphysics to isolate the effects of neutrino cooling and heating and we compute the nucleosynthetic yields of the ejecta. We find that eccentric binaries can eject significantly more material than quasi-circular binaries and generate bright infrared and radio emission. In all our simulations the outflow is composed of a combination of tidally- and shock-driven ejecta, mostly distributed over a broad $\\sim 60^\\circ$ angle from the orbital plane, and, to a lesser extent, by thermally driven winds at high latitudes. Ejecta from eccentric mergers are typically more neutron rich than those of quasi-circular mergers. This is the effect of the strong tidal torques exerted on the neutron stars during their ...

  8. Vortex pinning and dynamics in the neutron star crust

    CERN Document Server

    Wlazłowski, Gabriel; Magierski, Piotr; Bulgac, Aurel; Forbes, Michael McNeil

    2016-01-01

    The nature of the interaction between superfluid vortices and the neutron star crust, conjectured by Anderson and Itoh in 1975 to be at the heart vortex creep and the cause of glitches, has been a longstanding question in astrophysics. Previous estimates of the vortex-"nucleus" interaction have been error-prone, being either phenomenological or derived from tiny differences of large energies of stationary configurations. Using a qualitatively new approach, we follow the dynamics as superfluid vortices move in response to the presence of "nuclei" (nuclear defects in the crust). The resulting motion is perpendicular to the force, similar to the motion of a spinning top when pushed. We show that nuclei repel vortices in the neutron star crust, leading thus to interstitial vortex pinning, and characterize the force as a function of the vortex-nucleus separation.

  9. Molecular Dynamics of Nuclear Pasta in Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Christian; da Silva Schneider, Andre

    2014-09-01

    During a core collapse supernova, a massive star undergoes rapid contraction followed by a massive explosion on the order of a hundred trillion trillion nuclear bombs in less than a second. While most matter is expelled at high speeds, what remains can form a neutron star. The bulk of a neutron star does not contain separate nuclei but is itself a single nucleus of radius ~10 km. In the crust of a neutron star, density is low enough that some matter exists as distinct nuclei arranged into crystalline lattice dominated by electromagnetic forces. Between the crust and core lies an interesting interface where matter is neither a single nucleus nor separate nuclei. It exists in a frustrated phase; competition between electromagnetic and strong nuclear forces causes exotic shapes to emerge, referred to as nuclear pasta. We use Molecular Dynamics (MD) to simulate nuclear pasta, with densities between nuclear saturation density and approximately one-tenth saturation density. Using MD particle trajectories, we compute the static structure factor S(q) and dynamical response function to describe both electron-pasta and neutrino-pasta scattering. We relate the structure and properties of nuclear pasta phases to features in S(q). Finally, one can integrate over S(q) to determine transport properties such as the electrical and thermal conductivity. This may help provide a better understanding of X-ray observations of neutron stars. During a core collapse supernova, a massive star undergoes rapid contraction followed by a massive explosion on the order of a hundred trillion trillion nuclear bombs in less than a second. While most matter is expelled at high speeds, what remains can form a neutron star. The bulk of a neutron star does not contain separate nuclei but is itself a single nucleus of radius ~10 km. In the crust of a neutron star, density is low enough that some matter exists as distinct nuclei arranged into crystalline lattice dominated by electromagnetic forces

  10. Vortex Pinning and Dynamics in the Neutron Star Crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlazłowski, Gabriel; Sekizawa, Kazuyuki; Magierski, Piotr; Bulgac, Aurel; Forbes, Michael McNeil

    2016-12-02

    The nature of the interaction between superfluid vortices and the neutron star crust, conjectured by Anderson and Itoh in 1975 to be at the heart vortex creep and the cause of glitches, has been a long-standing question in astrophysics. Using a qualitatively new approach, we follow the dynamics as superfluid vortices move in response to the presence of "nuclei" (nuclear defects in the crust). The resulting motion is perpendicular to the force, similar to the motion of a spinning top when pushed. We show that nuclei repel vortices in the neutron star crust, and characterize the force per unit length of the vortex line as a function of the vortex element to the nucleus separation.

  11. A novel fast-neutron detector concept for energy-selective imaging and imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortesi, M.; Prasser, H.-M. [Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI 5234 (Switzerland); Mechanical Engineering Department, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich 8092 (Switzerland); Dangendorf, V. [Ion and Neutron Radiation Department, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig 38116 (Germany); Zboray, R. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich 8092 (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    We present and discuss the operational principle of a new fast-neutron detector concept suitable for either energy-selective imaging or for imaging spectroscopy. The detector is comprised of a series of energy-selective stacks of converter foils immersed in a noble-gas based mixture, coupled to a position-sensitive charge readout. Each foil in the various stacks is made of two layers of different thicknesses, fastened together: a hydrogen-rich (plastic) layer for neutron-to-proton conversion, and a hydrogen-free coating to selectively stop/absorb the recoil protons below a certain energy cut-off. The neutron-induced recoil protons, that escape the converter foils, release ionization electrons in the gas gaps between consecutive foils. The electrons are then drifted towards and localized by a position-sensitive charge amplification and readout stage. Comparison of the images detected by stacks with different energy cut-offs allows energy-selective imaging. Neutron energy spectrometry is realized by analyzing the responses of a sufficient large number of stacks of different energy response and unfolding techniques. In this paper, we present the results of computer simulation studies and discuss the expected performance of the new detector concept. Potential applications in various fields are also briefly discussed, in particularly, the application of energy-selective fast-neutron imaging for nuclear safeguards application, with the aim of determining the plutonium content in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels.

  12. Preliminary Status Report of Neutron Radiation Effects and Damage to Neutron Imaging System Equipment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleuel, D. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anderson, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, L. A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Brand, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, J. A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Caggiano, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); FItsos, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Goldblum, B. L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Hall, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Harrig, K. P. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Johnson, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kruse, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Laplace, T. A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Mahowald, M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Matthews, E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Nielson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ratkiewicz, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rusnak, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Souza, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ureche, A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ummel, C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wiedrick, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zeiser, F. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway)

    2017-02-08

    A high-intensity neutron source is being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform neutron imaging (NI). Two accelerators are be- ing installed in the shielded, underground, north cave of Building 194 to produce neutrons via deuterium- deuterium fusion at 4 MeV or 7 MeV in a windowless gas cell. Over months to years of future experiments, elec- tronic and mechanical equipment in the room will be ir- radiated by a large uence of neutrons, which could cause them to fail or function incorrectly. Neutrons will also activate equipment and materials in the room, making frequent maintenance di cult and time-consuming, ex- acerbating the consequence of equipment failure. To test the neutron response and failure probability of mission- critical components, a variety of equipment intended to be located closest to the neutron source was irradiated at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL's) 88-inch cyclotron, using neutrons produced from the breakup of deuterons impinging a thick beryllium target. The high neutron production and high neutron energy of this reaction in combination with the close-in geom- etry possible at the cyclotron allows the application of neutron doses expected to be delivered in months of NI facility operation in only a few days. In most cases, each piece of equipment was irradiated while powered, moni- tored remotely for failure, to test both its live response to irradiation in addition to permanent e ects. Aluminum activation foils were used as uence monitors, assuming the spectral shape measured by Meulders et. al.[1] While the neutron spectrum of the NI facility and the LBNL fa- cility were not identical, relative electronics and materials damage cross sections were used to equate an equivalent amount of energy-dependent neutron damage.

  13. Neutron-rich gamma-ray burst flows: dynamics and particle creation in neutron - proton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Koers, H B J; Koers, Hylke B. J.; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    We consider gamma-ray burst outflows with a substantial neutron component that are either dominated by thermal energy (fireballs) or by magnetic energy. In the latter case, we focus on the recently introduced `AC' model which relies on magnetic reconnection to accelerate the flow and power the prompt emission. For both the fireball and the AC model, we investigate the dynamical importance of neutrons on the outflow. We study particle creation in inelastic neutron - proton collisions and find that in both models the resulting neutrino emission is too weak to be detectable. The inelastic collisions also produce gamma-rays, which create pairs in interactions with soft photons carried with the flow. In magnetically driven outflows, the energy of these pairs is radiated away as synchrotron emission. The bulk of the emission takes place at a few hundred keV, which makes it difficult to disentangle this signal from the prompt emission. In fireballs, however, pair cascading leads to the emission of gamma-rays with ob...

  14. Concept of a novel fast neutron imaging detector based on THGEM for fan-beam tomography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, M.; Zboray, R.; Adams, R.; Dangendorf, V.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2012-02-01

    The conceptual design and operational principle of a novel high-efficiency, fast neutron imaging detector based on THGEM, intended for future fan-beam transmission tomography applications, is described. We report on a feasibility study based on theoretical modeling and computer simulations of a possible detector configuration prototype. In particular we discuss results regarding the optimization of detector geometry, estimation of its general performance, and expected imaging quality: it has been estimated that detection efficiency of around 5-8% can be achieved for 2.5 MeV neutrons; spatial resolution is around one millimeter with no substantial degradation due to scattering effects. The foreseen applications of the imaging system are neutron tomography in non-destructive testing for the nuclear energy industry, including examination of spent nuclear fuel bundles, detection of explosives or drugs, as well as investigation of thermal hydraulics phenomena (e.g., two-phase flow, heat transfer, phase change, coolant dynamics, and liquid metal flow).

  15. Neutrons and music: Imaging investigation of ancient wind musical instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, G.; Tardino, G.; Pontecorvo, L.; Mannes, D. C.; Senesi, R.; Gorini, G.; Andreani, C.

    2014-10-01

    A set of seven musical instruments and two instruments cares from the 'Fondo Antico della Biblioteca del Sacro Convento' in Assisi, Italy, were investigated through neutron and X-ray imaging techniques. Historical and scientific interests around ancient musical instruments motivate an intense research effort for their characterization using non-destructive and non-invasive techniques. X-ray and neutron tomography/radiography were applied to the study of composite material samples containing wood, hide and metals. The study was carried out at the NEUTRA beamline, PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). Results of the measurements provided new information on the composite and multi-scale structure, such as: the internal structure of the samples, position of added materials like metals, wood fiber displays, deformations, presence of adhesives and their spatial distribution and novel insight about construction methods to guide the instruments' restoration process.

  16. Neutrons and music: Imaging investigation of ancient wind musical instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Festa, G., E-mail: giulia.festa@roma2.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-IPCF, Messina (Italy); Tardino, G. [BauArt Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Pontecorvo, L. [Conservatorio di Cosenza – Cosenza Conservatory (Italy); Mannes, D.C. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Senesi, R. [Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-IPCF, Messina (Italy); Gorini, G. [Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Andreani, C. [Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-IPCF, Messina (Italy)

    2014-10-01

    A set of seven musical instruments and two instruments cares from the ‘Fondo Antico della Biblioteca del Sacro Convento’ in Assisi, Italy, were investigated through neutron and X-ray imaging techniques. Historical and scientific interests around ancient musical instruments motivate an intense research effort for their characterization using non-destructive and non-invasive techniques. X-ray and neutron tomography/radiography were applied to the study of composite material samples containing wood, hide and metals. The study was carried out at the NEUTRA beamline, PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). Results of the measurements provided new information on the composite and multi-scale structure, such as: the internal structure of the samples, position of added materials like metals, wood fiber displays, deformations, presence of adhesives and their spatial distribution and novel insight about construction methods to guide the instruments’ restoration process.

  17. Lithium indium diselenide: A new scintillator for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukosi, Eric; Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel; Lee, Kyung-Min; Wiggins, Brenden; Trtik, Pavel; Penumadu, Dayakar; Young, Stephen; Santodonato, Louis; Bilheux, Hassina; Burger, Arnold; Matei, Liviu; Stowe, Ashley C.

    2016-09-01

    Lithium indium diselenide, 6LiInSe2 or LISe, is a newly developed neutron detection material that shows both semiconducting and scintillating properties. This paper reports on the performance of scintillating LISe crystals for its potential use as a converter screen for cold neutron imaging. The spatial resolution of LISe, determined using a 10% threshold of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), was found to not scale linearly with thickness. Crystals having a thickness of 450 μm or larger resulted in an average spatial resolution of 67 μm, and the thinner crystals exhibited an increase in spatial resolution down to the Nyquist frequency of the CCD. The highest measured spatial resolution of 198 μm thick LISe (27 μm) outperforms a commercial 50 μm thick ZnS(Cu):6LiF scintillation screen by more than a factor of three. For the LISe dimensions considered in this study, it was found that the light yield of LISe did not scale with its thickness. However, absorption measurements indicate that the 6Li concentration is uniform and the neutron absorption efficiency of LISe as a function of thickness follows general nuclear theory. This suggests that the differences in apparent brightness observed for the LISe samples investigated may be due to a combination of secondary charged particle escape, scintillation light transport in the bulk and across the LISe-air interface, and variations in the activation of the scintillation mechanism. Finally, it was found that the presence of 115In and its long-lived 116In activation product did not result in ghosting (memory of past neutron exposure), demonstrating potential of LISe for imaging transient systems.

  18. Lithium indium diselenide: A new scintillator for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukosi, Eric, E-mail: elukosi@utk.edu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel; Lee, Kyung-Min [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wiggins, Brenden [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trtik, Pavel [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland); Penumadu, Dayakar; Young, Stephen [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Santodonato, Louis; Bilheux, Hassina [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burger, Arnold; Matei, Liviu [Fisk University, Nashville, TN (United States); Stowe, Ashley C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-11

    Lithium indium diselenide, {sup 6}LiInSe{sub 2} or LISe, is a newly developed neutron detection material that shows both semiconducting and scintillating properties. This paper reports on the performance of scintillating LISe crystals for its potential use as a converter screen for cold neutron imaging. The spatial resolution of LISe, determined using a 10% threshold of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), was found to not scale linearly with thickness. Crystals having a thickness of 450 µm or larger resulted in an average spatial resolution of 67 µm, and the thinner crystals exhibited an increase in spatial resolution down to the Nyquist frequency of the CCD. The highest measured spatial resolution of 198 µm thick LISe (27 µm) outperforms a commercial 50 µm thick ZnS(Cu):{sup 6}LiF scintillation screen by more than a factor of three. For the LISe dimensions considered in this study, it was found that the light yield of LISe did not scale with its thickness. However, absorption measurements indicate that the {sup 6}Li concentration is uniform and the neutron absorption efficiency of LISe as a function of thickness follows general nuclear theory. This suggests that the differences in apparent brightness observed for the LISe samples investigated may be due to a combination of secondary charged particle escape, scintillation light transport in the bulk and across the LISe-air interface, and variations in the activation of the scintillation mechanism. Finally, it was found that the presence of {sup 115}In and its long-lived {sup 116}In activation product did not result in ghosting (memory of past neutron exposure), demonstrating potential of LISe for imaging transient systems.

  19. Performance of Optical Devices for Energy-Selective Neutron Imaging in NOBORU at J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Masahide; Oikawa, Kenichi; Ooi, Motoki; Kai, Tetsuya; Shinohara, Takenao; Sakai, Kenji; Maekawa, Fujio

    The NeutrOn Beam-line for Observation and Research Use (NOBORU) is a day-1 neutron instrument serving as a test beam port at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. Energy-selective neutron imaging is one of the more important research activities performed with NOBORU. To obtain a high spatial resolution with low background environment in the imaging experiment, improved neutron optics is necessary. Therefore, a rotary collimator to control the spatial resolution with high neutron intensity and a neutron filter device to control the neutron spectral intensity and gamma ray intensity are designed and installed on the middle of the beam-line. It is found from the results of a neutron radiography test that neutron transmission images with high spatial resolution (˜50 µm) can be obtained using the smallest hole in the rotary collimator. It is also confirmed that the remote-controlled filter device introduced in front of the rotary collimator can control the intensity of neutrons and gamma rays with only a small increase of the background. In particular, as bulk lead plates and bismuth single crystal plates attenuate the prompt gamma rays while only slightly sacrificing neutron intensity, neutrons in the epithermal neutron region can be easily measured.

  20. Reveal protein dynamics by combining computer simulation and neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Liang; Smith, Jeremy; CenterMolecular Biophysics Team

    2014-03-01

    Protein carries out most functions in living things on the earth through characteristic modulation of its three-dimensional structure over time. Understanding the microscopic nature of the protein internal motion and its connection to the function and structure of the biomolecule is a central topic in biophysics, and of great practical importance for drug design, study of diseases, and the development of renewable energy, etc. Under physiological conditions, protein exhibits a complex dynamics landscape, i.e., a variety of diffusive and conformational motions occur on similar time and length scales. This variety renders difficult the derivation of a simplified description of protein internal motions in terms of a small number of distinct, additive components. This difficulty is overcome by our work using a combined approach of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and the Neutron Scattering experiments. Our approach enables distinct protein motions to be characterized separately, furnishing an in-depth understanding of the connection between protein structure, dynamics and function.

  1. Neutron Reflectivity Measurement for Polymer Dynamics near Graphene Oxide Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jaseung

    We investigated the diffusion dynamics of polymer chains confined between graphene oxide layers using neutron reflectivity (NR). The bilayers of polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA)/ deuterated PMMA (d-PMMA) films and polystyrene (PS)/d-PS films with various film thickness sandwiched between Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers of graphene oxide (GO) were prepared. From the NR results, we found that PMMA diffusion dynamics was reduced near the GO surface while the PS diffusion was not significantly changed. This is due to the different strength of GO-polymer interaction. In this talk, these diffusion results will be compared with dewetting dynamics of polymer thin films on the GO monolayers. This has given us the basis for development of graphene-based nanoelectronics with high efficiency, such as heterojunction devices for polymer photovoltaic (OPV) applications.

  2. Block-Based Compressed Sensing for Neutron Radiation Image Using WDFB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ideal compression method for neutron radiation image should have high compression ratio while keeping more details of the original image. Compressed sensing (CS, which can break through the restrictions of sampling theorem, is likely to offer an efficient compression scheme for the neutron radiation image. Combining wavelet transform with directional filter banks, a novel nonredundant multiscale geometry analysis transform named Wavelet Directional Filter Banks (WDFB is constructed and applied to represent neutron radiation image sparsely. Then, the block-based CS technique is introduced and a high performance CS scheme for neutron radiation image is proposed. By performing two-step iterative shrinkage algorithm the problem of L1 norm minimization is solved to reconstruct neutron radiation image from random measurements. The experiment results demonstrate that the scheme not only improves the quality of reconstructed image obviously but also retains more details of original image.

  3. Image enhancement using MCNP5 code and MATLAB in neutron radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharwat, Montaser; Mohamed, Nader; Mongy, T

    2014-07-01

    This work presents a method that can be used to enhance the neutron radiography (NR) image for objects with high scattering materials like hydrogen, carbon and other light materials. This method used Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, to simulate the NR process and get the flux distribution for each pixel of the image and determines the scattered neutron distribution that caused image blur, and then uses MATLAB to subtract this scattered neutron distribution from the initial image to improve its quality. This work was performed before the commissioning of digital NR system in Jan. 2013. The MATLAB enhancement method is quite a good technique in the case of static based film neutron radiography, while in neutron imaging (NI) technique, image enhancement and quantitative measurement were efficient by using ImageJ software. The enhanced image quality and quantitative measurements were presented in this work.

  4. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of protein dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rorschach, H.E.

    1993-05-25

    Results that shed new light on the study of protein dynamics were obtained by quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The triple axis instrument H-9 supplied by the cold source was used to perform a detailed study of the quasi-elastic spectrum and the Debye-Waller factor for trypsin in powder form, in solution, and in crystals. A preliminary study of myoglobin crystals was also done. A new way to view the results of quasi-elastic scattering experiments is sketched, and the data on trypsin are presented and analyze according to this new picture.

  5. Conceptual design of a camera system for neutron imaging in low fusion power tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X.; Yuan, X.; Zhang, X.; Nocente, M.; Chen, Z.; Peng, X.; Cui, Z.; Du, T.; Hu, Z.; Li, T.; Fan, T.; Chen, J.; Li, X.; Zhang, G.; Yuan, G.; Yang, J.; Yang, Q.

    2016-02-01

    The basic principles for designing a camera system for neutron imaging in low fusion power tokamaks are illustrated for the case of the HL-2A tokamak device. HL-2A has an approximately circular cross section, with total neutron yields of about 1012 n/s under 1 MW neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. The accuracy in determining the width of the neutron emission profile and the plasma vertical position are chosen as relevant parameters for design optimization. Typical neutron emission profiles and neutron energy spectra are calculated by Monte Carlo method. A reference design is assumed, for which the direct and scattered neutron fluences are assessed and the neutron count profile of the neutron camera is obtained. Three other designs are presented for comparison. The reference design is found to have the best performance for assessing the width of peaked to broadened neutron emission profiles. It also performs well for the assessment of the vertical position.

  6. Discrimination of carnation pistils in neutron tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, U. [University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Lehmann, E.H.; Vontobel, P. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kawamitsu, Y.; Nishizawa, T. [Yamagata University, Tsuruoka (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Discrimination of plant organs and tissues from neutron tomographic image of a carnation flower is important to compare before and after changes in water distribution in each organ. A discriminative image processing that based on geographical characteristics of flower organs was used to try to create an image of a pistil in a flower. The styles in the pistil were clearly. On the other hand, the discriminated isosurface of the ovary was rugged with several spikes because the coalesced petals were recognized as parts of the ovary. Therefore, to correct the rugged surface, open filtering and closed filtering were attempted. The filtering processes showed strong dilation and erosion effects respectively. Combined open and closed filtering were applied to complement each other. The process removed coalesced petals and had fewer side effects.

  7. Assessment of Radiographic Image Quality by Visual Examination of Neutron Radiographs of the Calibration Fuel Pin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Up till now no reliable radiographic image quality standards exist for neutron radiography of nuclear reactor fuel. Under the Euratoro Neutron Radiography Working Group (NRWG) Test Program neutron radiographs were produced at different neutron radiography facilities within the European Community...... of a calibration fuel pin. The radiographs were made by the direct, transfer and tracketch methods using different film recording materials. These neutron radiographs of the calibration fuel pin were used for the assessement of radiographic image quality. This was done by visual examination of the radiographs...

  8. LiF crystals as high spatial resolution neutron imaging detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubayashi, M., E-mail: matsubayashi.masahito@jaea.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirane 2-4, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Faenov, A.; Pikuz, T. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaja Street 13/19, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fukuda, Y. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kato, Y. [The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Yasuda, R.; Iikura, H.; Nojima, T.; Sakai, T. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirane 2-4, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    Neutron imaging by color center formation in LiF crystals was applied to a sensitivity indicator (SI) as a standard samples for neutron radiography. The SI was exposed to a 5 mm pinhole-collimated thermal neutron beam with an LiF crystal and a neutron imaging plate (NIP) for 120 min in the JRR-3M thermal neutron radiography facility. The image in the LiF crystal was read out using a laser confocal microscope. All gaps were clearly observed in images for both the LiF crystal and the NIP. The experimental results showed that LiF crystals have excellent characteristics as neutron imaging detectors in areas such as high spatial resolution.

  9. Pulsed neutron spectroscopic imaging for crystallographic texture and microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Hirotaka, E-mail: hakuryu@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kamiyama, Takashi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Iwase, Kenji; Ishigaki, Toru [Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, Ibaraki University, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    A time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopic neutron imaging at a pulsed neutron source is expected to be a new material analysis tool because this method can non-destructively investigate the spatial dependence of the crystallographic and metallographic information in a bulk material. For quantitative evaluation of such information, a spectral analysis code for the transmission data is necessary. Therefore, we have developed a Rietveld-like analysis code, RITS. Furthermore, we have applied the RITS code to evaluation of the position dependence of the crystal orientation anisotropy, the preferred orientation and the crystallite size of a welded {alpha}-iron plate, and we successfully obtained the information on the texture and the microstructure. However, the reliability of the values given by the RITS code has not been evaluated yet in detail. For this reason, we compared the parameters provided by the RITS code with the parameters obtained by the neutron TOF powder diffractometry and its Rietveld analysis. Both the RITS code and the Rietveld analysis software indicated values close to each other, but there were systematic differences on the preferred orientation and the crystallite size.

  10. Development of high-energy neutron imaging for use in NDE applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, F; Hall, J; Logan, C; Schmid, G

    1999-06-01

    We are currently developing a high-energy (10 - 15 MeV) neutron imaging system for use in NDE applications. Our goal is to develop an imaging system capable of detecting cubic-mm-scale voids or other structural defects in heavily-shielded low-Z materials within thick sealed objects. The system will be relatively compact (suitable for use in a small laboratory) and capable of acquiring tomographic image data sets. The design of a prototype imaging detector and multi-axis staging system will be discussed and selected results from recent imaging experiments will be presented. The development of an intense, accelerator-driven neutron source suitable for use with the imaging system will also be discussed. Keywords: neutron imaging, neutron radiography, computed tomography, non-destructive inspection, neutron sources

  11. Preliminary energy-filtering neutron imaging with time-of-flight method on PKUNIFTY: A compact accelerator based neutron imaging facility at Peking University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Zou, Yubin; Wen, Weiwei; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility (PKUNIFTY) works on an accelerator-based neutron source with a repetition period of 10 ms and pulse duration of 0.4 ms, which has a rather low Cd ratio. To improve the effective Cd ratio and thus improve the detection capability of the facility, energy-filtering neutron imaging was realized with the intensified CCD camera and time-of-flight (TOF) method. Time structure of the pulsed neutron source was firstly simulated with Geant4, and the simulation result was evaluated with experiment. Both simulation and experiment results indicated that fast neutrons and epithermal neutrons were concentrated in the first 0.8 ms of each pulse period; meanwhile in the period of 0.8-2.0 ms only thermal neutrons existed. Based on this result, neutron images with and without energy filtering were acquired respectively, and it showed that detection capability of PKUNIFTY was improved with setting the exposure interval as 0.8-2.0 ms, especially for materials with strong moderating capability.

  12. Preliminary energy-filtering neutron imaging with time-of-flight method on PKUNIFTY: A compact accelerator based neutron imaging facility at Peking University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hu; Zou, Yubin, E-mail: zouyubin@pku.edu.cn; Wen, Weiwei; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility (PKUNIFTY) works on an accelerator–based neutron source with a repetition period of 10 ms and pulse duration of 0.4 ms, which has a rather low Cd ratio. To improve the effective Cd ratio and thus improve the detection capability of the facility, energy-filtering neutron imaging was realized with the intensified CCD camera and time-of-flight (TOF) method. Time structure of the pulsed neutron source was firstly simulated with Geant4, and the simulation result was evaluated with experiment. Both simulation and experiment results indicated that fast neutrons and epithermal neutrons were concentrated in the first 0.8 ms of each pulse period; meanwhile in the period of 0.8–2.0 ms only thermal neutrons existed. Based on this result, neutron images with and without energy filtering were acquired respectively, and it showed that detection capability of PKUNIFTY was improved with setting the exposure interval as 0.8–2.0 ms, especially for materials with strong moderating capability.

  13. Dynamic Pattern Based Image Steganography

    OpenAIRE

    Thiyagarajan, P.; G. Aghila; Venkatesan, V. Prasanna

    2012-01-01

    Steganography is the art of hiding secret information in media such as image, audio and video. The purpose of steganography is to conceal the existence of the secret information in any given medium. This work aims at strengthening the security in steganography algorithm by generating dynamic pattern in selection of indicator sequence. In addition to this dynamicity is also encompassed in number of bits embedded in data channel. This technique has been implemented and the results have been com...

  14. Non-Destructive Spent Fuel Characterization with Semi-Conducting Gallium Arsinde Neutron Imaging Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas S. McGregor; Holly K. Gersch; Jeffrey D. Sanders; John C. Lee; Mark D. Hammig; Michael R. Hartman; Yong Hong Yang; Raymond T. Klann; Brian Van Der Elzen; John T. Lindsay; Philip A. Simpson

    2002-01-30

    High resistivity bulk grown GaAs has been used to produce thermal neutron imaging devices for use in neutron radiography and characterizing burnup in spent fuel. The basic scheme utilizes a portable Sb/Be source for monoenergetic (24 keV) neutron radiation source coupled to an Fe filter with a radiation hard B-coated pixellated GaAs detector array as the primary neutron detector. The coated neutron detectors have been tested for efficiency and radiation hardness in order to determine their fitness for the harsh environments imposed by spent fuel. Theoretical and experimental results are presented, showing detector radiation hardness, expected detection efficiency and the spatial resolution from such a scheme. A variety of advanced neutron detector designs have been explored, with experimental results achieving 13% thermal neutron detection efficiency while projecting the possibility of over 30% thermal neutron detection efficiency.

  15. Development and performance of the Fast Neutron Imaging Telescope for SNM detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James M.; Bravar, Ulisse; Flückiger, Erwin O.; Macri, John R.; McConnell, Mark L.; Pirard, Benoit; Woolf, Richard S.

    2008-04-01

    FNIT (the Fast Neutron Imaging Telescope), a detector with both imaging and energy measurement capabilities, sensitive to neutrons in the range 0.8-20 MeV, was initially conceived to study solar neutrons as a candidate design for the Inner Heliosphere Sentinel (IHS) spacecraft of NASA's Solar Sentinels program and successively reconfigured to locate fission neutron sources. By accurately identifying the position of the source with imaging techniques and reconstructing the Watt spectrum of fission neutrons, FNIT can detect samples of special nuclear material (SNM), including heavily shielded and masked ones. The detection principle is based on multiple elastic neutron-proton scatterings in organic scintillators. By reconstructing n-p event locations and sequence and measuring the recoil proton energies, the direction and energy spectrum of the primary neutron flux can be determined and neutron sources identified. We describe the design of the FNIT prototype and present its energy reconstruction and imaging performance, assessed by exposing FNIT to a neutron beam and to a Pu fission neutron source.

  16. Applications and characteristics of imaging plates as detector in neutron radiography at SINQ

    CERN Document Server

    Kolbe, H; Gunia, W; Körner, S

    1999-01-01

    Imaging plate technique is a commonly accepted method in many fields as in medicine, biology and physics for detection of the distribution of beta- and gamma-radiation or X-rays on large areas. Recently a new type of imaging plate sensitive to neutrons has been developed. The storage layer is doped with gadolinium, which, after absorption of neutrons, produces radiation detectable by the same sensitive crystals used in conventional imaging plates. At the spallation neutron source, SINQ, at the Paul Scherrer Institut (CH) some of the characteristics of the neutron radiography station in combination with the imaging plate technique were investigated. The intensity distribution of the source was measured to check the accuracy for quantification of the image data. Also, the reproducibility of results obtained by this detection system was stated. For a test object, the high selectivity for different neutron absorption is demonstrated at details with low contrast. The obtainable spatial resolution was determined re...

  17. Overview of the Conceptual Design of the Future VENUS Neutron Imaging Beam Line at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilheux, Hassina; Herwig, Ken; Keener, Scott; Davis, Larry

    VENUS (Versatile Neutron Imaging Beam line at the Spallation Neutron Source) will be a world-class neutron-imaging instrument that will uniquely utilize the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) time-of-flight (TOF) capabilities to measure and characterize objects across several length scales (mm to μm). When completed, VENUS will provide academia, industry and government laboratories with the opportunity to advance scientific research in areas such as energy, materials, additive manufacturing, geosciences, transportation, engineering, plant physiology, biology, etc. It is anticipated that a good portion of the VENUS user community will have a strong engineering/industrial research focus. Installed at Beam line 10 (BL10), VENUS will be a 25-m neutron imaging facility with the capability to fully illuminate (i.e., umbra illumination) a 20 cm x 20 cm detector area. The design allows for a 28 cm x 28 cm field of view when using the penumbra to 80% of the full illumination flux. A sample position at 20 m will be implemented for magnification measurements. The optical components are comprised of a series of selected apertures, T0 and bandwidth choppers, beam scrapers, a fast shutter to limit sample activation, and flight tubes filled with Helium. Techniques such as energy selective, Bragg edge and epithermal imaging will be available at VENUS.

  18. Recovering root system traits using image analysis exemplified by two-dimensional neutron radiography images of lupine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Daniel; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Schnepf, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Root system traits are important in view of current challenges such as sustainable crop production with reduced fertilizer input or in resource-limited environments. We present a novel approach for recovering root architectural parameters based on image-analysis techniques. It is based on a graph representation of the segmented and skeletonized image of the root system, where individual roots are tracked in a fully automated way. Using a dynamic root architecture model for deciding whether a specific path in the graph is likely to represent a root helps to distinguish root overlaps from branches and favors the analysis of root development over a sequence of images. After the root tracking step, global traits such as topological characteristics as well as root architectural parameters are computed. Analysis of neutron radiographic root system images of lupine (Lupinus albus) grown in mesocosms filled with sandy soil results in a set of root architectural parameters. They are used to simulate the dynamic development of the root system and to compute the corresponding root length densities in the mesocosm. The graph representation of the root system provides global information about connectivity inside the graph. The underlying root growth model helps to determine which path inside the graph is most likely for a given root. This facilitates the systematic investigation of root architectural traits, in particular with respect to the parameterization of dynamic root architecture models.

  19. Microstructured boron foil scintillating G-GEM detector for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takeshi; Bautista, Unico; Mitsuya, Yuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Otake, Yoshie; Taketani, Atsushi; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Toyokawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a new simple neutron imaging gaseous detector was successfully developed by combining a micro-structured 10B foil, a glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), and a mirror-lens-charge-coupled device (CCD)-camera system. The neutron imaging system consists of a chamber filled with Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture. Inside this system, the G-GEM is mounted for gas multiplication. The neutron detection in this system is based on the reaction between 10B and neutrons. A micro-structured 10B is developed to overcome the issue of low detection efficiency. Secondary electrons excite Ar/CF4 gas molecules, and high-yield visible photons are emitted from those excited gas molecules during the gas electron multiplication process in the G-GEM holes. These photons are easily detected by a mirror-lens-CCD-camera system. A neutron radiograph is then simply formed. We obtain the neutron images of different materials with a compact accelerator-driven neutron source. We confirm that the new scintillating G-GEM-based neutron imager works properly with low gamma ray sensitivity and exhibits a good performance as a new simple digital neutron imaging device.

  20. Distribution of root exudates and mucilage in the rhizosphere: combining 14C imaging with neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Maire; Carminati, Andrea; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    exudates. We found that mucilage and 14C concentrations were higher around the young root segments. Mucilage concentration was particularly high in the most apical 3-5 cm of the roots. Drought stress increased 14C exudation relative to C fixation and led to higher mucilage concentrations around roots. However, it remains unclear, whether the lower mucilage concentration around roots grown at higher soil moisture was caused by the faster diffusion of mucilage in wet soils. Therefore, a second experiment was focused on diffusion of mucilage in soil at varying water contents. The diffusion of mucilage in soil was not very sensitive to soil water content. We conclude that mucilage release was higher for plants exposed to drought stress. In summary, the combination of neutron radiography and 14C imaging can successfully be used to visualize and to quantify the distribution of mucilage and root exudates in the rhizosphere of plants grown in soil. References Kroener, E., Zarebanadkouki, M., Kaestner, A., & Carmintati, A. (2014). Nonequilibrium water dynamics in the rhizosphere: How mucilage affects water flow in soils. Water Resources Research, 37. Pausch, J., & Kuzyakov, Y. (2011). Photoassimilate allocation and dynamics of hotspots in roots visualized by 14C phosphor imaging. Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, 174(1), 12-19.

  1. Coherent Neutron Scattering and Collective Dynamics in the Protein, GFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Jonathan D.; Perticaroli, Stefania; O’Neill, Hugh; Zhang, Qiu; Ehlers, Georg; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2013-01-01

    Collective dynamics are considered to be one of the major properties of soft materials, including biological macromolecules. We present coherent neutron scattering studies of the low-frequency vibrations, the so-called boson peak, in fully deuterated green fluorescent protein (GFP). Our analysis revealed unexpectedly low coherence of the atomic motions in GFP. This result implies a low amount of in-phase collective motion of the secondary structural units contributing to the boson peak vibrations and fast conformational fluctuations on the picosecond timescale. These observations are in contrast to earlier studies of polymers and glass-forming systems, and suggest that random or out-of-phase motions of the β-strands contribute greater than two-thirds of the intensity to the low-frequency vibrational spectra of GFP. PMID:24209864

  2. Dynamical mass ejection from binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radice, David; Galeazzi, Filippo; Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.; Ott, Christian D.; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    We present fully general-relativistic simulations of binary neutron star mergers with a temperature and composition dependent nuclear equation of state. We study the dynamical mass ejection from both quasi-circular and dynamical-capture eccentric mergers. We systematically vary the level of our treatment of the microphysics to isolate the effects of neutrino cooling and heating and we compute the nucleosynthetic yields of the ejecta. We find that eccentric binaries can eject significantly more material than quasi-circular binaries and generate bright infrared and radio emission. In all our simulations the outflow is composed of a combination of tidally- and shock-driven ejecta, mostly distributed over a broad ˜60° angle from the orbital plane, and, to a lesser extent, by thermally driven winds at high latitudes. Ejecta from eccentric mergers are typically more neutron rich than those of quasi-circular mergers. We find neutrino cooling and heating to affect, quantitatively and qualitatively, composition, morphology, and total mass of the outflows. This is also reflected in the infrared and radio signatures of the binary. The final nucleosynthetic yields of the ejecta are robust and insensitive to input physics or merger type in the regions of the second and third r-process peaks. The yields for elements on the first peak vary between our simulations, but none of our models is able to explain the Solar abundances of first-peak elements without invoking additional first-peak contributions from either neutrino and viscously-driven winds operating on longer time-scales after the mergers, or from core-collapse supernovae.

  3. Neutron μstiX. Micrometer structure investigation with real space and reciprocal space crossover using neutron imaging detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehlbauer, Martin Johann

    2013-07-19

    This work is concerned with the investigation of inhomogeneities in materials with length scales of the order of micrometers by means of neutrons. In real space this is done by neutron imaging methods measuring the transmitted signal while for Ultra Small Angle Neutron Scattering (USANS) the signal of the scattered neutrons is assigned to a spatial frequency distribution in reciprocal space. The part about neutron imaging is focused on time-resolved neutron radiography on an injection nozzle similar to the ones used for modern diesel truck engines. The associated experiments have been carried out at the neutron imaging facility ANTARES at the Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) of the Technische Universitaet Muenchen in Garching near Munich. Especially the demands on the detector system were high. Therefore different detection methods and detector configurations have been tested. On the one hand the detector should allow for a time resolution high enough to record the injection process lasting about 900 μs. On the other hand it needed to offer a spatial resolution sufficient to resolve the test oil inside the spray hole of a maximum diameter of less than 200 μm. An advanced aim of this work is the visualization of cavitation phenomena which may occur during the injection process inside of the spray hole. In order to operate the injector at conditions as close to reality as possible a high pressure pump supplying the injector with test oil at a pressure of 1600 bar was needed in addition to the specially developed control electronics, the recuperation tank and the exhaust gas equipment for the escaping atomized spray. A second part of the work describes USANS experiments based on the idea of Dr. Roland Gaehler and carried out at the instrument D11 at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. For this purpose a specific multi-beam geometry was applied, where a multi-slit aperture replaced the standard source aperture and the sample aperture was

  4. Charge-dependent conformations and dynamics of pamam dendrimers revealed by neutron scattering and molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin

    Neutron scattering and fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) are employed to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers with ethylenediamine (EDA) core under various charge conditions. Regarding to the conformational characteristics, we focus on scrutinizing density profile evolution of PAMAM dendrimers as the molecular charge of dendrimer increases from neutral state to highly charged condition. It should be noted that within the context of small angle neutron scattering (SANS), the dendrimers are composed of hydrocarbon component (dry part) and the penetrating water molecules. Though there have been SANS experiments that studied the charge-dependent structural change of PAMAM dendrimers, their results were limited to the collective behavior of the aforementioned two parts. This study is devoted to deepen the understanding towards the structural responsiveness of intra-molecular polymeric and hydration parts separately through advanced contrast variation SANS data analysis scheme available recently and unravel the governing principles through coupling with MD simulations. Two kinds of acids, namely hydrochloric and sulfuric acids, are utilized to tune the pH condition and hence the molecular charge. As far as the dynamical properties, we target at understanding the underlying mechanism that leads to segmental dynamic enhancement observed from quasielstic neutron scattering (QENS) experiment previously. PAMAM dendrimers have a wealth of potential applications, such as drug delivery agency, energy harvesting medium, and light emitting diodes. More importantly, it is regarded as an ideal system to test many theoretical predictions since dendrimers conjugate both colloid-like globular shape and polymer-like flexible chains. This Ph.D. research addresses two main challenges in studying PAMAM dendrimers. Even though neutron scattering is an ideal tool to study this PAMAM dendrimer solution due to its matching temporal and

  5. Geant4 Analysis of a Thermal Neutron Real-Time Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Arka; Hawari, Ayman I.

    2017-07-01

    Thermal neutron imaging is a technique for nondestructive testing providing complementary information to X-ray imaging for a wide range of applications in science and engineering. Advancement of electronic imaging systems makes it possible to obtain neutron radiographs in real time. This method requires a scintillator to convert neutrons to optical photons and a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to detect those photons. Alongside, a well collimated beam which reduces geometrical blurriness, the use of a thin scintillator can improve the spatial resolution significantly. A representative scintillator that has been applied widely for thermal neutron imaging is 6LiF:ZnS (Ag). In this paper, a multiphysics simulation approach for designing thermal neutron imaging system is investigated. The Geant4 code is used to investigate the performance of a thermal neutron imaging system starting with a neutron source and including the production of charged particles and optical photons in the scintillator and their transport for image formation in the detector. The simulation geometry includes the neutron beam collimator and sapphire filter. The 6LiF:ZnS (Ag) scintillator is modeled along with a pixelated detector for image recording. The spatial resolution of the system was obtained as the thickness of the scintillator screen was varied between 50 and 400 μm. The results of the simulation were compared to experimental results, including measurements performed using the PULSTAR nuclear reactor imaging beam, showing good agreement. Using the established model, further examination showed that the resolution contribution of the scintillator screen is correlated with its thickness and the range of the neutron absorption reaction products (i.e., the alpha and triton particles). Consequently, thinner screens exhibit improved spatial resolution. However, this will compromise detection efficiency due to the reduced probability of neutron absorption.

  6. Progress toward the development and testing of source reconstruction methods for NIF neutron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, E N; Grim, G P; Wilde, C; Wilson, D C; Morgan, G; Wilke, M; Tregillis, I; Merrill, F; Clark, D; Finch, J; Fittinghoff, D; Bower, D

    2010-10-01

    Development of analysis techniques for neutron imaging at the National Ignition Facility is an important and difficult task for the detailed understanding of high-neutron yield inertial confinement fusion implosions. Once developed, these methods must provide accurate images of the hot and cold fuels so that information about the implosion, such as symmetry and areal density, can be extracted. One method under development involves the numerical inversion of the pinhole image using knowledge of neutron transport through the pinhole aperture from Monte Carlo simulations. In this article we present results of source reconstructions based on simulated images that test the methods effectiveness with regard to pinhole misalignment.

  7. Conversion from film to image plates for transfer method neutron radiography of nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, Aaron E.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.

    2017-02-01

    This paper summarizes efforts to characterize and qualify a computed radiography (CR) system for neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). INL has multiple programs that are actively developing, testing, and evaluating new nuclear fuels. Irradiated fuel experiments are subjected to a number of sequential post-irradiation examination techniques that provide insight into the overall behavior and performance of the fuel. One of the first and most important of these exams is neutron radiography, which provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Results from neutron radiography are often the driver for subsequent examinations of the PIE program. Features of interest that can be evaluated using neutron radiography include irradiation-induced swelling, isotopic and fuel-fragment redistribution, plate deformations, and fuel fracturing. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique with film for imaging fuel. INL is pursuing multiple efforts to advance its neutron imaging capabilities for evaluating irradiated fuel and other applications, including conversion from film to CR image plates. Neutron CR is the current state-of-the-art for neutron imaging of highly-radioactive objects. Initial neutron radiographs of various types of nuclear fuel indicate that radiographs can be obtained of comparable image quality currently obtained using film. This paper provides neutron radiographs of representative irradiated fuel pins along with neutron radiographs of standards that informed the qualification of the neutron CR system for routine use. Additionally, this paper includes evaluations of some of the CR scanner parameters and their effects on image quality.

  8. Investigation of microstructure within metal welds by energy resolved neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Kockelmann, W.; Paradowska, A. M.; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Korsunsky, A. M.; Shinohara, T.; Feller, W. B.; Lehmann, E. H.

    2016-09-01

    The recent development of bright pulsed neutron sources and high resolution neutron counting detectors enables simultaneous acquisition of a neutron transmission spectrum for each pixel of the image. These spectra can be used to reconstruct microstructure parameters within welds, such as strain, texture and phase composition through Bragg edge analysis, and in some cases elemental composition through resonance absorption analysis. In this paper we demonstrate the potential of energy-resolved neutron imaging to study the microstructures of two steel welds, where the spatial distribution of residual strain within the welds, as well as some information on the texture, are obtained with sub-mm spatial resolution. A friction stir weld of two steel plates and a conventional weld of two steel pipes were studied at pulsed neutron facilities, where a Δλ/λ resolution as low as 0.2% can be attained over a wide range of neutron wavelengths ranging from 0.5 Å to 8 Å.

  9. Protein dynamics by neutron scattering: The protein dynamical transition and the fragile-to-strong dynamical crossover in hydrated lysozyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magazù, Salvatore; Migliardo, Federica [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina, C. da Papardo n° 31, P.O. Box 55, Vill. S. Agata, 98166 Messina (Italy); Benedetto, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.benedetto@ucd.ie [School of Physics, University College Dublin-UCD, Belfield Campus, Dublin 2 (Ireland); School of Medical Sciences, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Anderson Stuart Building F13, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Vertessy, Beata [Institute of Enzymology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Karolina 29, H-1113 Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-10-16

    Highlights: • The role played by the instrumental energy resolution in neutron scattering is presented. • The effect of natural bioprotectants on protein dynamics is shown. • A connection between the protein dynamical transition and the fragile-to-strong dynamical crossover is formulated. - Abstract: In this work Elastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering (EINS) results on lysozyme water mixtures in absence and in presence of bioprotectant systems are presented. The EINS data have been collected by using the IN13 and the IN10 spectrometers at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL, Grenoble, France) allowing to evaluate the temperature behaviour of the mean square displacement and of the relaxation time for the investigated systems. The obtained experimental findings together with theoretical calculations allow to put into evidence the role played by the spectrometer resolution and to clarify the connexion between the registered protein dynamical transition, the system relaxation time, and the instrumental energy resolution.

  10. Development and Test of a Neutron Imaging Setup at the PGAA Instrument at FRM II

    OpenAIRE

    Söllradl, S.; M. J. Mühlbauer; Kudejova, P.; Türler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We report on the developments of a neutron tomography setup at the instrument for prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) at the Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum(MLZ). The recent developments are driven by the idea of combining the spatial information obtained with neutron tomography with the elemental information determined with PGAA, i.e. to further combine both techniques to an investigative technique called prompt gamma activation imaging (PGAI).At the PGAA instrument, a cold neutron flux of up...

  11. Capillary rise dynamics of liquid hydrocarbons in mesoporous silica as explored by gravimetry, optical and neutron imaging: Nano-rheology and determination of pore size distributions from the shape of imbibition fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Gruener, Simon; Schillinger, Burkhard; Egelhaaf, Stefan U; Huber, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We present gravimetrical, optical, and neutron imaging measurements of the capillarity-driven infiltration of mesoporous silica glass by hydrocarbons. Square-root-of-time Lucas-Washburn invasion kinetics are found for linear alkanes from n-decane (C10) to n-hexacontane (C60) and for squalane, a branched alkane, in porous Vycor with 6.5 nm or 10 nm pore diameter, respectively. Humidity-dependent experiments allow us to study the influence on the imbibition kinetics of water layers adsorbed on the pore walls. Except for the longest molecule studied, C60, the invasion kinetics can be described by bulk fluidity and bulk capillarity, provided we assume a sticking, pore-wall adsorbed boundary layer, i.e. a monolayer of water covered by a monolayer of flat-laying hydrocarbons. For C60, however, an enhanced imbibition speed compared to the value expected in the bulk is found. This suggests the onset of velocity slippage at the silica walls or a reduced shear viscosity due to the transition towards a polymer-like flow...

  12. Dynamics of lipid-saccharide nanoparticles by quasielastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Bari, M.T.; Gerelli, Y. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Unita CNISM, Universita degli Studi di Parma (Italy); Sonvico, F. [Dipartimento Farmaceutico, Universita degli Studi di Parma (Italy); Deriu, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Unita CNISM, Universita degli Studi di Parma (Italy)], E-mail: antonio.deriu@fis.unipr.it; Cavatorta, F.; Albanese, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Unita CNISM, Universita degli Studi di Parma (Italy); Colombo, P. [Dipartimento Farmaceutico, Universita degli Studi di Parma (Italy); Fernandez-Alonso, F. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-18

    Nano- and microparticles composed of saccharide and lipid systems are extensively investigated for applications as highly biocompatible drug carriers. A detailed understanding of particle-solvent interactions is of key importance in order to tailor their characteristics for delivering drugs with specific chemical properties. Here we report results of a quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) investigation on lecithin/chitosan nanoparticles prepared by autoassembling the two components in an aqueous solution. The measurements were performed at room temperature on lyophilized and H{sub 2}O hydrated nanoparticles (h = 0.47 w H{sub 2}O/w hydrated sample). In the latter, hydration water is mostly enclosed inside the nanoparticles; its dynamics is similar to that of bulk water but with a significant decrease in diffusivity. The scattering from the nanoparticles can be described by a simple model of confined diffusion. In the lyophilized state only hydrogens belonging to the polar heads are seen as mobile within the experimental time-window. In the hydrated sample the diffusive dynamics involves also a significant part of the hydrogens in the lipid tails.

  13. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Ann

    Understanding the structure and functionality of biological systems on a nanometer-resolution and short temporal scales is important for solving complex biological problems, developing innovative treatment, and advancing the design of highly functionalized biomimetic materials. For example, adhesion of cells to an underlying substrate plays a crucial role in physiology and disease development, and has been investigated with great interest for several decades. In the talk, we would like to highlight recent advances in utilizing neutron scattering to study bio-related structures in dynamic conditions (e . g . under the shear flow) including in-situ investigations of the interfacial properties of living cells. The strength of neutron reflectometry is its non-pertubative nature, the ability to probe buried interfaces with nanometer resolution and its sensitivity to light elements like hydrogen and carbon. That allows us to study details of cell - substrate interfaces that are not accessible with any other standard techniques. We studied the adhesion of human brain tumor cells (U251) to quartz substrates and their responses to the external mechanical forces. Such cells are isolated within the central nervous system which makes them difficult to reach with conventional therapies and therefore making them highly invasive. Our results reveal changes in the thickness and composition of the adhesion layer (a layer between the cell lipid membrane and the quartz substrate), largely composed of hyaluronic acid and associated proteoglycans, when the cells were subjected to shear stress. Further studies will allow us to determine more conditions triggering changes in the composition of the bio-material in the adhesion layer. This, in turn, can help to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness, which can have significant medical impact for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  14. Recent results with a combined gamma-ray and neutron imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundara-Pandian, L.; Whitney, C. M.; Johnson, E. B.; Vinci, R.; Glodo, J.; Christian, J. F.; Gervais, J.; Vogel, Sam; Nagarkar, E.; Robertson, F.; Squillante, M. S.; Waer, P.; Squillante, M. R.

    2014-09-01

    Numerous instruments have been developed for performing gamma-ray imaging and neutron imaging for research, nondestructive testing, medicine and national security. However, none are capable of imaging gamma-rays and neutrons simultaneously while also discriminating gamma-rays from the neutron. This paper will describe recent experimental results obtained using a gamma/neutron camera based on Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) scintillation crystals, which can discriminate gamma-rays from neutrons. The ability to do this while also having good energy resolution provides a powerful capability for detecting and identifying shielded special nuclear materials for security applications. Also discussed are results obtained using a LaBr3 scintillation crystal.

  15. Neutron Imaging at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Application to Biological Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Cekanova, Maria [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bilheux, Jean-Christophe [ORNL; Bailey, William Barton [ORNL; Keener, Wylie S [ORNL; Davis, Larry E [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD) has recently installed a neutron imaging beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold guide hall. The CG-1D beamline supports a broad range of user research spanning from engineering to material research, energy storage, additive manufacturing, vehicle technologies, archaeology, biology, and plant physiology. The beamline performance (spatial resolution, field of view, etc.) and its utilization for biological research are presented. The NScD is also considering a proposal to build the VENUS imaging beamline (beam port 10) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Unlike CG-1D which provides cold neutrons, VENUS will offer a broad range of neutron wavelengths, from epithermal to cold, and enhanced contrast mechanisms. This new capability will also enable the imaging of thicker biological samples than is currently available at CG-1D. A brief overview of the VENUS capability for biological research is discussed.

  16. Non-Uniform Contrast and Noise Correction for Coded Source Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Since the first application of neutron radiography in the 1930s, the field of neutron radiography has matured enough to develop several applications. However, advances in the technology are far from concluded. In general, the resolution of scintillator-based detection systems is limited to the $10\\mu m$ range, and the relatively low neutron count rate of neutron sources compared to other illumination sources restricts time resolved measurement. One path toward improved resolution is the use of magnification; however, to date neutron optics are inefficient, expensive, and difficult to develop. There is a clear demand for cost-effective scintillator-based neutron imaging systems that achieve resolutions of $1 \\mu m$ or less. Such imaging system would dramatically extend the application of neutron imaging. For such purposes a coded source imaging system is under development. The current challenge is to reduce artifacts in the reconstructed coded source images. Artifacts are generated by non-uniform illumination of the source, gamma rays, dark current at the imaging sensor, and system noise from the reconstruction kernel. In this paper, we describe how to pre-process the coded signal to reduce noise and non-uniform illumination, and how to reconstruct the coded signal with three reconstruction methods correlation, maximum likelihood estimation, and algebraic reconstruction technique. We illustrates our results with experimental examples.

  17. Timing and position response of a block detector for fast neutron time-of-flight imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, M. A.; Hayward, J. P.; Zhang, X.; Cates, J. W.

    2014-11-01

    Our research effort seeks to improve the spatial and timing performance of a block detector made of a pixilated plastic scintillator (EJ-200), first demonstrated as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Advanced Portable Neutron Imaging System. Improvement of the position and time response is necessary to achieve better resolution and contrast in the images of shielded special nuclear material. Time-of-flight is used to differentiate between gamma and different sources of neutrons (e.g., transmission and fission neutrons). Factors limiting the timing and position performance of the neutron detector have been revealed through simulations and measurements. Simulations have suggested that the degradation in the ability to resolve pixels in the neutron detector is due to those interactions occurring near the light guide. The energy deposition within the neutron detector is shown to affect position performance and imaging efficiency. This examination details how energy cuts improve the position performance and degrade the imaging efficiency. Measurements have shown the neutron detector to have a timing resolution of σ=238 ps. The majority of this timing uncertainty is from the depth-of-interaction (DOI) of the neutron which is confirmed by simulations and analytical calculations.

  18. Neutron Imaging of Lithium Concentration for Validation of Li-Ion Battery State of Charge Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    a change in the nuclear reactor which slightly changes the optical axis of the neutron beam. 3.4 Theoretical vs Experimental Results This section...Siegmund, O., J. Vallerga, A. Tremsin, and W. Feller, 2009: High spatial and temporal resolution neutron imaging with microchannel plate detectors

  19. Gamma–neutron imaging system utilizing pulse shape discrimination with CLYC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, Chad M., E-mail: cwhitney@rmdinc.com; Soundara-Pandian, Lakshmi; Johnson, Erik B.; Vogel, Sam; Vinci, Bob; Squillante, Michael; Glodo, Jarek; Christian, James F.

    2015-06-01

    Recently, RMD has investigated the use of CLYC (Cs{sub 2}LiYCl{sub 6}:Ce), a new and emerging scintillation material, in a gamma–neutron coded aperture imaging system based on RMD's commercial RadCam{sup TM} instrument. CLYC offers efficient thermal neutron detection, fast neutron detection capabilities, excellent pulse shape discrimination (PSD), and gamma-ray energy resolution as good as 4% at 662 keV. PSD improves the isolation of higher energy gammas from thermal neutron interactions (>3 MeV electron equivalent peak), compared to conventional pulse height techniques. The scintillation emission time in CLYC provides the basis for PSD; where neutron interactions result in a slower emission rise and decay components while gamma interactions result in a faster emission components. By creating a population plot based on the ratio of the decay tail compared to the total integral amplitude (PSD ratio), discrimination of gammas, thermal neutrons, and fast neutrons is possible. Previously, we characterized the CLYC-based RadCam system for imaging gammas and neutrons using a layered W-Cd coded aperture mask and employing only pulse height discrimination. In this paper, we present the latest results which investigate gamma-neutron imaging capabilities using PSD. An FPGA system is used to acquire the CLYC–PSPMT last dynode signals, determine a PSD ratio for each event, and compare it to a calibrated PSD cutoff. Each event is assigned either a gamma (low) or neutron (high) flag signal which is then correlated with the imaging information for each event. - Highlights: • The latest results are presented for our CLYC RadCam-2 system which investigate gamma–neutron imaging using pulse shape discrimination. • CLYC RadCam-2 system successfully discriminates gammas, thermal neutrons, and fast neutrons by employing a fully integrated, FPGA-based PSD system. • Imaging of our {sup 252}Cf source was possible using both pulse height and pulse shape discrimination with

  20. Active neutron and gamma-ray imaging of highly enriched uranium for treaty verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Michael C; Polack, J Kyle; Ruch, Marc L; Marcath, Matthew J; Clarke, Shaun D; Pozzi, Sara A

    2017-08-11

    The detection and characterization of highly enriched uranium (HEU) presents a large challenge in the non-proliferation field. HEU has a low neutron emission rate and most gamma rays are low energy and easily shielded. To address this challenge, an instrument known as the dual-particle imager (DPI) was used with a portable deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator to detect neutrons and gamma rays from induced fission in HEU. We evaluated system response using a 13.7-kg HEU sphere in several configurations with no moderation, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) moderation, and tungsten moderation. A hollow tungsten sphere was interrogated to evaluate the response to a possible hoax item. First, localization capabilities were demonstrated by reconstructing neutron and gamma-ray images. Once localized, additional properties such as fast neutron energy spectra and time-dependent neutron count rates were attributed to the items. For the interrogated configurations containing HEU, the reconstructed neutron spectra resembled Watt spectra, which gave confidence that the interrogated items were undergoing induced fission. The time-dependent neutron count rate was also compared for each configuration and shown to be dependent on the neutron multiplication of the item. This result showed that the DPI is a viable tool for localizing and confirming fissile mass and multiplication.

  1. Design, construction, and demonstration of a neutron beamline and a neutron imaging facility at a Mark-I TRIGA reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Aaron E.

    The fleet of research and training reactors is aging, and no new research reactors are planned in the United States. Thus, there is a need to expand the capabilities of existing reactors to meet users' needs. While many research reactors have beam port facilities, the original design of the United States Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor (GSTR) did not include beam ports. The MInes NEutron Radiography (MINER) facility developed by this thesis and installed at the GSTR provides new capabilities for both researchers and students at the Colorado School of Mines. The facility consists of a number of components, including a neutron beamline and beamstop, an optical table, an experimental enclosure and associated interlocks, a computer control system, a multi-channel plate imaging detector, and the associated electronics. The neutron beam source location, determined through Monte Carlo modeling, provides the best mixture of high neutron flux, high thermal neutron content, and low gamma radiation content. A Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the neutron beam provides researchers with a tool for designing experiments before placing objects in the neutron beam. Experimental multi-foil activation results, compared to calculated multi-foil activation results, verify the model. The MCNP model predicts a neutron beamline flux of 2.2*106 +/- 6.4*105 n/cm2-s based on a source particle rate determined from the foil activation experiments when the reactor is operating at a power of 950 kWt with the beam shutter fully open. The average cadmium ratio of the beamline is 7.4, and the L/D of the neutron beam is approximately 200+/-10. Radiographs of a sensitivity indicator taken using both the digital detector and the transfer foil method provide one demonstration of the radiographic capabilities of the new facility. Calibration fuel pins manufactured using copper and stainless steel surrogate fuel pellets provide additional specimens for demonstration of the new facility and offer a

  2. Neutron imaging detector based on the muPIC micro-pixel chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, J D; Fujioka, H; Harada, M; Iwaki, S; Kabuki, S; Kishimoto, Y; Kubo, H; Kurosawa, S; Miuchi, K; Nagae, T; Nishimura, H; Oku, T; Sawano, T; Shinohara, T; Suzuki, J; Takada, A; Tanimori, T; Ueno, K

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a prototype time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing the micro-pixel chamber (muPIC), a micro-pattern gaseous detector, coupled with a field programmable gate array-based data acquisition system for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity neutron sources. The prototype system, with an active area of 10cm x 10cm and operated at a gas pressure of 2 atm, measures both the energy deposition (via time-over-threshold) and 3-dimensional track of each neutron-induced event, allowing the reconstruction of the neutron interaction point with improved accuracy. Using a simple position reconstruction algorithm, a spatial resolution of 349 +/- 36 microns was achieved, with further improvement expected. The detailed tracking allows strong rejection of background gamma-rays, resulting in an effective gamma sensitivity of 10^-12 or less, coupled with stable, robust neutron identification. The detector also features a time resolution of 0.6 microseconds.

  3. Relaxation dynamics of lysozyme in solution under pressure: Combining molecular dynamics simulations and quasielastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calandrini, V. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L' Orme de Merisiers, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hamon, V. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Hinsen, K. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L' Orme de Merisiers, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Calligari, P. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 156, 38042 Grenoble (France); Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bellissent-Funel, M.-C. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kneller, G.R. [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Synchrotron Soleil, L' Orme de Merisiers, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)], E-mail: kneller@cnrs-orleans.fr

    2008-04-18

    This paper presents a study of the influence of non-denaturing hydrostatic pressure on the relaxation dynamics of lysozyme in solution, which combines molecular dynamics simulations and quasielastic neutron scattering experiments. We compare results obtained at ambient pressure and at 3 kbar. Experiments have been performed at pD 4.6 and at a protein concentration of 60 mg/ml. For both pressures we checked the monodispersity of the protein solution by small angle neutron scattering. To interpret the simulation results and the experimental data, we adopt the fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a model for the internal relaxation dynamics of the protein. On the experimental side, global protein motions are accounted for by the model of free translational diffusion, neglecting the much slower rotational diffusion. We find that the protein dynamics in the observed time window from about 1 to 100 ps is slowed down under pressure, while its fractal characteristics is preserved, and that the amplitudes of the motions are reduced by about 20%. The slowing down of the relaxation is reduced with increasing q-values, where more localized motions are seen.

  4. Dynamical Tidal Response of a Rotating Neutron Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Philippe; Poisson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The gravitational wave phase of a neutron star (NS) binary is sensitive to the deformation of the NS that results from its companion's tidal influence. In a perturbative treatment, the tidal deformation can be characterized by a set of dimensionless constants, called Love numbers, which depend on the NS equation of state. For static NSs, one type of Love number encodes the response to gravitoelectric tidal fields (associated with mass multipole moments), while another does likewise for gravitomagnetic fields (associated with mass currents). A NS subject to a gravitomagnetic tidal field develops internal fluid motions through gravitomagnetic induction; the fluid motions are irrotational, provided the star is non-rotating. When the NS is allowed to rotate, the situation is complicated by couplings between the tidal field and the star's spin. The problem becomes tractable in the slow-rotation limit. In this case, the fluid motions induced by an external gravitomagnetic field are fully dynamical, even if the tidal field is stationary: interior metric and fluid variables are time-dependent, and vary on the timescale of the rotation period. Remarkably, the exterior geometry of the NS remains time-independent.

  5. Source reconstruction for neutron coded-aperture imaging: A sparse method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongming; Hu, Huasi; Zhang, Fengna; Jia, Qinggang

    2017-08-01

    Neutron coded-aperture imaging has been developed as an important diagnostic for inertial fusion studies in recent decades. It is used to measure the distribution of neutrons produced in deuterium-tritium plasma. Source reconstruction is an essential part of the coded-aperture imaging. In this paper, we applied a sparse reconstruction method to neutron source reconstruction. This method takes advantage of the sparsity of the source image. Monte Carlo neutron transport simulations were performed to obtain the system response. An interpolation method was used while obtaining the spatially variant point spread functions on each point of the source in order to reduce the number of point spread functions that needs to be calculated by the Monte Carlo method. Source reconstructions from simulated images show that the sparse reconstruction method can result in higher signal-to-noise ratio and less distortion at a relatively high statistical noise level.

  6. Low-Afterglow, High-Refractive-Index Liquid Scintillators for Fast-Neutron Spectrometry and Imaging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lauck, Ronald; Bromberger, Benjamin; Dangendorf, Volker; Goldberg, Mark B; Mor, Ilan; Tittelmeier, Kai; Vartsky, David

    2009-01-01

    For ion and neutron spectrometry and imaging applications at a high intensity pulsed laser facility, fast liquid scintillators with very low afterglow are required. Furthermore, neutron imaging with fiber (or liquid-core) capillary arrays calls for scintillation materials with high refractive index. To this end, we have examined various combinations of established mixtures of fluors and solvents, that were enriched alternatively with nitrogen or oxygen. Dissolved molecular oxygen is known to be a highly effective quenching agent, that efficiently suppresses the population of the triplet states in the fluor, which are primarily responsible for the afterglow. For measuring the glow curves of scintillators, we have employed the time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) technique, characterized by high dynamic range of several orders of magnitude in light intensity. In this paper we outline the application for the fast scintillators, briefly present the scintillation mechanism in liquids, describe our specif...

  7. A wide dynamics neutron monitor with BF3 and logarithmic amplifier based front-end electronics

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a wide dynamics neutron monitor based on BF3 neutron detector is described. The detector is used in current mode, and a front-end electronics based on a logarithmic amplifier is used in order to have a measurement capability ranging over many decades. The system has been calibrated at Polytechnic of Milan, CESNEF, with an AmBe neutron source, and has been tested in a pulsed field at the PUNITA facility at JRC, Ispra. The detector has achieved a dynamics ranging ov...

  8. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser Krista

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1 available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were characterized at the imaging plane for the ACRR's neutron radiography system for the 65:1, 125:1 and 250:1 apertures.

  9. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Krista; Chantel Nowlen, K.; DePriest, K. Russell

    2016-02-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1) available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were characterized at the imaging plane for the ACRR's neutron radiography system for the 65:1, 125:1 and 250:1 apertures.

  10. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Damiano; Eid, Marwen; Schoepf, U Joseph; Jin, Kwang Nam; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Tesche, Christian; Mangold, Stefanie; Spandorfer, Adam; Laghi, Andrea; De Cecco, Carlo N

    2016-10-01

    Non-invasive cardiac imaging has rapidly evolved during the last decade due to advancements in CT based technologies. Coronary CT angiography has been shown to reliably assess coronary anatomy and detect high risk coronary artery disease. However, this technique is limited to anatomical assessment, thus non-invasive techniques for functional assessment of the heart are necessary. CT myocardial perfusion is a new CT based technique that provides functional assessment of the myocardium and allows for a comprehensive assessment of coronary artery disease with a single modality when combined with CTA. This review aims to discuss dynamic CT myocardial perfusion as a new technique in the assessment of CAD.

  11. Dynamic processes in biological membrane mimics revealed by quasielastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautner, Lisa; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Barth, Nicolai K H; Seydel, Tilo; Lohstroh, Wiebke; Böckmann, Rainer A; Unruh, Tobias

    2017-08-01

    Neutron scattering is a powerful tool to study relaxation processes in biological membrane mimics in space and time. Combining different inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering techniques, a large dynamic range can be covered: from atomic to mesoscopic lengths and from femto- to some hundreds of nanoseconds in time. This allows studies on e.g. the diffusion of lipids, the membrane undulation motions, the dispersion of sound waves in membranes as well as the mutual interactions of membrane constituents such as lipids, proteins, and additives. In particular, neutron scattering provides a quite direct experimental approach to the inter-atomic and inter-molecular potentials on length and time scales which are perfectly accessible by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Neutron scattering experiments may thus substantially support the further refinement of biomolecular force fields for MD simulations by supplying structural and dynamical information with high spatial and temporal resolution. In turn, MD simulations support the interpretation of neutron scattering data. The combination of both, neutron scattering experiments and MD simulations, yields an unprecedented insight into the molecular interactions governing the structure and dynamics of biological membranes. This review provides an overview of the molecular dynamics in biological membrane mimics as revealed by neutron scattering. It focuses on the latest findings such as the fundamental molecular mechanism of lateral lipid diffusion as well as the influence of additives and proteins on the short-time dynamics of lipids. Special emphasis is placed on the comparison of recent neutron scattering and MD simulation data with respect to molecular membrane dynamics on the pico- to nanosecond time scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Parameterising root system growth models using 2D neutron radiography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Leitner, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Root architecture is a key factor for plant acquisition of water and nutrients from soil. In particular in view of a second green revolution where the below ground parts of agricultural crops are important, it is essential to characterise and quantify root architecture and its effect on plant resource acquisition. Mathematical models can help to understand the processes occurring in the soil-plant system, they can be used to quantify the effect of root and rhizosphere traits on resource acquisition and the response to environmental conditions. In order to do so, root architectural models are coupled with a model of water and solute transport in soil. However, dynamic root architectural models are difficult to parameterise. Novel imaging techniques such as x-ray computed tomography, neutron radiography and magnetic resonance imaging enable the in situ visualisation of plant root systems. Therefore, these images facilitate the parameterisation of dynamic root architecture models. These imaging techniques are capable of producing 3D or 2D images. Moreover, 2D images are also available in the form of hand drawings or from images of standard cameras. While full 3D imaging tools are still limited in resolutions, 2D techniques are a more accurate and less expensive option for observing roots in their environment. However, analysis of 2D images has additional difficulties compared to the 3D case, because of overlapping roots. We present a novel algorithm for the parameterisation of root system growth models based on 2D images of root system. The algorithm analyses dynamic image data. These are a series of 2D images of the root system at different points in time. Image data has already been adjusted for missing links and artefacts and segmentation was performed by applying a matched filter response. From this time series of binary 2D images, we parameterise the dynamic root architecture model in the following way: First, a morphological skeleton is derived from the binary

  13. Quantification of the sensitivity range in neutron dark-field imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betz, B.; Harti, R. P.; Hovind, J.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C. [Paul Scherrer Institute, LNS, Neutron Imaging and Activation Group, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Strobl, M. [European Spallation Source ESS, 22100 Lund, Sweden and University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Van Swygenhoven, H. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, NXMM Laboratory, IMX, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland and Paul Scherrer Institut, NXMM, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    In neutron grating interferometry, the dark-field image visualizes the scattering properties of samples in the small-angle and ultra-small-angle scattering range. These angles correspond to correlation lengths from several hundred nanometers up to several tens of micrometers. In this article, we present an experimental study that demonstrates the potential of quantitative neutron dark-field imaging. The dark-field signal for scattering from different particle sizes and concentrations of mono-dispersive polystyrene particles in aqueous solution is compared to theoretical predictions and the good agreement between measurements and calculations underlines the quantitative nature of the measured values and reliability of the technique with neutrons.

  14. Neutron Imaging study of bubble behaviors in Nanofluid Through Engineered Orifices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seok Bin; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Most studies focused on the change of surface parameters through deposited nanoparticles, while Vafaei and Wen firstly discussed modification of bubble dynamics by dispersed nanoparticles in fluid as well as deposited ones. The boiling mechanism, as an effective heat transfer mode, includes bubble generation, growth, departure, and coalescence. Therefore the change of bubble dynamics can lead to the change of boiling heat transfer condition. That is, not only surface characteristics but the dispersed nanoparticles would be the essential parameters of boiling mechanism in terms of bubble dynamics. For advanced visualization of opaque fluids, the neutron imaging technique is introduced. In the present study, the bubble dynamics in nanofluid through engineered orifices was studied. The main parameters of engineered orifices are size and geometry. Photographic analysis of bubble departure frequency and averaged bubble departure volume provides as follows: With increasing orifice diameter, averaged bubble departure volume increases, while bubble departure frequency decreases. The results are attributed to enhanced capillary force by increasing contact perimeter. Averaged bubble departure volume and bubble departure frequency remain similar for three different types of orifices. But edges of the triangle and square orifice produce small bubbles which interrupts bubble generation. The converged triple contact line due to the edge may be a reason for the emerged baby bubbles. Nanofluid shows less averaged bubble departure volume and higher bubble departure frequency. Considering little change in physical properties of the fluid, interaction between bubble interface and nanoparticles may be in charge of the results.

  15. Neutron imaging detector with 2 μm spatial resolution based on event reconstruction of neutron capture in gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Daniel S.; LaManna, Jacob M.; Baltic, Elias; Jacobson, David L.

    2017-09-01

    We report on efforts to improve the achievable spatial resolution in neutron imaging by centroiding the scintillation light from gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators. The current state-of-the-art neutron imaging spatial resolution is about 10 μm, and many applications of neutron imaging would benefit from at least an order of magnitude improvement in the spatial resolution. The detector scheme that we have developed magnifies the scintillation light from a gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator, calculates the center of mass of the scintillation event, resulting in an event-based imaging detector with spatial resolution of about 2 μm.

  16. Combining Neutron and Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Interaction of Plant Rootsand Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Sascha E.; Tötzke, Christian; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Kaestner, Anders P.; Lehmann, Eberhard

    The soil in direct vicinity of the roots, the root-soil interface or so called rhizosphere, is heavily modified by the activity of roots, compared to bulk soil, e.g. in respect to microbiology and soil chemistry. It has turned out that the root-soil interface, though small in size, also plays a decisive role in the hydraulics controlling the water flow from bulk soil into the roots. A promising approach for the non-invasive investigation of water dynamics, water flow and solute transport is the combination of the two imaging techniques magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neutron imaging (NI). Both methods are complementary, because NI maps the total proton density, possibly amplified by NI tracers, which usually corresponds to total water content, and is able to detect changes and spatial patterns with high resolution. On the other side, nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times reflect the interaction between fluid and matrix, while also a mapping of proton spin density and thus water content is possible. Therefore MRI is able to classify different water pools via their relaxation times additionally to the water distribution inside soil as a porous medium. We have started such combined measurements with the approach to use the same samples and perform tomography with each imaging method at different location and short-term sample transfer.

  17. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowska, Małgorzata G., E-mail: malg@dtu.dk [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde 4000 (Denmark); European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N. [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde 4000 (Denmark); Lauridsen, Erik M. [Xnovo Technology ApS, Galoche Alle 15, Køge 4600 (Denmark); Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Tremsin, Anton S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Grosse, Mirco [Institute for Applied Material Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe DE-76021 (Germany); Morgano, Manuel [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI CH-5232 (Switzerland); Kabra, Saurabh [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Strobl, Markus [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-12-15

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  18. Detector Development for Neutron Imaging System for Radioactive-Waste Analysis (NISRA) with 14 MeV Neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Radioactive waste has to undergo a process of quality checking in order to check its conformance with national regulations prior to its transport, intermediate storage and final disposal. Within the quality checking of radioactive waste packages non-destructive assays are required to characterize their radiotoxic and chemotoxic contents. In a cooperation framework Forschungszentrum Jülich, RWTH Aachen University and the Siemens AG are studying the feasibility of a compact Neutron Imaging Syst...

  19. Dynamics of Magnetic Nanoparticles Studied by Neutron Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen

    1997-01-01

    We present the first triple-axis neutron scattering measurements of magnetic fluctuations in nanoparticles using an antiferromagnetic reflection. Both the superparamagnetic relaxation and precession modes in similar to 15 nm hematite particles are: observed. The results have been consistently...

  20. A novel approach to correct the coded aperture misalignment for fast neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, F. N.; Hu, H. S., E-mail: huasi-hu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang, D. M.; Jia, J. [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, T. K. [Laser Fusion Research Center, CAEP, Mianyang, 621900 Sichuan (China); Jia, Q. G. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Aperture alignment is crucial for the diagnosis of neutron imaging because it has significant impact on the coding imaging and the understanding of the neutron source. In our previous studies on the neutron imaging system with coded aperture for large field of view, “residual watermark,” certain extra information that overlies reconstructed image and has nothing to do with the source is discovered if the peak normalization is employed in genetic algorithms (GA) to reconstruct the source image. Some studies on basic properties of residual watermark indicate that the residual watermark can characterize coded aperture and can thus be used to determine the location of coded aperture relative to the system axis. In this paper, we have further analyzed the essential conditions for the existence of residual watermark and the requirements of the reconstruction algorithm for the emergence of residual watermark. A gamma coded imaging experiment has been performed to verify the existence of residual watermark. Based on the residual watermark, a correction method for the aperture misalignment has been studied. A multiple linear regression model of the position of coded aperture axis, the position of residual watermark center, and the gray barycenter of neutron source with twenty training samples has been set up. Using the regression model and verification samples, we have found the position of the coded aperture axis relative to the system axis with an accuracy of approximately 20 μm. Conclusively, a novel approach has been established to correct the coded aperture misalignment for fast neutron coded imaging.

  1. Thermal neutron imaging through XRQA2 GAFCHROMIC films coupled with a cadmium radiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacco, D. [INFN – LNF, Via E. Fermi n.40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); INAIL – DIT, Via di Fontana Candida n.1, 00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy); Bedogni, R., E-mail: roberto.bedogni@lnf.infn.it [INFN – LNF, Via E. Fermi n.40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); Bortot, D. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); INFN – Milano, Via Celoria16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Palomba, M. [ENEA Casaccia, Via Anguillarese, 301, S. Maria di Galeria, 00123 Roma (Italy); Pola, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); INFN – Milano, Via Celoria16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Introini, M.V.; Lorenzoli, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Gentile, A. [INFN – LNF, Via E. Fermi n.40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); Strigari, L. [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Via E. Chianesi 53, 00144 Roma (Italy); Pressello, C. [Department of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliera San Camillo Forlanini, Circonvallazione Gianicolense 87, 00152 Roma (Italy); Soriani, A. [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Via E. Chianesi 53, 00144 Roma (Italy); Gómez-Ros, J.M. [INFN – LNF, Via E. Fermi n.40, Frascati, 00044 Roma (Italy); CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-21

    A simple and inexpensive method to perform passive thermal neutron imaging on large areas was developed on the basis of XRQA2 GAFCHROMIC films, commonly employed for quality assurance in radiology. To enhance their thermal neutron response, the sensitive face of film was coupled with a 1 mm thick cadmium radiator, forming a sandwich. By exchanging the order of Cd filter and sensitive film with respect to the incident neutron beam direction, two different configurations (beam-Cd-film and beam-film-Cd) were identified. These configurations were tested at thermal neutrons fluence values in the range 10{sup 9}–10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}, using the ex-core radial thermal neutron column of the ENEA Casaccia – TRIGA reactor. The results are presented in this work.

  2. Thermal neutron imaging through XRQA2 GAFCHROMIC films coupled with a cadmium radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, D.; Bedogni, R.; Bortot, D.; Palomba, M.; Pola, A.; Introini, M. V.; Lorenzoli, M.; Gentile, A.; Strigari, L.; Pressello, C.; Soriani, A.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.

    2015-10-01

    A simple and inexpensive method to perform passive thermal neutron imaging on large areas was developed on the basis of XRQA2 GAFCHROMIC films, commonly employed for quality assurance in radiology. To enhance their thermal neutron response, the sensitive face of film was coupled with a 1 mm thick cadmium radiator, forming a sandwich. By exchanging the order of Cd filter and sensitive film with respect to the incident neutron beam direction, two different configurations (beam-Cd-film and beam-film-Cd) were identified. These configurations were tested at thermal neutrons fluence values in the range 109-1010 cm-2, using the ex-core radial thermal neutron column of the ENEA Casaccia - TRIGA reactor. The results are presented in this work.

  3. Guest editorial : high dynamic range imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Luís Paulo; Debattista, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) imagery is a step-change in imaging technology that is not limited to the 8-bits per pixel for each color channel that traditional or low-dynamic range digital images have been constrained to. These restrictions have meant that the current and relatively novel imaging technologies including stereoscopic, HD and ultraHD imaging do not provide an accurate representation of the lighting available in a real world environment. HDR technology has enabled the capture, sto...

  4. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, M., E-mail: isobe@nifs.ac.jp; Takeiri, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ogawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Hayashi, H.; Kobuchi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nakano, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Uritani, A. [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Misawa, T. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori 590-0494 (Japan); Nishitani, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho 039-3212 (Japan); Tomitaka, M.; Kumagai, T.; Mashiyama, Y.; Ito, D.; Kono, S. [Toshiba Corporation, Fuchu 183-8511 (Japan); Yamauchi, M. [Toshiba Nuclear Engineering Services Corporation, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ∼5 × 10{sup 9} counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 × 10{sup 16} n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design.

  5. Dynamic neutron scattering on incoherent systems using efficient resonance spin flip techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Häussler, Wolfgang [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching, Germany and Physik-Department E21, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kredler, Lukas [Physik-Department E21, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    We have performed numerical ray-tracing Monte-Carlo-simulations of incoherent dynamic neutron scattering experiments. We intend to optimize the efficiency of incoherent measurements depending on the fraction of neutrons scattered without and with spin flip at the sample. In addition to conventional spin echo, we have numerically and experimentally studied oscillating intensity techniques. The results point out the advantages of these different spin echo variants and are an important prerequisite for neutron resonance spin echo instruments like RESEDA (FRM II, Munich), to choose the most efficient technique depending on the scattering vector range and the properties of the sample system under study.

  6. Neutron depolarization imaging of the hydrostatic pressure dependence of inhomogeneous ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, M.; Neubauer, A.; Böni, P.; Pfleiderer, C.

    2016-05-01

    The investigation of fragile and potentially inhomogeneous forms of ferromagnetic order under extreme conditions, such as low temperatures and high pressures, is of central interest for areas such as geophysics, correlated electron systems, as well as the optimization of materials synthesis for applications where particular material properties are required. We report neutron depolarization imaging measurements on the weak ferromagnet Ni3Al under pressures up to 10 kbar using a Cu:Be clamp cell. Using a polychromatic neutron beam with wavelengths λ ≥ 4 Å in combination with 3He neutron spin filter cells as polarizer and analyzer, we were able to track differences of the pressure response in inhomogeneous samples by virtue of high resolution neutron depolarization imaging. This provides spatially resolved and non-destructive access to the pressure dependence of the magnetic properties of inhomogeneous ferromagnetic materials.

  7. Image reconstruction and multiple hole apertures in neutron radiography at FRM-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünauer, Florian

    2006-10-01

    Most neutron radiography facilities are based on the principle of a pinhole camera. With this setup the best spatial resolution and the maximal neutron flux at the specimen cannot be achieved simultaneously. A high flux is desirable in order to obtain a high signal-to-noise ratio within a short exposure time. The setup of a neutron radiography facility is always a compromise between high flux and high spatial resolution. Investigations were carried out whether the spatial resolution can be increased without decreasing the neutron flux by help of image deconvolution algorithms. The blur due to the neutron beam geometry, as well as the blur from the detector system was corrected. Whenever only a small neutron fluence is achieved in a projection, choosing a setup with lower spatial resolution and application of reconstruction algorithms improve the data quality considerably. As examples projections of a PC main board and specimens from a chestnut tree are shown in this paper. For increasing the neutron flux without loss in spatial resolution multiple hole apertures were tested. The application of this kind of apertures is useful whenever only a very small neutron fluence would be obtained by a single hole aperture. This is demonstrated in this paper by a phase contrast radiograph of a model air plane engine and a projection of monochromator crystals.

  8. Development and Test of a Neutron Imaging Setup at the PGAA Instrument at FRM II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söllradl, S.; Mühlbauer, M. J.; Kudejova, P.; Türler, A.

    We report on the developments of a neutron tomography setup at the instrument for prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) at the Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum(MLZ). The recent developments are driven by the idea of combining the spatial information obtained with neutron tomography with the elemental information determined with PGAA, i.e. to further combine both techniques to an investigative technique called prompt gamma activation imaging (PGAI).At the PGAA instrument, a cold neutron flux of up to 6 x 1010 cm-2 s-1 (thermal equivalent) is available in the focus of an elliptically tapered neutron guide. In the reported experiments, the divergence of the neutron beam was investigated, the resolution of the installed detector system tested, and a proof-of-principle tomography experiment performed. In our study a formerly used camera box was upgraded with a better camera and an optical resolution of 8 line pairs/mm was achieved. The divergence of the neutron beam was measured by a systematic scan along the beam axis. Based on the acquired data, a neutron imaging setup with a L/D ratio of 200 was installed. The resolution of the setup was testedin combination with a gadolinium test target and different scintillator screens. The test target was irradiated at two positions to determine the maximum resolution and the resolution at the actual sample position. The performance of the installed tomography setup was demonstrated bya tomography experiment of an electric amplifier tube.

  9. Design of the neutron imaging pinhole for use at the national ignition facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatherley, Valerie E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Felix P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grim, Gary P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oertel, John A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilde, Carl H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilke, Mark D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostic is designed to be used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This instrument will be used to image both primary (14MeV neutrons) and down scattered (6-8MeV neutrons). The pinhole body sits 225mm from the target, while the scintillator and recording systems are located 28m from the target. The diagnostic uses port 90, 315 and the recording system is located in a specifically built room located outside of switchyard I. The location of the pinhole and the recording system combine to give a magnification of 104. The recording of both the primary and downscattered image is done by recording the image from both the front and back side of the scintillator.

  10. Single photon image from position emission tomography with insertable collimator for boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joo Young; Yoo, Do Kun; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Key Jo [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Dept. of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford (United States)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of our proposed system is to confirm the feasibility of extraction of two types of images from one positron emission tomography (PET) module with an insertable collimator for brain tumor treatment during the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The BNCT theory and conceptual diagram of our proposed system are shown fig.1. Data from the PET module, neutron source, and collimator was entered in the Monte Carlon-particle extende source code. We attempted to acquire the PET and SPECT images simultaneously using only PET without an additional isotope. Single photon images were acquired using an insertable collimator on a PET detector.

  11. First study of macroscopic neutron dark field imaging using scattering grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schillinger, B., E-mail: Burkhard.Schillinger@frm2.tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, FRM II and Faculty for Physics E21, Lichtenbergstr. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Badurek, G. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien (Austria)

    2011-09-21

    Instead of using the phase grating concept for dark field imaging, macroscopic scattering grids were employed at the ANTARES neutron imaging facility. Two Cadmium grids with a 1 mm gap and 1.2 mm bar were adjusted in a distance of only a few cm in order to block the direct beam. Thus, by placing the samples between these two grids only neutrons that were scattered at the samples were transmitted. A linear motion of the coupled grids allowed scanning across the samples and obtaining complete scattering projections, which delivered surprisingly sharp images. The geometric relation between grids permits determination of the transmitted scattering angles.

  12. Recent developments and applications for the University of Texas Thermal Neutron Imaging Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, D J; Charlton, W S

    2004-10-01

    The Thermal Neutron Imaging Facility (UT-TNIF) at the University of Texas at Austin is being modified to begin work with the non-destructive evaluation of carbon fiber composite materials intended for use in space. The use of high-resolution borated micro channel plate (MCP) detectors has been investigated. MCNP calculations to redesign the external radiation shielding to allow UT-TNIF operation at higher reactor powers and to minimize internal neutron scattering have been performed.

  13. Energy-selective neutron imaging for morphological and phase analysis of iron-nickel meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetermans, S; Grazzi, F; Salvemini, F; Lehmann, E H; Caporali, S; Pratesi, G

    2013-09-21

    We propose energy-selective neutron imaging as a new and non-destructive method to investigate rare metallic meteorites. It is based on attenuation of a neutron beam of limited spectral distribution in a sample depending on the elemental composition and crystalline structure. Radiography and tomography allow obtaining the presence, morphology and orientation information in the bulk of mineral inclusions, oxide crust and crystalline structure. Its usage in classification and meteor formation studies would be of great value.

  14. A concept to collect neutron and x-ray images on the same line of sight at NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, F E; Danly, C R; Izumi, N; Jedlovec, D; Fittinghoff, D N; Grim, G P; Pak, A; Park, H-S; Volegov, P L; Wilde, C H

    2014-11-01

    Neutron and x-ray images are collected at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the size and shape of inertial confinement fusion implosions. The x-ray images provide a measure of the size and shape of the hot region of the deuterium-tritium fuel while the neutron images provide a measure of the size and shape of the burning plasma. Although these two types of images are collected simultaneously, they are not collected along the same line of sight (LOS). One 14 MeV neutron image is collected on the NIF equator, and two x-ray images are collected along the polar axis and nearly perpendicular to the neutron imaging line of sight on the equator. Both measurements use pinhole apertures to form the images, but existing x-ray imaging provides time-resolved measurements while the neutron images are time-integrated. Detailed comparisons of the x-ray and neutron images can provide information on the fuel assembly, but these studies have been limited because the implosions are not azimuthally symmetric and the images are collected along different LOS. We have developed a conceptual design of a time-integrated x-ray imaging system that could be added to the existing neutron imaging LOS. This new system would allow these detailed studies, providing important information on the fuel assembly of future implosions. Here we present this conceptual design and the expected performance characteristics.

  15. A concept to collect neutron and x-ray images on the same line of sight at NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, F. E., E-mail: fmerrill@lanl.gov; Danly, C. R.; Grim, G. P.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Izumi, N.; Jedlovec, D.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Neutron and x-ray images are collected at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the size and shape of inertial confinement fusion implosions. The x-ray images provide a measure of the size and shape of the hot region of the deuterium-tritium fuel while the neutron images provide a measure of the size and shape of the burning plasma. Although these two types of images are collected simultaneously, they are not collected along the same line of sight (LOS). One 14 MeV neutron image is collected on the NIF equator, and two x-ray images are collected along the polar axis and nearly perpendicular to the neutron imaging line of sight on the equator. Both measurements use pinhole apertures to form the images, but existing x-ray imaging provides time-resolved measurements while the neutron images are time-integrated. Detailed comparisons of the x-ray and neutron images can provide information on the fuel assembly, but these studies have been limited because the implosions are not azimuthally symmetric and the images are collected along different LOS. We have developed a conceptual design of a time-integrated x-ray imaging system that could be added to the existing neutron imaging LOS. This new system would allow these detailed studies, providing important information on the fuel assembly of future implosions. Here we present this conceptual design and the expected performance characteristics.

  16. Spatial resolution of a μPIC-based neutron imaging detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, J.D., E-mail: jparker@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Harada, M. [Materials and Life Science Facility Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hattori, K.; Iwaki, S.; Kabuki, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kurosawa, S.; Matsuoka, Y.; Miuchi, K.; Mizumoto, T.; Nishimura, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Oku, T. [Materials and Life Science Facility Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sawano, T. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Shinohara, T.; Suzuki, J. [Materials and Life Science Facility Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Takada, A.; Tanimori, T.; Ueno, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-10-21

    We present a detailed study of the spatial resolution of our time-resolved neutron imaging detector utilizing a new neutron position reconstruction method that improves both spatial resolution and event reconstruction efficiency. Our prototype detector system, employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber (μPIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system, combines 100μm-level spatial and sub-μs time resolutions with excellent gamma rejection and high data rates, making it well suited for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity, pulsed neutron sources. From data taken at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility within the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), the spatial resolution was found to be approximately Gaussian with a sigma of 103.48±0.77μm (after correcting for beam divergence). This is a significant improvement over that achievable with our previous reconstruction method (334±13μm), and compares well with conventional neutron imaging detectors and with other high-rate detectors currently under development. Further, a detector simulation indicates that a spatial resolution of less than 60μm may be possible with optimization of the gas characteristics and μPIC structure. We also present an example of imaging combined with neutron resonance absorption spectroscopy. -- Highlights: • Neutron imaging detector with micro-pattern gaseous detector and {sup 3}He was developed. • Detector combines imaging with energy by time-of-flight and high-rate capability. • Detector features 18% efficiency, 0.6μs time resolution, and γ sensitivity <10{sup −12}. • New analysis method with template fit achieves spatial resolution of nearly 100μm. • Simulation study indicates improvement to ∼60μm after optimization.

  17. Spin dynamics in Tb studied by critical neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, O. W.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1971-01-01

    The inelasticity of the critical neutron scattering in Tb was measured at and above the Neel temperature. In the hydrodynamic region the line width Gamma (q=0, kappa 1)=C kappa z1, with z=1.4+or-0.1 and c=4.3+or-0.3 meVAAz. This result deviates from the conventional theory, which predicts...

  18. Investigating Structure and Dynamics of Proteins in Amorphous Phases Using Neutron Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; McAuley, Arnold; Curtis, Joseph E

    2017-01-01

    In order to increase shelf life and minimize aggregation during storage, many biotherapeutic drugs are formulated and stored as either frozen solutions or lyophilized powders. However, characterizing amorphous solids can be challenging with the commonly available set of biophysical measurements used for proteins in liquid solutions. Therefore, some questions remain regarding the structure of the active pharmaceutical ingredient during freezing and drying of the drug product and the molecular role of excipients. Neutron scattering is a powerful technique to study structure and dynamics of a variety of systems in both solid and liquid phases. Moreover, neutron scattering experiments can generally be correlated with theory and molecular simulations to analyze experimental data. In this article, we focus on the use of neutron techniques to address problems of biotechnological interest. We describe the use of small-angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure of biological molecules and the packing arrangement in amorphous phases, that is, frozen glasses and freeze-dried protein powders. In addition, we discuss the use of neutron spectroscopy to measure the dynamics of glassy systems at different time and length scales. Overall, we expect that the present article will guide and prompt the use of neutron scattering to provide unique insights on many of the outstanding questions in biotechnology.

  19. Shadow Attenuation With High Dynamic Range Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadow often interferes with accurate image analysis. To mitigate shadow effects in near-earth imagery (2 m above ground level), we created high dynamic range (HDR) nadir images and used them to measure grassland ground cover. HDR composites were created by merging three differentially-exposed image...

  20. Study on detecting spatial distribution of neutrons and gamma rays using a multi-imaging plate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Endo, Satoru; Takada, Jun

    2014-06-01

    In order to measure the spatial distributions of neutrons and gamma rays separately using the imaging plate, the requirement for the converter to enhance specific component was investigated with the PHITS code. Consequently, enhancing fast neutrons using recoil protons from epoxy resin was not effective due to high sensitivity of the imaging plate to gamma rays. However, the converter of epoxy resin doped with (10)B was found to have potential for thermal and epithermal neutrons, and graphite for gamma rays.

  1. The monochromatic imaging mode of a RITA-type neutron spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, C.R.H.; Andersen, P.; Klausen, S.N.;

    2004-01-01

    The imaging monochromatic mode of a neutron spectrometer with a multi-bladed RITA analyser system is so far unexplored. We present analytical calculations that define the mode. It is shown that the mode can be realised for PG (002) analyser crystals, from incident energies of about 3.2 meV and up......, allowing the important cases of 3.7, 5.0 and 13.7 meV. Due to beam divergence, the neutron rays from neighbouring analyser blades are found to overlap slightly. Hence, the optimal use of the monochromatic imaging mode would be found by employing an adjustable radial collimator to limit the spread...

  2. Improved High Dynamic Range Image Reproduction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Rövid

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available High dynamic range (HDR of illumination may cause serious distortions andother problems in viewing and further processing of digital images. This paper describes anew algorithm for HDR image creation based on merging images taken with differentexposure time. There are many fields, in which HDR images can be used advantageously,with the help of them the accuracy, reliability and many other features of the certain imageprocessing methods can be improved.

  3. Neutron imaging of water penetration into cracked steel reinforced concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P. [Center for Durability and Sustainability Studies of Shandong Province, Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao 266033 (China); Wittmann, F.H., E-mail: wittmann@aedificat.d [Center for Durability and Sustainability Studies of Shandong Province, Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao 266033 (China); Aedificat Institute Freiburg, Schlierbergstr. 80, D-79100 Freiburg (Germany); Zhao, T. [Center for Durability and Sustainability Studies of Shandong Province, Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao 266033 (China); Lehmann, E.H. [Neutron Imaging and Activation Group (NIAG), Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-04-01

    Service life and durability of reinforced concrete structures have become a crucial issue because of the economical and ecological implications. Service life of reinforced concrete structures is often limited by penetration of water and chemical compounds dissolved in water into the porous cement-based material. By now it is well-known that cracks in reinforced concrete are preferential paths for ingress of aggressive substances. Neutron radiography was successfully applied to study the process of water penetration into cracked steel reinforced concrete. In addition, the effectiveness of integral water repellent concrete to prevent ingress of water and salt solutions was investigated. Results are described in detail in this contribution. It will be shown that neutron radiography is a powerful method to visualize the process of water penetration into cracked and uncracked cement-based materials. On the basis of the obtained experimental data, it is possible to quantify the time-dependent water distributions in concrete with high accuracy and spatial resolution. It is of particular interest that penetration of water and salt solutions into damaged interfaces between concrete and steel can be visualized by means of neutron radiography. Deteriorating processes in cracked reinforced concrete structures can be studied in a completely new way. This advanced technology will help and find adequate ways to improve durability and service life of reinforced concrete structures. This will mean at the same time an essential contribution to improved sustainability.

  4. High-resolution neutron microtomography with noiseless neutron counting detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McPhate, J.B.; Vallerga, J.V.; Siegmund, O.H.W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Feller, W.B. [Nova Scientific Inc., 10 Picker Road, Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States); Lehmann, E. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Butler, L.G. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Dawson, M. [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy (Germany)

    2011-10-01

    The improved collimation and intensity of thermal and cold neutron beamlines combined with recent advances in neutron imaging devices enable high-resolution neutron radiography and microtomography, which can provide information on the internal structure of objects not achievable with conventional X-ray imaging techniques. Neutron detection efficiency, spatial and temporal resolution (important for the studies of dynamic processes) and low background count rate are among the crucial parameters defining the quality of radiographic images and tomographic reconstructions. The unique capabilities of neutron counting detectors with neutron-sensitive microchannel plates (MCPs) and with Timepix CMOS readouts providing high neutron detection efficiency ({approx}70% for cold neutrons), spatial resolutions ranging from 15 to 55 {mu}m and a temporal resolution of {approx}1 {mu}s-combined with the virtual absence of readout noise-make these devices very attractive for high-resolution microtomography. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of an MCP-Timepix detection system applied to microtomographic imaging, performed at the ICON cold neutron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. The high resolution and the absence of readout noise enable accurate reconstruction of texture in a relatively opaque wood sample, differentiation of internal tissues of a fly and imaging of individual {approx}400 {mu}m grains in an organic powder encapsulated in a {approx}700 {mu}m thick metal casing.

  5. Analysis of critical neutron- scattering data from iron and dynamical scaling theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1970-01-01

    Experimental three- axis spectrometer data of critical neutron- scattering data from Fe are reanalyzed and compared with the recent theoretical prediction by P. Resibois and C. Piette. The reason why the spin- diffusion parameter did not obey the prediction of dynamical scaling theory is indicated...

  6. Probing the dynamics of high-viscosity entangled polymers under shear using Neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawecki, M.; Gutfreund, P.; Adlmann, F. A.; Lindholm, E.; Longeville, S.; Lapp, A.; Wolff, M.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy provides unique insight into molecular and submolecular dynamics as well as intra- and inter-molecular interactions in soft matter. These dynamics may change drastically under shear flow. In particular in polymer physics a stress plateau is observed, which might be explained by an entanglement-disentanglement transition. However, such a transition is difficult to identify directly by experiments. Neutron Spin Echo has been proven to provide information about entanglement length and degree by probing the local dynamics of the polymer chains. Combining shear experiments and neutron spin echo is challenging since, first the beam polarisation has to be preserved during scattering and second, Doppler scattered neutrons may cause inelastic scattering. In this paper we present a new shear device adapted for these needs. We demonstrate that a high beam polarisation can be preserved and present first data on an entangled polymer solution under shear. To complement the experiments on the dynamics we present novel SANS data revealing shear- induced conformational changes in highly entangled polymers.

  7. Inelastic neutron scattering study of lattice dynamics in -ZnCl2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Sen; Mala N Rao; R Mittal; S L Chaplot

    2004-08-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments have been carried out to measure the phonon density of states in polycrystalline -ZnCl2 at Dhruva, Trombay. Lattice dynamical calculations, based on an interatomic potential model, are accomplished to study phonons associated with this otherwise extremely hygroscopic compound. Our calculated data are found to be well-compatible with the available measured ones.

  8. Modified TOV in gravity’s rainbow: properties of neutron stars and dynamical stability conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendi, S.H. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University,Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM),P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bordbar, G.H. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University,Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center for Excellence in Astronomy and Astrophysics (CEAA-RIAAM)-Maragha,P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha 55177-36698 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panah, B. Eslam [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University,Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panahiyan, S. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University,Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University,Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-09

    In this paper, we consider a spherical symmetric metric to extract the hydrostatic equilibrium equation of stars in (3+1)-dimensional gravity’s rainbow in the presence of cosmological constant. Then, we generalize the hydrostatic equilibrium equation to d-dimensions and obtain the hydrostatic equilibrium equation for this gravity. Also, we obtain the maximum mass of neutron star using the modern equations of state of neutron star matter derived from the microscopic calculations. It is notable that, in this paper, we consider the effects of rainbow functions on the diagrams related to the mass-central mass density (M-ρ{sub c}) relation and also the mass-radius (M-R) relation of neutron star. We also study the effects of rainbow functions on the other properties of neutron star such as the Schwarzschild radius, average density, strength of gravity and gravitational redshift. Then, we apply the cosmological constant to this theory to obtain the diagrams of M-ρ{sub c} (or M-R) and other properties of these stars. Next, we investigate the dynamical stability condition for these stars in gravity’s rainbow and show that these stars have dynamical stability. We also obtain a relation between mass of neutron stars and Planck mass. In addition, we compare obtained results of this theory with the observational data.

  9. Ammonia dynamics in magnesium ammine from DFT and neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tekin, Adem; Hummelshøj, Jens Strabo; Jacobsen, Hjalte Sylvest

    2010-01-01

    Energy storage in the form of ammonia bound in metal salts, so-called metal ammines, combines high energy density with the possibility of fast and reversible NH3 ab- and desorption kinetics. The mechanisms and processes involved in the NH3 kinetics are investigated by density functional theory (DFT......) and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The crystal structures of Mg(NH3)(n)Cl-2 with n = 6, 2, 1, which contains up to 9.19 wt % hydrogen and 0.115 kg hydrogen L-1, are first analyzed using an algorithm based on simulated annealing (SA), finding all the experimentally known structures and predicting the C2/m...

  10. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) and Pulsed Fast-Neutron Analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ratio is greater than about 0.01. The Monte-Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projection angles and modest (2 cm) resolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and these reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte-Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA techniques are presented.

  11. Neutron imaging detector based on the {mu}PIC micro-pixel chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, J.D., E-mail: jparker@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hattori, K.; Fujioka, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Harada, M. [Materials and Life Science Facility Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Iwaki, S.; Kabuki, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kurosawa, S.; Miuchi, K.; Nagae, T.; Nishimura, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Oku, T. [Materials and Life Science Facility Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sawano, T. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Shinohara, T.; Suzuki, J. [Materials and Life Science Facility Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Takada, A.; Tanimori, T.; Ueno, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a prototype time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing the micro-pixel chamber ({mu}PIC), a micro-pattern gaseous detector, coupled with a field programmable gate array-based data acquisition system for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity neutron sources. The prototype system, with an active area of 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} and operated at a gas pressure of 2 atm, measures both the energy deposition (via time-over-threshold) and three-dimensional track of each neutron-induced event, allowing the reconstruction of the neutron interaction point with improved accuracy. Using a simple position reconstruction algorithm, a spatial resolution of 349{+-}36{mu}m was achieved, with further improvement expected. The detailed tracking allows strong rejection of background gamma-rays, resulting in an effective gamma sensitivity of 10{sup -12} or less, coupled with stable, robust neutron identification. The detector also features a time resolution of 0.6{mu}s.

  12. Effect of the environment on the protein dynamical transition: a neutron scattering study.

    OpenAIRE

    Paciaroni, Alessandro; Cinelli, Stefania; Onori, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    We performed an elastic neutron scattering investigation of the molecular dynamics of lysozyme solvated in glycerol, at different water contents h (grams of water/grams of lysozyme). The marked non-Gaussian behavior of the elastic intensity was studied in a wide experimental momentum transfer range, as a function of the temperature. The internal dynamics is well described in terms of the double-well jump model. At low temperature, the protein total mean square displacements exhibit an almost ...

  13. Non-destructive-Testing of Nuclear Fuel Element by Means of Neutron Imaging Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fuel element is the key component of nuclear reactor. People have to make strictly testing of the element to make sure the reactor operating safely. Neutron imaging is one of Non-destructive-Testing (NDT) techniques, which are very important techniques for

  14. Inelastic neutron scattering experiments with the monochromatic imaging mode of the RITA-II spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Lefmann, Kim; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech;

    2006-01-01

    to perform real inelastic neutron scattering experiments. We present the results from inelastic powder, single crystal dispersion and single crystal constant energy mapping experiments. The advantages and complications of performing these experiments are discussed along with a comparison between the imaging...

  15. Neutron imaging of diabatic two-phase flows relevant to air conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Sharma, Vishaldeep [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    The design of the evaporator of an air conditioning system relies heavily on heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop correlations that predominantly involve an estimate of the changing void fraction and the underlying two-phase flow regime. These correlations dictate whether the resulting heat exchanger is oversized or not and the amount of refrigerant charge necessary to operate. The latter is particularly important when dealing with flammable or high GWP refrigerants. Traditional techniques to measure the void fraction and visualize the flow are either invasive to the flow or occur downstream of the evaporator, where some of the flow distribution will have changed. Neutron imaging has the potential to visualize two-phase flow in-situ where an aluminium heat exchanger structure becomes essentially transparent to the penetrating neutrons. The subatomic particles are attenuated by the passing refrigerant flow. The resulting image may be directly related to the void fraction and the overall picture provides a clear insight into the flow regime present. This work presents neutron images of the refrigerant Isopentane as it passes through the flow channels of an aluminium evaporator at flowrates relevant to air conditioning. The flow in a 4mm square macro channel is compared to that in a 250 m by 750 m rectangular microchannel in terms of void fraction and regime. All neutron imaging experiments were conducted at the High Flux Isotope Reactor, an Oak Ridge National Laboratory facility

  16. Visualization and quantification of weathering effects on capillary water uptake of natural building stones by using neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raneri, Simona; Barone, Germana; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Rabot, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Building stones are frequently subjected to very intense degradation due to salt crystallization, often responsible for strong modifications of their pore network. These effects have a great influence on the mechanical properties and durability of the materials, and on the penetration of water. Therefore, the quantification and visualization of water absorption into the pore network of degraded stones could provide useful information to better understand the weathering process. In this study, neutron radiography has been used (1) to monitor and visualize in two dimensions the capillary water uptake in a Sicilian calcarenite widely used as building and replace stone (namely Sabucina stone) and (2) to quantify the water content distribution, as a function of time and weathering degree. Additionally, traditional experiments based on gravimetric methods have been performed, following the standard recommendations. Results demonstrated a change in the physical properties of Sabucina stones with the intensification of the degradation process, with severe effects on the capillary imbibition dynamics. The water penetration depth at the end of the experiment was substantially higher in the fresh than in the weathered stones. The water absorption kinetics was faster in the weathered samples, and the amount of water absorbed increased with the number of weathering cycles. Good agreement between classical and neutron imaging data has also been evidenced. However, neutron radiography has allowed retrieving additional spatial information on the water absorption process, and to better understand how salt weathering affects the petrophysical properties of the studied stone and how it influences then the stone response against water.

  17. Visualization and quantification of weathering effects on capillary water uptake of natural building stones by using neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raneri, Simona; Barone, Germana; Mazzoleni, Paolo [University of Catania, Department of Biological, Geological and Environment Sciences, Catania (Italy); Rabot, Eva [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (CNRS/CEA), Gif-Sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-11-15

    Building stones are frequently subjected to very intense degradation due to salt crystallization, often responsible for strong modifications of their pore network. These effects have a great influence on the mechanical properties and durability of the materials, and on the penetration of water. Therefore, the quantification and visualization of water absorption into the pore network of degraded stones could provide useful information to better understand the weathering process. In this study, neutron radiography has been used (1) to monitor and visualize in two dimensions the capillary water uptake in a Sicilian calcarenite widely used as building and replace stone (namely Sabucina stone) and (2) to quantify the water content distribution, as a function of time and weathering degree. Additionally, traditional experiments based on gravimetric methods have been performed, following the standard recommendations. Results demonstrated a change in the physical properties of Sabucina stones with the intensification of the degradation process, with severe effects on the capillary imbibition dynamics. The water penetration depth at the end of the experiment was substantially higher in the fresh than in the weathered stones. The water absorption kinetics was faster in the weathered samples, and the amount of water absorbed increased with the number of weathering cycles. Good agreement between classical and neutron imaging data has also been evidenced. However, neutron radiography has allowed retrieving additional spatial information on the water absorption process, and to better understand how salt weathering affects the petrophysical properties of the studied stone and how it influences then the stone response against water. (orig.)

  18. Observation of a strong interplanar electric field in a dynamical diffraction of polarized neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, V. L.; Fedorov, V. V.; Lapin, E. G.; Leushkin, E. K.; Rumiantsev, V. L.; Sumbaev, O. I.; Voronin, V. V.

    1989-11-01

    The first experimental study of the Schwinger interaction of polarized neutrons with an electric field of a noncentrosymmetric perfect crystal (α-quartz) was made for two wave dynamical diffraction. Phase shifts of Pendellösung fringes for two different spin to crystal field orientations were measured. The theory of the effect is given. The calculated value of SiO2 (11 overline20) interplanar electr field, seen by the diffracted neutron, is 2.1 × 10 8 V/cm. This is in good agreement with the experimental result: (1.8 ± 0.3) × 10 8 V/cm.

  19. Neutron scattering studies of the dynamics of biopolymer-water systems using pulsed-source spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middendorf, H.D. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Miller, A. [Stirling Univ., Stirling (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Energy-resolving neutron scattering techniques provide spatiotemporal data suitable for testing and refining analytical models or computer simulations of a variety of dynamical processes in biomolecular systems. This paper reviews experimental work on hydrated biopolymers at ISIS, the UK Pulsed Neutron Facility. Following an outline of basic concepts and a summary of the new instrumental capabilities, the progress made is illustrated by results from recent experiments in two areas: quasi- elastic scattering from highly hydrated polysaccharide gels (agarose and hyaluronate), and inelastic scattering from vibrational modes of slightly hydrated collagen fibers.

  20. A QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF THE WATER DISTRIBUTION IN A SOIL SAMPLE USING NEUTRON IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Šácha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical method by Kang et al. recently proposed for correcting two-dimensional neutron radiography for water quantification in soil. The method was tested on data from neutron imaging of the water infiltration in a soil sample. The raw data were affected by neutron scattering and by beam hardening artefacts. Two strategies for identifying the correction parameters are proposed in this paper. The method has been further developed for the case of three-dimensional neutron tomography. In a related experiment, neutron imaging is used to record ponded-infiltration experiments in two artificial soil samples. Radiograms, i.e., two-dimensional projections of the sample, were acquired during infiltration. A calculation was made of the amount of water and its distribution within the radiograms, in the form of two-dimensional water thickness maps. Tomograms were reconstructed from the corrected and uncorrected water thickness maps to obtain the 3D spatial distribution of the water content within the sample. Without the correction, the beam hardening and the scattering effects overestimated the water content values close to the perimeter of the sample, and at the same time underestimated the values close to the centre of the sample. The total water content of the entire sample was the same in both cases. The empirical correction method presented in this study is a relatively accurate, rapid and simple way to obtain the quantitatively determined water content from two-dimensional and three-dimensional neutron images. However, an independent method for measuring the total water volume in the sample is needed in order to identify the correction parameters.

  1. Recovering Root System Traits Using Image Analysis Exemplified by Two-Dimensional Neutron Radiography Images of Lupine1[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Daniel; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Schnepf, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Root system traits are important in view of current challenges such as sustainable crop production with reduced fertilizer input or in resource-limited environments. We present a novel approach for recovering root architectural parameters based on image-analysis techniques. It is based on a graph representation of the segmented and skeletonized image of the root system, where individual roots are tracked in a fully automated way. Using a dynamic root architecture model for deciding whether a specific path in the graph is likely to represent a root helps to distinguish root overlaps from branches and favors the analysis of root development over a sequence of images. After the root tracking step, global traits such as topological characteristics as well as root architectural parameters are computed. Analysis of neutron radiographic root system images of lupine (Lupinus albus) grown in mesocosms filled with sandy soil results in a set of root architectural parameters. They are used to simulate the dynamic development of the root system and to compute the corresponding root length densities in the mesocosm. The graph representation of the root system provides global information about connectivity inside the graph. The underlying root growth model helps to determine which path inside the graph is most likely for a given root. This facilitates the systematic investigation of root architectural traits, in particular with respect to the parameterization of dynamic root architecture models. PMID:24218493

  2. Lattice dynamics of solid deuterium by inelastic neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Bjerrum Møller, Hans

    1971-01-01

    The dispersion relations for phonons in solid ortho-deuterium have been measured at 5 °K by inelastic neutron scattering. The results are in good agreement with recent calculations in which quantum effects are taken into account. The data have been fitted to a third-neighbor general force model....... The effective force constants which are obtained show that the bond stretching forces between nearest-neighbor molecules are dominant and this bond stretching constant is 174 dyn cm-1. The elastic constants are deduced and the isothermal compressibility is calculated to be B-1=2.19×10-10 cm2 dyn-1. The density...... of states and the heat capacity is calculated and the Debye temperature is found to be θ0=114 °K....

  3. Dynamics in viscous orthoterphenyl: Results from coherent neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, E.; Fujara, F.; Legrand, J. F.; Petry, W.; Sillescu, H.; Wuttke, J.

    1995-07-01

    We have measured coherent neutron scattering from deuterated orthoterphenyl on a spin echo and a backscattering spectrometer. In agreement with mode coupling theory, pair correlations decay in two steps and follow the same scaling laws as those found previously for self-correlations. The temperature evolution of the intermediate plateau is compatible with the previously established Tc=290 K. The spatial resolution has not been sufficient to fully resolve oscillations of parameters as functions of Q, which are predicted by mode coupling theory. Within this limitation, we find that the double peak structure of S(Q) is not expressed in the nonergodicity parameter fcQ and that the de Gennes narrowing is missing.

  4. Neutron spin-echo investigation of the microemulsion dynamics. in bicontinuous lamellar and droplet phases

    CERN Document Server

    Mihailescu, M; Endo, H; Allgaier, J; Gompper, G; Stellbrink, J; Richter, D; Jakobs, B; Sottmann, T; Faragó, B

    2002-01-01

    Using neutron spin-echo (NSE) spectroscopy in combination with dynamic light scattering (DLS), we performed an extensive investigation of the bicontinuous phase in ternary water-surfactant-oil microemulsions, with extension to lamellar and droplet phases. The dynamical behavior of surfactant monolayers of decyl-polyglycol-ether (C sub 1 sub 0 E sub 4) molecules, or mixtures of surfactant with long amphiphilic block-copolymers of type poly-ethylene propylene/poly-ethylene oxide (PEP-PEO) was studied, under comparable conditions. The investigation techniques provide access to different length scales relative to the characteristic periodicity length of the microemulsion structure. Information on the elastic bending modulus is obtained from the local scale dynamics in view of existing theoretical descriptions and is found to be in accordance with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies. Evidence for the modified elastic properties and additional interaction of the amphiphilic layers due to the polymer is mo...

  5. Self characterization of a coded aperture array for neutron source imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volegov, P. L., E-mail: volegov@lanl.gov; Danly, C. R.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Fittinghoff, D. N. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the stagnation stage of inertial confinement fusion implosions. Since the neutron source is small (∼100 μm) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-μm resolution are 20-cm long, triangular tapers machined in gold foils. These gold foils are stacked to form an array of 20 apertures for pinhole imaging and three apertures for penumbral imaging. These apertures must be precisely aligned to accurately place the field of view of each aperture at the design location, or the location of the field of view for each aperture must be measured. In this paper we present a new technique that has been developed for the measurement and characterization of the precise location of each aperture in the array. We present the detailed algorithms used for this characterization and the results of reconstructed sources from inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments at NIF.

  6. Development of a neutron detector with broad dynamic range and multi-hit capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelczak, Iwona; Toke, Jan; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Udo Schröder, W.

    2007-10-01

    A new type of Gd-loaded plastic neutron detector with a broad dynamic range (from thermal to MeV range) and multi-hit capability has been designed and subjected to series of tests. The device consists of a stack of alternating plastic scintillator (Saint Gobain BC-408) slabs and thin radiator films (PDMS -- SYLGARD 184) loaded with 0.5% of Gd per weight, viewed by a photomultiplier tube. The scintillator functions as neutron moderator, provides a prompt integrated neutron energy signal, and detects delayed n capture by Gd nuclei via associated capture γ-rays. The design, Monte Carlo simulations carried out with an extended code DENIS(E), as well as first measurements with the detector will be discussed.

  7. Microscopic model for the neutron dynamic structure factor of solid methane in phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin Yunchang, E-mail: yunchang.shin@yale.ed [Department of Physics, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Mike Snow, W.; Liu, C.Y.; Lavelle, C.M.; Baxter, David V. [Department of Physics, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)

    2010-08-21

    We have constructed a microscopic model for the neutron dynamic structure factor S(Q,{omega}) of solid methane in phase II. We expect this model to apply for neutron energies below 1 eV at pressures near 1 bar and temperatures below 20 K where methane possesses both free rotation and hindered rotation modes of the tetrahedral molecules in the unit cell. The model treats the motions of molecular translations, intra-molecular vibrations and the free and hindered rotations of methane molecule as independent. Total scattering cross-sections calculated from the model agree with the cross-section measurements for incident neutron energies of 0.5 meV-1 eV. The effective density of states is extracted from the model. We also present the quantitative calculation of the separate contributions of the two different rotational modes to the inelastic cross-section for different methane temperatures in phase II.

  8. Use and imaging performance of CMOS flat panel imager with LiF/ZnS(Ag) and Gadox scintillation screens for neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, B. K.; kim, J. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Sim, C.; Cho, G.; Lee, D. H.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2011-01-01

    In digital neutron radiography system, a thermal neutron imaging detector based on neutron-sensitive scintillating screens with CMOS(complementary metal oxide semiconductor) flat panel imager is introduced for non-destructive testing (NDT) application. Recently, large area CMOS APS (active-pixel sensor) in conjunction with scintillation films has been widely used in many digital X-ray imaging applications. Instead of typical imaging detectors such as image plates, cooled-CCD cameras and amorphous silicon flat panel detectors in combination with scintillation screens, we tried to apply a scintillator-based CMOS APS to neutron imaging detection systems for high resolution neutron radiography. In this work, two major Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillation screens with various thickness were fabricated by a screen printing method. These neutron converter screens consist of a dispersion of Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillating particles in acrylic binder. These scintillating screens coupled-CMOS flat panel imager with 25x50mm2 active area and 48μm pixel pitch was used for neutron radiography. Thermal neutron flux with 6x106n/cm2/s was utilized at the NRF facility of HANARO in KAERI. The neutron imaging characterization of the used detector was investigated in terms of relative light output, linearity and spatial resolution in detail. The experimental results of scintillating screen-based CMOS flat panel detectors demonstrate possibility of high sensitive and high spatial resolution imaging in neutron radiography system.

  9. Understanding Synthesis Imaging Dynamic Range

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We develop a general framework for quantifying the many different contributions to the noise budget of an image made with an array of dishes or aperture array stations. Each noise contribution is associated with a relevant correlation timescale and frequency bandwidth so that the net impact in a complete observation can be assessed. All quantities are parameterised as function of observing frequency and the visibility baseline length. We apply the resulting noise budget analysis to a wide range of existing and planned telescope systems that will operate between about 100 MHz and 5 GHz to ascertain their imaging performance and limitations. We conclude that imaging performance is adversely impacted in several respects by small dimensions of the dishes or aperture array stations. It will be more challenging to achieve thermal noise limited performance using 15m class dishes rather than the 25m dishes of current arrays. Some of the performance risks are mitigated by the deployment of phased array feeds and more ...

  10. Method to evaluate the L/D ratio of neutron imaging beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliesi, R.; Pereira, M.A. Stanojev; Schoueri, R.M., E-mail: pugliesi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-04-01

    An alternative simple method to evaluate the L/D ratio of neutron imaging beams is proposed. It is based on the behavior of the ratio 'x/Ut', which asymptotically tends to L/D for large values of the parameter 'x', that corresponds to the distance separating a gadolinium test object to the scintillator plane, where its image is formed. The method was applied to the neutron imaging equipment of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute IPEN/CNEN-SP and the obtained result was L/D = (104 ± 4). The consistency of the proposed method was verified by comparing this value with those ones obtained by a well - known and established procedure. (author)

  11. Summary of the first neutron image data collected at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grim Gary P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A summary of data and results from the first neutron images produced by the National Ignition Facility (NIF, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA are presented. An overview of the neutron imaging technique is presented, as well as a synopsis of data and measurements made to date. Data from directly driven, DT filled microballoons, as well as indirectly driven, cryogenically layered ignition experiments are presented. The data show that the primary cores from directly driven implosions are approximately twice as large, 64 ± 3 μm, as indirectly driven cores, 25 ± 4 and 29 ± 4 μm and more asymmetric, P2/P0 = 47% vs. − 14% and 7%. Further, comparison with the size and shape of X-ray image data on the same implosions show good agreement, indicating X-ray emission is dominated by the hot regions of the implosion.

  12. Dynamics of biopolymers on nanomaterials studied by quasielastic neutron scattering and MD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet K.

    Neutron scattering has been proved to be a powerful tool to study the dynamics of biological systems under various conditions. This thesis intends to utilize neutron scattering techniques, combining with MD simulations, to develop fundamental understanding of several biologically interesting systems. Our systems include a drug delivery system containing Nanodiamonds with nucleic acid (RNA), and two specific model proteins, beta-Casein and Inorganic Pyrophosphatase (IPPase). RNA and nanodiamond (ND) both are suitable for drug-delivery applications in nano-biotechnology. The architecturally flexible RNA with catalytic functionality forms nanocomposites that can treat life-threatening diseases. The non-toxic ND has excellent mechanical and optical properties and functionalizable high surface area, and thus actively considered for biomedical applications. In this thesis, we utilized two tools, quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and Molecular Dynamics Simulations to probe the effect of ND on RNA dynamics. Our work provides fundamental understanding of how hydrated RNA motions are affected in the RNA-ND nanocomposites. From the experimental and Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MD), we found that hydrated RNA motion is faster on ND surface than a freestanding one. MD Simulation results showed that the failure of Stokes Einstein relation results the presence of dynamic heterogeneities in the biomacromolecules. Radial pair distribution function from MD Simulation confirmed that the hydrophilic nature of ND attracts more water than RNA results the de-confinement of RNA on ND. Therefore, RNA exhibits faster motion in the presence of ND than freestanding RNA. In the second project, we studied the dynamics of a natively disordered protein beta-Casein which lacks secondary structures. In this study, the temperature and hydration effects on the dynamics of beta-Casein are explored by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS). We investigated the mean square displacement (MSD) of

  13. Investigation of dissimilar metal welds by energy-resolved neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Ganguly, Supriyo; Meco, Sonia M.; Pardal, Goncalo R.; Shinohara, Takenao; Feller, W. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    A nondestructive study of the internal structure and compositional gradient of dissimilar metal-alloy welds through energy-resolved neutron imaging is described in this paper. The ability of neutrons to penetrate thick metal objects (up to several cm) provides a unique possibility to examine samples which are opaque to other conventional techniques. The presence of Bragg edges in the measured neutron transmission spectra can be used to characterize the internal residual strain within the samples and some microstructural features, e.g. texture within the grains, while neutron resonance absorption provides the possibility to map the degree of uniformity in mixing of the participating alloys and intermetallic formation within the welds. In addition, voids and other defects can be revealed by the variation of neutron attenuation across the samples. This paper demonstrates the potential of neutron energy-resolved imaging to measure all these characteristics simultaneously in a single experiment with sub-mm spatial resolution. Two dissimilar alloy welds are used in this study: Al autogenously laser welded to steel, and Ti gas metal arc welded (GMAW) to stainless steel using Cu as a filler alloy. The cold metal transfer variant of the GMAW process was used in joining the Ti to the stainless steel in order to minimize the heat input. The distributions of the lattice parameter and texture variation in these welds as well as the presence of voids and defects in the melt region are mapped across the welds. The depth of the thermal front in the Al–steel weld is clearly resolved and could be used to optimize the welding process. A highly textured structure is revealed in the Ti to stainless steel joint where copper was used as a filler wire. The limited diffusion of Ti into the weld region is also verified by the resonance absorption. PMID:27504075

  14. Investigation of dissimilar metal welds by energy-resolved neutron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, Anton S; Ganguly, Supriyo; Meco, Sonia M; Pardal, Goncalo R; Shinohara, Takenao; Feller, W Bruce

    2016-08-01

    A nondestructive study of the internal structure and compositional gradient of dissimilar metal-alloy welds through energy-resolved neutron imaging is described in this paper. The ability of neutrons to penetrate thick metal objects (up to several cm) provides a unique possibility to examine samples which are opaque to other conventional techniques. The presence of Bragg edges in the measured neutron transmission spectra can be used to characterize the internal residual strain within the samples and some microstructural features, e.g. texture within the grains, while neutron resonance absorption provides the possibility to map the degree of uniformity in mixing of the participating alloys and intermetallic formation within the welds. In addition, voids and other defects can be revealed by the variation of neutron attenuation across the samples. This paper demonstrates the potential of neutron energy-resolved imaging to measure all these characteristics simultaneously in a single experiment with sub-mm spatial resolution. Two dissimilar alloy welds are used in this study: Al autogenously laser welded to steel, and Ti gas metal arc welded (GMAW) to stainless steel using Cu as a filler alloy. The cold metal transfer variant of the GMAW process was used in joining the Ti to the stainless steel in order to minimize the heat input. The distributions of the lattice parameter and texture variation in these welds as well as the presence of voids and defects in the melt region are mapped across the welds. The depth of the thermal front in the Al-steel weld is clearly resolved and could be used to optimize the welding process. A highly textured structure is revealed in the Ti to stainless steel joint where copper was used as a filler wire. The limited diffusion of Ti into the weld region is also verified by the resonance absorption.

  15. Dynamics of flexible counter-ions in conducting polyaniline a quasielastic neutron-scattering study

    CERN Document Server

    Bee, M; Djurado, D; Marque, D; Combet, J; Rannou, P; Dufour, B

    2002-01-01

    Conducting polyaniline protonated with sulphonic flexible counter-ions was investigated by quasielastic incoherent neutron scattering. In addition to their role in electrical properties, the flexible counter-ions also increase the elasticity of the samples. As in the case of more rigid counter-ions, polymer chains appear as very stiff objects whose dynamics is completely outside the investigated time scale. Conversely, the counter-ion dynamics was proved to be of major importance in charge transport since a dynamical transition is observed precisely in the temperature range where the electronic properties change from a metallic to a semiconducting regime. (orig.)

  16. New perspectives on neutron star and black hole spectroscopy and dynamic tides

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, Sayan; Steinhoff, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We elaborate on a powerful tidal interaction formalism where the multipole dynamics is kept generic and encoded in a linear response function. This response function is the gravitational counterpart of the atomic spectrum and can become of similar importance with the rise of gravitational wave astronomy. We find that the internal dynamics of nonrotating neutron stars admit a harmonic oscillator formulation yielding a simple interpretation of tides. A preliminary investigation of the black holes case is given. Our results fill the gap between Love numbers and dynamic tides.

  17. Non destructive testing and neutron radiography in 1994; Les controles non destructifs et la neutronographie en 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayon, G.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron radiography has been considered for a long time as a promising technique; however it plays a minor part in the world of non destructive testing today, due to the lack of suitable neutron sources and lack of new industrial applications. This paper reviews the present status of neutron sources, neutron radiography activities, especially in France (such as the neutron-capture-issued secondary radiation spectrometry), in nuclear, aerospace, aeronautical and metallurgical sectors, and the last applications of neutron dynamic imaging. 9 refs.

  18. Structural and Dynamical Trends in Alkali-Metal Silanides Characterized by Neutron-Scattering Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wan Si; Dimitrievska, Mirjana; Chotard, Jean-Noel; Zhou, Wei; Janot, Raphael; Skripov, Alexander V.; Udovic, Terrence J.

    2016-09-29

    Structural, vibrational, and dynamical properties of the mono- and mixed-alkali silanides (MSiH3, where M = K, Rb, Cs, K0.5Rb0.5, K0.5Cs0.5, and Rb0.5Cs0.5) were investigated by various neutron experiments, including neutron powder diffraction (NPD), neutron vibrational spectroscopy (NVS), neutron-scattering fixed-window scans (FWSs), and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements. Structural characterization showed that the mixed compounds exhibit disordered (..alpha..) and ordered (..beta..) phases for temperatures above and below about 200-250 K, respectively, in agreement with their monoalkali correspondents. Vibrational and dynamical properties are strongly influenced by the cation environment; in particular, there is a red shift in the band energies of the librational and bending modes with increasing lattice size as a result of changes in the bond lengths and force constants. Additionally, slightly broader spectral features are observed in the case of the mixed compounds, indicating the presence of structural disorder caused by the random distribution of the alkali-metal cations within the lattice. FWS measurements upon heating showed that there is a large increase in reorientational mobility as the systems go through the order-disorder (..beta..-..alpha..) phase transition, and measurements upon cooling of the ..alpha..-phase revealed the known strong hysteresis for reversion back to the ..beta..-phase. Interestingly, at a given temperature, among the different alkali silanide compounds, the relative reorientational mobilities of the SiH3- anions in the ..alpha..- and ..beta..-phases tended to decrease and increase, respectively, with increasing alkali-metal mass. This dynamical result might provide some insights concerning the enthalpy-entropy compensation effect previously observed for these potentially promising hydrogen storage materials.

  19. Advances in neutron radiographic techniques and applications: a method for nondestructive testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Harold

    2004-10-01

    A brief history of neutron radiography is presented to set the stage for a discussion of significant neutron radiographic developments and an assessment of future directions for neutron radiography. Specific advances are seen in the use of modern, high dynamic range imaging methods (image plates and flat panels) and for high contrast techniques such as phase contrast, and phase-sensitive imaging. Competition for neutron radiographic inspection may develop as these techniques offer application prospects for X-ray methods.

  20. PREFACE: Structure and dynamics determined by neutron and x-ray scattering Structure and dynamics determined by neutron and x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Neutron and x-ray scattering have emerged as powerful methods for the determination of structure and dynamics. Driven by emerging new, powerful neutron and synchrotron radiation sources, the continuous development of new instrumentation and novel scattering techniques gives rise to exciting possibilities. For example, in situ observations become possible via a high neutron or x-ray flux at the sample and, as a consequence, morphological transitions with small time constants can be detected. This special issue covers a broad range of different materials from soft to hard condensed matter. Hence, different material classes such as colloids, polymers, alloys, oxides and metals are addressed. The issue is dedicated to the 60th birthday of Professor Winfried Petry, scientific director of the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II), Germany, advisor at the physics department for the Bayerische Elite-Akademie, chair person of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Metall- und Materialphysik of the German Physical Society (DPG) and a member of the professional council of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). We would like to acknowledge and thank all contributors for their submissions, which made this special issue possible in the first place. Moreover, we would like to thank the staff at IOP Publishing for helping us with the administrative aspects and for coordinating the refereeing process, and Valeria Lauter for the beautiful cover artwork. Finally, to the readers, we hope that you find this special issue a valuable resource that provides insights into the present possibilities of neutron and x-ray scattering as powerful tools for the investigation of structure and dynamics. Structure and dynamics determined by neutron and x-ray scattering contents In situ studies of mass transport in liquid alloys by means of neutron radiography F Kargl, M Engelhardt, F Yang, H Weis, P Schmakat, B Schillinger, A Griesche and A Meyer Magnetic spin

  1. Beam dynamics simulation of the Spallation Neutron Source linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, H.; Billen, J.H.; Bhatia, T.S.

    1998-12-31

    The accelerating structure for Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) consists of a radio-frequency-quadrupole-linac (RFQ), a drift-tube-linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity-drift-tube-linac (CCDTL), and a coupled-cavity-linac (CCL). The linac is operated at room temperature. The authors discuss the detailed design of linac which accelerates an H{sup {minus}} pulsed beam coming out from RFQ at 2.5 MeV to 1000 MeV. They show a detailed transition from 402.5 MHz DTL with a 4 {beta}{lambda} structure to a CCDTL operated at 805 MHz with a 12 {beta}{lambda} structure. After a discussion of overall feature of the linac, they present an end-to-end particle simulation using the new version of the PARMILA code for a beam starting from the RFQ entrance through the rest of the linac. At 1000 MeV, the beam is transported to a storage ring. The storage ring requires a large ({+-}500-keV) energy spread. This is accomplished by operating the rf-phase in the last section of the linac so the particles are at the unstable fixed point of the separatrix. They present zero-current phase advance, beam size, and beam emittance along the entire linac.

  2. High dynamic range images for enhancing low dynamic range content

    OpenAIRE

    Banterle, Francesco; Dellepiane, Matteo; Scopigno, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    This poster presents a practical system for enhancing the quality of Low Dynamic Range (LDR) videos using High Dynamic Range (HDR) background images. Our technique relies on the assumption that the HDR information is static in the video footage. This assumption can be valid in many scenarios where moving subjects are the main focus of the footage and do not have to interact with moving light sources or highly reflective objects. Another valid scenario is teleconferencing via webcams, where th...

  3. Understanding synthesis imaging dynamic range

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We develop a general framework for quantifying the many different contributions to the noise budget of an image made with an array of dishes or aperture array stations. Each noise contribution to the visibility data is associated with a relevant correlation timescale and frequency bandwidth so that the net impact on a complete observation can be assessed. All quantities are parameterised as function of observing frequency and the visibility baseline length. We apply the resulting noise budget...

  4. Neutron imaging with coded sources: new challenges and the implementation of a simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Gregor, Jens [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2013-01-01

    The limitations in neutron flux and resolution (L/D) of current neutron imaging systems can be addressed with a Coded Source Imaging system with magnification (xCSI). More precisely, the multiple sources in an xCSI system can exceed the flux of a single pinhole system for several orders of magnitude, while maintaining a higher L/D with the small sources. Moreover, designing for an xCSI system reduces noise from neutron scattering, because the object is placed away from the detector to achieve magnification. However, xCSI systems are adversely affected by correlated noise such as non-uniform illumination of the neutron source, incorrect sampling of the coded radiograph, misalignment of the coded masks, mask transparency, and the imperfection of the system Point Spread Function (PSF). We argue that a model-based reconstruction algorithm can overcome these problems and describe the implementation of a Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique algorithm for coded sources. Design pitfalls that preclude a satisfactory reconstruction are documented.

  5. Inferences of Shell Asymmetry in ICF Implosions using Fluence Compensated Neutron Images at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D.; Fittinghoff, D.; Bionta, R.; Smalyuk, V.; Grim, G.; Munro, D.; Spears, B.; Raman, K.; Clark, D.; Kritcher, A.; Hinkel, D.; Hurricane, O.; Callahan, D.; Döppner, T.; Landen, O.; Ma, T.; Le Pape, S.; Ross, S.; Meezan, N.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Volegov, P.; Merill, F.

    2016-10-01

    In ICF experiments, a dense shell is imploded and used to compress and heat a hotspot of DT fuel. Controlling the symmetry of this process is both important and challenging. It is therefore important to observe the symmetry of the stagnated shell assembly. The Neutron Imaging System at the NIF is used to observe the primary 14 MeV neutrons from the hotspot and the down-scattered neutrons (6-12 MeV), from the assembled shell but with a strong imprint from the primary-neutron fluence. Using a characteristic scattering angle approximation, we have compensated the image for this fluence effect, revealing information about shell asymmetry that is otherwise difficult to extract without models. Preliminary observations with NIF data show asymmetries in imploded shell, which will be compared with other nuclear diagnostics and postshot simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Development of the large neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillaud, T; Landoas, O; Briat, M; Kime, S; Rossé, B; Thfoin, I; Bourgade, J L; Disdier, L; Glebov, V Yu; Marshall, F J; Sangster, T C

    2012-03-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires a high resolution (~10 μm) neutron imaging system to observe deuterium and tritium (DT) core implosion asymmetries. A new large (150 mm entrance diameter: scaled for Laser MégaJoule [P. A. Holstein, F. Chaland, C. Charpin, J. M. Dufour, H. Dumont, J. Giorla, L. Hallo, S. Laffite, G. Malinie, Y. Saillard, G. Schurtz, M. Vandenboomgaerde, and F. Wagon, Laser and Particle Beams 17, 403 (1999)]) neutron imaging detector has been developed for such ICF experiments. The detector has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a (60)Co γ-ray source. A penumbral aperture was used to observe DT-gas-filled target implosions performed on the OMEGA laser facility. [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] Neutron core images of 14 MeV with a resolution of 15 μm were obtained and are compared to x-ray images of comparable resolution.

  7. Development of the large neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Kime, S.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires a high resolution ({approx}10 {mu}m) neutron imaging system to observe deuterium and tritium (DT) core implosion asymmetries. A new large (150 mm entrance diameter: scaled for Laser MegaJoule [P. A. Holstein, F. Chaland, C. Charpin, J. M. Dufour, H. Dumont, J. Giorla, L. Hallo, S. Laffite, G. Malinie, Y. Saillard, G. Schurtz, M. Vandenboomgaerde, and F. Wagon, Laser and Particle Beams 17, 403 (1999)]) neutron imaging detector has been developed for such ICF experiments. The detector has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source. A penumbral aperture was used to observe DT-gas-filled target implosions performed on the OMEGA laser facility. [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] Neutron core images of 14 MeV with a resolution of 15 {mu}m were obtained and are compared to x-ray images of comparable resolution.

  8. The Dynamical Evolution of Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries in General Relativity: Simulations of Tidal Disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Faber, J A; Shapiro, S L; Taniguchi, K; Rasio, F A; Faber, Joshua A.; Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the first dynamical evolutions of merging black hole-neutron star binaries that construct the combined black hole-neutron star spacetime in a general relativistic framework. We treat the metric in the conformal flatness approximation, and assume that the black hole mass is sufficiently large compared to that of the neutron star so that the black hole remains fixed in space. Using a spheroidal spectral methods solver, we solve the resulting field equations for a neutron star orbiting a Schwarzschild black hole. The matter is evolved using a relativistic, Lagrangian, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) treatment. We take as our initial data recent quasiequilibrium models for synchronized neutron star polytropes generated as solutions of the conformal thin-sandwich (CTS) decomposition of the Einstein field equations. We are able to construct from these models relaxed SPH configurations whose profiles show good agreement with CTS solutions. Our adiabatic evolution calculations for neutron stars wit...

  9. Ab initio simulations and neutron scattering studies of structure and dynamics in PdH

    CERN Document Server

    Totolici, I E

    2001-01-01

    The work presented in this PhD thesis is concerned with the interpretation of the neutron scattering measurements from the palladium hydrogen system by means of ab initio electronic structure calculations. The motivation of performing such calculations was due to recent neutron scattering studies on this system that showed a strong directional dependence to the dynamical structure factor together with a complex dependence on energy. Here we attempt to describe the origin of these features by ab initio simulations of the dynamical structure factor. The method assumes an adiabatic separation of the motion of the proton and palladium atoms. The proton wave functions are calculated by a direct solution of the associated single-particle Schroedinger equation using a plane wave basis set method and a mapping of the adiabatic surface. The Fourier components of the adiabatic potential are obtained from LDA pseudopotential calculations. Using Fermi's golden rule within the Born approximation we were then able to calcu...

  10. Solution of the neutronics code dynamic benchmark by finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avvakumov, A. V.; Vabishchevich, P. N.; Vasilev, A. O.; Strizhov, V. F.

    2016-10-01

    The objective is to analyze the dynamic benchmark developed by Atomic Energy Research for the verification of best-estimate neutronics codes. The benchmark scenario includes asymmetrical ejection of a control rod in a water-type hexagonal reactor at hot zero power. A simple Doppler feedback mechanism assuming adiabatic fuel temperature heating is proposed. The finite element method on triangular calculation grids is used to solve the three-dimensional neutron kinetics problem. The software has been developed using the engineering and scientific calculation library FEniCS. The matrix spectral problem is solved using the scalable and flexible toolkit SLEPc. The solution accuracy of the dynamic benchmark is analyzed by condensing calculation grid and varying degree of finite elements.

  11. Quantum dynamic imaging theoretical and numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Misha

    2011-01-01

    Studying and using light or "photons" to image and then to control and transmit molecular information is among the most challenging and significant research fields to emerge in recent years. One of the fastest growing areas involves research in the temporal imaging of quantum phenomena, ranging from molecular dynamics in the femto (10-15s) time regime for atomic motion to the atto (10-18s) time scale of electron motion. In fact, the attosecond "revolution" is now recognized as one of the most important recent breakthroughs and innovations in the science of the 21st century. A major participant in the development of ultrafast femto and attosecond temporal imaging of molecular quantum phenomena has been theory and numerical simulation of the nonlinear, non-perturbative response of atoms and molecules to ultrashort laser pulses. Therefore, imaging quantum dynamics is a new frontier of science requiring advanced mathematical approaches for analyzing and solving spatial and temporal multidimensional partial differ...

  12. Enhanced dynamic range x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidekker, Mark A; Morrison, Logan Dain-Kelley; Sharma, Ajay; Burke, Emily

    2017-03-01

    X-ray images can suffer from excess contrast. Often, image exposure is chosen to visually optimize the region of interest, but at the expense of over- and underexposed regions elsewhere in the image. When image values are interpreted quantitatively as projected absorption, both over- and underexposure leads to the loss of quantitative information. We propose to combine multiple exposures into a composite that uses only pixels from those exposures in which they are neither under- nor overexposed. The composite image is created in analogy to visible-light high dynamic range photography. We present the mathematical framework for the recovery of absorbance from such composite images and demonstrate the method with biological and non-biological samples. We also show with an aluminum step-wedge that accurate recovery of step thickness from the absorbance values is possible, thereby highlighting the quantitative nature of the presented method. Due to the higher amount of detail encoded in an enhanced dynamic range x-ray image, we expect that the number of retaken images can be reduced, and patient exposure overall reduced. We also envision that the method can improve dual energy absorptiometry and even computed tomography by reducing the number of low-exposure ("photon-starved") projections.

  13. Lattice dynamics of wurtzite CdS: Neutron scattering and ab-initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debernardi, A.; Pyka, N. M.; Göbel, A.; Ruf, T.; Lauck, R.; Kramp, S.; Cardona, M.

    1997-08-01

    We have measured the phonon dispersion of wurtzite CdS by inelastic neutron scattering in a single crystal made from the nonabsorbing isotope 114Cd. One of the two silent B 1-modes occurs at 3.96 THz ( k = 0 ). It is significantly lower and less dispersive than so far assumed. Previous semiempirical lattice dynamical models need to be reanalyzed. However, the observed dispersion branches compare favorably with an ab-initio calculation.

  14. Effects of neutron-star dynamic tides on gravitational waveforms within the effective-one-body approach

    CERN Document Server

    Hinderer, Tanja; Foucart, Francois; Buonanno, Alessandra; Steinhoff, Jan; Duez, Matthew; Kidder, Lawrence E; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Scheel, Mark A; Szilagyi, Bela; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru; Carpenter, Cory W

    2016-01-01

    Extracting the unique information on ultradense nuclear matter from the gravitational waves emitted by merging, neutron-star binaries requires robust theoretical models of the signal. We develop a novel effective-one-body waveform model that includes, for the first time, dynamic (instead of only adiabatic) tides of the neutron star, as well as the merger signal for neutron-star--black-hole binaries. We demonstrate the importance of the dynamic tides by comparing our model against new numerical-relativity simulations of nonspinning neutron-star--black-hole binaries spanning more than 24 gravitational-wave cycles, and to other existing numerical simulations for double neutron-star systems. Furthermore, we derive an effective description that makes explicit the dependence of matter effects on two key parameters: tidal deformability and fundamental oscillation frequency.

  15. Dynamic metamaterial aperture for microwave imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleasman, Timothy; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Gollub, Jonah N.; Smith, David R. [Center for Metamaterials and Integrated Plasmonics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, 27708 (United States)

    2015-11-16

    We present a dynamic metamaterial aperture for use in computational imaging schemes at microwave frequencies. The aperture consists of an array of complementary, resonant metamaterial elements patterned into the upper conductor of a microstrip line. Each metamaterial element contains two diodes connected to an external control circuit such that the resonance of the metamaterial element can be damped by application of a bias voltage. Through applying different voltages to the control circuit, select subsets of the elements can be switched on to create unique radiation patterns that illuminate the scene. Spatial information of an imaging domain can thus be encoded onto this set of radiation patterns, or measurements, which can be processed to reconstruct the targets in the scene using compressive sensing algorithms. We discuss the design and operation of a metamaterial imaging system and demonstrate reconstructed images with a 10:1 compression ratio. Dynamic metamaterial apertures can potentially be of benefit in microwave or millimeter wave systems such as those used in security screening and through-wall imaging. In addition, feature-specific or adaptive imaging can be facilitated through the use of the dynamic aperture.

  16. Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons with an imaging camera and its implications to spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Wanchun; Hoffbauer, M A; Makela, M; Morris, C L; Tang, Z; Adamek, E R; Callahan, N B; Clayton, S M; Cude-Woods, C; Currie, S; Dees, E B; Ding, X; Geltenbort, P; Hickerson, K P; Holley, A T; Ito, T M; Leung, K K; Liu, C -Y; Morley, D J; Ramsey, J C; Pattie,, R W; Salvat, D J; Saunders, A; Seestrom, S J; Sharapov, E I; Sjue, S K; Wexler, J; Womack, T L; Young, A R; Zeck, B A; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-01-01

    Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is demonstrated using an imaging charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A spatial resolution less than 15 $\\mu$m has been achieved, which through the relation $\\delta E = m_0g \\delta x$, converts to UCN energy resolution below 2 pico-electron volts. The symbols $\\delta E$, $\\delta x$, $m_0$ and $g$ are for energy resolution, spatial resolution, the neutron rest mass and gravitational acceleration respectively. A multilayer surface convertor described previously is used to capture UCNs and emits visible light for CCD imaging. Particle identification and noise rejection are discussed through light intensity profile analysis. This method allows new types of UCN spectroscopy and various applications.

  17. Identification of microorganisms for the analysis of images obtained by neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, J.D.R.; Crispim, V.R. E-mail: verginia@lmn.con.ufrj.br; Lage, C

    2001-06-01

    The main difficulty in identifying infectious microorganisms is the time required to obtain a reliable result, a minimum of 72 h. We propose a reduction to about 5 h through the technique of neutron radiography. Samples containing the bacillus Escherichia coli and the cocci Staphylococcus epidermidis were incubated with B{sup 10}, layered on SSNTD (CR-39) surface and irradiated in the J-9 channel from the Argonauta Reactor (IEN/CNEN) with a flux of thermal neutrons at a rate of 2.2x10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2} s. Images were observed in an optical microscope after exposure of the plates to chemical development of the latent alpha-tracks. Analysis of the images revealed morphological differences between the species, conferring the technique the perspective to use in microbial diagnosis.

  18. In situ diagnostics of the crystal-growth process through neutron imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Makowska, Malgorzata Grazyna; Perrodin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Neutrons are known to be unique probes in situations where other types of radiation fail to penetrate samples and their surrounding structures. In this paper it is demonstrated how thermal and cold neutron radiography can provide time-resolved imaging of materials while they are being processed (e......, as limited by the resolution of the present experiments). It is also demonstrated that the dopant concentration can be quantified even for very low concentration levels (∼ 0.1%) in 10 mm thick samples. The interface between the solid and liquid phases can also be imaged, provided there is a sufficient change.......g. while growing single crystals). The processing equipment, in this case furnaces, and the scintillator materials are opaque to conventional X-ray interrogation techniques. The distribution of the europium activator within a BaBrCl:Eu scintillator (0.1 and 0.5% nominal doping concentrations per mole...

  19. Final design of the Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging System “RADEN” at J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, T.; Kai, T.; Oikawa, K.; Segawa, M.; Harada, M.; Nakatani, T.; Ooi, M.; Aizawa, K.; Sato, H.; Kamiyama, T.; Yokota, H.; Sera, T.; Mochiki, K.; Kiyanagi, Y.

    2016-09-01

    A new pulsed-neutron instrument, named the Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging System “RADEN”, has been constructed at the beam line of BL22 in the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) of J-PARC. The primary purpose of this instrument is to perform energy-resolved neutron imaging experiments through the effective utilization of the pulsed nature of the neutron beam, making this the world's first instrument dedicated to pulsed neutron imaging experiments. RADEN was designed to cover a broad energy range: from cold neutrons with energy down to 1.05 meV (or wavelength up to 8.8 Å) with a good wavelength resolution of 0.20% to high-energy neutrons with energy of several tens keV (or wavelength of 10-3 Å). In addition, this instrument is intended to perform state-of-the-art neutron radiography and tomography experiments in Japan. Hence, a maximum beam size of 300 mm square and a high L/D value of up to 7500 are provided.

  20. Hydration-dependent dynamics of human telomeric oligonucleotides in the picosecond timescale: A neutron scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, F.; Longo, M.; Orecchini, A.; Comez, L.; De Francesco, A.; Muthmann, M.; Teixeira, S. C. M.; Petrillo, C.; Sacchetti, F.; Paciaroni, A.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of the human oligonucleotide AG3(T2AG3)3 has been investigated by incoherent neutron scattering in the sub-nanosecond timescale. A hydration-dependent dynamical activation of thermal fluctuations in weakly hydrated samples was found, similar to that of protein powders. The amplitudes of such thermal fluctuations were evaluated in two different exchanged wave-vector ranges, so as to single out the different contributions from intra- and inter-nucleotide dynamics. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature-dependent characteristic times of the corresponding dynamical processes. The trends of both amplitudes and activation energies support a picture where oligonucleotides possess a larger conformational flexibility than long DNA sequences. This additional flexibility, which likely results from a significant relative chain-end contribution to the average chain dynamics, could be related to the strong structural polymorphism of the investigated oligonucleotides.

  1. Hydration-dependent dynamics of human telomeric oligonucleotides in the picosecond timescale: A neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastiani, F.; Comez, L.; Sacchetti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Unità di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Longo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Elettra—Sincrotrone Trieste, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Orecchini, A.; Petrillo, C.; Paciaroni, A., E-mail: alessandro.paciaroni@fisica.unipg.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); De Francesco, A. [CNR-IOM OGG c/o Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Muthmann, M. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Teixeira, S. C. M. [EPSAM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Institut Laue–Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-07-07

    The dynamics of the human oligonucleotide AG{sub 3}(T{sub 2}AG{sub 3}){sub 3} has been investigated by incoherent neutron scattering in the sub-nanosecond timescale. A hydration-dependent dynamical activation of thermal fluctuations in weakly hydrated samples was found, similar to that of protein powders. The amplitudes of such thermal fluctuations were evaluated in two different exchanged wave-vector ranges, so as to single out the different contributions from intra- and inter-nucleotide dynamics. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature-dependent characteristic times of the corresponding dynamical processes. The trends of both amplitudes and activation energies support a picture where oligonucleotides possess a larger conformational flexibility than long DNA sequences. This additional flexibility, which likely results from a significant relative chain-end contribution to the average chain dynamics, could be related to the strong structural polymorphism of the investigated oligonucleotides.

  2. High-position-resolution scintillation neutron-imaging detector by crossed-fiber readout with novel centroid-finding method

    CERN Document Server

    Katagiri, M; Sakasai, K; Matsubayashi, M; Birumachi, A; Takahashi, H; Nakazawa, M

    2002-01-01

    Aiming at high-position-resolution and high-counting-rate neutron imaging, a novel centroid-finding method is proposed for a scintillation neutron-imaging detector with crossed-fiber readout. Crossed wavelength-shifting fibers are arranged on and under the scintillator. Luminescences generated in the scintillator are emitted and detected by a few fibers surrounding the incident point of a neutron. In the novel method, X and Y positions of the incident neutron are decided by coincidence of a central signal and neighboring signals, respectively. By fundamental experiments using a ZnS:Ag/ sup 6 LiF scintillator of 0.5-mm thickness and crossed wavelength-shifting fibers with a size of 0.5 x 0.5 mm sup 2 , it was confirmed that the position resolution is about 0.5 mm and the limitation of the neutron-counting rate is 320 kcps. (orig.)

  3. High resolution neutron imaging of water in the polymer electrolyte fuel cell membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hussey, D S [NIST; Jacobson, D L [NIST; Arif, M [NIST

    2009-01-01

    Water transport in the ionomeric membrane, typically Nafion{reg_sign}, has profound influence on the performance of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell, in terms of internal resistance and overall water balance. In this work, high resolution neutron imaging of the Nafion{reg_sign} membrane is presented in order to measure water content and through-plane gradients in situ under disparate temperature and humidification conditions.

  4. Dynamic NMR cardiac imaging in a piglet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, M.; Rzedzian, R.; Mansfield, P. (Nottingham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Coupland, R.E. (Nottingham Univ. (UK). Queen' s Medical Centre)

    1983-12-01

    NMR echo-planar imaging (EPI) has been used in a real-time mode to visualise the thorax of a live piglet. Moving pictures are available on an immediate image display system which demonstrates dynamic cardiac function. Frame rates vary from one per cardiac cycle in a prospective stroboscopic mode with immediate visual output to a maximum of 10 frames per second yielding up to six looks in one piglet heart cycle, but using a visual playback mode. A completely new system has been used to obtain these images, features of which include a probe assembly with 22 cm access and an AP400 array processor for real-time data processing.

  5. GPU-based prompt gamma ray imaging from boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suh, Tae Suk [College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This reaction can be applied to the therapy and diagnosis about the tumor simultaneously. After the compound labeled with the boron is accumulated at the tumor site, the alpha particle induced by the reaction between the thermal neutron and the boron induces tumor cell death. Also, the 478 keV prompt gamma ray is emitted from the same reaction point. If this single prompt photon is detected by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), the tomographic image of the therapy region can be monitored during the radiation treatment. However, in order to confirm the therapy region using the image during the treatment, the image needs to be provided promptly. Due to a relatively long acquisition time required to get SPECT images, both reduced number of projections and the fast image reconstruction schemes are needed to provide the images during radiation treatment. The computation time for image reconstruction using the GPU with the modified OSEM algorithm was measured and compared with the computation time using CPU. Through the results, we confirmed the feasibility of the image reconstruction for prompt gamma ray image using GPU for the BNCT. In the further study, the development of the algorithm for faster reconstruction of the prompt gamma ray image during the BNCT using the GPU computation will be conducted. Also, the analysis of the target to background level about the reconstructed image will be performed using the extracted image profile.

  6. Angular resolution study of a combined gamma-neutron coded aperture imager for standoff detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz-Maierhafer, Birsen; Hayward, Jason P.; Ziock, Klaus P.; Blackston, Matthew A.; Fabris, Lorenzo

    2013-06-01

    Nuclear threat source observables at standoff distances of tens of meters from mCi class sources include both gamma-rays and neutrons. This work uses simulations to investigate the effects of the angular resolution of a mobile gamma-ray and neutron coded aperture imaging system upon orphan source detection significance and specificity. The design requires maintaining high sensitivity and specificity while keeping the system size as compact as possible to reduce weight, footprint, and cost. A mixture of inorganic and organic scintillators was considered in the detector plane for high sensitivity to both gamma-rays and fast neutrons. For gamma-rays (100 to 2500 keV) and fission spectrum neutrons, angular resolutions of 1-9° and radiation angles of incidence appropriate for mobile search were evaluated. Detection significance for gamma-rays considers those events that contribute to the photopeak of the image pixel corresponding the orphan source location. For detection of fission spectrum neutrons, energy depositions above a set pulse shape discrimination threshold were tallied. The results show that the expected detection significance for the system at an angular resolution of 1° is significantly lower compared to its detection significance an angular resolution of ˜3-4°. An angular resolution of ˜3-4° is recommended both for better detection significance and improved false alarm rate, considering that finer angular resolution does not result in improved background rejection when the coded aperture method is used. Instead, over-pixelating the search space may result in an unacceptably high false alarm rate.

  7. The new neutron radiography/tomography/imaging station DINGO at OPAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbe, U., E-mail: ulf.garbe@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Randall, T.; Hughes, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2011-09-21

    A new neutron imaging instrument will be built to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/tomography) at ANSTO. The instrument will be designed for an international user community and for routine quality control for defence, industrial, mining, space and aircraft applications. It will also be a useful tool for assessing oil and water flow in sedimentary rock reservoirs (like the North West Shelf), assessing water damage in aircraft components, and the study of hydrogen distribution and cracking in steel. The instrument is planned to be completed by the end of June 2013 and is currently in the design stage. The usable neutron flux is mainly determined by the neutron source, but it also depends on the instrument position and the resolution. The designated instrument position for DINGO is the beam port HB-2 in the reactor hall. The estimated flux for an L/D of approximately 250 at HB-2 is calculated by Mcstas simulation in a range of 4.75x10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} s, which is in the same range of other facilities like ANSTARES (FRM II; Schillinger et al., 2004 ) or BT2 (NIST; Hussey et al., 2005 ). A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator place in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/D of 250 and 1000. A secondary collimator will separate the two beams and block one. The whole instrument will operate in two different positions, one for high resolution and the other for high speed.

  8. The new neutron radiography/tomography/imaging station DINGO at OPAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbe, U.; Randall, T.; Hughes, C.

    2011-09-01

    A new neutron imaging instrument will be built to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/tomography) at ANSTO. The instrument will be designed for an international user community and for routine quality control for defence, industrial, mining, space and aircraft applications. It will also be a useful tool for assessing oil and water flow in sedimentary rock reservoirs (like the North West Shelf), assessing water damage in aircraft components, and the study of hydrogen distribution and cracking in steel. The instrument is planned to be completed by the end of June 2013 and is currently in the design stage. The usable neutron flux is mainly determined by the neutron source, but it also depends on the instrument position and the resolution. The designated instrument position for DINGO is the beam port HB-2 in the reactor hall. The estimated flux for an L/ D of approximately 250 at HB-2 is calculated by Mcstas simulation in a range of 4.75×10 7 n/cm 2 s, which is in the same range of other facilities like ANSTARES (FRM II; Schillinger et al., 2004 [1]) or BT2 (NIST; Hussey et al., 2005 [2]). A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator place in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/ D of 250 and 1000. A secondary collimator will separate the two beams and block one. The whole instrument will operate in two different positions, one for high resolution and the other for high speed.

  9. How to organize a neutron imaging user lab? 13 years of experience at PSI, CH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, E. H.; Vontobel, P.; Frei, G.; Kuehne, G.; Kaestner, A.

    2011-09-01

    PSI has a relatively long tradition in neutron imaging since the first trials were done at its formerly existing research reactor SAPHIR with film methods. This reactor source was replaced after its shutdown in 1994 by the spallation neutron source SINQ in 1996, driven by the 590 MeV cyclotron for protons with presently up to 2.3 mA beam current. One of the first experimental devices at SINQ was the thermal neutron imaging facility NEUTRA, which was designed from scratch and has been the first device of its kind at a spallation source. Until now, NEUTRA has been successfully in use for many investigations in a wide range of studies covering fuel cell research, environmental behavior of plants, nuclear fuel inspection and the research on cultural heritage objects. It has been the host of PhD projects for students from all over Europe for years. In a previous meeting it has been offered as a European reference facility. Some of its features were really adapted to the layout of new installations. In 2004, it was possible to initiate the project of a second beam line at SINQ for imaging with cold neutrons. Previous studies have shown the potential of this option in order to broaden the user profile and to extend the scientific basis for neutron imaging. It was inaugurated with a workshop at PSI in 2005. The user service was started at the facility ICON in 2006. Beside the setup, installation and optimization of the facilities, the organization of the user program plays an important role. The two neutron imaging beam lines are equal installations at SINQ among the 14 scientific devices. Therefore, the user approach is organized via "calls for proposals", which are sent out each half year via the "Digital User Office (DUO)" (see http://duo.web.psi.ch). The evaluation of the proposals is done by the "Advisory Committee for Neutron Imaging (ACNI)" consisting of 6 external and PSI internal members. Further requests are given by industrial collaborations. This beam time

  10. How to organize a neutron imaging user lab? 13 years of experience at PSI, CH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, E.H., E-mail: eberhard.lehmann@psi.ch [Spallation Neutron Source Division, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Vontobel, P.; Frei, G.; Kuehne, G.; Kaestner, A. [Spallation Neutron Source Division, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-09-21

    PSI has a relatively long tradition in neutron imaging since the first trials were done at its formerly existing research reactor SAPHIR with film methods. This reactor source was replaced after its shutdown in 1994 by the spallation neutron source SINQ in 1996, driven by the 590 MeV cyclotron for protons with presently up to 2.3 mA beam current. One of the first experimental devices at SINQ was the thermal neutron imaging facility NEUTRA, which was designed from scratch and has been the first device of its kind at a spallation source. Until now, NEUTRA has been successfully in use for many investigations in a wide range of studies covering fuel cell research, environmental behavior of plants, nuclear fuel inspection and the research on cultural heritage objects. It has been the host of PhD projects for students from all over Europe for years. In a previous meeting it has been offered as a European reference facility. Some of its features were really adapted to the layout of new installations. In 2004, it was possible to initiate the project of a second beam line at SINQ for imaging with cold neutrons. Previous studies have shown the potential of this option in order to broaden the user profile and to extend the scientific basis for neutron imaging. It was inaugurated with a workshop at PSI in 2005. The user service was started at the facility ICON in 2006. Beside the setup, installation and optimization of the facilities, the organization of the user program plays an important role. The two neutron imaging beam lines are equal installations at SINQ among the 14 scientific devices. Therefore, the user approach is organized via 'calls for proposals', which are sent out each half year via the 'Digital User Office (DUO)' (see (http://duo.web.psi.ch)). The evaluation of the proposals is done by the 'Advisory Committee for Neutron Imaging (ACNI)' consisting of 6 external and PSI internal members. Further requests are given by industrial

  11. The measurement of the presampled MTF of a high spatial resolution neutron imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Raymond Lei [Nuclear Engineering Teaching Lab, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)], E-mail: rcao@nist.gov; Biegalski, Steven R. [Nuclear Engineering Teaching Lab, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    2007-11-21

    A high spatial resolution neutron imaging device was developed at the Mark II TRIGA reactor at University of Texas at Austin. As the modulation transfer function (MTF) is recognized as a well-established parameter for evaluation of imaging system resolution, the aliasing associated with digital sampling adds complexity to its measurement. Aliasing is especially problematic when using a high spatial resolution micro-channel plate (MCP) neutron detector that has a pixel grid size similar to that of a CCD array. To compensate for the aliasing an angulated edge method was used to evaluate the neutron imaging facility, overcoming aliasing by obtaining an oversampled edge spread function (ESF). Baseline correction was applied to the ESF to remove the noticeable trends and the LSF was multiplied by Hann window to obtain a smoothed version of presampled MTF. The computing procedure is confirmed by visual inspection of a testing phantom; in addition, it is confirmed by comparison to the MTF measurement of a scintillation screen with a known MTF curve.

  12. Feasibility Study of Neutron Dose for Real Time Image Guided Proton Therapy: A Monte Carlo Study

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jin Sung; Kim, Daehyun; Shin, EunHyuk; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungkoo; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Ju, Sanggyu; Chung, Yoonsun; Jung, Sang Hoon; Han, Youngyih

    2015-01-01

    Two full rotating gantry with different nozzles (Multipurpose nozzle with MLC, Scanning Dedicated nozzle) with conventional cyclotron system is installed and under commissioning for various proton treatment options at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The purpose of this study is to investigate neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, to x-ray imaging equipment under various treatment conditions with monte carlo simulation. At first, we investigated H/D with the various modifications of the beam line devices (Scattering, Scanning, Multi-leaf collimator, Aperture, Compensator) at isocenter, 20, 40, 60 cm distance from isocenter and compared with other research groups. Next, we investigated the neutron dose at x-ray equipments used for real time imaging with various treatment conditions. Our investigation showed the 0.07 ~ 0.19 mSv/Gy at x-ray imaging equipments according to various treatment options and intestingly 50% neutron dose reduction effect of flat panel detector was observed due to multi- lea...

  13. A novel approach to neutron scattering instrumentation for probing multiscale dynamics in soft and biological matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamontov, Eugene

    2016-09-01

    We present a concept and ray-tracing simulation of a mechanical device that will enable inelastic neutron scattering measurements where the data at energy transfers from a few μeV to several hundred meV can be collected in a single, gapless spectrum. Besides covering 5 orders of magnitude on the energy (time) scale, the device provides data over 2 orders of magnitude on the scattering momentum (length) scale in a single measurement. Such capabilities are geared primarily toward soft and biological matter, where the broad dynamical features of relaxation origin largely overlap with vibration features, thus necessitating gapless spectral coverage over several orders of magnitude in time and space. Furthermore, neutron scattering experiments with such a device are performed with a fixed neutron final energy, which enables measurements, with neutron energy loss in the sample, at arbitrarily low temperatures over the same broad spectral range. This capability is also invaluable in biological and soft matter research, as the variable temperature dependence of different relaxation components allows their separation in the scattering spectra as a function of temperature.

  14. Quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the molecular dynamics of discotic molecules in the bulk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krause Christina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In- and quasielastic neutron scattering is employed to investigate both the vibrational density of states and the molecular dynamics of two homologous discotic liquid crystals (DLC with different length of the alkyl side chain based on a triphenylene derivate. For both compounds characteristic low frequency excess contributions to the vibrational density of states are found. Therefore it is concluded that these liquid crystals show a glass-like behaviour. Elastic scans further show that in these materials a rich molecular dynamics takes place.

  15. HEIMDAL: A thermal neutron powder diffractometer with high and flexible resolution combined with SANS and neutron imaging - Designed for materials science studies at the European Spallation Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Sonja L.; Lefmann, Kim; Henry, Paul F.; Bertelsen, Mads; Schefer, Jürg; Christensen, Mogens

    2016-08-01

    HEIMDAL will be a multi length scale neutron scattering instrument for the study of structures covering almost nine orders of magnitude from 0.01 nm to 50 mm. The instrument is accepted for construction at the European Spallation Source (ESS) and features a variable resolution thermal neutron powder diffractometer (TNPD), combined with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron imaging (NI). The instrument uses a novel combination of a cold and a thermal guide to fulfill the diverse requirements for diffraction and SANS. With an instrument length of 170 m, HEIMDAL will take advantage of the high neutron flux of the long pulse at ESS, whilst maintaining a high q-resolution due to the long flight path. The q-range coverage is up to 20 Å-1 allowing low-resolution PDF analysis. With the addition of SANS, HEIMDAL will be able to cover a uniquely broad length scale within a single instrumental set-up. HEIMDAL will be able to accommodate modern materials research in a broad variety of fields, and the task of the instrument will be to study advanced functional materials in action, as in situ and in operandi at multiple length scales (0.01-100 nm) quasi simultaneously. The instrument combines state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques (TNPD, SANS, and NI) with the goal of studying real materials, in real time, under real conditions. This article describes the instrument design ideas, calculations and results of simulations and virtual experiments.

  16. Neutron Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  17. A suggestion for B-10 imaging during boron neutron capture therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Cortesi, M

    2007-01-01

    Selective accumulation of B-10 compound in tumour tissue is a fundamental condition for the achievement of BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy), since the effectiveness of therapy irradiation derives just from neutron capture reaction of B-10. Hence, the determination of the B-10 concentration ratio, between tumour and healthy tissue, and a control of this ratio, during the therapy, are essential to optimise the effectiveness of the BNCT, which it is known to be based on the selective uptake of B-10 compound. In this work, experimental methods are proposed and evaluated for the determination in vivo of B-10 compound in biological samples, in particular based on neutron radiography and gammaray spectroscopy by telescopic system. Measures and Monte Carlo calculations have been performed to investigate the possibility of executing imaging of the 10B distribution, both by radiography with thermal neutrons, using 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillator screen and a CCD camera, and by spectroscopy, based on the revelation of gamm...

  18. Spatial resolution of a {\\mu}PIC-based neutron imaging detector

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Joseph D; Hattori, Kaori; Iwaki, Satoru; Kabuki, Shigeto; Kishimoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Hironobu; Oku, Takayuki; Sawano, Tatsuya; Shinohara, Takenao; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the spatial resolution of our time-resolved neutron imaging detector utilizing a new neutron position reconstruction method that improves both spatial resolution and event reconstruction efficiency. Our prototype detector system, employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber ({\\mu}PIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system, combines 100{\\mu}m-level spatial and sub-{\\mu}s time resolutions with excellent gamma rejection and high data rates, making it well suited for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity, pulsed neutron sources. From data taken at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility within the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), the spatial resolution was found to be approximately Gaussian with a sigma of 103.48 +/- 0.77 {\\mu}m (after correcting for beam divergence). This is a significant improvement over that achievable with our previous reconstruction method (334 +/...

  19. Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy (ESS): an Instrument-Concept for Dynamics of Complex (Bio-) Systems From Elastic Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Antonio; Kearley, Gordon J.

    2016-10-01

    A new type of neutron-scattering spectroscopy is presented that is designed specifically to measure dynamics in bio-systems that are difficult to obtain in any other way. The temporal information is largely model-free and is analogous to relaxation processes measured with dielectric spectroscopy, but provides additional spacial and geometric aspects of the underlying dynamics. Numerical simulations of the basic instrument design show the neutron beam can be highly focussed, giving efficiency gains that enable the use of small samples. Although we concentrate on continuous neutron sources, the extension to pulsed neutron sources is proposed, both requiring minimal data-treatment and being broadly analogous with dielectric spectroscopy, they will open the study of dynamics to new areas of biophysics.

  20. Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy (ESS): an Instrument-Concept for Dynamics of Complex (Bio-) Systems From Elastic Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Antonio; Kearley, Gordon J.

    2016-01-01

    A new type of neutron-scattering spectroscopy is presented that is designed specifically to measure dynamics in bio-systems that are difficult to obtain in any other way. The temporal information is largely model-free and is analogous to relaxation processes measured with dielectric spectroscopy, but provides additional spacial and geometric aspects of the underlying dynamics. Numerical simulations of the basic instrument design show the neutron beam can be highly focussed, giving efficiency gains that enable the use of small samples. Although we concentrate on continuous neutron sources, the extension to pulsed neutron sources is proposed, both requiring minimal data-treatment and being broadly analogous with dielectric spectroscopy, they will open the study of dynamics to new areas of biophysics. PMID:27703184

  1. Coherent dynamics of meta-toluidine investigated by quasielastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraone, Antonio; Hong, Kunlun; Kneller, Larry R; Ohl, Michael; Copley, John R D

    2012-03-14

    The coherent dynamics of a typical fragile glass former, meta-toluidine, was investigated at the molecular level using quasielastic neutron scattering, with time-of-flight and neutron spin echo spectrometers. It is well known that the static structure factor of meta-toluidine shows a prepeak originating from clustering of the molecules through hydrogen bonding between the amine groups. The dynamics of meta-toluidine was measured for several values of the wavevector transfer Q, which is equivalent to an inverse length scale, in a range encompassing the prepeak and the structure factor peak. Data were collected in the temperature range corresponding to the liquid and supercooled states, down to the glass transition. At least two dynamical processes were identified. This paper focuses on the slowest relaxation process in the system, the α-relaxation, which was found to scale with the macroscopic shear viscosity at all the investigated Q values. No evidence of "de Gennes" narrowing associated with the prepeak was observed, in contrast with what happens at the Q value corresponding to the interparticle distance. Moreover, using partially deuterated samples, the dynamics of the clusters was found to be correlated to the single-particle dynamics of the meta-toluidine molecules.

  2. Coherent Dynamics of meta-Toluidine Investigated by QuasiElastic Neutron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraone, Antonio [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Kneller, Larry [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Ohl, Michael E [ORNL; Copley, John R. D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD

    2012-01-01

    The coherent dynamics of a typical fragile glass former, meta-toluidine, was investigated at the molecular level using quasielastic neutron scattering, with time-of-flight and neutron spin echo spectrometers. It is well known that the static structure factor of meta-toluidine shows a prepeak originating from clustering of the molecules through hydrogen bonding between the amine groups. The dynamics of meta-toluidine was measured for several values of the wavevector transfer Q, which is equivalent to an inverse length scale, in a range encompassing the prepeak and the structure factor peak. Data were collected in the temperature range corresponding to the liquid and supercooled states, down to the glass transition. At least two dynamical processes were identified. This paper focuses on the slowest relaxation process in the system, the {alpha}-relaxation, which was found to scale with the macroscopic shear viscosity at all the investigated Q values. No evidence of 'de Gennes' narrowing associated with the prepeak was observed, in contrast with what happens at the Q value corresponding to the interparticle distance. Moreover, using partially deuterated samples, the dynamics of the clusters was found to be correlated to the single-particle dynamics of the meta-toluidine molecules.

  3. Overcoming Dynamic Disturbances in Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eric W.; Dente, Gregory C.; Lyon, Richard G.; Chesters, Dennis; Gong, Qian

    2000-01-01

    We develop and discuss a methodology with the potential to yield a significant reduction in complexity, cost, and risk of space-borne optical systems in the presence of dynamic disturbances. More robust systems almost certainly will be a result as well. Many future space-based and ground-based optical systems will employ optical control systems to enhance imaging performance. The goal of the optical control subsystem is to determine the wavefront aberrations and remove them. Ideally reducing an aberrated image of the object under investigation to a sufficiently clear (usually diffraction-limited) image. Control will likely be distributed over several elements. These elements may include telescope primary segments, telescope secondary, telescope tertiary, deformable mirror(s), fine steering mirror(s), etc. The last two elements, in particular, may have to provide dynamic control. These control subsystems may become elaborate indeed. But robust system performance will require evaluation of the image quality over a substantial range and in a dynamic environment. Candidate systems for improvement in the Earth Sciences Enterprise could include next generation Landsat systems or atmospheric sensors for dynamic imaging of individual, severe storms. The technology developed here could have a substantial impact on the development of new systems in the Space Science Enterprise; such as the Next Generation Space Telescope(NGST) and its follow-on the Next NGST. Large Interferometric Systems of non-zero field, such as Planet Finder and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure, could benefit. These systems most likely will contain large, flexible optormechanical structures subject to dynamic disturbance. Furthermore, large systems for high resolution imaging of planets or the sun from space may also benefit. Tactical and Strategic Defense systems will need to image very small targets as well and could benefit from the technology developed here. We discuss a novel

  4. Demonstration of a time-integrated short line of sight neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, R., E-mail: raspberry@lanl.gov; Danly, C.; Fatherley, V. E.; Merrill, F. E.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Christensen, K.; Fittinghoff, D.; Grim, G. P.; Izumi, N.; Jedlovec, D.; Skulina, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is an important diagnostic for understanding implosions of deuterium-tritium capsules at the National Ignition Facility. While the detectors for the existing system must be positioned 28 m from the source to produce sufficient imaging magnification and resolution, recent testing of a new short line of sight neutron imaging system has shown sufficient resolution to allow reconstruction of the source image with quality similar to that of the existing NIS on a 11.6 m line of sight. The new system used the existing pinhole aperture array and a stack of detectors composed of 2 mm thick high-density polyethylene converter material followed by an image plate. In these detectors, neutrons enter the converter material and interact with protons, which recoil and deposit energy within the thin active layer of the image plate through ionization losses. The described system produces time-integrated images for all neutron energies passing through the pinhole. We present details of the measurement scheme for this novel technique to produce energy-integrated neutron images as well as source reconstruction results from recent experiments at NIF.

  5. Demonstration of a time-integrated short line of sight neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R.; Christensen, K.; Danly, C.; Fatherley, V. E.; Fittinghoff, D.; Grim, G. P.; Izumi, N.; Jedlovec, D.; Merrill, F. E.; Skulina, K.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is an important diagnostic for understanding implosions of deuterium-tritium capsules at the National Ignition Facility. While the detectors for the existing system must be positioned 28 m from the source to produce sufficient imaging magnification and resolution, recent testing of a new short line of sight neutron imaging system has shown sufficient resolution to allow reconstruction of the source image with quality similar to that of the existing NIS on a 11.6 m line of sight. The new system used the existing pinhole aperture array and a stack of detectors composed of 2 mm thick high-density polyethylene converter material followed by an image plate. In these detectors, neutrons enter the converter material and interact with protons, which recoil and deposit energy within the thin active layer of the image plate through ionization losses. The described system produces time-integrated images for all neutron energies passing through the pinhole. We present details of the measurement scheme for this novel technique to produce energy-integrated neutron images as well as source reconstruction results from recent experiments at NIF.

  6. Enhanced Analysis Techniques for an Imaging Neutron and Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Amanda C.

    The presence of gamma rays and neutrons is a strong indicator of the presence of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). The imaging Neutron and gamma ray SPECTrometer (NSPECT) developed by the University of New Hampshire and Michigan Aerospace corporation detects the fast neutrons and prompt gamma rays from fissile material, and the gamma rays from radioactive material. The instrument operates as a double scatter device, requiring a neutron or a gamma ray to interact twice in the instrument. While this detection requirement decreases the efficiency of the instrument, it offers superior background rejection and the ability to measure the energy and momentum of the incident particle. These measurements create energy spectra and images of the emitting source for source identification and localization. The dual species instrument provides superior detection than a single species alone. In realistic detection scenarios, few particles are detected from a potential threat due to source shielding, detection at a distance, high background, and weak sources. This contributes to a small signal to noise ratio, and threat detection becomes difficult. To address these difficulties, several enhanced data analysis tools were developed. A Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (ROC) helps set instrumental alarm thresholds as well as to identify the presence of a source. Analysis of a dual-species ROC curve provides superior detection capabilities. Bayesian analysis helps to detect and identify the presence of a source through model comparisons, and helps create a background corrected count spectra for enhanced spectroscopy. Development of an instrument response using simulations and numerical analyses will help perform spectra and image deconvolution. This thesis will outline the principles of operation of the NSPECT instrument using the double scatter technology, traditional analysis techniques, and enhanced analysis techniques as applied to data from the NSPECT instrument, and an

  7. Dynamic Image Stitching for Panoramic Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Yu Shieh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The design of this paper is based on the Dynamic image titching for panoramic video. By utilizing OpenCV visual function data library and SIFT algorithm as the basis for presentation, this article brings forward Gaussian second differenced MoG which is processed basing on DoG Gaussian Difference Map to reduce order in synthesizing dynamic images and simplify the algorithm of the Gaussian pyramid structure. MSIFT matches with overlapping segmentation method to simplify the scope of feature extraction in order to enhance speed. And through this method traditional image synthesis can be improved without having to take lots of time in calculation and being limited by space and angle. This research uses four normal Webcams and two IPCAM coupled with several-wide angle lenses. By using wide-angle lenses to monitor over a wide range of an area and then by using image stitching panoramic effect is achieved. In terms of overall image application and control interface, Microsoft Visual Studio C# is adopted to a construct software interface. On a personal computer with 2.4-GHz CPU and 2-GB RAM and with the cameras fixed to it, the execution speed is three images per second, which reduces calculation time of the traditional algorithm.

  8. Elastic neutron scattering study of water dynamics in ion-exchanged type-A zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, C; Crupi, V; Longo, F; Majolino, D; Venuti, V; Wanderlingh, U

    2005-12-01

    With the aim to investigate, by means of elastic neutron scattering, the effects produced by the cation substitution on the dynamics of water in zeolites, we measured, using a neutron backscattering spectrometer, the temperature dependence of mean-square atomic displacements [u2] derived from window integrated quasielastic spectra of fully and partially hydrated Na-A and Mg50-A zeolites. The results, collected in the 20-273 K temperature range, reveal that, at low temperature, the [u2] shows a harmonic trend independent of hydration and cation substitution, and, at higher temperatures, the onset of a non-Gaussian dynamics of the elastic intensity. This latter takes place at T approximately 200 K and approximately 150 K for fully and partially hydrated samples, respectively. This behavior has been interpreted in terms of reorientational jumps of H atoms described by two-site processes within an asymmetric double-minimum potential. In spite of its simplicity, the model seems to reproduce the rearrangement of the hydrogen bond network of zeolitic water. The fit results indicate a reduced proton mobility by diminishing the water content and by the induced Na+-->Mg2+ ion exchange, in agreement with previous incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering results at higher temperatures.

  9. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies on dynamics of water confined in nanoporous copper rubeanate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Yonamine, Ryo; Yamada, Teppei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Nagao, Michihiro; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2011-11-24

    We have investigated the mechanism of the first order transition and proton conductivity in copper rubeanate hydrates from microscopic and dynamical points of view. Three different types of neutron spectrometer-time-of-flight, backscattering, and neutron spin echo-were used to cover a wide dynamic range (1 ps to 100 ns). We found that the water molecules adsorbed in the pore are divided into "free water" having diffusion coefficients similar to those of bulk water at room temperature and "condensed water" which is about 10 times slower than bulk water owing to the interaction with the pore wall. The hydrogen atoms in the pore wall exhibited no relaxation within the measured time scales. The free water has, in the framework of the jump-diffusion model, smaller activation energy, longer residence time, and longer jump distance than bulk water. The neutron spin echo measurement revealed that the first order transition is a kind of liquid-liquid transition at which the free water is condensed on the pore surface in the low temperature phase. On cooling the condensed water, the relaxation time starts to deviate from the VFT equation around 200 K as previously observed in the water confined in nanoporous silicates. The free water plays an important role as the proton carrier but the proton conductivity is mainly governed by the number of protons provided into the adsorbed water from the pore wall.

  10. Microscopic dynamics simulations of heavy-ion fusion reactions induced by neutron-rich nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yingxun; Li, Zhuxia

    2014-01-01

    The heavy-ion fusion reactions induced by neutron-rich nuclei are investigated with the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model. With a subtle consideration of the neutron skin thickness of nuclei and the symmetry potential, the stability of nuclei and the fusion excitation functions of heavy-ion fusion reactions $^{16}$O+$^{76}$Ge, $^{16}$O+$^{154}$Sm, $^{40}$Ca+$^{96}$Zr and $^{132}$Sn+$^{40}$Ca are systematically studied. The fusion cross sections of these reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier can be well reproduced by using the ImQMD model. The corresponding slope parameter of the symmetry energy adopted in the calculations is $L \\approx 78$ MeV and the surface energy coefficient is $g_{\\rm sur}=18\\pm 1.5$ MeVfm$^2$. In addition, it is found that the surface-symmetry term significantly influences the fusion cross sections of neutron-rich fusion systems. For sub-barrier fusion, the dynamical fluctuations in the densities of the reaction partners and the enhanced surface diffuseness at ...

  11. High-frame rate, fast neutron imaging of two-phase flow in a thin rectangular channel

    CERN Document Server

    Zboray, R; Dangendorf, V; Stark, M; Tittelmeier, K; Cortesi, M; Adams, R

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of performing high-frame-rate, fast neutron radiography of air-water two-phase flows in a thin channel with rectangular cross section. The experiments have been carried out at the accelerator facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. A polychromatic, high-intensity fast neutron beam with average energy of 6 MeV was produced by 11.5 MeV deuterons hitting a thick Be target. Image sequences down to 10 millisecond exposure times were obtained using a fast-neutron imaging detector developed in the context of fast-neutron resonance imaging. Different two-phase flow regimes such as bubbly slug and churn flows have been examined. Two phase flow parameters like the volumetric gas fraction, bubble size and bubble velocities have been measured. The first results are promising, improvements for future experiments are also discussed.

  12. Probing Dynamics at Interfaces: Molecular Motions in Lipid Bilayers studied by Neutron Backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rheinstädter, M C; Salditt, T; Rheinst\\"adter, Maikel C.; Seydel, Tilo; Salditt, Tim

    2004-01-01

    Lipid membranes in a physiological context cannot be understood without taking into account their mobile environment. Here, we report on a high energy-resolution neutron backscattering study to investigate slow motions on nanosecond time scales in highly oriented solid supported phospholipid bilayers of the model system DMPC -d54 (deuterated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phoshatidylcholine). This technique allows discriminating the Q-dependent onset of mobility and provides a benchmark test regarding the feasibility of dynamical neutron scattering investigations on these sample systems. Apart from freezing of the lipid acyl-chains, we could observe a second freezing temperature that we attribute to the hydration water in between the membrane stacks. The freezing is lowered several degrees as compared to (heavy) bulk water.

  13. Global ENA Imaging of Earth's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between singly charged ions of Earth's magnetosphere and its neutral exosphere and upper atmosphere gives rise to Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs). This has enabled several missions to remotely image the global injection dynamics of the ring current and plasma sheet, the outflow of ions from Earth's polar regions, and the location of the sub-solar magnetopause. In this presentation we review ENA observations by the Astrid, IMAGE, TWINS and IBEX missions. We focus on results from the IMAGE/HENA Camera including observations of proton and oxygen ion injections in to the ring current and their impact on the force-balance and ionospheric coupling in the inner magnetosphere. We report also on the status of inversion techniques for retrieving the ion spatial and pitch-angle distributions from ENA images. The presentation concludes with a discussion of future next steps in ENA instrumentation and analysis capabilities required to deliver the science as recommended by the Heliophysics Decadal Survey.

  14. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Martin O

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation.

  15. Energy-dispersive neutron imaging and diffraction of magnetically driven twins in a Ni2MnGa single crystal magnetic shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabra, Saurabh; Kelleher, Joe; Kockelmann, Winfried; Gutmann, Matthias; Tremsin, Anton

    2016-09-01

    Single crystals of a partially twinned magnetic shape memory alloy, Ni2MnGa, were imaged using neutron diffraction and energy-resolved imaging techniques at the ISIS spallation neutron source. Single crystal neutron diffraction showed that the crystal produces two twin variants with a specific crystallographic relationship. Transmission images were captured using a time of flight MCP/Timepix neutron counting detector. The twinned and untwinned regions were clearly distinguishable in images corresponding to narrow-energy transmission images. Further, the spatially-resolved transmission spectra were used to elucidate the orientations of the crystallites in the different volumes of the crystal.

  16. Genetic algorithms applied to reconstructing coded imaging of neutrons and analysis of residual watermark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiankui; Hu, Huasi; Jia, Qinggang; Zhang, Fengna; Chen, Da; Li, Zhenghong; Wu, Yuelei; Liu, Zhihua; Hu, Guang; Guo, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Monte-Carlo simulation of neutron coded imaging based on encoding aperture for Z-pinch of large field-of-view with 5 mm radius has been investigated, and then the coded image has been obtained. Reconstruction method of source image based on genetic algorithms (GA) has been established. "Residual watermark," which emerges unavoidably in reconstructed image, while the peak normalization is employed in GA fitness calculation because of its statistical fluctuation amplification, has been discovered and studied. Residual watermark is primarily related to the shape and other parameters of the encoding aperture cross section. The properties and essential causes of the residual watermark were analyzed, while the identification on equivalent radius of aperture was provided. By using the equivalent radius, the reconstruction can also be accomplished without knowing the point spread function (PSF) of actual aperture. The reconstruction result is close to that by using PSF of the actual aperture.

  17. Genetic algorithms applied to reconstructing coded imaging of neutrons and analysis of residual watermark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Tiankui; Hu Huasi; Jia Qinggang; Zhang Fengna; Liu Zhihua; Hu Guang; Guo Wei [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Chen Da [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Li Zhenghong [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, CAEP, Mianyang, 621900 Sichuan (China); Wu Yuelei [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Nuclear and Radiation Safety Centre, State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA), Beijing 100082 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Monte-Carlo simulation of neutron coded imaging based on encoding aperture for Z-pinch of large field-of-view with 5 mm radius has been investigated, and then the coded image has been obtained. Reconstruction method of source image based on genetic algorithms (GA) has been established. 'Residual watermark,' which emerges unavoidably in reconstructed image, while the peak normalization is employed in GA fitness calculation because of its statistical fluctuation amplification, has been discovered and studied. Residual watermark is primarily related to the shape and other parameters of the encoding aperture cross section. The properties and essential causes of the residual watermark were analyzed, while the identification on equivalent radius of aperture was provided. By using the equivalent radius, the reconstruction can also be accomplished without knowing the point spread function (PSF) of actual aperture. The reconstruction result is close to that by using PSF of the actual aperture.

  18. Simultaneous neutron and x-ray imaging of inertial confinement fusion experiments along a single line of sight at Omega

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danly, C. R.; Day, T. H.; Herrmann, H.; Kim, Y. H.; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Schmidt, D. W.; Simpson, R. A.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Fittinghoff, D. N.; Izumi, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Neutron and x-ray imaging provide critical information about the geometry and hydrodynamics of inertial confinement fusion implosions. However, existing diagnostics at Omega and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) cannot produce images in both neutrons and x-rays along the same line of sight. This leads to difficulty comparing these images, which capture different parts of the plasma geometry, for the asymmetric implosions seen in present experiments. Further, even when opposing port neutron and x-ray images are available, they use different detectors and cannot provide positive information about the relative positions of the neutron and x-ray sources. A technique has been demonstrated on implosions at Omega that can capture x-ray images along the same line of sight as the neutron images. The technique is described, and data from a set of experiments are presented, along with a discussion of techniques for coregistration of the various images. It is concluded that the technique is viable and could provide valuable information if implemented on NIF in the near future.

  19. NIPS–NORMA station—A combined facility for neutron-based nondestructive element analysis and imaging at the Budapest Neutron Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kis, Zoltán, E-mail: kis.zoltan@energia.mta.hu; Szentmiklósi, László; Belgya, Tamás

    2015-04-11

    Neutron attenuation, scattering or radiative capture are used in various non-destructive methods to gain morphological, structural, elemental or isotopic information about the sample under study. The combined use of position-sensitive prompt gamma-ray detection (i.e. prompt gamma-ray activation imaging, PGAI) and neutron radiography/tomography (NR/NT) makes it possible to determine the 3D distribution of major elements and to visualize internal structures of heterogeneous objects in a non-destructive way. Based on earlier experience, the first ever permanent facility for this purpose, NIPS–NORMA, was constructed at the Budapest Neutron Centre, Hungary in 2012. The installation consists of a well-shielded, Compton-suppressed HPGe detector; a CCD-camera based imaging equipment and a motorized positioning system with sample support. Conventional PGAA measurements and NR/NT imaging using guided cold neutrons are the basic methods that form the basis of the more sophisticated experimental method called NR/NT-driven PGAI. The current status of the experimental station and its characteristics are described in the present paper.

  20. Image Classifying Registration and Dynamic Region Merging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himadri Nath Moulick

    2013-07-01

    account spatial variations of intensity dependencies while keeping a good registration accuracy. And the addresses the automatic image segmentation problem in a region merging style. With an initially over-segmented image, in which the many regions (or super-pixels with homogeneous color aredetected, image segmentation is performed by iteratively merging the regions according to a statistical test. There are two essential issues in a region merging algorithm: order of merging and the stopping criterion. In the proposed algorithm, these two issues are solved by a novel predicate, which is defined by the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT and the minimal cost criterion. Starting from an over-segmented image, neighboring regions are progressively merged if there is an evidence for merging according to this predicate. We show that the merging order follows the principle of dynamic programming. This formulates image segmentation as an inference problem, where the final segmentation is established based on the observed image. We also prove that the produced segmentation satisfies certain global properties. In addition, a faster algorithm is developed to accelerate the region merging process, which maintains a nearest neighbor graph (NNG in each iteration. Experiments on real natural images are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed dynamic region merging algorithm.

  1. Development of neutron imaging quantitative data treatment to assess conservation products in cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realini, Marco; Colombo, Chiara; Conti, Claudia; Grazzi, Francesco; Perelli Cippo, Enrico; Hovind, Jan

    2017-08-14

    Distribution, penetration depth and amount of new mineralogical phases formed after the interaction between an inorganic treatment and a matrix are key factors for the evaluation of the conservation treatment behaviour. Nowadays, the conventional analytical methodologies, such as vibrational spectroscopies, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, provide only qualitative and spot information. Here, we report, for the first time, the proof of concept of a methodology based on neutron imaging able to achieve quantitative data useful to assess the formation of calcium oxalate in a porous carbonatic stone treated with ammonium oxalate. Starting from the neutron attenuation coefficient of Noto stone-treated specimens, the concentrations of newly formed calcium oxalate and the diffusion coefficient have been calculated for both sound and decayed substrates. These outcomes have been also used for a comparative study between different treatment modalities. Graphical abstract Horizontal slice at 300 mm depth and CaOx molar density profile by NEUTRA output.

  2. Neutron Imaging for Selective Laser Melting Inconel Hardware with Internal Passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramel, Terri L.; Norwood, Joseph K.; Bilheux, Hassina

    2014-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing is showing great promise for the development of new innovative designs and large potential life cycle cost reduction for the Aerospace Industry. However, more development work is required to move this technology into space flight hardware production. With selective laser melting (SLM), hardware that once consisted of multiple, carefully machined and inspected pieces, joined together can be made in one part. However standard inspection techniques cannot be used to verify that the internal passages are within dimensional tolerances or surface finish requirements. NASA/MSFC traveled to Oak Ridge National Lab's (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source to perform some non-destructive, proof of concept imaging measurements to assess the capabilities to understand internal dimensional tolerances and internal passages surface roughness. This presentation will describe 1) the goals of this proof of concept testing, 2) the lessons learned when designing and building these Inconel 718 test specimens to minimize beam time, 3) the neutron imaging test setup and test procedure to get the images, 4) the initial results in images, volume and a video, 4) the assessment of using this imaging technique to gather real data for designing internal flow passages in SLM manufacturing aerospace hardware, and lastly 5) how proper cleaning of the internal passages is critically important. In summary, the initial results are very promising and continued development of a technique to assist in SLM development for aerospace components is desired by both NASA and ORNL. A plan forward that benefits both ORNL and NASA will also be presented, based on the promising initial results. The initial images and volume reconstruction showed that clean, clear images of the internal passages geometry are obtainable. These clear images of the internal passages of simple geometries will be compared to the build model to determine any differences. One surprising result was that a new cleaning

  3. High dynamic range imaging sensors and architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Darmont, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Illumination is a crucial element in many applications, matching the luminance of the scene with the operational range of a camera. When luminance cannot be adequately controlled, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system may be necessary. These systems are being increasingly used in automotive on-board systems, road traffic monitoring, and other industrial, security, and military applications. This book provides readers with an intermediate discussion of HDR image sensors and techniques for industrial and non-industrial applications. It describes various sensor and pixel architectures capable

  4. Image processing analysis of nuclear track parameters for CR-39 detector irradiated by thermal neutron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jobouri, Hussain A.; Rajab, Mustafa Y.

    2016-03-01

    CR-39 detector which covered with boric acid (H3Bo3) pellet was irradiated by thermal neutrons from (241Am - 9Be) source with activity 12Ci and neutron flux 105 n. cm-2. s-1. The irradiation times -TD for detector were 4h, 8h, 16h and 24h. Chemical etching solution for detector was sodium hydroxide NaOH, 6.25N with 45 min etching time and 60 C˚ temperature. Images of CR-39 detector after chemical etching were taken from digital camera which connected from optical microscope. MATLAB software version 7.0 was used to image processing. The outputs of image processing of MATLAB software were analyzed and found the following relationships: (a) The irradiation time -TD has behavior linear relationships with following nuclear track parameters: i) total track number - NT ii) maximum track number - MRD (relative to track diameter - DT) at response region range 2.5 µm to 4 µm iii) maximum track number - MD (without depending on track diameter - DT). (b) The irradiation time -TD has behavior logarithmic relationship with maximum track number - MA (without depending on track area - AT). The image processing technique principally track diameter - DT can be take into account to classification of α-particle emitters, In addition to the contribution of these technique in preparation of nano- filters and nano-membrane in nanotechnology fields.

  5. A wide dynamic range BF 3 neutron monitor with front-end electronics based on a logarithmic amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrarini, M.; Varoli, V.; Favalli, A.; Caresana, M.; Pedersen, B.

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a wide dynamic range neutron monitor based on a BF 3 neutron detector. The detector is used in current mode, and front-end electronics based on a logarithmic amplifier are used in order to have a measurement capability ranging over many orders of magnitude. The system has been calibrated at the Polytechnic of Milan, CESNEF, with an AmBe neutron source, and has been tested in a pulsed field at the PUNITA facility at JRC, Ispra. The detector has achieved a dynamic range of over 6 orders of magnitude, being able to measure single neutron pulses and showing saturation-free response for a reaction rate up to 10 6 s -1. It has also proved effective in measuring the PUNITA facility pulse integral fluence.

  6. A wide dynamic range BF{sub 3} neutron monitor with front-end electronics based on a logarithmic amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrarini, M., E-mail: michele.ferrarini@polimi.i [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento Energia, via G. Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Fondazione CNAO, via Caminadella 16, 20123 Milano (Italy); Varoli, V. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento Energia, via G. Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Favalli, A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and Security of Citizen, TP 800, Via E. Fermi, 21027 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy); Caresana, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento Energia, via G. Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Pedersen, B. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and Security of Citizen, TP 800, Via E. Fermi, 21027 Ispra (Italy)

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a wide dynamic range neutron monitor based on a BF{sub 3} neutron detector. The detector is used in current mode, and front-end electronics based on a logarithmic amplifier are used in order to have a measurement capability ranging over many orders of magnitude. The system has been calibrated at the Polytechnic of Milan, CESNEF, with an AmBe neutron source, and has been tested in a pulsed field at the PUNITA facility at JRC, Ispra. The detector has achieved a dynamic range of over 6 orders of magnitude, being able to measure single neutron pulses and showing saturation-free response for a reaction rate up to 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. It has also proved effective in measuring the PUNITA facility pulse integral fluence.

  7. Modeling the dynamics of tidally-interacting binary neutron stars up to merger

    CERN Document Server

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Dietrich, Tim; Damour, Thibault

    2014-01-01

    We propose an effective-one-body (EOB) model that describes the general relativistic dynamics of neutron star binaries from the early inspiral up to merger. Our EOB model incorporates an enhanced attractive tidal potential motivated by recent analytical advances in the post-Newtonian and gravitational self-force description of relativistic tidal interactions. No fitting parameters are introduced for the description of tidal interaction in the late, strong-field dynamics. We compare the model dynamics (described by the gauge invariant relation between binding energy and orbital angular momentum), and the gravitational wave phasing, with new high-resolution multi-orbit numerical relativity simulations of equal-mass configurations with different equations of state. We find agreement essentially within the uncertainty of the numerical data for all the configurations. Our model is the first semi-analytical model which captures the tidal amplification effects close to merger. It thereby provides the most accurate a...

  8. GPU-based prompt gamma ray imaging from boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suk Suh, Tae, E-mail: suhsanta@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 505 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jo Hong, Key [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Sil Lee, Keum [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to perform the fast reconstruction of a prompt gamma ray image using a graphics processing unit (GPU) computation from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) simulations. Methods: To evaluate the accuracy of the reconstructed image, a phantom including four boron uptake regions (BURs) was used in the simulation. After the Monte Carlo simulation of the BNCT, the modified ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm using the GPU computation was used to reconstruct the images with fewer projections. The computation times for image reconstruction were compared between the GPU and the central processing unit (CPU). Also, the accuracy of the reconstructed image was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The image reconstruction time using the GPU was 196 times faster than the conventional reconstruction time using the CPU. For the four BURs, the area under curve values from the ROC curve were 0.6726 (A-region), 0.6890 (B-region), 0.7384 (C-region), and 0.8009 (D-region). Conclusions: The tomographic image using the prompt gamma ray event from the BNCT simulation was acquired using the GPU computation in order to perform a fast reconstruction during treatment. The authors verified the feasibility of the prompt gamma ray image reconstruction using the GPU computation for BNCT simulations.

  9. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  10. Motility Contrast Imaging and Tissue Dynamics Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, David D.; An, Ran; Turek, John

    Motion is the defining physiological characteristic of living matter. If we are interested in how things function, then the way they move is most informative. Motion provides an endogenous and functional suite of biomarkers that are sensitive to subtle changes that occur under applied pharmacological doses or cellular stresses. This chapter reviews the application of biodynamic imaging to measure cellular dynamics in three-dimensional tissue culture for drug screening applications. Nanoscale and microscale motions are detected through statistical fluctuations in dynamic speckle across an ensemble of cells within each resolution voxel. Tissue dynamics spectroscopy generates drug-response spectrograms that serve as phenotypic fingerprints of drug action and can differentiate responses from heterogeneous regions of tumor tissue.

  11. R-Process Nucleosynthesis in Dynamically Ejected Matter of Neutron Star Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Goriely, Stephane; Janka, H -Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Although the rapid neutron-capture process, or r-process, is fundamentally important for explaining the origin of approximately half of the stable nuclei with A > 60, the astrophysical site of this process has not been identified yet. Here we study r-process nucleosynthesis in material that is dynamically ejected by tidal and pressure forces during the merging of binary neutron stars (NSs) and within milliseconds afterwards. For the first time we make use of relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of such events, defining consistently the conditions that determine the nucleosynthesis, i.e., neutron enrichment, entropy, early density evolution and thus expansion timescale, and ejecta mass. We find that 10^{-3}-10^{-2} solar masses are ejected, which is enough for mergers to be the main source of heavy (A > 140) galactic r-nuclei for merger rates of some 10^{-5} per year. While asymmetric mergers eject 2-3 times more mass than symmetric ones, the exact amount depends weakly on whether the NSs have radii of ~15 ...

  12. Low Resolution Structure and Dynamics of a Colicin-Receptor Complex Determined by Neutron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Luke A [ORNL; Johnson, Christopher L [ORNL; Solovyova, Alexandra [University of Newcastle upon Tyne; Callow, Phil [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Weiss, Kevin L [ORNL; Ridley, Helen [University of Newcastle upon Tyne; Le Brun, Anton P [ORNL; Kinane, Christian [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Webster, John [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Holt, Stephen A [ORNL; Lakey, Jeremy H [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Proteins that translocate across cell membranes need to overcome a significant hydrophobic barrier. This is usually accomplished via specialized protein complexes, which provide a polar transmembrane pore. Exceptions to this include bacterial toxins, which insert into and cross the lipid bilayer itself. We are studying the mechanism by which large antibacterial proteins enter Escherichia coli via specific outer membrane proteins. Here we describe the use of neutron scattering to investigate the interaction of colicin N with its outer membrane receptor protein OmpF. The positions of lipids, colicin N, and OmpF were separately resolved within complex structures by the use of selective deuteration. Neutron reflectivity showed, in real time, that OmpF mediates the insertion of colicin N into lipid monolayers. This data were complemented by Brewster Angle Microscopy images, which showed a lateral association of OmpF in the presence of colicin N. Small angle neutron scattering experiments then defined the three-dimensional structure of the colicin N-OmpF complex. This revealed that colicin N unfolds and binds to the OmpF-lipid interface. The implications of this unfolding step for colicin translocation across membranes are discussed.

  13. Methyl group dynamics in a glass and its crystalline counterpart by neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno, A J; Colmenero, J; Frick, B

    2002-01-01

    Methyl group dynamics in the same sample of sodium acetate trihydrate in crystalline and glassy states have been investigated by neutron scattering. Measurements have been carried out in the whole temperature range covering the crossover from rotational tunneling to classical hopping. The results in the crystalline sample have been analyzed according to the usual single-particle model, while those in the glass were analyzed in terms of a broad Gaussian distribution of single-particle potentials, with a standard deviation of 205 K. The average barrier in the glass (417 K) takes, within the experimental error, the same value as the unique barrier in the crystal. (orig.)

  14. Inspection of the metal composite materials using a combination of X-ray radiography and Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavrik, D [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, CZ 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Jeon, I [School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lehmann, E; Kaestner, A [Paul Scherrer Institut, Neutron Imaging and Activation Group, WBBA/110 , CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Vacik, J, E-mail: vavrik@itam.cas.cz [Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR and Research Center Rez CZ-25068 (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-01

    Neutron Imaging and X-ray radiography are complementary methods from the point of view of the visibility and contrast of the material imaged. One potential application is the observation of the behavior of so-called 'metal composite materials', in which metallic and light material parts are combined. This material type is commonly used in the aerospace industry. Neutron Imaging is a suitable tool for the observation of the structure of light materials in an environment of heavier elements like metals. X-ray radiography on other hand is an appropriate tool for the observation of geometry of metal components inside an environment of lighter materials.

  15. A neutron image plate quasi-Laue diffractometer for protein crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cipriani, F.; Castagna, J.C.; Wilkinson, C. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble (France)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    An instrument which is based on image plate technology has been constructed to perform cold neutron Laue crystallography on protein structures. The crystal is mounted at the center of a cylindrical detector which is 400mm long and has a circumference of 1000mm, with gadolinium oxide-containing image plates mounted on its exterior surface. Laue images registered on the plate are read out by rotating the drum and translating a laser read head parallel to the cylinder axis, giving a pixel size of 200{mu}m x 200{mu}m and a total read time of 5 minutes. Preliminary results indicate that it should be possible to obtain a complete data set from a protein crystal to atomic resolution in about two weeks.

  16. Neutron, fluorescence, and optical imaging: An in situ combination of complementary techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, D.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Hermes, H. E. [Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Heinrich Heine University, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Börgardts, M.; Müller, T. J. J. [Institute for Organic and Macromolecular Chemistry, Heinrich Heine University, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Grünzweig, C.; Lehmann, E. [Neutron Imaging and Activation Group, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    An apparatus which enables the simultaneous combination of three complementary imaging techniques, optical imaging, fluorescence imaging, and neutron radiography, is presented. While each individual technique can provide information on certain aspects of the sample and their time evolution, a combination of the three techniques in one setup provides a more complete and consistent data set. The setup can be used in transmission and reflection modes and thus with optically transparent as well as opaque samples. Its capabilities are illustrated with two examples. A polymer hydrogel represents a transparent sample and the diffusion of fluorescent particles into and through this polymer matrix is followed. In reflection mode, the absorption of solvent by a nile red-functionalized mesoporous silica powder and the corresponding change in fluorescent signal are studied.

  17. Combined Neutron and X-ray Imaging for Non-invasive Investigations of Cultural Heritage Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannes, D.; Schmid, F.; Frey, J.; Schmidt-Ott, K.; Lehmann, E.

    The combined utilization of neutron and X-ray imaging for non-invasive investigations of cultural heritage objects is demonstrated on the example of a short sword found a few years ago in lake Zug, Switzerland. After conservation treatments carried out at the Swiss National Museum the sword was examined at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (CH), by means of neutron and X-ray computer tomography (CT). The two types of radiation show different interaction behavior with matter, which makes the two methods complementary. While X-rays show a strong correlation of the attenuation with the atomic number, neutrons demonstrate a high sensitivity for some light elements, such as Hydrogen and thus organic material, while some heavy elements (such as Lead) show high penetrability. The examined object is a composite of metal and organic material, which makes it an ideal example to show the complementarity of the two methods as it features materials, which are rather transparent for one type of radiation, while yielding at the same time high contrast for the other. Only the combination of the two methods made an exhaustive examination of the object possible and allowed to rebuild an accurate replica of the sword.

  18. Alternatives to argon for gas stopping volumes in the B194 neutron imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleuel, D. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anderson, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Caggiano, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hall, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ratkiewicz, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rusnak, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-17

    In a recent experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the 40Ar(d,p)41Ar excitation function between 3-7 MeV was measured, confirming a previous estimation that there may be an intolerable radiation dose from 41Ar production by slowing to rest 6.74 MeV deuterons in the gas cell of the neutron imaging facility being constructed in B194. Gas alternatives to argon are considered, including helium, nitrogen (N2), neon, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), krypton, and xenon, as well as high atomic number solid backings such as tantalum.

  19. Energy-selective neutron imaging with high spatial resolution and its impact on the study of crystalline-structured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, E. H.; Peetermans, S.; Josic, L.; Leber, H.; van Swygenhoven, H.

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline-structured materials with preferentially large grains were investigated by means of energy-selective neutron imaging methods (transmission radiography and tomography) under the conditions of the best possible spatial resolution at the ICON facility, SINQ, and PSI. Because of the cold spectrum at that beam line, access to the Bragg diffraction features was possible even when the energy resolution of the used selector device was only 15%. Grains with a size below the detector resolution (approximately 25 μm) are not visible, and a quasi-homogeneous contrast variation is found when the neutron energy is varied.In the cases of welded stainless steel samples and rolled Al plates, we obtained structural information from a very short exposure of approximately 60 s. Tomographic examinations of these samples at suitable neutron energies qualitatively verified the radiographic findings by showing the same features in the bulk. Comparison to common electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) investigations in selected regions of the samples provided a complete verification of the neutron-image data with respect to the grain size and the different grain orientations. The method of energy-selective neutron imaging provides an easy and straightforward approach for non-invasive material research that can be performed without any sample preparation if the most suitable neutron energy is chosen. Further studies will be necessary to extend the experimental data base to other materials with different crystal structures and grain sizes. A comparison to diffraction data will enhance the quantitative value of the investigations.

  20. The functional role of protein dynamics in photosynthetic reaction centers investigated by elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieper Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This short review summarizes our current knowledge about the functional relevance of protein dynamics in photosynthetic reaction centers. In the case of Photosystem II membrane fragments, elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering experiments reveal a dynamical transition at about 240 K corresponding to the activation of picosecond molecular motions. Likewise, a “freezing” of molecular dynamics is observed upon dehydration. Intriguingly, these effects correlate with the pronounced temperature- and hydration-dependence of specific electron transfer steps in Photosystem II indicating that molecular dynamics is an indispensable prerequisite for its function. Thus, electron transfer in Photosystem II appears to be a prototypical example for a dynamics-function correlation. Finally, the laser-neutron pump-probe technique is shown to permit in-situ monitoring of molecular dynamics in specific functional states of a protein in real time.

  1. Computing dynamic classification images from correlation maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongjing; Liu, Zili

    2006-05-22

    We used Pearson's correlation to compute dynamic classification images of biological motion in a point-light display. Observers discriminated whether a human figure that was embedded in dynamic white Gaussian noise was walking forward or backward. Their responses were correlated with the Gaussian noise fields frame by frame, across trials. The resultant correlation map gave rise to a sequence of dynamic classification images that were clearer than either the standard method of A. J. Ahumada and J. Lovell (1971) or the optimal weighting method of R. F. Murray, P. J. Bennett, and A. B. Sekuler (2002). Further, the correlation coefficients of all the point lights were similar to each other when overlapping pixels between forward and backward walkers were excluded. This pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that the point-light walker is represented in a global manner, as opposed to a fixed subset of point lights being more important than others. We conjecture that the superior performance of the correlation map may reflect inherent nonlinearities in processing biological motion, which are incompatible with the assumptions underlying the previous methods.

  2. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.

  3. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.

  4. Small-angle neutron and dynamic light scattering study of gelatin coacervates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, B.; Aswal, V. K.; Goyal, P. S.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2004-08-01

    The state of intermolecular aggregates and that of folded gelatin molecules could be characterized by dynamic laser light and small-angle neutron scattering experiments, which implied spontaneous segregation of particle sizes preceding coacervation, which is a liquid-liquid phase transition phenomenon. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) data analysis revealed two particle sizes until precipitation was reached. The smaller particles having a diameter of 50 nm (stable nanoparticles prepared by coacervation method) were detected in the supernatant, whereas the inter-molecular aggregates having a diameter of 400 nm gave rise to coacervation. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments revealed that typical mesh size of the networks exist in polymer dense phase (coacervates) [1]. Analysis of the SANS structure factor showed the presence of two length scales associated with this system that were identified as the correlation length or mesh size, xi = 10.6 Å of the network and the other is the size of inhomogeneities = 21.4 Å. Observations were discussed based on the results obtained from SANS experiments performed in 5% (w/v) gelatin solution at 60oC (xi = 50 Å, zeta = 113 Å) and 5% (w/v) gel at 28oC (xi = 47 Å, zeta = 115 Å) in aqueous phase [2] indicating smaller length scales in coacervate as compared to sol and gel.

  5. Life at extreme conditions: Neutron scattering studies of biological molecules suggest that evolution selected dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joseph (Giuseppe) Zaccai

    2008-10-01

    The short review concentrates on recent work performed at the neutrons in biology laboratories of the Institut Laue Langevin and Institut de Biologie Structurale in Grenoble. Extremophile organisms have been discovered that require extreme conditions of temperature, pressure or solvent environment for survival. The existence of such organisms poses a significant challenge in understanding the physical chemistry of their proteins, in view of the great sensitivity of protein structure and stability to the aqueous environment and to external conditions in general. Results of neutron scattering measurements on the dynamics of proteins from extremophile organisms, in vitro as well as in vivo, indicated remarkably how adaptation to extreme conditions involves forces and fluctuation amplitudes that have been selected specifically, suggesting that evolutionary macromolecular selection proceeded via dynamics. The experiments were performed on a halophilic protein, and membrane adapted to high salt, a thermophilic enzyme adapted to high temperature and its mesophilic (adapted to 37°C) homologue; and in vivo for psychrophilic, mesophilic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic bacteria, adapted respectively to temperatures of 4°C, 37°C, 75°C and 85°C. Further work demonstrated the existence of a water component of exceptionally low mobility in an extreme halophile from the Dead Sea, which is not present in mesophile bacterial cells.

  6. Small-angle neutron and dynamic light scattering study of gelatin coacervates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Mohanty; V K Aswal; P S Goyal; H B Bohidar

    2004-08-01

    The state of intermolecular aggregates and that of folded gelatin molecules could be characterized by dynamic laser light and small-angle neutron scattering experiments, which implied spontaneous segregation of particle sizes preceding coacervation, which is a liquid-liquid phase transition phenomenon. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) data analysis revealed two particle sizes until precipitation was reached. The smaller particles having a diameter of ∼ 50 nm (stable nanoparticles prepared by coacervation method) were detected in the supernatant, whereas the inter-molecular aggregates having a diameter of ∼ 400 nm gave rise to coacervation. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments revealed that typical mesh size of the networks exist in polymer dense phase (coacervates) [1]. Analysis of the SANS structure factor showed the presence of two length scales associated with this system that were identified as the correlation length or mesh size, = 10.6 Å of the network and the other is the size of inhomogeneities = 21.4 Å. Observations were discussed based on the results obtained from SANS experiments performed in 5% (w/v) gelatin solution at 60° C ( = 50$ Å, = 113 Å) and 5% (w/v) gel at 28° C ( = 47 Å, = 115 Å) in aqueous phase [2] indicating smaller length scales in coacervate as compared to sol and gel.

  7. NEUTRON SCATTERING AND LATTICE DYNAMICAL STUDIES OF THE HIGH-PRESSURE PHASE ICE (II)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董顺乐; 王燕

    2001-01-01

    Lattice dynamical calculations have been carried out for ice II based on the force field constructed for ice Ih. In order to fully understand ice II inelastic neutron scattering spectra, the decomposed phonon density of states was shown mode by mode. Calculated results have shown that the hydrogen bond force constant between the six-molecule rings is significantly weaker, 75eV/nm2, compared with the force constant, 220eV/nm2, within the rings. Inelastic neutron scattering spectra of clathrate hydrate H2O+He are almost the same as ice II. This means that the absorption of He atoms cannot affect the bond strengths of the ice II host lattice. Based on the force field model for ice II, the van der Waals interactions between water molecules and helium atoms are considered. The results obtained are consistent with experimental data. Lattice dynamical calculations have been carried out for ice II using seven rigid pairwise potentials.It was found that MCY makes the stretching and bending interactions in ice II too weak and makes the O-O bond length too long (~5%), thus its lattice densities are obviously lower than other potential lattices or experimental values.

  8. Isotope effects in water as investigated by neutron diffraction and path integral molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidler, Anita [University of Bath; Salmon, Phil [University of Bath; Fischer, Henry E [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Simonson, J Michael {Mike} [ORNL; Markland, Thomas [Columbia University

    2012-01-01

    The structure of heavy and light water at 300 K was investigated by using a joint approach in which the method of neutron di raction with oxygen isotope substitution was combined with path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The di raction results, which give intra-molecular O-D and O-H bond distances of 0.985(5) and 0.990(5) A, were found to be in best agreement with those obtained by using the exible anharmonic TTM3-F water model. Both techniques show a di erence of '0.5% between the O-D and O-H intra-molecular bond lengths and the results support a competing quantum e ects model for water in which its structural and dynamical properties are governed by an o set between intra-molecular and inter-molecular quantum contributions. Further consideration of the O-O correlations is needed in order to improve agreement with experiment.

  9. Isotope effects in water as investigated by neutron diffraction and path integral molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler, Anita; Salmon, Philip S.; Fischer, Henry E.; Neuefeind, Jörg C.; Simonson, J. Mike; Markland, Thomas E.

    2012-07-01

    The structures of heavy and light water at 300 K were investigated by using a joint approach in which the method of neutron diffraction with oxygen isotope substitution was complemented by path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The diffraction results, which give intra-molecular O-D and O-H bond distances of 0.985(5) and 0.990(5) Å, were found to be in best agreement with those obtained by using the flexible anharmonic TTM3-F water model. Both techniques show a difference of ≃ 0.5% between the O-D and O-H intra-molecular bond lengths, and the results support a competing quantum effects model for water in which its structural and dynamical properties are governed by an offset between intra-molecular and inter-molecular quantum contributions. Further consideration of the O-O correlations is needed in order to improve agreement with experiment.

  10. Dynamics in poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) based hydrogel: Neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhudesai, S. A., E-mail: swapnil@barc.gov.in; Mitra, S.; Mukhopadhyay, R. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 40085 (India); Lawrence, Mathias B. [Department of Physics, St. Xavier’s College, Mapusa, Goa 403507 (India); Desa, J. A. E. [Department of Physics, Goa University, Taleigao Plateau, Goa 403206 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Results of quasielastic neutron scattering measurements carried out on Poly Vinyl Alcohol (PVA) based hydrogels are reported here. PVA hydrogels are formed using Borax as a cross-linking agent in D{sub 2}O solvent. This synthetic polymer can be used for obtaining the hydrogels with potential use in the field of biomaterials. The aim of this paper is to study the dynamics of polymer chain in the hydrogel since it is known that polymer mobility influences the kinetics of loading and release of drugs. It is found that the dynamics of hydrogen atoms in the polymer chain could be described by a model where the diffusion of hydrogen atoms is limited within a spherical volume of radius 3.3 Å. Average diffusivity estimated from the behavior of quasielastic width is found to be 1.2 × 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}/sec.

  11. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laulumaa Saara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  12. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  13. Feasibility study of the neutron dose for real-time image-guided proton therapy: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Sung; Shin, Jung Suk; Kim, Daehyun; Shin, Eunhyuk; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungkoo; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Ju, Sanggyu; Chung, Yoonsun; Jung, Sang Hoon; Han, Youngyih

    2015-07-01

    Two full rotating gantries with different nozzles (multipurpose nozzle with MLC, scanning dedicated nozzle) for a conventional cyclotron system are installed and being commissioned for various proton treatment options at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The purpose of this study is to use Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, for X-ray imaging equipment under various treatment conditions. At first, we investigated the H/D for various modifications of the beamline devices (scattering, scanning, multi-leaf collimator, aperture, compensator) at the isocenter and at 20, 40 and 60 cm distances from the isocenter, and we compared our results with those of other research groups. Next, we investigated the neutron dose at the X-ray equipment used for real-time imaging under various treatment conditions. Our investigation showed doses of 0.07 ~ 0.19 mSv/Gy at the X-ray imaging equipment, depending on the treatment option and interestingly, the 50% neutron dose reduction was observed due to multileaf collimator during proton scanning treatment with the multipurpose nozzle. In future studies, we plan to measure the neutron dose experimentally and to validate the simulation data for X-ray imaging equipment for use as an additional neutron dose reduction method.

  14. Concept of a novel fast neutron imaging detector based on THGEM for fan-beam tomography applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cortesi, M; Adams, R; Dangendorf, V; Prasser, H -M

    2012-01-01

    The conceptual design and operational principle of a novel high-efficiency, fast neutron imaging detector based on THGEM, intended for future fan-beam transmission tomography applications, is described. We report on a feasibility study based on theoretical modeling and computer simulations of a possible detector configuration prototype. In particular we discuss results regarding the optimization of detector geometry, estimation of its general performance, and expected imaging quality: it has been estimated that detection efficiency of around 5-8% can be achieved for 2.5MeV neutrons; spatial resolution is around one millimeter with no substantial degradation due to scattering effects. The foreseen applications of the imaging system are neutron tomography in non-destructive testing for the nuclear energy industry, including examination of spent nuclear fuel bundles, detection of explosives or drugs, as well as investigation of thermal hydraulics phenomena (e.g., two-phase flow, heat transfer, phase change, cool...

  15. Thermal fluctuations in amphipol A8-35 particles: a neutron scattering and molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehei, Moeava; Perlmutter, Jason D; Giusti, Fabrice; Sachs, Jonathan N; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2014-10-01

    Amphipols are a class of polymeric surfactants that can stabilize membrane proteins in aqueous solutions as compared to detergents. A8-35, the best-characterized amphipol to date, is composed of a polyacrylate backbone with ~35% of the carboxylates free, ~25% grafted with octyl side-chains, and ~40% with isopropyl ones. In aqueous solutions, A8-35 self-organizes into globular particles with a molecular mass of ~40 kDa. The thermal dynamics of A8-35 particles was measured by neutron scattering in the 10-picosecond, 18-picosecond, and 1-nanosecond time-scales on natural abundance and deuterium-labeled molecules, which permitted to separate backbone and side-chain motions. A parallel analysis was performed on molecular dynamics trajectories (Perlmutter et al., Langmuir 27:10523-10537, 2011). Experimental results and simulations converge, from their respective time-scales, to show that A8-35 particles feature a more fluid hydrophobic core, predominantly containing the octyl chains, and a more rigid solvent-exposed surface, made up predominantly of the hydrophilic polymer backbone. The fluidity of the core is comparable to that of the lipid environment around proteins in the center of biological membranes, as also measured by neutron scattering. The biological activity of proteins depends sensitively on molecular dynamics, which itself is strongly dependent on the immediate macromolecular environment. In this context, the characterization of A8-35 particle dynamics constitutes a step toward understanding the effect of amphipols on membrane protein stability and function.

  16. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  17. Imaging electric field dynamics with graphene optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Jason; Balch, Halleh B.; McGuire, Allister F.; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Forrester, Patrick R.; Crommie, Michael F.; Cui, Bianxiao; Wang, Feng

    2016-12-01

    The use of electric fields for signalling and control in liquids is widespread, spanning bioelectric activity in cells to electrical manipulation of microstructures in lab-on-a-chip devices. However, an appropriate tool to resolve the spatio-temporal distribution of electric fields over a large dynamic range has yet to be developed. Here we present a label-free method to image local electric fields in real time and under ambient conditions. Our technique combines the unique gate-variable optical transitions of graphene with a critically coupled planar waveguide platform that enables highly sensitive detection of local electric fields with a voltage sensitivity of a few microvolts, a spatial resolution of tens of micrometres and a frequency response over tens of kilohertz. Our imaging platform enables parallel detection of electric fields over a large field of view and can be tailored to broad applications spanning lab-on-a-chip device engineering to analysis of bioelectric phenomena.

  18. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Singh, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  19. Investigations of the structural stability of metal hydride composites by in-situ neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbrig, Kai; Pohlmann, Carsten; Gondek, Łukasz; Figiel, Henryk; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, André; Manke, Ingo; Banhart, John; Kieback, Bernd; Röntzsch, Lars

    2015-10-01

    Metal hydride composites (MHC) with expanded natural graphite (ENG) exhibiting enhanced thermal conductivity and reduced porosity compared to metal hydride powders can enable a reversible, compact and safe way for hydrogen storage. In this study, neutron imaging during cyclic hydrogenation was utilized to investigate the structural stability and the spatial-temporal hydrogen concentration of application-oriented MHC with 40 mm in diameter compared to a loose metal hydride powder. In particular, swelling and shrinking effects of a radially confined MHC which could freely expand upwards were studied. It was found that the loose powder bed was easily torn apart during dehydrogenation, which leads to increased thermal resistance within the hydride bed. In contrast, the thermal resistance between MHC and container wall was minimized since the initial gap closes during initial hydrogenation and does not reopen thereafter. Further cyclic hydrogenation caused MHC volume changes, i.e. an almost reversible swelling/shrinking (so-called ;MHC breathing;). Moreover, neutron imaging allowed for the observation of reaction fronts within the MHC and the powder bed that are governed by the heat transfer.

  20. Dynamic force microscopy imaging of native membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienberger, Ferry; Stroh, Cordula; Kada, Gerald; Moser, Rosita; Baumgartner, Werner; Pastushenko, Vassili; Rankl, Christian; Schmidt, Ute; Mueller, Harald; Orlova, Elena; LeGrimellec, Christian; Drenckhahn, Detlev; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2003-10-15

    We employed magnetic ACmode atomic force microscopy (MACmode AFM) as a novel dynamic force microscopy method to image surfaces of biological membranes in their native environments. The lateral resolution achieved under optimized imaging conditions was in the nanometer range, even when the sample was only weakly attached to the support. Purple membranes (PM) from Halobacterium salinarum were used as a test standard for topographical imaging. The hexagonal arrangement of the bacteriorhodopsin trimers on the cytoplasmic side of PM was resolved with 1.5 nm lateral accuracy, a resolution similar to images obtained in contact and tapping-mode AFM. Human rhinovirus 2 (HRV2) particles were attached to mica surfaces via nonspecific interactions. The capsid structure and 2 nm sized protein loops of HRV2 were routinely obtained without any displacement of the virus. Globular and filamentous structures on living and fixed endothelial cells were observed with a resolution of 5-20 nm. These examples show that MACmode AFM is a favorable method in studying the topography of soft and weakly attached biological samples with high resolution under physiological conditions.

  1. Nano-confined water in the interlayers of hydrocalumite: Reorientational dynamics probed by neutron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichev, A. G.; Faraone, A.; Udovic, T.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; de Souza, N. R.; Reinholdt, M. X.; Kirkpatrick, R.

    2008-12-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs, anionic clays) represent excellent model systems for detailed molecular- level studies of the structure, dynamics, and energetics of nano-confined water in mineral interlayers and nano-pores, because LDH interlayers can have a well-defined structures and contain H2O molecules and a wide variety of anions in structurally well-defined positions and coordinations. [Ca2Al(OH)6]Cl·2H2O, also known as hydrocalumite or Friedel's salt, has a well- ordered Ca,Al distribution in the hydroxide layer and a very high degree of H2O,Cl ordering in the interlayer. It is also one of the only LDH phase for which a single crystal structure refinement is available. Thus, it is currently the best model compound for understanding the structure and dynamical behavior of interlayer and surface species in other, less-ordered, LDHs. We investigated the structural and dynamic behavior of water in the interlayers of hydrocalumite using inelastic (INS) and quasielastic (QENS) neutron scattering and molecular dynamics computer simulations. The comperehensive neutron scattering studies were performed for one fully hydrated and one dehydrated sample of hydrocalumite using several complementary instruments (HFBS, DCS and FANS at NCNR; HRMECS and QENS at IPNS) at temperatures above and below the previously discovered order-disorder interlayer phase transition. Together the experimental and molecular modeling results capture the important details of the dynamics of nano-confined water and the effects of the orientational ordering of H2O molecules above and below the phase transition. They provide otherwise unobtainable experimental information about the transformation of H2O librational and diffusional modes across the order-disorder phase transition and significantly add to our current understanding of the structure and dynamics of water in LDH phases based on the earlier NMR, IR, X-ray, and calorimetric measurements. The approach can now be extended to probe the

  2. Effect of the environment on the protein dynamical transition: a neutron scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciaroni, Alessandro; Cinelli, Stefania; Onori, Giuseppe

    2002-08-01

    We performed an elastic neutron scattering investigation of the molecular dynamics of lysozyme solvated in glycerol, at different water contents h (grams of water/grams of lysozyme). The marked non-Gaussian behavior of the elastic intensity was studied in a wide experimental momentum transfer range, as a function of the temperature. The internal dynamics is well described in terms of the double-well jump model. At low temperature, the protein total mean square displacements exhibit an almost linear harmonic trend irrespective of the hydration level, whereas at the temperature T(d) a clear changeover toward an anharmonic regime marks a protein dynamical transition. The decrease of T(d) from approximately 238 K to approximately 195 K as a function of h is reminiscent of that found in the glass transition temperature of aqueous solutions of glycerol, thus suggesting that the protein internal dynamics as a whole is slave to the environment properties. Both T(d) and the total mean square displacements indicate that the protein flexibility strongly rises between 0.1 and 0.2h. This hydration-dependent dynamical activation, which is similar to that of hydrated lysozyme powders, is related to the specific interplay of the protein with the surrounding water and glycerol molecules.

  3. Multi-mirror imaging optics for low-loss transport of divergent neutron beams and tailored wavelength spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmer, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    A neutron optical transport system is proposed which comprises nested short elliptical mirrors located halfway between two common focal points M and M'. It images cold neutrons from a diverging beam or a source with finite size at M by single reflections onto a spot of similar size at M'. Direct view onto the neutron source is blocked by a central absorber with little impact on the transported solid angle. Geometric neutron losses due to source size can be kept small using modern supermirrors and distances M-M' of a few tens of metres. Very short flat mirrors can be used in practical implementations. Transport with a minimum of reflections remedies losses due to multiple reflections that are common in long elliptical neutron guides. Moreover, well-defined reflection angles lead to new possibilities for enhancing the spectral quality of primary beams, such as clear-cut discrimination of short neutron wavelengths or beam monochromation using bandpass supermirrors. Multi-mirror imaging systems may thus complemen...

  4. Thermal Neutron Point Source Imaging using a Rotating Modulation Collimator (RMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    2.5 Neutron Attenuation Neutron attenuation is an important physical aspect that influences the design of the RMC components. The narrow- beam ...29 3.3 Mask Designs .......................................................................................................36 3.4 Neutron ...detection efficiency is very high for thermal and epithermal neutrons but begins to approach zero at 1 MeV and above. For this reason the detector is

  5. Image processing analysis of nuclear track parameters for CR-39 detector irradiated by thermal neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Jobouri, Hussain A., E-mail: hahmed54@gmail.com; Rajab, Mustafa Y., E-mail: mostafaheete@gmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, AL-Nahrain University, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2016-03-25

    CR-39 detector which covered with boric acid (H{sub 3}Bo{sub 3}) pellet was irradiated by thermal neutrons from ({sup 241}Am - {sup 9}Be) source with activity 12Ci and neutron flux 10{sup 5} n. cm{sup −2}. s{sup −1}. The irradiation times -T{sub D} for detector were 4h, 8h, 16h and 24h. Chemical etching solution for detector was sodium hydroxide NaOH, 6.25N with 45 min etching time and 60 C° temperature. Images of CR-39 detector after chemical etching were taken from digital camera which connected from optical microscope. MATLAB software version 7.0 was used to image processing. The outputs of image processing of MATLAB software were analyzed and found the following relationships: (a) The irradiation time -T{sub D} has behavior linear relationships with following nuclear track parameters: i) total track number - N{sub T} ii) maximum track number - MRD (relative to track diameter - D{sub T}) at response region range 2.5 µm to 4 µm iii) maximum track number - M{sub D} (without depending on track diameter - D{sub T}). (b) The irradiation time -T{sub D} has behavior logarithmic relationship with maximum track number - M{sub A} (without depending on track area - A{sub T}). The image processing technique principally track diameter - D{sub T} can be take into account to classification of α-particle emitters, In addition to the contribution of these technique in preparation of nano- filters and nano-membrane in nanotechnology fields.

  6. Simulating pasta phases by molecular dynamics and cold atoms --- Formation in supernovae and superfluid neutrons in neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, Gentaro

    2010-01-01

    In dense stars such as collapsing cores of supernovae and neutron stars, nuclear "pasta" such as rod-like and slab-like nuclei are speculated to exist. However, whether or not they are actually formed in supernova cores is still unclear. Here we solve this problem by demonstrating that a lattice of rod-like nuclei is formed from a bcc lattice by compression. We also find that the formation process is triggered by an attractive force between nearest neighbor nuclei, which starts to act when their density profile overlaps, rather than the fission instability. We also discuss the connection between pasta phases in neutron star crusts and ultracold Fermi gases.

  7. Performance Study of an aSi Flat Panel Detector for Fast Neutron Imaging of Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, M.; Mauerhofer, E. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Engels, R.; Kemmerling, G. [Central Institute for Engineering, Electronics and Analytics - Electronic Systems, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Frank, M. [MATHCCES - Department of Mathematics, RWTH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen (Germany); Havenith, A.; Kettler, J.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, T. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology Transfer, RWTH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen (Germany); Schitthelm, O. [Corporate Technology, Siemens AG, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Radioactive waste must be characterized to check its conformance for intermediate storage and final disposal according to national regulations. For the determination of radio-toxic and chemo-toxic contents of radioactive waste packages non-destructive analytical techniques are preferentially used. Fast neutron imaging is a promising technique to assay large and dense items providing, in complementarity to photon imaging, additional information on the presence of structures in radioactive waste packages. Therefore the feasibility of a compact Neutron Imaging System for Radioactive waste Analysis (NISRA) using 14 MeV neutrons is studied in a cooperation framework of Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, RWTH Aachen University and Siemens AG. However due to the low neutron emission of neutron generators in comparison to research reactors the challenging task resides in the development of an imaging detector with a high efficiency, a low sensitivity to gamma radiation and a resolution sufficient for the purpose. The setup is composed of a commercial D-T neutron generator (Genie16GT, Sodern) with a surrounding shielding made of polyethylene, which acts as a collimator and an amorphous silicon flat panel detector (aSi, 40 x 40 cm{sup 2}, XRD-1642, Perkin Elmer). Neutron detection is achieved using a general propose plastic scintillator (EJ-260, Eljen Technology) linked to the detector. The thermal noise of the photodiodes is reduced by employing an entrance window made of aluminium. Optimal gain and integration time for data acquisition are set by measuring the response of the detector to the radiation of a 500 MBq {sup 241}Am-source. Detector performance was studied by recording neutron radiography images of materials with various, but well known, chemical compositions, densities and dimensions (Al, C, Fe, Pb, W, concrete, polyethylene, 5 x 8 x 10 cm{sup 3}). To simulate gamma-ray emitting waste radiographs in presence of a gamma-ray sources ({sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241

  8. Methods and applications in high flux neutron imaging; Methoden und Anwendungen fuer bildgebende Verfahren mit hohen Neutronenfluessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballhausen, H.

    2007-02-07

    This treatise develops new methods for high flux neutron radiography and high flux neutron tomography and describes some of their applications in actual experiments. Instead of single images, time series can be acquired with short exposure times due to the available high intensity. To best use the increased amount of information, new estimators are proposed, which extract accurate results from the recorded ensembles, even if the individual piece of data is very noisy and in addition severely affected by systematic errors such as an influence of gamma background radiation. The spatial resolution of neutron radiographies, usually limited by beam divergence and inherent resolution of the scintillator, can be significantly increased by scanning the sample with a pinhole-micro-collimator. This technique circumvents any limitations in present detector design and, due to the available high intensity, could be successfully tested. Imaging with scattered neutrons as opposed to conventional total attenuation based imaging determines separately the absorption and scattering cross sections within the sample. For the first time even coherent angle dependent scattering could be visualized space-resolved. New applications of high flux neutron imaging are presented, such as materials engineering experiments on innovative metal joints, time-resolved tomography on multilayer stacks of fuel cells under operation, and others. A new implementation of an algorithm for the algebraic reconstruction of tomography data executes even in case of missing information, such as limited angle tomography, and returns quantitative reconstructions. The setup of the world-leading high flux radiography and tomography facility at the Institut Laue-Langevin is presented. A comprehensive appendix covers the physical and technical foundations of neutron imaging. (orig.)

  9. Dynamics, nucleosynthesis, and kilonova signature of black hole—neutron star merger ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Foucart, Francois; Kasen, Daniel; Lippuner, Jonas; Desai, Dhruv; Roberts, Luke F.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the ejecta from black hole—neutron star mergers by modeling the formation and interaction of mass ejected in a tidal tail and a disk wind. The outflows are neutron-rich, giving rise to optical/infrared emission powered by the radioactive decay of r-process elements (a kilonova). Here we perform an end-to-end study of this phenomenon, where we start from the output of a fully-relativistic merger simulation, calculate the post-merger hydrodynamical evolution of the ejecta and disk winds including neutrino physics, determine the final nucleosynthetic yields using post-processing nuclear reaction network calculations, and compute the kilonova emission with a radiative transfer code. We study the effects of the tail-to-disk mass ratio by scaling the tail density. A larger initial tail mass results in fallback matter becoming mixed into the disk and ejected in the subsequent disk wind. Relative to the case of a disk without dynamical ejecta, the combined outflow has lower mean electron fraction, faster speed, larger total mass, and larger absolute mass free of high-opacity Lanthanides or Actinides. In most cases, the nucleosynthetic yield is dominated by the heavy r-process contribution from the unbound part of the dynamical ejecta. A Solar-like abundance distribution can however be obtained when the total mass of the dynamical ejecta is comparable to the mass of the disk outflows. The kilonova has a characteristic duration of 1 week and a luminosity of  ∼ 1041 erg s-1 , with orientation effects leading to variations of a factor  ∼2 in brightness. At early times (< 1 d) the emission includes an optical component from the (hot) Lanthanide-rich material, but the spectrum evolves quickly to the infrared thereafter.

  10. Dynamics of functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes in solution studied by incoherent neutron scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbina, A; Miguel, C [Departamento Electronica, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Plaza Hospital 1, 30202 Cartagena (Spain); Delgado, J L; Langa, F [Facultad de Ciencias del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 45071, Toledo (Spain); DIaz-Paniagua, C [Centro Espanol de MetrologIa, 28760 Madrid (Spain); Jimenez, M [Institut Laue-Langevin, 39042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Batallan, F [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: antonio.urbina@upct.es

    2008-03-12

    We have studied, by incoherent neutron scattering experiments, the dynamics of a colloidal suspension of functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The nanotubes have been functionalized with pentyl ester groups attached at the ends and suspended in deuterated toluene with a concentration of 2.6 mg SWNT/1 ml of deuterated toluene. The experimental techniques were incoherent elastic neutron scattering (IENS) and incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering (IQNS). In the temperature range between 4 K and 300 K, three phases were observed by IENS measurements: a solid phase for TT{sub m}. Furthermore, in the high temperature range of the undercooled liquid phase, hysteresis loops in the heating and cooling scans were observed. The lower limit of the hysteresis loop defines the critical crossover temperature T{sub c}. IQNS measurements in the liquid phase and a cooling scan of the undercooled liquid phase were performed. Three different quasielastic peaks were identified, two in the liquid phase and another one in the undercooled liquid phase. The widths of the quasielastic peaks are discussed as a generalized diffusion function which can be factorized as a temperature dependent diffusion function and a Q dependent structure function. From the comparison of the diffusion function with the viscosity of toluene, we conclude that two components are in the long-time range Brownian motion and the other one in the short-time range Brownian motion.

  11. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics studies for exotic clustering phenomena in neutron-rich nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, M.; Suhara, T.; Kanada-En'yo, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We present a review of recent works on clustering phenomena in unstable nuclei studied by antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). The AMD studies in these decades have uncovered novel types of clustering phenomena brought about by the excess neutrons. Among them, this review focuses on the molecule-like structure of unstable nuclei. One of the earliest discussions on the clustering in unstable nuclei was made for neutron-rich Be and B isotopes. AMD calculations predicted that the ground state clustering is enhanced or reduced depending on the number of excess neutrons. Today, the experiments are confirming this prediction as the change of the proton radii. Behind this enhancement and reduction of the clustering, there are underlying shell effects called molecular and atomic orbits. These orbits form covalent and ionic bonding of the clusters analogous to the atomic molecules. It was found that this "molecular-orbit picture" reasonably explains the low-lying spectra of Be isotopes. The molecular-orbit picture is extended to other systems having parity asymmetric cluster cores and to the three cluster systems. O and Ne isotopes are the candidates of the former, while the 3 α linear chains in C isotopes are the latter. For both subjects, many intensive studies are now in progress. We also pay a special attention to the observables which are the fingerprint of the clustering. In particular, we focus on the monopole and dipole transitions which are recently regarded as good probe for the clustering. We discuss how they have and will reveal the exotic clustering.

  12. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics studies for exotic clustering phenomena in neutron-rich nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, M. [Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University, Nuclear Reaction Data Centre, Faculty of Science, Sapporo (Japan); Suhara, T. [Matsue College of Technology, Matsue (Japan); Kanada-En' yo, Y. [Kyoto University, Department of Physics, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    We present a review of recent works on clustering phenomena in unstable nuclei studied by antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). The AMD studies in these decades have uncovered novel types of clustering phenomena brought about by the excess neutrons. Among them, this review focuses on the molecule-like structure of unstable nuclei. One of the earliest discussions on the clustering in unstable nuclei was made for neutron-rich Be and B isotopes. AMD calculations predicted that the ground state clustering is enhanced or reduced depending on the number of excess neutrons. Today, the experiments are confirming this prediction as the change of the proton radii. Behind this enhancement and reduction of the clustering, there are underlying shell effects called molecular and atomic orbits. These orbits form covalent and ionic bonding of the clusters analogous to the atomic molecules. It was found that this ''molecular-orbit picture'' reasonably explains the low-lying spectra of Be isotopes. The molecular-orbit picture is extended to other systems having parity asymmetric cluster cores and to the three cluster systems. O and Ne isotopes are the candidates of the former, while the 3α linear chains in C isotopes are the latter. For both subjects, many intensive studies are now in progress. We also pay a special attention to the observables which are the fingerprint of the clustering. In particular, we focus on the monopole and dipole transitions which are recently regarded as good probe for the clustering. We discuss how they have and will reveal the exotic clustering. (orig.)

  13. Neutron-rich gamma-ray burst flows: dynamics and particle creation in neutron-proton collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koers, H.B.J.; Giannios, D.

    2007-01-01

    We consider gamma-ray burst outflows with a substantial neutron component that are either dominated by thermal energy (fireballs) or by magnetic energy. In the latter case, we focus on the recently introduced "AC" model which relies on magnetic reconnection to accelerate the flow and power the promp

  14. Quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation studies of the melting transition in butane and hexane monolayers adsorbed on graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervig, K.W.; Wu, Z.; Dai, P.

    1997-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to investigate molecular diffusive motion near the melting transition of monolayers of flexible rod-shaped molecules. The experiments were conducted on butane and hexane monolayers adsorbed on an ex......Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to investigate molecular diffusive motion near the melting transition of monolayers of flexible rod-shaped molecules. The experiments were conducted on butane and hexane monolayers adsorbed...... comparison with experiment, quasielastic spectra calculated from the MD simulations were analyzed using the same models and fitting algorithms as for the neutron spectra. This combination of techniques gives a microscopic picture of the melting process in these two monolayers which is consistent with earlier...

  15. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of the slow dynamics of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mamontov, Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-02-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent β(Q) is independent of the wavevector transfer Q in the measured Q range and (ii) the structural relaxation time τ(Q) follows a power-law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time τ0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of τ0 can be fitted with the mode-coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function χT(Q, t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement langx2rang and the non-Gaussian parameter α2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  16. Ligation-Dependent Picosecond Dynamics in Human Hemoglobin As Revealed by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Satoru; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Matsuo, Tatsuhito; Kono, Fumiaki; Tominaga, Taiki; Shibata, Kaoru; Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Shibayama, Naoya

    2017-08-31

    Hemoglobin, the vital O2 carrier in red blood cells, has long served as a classic example of an allosteric protein. Although high-resolution X-ray structural models are currently available for both the deoxy tense (T) and fully liganded relaxed (R) states of hemoglobin, much less is known about their dynamics, especially on the picosecond to subnanosecond time scales. Here, we investigate the picosecond dynamics of the deoxy and CO forms of human hemoglobin using quasielastic neutron scattering under near physiological conditions in order to extract the dynamics changes upon ligation. From the analysis of the global motions, we found that whereas the apparent diffusion coefficients of the deoxy form can be described by assuming translational and rotational diffusion of a rigid body, those of the CO form need to involve an additional contribution of internal large-scale motions. We also found that the local dynamics in the deoxy and CO forms are very similar in amplitude but are slightly lower in frequency in the former than in the latter. Our results reveal the presence of rapid large-scale motions in hemoglobin and further demonstrate that this internal mobility is governed allosterically by the ligation state of the heme group.

  17. The redshift distribution of short gamma-ray bursts from dynamically formed neutron star binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Hopman, C; Waxman, E; Zwart, S P; Guetta, Dafne; Hopman, Clovis; Waxman, Eli; Zwart, Simon Portegies

    2006-01-01

    Short-hard gamma-ray bursts (SHBs) may arise from gravitational wave (GW) driven mergers of double neutron star (DNS) systems. DNSs may be "primordial" or can form dynamically by binary exchange interactions in globular clusters during core-collapse. For primordial binaries, the time delay between formation and merger is expected to be short, tau~0.1 Gyr, implying that the redshift distribution of merger events should follow that of star-formation. We point out here that for dynamically formed DNSs, the time delay between star-formation and merger is dominated by the cluster core-collapse time, rather than by the GW inspiral time, yielding delays comparable to the Hubble time. We derive the redshift distribution of merger events of dynamically formed DNSs, and find it to differ significantly from that typically expected for primordial binaries. The observed redshift distribution of SHBs favors dynamical formation, although a primordial origin cannot be ruled out due to possible detection biases. Future red-sh...

  18. Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Studies of the Slow Dynamics of Supercooled and Glassy Aspirin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang [ORNL; Tyagi, M. [NCNR and University of Maryland; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Chen, Sow-hsin H [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 K down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent (Q) is independent of the wave vector transfer Q in the measured Q-range, and (ii) the structural relaxation time (Q) follows a power law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time 0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of 0 can be fitted with the mode coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by M. Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function T(Q,t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows a direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement x2 and non-Gaussian parameter 2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  19. Shape recovery using high dynamic range images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zuoyong; Ma Lizhuang; Li Zhong

    2008-01-01

    An effective method for object shape recovery using HDRIs (high dynamic range images) is proposed. The radiance values of each point on the reference sphere and target object are firstly calculated, thus the set of candidate normals of each target point are found by comparing its radiance to that of each reference sphere point. In single-image shape recovery, a smoothness operation is applied to the target normals to obtain a stable and reasonable result; while in photometric stereo, radiance vectors of reference and target objects formed due to illuminations under different light source directions are directly compared to get the most suitable target normals. Finally, the height values can be recovered from the resulting normal field. Because diffuse and specular reflection are handled in an unified framework with radiance, our approach eliminates the limitation presented in most recovery strategies, i.e., only Lambertian model can be used. The experiment results from the real and synthesized images show the performance of our approach.

  20. Systematics of dynamical mass ejection, nucleosynthesis, and radioactively powered electromagnetic signals from neutron-star mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Bauswein, A; Janka, H -T

    2013-01-01

    Neutron star (NS) mergers can eject considerable amounts of neutron-rich matter, allowing for r-processing. The radioactive decay of the products heats the ejecta and makes them potentially observable as a source of thermal electromagnetic radiation. We investigate systematically the dynamical mass ejection during the NS collision in dependence on uncertain properties of the nuclear equation of state (EoS) by using 40 representative, microphysical EoSs in relativistic merger simulations. The NS compactness, characterized by the radius R_1.35 of nonrotating NSs of 1.35 Msun, is the crucial parameter that determines the ejecta mass. NSs with smaller radii R_1.35 ("soft"' EoS) collide more violently and eject systematically higher masses. These range from ~10^-3 Msun to ~10^-2 Msun for symmetric 1.35-1.35 Msun binaries with R_1.35 between 16 km and 11 km, and from ~5*10^-3 Msun to ~2*10^-2 Msun for asymmetric 1.2-1.5 Msun binaries. Correspondingly, the bolometric peak luminosities of the optical transients vary ...

  1. Structure and dynamics of aqueous 2-propanol: a THz-TDS, NMR and neutron diffraction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, James; Li, Ruoyu; Zeitler, J Axel; D'Agostino, Carmine; Collins, James H P; Mantle, Mick D; Manyar, Haresh; Holbrey, John D; Falkowska, Marta; Youngs, Tristan G A; Hardacre, Christopher; Stitt, E Hugh; Gladden, Lynn F

    2015-11-11

    Aqueous liquid mixtures, in particular, those involving amphiphilic species, play an important role in many physical, chemical and biological processes. Of particular interest are alcohol/water mixtures; however, the structural dynamics of such systems are still not fully understood. Herein, a combination of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and NMR relaxation time analysis has been applied to investigate 2-propanol/water mixtures across the entire composition range; while neutron diffraction studies have been carried out at two specific concentrations. Excellent agreement is seen between the techniques with a maximum in both the relative absorption coefficient and the activation energy to molecular motion occurring at ∼90 mol% H2O. Furthermore, this is the same value at which well-established excess thermodynamic functions exhibit a maximum/minimum. Additionally, both neutron diffraction and THz-TDS have been used to provide estimates of the size of the hydration shell around 2-propanol in solution. Both methods determine that between 4 and 5 H2O molecules per 2-propanol are found in the 2-propanol/water clusters at 90 mol% H2O. Based on the acquired data, a description of the structure of 2-propanol/water across the composition range is presented.

  2. Cluster dynamics modeling of accumulation and diffusion of helium in neutron irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.G.; Zhou, W.H.; Huang, L.F. [Key Laboratory for Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zeng, Z., E-mail: zzeng@theory.issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Ju, X. [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-12-15

    A cluster dynamics model based on rate theory has been developed to study the accumulation and diffusion processes of helium in tungsten under synergistic effects of helium implantation and neutron irradiation. By including self-interstitial atoms, vacancies and helium atoms as well as their clusters and further using more reliable parameters, the evolution of different types of defects with time and depth is investigated. The calculated results are comparable with experiments. The cases of helium plasma corresponding to the first wall and to the divertor are taken into account. The accumulation and diffusion behaviors of helium in tungsten are illustrated by the time and depth dependence of helium concentration in tungsten with or without the neutron irradiation, the contribution of different types of helium clusters/complexes to helium concentration and the depth profiles of different mobile defects and helium-vacancy complexes. It is concluded that the competition of trapping and diffusion effects dominates the behavior of helium atoms in tungsten for these two typical cases. Understanding these mechanisms is important for estimating damages to the plasma-facing materials.

  3. Imaging Collective Dynamics in the Neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Sonya

    2005-03-01

    Central to understanding collective neural dynamics is the problem of obtaining spatiotemporal data which reveals the collective behavior of neural ensembles; this can be done either through multi-contact recordings or through various imaging modalities. As an example of both the power and limitations of imaging techniques, we consider the onset, spread, and termination of focal seizures, imaged using the intrinsic optical signal (IOS). The IOS is a change in light reflectance from neural tissue that correlates with the underlying electrophysiological activity. With incident light in the green range, the IOS reflects changes in blood volume (CBV signal); for incident light in the orange range, the IOS shows a change in the oxygenation state of hemoglobin (Hbr signal), and can be correlated with the BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) fMRI signal; for incident red light, the IOS reflects changes in cell volume and/or light scattering (LS signal). Using the IOS to image the spread of focal neocortical seizures induced by 4-aminopyridine in the rat, we found that the CBV, Hbr and LS signals were equally useful in localizing the ictal onset. We found a focal, profound dip in hemoglobin oxygenation (Hbr signal) during the entire seizure duration, implying that brain perfusion is inadequate to meet the metabolic demands of an epileptic focus. We observed significant variability in the spatial distribution of the active region during seizure termination. However, the IOS was unable to resolve electrophysiologically distinct patterns of seizure onset and the signal, at all incident wavelengths, persisted long after seizure termination.

  4. Low-temperature dynamics of magnetic colloids studied by time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiedenmann, A.; Keiderling, U.; Meissner, M.; Wallacher, D.; Gähler, R.; May, R.P.; Prévost, S.; Klokkenburg, M.; Erne, B.H.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of ordering and relaxation processes in magnetic colloids has been studied by means of stroboscopic small angle neutron scattering techniques in an oscillating magnetic field. Surfactant stabilized ferrofluids (FFs) of Fe3O4 and Co nanoparticles have been investigated as a function of t

  5. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  6. Small-angle neutron scattering and Molecular Dynamics structural study of gelling DNA nanostars

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Castanon, Javier; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Zanatta, Marco; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Comez, Lucia; Porcar, Lionel; Jafta, Charl J; Fadda, Giulia C; Bellini, Tommaso; Sciortino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    DNA oligomers with properly designed sequences self-assemble into well defined constructs. Here, we exploit this methodology to produce bulk quantities of tetravalent DNA nanostars (each one composed by 196 nucleotides) and to explore the structural signatures of their aggregation process. We report small-angle neutron scattering experiments focused on the evaluation of both the form factor and the temperature evolution of the scattered intensity at a nano star concentration where the system forms a tetravalent equilibrium gel. We also perform molecular dynamics simulations of one isolated tetramer to evaluate the form factor theoretically, without resorting to any approximate shape. The numerical form factor is found to be in very good agreement with the experimental one. Simulations predict an essentially temperature independent form factor, offering the possibility to extract the effective structure factor and its evolution during the equilibrium gelation.

  7. Small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics structural study of gelling DNA nanostars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Castanon, J.; Bomboi, F.; Rovigatti, L.; Zanatta, M.; Paciaroni, A.; Comez, L.; Porcar, L.; Jafta, C. J.; Fadda, G. C.; Bellini, T.; Sciortino, F.

    2016-08-01

    DNA oligomers with properly designed sequences self-assemble into well defined constructs. Here, we exploit this methodology to produce bulk quantities of tetravalent DNA nanostars (each one composed of 196 nucleotides) and to explore the structural signatures of their aggregation process. We report small-angle neutron scattering experiments focused on the evaluation of both the form factor and the temperature evolution of the scattered intensity at a nanostar concentration where the system forms a tetravalent equilibrium gel. We also perform molecular dynamics simulations of one isolated tetramer to evaluate the form factor numerically, without resorting to any approximate shape. The numerical form factor is found to be in very good agreement with the experimental one. Simulations predict an essentially temperature-independent form factor, offering the possibility to extract the effective structure factor and its evolution during the equilibrium gelation.

  8. Non-contact measurement of partial gas pressure and distribution of elemental composition using energy-resolved neutron imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tremsin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron resonance absorption imaging is a non-destructive technique that can characterize the elemental composition of a sample by measuring nuclear resonances in the spectrum of a transmitted beam. Recent developments in pixelated time-of-flight imaging detectors coupled with pulsed neutron sources pose new opportunities for energy-resolved imaging. In this paper we demonstrate non-contact measurements of the partial pressure of xenon and krypton gases encapsulated in a steel pipe while simultaneously passing the neutron beam through high-Z materials. The configuration was chosen as a proof of principle demonstration of the potential to make non-destructive measurement of gas composition in nuclear fuel rods. The pressure measured from neutron transmission spectra (∼739 ± 98 kPa and ∼751 ± 154 kPa for two Xe resonances is in relatively good agreement with the pressure value of ∼758 ± 21 kPa measured by a pressure gauge. This type of imaging has been performed previously for solids with a spatial resolution of ∼ 100 μm. In the present study it is demonstrated that the high penetration capability of epithermal neutrons enables quantitative mapping of gases encapsulate within high-Z materials such as steel, tungsten, urania and others. This technique may be beneficial for the non-destructive testing of bulk composition of objects (such as spent nuclear fuel assemblies and others containing various elements opaque to other more conventional imaging techniques. The ability to image the gaseous substances concealed within solid materials also allows non-destructive leak testing of various containers and ultimately measurement of gas partial pressures with sub-mm spatial resolution.

  9. Non-contact measurement of partial gas pressure and distribution of elemental composition using energy-resolved neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Losko, A. S.; Vogel, S. C.; Byler, D. D.; McClellan, K. J.; Bourke, M. A. M.; Vallerga, J. V.

    2017-01-01

    Neutron resonance absorption imaging is a non-destructive technique that can characterize the elemental composition of a sample by measuring nuclear resonances in the spectrum of a transmitted beam. Recent developments in pixelated time-of-flight imaging detectors coupled with pulsed neutron sources pose new opportunities for energy-resolved imaging. In this paper we demonstrate non-contact measurements of the partial pressure of xenon and krypton gases encapsulated in a steel pipe while simultaneously passing the neutron beam through high-Z materials. The configuration was chosen as a proof of principle demonstration of the potential to make non-destructive measurement of gas composition in nuclear fuel rods. The pressure measured from neutron transmission spectra (˜739 ± 98 kPa and ˜751 ± 154 kPa for two Xe resonances) is in relatively good agreement with the pressure value of ˜758 ± 21 kPa measured by a pressure gauge. This type of imaging has been performed previously for solids with a spatial resolution of ˜ 100 μm. In the present study it is demonstrated that the high penetration capability of epithermal neutrons enables quantitative mapping of gases encapsulate within high-Z materials such as steel, tungsten, urania and others. This technique may be beneficial for the non-destructive testing of bulk composition of objects (such as spent nuclear fuel assemblies and others) containing various elements opaque to other more conventional imaging techniques. The ability to image the gaseous substances concealed within solid materials also allows non-destructive leak testing of various containers and ultimately measurement of gas partial pressures with sub-mm spatial resolution.

  10. Calculation of the neutron electric dipole moment with two dynamical flavors of domain wall fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Berruto; T. Blum; K. Orginos; A. Soni

    2005-12-08

    We present a study of the neutron electric dipole moment ({rvec d}{sub N}) within the framework of lattice QCD with two flavors of dynamical light quarks. The dipole moment is sensitive to the topological structure of the gauge fields, and accuracy can only be achieved by using dynamical, or sea quark, calculations. However, the topological charge evolves slowly in these calculations, leading to a relatively large uncertainty in {rvec d}{sub N}. It is shown, using quenched configurations, that a better sampling of the charge distribution reduces this problem, but because the CP even part of the fermion determinant is absent, both the topological charge distribution and {rvec d}{sub N} are pathological in the chiral limit. We discuss the statistical and systematic uncertainties arising from the topological charge distribution and unphysical size of the quark mass in our calculations and prospects for eliminating them. Our calculations employ the RBC collaboration two flavor domain wall fermion and DBW2 gauge action lattices with inverse lattice spacing a{sup -1} {approx} 1.7 GeV, physical volume V {approx} (2 fm){sup 3}, and light quark mass roughly equal to the strange quark mass (m{sub sea} = 0.03 and 0.04). We determine a value of the electric dipole moment that is zero within (statistical) errors, |{rvec d}{sub N}| = -0.04(20) e-{theta}-fm at the smaller sea quark mass. Satisfactory results for the magnetic and electric form factors of the proton and neutron are also obtained and presented.

  11. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: general dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  12. Sub-pixel correlation length neutron imaging: Spatially resolved scattering information of microstructures on a macroscopic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harti, Ralph P.; Strobl, Markus; Betz, Benedikt; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Kagias, Matias; Grünzweig, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Neutron imaging and scattering give data of significantly different nature and traditional methods leave a gap of accessible structure sizes at around 10 micrometers. Only in recent years overlap in the probed size ranges could be achieved by independent application of high resolution scattering and imaging methods, however without providing full structural information when microstructures vary on a macroscopic scale. In this study we show how quantitative neutron dark-field imaging with a novel experimental approach provides both sub-pixel resolution with respect to microscopic correlation lengths and imaging of macroscopic variations of the microstructure. Thus it provides combined information on multiple length scales. A dispersion of micrometer sized polystyrene colloids was chosen as a model system to study gravity induced crystallisation of microspheres on a macro scale, including the identification of ordered as well as unordered phases. Our results pave the way to study heterogeneous systems locally in a previously impossible manner. PMID:28303923

  13. Neutron scattering and ab initio molecular dynamics study of cross-linking in biomedical phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, A J; Ahmed, I; Rudd, C D [Division of Materials, Mechanics and Structures, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Cuello, G J; Pellegrini, E; Richard, D; Johnson, M R, E-mail: andrew.parsons@nottingham.ac.uk [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2010-12-08

    Details of the microscopic structure of phosphate glasses destined for biomedical applications, which include sodium, magnesium and calcium cations, have been obtained from the static structure factor measured by means of neutron scattering. A complementary, molecular dynamics study has been performed on a range of phosphate glasses using density functional theory methods, which allow structural fluctuations, including bond breaking, in the liquid phase before quenching to the glass phase. Good agreement between experiment and simulation allows the molecular dynamics trajectories to be analysed in detail. In particular, attention is focused on the cross-linking of divalent cations in contrast with the structural aspects associated with monovalent cations. Magnesium cations are found equidistant and bridging between the phosphorus atoms of different phosphate chains, leading to a shorter phosphorus-phosphorus second neighbour distance (that is, a more compact packing of neighbouring phosphate chains) compared to the effect of sodium cations. Calcium cations show behaviour intermediate between those of magnesium and sodium. Molecular dynamics simulations give access to the cation mobility, which is lowest for magnesium, reflecting its structural, cross-linking role.

  14. Real-time Crystal Growth Visualization and Quantification by Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Perrodin, Didier; Losko, Adrian S.; Vogel, Sven C.; Bourke, Mark A.M.; Bizarri, Gregory A.; Bourret, Edith D.

    2017-01-01

    Energy-resolved neutron imaging is investigated as a real-time diagnostic tool for visualization and in-situ measurements of “blind” processes. This technique is demonstrated for the Bridgman-type crystal growth enabling remote and direct measurements of growth parameters crucial for process optimization. The location and shape of the interface between liquid and solid phases are monitored in real-time, concurrently with the measurement of elemental distribution within the growth volume and with the identification of structural features with a ~100 μm spatial resolution. Such diagnostics can substantially reduce the development time between exploratory small scale growth of new materials and their subsequent commercial production. This technique is widely applicable and is not limited to crystal growth processes. PMID:28425461

  15. Water management in a planar air-breathing fuel cell array using operando neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coz, E.; Théry, J.; Boillat, P.; Faucheux, V.; Alincant, D.; Capron, P.; Gébel, G.

    2016-11-01

    Operando Neutron imaging is used for the investigation of a planar air-breathing array comprising multiple cells in series. The fuel cell demonstrates a stable power density level of 150 mW/cm2. Water distribution and quantification is carried out at different operating points. Drying at high current density is observed and correlated to self-heating and natural convection. Working in dead-end mode, water accumulation at lower current density is largely observed on the anode side. However, flooding mechanisms are found to begin with water condensation on the cathode side, leading to back-diffusion and anodic flooding. Specific in-plane and through-plane water distribution is observed and linked to the planar array design.

  16. Real-time Crystal Growth Visualization and Quantification by Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Perrodin, Didier; Losko, Adrian S.; Vogel, Sven C.; Bourke, Mark A. M.; Bizarri, Gregory A.; Bourret, Edith D.

    2017-04-01

    Energy-resolved neutron imaging is investigated as a real-time diagnostic tool for visualization and in-situ measurements of “blind” processes. This technique is demonstrated for the Bridgman-type crystal growth enabling remote and direct measurements of growth parameters crucial for process optimization. The location and shape of the interface between liquid and solid phases are monitored in real-time, concurrently with the measurement of elemental distribution within the growth volume and with the identification of structural features with a ~100 μm spatial resolution. Such diagnostics can substantially reduce the development time between exploratory small scale growth of new materials and their subsequent commercial production. This technique is widely applicable and is not limited to crystal growth processes.

  17. A Micromegas Detector for Neutron Beam Imaging at the n_TOF Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calviani, M; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Giomataris, Y; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Iguaz, F J; Kebbiri, M; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Tsinganis, A; Vlachoudis, V; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Cortés, G; Corté-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Marítnez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A J M; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T J; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    Micromegas (Micro-MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors are gas detectors consisting of a stack of one ionization and one proportional chamber. A micromesh separates the two communicating regions, where two different electric fields establish respectively a charge drift and a charge multiplication regime. The n\\_TOF facility at CERN provides a white neutron beam (from thermal up to GeV neutrons) for neutron induced cross section measurements. These measurements need a perfect knowlodge of the incident neutron beam, in particular regarding its spatial profile. A position sensitive micromegas detector equipped with a B-10 based neutron/charged particle converter has been extensively used at the n\\_TOF facility for characterizing the neutron beam profile and extracting the beam interception factor for samples of different size. The boron converter allowed to scan the energy region of interest for neutron induced capture reactions as a function of the neutron energy, determined by the time of flight. Experimental ...

  18. Analytical complex at the PIK reactor for studying the supra-atomic structure and dynamics of materials by neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, V. M., E-mail: lebedev@pnpi.spb.ru; Lebedev, V. T.; Ivanova, I. N.; Orlova, D. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    A project of the center for studying reactor materials and solving problems of materials science is presented which will be equipped with the following neutron instruments: a small-angle Membrana diffractometer, a spin-echo spectrometer, and a time-of-flight spectrometer. It is proposed to irradiate materials in the PIK reactor core and use neutron-scattering tools to analyze the structure and dynamics of these materials and investigate radiative defects in the complete experimental cycle (initial material-irradiation-strength tests, thermal loads, and other effects) using materials science techniques.

  19. Modification of the mesoscopic structure in neutron irradiated EPDM viewed through positron annihilation spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambri, O.A., E-mail: olambri@fceia.unr.edu.a [Instituto de Fisica Rosario - CONICET, Avda. 27 de Febrero 210 bis, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Plazaola, F.; Axpe, E. [Elektrizitatea eta Elektronika Saila, Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, P.K. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Mocellini, R.R.; Zelada-Lambri, G.I. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Garcia, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain); Matteo, C.L.; Sorichetti, P.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Avda. Paseo Colon 850, 1063 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-02-01

    This article focuses on the study of the mesoscopic structure in neutron irradiated EPDM both from experimental and theoretical points of view. In this work we reveal completely the modification of the mesostructure of the EPDM due to neutron irradiation, resolving volume fraction, size and distribution of the crystalline zones as a function of the irradiation dose. Positron annihilation spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis techniques are applied and the results are discussed by means of new theoretical results for describing the interaction process between the crystals and amorphous zones in EPDM.

  20. Spin-density correlations in the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory: Comparison with polarized neutron scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, N.B., E-mail: melnikov@cs.msu.su [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Reser, B.I., E-mail: reser@imp.uran.ru [Miheev Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Paradezhenko, G.V., E-mail: gparadezhenko@cs.msu.su [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-01

    To study the spin-density correlations in the ferromagnetic metals above the Curie temperature, we relate the spin correlator and neutron scattering cross-section. In the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory, we obtain explicit expressions for the effective and local magnetic moments and spatial spin-density correlator. Our theoretical results are demonstrated by the example of bcc Fe. The effective and local moments are found in good agreement with results of polarized neutron scattering experiment over a wide temperature range. The calculated short-range order is small (up to 4 Å) and slowly decreases with temperature.

  1. Improvement in dynamic magnetic resonance imaging thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun-Yu

    This dissertation is focused on improving MRI Thermometry (MRIT) techniques. The application of the spin-lattice relaxation constant is investigated in which T1 is used as indicator to measure the temperature of flowing fluid such as blood. Problems associated with this technique are evaluated, and a new method to improve the consistency and repeatability of T1 measurements is presented. The new method combines curve fitting with a measure of the curve null point to acquire more accurate and consistent T1 values. A novel method called K-space Inherited Parallel Acquisition (KIPA) is developed to achieve faster dynamic temperature measurements. Localized reconstruction coefficients are used to achieve higher reduction factors, and lower noise and artifact levels compared to that of GeneRalized Autocalibrating Partially Parallel Acquisition (GRAPPA) reconstruction. Artifacts in KIPA images are significantly reduced, and SNR is largely improved in comparison with that in GRAPPA images. The Root-Mean-Square (RMS) error of temperature for GRAPPA is 2 to 5 times larger than that for KIPA. Finally, the accuracy and comparison of the effects of motion on three parallel imaging methods: SENSE (SENSitivity Encoding), VSENSE (Variable-density SENSE) and KIPA are estimated. According to the investigation, KIPA is the most accurate and robust method among all three methods for studies with or without motion. The ratio of the normalized RMS (NRMS) error for SENSE to that for KIPA is within the range from 1 to 3.7. The ratio of the NRMS error for VSENSE to that for KIPA is about 1 to 2. These factors change with the reduction factor, motion and subject. In summary, the new strategy and method for the fast noninvasive measurement of T1 of flowing blood are proposed to improve stability and precision. The novel parallel reconstruction algorithm, KIPA, is developed to improve the temporal and spatial resolution for the PRF method. The motion effects on the KIPA method are also

  2. Contact angle and adsorption energies of nanoparticles at the air-liquid interface determined by neutron reflectivity and molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguera, Javier; Ponomarev, Evgeniy; Geue, Thomas; Stellacci, Francesco; Bresme, Fernando; Moglianetti, Mauro

    2015-03-01

    Understanding how nanomaterials interact with interfaces is essential to control their self-assembly as well as their optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. We present here an experimental approach based on neutron reflectivity (NR) that allows the in situ measurement of the contact angles of nanoparticles adsorbed at fluid interfaces. Because our method provides a route to quantify the adsorption and interfacial energies of the nanoparticles in situ, it circumvents problems associated with existing indirect methods, which rely on the transport of the monolayers to substrates for further analysis. We illustrate the method by measuring the contact angle of hydrophilic and hydrophobic gold nanoparticles, coated with perdeuterated octanethiol (d-OT) and with a mixture of d-OT and mercaptohexanol (MHol), respectively. The contact angles were also calculated via atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) computations, showing excellent agreement with the experimental data. Our method opens the route to quantify the adsorption of complex nanoparticle structures adsorbed at fluid interfaces featuring different chemical compositions.Understanding how nanomaterials interact with interfaces is essential to control their self-assembly as well as their optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. We present here an experimental approach based on neutron reflectivity (NR) that allows the in situ measurement of the contact angles of nanoparticles adsorbed at fluid interfaces. Because our method provides a route to quantify the adsorption and interfacial energies of the nanoparticles in situ, it circumvents problems associated with existing indirect methods, which rely on the transport of the monolayers to substrates for further analysis. We illustrate the method by measuring the contact angle of hydrophilic and hydrophobic gold nanoparticles, coated with perdeuterated octanethiol (d-OT) and with a mixture of d-OT and mercaptohexanol (MHol), respectively. The contact angles were

  3. Dynamic imaging through turbid media based on digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiping; Zhong, Jingang

    2014-03-01

    Imaging through turbid media using visible or IR light instead of harmful x ray is still a challenging problem, especially in dynamic imaging. A method of dynamic imaging through turbid media using digital holography is presented. In order to match the coherence length between the dynamic object wave and the reference wave, a cw laser is used. To solve the problem of difficult focusing in imaging through turbid media, an autofocus technology is applied. To further enhance the image contrast, a spatial filtering technique is used. A description of digital holography and experiments of imaging the objects hidden in turbid media are presented. The experimental result shows that dynamic images of the objects can be achieved by the use of digital holography.

  4. Dynamic imaging of disorders at craniovertebral junction using fast gradient echo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nambu, Toshikazu; Miyasaka, Kazuo [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine; Yamamoto, Isao; Itoh, Hajime

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the usefulness of Turbo-FLASH MR imaging in the dynamic evaluations of the disorders at craniovertebral junction. Using this fast scan program, serial fifteen dynamic images of the midline cervical plane could be obtained in 53 seconds, while the patient had very slow autonomous flexion-extension movement. Twelve cases including atlanto-axial dislocation, os odontoideum and Chiari malformation were investigated. The dynamic images could demonstrate findings of upper spinal cord compression which correlated well to the static functional SE images. We conclude that ultrafast MR imaging shows promise as a convenient dynamic evaluation of craniovertebral junctional disorders. (author).

  5. Ground tests of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutron instrument operation in the passive mode with a Martian soil model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvetsov, V. N.; Dubasov, P. V.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Krylov, A. R.; Krylov, V. A.; Litvak, M. L.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Zontikov, A. O.

    2017-07-01

    The results of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument ground tests in the passive mode of operation are presented in comparison with the numerical calculations. These test series were conducted to support the current surface measurements of DAN onboard the MSL Curiosity rover. The instrument sensitivity to detect thin subsurface layers of water ice buried at different depths in the analog of Martian soil has been evaluated during these tests. The experiments have been done with a radioisotope Pu-Be neutron source (analog of the MMRTG neutron source onboard the Curiosity rover) and the Martian soil model assembled from silicon-rich window glass pane. Water ice layers were simulated with polyethylene sheets. All experiments have been performed at the test facility built at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia).

  6. PRE-IMAGE ENTROPY OF NONAUTONOMOUS DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianjiu HUANG; Xi WEN; Fanping ZENG

    2008-01-01

    The authors define and study topological pre-image entropy for the non-autonomous discrete dynamical systems given by a sequence {fi}∞/i=1 of continuous self-maps of a compact topological space.The basic properties and the invariant with respect to equiconjugacy of pre-image entropy for the non-autonomous discrete dynamical systems are obtained.

  7. Dynamic Range Improvement of GMRT Low Frequency Images

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Peeyush

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines some new observational and data processing techniques for enhancing the dynamic range of low frequency images obtained with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. We illustrate new software tools developed to facilitate visibility editing and calibration as well as other preprocessing required to enhance the dynamic range of images from a planned survey.

  8. Development of a Time-resolved Neutron Imaging Detector Based on the {\\mu}PIC Micro-Pixel Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Joseph D; Hattori, Kaori; Iwaki, Satoru; Kabuki, Shigeto; Kishimoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Hironobu; Oku, Takayuki; Sawano, Tatsuya; Shinohara, Takenao; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki; Ikeno, Masahiro; Tanaka, Manobu; Uchida, Tomohisa

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a prototype time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber ({\\mu}PIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system. Our detector system combines 100{\\mu}m-level spatial and sub-{\\mu}s time resolutions with a low gamma sensitivity of less than 10^-12 and high data rates, making it well suited for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity, pulsed neutron sources. In the present paper, we introduce the detector system and present several test measurements performed at NOBORU (BL10), J-PARC to demonstrate the capabilities of our prototype. We also discuss future improvements to the spatial resolution and rate performance.

  9. Calculation of the neutron electric dipole moment with two dynamical flavors of domain wall fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Berruto, F; Orginos, K; Soni, A

    2005-01-01

    We present a study of the neutron electric dipole moment ($\\vec d_N$) within the framework of lattice QCD with two flavors of dynamical lig ht quarks. The dipole moment is sensitive to the topological structure of the gaug e fields, and accuracy can only be achieved by using dynamical, or sea quark, calc ulations. However, the topological charge evolves slowly in these calculations, le ading to a relatively large uncertainty in $\\vec d_N$. It is shown, using quenched configurations, that a better sampling of the charge d istribution reduces this problem, but because the CP even part of the fermion determinant is absent, both the topological charge dis tribution and $\\vec d_N$ are pathological in the chiral limit. We discuss the statistical and systematic uncertainties arising from the topological charge distr ibution and unphysical size of the quark mass in our calculations and prospects fo r eliminating them. Our calculations employ the RBC collaboration two flavor domain wall fermion and DBW2 gauge action l...

  10. Heterogeneous slow dynamics of imidazolium-based ionic liquids studied by neutron spin echo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofu, Maiko; Nagao, Michihiro; Ueki, Takeshi; Kitazawa, Yuzo; Nakamura, Yutaro; Sawamura, Syota; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2013-03-07

    We have investigated structure and relaxation phenomena for ionic liquids 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (C8mimPF6) and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (C8mimTFSI) by means of neutron diffraction and neutron spin echo (NSE) techniques. The diffraction patterns show two distinct peaks appeared at scattering vectors Q of 0.3 and 1.0 Å(-1). The former originates from the nanoscale structure characteristic to ionic liquids and the latter due to the interionic correlations. Interestingly, the intensity of the low-Q peak drastically grows upon cooling and keeps growing even below the glass transition temperature. The NSE measurements have been performed at these two Q positions, to explore the time evolution of each correlation. The relaxation related to the ionic correlation (ionic diffusion) is of Arrhenius-type and exhibits nonexponential behavior. The activation energy (Ea) of the ionic diffusion, which is linked to viscosity, depends on the type of anion; the larger is the anion size, the smaller Ea becomes for most of anions. On the other hand, two kinds of relaxation processes, slower and faster ones, are found at the low-Q peak position. The most significant finding is that the fraction of the slower relaxation increases and that of the faster one decreases upon cooling. Combining the NSE data with the diffraction data, we conclude that there exist two parts in ILs: one with the ordered nanostructure exhibiting the slow relaxation, and the other with disordered structure showing faster relaxation. The structure and dynamics of ILs are heterogeneous in nature, and the fraction of each part changes with temperature.

  11. A novel liquid-Xenon detector concept for combined fast-neutrons and gamma imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breskin, A.; Israelashvili, I.; Cortesi, M.; Arazi, L.; Shchemelinin, S.; Chechik, R.; Dangendorf, V.; Bromberger, B.; Vartsky, D.

    2012-06-01

    A new detector concept is presented for combined imaging and spectroscopy of fast-neutrons and gamma rays. It comprises a liquid-Xenon (LXe) converter and scintillator coupled to a UV-sensitive gaseous imaging photomultiplier (GPM). Radiation imaging is obtained by localization of the scintillation-light from LXe with the position-sensitive GPM. The latter comprises a cascade of Thick Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEM), where the first element is coated with a CsI UV-photocathode. We present the concept and provide first model-simulation results of the processes involved and the expected performances of a detector having a LXe-filled capillaries converter. The new detector concept has potential applications in combined fast-neutron and gamma-ray screening of hidden explosives and fissile materials with pulsed sources.

  12. Dynamic infrared imaging for skin cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Sebastián E.; Ramirez, David A.; Myers, Stephen A.; von Winckel, Greg; Krishna, Sanchita; Berwick, Marianne; Padilla, R. Steven; Sen, Pradeep; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic thermal imaging (DTI) with infrared cameras is a non-invasive technique with the ability to detect the most common types of skin cancer. We discuss and propose a standardized analysis method for DTI of actual patient data, which achieves high levels of sensitivity and specificity by judiciously selecting pixels with the same initial temperature. This process compensates the intrinsic limitations of the cooling unit and is the key enabling tool in the DTI data analysis. We have extensively tested the methodology on human subjects using thermal infrared image sequences from a pilot study conducted jointly with the University of New Mexico Dermatology Clinic in Albuquerque, New Mexico (ClinicalTrials ID number NCT02154451). All individuals were adult subjects who were scheduled for biopsy or adult volunteers with clinically diagnosed benign condition. The sample size was 102 subjects for the present study. Statistically significant results were obtained that allowed us to distinguish between benign and malignant skin conditions. The sensitivity and specificity was 95% (with a 95% confidence interval of [87.8% 100.0%]) and 83% (with a 95% confidence interval of [73.4% 92.5%]), respectively, and with an area under the curve of 95%. Our results lead us to conclude that the DTI approach in conjunction with the judicious selection of pixels has the potential to provide a fast, accurate, non-contact, and non-invasive way to screen for common types of skin cancer. As such, it has the potential to significantly reduce the number of biopsies performed on suspicious lesions.

  13. Time-of-flight neutron rejection to improve prompt gamma imaging for proton range verification: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegun, Aleksandra K.; Seravalli, Enrica; Cambraia Lopes, Patrícia; Rinaldi, Ilaria; Pinto, Marco; Oxley, David C.; Dendooven, Peter; Verhaegen, Frank; Parodi, Katia; Crespo, Paulo; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2012-10-01

    Therapeutic proton and heavier ion beams generate prompt gamma photons that may escape from the patient. In principle, this allows for real-time, in situ monitoring of the treatment delivery, in particular, the hadron range within the patient, by imaging the emitted prompt gamma rays. Unfortunately, the neutrons simultaneously created with the prompt photons create a background that may obscure the prompt gamma signal. To enhance the accuracy of proton dose verification by prompt gamma imaging, we therefore propose a time-of-flight (TOF) technique to reject this neutron background, involving a shifting time window to account for the propagation of the protons through the patient. Time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the generation and transport of prompt gamma photons and neutrons upon irradiation of a PMMA phantom with 100, 150 and 200 MeV protons were performed using Geant4 (version 9.2.p02) and MCNPX (version 2.7.D). The influence of angular collimation and TOF selection on the prompt gamma and neutron longitudinal profiles is studied. Furthermore, the implications of the proton beam microstructure (characterized by the proton bunch width and repetition period) are investigated. The application of a shifting TOF window having a width of ΔTOFz = 1.0 ns appears to reduce the neutron background by more than 99%. Subsequent application of an energy threshold does not appear to sharpen the distal falloff of the prompt gamma profile but reduces the tail that is observed beyond the proton range. Investigations of the influence of the beam time structure show that TOF rejection of the neutron background is expected to be effective for typical therapeutic proton cyclotrons.

  14. Dynamic infrared imaging for the detection of malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, Terry M [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Li, Haifang [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Fisher, Paul [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Rosenblatt, Ruth [Department of Radiology, Strang Cancer Prevention Center, New York, NY 10021 USA (United States); Dulaimy, Khaldoon [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Li, Song [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); O' Hea, Brian [Department of Surgery, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Salvitti, Mathew [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Geronimo, Veronica [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Geronimo, Christine [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Jambawalikar, Sachin [Department Biomedical Engineering, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Carvelli, Paola [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Weiss, Richard [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2004-07-21

    The potential for malignancy detection using dynamic infrared imaging (DIRI) has been investigated in an animal model of human malignancy. Malignancy was apparent in images formed at the vasomotor and cardiogenic frequencies of tumour bearing mice. The observation of malignancy was removed by the administration of an agent that blocks vasodilation caused by nitric oxide (NO). Image patterns similar to those that characterize malignancy could be mimicked in normal mice using an NO producing agent. Apparently DIRI allows for cancer detection in this model through vasodilation caused by malignancy generated NO. Dynamic infrared detection of vasomotor and cardiogenic surface perfusion was validated in human subjects by a comparison with laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Dynamic infrared imaging technology was then applied to breast cancer detection. It is shown that dynamic infrared images formed at the vasomotor and cardiogenic frequencies of the normal and malignant breast have image pattern differences, which may allow for breast cancer detection.

  15. Low Dynamic Range Solutions to the High Dynamic Range Imaging Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanmuganathan RAMAN; Subhasis CHAUDHURI

    2010-01-01

    While capturing a real world scene using a common digital camera,due to limitations of the sensar dynamic range,we will not be able to capture the entire dynamic range of the soene.This problem is evident while capturing a picture of a scene which has both brightly and poorly illumninated regions.High Dynamic Range (HDR) imaging aims to recover the entire dynamic range of the scene by compositing multi-exposure images.Tone reproduction is required for displaying HDR images as the corresponding Low Dynamic Range(LDR) images on common displays.This paper discusses novel approaches to reconstruct LDR images directly from multi-exposure images.It is assumed that there is no knowledge of camera response function and other caraera settings.At last,it is explained how this task can be achieved effectively for static and dynamic scenes.

  16. Photoresist latent and developer images as probed by neutron reflectivity methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Vivek M; Kang, Shuhui; VanderHart, David L; Satija, Sushil K; Lin, Eric K; Wu, Wen-li

    2011-01-18

    Photoresist materials enable the fabrication of advanced integrated circuits with ever-decreasing feature sizes. As next-generation light sources are developed, using extreme ultraviolet light of wavelength 13.5 nm, these highly tuned formulations must meet strict image-fidelity criteria to maintain the expected performance gains from decreases in feature size. However, polymer photoresists appear to be reaching resolution limits and advancements in measurements of the in situ formed solid/solid and solid/liquid interface is necessary. This Review focuses on the chemical and physical structure of chemically amplified photoresists at the lithographic feature edge at length scales between 1 nm and 100 nm. Neutron reflectivity measurements provide insight into the nanometer-scale composition profiling of the chemical latent image at an ideal lithographic line-edge that separates optical resolution effects from materials processing effects. Four generations of advanced photoresist formulations were examined over the course of seven years to quantify photoresist/photoacid and photoresist/developer interactions on the fidelity of lithographic features. The outcome of these measurements complement traditional resist design criteria by providing the effects of the impacts of the photoresist and processing on the feature fidelity. These physical relations are also described in the context of novel resist architectures under consideration for next-generation photolithography with extreme-ultraviolet radiation.

  17. Imaging complex nutrient dynamics in mycelial networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, M D; Lee, J A; Bebber, D P; Tlalka, M; Hynes, J; Darrah, P R; Watkinson, S C; Boddy, L

    2008-08-01

    Transport networks are vital components of multi-cellular organisms, distributing nutrients and removing waste products. Animal cardiovascular and respiratory systems, and plant vasculature, are branching trees whose architecture is thought to determine universal scaling laws in these organisms. In contrast, the transport systems of many multi-cellular fungi do not fit into this conceptual framework, as they have evolved to explore a patchy environment in search of new resources, rather than ramify through a three-dimensional organism. These fungi grow as a foraging mycelium, formed by the branching and fusion of threadlike hyphae, that gives rise to a complex network. To function efficiently, the mycelial network must both transport nutrients between spatially separated source and sink regions and also maintain its integrity in the face of continuous attack by mycophagous insects or random damage. Here we review the development of novel imaging approaches and software tools that we have used to characterise nutrient transport and network formation in foraging mycelia over a range of spatial scales. On a millimetre scale, we have used a combination of time-lapse confocal imaging and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to quantify the rate of diffusive transport through the unique vacuole system in individual hyphae. These data then form the basis of a simulation model to predict the impact of such diffusion-based movement on a scale of several millimetres. On a centimetre scale, we have used novel photon-counting scintillation imaging techniques to visualize radiolabel movement in small microcosms. This approach has revealed novel N-transport phenomena, including rapid, preferential N-resource allocation to C-rich sinks, induction of simultaneous bi-directional transport, abrupt switching between different pre-existing transport routes, and a strong pulsatile component to transport in some species. Analysis of the pulsatile transport component using Fourier

  18. A framework of region-based dynamic image fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-hua; QIN Zheng; LIU Yu

    2007-01-01

    A new framework of region-based dynamic image fusion is proposed. First, the technique of target detection is applied to dynamic images (image sequences) to segment images into different targets and background regions. Then different fusion rules are employed in different regions so that the target information is preserved as much as possible. In addition, steerable non-separable wavelet frame transform is used in the process of multi-resolution analysis, so the system achieves favorable characters of orientation and invariant shift. Compared with other image fusion methods, experimental results showed that the proposed method has better capabilities of target recognition and preserves clear background information.

  19. Dynamic Data Updating Algorithm for Image Superresolution Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Bing; XU Qing; ZHANG Yan; XING Shuai

    2006-01-01

    A dynamic data updating algorithm for image superesolution is proposed. On the basis of Delaunay triangulation and its local updating property, this algorithm can update the changed region directly under the circumstances that only a part of the source images has been changed. For its high efficiency and adaptability, this algorithm can serve as a fast algorithm for image superesolution reconstruction.

  20. Exploring the potential of the cosmic-ray neutron method to simultaneously predict soil water and vegetation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogena, H. R.; Fuchs, H.; Jakobi, J.; Huisman, J. A.; Diekkrüger, B.; Vereecken, H.

    2016-12-01

    intensity reduced the discrepancy between cosmic-ray-derived and in-situ measured soil moisture. Finally, we investigated the temporal dynamics of the thermal-to-epithermal neutron ratio to explore its potential as a predictor for canopy interception and biomass changes.

  1. Pixel pitch and particle energy influence on the dark current distribution of neutron irradiated CMOS image sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloir, Jean-Marc; Goiffon, Vincent; Virmontois, Cédric; Raine, Mélanie; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Gaillardin, Marc; Molina, Romain; Magnan, Pierre; Gilard, Olivier

    2016-02-22

    The dark current produced by neutron irradiation in CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) is investigated. Several CIS with different photodiode types and pixel pitches are irradiated with various neutron energies and fluences to study the influence of each of these optical detector and irradiation parameters on the dark current distribution. An empirical model is tested on the experimental data and validated on all the irradiated optical imagers. This model is able to describe all the presented dark current distributions with no parameter variation for neutron energies of 14 MeV or higher, regardless of the optical detector and irradiation characteristics. For energies below 1 MeV, it is shown that a single parameter has to be adjusted because of the lower mean damage energy per nuclear interaction. This model and these conclusions can be transposed to any silicon based solid-state optical imagers such as CIS or Charged Coupled Devices (CCD). This work can also be used when designing an optical imager instrument, to anticipate the dark current increase or to choose a mitigation technique.

  2. Determining fragmentation dynamics through a study of neutron multiplicity at the NSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Sharon; Christ, Peter; Mazza, Maria; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In nuclear fragmentation reactions the number of neutrons and the excitation energy of the final fragment are related to the excitation energies of prefragments, which are produced in the reaction target but not directly observed. The MoNA Collaboration designed and performed an experiment to measure the number of neutrons in coincidence with charged projectile fragments to determine the excitation mechanisms of specific prefragments. All prior MoNA experimental campaigns concentrated on neutrons emitted from discrete levels in near dripline nuclei and treated any evaporation neutrons as an underlying background. This experiment capitalizes on those evaporation neutrons, focusing on sodium, neon and fluorine reaction products. For the experiment a 32Mg secondary beam with energy 86 MeV/u was incident on a Be reaction target. This target is upstream from the Sweeper, a superconducting dipole steering magnet with a bending angle of 43° and a vertical gap that permits forward-focused neutrons to get to the MoNA, the Modular Neutron Array. The rigidity of the Sweeper was varied during this experiment to increase the detection range. Analysis of the neutron-neutron hit distribution in coincidence with each sodium, neon, or fluorine charged fragment will be presented. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation Award 1613429 and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Award 52007540.

  3. Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements of fast process and methyl group dynamics in glassy poly(vinyl acetate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Chuhong [Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Midlothian, Scotland, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Arrighi, Valeria [Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Midlothian, Scotland, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: v.arrighi@hw.ac.uk; Gagliardi, Simona [Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Midlothian, Scotland, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); McEwen, Iain J. [Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Midlothian, Scotland, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Tanchawanich, Jeerachada [Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Midlothian, Scotland, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Telling, Mark T.F. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 OQX (United Kingdom); Zanotti, J.-M. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (CEA-CNRS), CEA Saclay, 91191Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2006-09-29

    The dynamics of poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) in the glassy state has been investigated using a range of neutron spectrometers, sampling complementary energy and momentum transfer ranges. By combining the analysis of elastic window scan data at high resolution, medium resolution quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) spectra and low resolution time-of-flight measurements we identify the molecular processes occurring in PVAc, below the polymer glass transition. Our QENS results are in agreement with the literature data for the methyl group rotation but we also find evidence for a fast process, with activation energy of 1.9 kJ/mol. Although the different instruments provide only limited dynamic information, we attempt to give a homogeneous description of molecular motion across the different energies and Q ranges.

  4. Hydrogen motions and the -relaxation in glass-forming polymers: Molecular dynamics simulation and quasi-elastic neutron scattering results

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Colmenero; A Arbe; F Alvarez; A Narros; D Richter; M Monkenbush; B Farago

    2004-07-01

    The combination of molecular dynamics simulations and neutron scattering measurements on three different glass-forming polymers (polyisoprene, poly(vinyl ethylene) and polybutadiene) has allowed to establish the existence of a crossover from Gaussian to non-Gaussian behavior for the incoherent scattering function in the -relaxation regime. The deviation from Gaussian behavior observed can be reproduced assuming the existence of a distribution of discrete jump lengths underlying the sublinear diffusion of the atomic motions during the structural relaxation.

  5. Precision Cross Sections Measurement of 56Fe(n,n γ) at 14.1 MeV using Associated Particle Neutron Elemental Imaging Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyu; Koltick, David

    2017-01-01

    Integral production cross sections for 846.8 keV and 1238.3 keV prompt gamma rays from 14.1 MeV neutrons interactions on 56Fe and are reported, using Associated Particle Neutron Elemental Imaging technique. The experimental technique involves: (1) The development of a VME standard high speed DAQ system and a MATLAB parallel cluster for offline signal analysis with full control of data flow; (2) The advantage of the <1.5 ns coincidence timing resolution between the neutron production and the gamma ray detection to reject noise; (3) A large 30% solid angle gamma ray coverage by an array of NaI(Tl) detectors. The neutron flux is measured through detecting the associated alpha-particle from the D-T fusion reaction in the neutron generator. Present cross section measurements using other techniques with limited timing resolution and solid angle coverage are in agreement at neutron energies lower than 6 MeV. At higher neutron energies reported results can disagree by more than 20%. This more accurate technique presented can distinguish between the differences in the reported results based on pulse-mode neutron source and neutron time-of-flight techniques, at higher neutron energies.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Dynamic Pelvic Floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. A computer then processes the signals and generates a series of images, each of ...

  7. Visualization of Water Behavior in the In-plane and Throughplane Directions in a PEFC using a Neutron Image Intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakawa, H.; Sugimoto, K.; Miyata, K.; Asano, H.; Takenaka, N.; Saito, Y.

    Water distributions of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) with 9-parallel channels during operation were visualized using a neutron radiography facility at B4 port in KUR (Kyoto University Research Reactor). An imaging system with a neutron image intensifier (I.I.) was employed for reducing the exposure time, and the water distributions in the in-plane and through-plane directions in the PEFC were alternately obtained every 20 sec. The accumulation processes from the GDL to the channels were confirmed. Water accumulated in the GDL at the cathode and evacuation into the channels started around 5 min. Water tended to accumulate at the edge of the ribs, and accumulated as water drops in the channels. The size of the water drops grew up to 1 mm which was the same size as the channel width and height, and the cell voltage was decreased because the liquid drops disturbed the air supply.

  8. Dynamical scalarization of neutron stars in scalar-tensor gravity theories

    CERN Document Server

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Ponce, Marcelo; Lehner, Luis

    2013-01-01

    We present a framework to study generic neutron-star binaries in scalar-tensor theories of gravity. Our formalism achieves this goal by suitably interfacing a post-Newtonian orbital evolution (described by a set of ordinary differential equations) with a set of non-linear algebraic equations, which provide a description of the scalar charge of each binary's component along the evolution in terms of isolated-star data. We validate this semi-analytical procedure by comparing its results to those of fully general-relativistic simulations, and use it to investigate the behavior of binary systems in large portions of the parameter space of scalar-tensor theories. This allows us to shed further light on the phenomena of "dynamical scalarization", which we uncovered in [Barausse, Palenzuela, Ponce and Lehner, Phys. Rev. D 87, 081506(R) (2013)] and which takes place in tight binaries, even for stars that have exactly zero scalar charge in isolation. We also employ our formalism to study representative binary systems,...

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Philip; Kosik, Ivan; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid imaging modality that integrates the strengths from both optical imaging and acoustic imaging while simultaneously overcoming many of their respective weaknesses. In previous work, we reported on a real-time 3D PAI system comprised of a 32-element hemispherical array of transducers. Using the system, we demonstrated the ability to capture photoacoustic data, reconstruct a 3D photoacoustic image, and display select slices of the 3D image every 1.4 s, where each 3D image resulted from a single laser pulse. The present study aimed to exploit the rapid imaging speed of an upgraded 3D PAI system by evaluating its ability to perform dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. The contrast dynamics can provide rich datasets that contain insight into perfusion, pharmacokinetics and physiology. We captured a series of 3D PA images of a flow phantom before and during injection of piglet and rabbit blood. Principal component analysis was utilized to classify the data according to its spatiotemporal information. The results suggested that this technique can be used to separate a sequence of 3D PA images into a series of images representative of main features according to spatiotemporal flow dynamics.

  10. [Staging urinary bladder cancer with dynamic MR imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, K; Narumi, Y; Nakamura, H; Nonomura, I; Okuyama, A

    2000-11-01

    This article reviews the magnetic resonance (MR) staging of bladder cancer. The multiplanar and soft-tissue characterization capabilities of MR imaging make it a valuable diagnostic tool to image the urinary bladder. Recent advances of MR imaging such as fast imaging, pelvic phased array coil, and dynamic imaging improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy for staging bladder cancer. Some patient-related factors are also important for optimal imaging of the urinary bladder, especially motion artifacts from the gastrointestinal tract and the degree of bladder distension. An anticholinergic agent should be used for suppressing the motion artifacts. Optimal bladder filling can be achieved by asking patients to void and drink water 1 hour before examinations. Scanning perpendicular to the bladder wall is necessary for optimal evaluation for staging bladder cancer. Oblique scanning is needed in cases when a tumor is not located on the dome, base, anterior wall, posterior wall, or lateral walls. The early phase image of dynamic imaging is most useful for staging tumors. Better contrast between tumor and bladder wall on dynamic images provides high staging accuracy, especially in differentiation between superficial tumors and tumors with muscle invasion. MR imaging is comparable to computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of lymph nodes. Although MR imaging currently is not appropriate for screening for bladder cancer and detecting small tumors, it has been proved to be most useful in the staging of bladder cancer.

  11. Neutron scatter camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Krenz, Kevin D.

    2010-06-22

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source has been described. This instrument can improve the signal to background compared to non imaging neutron detection techniques by a factor given by ratio of the angular resolution window to 4.pi.. In addition to being a neutron imager, this instrument will also be an excellent neutron spectrometer, and will be able to differentiate between different types of neutron sources (e.g. fission, alpha-n, cosmic ray, and D-D or D-T fusion). Moreover, the instrument is able to pinpoint the source location.

  12. Generation of high-dynamic range image from digital photo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Potemin, Igor S.; Zhdanov, Dmitry D.; Wang, Xu-yang; Cheng, Han

    2016-10-01

    A number of the modern applications such as medical imaging, remote sensing satellites imaging, virtual prototyping etc use the High Dynamic Range Image (HDRI). Generally to obtain HDRI from ordinary digital image the camera is calibrated. The article proposes the camera calibration method based on the clear sky as the standard light source and takes sky luminance from CIE sky model for the corresponding geographical coordinates and time. The article considers base algorithms for getting real luminance values from ordinary digital image and corresponding programmed implementation of the algorithms. Moreover, examples of HDRI reconstructed from ordinary images illustrate the article.

  13. Design of the polar neutron-imaging aperture for use at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatherley, V. E.; Barker, D. A.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Hibbard, R. L.; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Schmidt, D. W.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.

    2016-11-01

    The installation of a neutron imaging diagnostic with a polar view at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) required design of a new aperture, an extended pinhole array (PHA). This PHA is different from the pinhole array for the existing equatorial system due to significant changes in the alignment and recording systems. The complex set of component requirements, as well as significant space constraints in its intended location, makes the design of this aperture challenging. In addition, lessons learned from development of prior apertures mandate careful aperture metrology prior to first use. This paper discusses the PHA requirements, constraints, and the final design. The PHA design is complex due to size constraints, machining precision, assembly tolerances, and design requirements. When fully assembled, the aperture is a 15 mm × 15 mm × 200 mm tungsten and gold assembly. The PHA body is made from 2 layers of tungsten and 11 layers of gold. The gold layers include 4 layers containing penumbral openings, 4 layers containing pinholes and 3 spacer layers. In total, there are 64 individual, triangular pinholes with a field of view (FOV) of 200 μm and 6 penumbral apertures. Each pinhole is pointed to a slightly different location in the target plane, making the effective FOV of this PHA a 700 μm square in the target plane. The large FOV of the PHA reduces the alignment requirements both for the PHA and the target, allowing for alignment with a laser tracking system at NIF.

  14. Design of the polar neutron-imaging aperture for use at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatherley, V. E., E-mail: vef@lanl.gov; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Schmidt, D. W.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Barker, D. A.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Hibbard, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The installation of a neutron imaging diagnostic with a polar view at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) required design of a new aperture, an extended pinhole array (PHA). This PHA is different from the pinhole array for the existing equatorial system due to significant changes in the alignment and recording systems. The complex set of component requirements, as well as significant space constraints in its intended location, makes the design of this aperture challenging. In addition, lessons learned from development of prior apertures mandate careful aperture metrology prior to first use. This paper discusses the PHA requirements, constraints, and the final design. The PHA design is complex due to size constraints, machining precision, assembly tolerances, and design requirements. When fully assembled, the aperture is a 15 mm × 15 mm × 200 mm tungsten and gold assembly. The PHA body is made from 2 layers of tungsten and 11 layers of gold. The gold layers include 4 layers containing penumbral openings, 4 layers containing pinholes and 3 spacer layers. In total, there are 64 individual, triangular pinholes with a field of view (FOV) of 200 μm and 6 penumbral apertures. Each pinhole is pointed to a slightly different location in the target plane, making the effective FOV of this PHA a 700 μm square in the target plane. The large FOV of the PHA reduces the alignment requirements both for the PHA and the target, allowing for alignment with a laser tracking system at NIF.

  15. Application of backscatter electrons for large area imaging of cavities produced by neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, V. I.; Averin, S. A.; Panchenko, V. L.; Portnykh, I. A.; Freyer, P. D.; Giannuzzi, L. A.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that with proper optimization, backscattered electrons in a scanning electron microscope can produce images of cavity distribution in austenitic steels over a large specimen surface for a depth of ∼500-700 nm, eliminating the need for electropolishing or multiple specimen production. This technique is especially useful for quantifying cavity structures when the specimen is known or suspected to contain very heterogeneous distributions of cavities. Examples are shown for cold-worked EK-164, a very heterogeneously-swelling Russian fast reactor fuel cladding steel and also for AISI 304, a homogeneously-swelling Western steel used for major structural components of light water cooled reactors. This non-destructive overview method of quantifying cavity distribution can be used to direct the location and number of required focused ion beam prepared transmission electron microscopy specimens for examination of either neutron or ion-irradiated specimens. This technique can also be applied in stereo mode to quantify the depth dependence of cavity distributions.

  16. Transport in fuel cells: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and neutron imaging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Douglas Scott

    This dissertation focuses on two powerful methods of performing in-situ studies of transport limitations in fuel cells. The first is electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) while the second is neutron imaging. Three fuel cell systems are studied in this work: polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and enzyme fuel cells (EFCs). The first experimental section of this dissertation focuses on application of EIS and neutron imaging to an operating PEMFC. The effects of cathode-side humidity and flow rate, as well as cell temperature and a transient response to cathode-side humidity, were studied for a PEMFC via EIS. It was found that increased air humidity in the cathode resulted in greatly reduced cathode resistance as well as a significant reduction in membrane resistance. The anode resistance was only slightly reduced in this case. Increased air flow rate was observed to have little effect on any resistance in the PEMFC, though slight reductions in both the anode and the cathode were observed. Increased cell temperature resulted in decreased cathode and anode resistances. Finally, the transient response to increased humidity exhibited unstable behavior for both the anode and the cathode resistances and the PEMFC power output. Neutron imaging allowed the calculation of water content throughout the PEMFC, showing a maximum in water content at the cathode gas diffusion layer - membrane interface. The second experimental section of this dissertation delves into the world of microbial fuel cells. Multiple long-term observations of changes in internal resistances were performed and illustrated the reduction in anode resistance as the bacterial community was established. Over this same time period, the cathode resistance was observed to have increased; these two phenomena suggest that the anode improved over time while the cathode suffered from degradation. Increased anode fluid ionic strength and flow rate both led to significant

  17. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Model-Based Perfusion Analysis in Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiuru Aaro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The "Dynamic Chest Image Analysis" project aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the dynamic pulmonary imaging technique. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model for ventilation analysis. This paper presents a new model-based method for pulmonary perfusion analysis. According to perfusion properties, we first devise a novel mathematical function to form a perfusion model. A simple yet accurate approach is further introduced to extract cardiac systolic and diastolic phases from the heart, so that this cardiac information may be utilized to accelerate the perfusion analysis and improve its sensitivity in detecting pulmonary perfusion abnormalities. This makes perfusion analysis not only fast but also robust in computation; consequently, perfusion analysis becomes computationally feasible without using contrast media. Our clinical case studies with 52 patients show that this technique is effective for pulmonary embolism even without using contrast media, demonstrating consistent correlations with computed tomography (CT and nuclear medicine (NM studies. This fluoroscopical examination takes only about 2 seconds for perfusion study with only low radiation dose to patient, involving no preparation, no radioactive isotopes, and no contrast media.

  18. Dynamics and gravitational-wave emission of neutron-star merger remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Bauswein, A; Stergioulas, N; Janka, H -T

    2016-01-01

    The coalescence of a neutron-star binary is likely to result in the formation of a neutron-star merger remnant for a large range of binary mass configurations. The massive merger remnant shows strong oscillations, which are excited by the merging process, and emits gravitational waves. Here we discuss possibilities and prospects of inferring unknown stellar properties of neutron stars by the detection of postmerger gravitational-wave emission, which thus leads to constraints of the equation of state of high-density matter. In particular, the dominant oscillation frequency of the postmerger remnant provides tight limits to neutron-star radii. We mention first steps towards a practical implementation of future gravitational-wave searches for the postmerger emission. Moreover, we outline possibilities to estimate the unknown maximum mass of nonrotating neutron stars from such types of measurements. Finally, we review the origin and scientific implications of secondary peaks in the gravitational-wave spectrum of ...

  19. Bulk Hydrogen Content OF High-Silica Rocks in Gale Crater With the Active Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, T. S. J.; Hardgrove, C.; Litvak, M.; Mitrofanov, I.; Boynton, W. V.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Jun, I.; Mischna, M.; Tate, C. G.; Moersch, J.; Harshman, K.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Malakhov, A.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Sanin, A. B.; Vostrukhin, A.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Franz, H. B.; Thompson, L.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover recently traversed over plateaus of mafic aeolian sandstones (the 'Stimson' formation) that overlie mudstones (the 'Murray' formation). Within the Stimson formation we observed many lighter-toned, halo-forming features, that are potentially indicative of fluid alteration (see Fig. 1). These halo features extend for tens of meters laterally and are approx.1 meter wide. The halo features were characterized by Curiosity's geochemical instruments: Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS), Chemin, Chemcam and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM). With respect to the host (unaltered) Stimson rocks, fracture halos were significantly enriched in silicon and low in iron [1]. Changes in hydrogen abundance (due to its large neutron scattering cross section) greatly influence the magnitude of the thermal neutron response from the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument [2]. There are also some elemental species, e.g. chlorine, iron, and nickel, that have significant microscopic neutron absorption cross sections. These elements can be abundant and variable results provide a useful estimate of the lower bound for bulk hydrogen content (assuming a homogeneous distribution).

  20. Point defect dynamics in sodium aluminum hydrides - a combined quasielastic neutron scattering and density functional theory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Qing; Voss, Johannes; Jacobsen, H.S.

    2007-01-01

    we study hydrogen dynamics in undoped and TiCl3-doped samples of NaAlH4 and Na3AlH6 using a combination of density functional theory calculations and quasielastic neutron scattering. Hydrogen dynamics is found to be limited and mediated by hydrogen vacancies in both alanate phases, requiring......Understanding the catalytic role of titanium-based additives on the reversible hydrogenation of complex metal hydrides is an essential step towards developing hydrogen storage materials for the transport sector. Improved bulk diffusion of hydrogen is one of the proposed catalytic effects, and here...

  1. Hydrogen dynamics in Na3AlH6: A combined density functional theory and quasielastic neutron scattering study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Johannes; Shi, Qing; Jacobsen, Hjalte Sylvest

    2007-01-01

    alanate with TiCl3, and here we study hydrogen dynamics in doped and undoped Na3AlH6 using a combination of density functional theory calculations and quasielastic neutron scattering. The hydrogen dynamics is found to be vacancy mediated and dominated by localized jump events, whereas long-range bulk......Understanding the elusive catalytic role of titanium-based additives on the reversible hydrogenation of complex hydrides is an essential step toward developing hydrogen storage materials for the transport sector. Improved bulk diffusion of hydrogen is one of the proposed effects of doping sodium...

  2. ANTS — a simulation package for secondary scintillation Anger-camera type detector in thermal neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A.; Defendi, I.; Engels, R.; Fraga, F. A. F.; Fraga, M. M. F. R.; Guerard, B.; Jurkovic, M.; Kemmerling, G.; Manzin, G.; Margato, L. M. S.; Niko, H.; Pereira, L.; Petrillo, C.; Peyaud, A.; Piscitelli, F.; Raspino, D.; Rhodes, N. J.; Sacchetti, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Van Esch, P.; Zeitelhack, K.

    2012-08-01

    A custom and fully interactive simulation package ANTS (Anger-camera type Neutron detector: Toolkit for Simulations) has been developed to optimize the design and operation conditions of secondary scintillation Anger-camera type gaseous detectors for thermal neutron imaging. The simulation code accounts for all physical processes related to the neutron capture, energy deposition pattern, drift of electrons of the primary ionization and secondary scintillation. The photons are traced considering the wavelength-resolved refraction and transmission of the output window. Photo-detection accounts for the wavelength-resolved quantum efficiency, angular response, area sensitivity, gain and single-photoelectron spectra of the photomultipliers (PMTs). The package allows for several geometrical shapes of the PMT photocathode (round, hexagonal and square) and offers a flexible PMT array configuration: up to 100 PMTs in a custom arrangement with the square or hexagonal packing. Several read-out patterns of the PMT array are implemented. Reconstruction of the neutron capture position (projection on the plane of the light emission) is performed using the center of gravity, maximum likelihood or weighted least squares algorithm. Simulation results reproduce well the preliminary results obtained with a small-scale detector prototype. ANTS executables can be downloaded from http://coimbra.lip.pt/~andrei/.

  3. Analysis of Dynamic Brain Imaging Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, P

    1998-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques for probing brain function, including functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, intrinsic and extrinsic contrast optical imaging, and magnetoencephalography, generate large data sets with complex content. In this paper we develop appropriate techniques of analysis and visualization of such imaging data, in order to separate the signal from the noise, as well as to characterize the signal. The techniques developed fall into the general category of multivariate time series analysis, and in particular we extensively use the multitaper framework of spectral analysis. We develop specific protocols for the analysis of fMRI, optical imaging and MEG data, and illustrate the techniques by applications to real data sets generated by these imaging modalities. In general, the analysis protocols involve two distinct stages: `noise' characterization and suppression, and `signal' characterization and visualization. An important general conclusion of our study is the utility of a frequency-based repres...

  4. Water dynamics as affected by interaction with biomolecules and change of thermodynamic state: a neutron scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchini, A.; Paciaroni, A.; Petrillo, C.; Sebastiani, F.; De Francesco, A.; Sacchetti, F.

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of water as subtly perturbed by both the interaction with biomolecules and the variation of temperature and pressure has been investigated via neutron scattering spectroscopy. A measurement of inelastic neutron scattering devoted to the study of the coherent THz dynamics of water in a water-rich mixture with DNA (hydration level of 1 g DNA/15 g D2O) at room temperature is reported. The DNA hydration water coherent dynamics is characterised by the presence of collective modes, whose dispersion relations are similar to those observed in bulk water. These dispersion relations are well described by the interaction model developed in the case of bulk water, and the existence of a fast sound is experimentally demonstrated. The behaviour of the collective water dynamics was complemented by studying the single-particle dynamics of bulk water along the isotherm T = 298 K in the pressure range 0.1-350 MPa by means of incoherent scattering. This experiment is an attempt to simulate the change of the water molecular arrangement due to the interaction with DNA, by increasing the pressure as the presence of the biomolecule produces an increase in the density. An anomaly is found in the behaviour of the relaxation time derived from the quasi-elastic scattering signal, which can be related to the hypothetical second critical point in water. This anomaly and the transition from slow to fast sound take place in the same Q range, thus suggesting that the two phenomena could be related at some microscopic level.

  5. High Dynamic Range Processing for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukerkar, Preeti A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To minimize feature loss in T1- and T2-weighted MRI by merging multiple MR images acquired at different TR and TE to generate an image with increased dynamic range. Materials and Methods High Dynamic Range (HDR) processing techniques from the field of photography were applied to a series of acquired MR images. Specifically, a method to parameterize the algorithm for MRI data was developed and tested. T1- and T2-weighted images of a number of contrast agent phantoms and a live mouse were acquired with varying TR and TE parameters. The images were computationally merged to produce HDR-MR images. All acquisitions were performed on a 7.05 T Bruker PharmaScan with a multi-echo spin echo pulse sequence. Results HDR-MRI delineated bright and dark features that were either saturated or indistinguishable from background in standard T1- and T2-weighted MRI. The increased dynamic range preserved intensity gradation over a larger range of T1 and T2 in phantoms and revealed more anatomical features in vivo. Conclusions We have developed and tested a method to apply HDR processing to MR images. The increased dynamic range of HDR-MR images as compared to standard T1- and T2-weighted images minimizes feature loss caused by magnetization recovery or low SNR. PMID:24250788

  6. High dynamic range processing for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy H Hung

    Full Text Available To minimize feature loss in T1- and T2-weighted MRI by merging multiple MR images acquired at different TR and TE to generate an image with increased dynamic range.High Dynamic Range (HDR processing techniques from the field of photography were applied to a series of acquired MR images. Specifically, a method to parameterize the algorithm for MRI data was developed and tested. T1- and T2-weighted images of a number of contrast agent phantoms and a live mouse were acquired with varying TR and TE parameters. The images were computationally merged to produce HDR-MR images. All acquisitions were performed on a 7.05 T Bruker PharmaScan with a multi-echo spin echo pulse sequence.HDR-MRI delineated bright and dark features that were either saturated or indistinguishable from background in standard T1- and T2-weighted MRI. The increased dynamic range preserved intensity gradation over a larger range of T1 and T2 in phantoms and revealed more anatomical features in vivo.We have developed and tested a method to apply HDR processing to MR images. The increased dynamic range of HDR-MR images as compared to standard T1- and T2-weighted images minimizes feature loss caused by magnetization recovery or low SNR.

  7. RADIANCE DOMAIN COMPOSITING FOR HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Renu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available High dynamic range imaging aims at creating an image with a range of intensity variations larger than the range supported by a camera sensor. Most commonly used methods combine multiple exposure low dynamic range (LDR images, to obtain the high dynamic range (HDR image. Available methods typically neglect the noise term while finding appropriate weighting functions to estimate the camera response function as well as the radiance map. We look at the HDR imaging problem in a denoising frame work and aim at reconstructing a low noise radiance map from noisy low dynamic range images, which is tone mapped to get the LDR equivalent of the HDR image. We propose a maximum aposteriori probability (MAP based reconstruction of the HDR image using Gibb’s prior to model the radiance map, with total variation (TV as the prior to avoid unnecessary smoothing of the radiance field. To make the computation with TV prior efficient, we extend the majorize-minimize method of upper bounding the total variation by a quadratic function to our case which has a nonlinear term arising from the camera response function. A theoretical justification for doing radiance domain denoising as opposed to image domain denoising is also provided.

  8. Personal computer aided cerebral perfusion imaging with dynamic CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林燕; 高培毅

    2004-01-01

    @@Reports on the clinical implementation of dynamic computerised tomography (CT) perfusion imaging and quantitative measurement have increased dramatically of late.1-8 The advantages of dynamic CT perfusion imaging and quantitative measurement for the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction have been acknowledged. However, most overseas CT vendors set perfusion imaging software package as an option for graphic workstation at a too high price for domestic practitioners. To foster the domestic implementation and development of this new technology, we have extended the earlier work.1,2 Applying the theory of central volume principle to DICOM 3.0 standard forms of prime CT images, we developed dynamic CT perfusion imaging and quantitative measure-ment programmes for PCs using Visual C+ + in Windows 98 system.

  9. Exploring the potential of the cosmic-ray neutron method to measure interception storage dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobi, Jannis; Bogena, Heye; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-04-01

    Cosmic-ray neutron soil moisture probes are an emerging technology that relies on the negative correlation between near-surface fast neutron counts and soil moisture content. Hydrogen atoms in the soil, which are mainly present as water, moderate the secondary neutrons on the way back to the surface. Any application of this method needs to consider the sensitivity of the neutron counts to additional sources of hydrogen (e.g. above- and below-ground biomass, humidity of the lower atmosphere, lattice water of the soil minerals, organic matter and water in the litter layer, intercepted water in the canopy, and soil organic matter). In this study, we analyzed the effects of canopy-intercepted water on the cosmic-ray neutron counts. For this, an arable field cropped with sugar beet was instrumented with several cosmic-ray neutron probes and a wireless sensor network with more than 140 in-situ soil moisture sensors. Additionally rainfall interception was estimated using a new approach coupling throughfall measurements and leaf wetness sensors. The derived interception storage was used to correct for interception effects on cosmic ray neutrons to enhance soil water content prediction. Furthermore, the potential for a simultaneous prediction of above- and below-ground biomass, soil moisture and interception was tested.

  10. Non-Destructive Study of Bulk Crystallinity and Elemental Composition of Natural Gold Single Crystal Samples by Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, Anton S; Rakovan, John; Shinohara, Takenao; Kockelmann, Winfried; Losko, Adrian S; Vogel, Sven C

    2017-01-19

    Energy-resolved neutron imaging enables non-destructive analyses of bulk structure and elemental composition, which can be resolved with high spatial resolution at bright pulsed spallation neutron sources due to recent developments and improvements of neutron counting detectors. This technique, suitable for many applications, is demonstrated here with a specific study of ~5-10 mm thick natural gold samples. Through the analysis of neutron absorption resonances the spatial distribution of palladium (with average elemental concentration of ~0.4 atom% and ~5 atom%) is mapped within the gold samples. At the same time, the analysis of coherent neutron scattering in the thermal and cold energy regimes reveals which samples have a single-crystalline bulk structure through the entire sample volume. A spatially resolved analysis is possible because neutron transmission spectra are measured simultaneously on each detector pixel in the epithermal, thermal and cold energy ranges. With a pixel size of 55 μm and a detector-area of 512 by 512 pixels, a total of 262,144 neutron transmission spectra are measured concurrently. The results of our experiments indicate that high resolution energy-resolved neutron imaging is a very attractive analytical technique in cases where other conventional non-destructive methods are ineffective due to sample opacity.

  11. Dynamical ejecta from precessing neutron star-black hole mergers with a hot, nuclear-theory based equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucart, F.; Desai, D.; Brege, W.; Duez, M. D.; Kasen, D.; Hemberger, D. A.; Kidder, L. E.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Scheel, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    Neutron star-black hole binaries are among the strongest sources of gravitational waves detectable by current observatories. They can also power bright electromagnetic signals (gamma-ray bursts, kilonovae), and may be a significant source of production of r-process nuclei. A misalignment of the black hole spin with respect to the orbital angular momentum leads to precession of that spin and of the orbital plane, and has a significant effect on the properties of the post-merger remnant and of the material ejected by the merger. We present a first set of simulations of precessing neutron star-black hole mergers using a hot, composition dependent, nuclear-theory based equation of state (DD2). We show that the mass of the remnant and of the dynamical ejecta are broadly consistent with the result of simulations using simpler equations of state, while differences arise when considering the dynamics of the merger and the velocity of the ejecta. We show that the latter can easily be understood from assumptions about the composition of low-density, cold material in the different equations of state, and propose an updated estimate for the ejecta velocity which takes those effects into account. We also present an updated mesh-refinement algorithm which allows us to improve the numerical resolution used to evolve neutron star-black hole mergers.

  12. The Mission and Technology of a Gas Dynamic Trap Neutron Source for Fusion Material and Component Testing and Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A; Kulcinski, J; Molvik, A; Ryutov, D; Santarius, J; Simonen, T; Wirth, B D; Ying, A

    2009-11-23

    The successful operation (with {beta} {le} 60%, classical ions and electrons with Te = 250 eV) of the Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) device at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) in Novosibirsk, Russia, extrapolates to a 2 MW/m{sup 2} Dynamic Trap Neutron Source (DTNS), which burns only {approx}100 g of tritium per full power year. The DTNS has no serious physics, engineering, or technology obstacles; the extension of neutral beam lines to steady state can use demonstrated engineering; and it supports near-term tokamaks and volume neutron sources. The DTNS provides a neutron spectrum similar to that of ITER and satisfies the missions specified by the materials community to test fusion materials (listed as one of the top grand challenges for engineering in the 21st century by the U.S. National Academy of Engineering) and subcomponents (including tritium-breeding blankets) needed to construct DEMO. The DTNS could serve as the first Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), called for by ReNeW, and could provide the data necessary for licensing subsequent FSNFs.

  13. Optical imaging of fast, dynamic neurophysiological function.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rector, D. M. (David M.); Carter, K. M. (Kathleen M.); Yao, X. (Xincheng); George, J. S. (John S.)

    2002-01-01

    Fast evoked responses were imaged from rat dorsal medulla and whisker barrel cortex. To investigate the biophysical mechanisms involved, fast optical responses associated with isolated crustacean nerve stimulation were recorded using birefringence and scattered light. Such studies allow optimization of non-invasive imaging techniques being developed for use in humans.

  14. SU-C-204-05: Simulations of a Portal Imaging System for Conformal and Intensity Modulated Fast Neutron Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, S St.; Argento, D; Stewart, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The University of Washington Medical Center offers neutron therapy for the palliative and definitive treatment of selected cancers. In vivo field verification has the potential to improve the safe and effective delivery of neutron therapy. We propose a portal imaging method that relies on the creation of positron emitting isotopes (11C and 15O) through (n, 2n) reactions with a PMMA plate placed below the patient. After field delivery, the plate is retrieved from the vault and imaged using a reader that detects annihilation photons. The spatial pattern of activity produced in the PMMA plate provides information to reconstruct the neutron fluence map needed to confirm treatment delivery. Methods: We used MCNP to simulate the accumulation of 11C activity in a slab of PMMA 2 mm thick, and GATE was used to simulate the sensitivity and spatial resolution of a prototype imaging system. BGO crystal thicknesses of 1 cm, 2 cm and 3 cm were simulated with detector separations of 2 cm. Crystal pitches of 2 mm and 4 mm were evaluated. Back-projection of the events was used to create a planar image. The spatial resolution was taken to be the FWHM of the reconstructed point source image. Results: The system sensitivity for a point source in the center of the field of view was found to range from 58% for 1 cm thick BGO with 2 mm crystal pitch to 74% for the 3 cm thick BGO crystals with 4 mm crystal pitch. The spatial resolution at the center of the field of view was found to be 1.5 mm for the system with 2 mm crystal pitch and 2.8 mm for the system with the 4 mm crystal pitch. Conclusion: BGO crystals with 4 mm crystal pitch and 3 cm length would offer the best sensitivity reader.

  15. High Dynamic Range Image Based on Multiple Exposure Time Synthetization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Shimodaira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available High dynamic range of illumination may cause serious distortions and otherproblems in viewing and further processing of digital images. In this paper a new tonereproduction preprocessing algorithm is introduced which may help in developing hardly ornon-viewable features and content of the images. The method is based on the synthetizationof multiple exposure images from which the dense part, i.e. regions having the maximumlevel of detail are included in the output image. The resulted high quality HDR image makeseasier the information extraction and effectively supports the further processing of theimage.

  16. Study on beam geometry and image reconstruction algorithm in fast neutron computerized tomography at NECTAR facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China); Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching 80748 (Germany); Buecherl, T. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching 80748 (Germany); Zou, Y., E-mail: zouyubin@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China); Guo, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-09-21

    Investigations on the fast neutron beam geometry for the NECTAR facility are presented. The results of MCNP simulations and experimental measurements of the beam distributions at NECTAR are compared. Boltzmann functions are used to describe the beam profile in the detection plane assuming the area source to be set up of large number of single neutron point sources. An iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithm is developed, realized and verified by both simulated and measured projection data. The feasibility for improved reconstruction in fast neutron computerized tomography at the NECTAR facility is demonstrated.

  17. Dynamic Imaging of a Pigmented Free-Floating Vitreous Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Dilraj S; Fekrat, Sharon

    2016-10-01

    The authors present an incidentally noted pigmented anterior vitreous cyst in an asymptomatic male adult. Observation was elected. Stability during the course of 2 years and mobility of the vitreous cyst using dynamic imaging are demonstrated. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:975-977.].

  18. Study on the Medical Image Distributed Dynamic Processing Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张全海; 施鹏飞

    2003-01-01

    To meet the challenge of implementing rapidly advanced, time-consuming medical image processing algorithms,it is necessary to develop a medical image processing technology to process a 2D or 3D medical image dynamically on the web. But in a premier system, only static image processing can be provided with the limitation of web technology. The development of Java and CORBA (common object request broker architecture) overcomes the shortcoming of the web static application and makes the dynamic processing of medical images on the web available. To develop an open solution of distributed computing, we integrate the Java, and web with the CORBA and present a web-based medical image dynamic processing methed, which adopts Java technology as the language to program application and components of the web and utilies the CORBA architecture to cope with heterogeneous property of a complex distributed system. The method also provides a platform-independent, transparent processing architecture to implement the advanced image routines and enable users to access large dataset and resources according to the requirements of medical applications. The experiment in this paper shows that the medical image dynamic processing method implemented on the web by using Java and the CORBA is feasible.

  19. The HD molecule in small and medium cages of clathrate hydrates: Quantum dynamics studied by neutron scattering measurements and computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colognesi, Daniele; Celli, Milva; Ulivi, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.ulivi@isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Powers, Anna; Xu, Minzhong [Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, New York 10003 (United States); Bačić, Zlatko, E-mail: zlatko.bacic@nyu.edu [Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, New York 10003 (United States); NYU-ECNU Center for Computational Chemistry at NYU Shanghai, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2014-10-07

    We report inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements on molecular hydrogen deuteride (HD) trapped in binary cubic (sII) and hexagonal (sH) clathrate hydrates, performed at low temperature using two different neutron spectrometers in order to probe both energy and momentum transfer. The INS spectra of binary clathrate samples exhibit a rich structure containing sharp bands arising from both the rotational transitions and the rattling modes of the guest molecule. For the clathrates with sII structure, there is a very good agreement with the rigorous fully quantum simulations which account for the subtle effects of the anisotropy, angular and radial, of the host cage on the HD microscopic dynamics. The sH clathrate sample presents a much greater challenge, due to the uncertainties regarding the crystal structure, which is known only for similar crystals with different promoter, but nor for HD (or H{sub 2}) plus methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE-d12)

  20. Structure of molten CaSiO3: neutron diffraction isotope substitution with aerodynamic levitation and molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, L B; Benmore, C J; Weber, J K R; Tumber, S; Lazareva, L; Neuefeind, J; Santodonato, L; Du, J; Parise, J B

    2012-11-15

    We have performed neutron diffraction isotopic substitution experiments on aerodynamically levitated droplets of CaSiO(3), to directly extract intermediate and local structural information on the Ca environment. The results show a substantial broadening of the first Ca-O peak in the pair distribution function of the melt compared to the glass, which comprises primarily of 6- and 7-fold coordinated Ca-polyhedra. The broadening can be explained by a redistribution of Ca-O bond lengths, especially toward longer distances in the liquid. The first order neutron difference function provides a test of recent molecular dynamics simulations and supports the MD model which contains short chains or channels of edge shared Ca-octahedra in the liquid state. It is suggested that the polymerization of Ca-polyhedra is responsible for the fragile viscosity behavior of the melt and the glass forming ability in CaSiO(3).

  1. Dynamics of elements in soil treated with increasing doses sewage sludge for instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Helder de; Mortatti, Jefferson; Vendramini, Diego; Lopes, Renato A.; Nolasco, Murilo M. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis]. E-mail: helder@cena.usp.br; Sarries, Gabriel A. [Escola Superior de Agricultura ' Luiz de Queiroz' (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas]. E-mail: gabriel@carpa.ciagri.usp.br; Furlan, Adriana [UNESP, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Petrologia e Metalogenia]. E-mail: adriana_furlangumiere@yahoo.com.br

    2007-07-01

    In this work the dynamics of the elements was analyzed The, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Hf, La, In the, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Th, U, Yb and Zn in a profile of a red-yellow latossolo, in the depths of 0-5, 5-10, 10-30 and 30-50 cm, and dose of the biosolid of 0, 25, 124 and 375 t ha{sup -1}, of the station of treatment of sewer of Barueri, Sao Paulo. The experiment was carried out in areas of 3,05 m{sup 2} in the times of 2,2; 4,0; 6,6; 14,3 and 21 months. For analysis of the elementary composition, it was used of the analysis technique by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The experiment was submitted under normal tropical conditions in a forest station in Itatinga, Sao Paulo, of the University of Sao Paulo. For better details, the factors depth, doses and times statistical analyses of the results of the elementary composition of the soil samples were made. For all the biossolid doses conditioned with polymeric and applied in the soil, the composition of 17 of the 18 elements in the soil were not altered, with exception for Cr in the studied times. The elements As, Br, Ce, Co, Fe, Hf, La, Sm, Ta, Th, U and Yb presented higher levels in the deepest layers of soil; already the elements Cr, In the, Sb and Zn presented higher concentrations in the superficial layers. (author)

  2. Increasing the Dynamic Range of Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    In current ultrasound systems the dynamic range of detectable velocities is susceptible to the selected pulse repetition frequency, thus limiting the dynamic range of flow mapping. To establish the feasibility of extending the range of detectable velocities towards low velocity vessels, results...... standard deviations are 1.59% and 6.12%, respectively. The presented method can improve the estimates by synthesizing a lower pulse repetition frequency, thereby increasing the dynamic range of the vector velocity imaging....

  3. Neutron resonances in the compound nucleus: Parity nonconservation to dynamic temperature measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, V.W.

    1997-08-01

    Experiments using epithermal neutrons that interact to form compound-nuclear resonances serve a wide range of scientific applications. Changes in transmission which are correlated to polarization reversal in incident neutrons have been used to study parity nonconservation in the compound nucleus for a wide range of targets. The ensemble of measured parity asymmetries provides statistical information for the extraction of the rms parity-violating mean-square matrix element as a function of mass. Parity nonconservation in neutron resonances can also be used to determine the polarization of neutron beams. Finally the motion of target atoms results in an observed temperature-dependent Doppler broadening of resonance line widths. This broadening can be used to determine temperatures on a fast time scale of one microsecond or less.

  4. Imaging plants dynamics in heterogenic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorani, Fabio; Rascher, Uwe; Jahnke, Siegfried; Schurr, Ulrich

    2012-04-01

    Noninvasive imaging sensors and computer vision approaches are key technologies to quantify plant structure, physiological status, and performance. Today, imaging sensors exploit a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and they can be deployed to measure a growing number of traits, also in heterogenic environments. Recent advances include the possibility to acquire high-resolution spectra by imaging spectroscopy and classify signatures that might be informative of plant development, nutrition, health, and disease. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of surfaces and volume is of particular interest, enabling functional and mechanistic analyses. While taking pictures is relatively easy, quantitative interpretation often remains challenging and requires integrating knowledge of sensor physics, image analysis, and complex traits characterizing plant phenotypes.

  5. Experience of the Indirect Neutron Radiography Method Based on the X-ray Imaging Plate at CARR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guohai; Han, Songbai; Wang, Hongli; He, Linfeng; Wang, Yu; Wu, Meimei; Liu, Yuntao; Chen, Dongfeng

    Indirect neutron radiography (INR) experiments by X-ray imaging plate were carried out at the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR). The key experiment parameters were optimized, especially the exposure time of the neutron converter andimaging plate. The optimized total exposure time is 37.25 min, it is two-fifths of the timebased on the film method under the same experimental conditions. The qualitative and quantitativeinspections were tested with dummy nuclear fuel rods and a water temperaturesensor ofa motor vehicle. The spring in the sensor and the defects of the dummy fuel rod's pellets can be qualitatively detected. The thickness of the tape at one position on the cladding of the dummy nuclear fuel rodwas quantitatively calculated to be 9.57 layers with the relative error of ±4.3%.

  6. Accelerating Dynamic Cardiac MR Imaging Using Structured Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nian Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing (CS has produced promising results on dynamic cardiac MR imaging by exploiting the sparsity in image series. In this paper, we propose a new method to improve the CS reconstruction for dynamic cardiac MRI based on the theory of structured sparse representation. The proposed method user the PCA subdictionaries for adaptive sparse representation and suppresses the sparse coding noise to obtain good reconstructions. An accelerated iterative shrinkage algorithm is used to solve the optimization problem and achieve a fast convergence rate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method improves the reconstruction quality of dynamic cardiac cine MRI over the state-of-the-art CS method.

  7. Experimental Component Characterization, Monte-Carlo-Based Image Generation and Source Reconstruction for the Neutron Imaging System of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, C A; Moran, M J

    2007-08-21

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is one of seven ignition target diagnostics under development for the National Ignition Facility. The NIS is required to record hot-spot (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (6-10 MeV) images with a resolution of 10 microns and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10 at the 20% contour. The NIS is a valuable diagnostic since the downscattered neutrons reveal the spatial distribution of the cold fuel during an ignition attempt, providing important information in the case of a failed implosion. The present study explores the parameter space of several line-of-sight (LOS) configurations that could serve as the basis for the final design. Six commercially available organic scintillators were experimentally characterized for their light emission decay profile and neutron sensitivity. The samples showed a long lived decay component that makes direct recording of a downscattered image impossible. The two best candidates for the NIS detector material are: EJ232 (BC422) plastic fibers or capillaries filled with EJ399B. A Monte Carlo-based end-to-end model of the NIS was developed to study the imaging capabilities of several LOS configurations and verify that the recovered sources meet the design requirements. The model includes accurate neutron source distributions, aperture geometries (square pinhole, triangular wedge, mini-penumbral, annular and penumbral), their point spread functions, and a pixelated scintillator detector. The modeling results show that a useful downscattered image can be obtained by recording the primary peak and the downscattered images, and then subtracting a decayed version of the former from the latter. The difference images need to be deconvolved in order to obtain accurate source distributions. The images are processed using a frequency-space modified-regularization algorithm and low-pass filtering. The resolution and SNR of these sources are quantified by using two surrogate sources. The simulations show that all LOS

  8. Advanced High Dynamic Range Imaging Theory and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Banterle, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Imaging techniques seek to simulate the array of light that reaches our eyes to provide the illusion of sensing scenes directly. Both photography and computer graphics deal with the generation of images. Both disciplines have to cope with the high dynamic range in the energy of visible light that human eyes can sense. Traditionally photography and computer graphics took different approaches to the high dynamic range problem. Work over the last ten years though has unified these disciplines and created powerful new tools for the creation of complex, compelling and realistic images. This book pr

  9. Accelerated dynamic EPR imaging using fast acquisition and compressive recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2016-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) allows quantitative imaging of tissue redox status, which provides important information about ischemic syndromes, cancer and other pathologies. For continuous wave EPR imaging, however, poor signal-to-noise ratio and low acquisition efficiency limit its ability to image dynamic processes in vivo including tissue redox, where conditions can change rapidly. Here, we present a data acquisition and processing framework that couples fast acquisition with compressive sensing-inspired image recovery to enable EPR-based redox imaging with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The fast acquisition (FA) allows collecting more, albeit noisier, projections in a given scan time. The composite regularization based processing method, called spatio-temporal adaptive recovery (STAR), not only exploits sparsity in multiple representations of the spatio-temporal image but also adaptively adjusts the regularization strength for each representation based on its inherent level of the sparsity. As a result, STAR adjusts to the disparity in the level of sparsity across multiple representations, without introducing any tuning parameter. Our simulation and phantom imaging studies indicate that a combination of fast acquisition and STAR (FASTAR) enables high-fidelity recovery of volumetric image series, with each volumetric image employing less than 10 s of scan. In addition to image fidelity, the time constants derived from FASTAR also match closely to the ground truth even when a small number of projections are used for recovery. This development will enhance the capability of EPR to study fast dynamic processes that cannot be investigated using existing EPR imaging techniques.

  10. Water dynamics in hardened ordinary Portland cement paste or concrete: from quasielastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordallo, Heloisa N; Aldridge, Laurence P; Desmedt, Arnaud

    2006-09-14

    Portland cement reacts with water to form an amorphous paste through a chemical reaction called hydration. In concrete the formation of pastes causes the mix to harden and gain strength to form a rock-like mass. Within this process lies the key to a remarkable peculiarity of concrete: it is plastic and soft when newly mixed, strong and durable when hardened. These qualities explain why one material, concrete, can build skyscrapers, bridges, sidewalks and superhighways, houses, and dams. The character of the concrete is determined by the quality of the paste. Creep and shrinkage of concrete specimens occur during the loss and gain of water from cement paste. To better understand the role of water in mature concrete, a series of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments were carried out on cement pastes with water/cement ratio varying between 0.32 and 0.6. The samples were cured for about 28 days in sealed containers so that the initial water content would not change. These experiments were carried out with an actual sample of Portland cement rather than with the components of cement studied by other workers. The QENS spectra differentiated between three different water interactions: water that was chemically bound into the cement paste, the physically bound or "glassy water" that interacted with the surface of the gel pores in the paste, and unbound water molecules that are confined within the larger capillary pores of cement paste. The dynamics of the "glassy" and "unboud" water in an extended time scale, from a hundred picoseconds to a few nanoseconds, could be clearly differentiated from the data. While the observed motions on the picosecond time scale are mainly stochastic reorientations of the water molecules, the dynamics observed on the nanosecond range can be attributed to long-range diffusion. Diffusive motion was characterized by diffusion constants in the range of (0.6-2) 10(-9) m(2)/s, with significant reduction compared to the rate of diffusion

  11. Stereo Vision-Based High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Differently-Exposed Image Pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Jae; Ji, Seo-Won; Kang, Seok-Jae; Jung, Seung-Won; Ko, Sung-Jea

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging method based on the stereo vision system is presented. The proposed method uses differently exposed low dynamic range (LDR) images captured from a stereo camera. The stereo LDR images are first converted to initial stereo HDR images using the inverse camera response function estimated from the LDR images. However, due to the limited dynamic range of the stereo LDR camera, the radiance values in under/over-exposed regions of the initial main-view (MV) HDR image can be lost. To restore these radiance values, the proposed stereo matching and hole-filling algorithms are applied to the stereo HDR images. Specifically, the auxiliary-view (AV) HDR image is warped by using the estimated disparity between initial the stereo HDR images and then effective hole-filling is applied to the warped AV HDR image. To reconstruct the final MV HDR, the warped and hole-filled AV HDR image is fused with the initial MV HDR image using the weight map. The experimental results demonstrate objectively and subjectively that the proposed stereo HDR imaging method provides better performance compared to the conventional method. PMID:28640235

  12. Stereo Vision-Based High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Differently-Exposed Image Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Jae Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high dynamic range (HDR imaging method based on the stereo vision system is presented. The proposed method uses differently exposed low dynamic range (LDR images captured from a stereo camera. The stereo LDR images are first converted to initial stereo HDR images using the inverse camera response function estimated from the LDR images. However, due to the limited dynamic range of the stereo LDR camera, the radiance values in under/over-exposed regions of the initial main-view (MV HDR image can be lost. To restore these radiance values, the proposed stereo matching and hole-filling algorithms are applied to the stereo HDR images. Specifically, the auxiliary-view (AV HDR image is warped by using the estimated disparity between initial the stereo HDR images and then effective hole-filling is applied to the warped AV HDR image. To reconstruct the final MV HDR, the warped and hole-filled AV HDR image is fused with the initial MV HDR image using the weight map. The experimental results demonstrate objectively and subjectively that the proposed stereo HDR imaging method provides better performance compared to the conventional method.

  13. Expansion of Lithium Ion Pouch Cell Batteries: Observations from Neutron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    electrolyte interface (SEI), and one which is reversible and follows the battery state of charge, expanding upon charging [4]. They attributed the...National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research. The collimated neutron beam originates from a 20MW reactor , which...electrodes stacked inside the pouch and electrically connected in parallel. The batteries were then filled with electrolyte , sealed, formed (cycled

  14. Dynamic Granularity for X-Ray Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissel, Matthias; Bigman, Verle H.; Edens, Aaron D.; Schollmeier, Marius; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2013-10-01

    Dynamic range and spatial resolution are correlated, because imaging units such as pixels or film grains can cover a wider dynamic range if they are larger, so that they can contain more electrons in a well or fluorescence centers in a grain. However, for systems that are subject to low photon flux, statistical noise influences the spatial resolution. Statistical noise is important for many experiments that rely on single shot X-ray imaging diagnostics. Detectors face a limited photon flux and often also a limited detection probability, where photons of higher energy may just penetrate the detector. The effective spatial resolution depends on detector efficiency, incident photon flux, detector cell size (grain/pixel), and the detector's inherent noise. We describe the combined influences with a ``dynamic granularity'' function, based on measurements of the grain size dependent distinguishability of grey levels. The dynamic granularity is unique to each imaging system, but allows us to quantify the performance of different detectors in a system. We have characterized a fast microchannel plate imaging detector and imaging plate with respect to dynamic granularity on the 6.151 keV crystal imaging system at the Z-Beamlet laser. Sandia Natl. Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Natl. Nucl. Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  15. Determining of the CME dynamics by digital image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigozo, Nivaor R.; Dal Lago, Alisson; Schuch, Nelson Jorge

    We have developed a new technique to detection of Coronal Mass Eject (CME) by used image processing. This is technique permit determined the CME dynamic (distance, velocity and acceleration radial, and distance, velocity and acceleration expansion). The CME dynamic is determined by selection a direction radial in a given LASCO image, which starts just before the occulter (close to the center) and extends to the extremity of the image. By tacking a series of image and extracting the same direction radial, for each of them and placing them side by side. It is possible to have a time history of any moving feature inside this direction. This technique allows you to choose the number of directions that will be used in CME detecting, i.e., in determining its dynamics.

  16. A study of alcohol-induced gelation of beta-lactoglobulin with small-angle neutron scattering, neutron spin echo, and dynamic light scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Koji; Yamaguchi, Toshio; Osaka, Noboru; Endo, Hitoshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2010-04-07

    Gelation of beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) in various alcohol-water mixtures with 0.1 M (M = mol L(-1)) hydrochloric acid was investigated with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), neutron spin echo (NSE), and time-resolved dynamic light scattering (TRDLS) measurements. The beta-Lg in alcohol-water solutions undergoes gelation at specific alcohol concentrations where the alcohol-induced alpha-helical structure of beta-Lg is stabilized. The SANS profiles showed that beta-Lg exists as a single molecule at a low alcohol concentration. With increasing alcohol concentration, the profiles indicate a power law behavior of approximately 1.7 when the samples gelate. These behaviors were observed in all alcohol-water mixtures used, but the alcohol concentrations where the SANS profiles change shift to a lower alcohol concentration region with an increase in the size of the hydrophobic group of the alcohols. Apparent diffusion constants, obtained from the intermediate scattering function (ISF) of NSE and the intensity time correlation function (ITCF) of TRDLS, mainly depend on the viscosity of alcohol-water mixtures before gelation. After gelation, on the other hand, the ISFs of gels do not change appreciably in the range of the NSE time scale, indicating the microscopically rigid structure of beta-Lg gel. The ITCF functions obtained from TRDLS follow a double exponential decay type before gelation, but a logarithmic one (exponent alpha = 0.7) after gelation. It is most likely that the alcohol-induced gelation undergoes a similar mechanism to that for the heat-induced one at pH = 7 where beta-Lg aggregates stick together to form a fractal network, although the gelation time is faster in the former than in the latter.

  17. Efficient sinogram smoothing for dynamic neuroreceptor PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaochuan; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Ye, James; Mukherjee, J.; Chen, Chin-Tu

    1997-05-01

    We have developed image-restoration techniques applicable to dynamic positron emission tomography that improve the visual quality and quantitative accuracy of neuroreceptor images. Starting wit data from a study of dopamine D-2 receptors in rhesus monkey striata using selective radioligands such as fallypride, we performed a novel effective 3D smoothing of the dynamic sinogram at a much lower computational cost than a truly 3D, adaptive smoothing. The processed sinogram was then input to a standard filtered back-projection algorithm and the resulting images were sharper and less noisy than images reconstructed from the unprocessed sinogram. Simulations were performed and the radioligand binding curves extracted from the restored images were found to be smoother and more accurate than those extracted form the unprocessed reconstructions. Comparison was also made to reconstructions from sinograms processed by the principal component analysis/projection onto convex sets algorithm.

  18. Direct assignment of molecular vibrations via normal mode analysis of the neutron dynamic pair distribution function technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry-Petit, A. M., E-mail: mcqueen@jhu.edu, E-mail: afry@fullerton.edu; Sheckelton, J. P.; McQueen, T. M., E-mail: mcqueen@jhu.edu, E-mail: afry@fullerton.edu [Department of Chemistry, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Institute for Quantum Matter and Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Rebola, A. F.; Fennie, C. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Mourigal, M.; Valentine, M.; Drichko, N. [Institute for Quantum Matter and Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    For over a century, vibrational spectroscopy has enhanced the study of materials. Yet, assignment of particular molecular motions to vibrational excitations has relied on indirect methods. Here, we demonstrate that applying group theoretical methods to the dynamic pair distribution function analysis of neutron scattering data provides direct access to the individual atomic displacements responsible for these excitations. Applied to the molecule-based frustrated magnet with a potential magnetic valence-bond state, LiZn{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 8}, this approach allows direct assignment of the constrained rotational mode of Mo{sub 3}O{sub 13} clusters and internal modes of MoO{sub 6} polyhedra. We anticipate that coupling this well known data analysis technique with dynamic pair distribution function analysis will have broad application in connecting structural dynamics to physical properties in a wide range of molecular and solid state systems.

  19. Color Sensitivity Multiple Exposure Fusion using High Dynamic Range Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Borole

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a high dynamic range imaging (HDRI method using a capturing camera image using normally exposure, over exposure and under exposure. We make three different images from a multiple input image using local histogram stretching. Because the proposed method generated three histogram-stretched images from a multiple input image, ghost artifacts that are the result of the relative motion between the camera and objects during exposure time, are inherently removed. Therefore, the proposed method can be applied to a consumer compact camera to provide the ghost artifacts free HDRI. Experiments with several sets of test images with different exposures show that the proposed method gives a better performance than existing methods in terms of visual results and computation time.

  20. High resolution neutron imaging of water in the polymer electrolyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fairweather, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    To achieve a deeper understanding of water transport and performance issues associated with water management, we have conducted in situ water examinations to help understand the effects of components and operation. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and neutron radiography were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells under various operating conditions. Variables examined include: sub-freezing conditions, inlet relative humidities, cell temperature, current density and response transients, different flow field orientations and different component materials (membranes, GDLs and MEAs). Quantification of the water within the membrane was made by neutron radiography after equilibration to different humidified gases, during fuel cell operation and in hydrogen pump mode. The water content was evaluated in bare Nafion{reg_sign} membranes as well as in MEAs operated in both fuel cell and H{sub 2} pump mode. These in situ imaging results allow measurement of the water content and gradients in the PEFC membrane and relate the membrane water transport characteristics to the fuel cell operation and performance under disparate materials and operational combinations. Flow geometry makes a large impact on MEA water content. Higher membrane water with counter flow was measured compared with co-flow for sub-saturated inlet RH's. This correlates to lower HFR and higher performance compared with co-flow. Higher anode stoichiometry helps remove water which accumulates in the anode channels and GDL material. Cell orientation was measured to affect both the water content and cell performance. While membrane water content was measured to be similar regardless of orientation, cells with the cathode on top show flooding and loss of performance compared with similarly operated cells with the anode on top. Transient fuel cell current measurements show a large degree of hysteresis in terms of membrane hydration as measured by HFR. Current step transients from 0

  1. Advances in neutron tomography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W Treimer

    2008-11-01

    In the last decade neutron radiography (NR) and tomography (NCT) have experienced a number of improvements, due to the well-known properties of neutrons interacting with matter, i.e. the low attenuation by many materials, the strong attenuation by hydrogenous constituent in samples, the wavelength-dependent attenuation in the neighbourhood of Bragg edges and due to better 2D neutron detectors. So NR and NCT were improved by sophisticated techniques that are based on the attenuation of neutrons or on phase changes of the associated neutron waves if they pass through structured materials. Up to now the interaction of the neutron spin with magnetic fields in samples has not been applied to imaging techniques despite the fact that it was proposed many years ago. About ten years ago neutron depolarization as imaging signal for neutron radiography or tomography was demonstrated and in principle it works. Now one can present much improved test experiments using polarized neutrons for radiographic imaging. For this purpose the CONRAD instrument of the HMI was equipped with polarizing and analysing benders very similar to conventional scattering experiments using polarized neutrons. Magnetic fields in different coils and in samples (superconductors) at low temperatures could be visualized. In this lecture a summary about standard signals (attenuation) and the more `sophisticated' imaging signals as refraction, small angle scattering and polarized neutrons will be given.

  2. Water equivalent hydrogen estimates from the first 200 sols of Curiosity's traverse (Bradbury Landing to Yellowknife Bay): Results from the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) passive mode experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, C. G.; Moersch, J.; Jun, I.; Ming, D. W.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M.; Behar, A.; Boynton, W. V.; Deflores, L.; Drake, D.; Ehresmann, B.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Hardgrove, C.; Harshman, K.; Hassler, D. M.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Kuzmin, R.; Lisov, D.; Malakhov, A.; Milliken, R.; Mischna, M.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Sanin, A. B.; Starr, R.; Varenikov, A.; Vostrukhin, A.; Zeitlin, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity is designed to detect neutrons to determine hydrogen abundance within the subsurface of Mars (Mitrofanov, I.G. et al. [2012]. Space Sci. Rev. 170, 559-582. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11214-012-9924-y; Litvak, M.L. et al. [2008]. Astrobiology 8, 605-613. http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ast.2007.0157). While DAN has a pulsed neutron generator for active measurements, in passive mode it only measures the leakage spectrum of neutrons produced by the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). DAN passive measurements provide better spatial coverage than the active measurements because they can be acquired while the rover is moving. Here we compare DAN passive-mode data to models of the instrument's response to compositional differences in a homogeneous regolith in order to estimate the water equivalent hydrogen (WEH) content along the first 200 sols of Curiosity's traverse in Gale Crater, Mars. WEH content is shown to vary greatly along the traverse. These estimates range from 0.5 ± 0.1 wt.% to 3.9 ± 0.2 wt.% for fixed locations (usually overnight stops) investigated by the rover and 0.6 ± 0.2 wt.% to 7.6 ± 1.3 wt.% for areas that the rover has traversed while continuously acquiring DAN passive data between fixed locations. Estimates of WEH abundances at fixed locations based on passive mode data are in broad agreement with those estimated at the same locations using active mode data. Localized (meter-scale) anomalies in estimated WEH values from traverse measurements have no particular surface expression observable in co-located images. However at a much larger scale, the hummocky plains and bedded fractured units are shown to be distinct compositional units based on the hydrogen content derived from DAN passive measurements. DAN passive WEH estimates are also shown to be consistent with geologic models inferred from other

  3. Dynamical mass ejection from the merger of asymmetric binary neutron stars: Radiation-hydrodynamics study in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    We perform neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for the merger of asymmetric binary neutron stars in numerical relativity. Neutron stars are modeled by soft and moderately stiff finite-temperature equations of state (EOS). We find that the properties of the dynamical ejecta such as the total mass, neutron richness profile, and specific entropy profile depend on the mass ratio of the binary systems for a given EOS in a unique manner. For the soft EOS (SFHo), the total ejecta mass depends weakly on the mass ratio, but the average of electron number per baryon ($Y_e$) and specific entropy ($s$) of the ejecta decreases significantly with the increase of the degree of mass asymmetry. For the stiff EOS (DD2), with the increase of the mass asymmetry degree, the total ejecta mass significantly increases while the average of $Y_e$ and $s$ moderately decreases. We find again that only for the soft EOS (SFHo), the total ejecta mass exceeds $0.01M_\\odot$ irrespective of the mass ratio chosen in this paper. The ej...

  4. Beam dynamics study of a 30 MeV electron linear accelerator to drive a neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Yang, Haeryong; Kang, Heung-Sik

    2014-02-01

    An experimental neutron facility based on 32 MeV/18.47 kW electron linac has been studied by means of PARMELA simulation code. Beam dynamics study for a traveling wave constant gradient electron accelerator is carried out to reach the preferential operation parameters (E = 30 MeV, P = 18 kW, dE/E E-gun, pre-buncher, buncher, and 2 accelerating columns. A disk-loaded, on-axis-coupled, 2π/3-mode type accelerating rf cavity is considered for this linac. After numerous optimizations of linac parameters, 32 MeV beam energy is obtained at the end of the linac. As high electron energy is required to produce acceptable neutron flux. The final neutron flux is estimated to be 5 × 1011 n/cm2/s/mA. Future development will be the real design of a 30 MeV electron linac based on S band traveling wave.

  5. Beam dynamics study of a 30 MeV electron linear accelerator to drive a neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Yang, Haeryong; Kang, Heung-Sik, E-mail: hskang@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, San31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-14

    An experimental neutron facility based on 32 MeV/18.47 kW electron linac has been studied by means of PARMELA simulation code. Beam dynamics study for a traveling wave constant gradient electron accelerator is carried out to reach the preferential operation parameters (E = 30 MeV, P = 18 kW, dE/E < 12.47% for 99% particles). The whole linac comprises mainly E-gun, pre-buncher, buncher, and 2 accelerating columns. A disk-loaded, on-axis-coupled, 2π/3-mode type accelerating rf cavity is considered for this linac. After numerous optimizations of linac parameters, 32 MeV beam energy is obtained at the end of the linac. As high electron energy is required to produce acceptable neutron flux. The final neutron flux is estimated to be 5 × 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2}/s/mA. Future development will be the real design of a 30 MeV electron linac based on S band traveling wave.

  6. Neutron to proton mass difference, parton distribution functions and baryon resonances from dynamics on the Lie group u(3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinhammer, Ole

    PiMinus invariant mass in B decays. We give a controversial prediction of the relative neutron to proton mass difference 0.138 % as originating in period doublings of certain parametric states. The group space dynamics communicates with real space via the exterior derivative which projects out quark and gluon...... fields from the allospatial state. The allostate in turn is excited from space by the momentum operators which act as toroidal generators on the group manifold. Such generators can be used to trace out parton distribution functions and examples are shown to mimic the valence quark content of the proton....

  7. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of protein dynamics. Progress report, November 1, 1992--May 25, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rorschach, H.E.

    1993-05-25

    Results that shed new light on the study of protein dynamics were obtained by quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The triple axis instrument H-9 supplied by the cold source was used to perform a detailed study of the quasi-elastic spectrum and the Debye-Waller factor for trypsin in powder form, in solution, and in crystals. A preliminary study of myoglobin crystals was also done. A new way to view the results of quasi-elastic scattering experiments is sketched, and the data on trypsin are presented and analyze according to this new picture.

  8. Dynamic PET Image reconstruction for parametric imaging using the HYPR kernel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Benjamin; Qi, Jinyi; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Wang, Guobao

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic PET image reconstruction is a challenging problem because of the ill-conditioned nature of PET and the lowcounting statistics resulted from short time-frames in dynamic imaging. The kernel method for image reconstruction has been developed to improve image reconstruction of low-count PET data by incorporating prior information derived from high-count composite data. In contrast to most of the existing regularization-based methods, the kernel method embeds image prior information in the forward projection model and does not require an explicit regularization term in the reconstruction formula. Inspired by the existing highly constrained back-projection (HYPR) algorithm for dynamic PET image denoising, we propose in this work a new type of kernel that is simpler to implement and further improves the kernel-based dynamic PET image reconstruction. Our evaluation study using a physical phantom scan with synthetic FDG tracer kinetics has demonstrated that the new HYPR kernel-based reconstruction can achieve a better region-of-interest (ROI) bias versus standard deviation trade-off for dynamic PET parametric imaging than the post-reconstruction HYPR denoising method and the previously used nonlocal-means kernel.

  9. Neutron Imager and Flux Monitor Based on Micro Channel Plates (MCP) in Electrostatic Mirror Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variale, V.

    In this paper, a new high transparency device based on MCP for the monitoring the flux and spatial profile of a neutron beam will be described. The assembly consists of a carbon foil with a 6Li deposit, placed in the beam, and a MCP equipped with a phosphor screen readout viewed by a CCD camera, placed outside the beam. Secondary emitted electrons (SEE) produced in the carbon foil by the alpha-particles and tritons from the 6Li+n reaction, are deflected to the MCP detector by means of an electrostatic mirror, suitably designed to preserve the spatial resolution. The conductive layer on the phosphor can be used for neutron counting, and to obtain time-of-flight information. A peculiar feature of this device is that the use of an electrostatic mirror minimizes the perturbation of the neutron beam, i.e. absorption and scattering. It can be used at existing time-of-flight (TOF) facilities, in particular at the n_TOF facility at CERN, for monitoring the flux and special profile of the neutron beam in the thermal and epithermal region. In this work, the device principle and design will be presented, together with the main features in terms of resolution and neutron detection efficiency.

  10. Development of a hybrid MSGC detector for thermal neutron imaging with a MHz data acquisition and histogramming system

    CERN Document Server

    Gebauer, B; Richter, G; Levchanovsky, F V; Nikiforov, A

    2001-01-01

    For thermal neutron imaging at the next generation of high-flux pulsed neutron sources a large area and fourfold segmented, hybrid, low-pressure, two-dimensional position sensitive, microstrip ga