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Sample records for dynamic muscle fatigue

  1. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  2. Dynamic stability control in forward falls: postural corrections after muscle fatigue in young and older adults.

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    Mademli, Lida; Arampatzis, Adamantios; Karamanidis, Kiros

    2008-06-01

    Many studies report that muscle strength loss may alter the human system's capacity to generate rapid force for balance corrections after perturbations, leading to deficient recovery behaviours. Yet little is known regarding the effect of modifications in the neuromuscular system induced by fatigue on dynamic stability control during postural perturbations. This study investigates the effect of muscle strength decline induced by fatiguing contractions on the dynamic stability control of young and older adults during forward falls. Eleven young and eleven older male adults had to regain balance after sudden falls before and after submaximal fatiguing knee extension-flexion contractions. Young subjects had a higher margin of stability than older ones before and after the fatiguing task. This reflects their enhanced ability in using mechanisms for maintaining dynamic stability (i.e. a greater base of support). The margin of stability, the boundary of the base of support and the position of the extrapolated centre of mass, remained unaffected by the reduction in muscle strength induced by the fatiguing contractions, indicating an appropriate adjustment of the motor commands to compensate the deficit in muscle strength. Both young and older adults were able to counteract the decreased horizontal ground reaction forces after the fatiguing task by flexing their knee to a greater extent, leading to similar decreases in the horizontal velocity of centre of mass as in the pre fatigue condition. The results demonstrate the ability of the central nervous system to rapidly modify the execution of postural corrections including mechanisms for maintaining dynamic stability.

  3. Muscle fatigue and exhaustion during dynamic leg exercise in normoxia and hypobaric hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulco, C S; Lewis, S F; Frykman, Peter

    1996-01-01

    and during exercise. MVC force was 578 +/- 29 N in normoxia and 569 +/- 29 N in hypobaria before exercise and fell, at exhaustion, to similar levels (265 +/- 10 and 284 +/- 20 N for normoxia and hypobaria, respectively; P > 0.05) that were higher (P ...Using an exercise device that integrates maximal voluntary static contraction (MVC) of knee extensor muscles with dynamic knee extension, we compared progressive muscle fatigue, i.e., rate of decline in force-generating capacity, in normoxia (758 Torr) and hypobaric hypoxia (464 Torr). Eight...... healthy men performed exhaustive constant work rate knee extension (21 +/- 3 W, 79 +/- 2 and 87 +/- 2% of 1-leg knee extension O2 peak uptake for normoxia and hypobaria, respectively) from knee angles of 90-150 degrees at a rate of 1 Hz. MVC (90 degrees knee angle) was performed before dynamic exercise...

  4. Age-Related Changes in Dynamic Postural Control and Attentional Demands are Minimally Affected by Local Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remaud, Anthony; Thuong-Cong, Cécile; Bilodeau, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Normal aging results in alterations in the visual, vestibular and somtaosensory systems, which in turn modify the control of balance. Muscle fatigue may exacerbate these age-related changes in sensory and motor functions, and also increase the attentional demands associated with dynamic postural control. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on dynamic postural control and posture-related attentional demands before and after a plantar flexor fatigue protocol. Participants (young adults: n = 15; healthy seniors: n = 13) performed a dynamic postural task along the antero-posterior (AP) and the medio-lateral (ML) axes, with and without the addition of a simple reaction time (RT) task. The dynamic postural task consisted in following a moving circle on a computer screen with the representation of the center of pressure (COP). This protocol was repeated before and after a fatigue task where ankle plantar flexor muscles were targeted. The mean COP-target distance and the mean COP velocity were calculated for each trial. Cross-correlation analyses between the COP and target displacements were also performed. RTs were recorded during dual-task trials. Results showed that while young adults adopted an anticipatory control mode to move their COP as close as possible to the target center, seniors adopted a reactive control mode, lagging behind the target center. This resulted in longer COP-target distance and higher COP velocity in the latter group. Concurrently, RT increased more in seniors when switching from static stance to dynamic postural conditions, suggesting potential alterations in the central nervous system (CNS) functions. Finally, plantar flexor muscle fatigue and dual-tasking had only minor effects on dynamic postural control of both young adults and seniors. Future studies should investigate why the fatigue-induced changes in quiet standing postural control do not seem to transfer to dynamic balance tasks. PMID:26834626

  5. Assessment of muscle fatigue using electromygraphm sensing

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    Helmi, Muhammad Hazimin Bin; Ping, Chew Sue; Ishak, Nur Elliza Binti; Saad, Mohd Alimi Bin Mohd; Mokhtar, Anis Shahida Niza Binti

    2017-08-01

    Muscle fatigue is condition of muscle decline in ability after undergoing any physical activity. Observation of the muscle condition of an athlete during training is crucial to prevent or minimize injury and able to achieve optimum performance in actual competition. The aim of this project is to develop a muscle monitoring system to detect muscle fatigue in swimming athlete. This device is capable to measure muscle stress level of the swimmer and at the same time provide indication of muscle fatigue level to trainer. Electromyography signal was recorded from the muscle movement while practicing the front crawl stroke repetitively. The time domain data was processed to frequency spectra in order to study the effect of muscle fatigue. The results show that the recorded EMG signal is able to sense muscle fatigue.

  6. Muscle glycogen stores and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Westerblad, Håkan; Nielsen, Joachim

    2013-01-01

      Studies performed at the beginning of the last century revealed the importance of carbohydrate as a fuel during exercise, and the importance of muscle glycogen on performance has subsequently been confirmed in numerous studies. However, the link between glycogen depletion and impaired muscle...... function during fatigue is not well understood and a direct cause-and-effect relationship between glycogen and muscle function remains to be established. The use of electron microscopy has revealed that glycogen is not homogeneously distributed in skeletal muscle fibres, but rather localized in distinct...... pools. Furthermore, each glycogen granule has its own metabolic machinery with glycolytic enzymes and regulating proteins. One pool of such glycogenolytic complexes is localized within the myofibrils in close contact with key proteins involved in the excitation-contraction coupling and Ca2+ release from...

  7. Quantitation of progressive muscle fatigue during dynamic leg exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulco, C S; Lewis, S F; Frykman, Peter

    1995-01-01

    , a product of a contraction rate (1 Hz), force measured at the ankle, and distance of ankle movement from 90 degrees to 150 degrees of KE, was precisely controlled. Lack of rise in myoelectric activity in biceps femoris of the active leg during DKE and MVC was consistent with restriction of muscle action...

  8. Assessment of muscle fatigue during biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaflitz, Marco; Molinari, Filippo

    2003-03-01

    The analysis of the surface myoelectric signal recorded while a muscle is performing a sustained contraction is a valuable tool for assessing the progression of localized fatigue. It is well known that the modifications of the spectral content of the myoelectric signal are mainly related to changes in the interstitial fluid pH, which, in turn, affect the membrane excitability of the active muscle fibers. This paper describes the effects of muscle fatigue on the surface myoelectric signal recorded from three thigh and leg muscles during biking, on a population consisting of 22 young healthy volunteers. The purpose of this study was to obtain normative data relative to an exercise protocol mild enough to be applicable, in the future, to pathological subjects as well. Each subject was asked to exercise 30 min on a cycloergometer at a constant velocity and against a constant torque. While subjects were biking, the surface myoelectric signal was recorded from the rectus femoris, the biceps femoris, and the gastrocnemius muscles. In this study, we considered two different aspects of muscle fatigue: first, the localized muscle fatigue as shown by the decrement of the instantaneous frequency of the myoelectric signal during the exercise; second, the modifications of the muscle ON-OFF timing, which could be explained as a strategy for increasing endurance by modifying the role of different muscles during the exercise. The first aspect was studied by obtaining the spectral characteristics of the signals by means of bilinear time-frequency transforms and by applying an original estimator of the instantaneous frequency of stochastic processes based on cross time-frequency transforms. Our results demonstrated that none of the subjects showed significant signs of localized muscle fatigue, since the decrement of the instantaneous frequency during the exercise was always lower than 5% of its initial value. Muscle ON-OFF timing was obtained by applying to the raw myoelectric signal

  9. Understanding Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Rutherford

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME is a debilitating disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by severe disabling fatigue in the absence of alternative diagnosis. Historically, there has been a tendency to draw psychological explanations for the origin of fatigue; however, this model is at odds with findings that fatigue and accompanying symptoms may be explained by central and peripheral pathophysiological mechanisms, including effects of the immune, oxidative, mitochondrial, and neuronal pathways. For example, patient descriptions of their fatigue regularly cite difficulty in maintaining muscle activity due to perceived lack of energy. This narrative review examined the literature for evidence of biochemical dysfunction in CFS/ME at the skeletal muscle level. Methods. Literature was examined following searches of PUB MED, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, using key words such as CFS/ME, immune, autoimmune, mitochondria, muscle, and acidosis. Results. Studies show evidence for skeletal muscle biochemical abnormality in CFS/ME patients, particularly in relation to bioenergetic dysfunction. Discussion. Bioenergetic muscle dysfunction is evident in CFS/ME, with a tendency towards an overutilisation of the lactate dehydrogenase pathway following low-level exercise, in addition to slowed acid clearance after exercise. Potentially, these abnormalities may lead to the perception of severe fatigue in CFS/ME.

  10. [Analysis of the Muscle Fatigue Based on Band Spectrum Entropy of Multi-channel Surface Electromyography].

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    Liu, Jian; Zou, Renling; Zhang, Dongheng; Xu, Xiulin; Hu, Xiufang

    2016-06-01

    Exercise-induced muscle fatigue is a phenomenon that the maximum voluntary contraction force or power output of muscle is temporarily reduced due to muscular movement.If the fatigue is not treated properly,it will bring about a severe injury to the human body.With multi-channel collection of lower limb surface electromyography signals,this article analyzes the muscle fatigue by adoption of band spectrum entropy method which combined electromyographic signal spectral analysis and nonlinear dynamics.The experimental result indicated that with the increase of muscle fatigue,muscle signal spectrum began to move to low frequency,the energy concentrated,the system complexity came down,and the band spectrum entropy which reflected the complexity was also reduced.By monitoring the entropy,we can measure the degree of muscle fatigue,and provide an indicator to judge fatigue degree for the sports training and clinical rehabilitation training.

  11. Muscle fiber velocity and electromyographic signs of fatigue in fibromyalgia.

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    Klaver-Król, Ewa G; Rasker, Johannes J; Henriquez, Nizare R; Verheijen, Wilma G; Zwarts, Machiel J

    2012-11-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder of widespread muscular pain. We investigated possible differences in surface electromyography (sEMG) in clinically unaffected muscle between patients with FM and controls. sEMG was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 13 women with FM and 14 matched healthy controls during prolonged dynamic exercises, unloaded, and loaded up to 20% of maximum voluntary contraction. The sEMG parameters were: muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV); skewness of motor unit potential (peak) velocities; peak frequency (PF) (number of peaks per second); and average rectified voltage (ARV). There was significantly higher CV in the FM group. Although the FM group performed the tests equally well, their electromyographic fatigue was significantly less expressed compared with controls (in CV, PF, and ARV). In the patients with FM, we clearly showed functional abnormalities of the muscle membrane, which led to high conduction velocity and resistance to fatigue in electromyography. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal

  13. Mechanomyogram for identifying muscle activity and fatigue.

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    Yang, Zhao Feng; Kumar, Dinesh Kant; Arjunan, Sridhar Poosapadi

    2009-01-01

    Mechanomyogram is the recording of the acoustic activity associated with the muscle contraction. While discovered nearly a decade ago with the intention of providing an alternate to the surface electromyogram, it has not yet been investigated thoroughly and there are no current applications associated with MMG. This paper reports an experimental study of MMG against force of contraction and muscle fatigue during cyclic contraction. The results indicate that there is a relationship between the intensity of the MMG recording and force of contraction. A change in the intensity of MMG is also observed with the onset of muscle fatigue. However, the inter-subject variation is very large. The results also indicate that the spectrum of the MMG is very inconsistent and not a useful feature of the signal.

  14. The role of central and peripheral muscle fatigue in postcancer fatigue: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Prinsen, Hetty; van Dijk, Johannes P; Zwarts, Machiel J; Leer, Jan Willem H; Bleijenberg, Gijs; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M

    2015-02-01

    Postcancer fatigue is a frequently occurring problem, impairing quality of life. Little is known about (neuro)physiological factors determining postcancer fatigue. It may be hypothesized that postcancer fatigue is characterized by low peripheral muscle fatigue and high central muscle fatigue. The aims of this study were to examine whether central and peripheral muscle fatigue differ between fatigued and non-fatigued cancer survivors and to examine the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) on peripheral and central muscle fatigue of fatigued cancer survivors in a randomized controlled trial. Sixteen fatigued patients in the intervention group (CBT) and eight fatigued patients in the waiting list group were successfully assessed at baseline and six months later. Baseline measurements of 20 fatigued patients were compared with 20 non-fatigued patients. A twitch interpolation technique and surface electromyography were applied, respectively, during sustained contraction of the biceps brachii muscle. Muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) and central activation failure (CAF) were not significantly different between fatigued and non-fatigued patients. Change scores of MFCV and CAF were not significantly different between patients in the CBT and waiting list groups. Patients in the CBT group reported a significantly larger decrease in fatigue scores than patients in the waiting list group. Postcancer fatigue is neither characterized by abnormally high central muscle fatigue nor by low peripheral muscle fatigue. These findings suggest a difference in the underlying physiological mechanism of postcancer fatigue vs. other fatigue syndromes. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of Muscle Fatigue Progression using Cyclostationary Property of Surface Electromyography Signals.

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    Karthick, P A; Venugopal, G; Ramakrishnan, S

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of neuromuscular fatigue finds various applications ranging from clinical studies to biomechanics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals are widely used for these studies due to its non-invasiveness. During cyclic dynamic contractions, these signals are nonstationary and cyclostationary. In recent years, several nonstationary methods have been employed for the muscle fatigue analysis. However, cyclostationary based approach is not well established for the assessment of muscle fatigue. In this work, cyclostationarity associated with the biceps brachii muscle fatigue progression is analyzed using sEMG signals and Spectral Correlation Density (SCD) functions. Signals are recorded from fifty healthy adult volunteers during dynamic contractions under a prescribed protocol. These signals are preprocessed and are divided into three segments, namely, non-fatigue, first muscle discomfort and fatigue zones. Then SCD is estimated using fast Fourier transform accumulation method. Further, Cyclic Frequency Spectral Density (CFSD) is calculated from the SCD spectrum. Two features, namely, cyclic frequency spectral area (CFSA) and cyclic frequency spectral entropy (CFSE) are proposed to study the progression of muscle fatigue. Additionally, degree of cyclostationarity (DCS) is computed to quantify the amount of cyclostationarity present in the signals. Results show that there is a progressive increase in cyclostationary during the progression of muscle fatigue. CFSA shows an increasing trend in muscle fatiguing contraction. However, CFSE shows a decreasing trend. It is observed that when the muscle progresses from non-fatigue to fatigue condition, the mean DCS of fifty subjects increases from 0.016 to 0.99. All the extracted features found to be distinct and statistically significant in the three zones of muscle contraction (p < 0.05). It appears that these SCD features could be useful in the automated analysis of sEMG signals for different neuromuscular conditions.

  16. Use of muscle synergies and wavelet transforms to identify fatigue during squatting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Kenneth B; Shourijeh, Mohammad S; Benoit, Daniel L

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to supplement continuous wavelet transforms with muscle synergies in a fatigue analysis to better describe the combination of decreased firing frequency and altered activation profiles during dynamic muscle contractions. Nine healthy young individuals completed the dynamic tasks before and after they squatted with a standard Olympic bar until complete exhaustion. Electromyography (EMG) profiles were analyzed with a novel concatenated non-negative matrix factorization method that decomposed EMG signals into muscle synergies. Muscle synergy analysis provides the activation pattern of the muscles while continuous wavelet transforms output the temporal frequency content of the EMG signals. Synergy analysis revealed subtle changes in two-legged squatting after fatigue while differences in one-legged squatting were more pronounced and included the shift from a general co-activation of muscles in the pre-fatigue state to a knee extensor dominant weighting post-fatigue. Continuous wavelet transforms showed major frequency content decreases in two-legged squatting after fatigue while very few frequency changes occurred in one-legged squatting. It was observed that the combination of methods is an effective way of describing muscle fatigue and that muscle activation patterns play a very important role in maintaining the overall joint kinetics after fatigue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The relationship between exercise-induced muscle fatigue, arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion after 56 days local muscle unloading.

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    Weber, Tobias; Ducos, Michel; Mulder, Edwin; Beijer, Åsa; Herrera, Frankyn; Zange, Jochen; Degens, Hans; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    In the light of the dynamic nature of habitual plantar flexor activity, we utilized an incremental isokinetic exercise test (IIET) to assess the work-related power deficit (WoRPD) as a measure for exercise-induced muscle fatigue before and after prolonged calf muscle unloading and in relation to arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion. Eleven male subjects (31 ± 6 years) wore the HEPHAISTOS unloading orthosis unilaterally for 56 days. It allows habitual ambulation while greatly reducing plantar flexor activity and torque production. Endpoint measurements encompassed arterial blood flow, measured in the femoral artery using Doppler ultrasound, oxygenation of the soleus muscle assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy, lactate concentrations determined in capillary blood and muscle activity using soleus muscle surface electromyography. Furthermore, soleus muscle biopsies were taken to investigate morphological muscle changes. After the intervention, maximal isokinetic torque was reduced by 23·4 ± 8·2% (Pflow, tissue oxygenation, lactate concentrations and EMG median frequency kinematics during the exercise test were comparable before and after the intervention, whereas the increase of RMS in response to IIET was less following the intervention (P = 0·03). In conclusion, following submaximal isokinetic muscle work exercise-induced muscle fatigue is unaffected after prolonged local muscle unloading. The observation that arterial blood flow was maintained may underlie the unchanged fatigability. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The Comparison between Spectral and Entropic Measures Following Fatigue in Erector Spinae Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Talebian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surface electromyography (sEMG of muscles is a non-invasive tool that can be helpful in the assessment of muscle function and some motor control evaluations. A loss of force, known as muscle fatigue is accompanied by changes in muscle electrical activity. One of the most commonly used surface EMG parameters which reflects paraspinal muscle fatigue during different tasks and positions is median frequency. Although it is widely known that the electromyography power spectrum shifts to lower frequencies during fatiguing contraction, an opinion exists that the validity of spectral shifts in assessment of fatigue is questionable. Some researchers have examined whether other quantities derived from sEMG signals are better indicators for muscle fatigue. Following cyclic flexion/extension and consequence fatigue, variation in sEMG signals may be complex for study. The aim of this study was to determine which of the median frequency (MF or entropic (ENTR is more sensitive for measuring muscular fatigue in erector spinae muscles during cyclic flexion/extension. Methods: Surface electromyography of erector spine muscles was recorded in 25 healthy subjects during cyclic dynamic contractions. The experimental session consisted of two parts: measurement of Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC, and performing the fatigue test. All subjects performed rhythmic flexion/extension with 50% MVC loading against B-200 Isostation, about 4-6 minutes. The MF and ENTR of the muscle activities were computed to assess muscular fatigue. Results: Paired sample t-tests showed that MF and ENTR changes after fatigue test were significant (P<0.001. Percentage changes of both MF and ENTR were reduced, this reduction for ENTR was more than 40% (P<0.001. Conclusion: It seems that the changes of ENTR in muscle activities have the ability to measure muscular fatigue and is more sensitive in comparison to MF.

  19. Dynamic cardiomyoplasty using artificial muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukui, Kozo; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic cardiomyoplasty using latissimus dorsi muscle was previously used to compensate for congestive heart failure. Now, however, this method is not acceptable because the long-term result was not as expected owing to fatigue of the skeletal muscle. BioMetal fiber developed by Toki Corporation is one of the artificial muscles activated by electric current. The behavior of this fiber is similar to that of organic muscle. We made an artificial muscle like the latissimus dorsi using BioMetal fiber and tested whether we could use this new muscle as a cardiac supporting device. Testing one Biometal fiber showed the following performance: practical use maximal generative force was 30 g, exercise variation was 50%, and the standard driving current was 220 mA. We created a 4 x 12-cm tabular artificial muscle using 8 BioMetal fibers as a cardiac support device. We also made a simulation circuit composed of a 6 x 8-cm soft bag with unidirectional valves, reservoir, and connecting tube. The simulation circuit was filled with water and the soft bag was wrapped with the artificial muscle device. After powering the device electrically at 9 V with a current of 220 mA for each fiber, we measured the inside pressure and observed the movement of the artificial device. The artificial muscle contracted in 0.5 s for peak time and squeezed the soft bag. The peak pressure inside the soft bag was measured as 10 mmHg. Although further work will be needed to enhance the speed of deformability and movement simulating contraction, we conclude that artificial muscle may be potentially useful as a cardiac assistance device that can be developed for dynamic cardiomyoplasty.

  20. The Effect of Fatigue in Proxmal and Distal Muscles of Lower Extremity on Postural Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Moghadam

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Several studies have shown the effects of muscular fatigue on proprioception and neuromuscular control. However all available researches have studied just the effect of local fatigue in ankle joint muscles on postural control, and no study have found about the effect of fatigue in proximal muscles of the lower extremity on postural control. To compare changes in postural control parameters after isokinetic fatigue of proximal and distal muscles of lower extremity. Materials & Methods: Subjects were twenty healthy men (age: 22.6±2.4 years, height: 173.7± 3.6 cm, weight: 63.3±7.9kg. There were 4 test sessions, with a randomized order according to site and plane of fatigue. During each session one of these muscle groups was fatigued using a Biodex isokinetic dynamometer: ankle plantar / dorsi flexors, ankle evertor / inventors, hip flexor / extensors and hip abductor/adductors. The biodex stability system was used to perform dynamic balance test before and after muscle fatigue in each session. Overall, anterior / posterior, and medial/lateral stability indices were recorded. The higher the stability indices, the lower the balancing skill. Results: Analysis of pre-and post fatigue balance results of all sessions, demonstrated significant increase (P<0.05 in all stability indices. Repeated measures ANOVA performed on the rate of changes in stability indices during each session revealed that hip muscle fatigue caused much more increase in stability indices than ankle muscle fatigue (P<0.05. Conclusion: Isokinetic fatigue of both ankle and hip muscles significantly decreases postural control ability in healthy young men. In addition, our findings suggest that the hip joint musculature plays a more prominent role in postural control.

  1. Muscle fatigue in fibromyalgia is in the brain, not in the muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, Elisabeth; Amris, Kirstine; Bliddal, Henning

    2013-01-01

    To investigate relationships between perceived and objectively measured muscle fatigue during exhausting muscle contractions in women with fibromyalgia (FM) compared with healthy controls (HC).......To investigate relationships between perceived and objectively measured muscle fatigue during exhausting muscle contractions in women with fibromyalgia (FM) compared with healthy controls (HC)....

  2. Fatigue effects on tracking performance and muscle activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huysmans, M.A.; Hoozemans, M.J.M.; van der Beek, A.J.; de Looze, M.P.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that fatigue affects proprioception and consequently movement accuracy, the effects of which may be counteracted by increased muscle activity. To determine the effects of fatigue on tracking performance and muscle activity in the M. extensor carpi radialis (ECR), 11 female

  3. Discrete wavelet transform analysis of surface electromyography for the fatigue assessment of neck and shoulder muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Suman Kanti; Nimbarte, Ashish D; Jaridi, Majid; Creese, Robert C

    2013-10-01

    Assessment of neuromuscular fatigue is essential for early detection and prevention of risks associated with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. In recent years, discrete wavelet transform (DWT) of surface electromyography (SEMG) has been used to evaluate muscle fatigue, especially during dynamic contractions when the SEMG signal is non-stationary. However, its application to the assessment of work-related neck and shoulder muscle fatigue is not well established. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish DWT analysis as a suitable method to conduct quantitative assessment of neck and shoulder muscle fatigue under dynamic repetitive conditions. Ten human participants performed 40min of fatiguing repetitive arm and neck exertions while SEMG data from the upper trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles were recorded. The ten of the most commonly used wavelet functions were used to conduct the DWT analysis. Spectral changes estimated using power of wavelet coefficients in the 12-23Hz frequency band showed the highest sensitivity to fatigue induced by the dynamic repetitive exertions. Although most of the wavelet functions tested in this study reasonably demonstrated the expected power trend with fatigue development and recovery, the overall performance of the "Rbio3.1" wavelet in terms of power estimation and statistical significance was better than the remaining nine wavelets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Degree of muscle fatigue in children with chronic juvenile arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekulić Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was to identify gradient of the muscle fatigue of some muscle groups, among children with chronic juvenile arthritis, which are restricted in function by existing limitation in range of motions. Four patients in age of 9,5, with mentioned diagnosis were examined. Healthy subjects, with same ages were control group. Manuel muscle test, range of motion test and EMG examination were performed. Results shown significance difference in degree of muscle fatigue among observed patients, which explain decrease of muscle efficiency and must be taken when intensity of kinesitherapic treatment has to be done. It is concluded that structural changes on locomotory system induce secondary hypertrophy or atrophy of the muscle system and increase of muscle fatigue when activity of certain muscles is performed.

  5. Quantitative estimation of muscle fatigue using surface electromyography during static muscle contraction.

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    Soo, Yewguan; Sugi, Masao; Nishino, Masataka; Yokoi, Hiroshi; Arai, Tamio; Kato, Ryu; Nakamura, Tatsuhiro; Ota, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is commonly associated with the musculoskeletal disorder problem. Previously, various techniques were proposed to index the muscle fatigue from electromyography signal. However, quantitative measurement is still difficult to achieve. This study aimed at proposing a method to estimate the degree of muscle fatigue quantitatively. A fatigue model was first constructed using handgrip dynamometer by conducting a series of static contraction tasks. Then the degree muscle fatigue can be estimated from electromyography signal with reasonable accuracy. The error of the estimated muscle fatigue was less than 10% MVC and no significant difference was found between the estimated value and the one measured using force sensor. Although the results were promising, there were still some limitations that need to be overcome in future study.

  6. Neck Muscle Fatigue with Helmet-Mounted Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eveland, Edward S; Pellettiere, Joseph A

    2006-01-01

    .... Changes in neck muscle strength were identified along with EMG evidence of fatigue. When flights occurred on an almost daily basis over 4 days, the force imparted to the neck was reduced each day...

  7. Influence of synchronous and sequential stimulation on muscle fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, M.; Thomsen, M.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    1997-01-01

    In acute experiments the sciatic nerve of the rat is electrically stimulated to induce fatigue in the medial Gastrocnemius muscle. Fatigue tests are carried out using intermittent stimulation of different compartments (sequential) or a single compartment (synchronous) of the sciatic nerve. The

  8. Upper-limb exoskeleton for human muscle fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, SK; Tokhi, MO

    2017-01-01

    Human muscle fatigue is identified as one of the causes to musculuskeletal disorder (MSD). The objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of an exoskeleton in dealing with muscle fatigue in a virtual environment. The focus of this work is, for the exoskeleton to provide support as needed by human joint. A (Proportional, Integration and Derivative) controller is used for both human and exoskeleton. Simmechanics and Simulink are used to evaluate the performance of the exoskeleton. Exp...

  9. MUSCLE WEAKNESS, FATIGUE, AND TORQUE VARIABILITY: EFFECTS OF AGE AND MOBILITY STATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    KENT-BRAUN, JANE A.; CALLAHAN, DAMIEN M.; FAY, JESSICA L.; FOULIS, STEPHEN A.; BUONACCORSI, JOHN P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Whereas deficits in muscle function, particularly power production, develop in old age and are risk factors for mobility impairment, a complete understanding of muscle fatigue during dynamic contractions is lacking. We tested hypotheses related to torque-producing capacity, fatigue resistance, and variability of torque production during repeated maximal contractions in healthy older, mobility-impaired older, and young women. Methods Knee extensor fatigue (decline in torque) was measured during 4 min of dynamic contractions. Torque variability was characterized using a novel 4-component logistic regression model. Results Young women produced more torque at baseline and during the protocol than older women (P torque variability differed by group (P = 0.022) and was greater in older impaired compared with young women (P = 0.010). Conclusions These results suggest that increased torque variability may combine with baseline muscle weakness to limit function, particularly in older adults with mobility impairments. PMID:23674266

  10. Inhibition of muscle spindle afferent activity during masseter muscle fatigue in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Orazio; Della Torre, Giovannella; Lucchi, Maria Luisa; Chiocchetti, Roberto; Bortolami, Ruggero; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2003-09-01

    The influence of muscle fatigue on the jaw-closing muscle spindle activity has been investigated by analyzing: (1) the field potentials evoked in the trigeminal motor nucleus (Vmot) by trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) stimulation, (2) the orthodromic and antidromic responses evoked in the Vmes by stimulation of the peripheral and central axons of the muscle proprioceptive afferents, and (3) the extracellular unitary discharge of masseter muscle spindles recorded in the Vmes. The masseter muscle was fatigued by prolonged tetanic masseter nerve electrical stimulation. Pre- and postsynaptic components of the potentials evoked in the Vmot showed a significant reduction in amplitude following muscle fatigue. Orthodromic and antidromic potentials recorded in the Vmes also showed a similar amplitude decrease. Furthermore, muscle fatigue caused a decrease of the discharge frequency of masseter muscle spindle afferents in most of the examined units. The inhibition of the potential amplitude and discharge frequency was strictly correlated with the extent of muscle fatigue and was mediated by the group III and IV afferent muscle fibers activated by fatigue. In fact, the inhibitory effect was abolished by capsaicin injection in the masseter muscle that provokes selective degeneration of small afferent muscle fibers containing neurokinins. We concluded that fatigue signals originating from the muscle and traveling through capsaicin-sensitive fibers are able to diminish the proprioceptive input by a central presynaptic influence. In the second part of the study, we examined the central projection of the masseter small afferents sensitive to capsaicin at the electron-microscopic level. Fiber degeneration was induced by injecting capsaicin into the masseter muscle. Degenerating terminals were found on the soma and stem process in Vmes and on the dendritic tree of neurons in Vmot. This suggests that small muscle afferents may influence the muscle spindle activity through

  11. Direct effects of doxorubicin on skeletal muscle contribute to fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norren, van K.; Helvoort, van A.; Argiles, J.M.; Tuijl, van S.; Arts, K.; Gorselink, M.; Laviano, A.; Kegler, D.; Haagsman, H.P.; Beek, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced fatigue is a multidimensional symptom. Oxidative stress has been proposed as a working mechanism for anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity. In this study, doxorubicin (DOX) was tested on skeletal muscle function. Doxorubicin induced impaired ex vivo skeletal muscle relaxation

  12. Testing of motor unit synchronization model for localized muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ganesh R; Kumar, Dinesh K; Yadav, Vivek; Wheeler, Katherine; Arjunan, Sridhar

    2009-01-01

    Spectral compression of surface electromyogram (sEMG) is associated with onset of localized muscle fatigue. The spectral compression has been explained based on motor unit synchronization theory. According to this theory, motor units are pseudo randomly excited during muscle contraction, and with the onset of muscle fatigue the recruitment pattern changes such that motor unit firings become more synchronized. While this is widely accepted, there is little experimental proof of this phenomenon. This paper has used source dependence measures developed in research related to independent component analysis (ICA) to test this theory.

  13. Muscle fatigue and contraction intensity modulates the complexity of surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashaback, Joshua G A; Cluff, Tyler; Potvin, Jim R

    2013-02-01

    Nonlinear dynamical techniques offer a powerful approach for the investigation of physiological time series. Multiscale entropy analyses have shown that pathological and aging systems are less complex than healthy systems and this finding has been attributed to degraded physiological control processes. A similar phenomenon may arise during fatiguing muscle contractions where surface electromyography signals undergo temporal and spectral changes that arise from the impaired regulation of muscle force production. Here we examine the affect of fatigue and contraction intensity on the short and long-term complexity of biceps brachii surface electromyography. To investigate, we used an isometric muscle fatigue protocol (parsed into three windows) and three contraction intensities (% of maximal elbow joint moment: 40%, 70% and 100%). We found that fatigue reduced the short-term complexity of biceps brachii activity during the last third of the fatiguing contraction. We also found that the complexity of surface electromyography is dependent on contraction intensity. Our results show that multiscale entropy is sensitive to muscle fatigue and contraction intensity and we argue it is imperative that both factors be considered when evaluating the complexity of surface electromyography signals. Our data contribute to a converging body of evidence showing that multiscale entropy can quantify subtle information content in physiological time series. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of fatigue in knee flexor and extensor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Y; Senda, M; Oka, T; Yagata, Y; Takahara, Y; Nagashima, H; Inoue, H

    2000-04-01

    In order to examine fatigue of the knee flexor and extensor muscles and to investigate the characteristics of muscular fatigue in different sports, a Cybex machine was used to measure muscle fatigue and recovery during isokinetic knee flexion and extension. Eighteen baseball players, 12 soccer players and 13 marathon runners were studied. Each subject was tested in the sitting position and made to perform 50 consecutive right knee bends and stretches at maximum strength. This was done 3 times with an interval of 10 min between each series. The peak torque to body weight ratio and the fatigue rate were determined in each case. In all subjects, the peak torque to body weight ratio was higher for extensors than flexors. Over the 3 trials, the fatigue rate of extensors showed little change, while that of flexors had a tendency to increase. In each subject, knee extensors showed a high fatigue rate but a quick recovery, while knee flexors showed a low fatigue rate but a slow recovery. As the marathon runners had the smallest fatigue rates for both flexors and extensors, we concluded that marathon runners had more stamina than baseball players and soccer players.

  15. Muscle injections with lidocaine improve resting fatigue and pain in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staud R

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Roland Staud,1 Taylor Kizer,1 Michael E Robinson2 1Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, 2Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Objective: Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS complain of long-lasting fatigue and pain which are not relieved by rest and worsened by physical exertion. Previous research has implicated metaboreceptors of muscles to play an important role for chronic fatigue and pain. Therefore, we hypothesized that blocking impulse input from deep tissues with intramuscular lidocaine injections would improve not only the pain but also fatigue of CFS patients. Methods: In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 58 CFS patients received 20 mL of 1% lidocaine (200 mg or normal saline once into both trapezius and gluteal muscles. Study outcomes included clinical fatigue and pain, depression, and anxiety. In addition, mechanical and heat hyperalgesia were assessed and serum levels of lidocaine were obtained after the injections. Results: Fatigue ratings of CFS patients decreased significantly more after lidocaine compared to saline injections (p = 0.03. In contrast, muscle injections reduced pain, depression, and anxiety (p < 0.001, but these changes were not statistically different between lidocaine and saline (p > 0.05. Lidocaine injections increased mechanical pain thresholds of CFS patients (p = 0.04 but did not affect their heat hyperalgesia. Importantly, mood changes or lidocaine serum levels did not significantly predict fatigue reductions. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that lidocaine injections reduce clinical fatigue of CFS patients significantly more than placebo, suggesting an important role of peripheral tissues for chronic fatigue. Future investigations will be necessary to evaluate the clinical benefits of such interventions. Keywords: muscle injections, lidocaine, metaboreceptor, chronic fatigue 

  16. Comparison of Muscle Fatigue Effects on Electromyographic Onset Latency of Trapezius Muscle in Posterior-Anterior Perturbation between Patients with Chronic Neck Pain and Healthy Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Rojhani-Shirazi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fatigue process in patients with neck pain was happened more quickly than healthy persons and neck muscle fatigue increased body sway during standing, but there is less evidence about the behavior of these muscles in dynamic conditions such as external perturbation, so this study was done to investigate the effect of muscle fatigue on onset latency of upper trapezius muscle in posterior-anterior perturbation among patients with chronic neck pain and healthy individuals. Materials & Methods: In this quasi experimental and interventional study 16 patients with chronic neck pain (intervention group and 16 healthy individuals (control group were selected by simple and convenient sampling and based on inclusive and exclusive criteria. Data collection was done by using questionnaire and doing some tests and the main equipments were dynamometer, accelerometer and surface electromyography. The weight equal to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction used to produce fatigue process and 10% of body weight used to produce perturbation. Independent T test, Paired T test and Repeated ANOVA were used for data analysis. Results: There was significant difference in onset latency of upper Trapezius muscle in posterior – anterior perturbation between two groups, before (P=0.006 and after (P=0.026 fatigue. This means that the onset latency was increased in healthy individuals and decreased in patients after fatigue. Also, there was significant difference in onset latency of Trapezius muscle in posterior – anterior perturbation between before and after fatigue in patients group (P<0.001 and healthy persons group (P=0.04. Conclusion: Pain can change the onset latency of trapezius muscle and possibly it can decrease muscle activity in deep muscle and change the pattern of muscle activation. Fatigue as an exaggerated risk factor can decrease onset latency of superficial muscle in patients with chronic neck pain to stabilize the system, that it can increase

  17. Comparative study of a muscle stiffness sensor and electromyography and mechanomyography under fatigue conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyonyoung; Jo, Sungho; Kim, Jung

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes the feasibility of a stiffness measurement for muscle contraction force estimation under muscle fatigue conditions. Bioelectric signals have been widely studied for the estimation of the contraction force for physical human-robot interactions, but the correlation between the biosignal and actual motion is decreased under fatigue conditions. Muscle stiffness could be a useful contraction force estimator under fatigue conditions because it measures the same physical quantity as the muscle contraction that generates the force. Electromyography (EMG), mechanomyography (MMG), and a piezoelectric resonance-based active muscle stiffness sensor were used to analyze the biceps brachii under isometric muscle fatigue conditions with reference force sensors at the end of the joint. Compared to EMG and MMG, the change in the stiffness signal was smaller (p fatigue condition changed fatigue conditions. This result indicates that the muscle stiffness signal is less sensitive to muscle fatigue than other biosignals. This investigation provides insights into methods of monitoring and compensating for muscle fatigue.

  18. Synchronous monitoring of muscle dynamics and electromyogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir Hossain, M.; Grill, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    A non-intrusive novel detection scheme has been implemented to detect the lateral muscle extension, force of the skeletal muscle and the motor action potential (EMG) synchronously. This allows the comparison of muscle dynamics and EMG signals as a basis for modeling and further studies to determine which architectural parameters are most sensitive to changes in muscle activity. For this purpose the transmission time for ultrasonic chirp signal in the frequency range of 100 kHz to 2.5 MHz passing through the muscle under observation and respective motor action potentials are recorded synchronously to monitor and quantify biomechanical parameters related to muscle performance. Additionally an ultrasonic force sensor has been employed for monitoring. Ultrasonic traducers are placed on the skin to monitor muscle expansion. Surface electrodes are placed suitably to pick up the potential for activation of the monitored muscle. Isometric contraction of the monitored muscle is ensured by restricting the joint motion with the ultrasonic force sensor. Synchronous monitoring was initiated by a software activated audio beep starting at zero time of the subsequent data acquisition interval. Computer controlled electronics are used to generate and detect the ultrasonic signals and monitor the EMG signals. Custom developed software and data analysis is employed to analyze and quantify the monitored data. Reaction time, nerve conduction speed, latent period between the on-set of EMG signals and muscle response, degree of muscle activation and muscle fatigue development, rate of energy expenditure and motor neuron recruitment rate in isometric contraction, and other relevant parameters relating to muscle performance have been quantified with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  19. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN MUSCLE MASS, MUSCLE STRENGTH, PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE, AND MUSCLE FATIGUE RESISTANCE IN COMMUNITY-DWELLING ELDERLY SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the correlations between muscle mass, muscle strength, physical performance, and muscle fatigue resistance in community-dwelling elderly people in order to elucidate factors which contribute to elderly’s performance of daily activities. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on community-dwelling elderly in Bandung from September to December 2014. One hundred and thirty elderly, 60 years old or above, were evaluated using bioelectrical impedance analysis to measure muscle mass; grip strength to measure muscle strength and muscle fatigue resistance; habitual gait speed to measure physical performance; and Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ to assess physical activity. Results: There were significant positive correlations between muscle mass (r=0,27, p=0,0019, muscle strength (r=0,26, p=0,0024, and physical performance (r=0,32, p=0,0002 with muscle fatigue resistance. Physical performance has the highest correlation based on multiple regression test (p=0,0025. In association with muscle mass, the physical activity showed a significant positive correlation (r=0,42, p=0,0000. Sarcopenia was identified in 19 (14.61% of 130 subjects. Conclusions: It is suggested that muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical performance influence muscle fatigue resistance.

  20. Coexistence of potentiation and fatigue in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.E. Rassier

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Twitch potentiation and fatigue in skeletal muscle are two conditions in which force production is affected by the stimulation history. Twitch potentiation is the increase in the twitch active force observed after a tetanic contraction or during and following low-frequency stimulation. There is evidence that the mechanism responsible for potentiation is phosphorylation of the regulatory light chains of myosin, a Ca2+-dependent process. Fatigue is the force decrease observed after a period of repeated muscle stimulation. Fatigue has also been associated with a Ca2+-related mechanism: decreased peak Ca2+ concentration in the myoplasm is observed during fatigue. This decrease is probably due to an inhibition of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although potentiation and fatigue have opposing effects on force production in skeletal muscle, these two presumed mechanisms can coexist. When peak myoplasmic Ca2+ concentration is depressed, but myosin light chains are relatively phosphorylated, the force response can be attenuated, not different, or enhanced, relative to previous values. In circumstances where there is interaction between potentiation and fatigue, care must be taken in interpreting the contractile responses.

  1. Evaluation of upper limb muscle fatigue based on surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qianxiang; Chen, Yuhong; Ma, Chao; Zheng, Xiaohui

    2011-10-01

    Fatigue is believed to be a major contributory factor to occupational injuries in machine operators. The development of accurate and usable techniques to measure operator fatigue is therefore important. In this study, we used a novel method based on surface electromyography (sEMG) of the biceps brachii and the Borg scale to evaluate local muscle fatigue in the upper limb after isometric muscle action. Thirteen young males performed isometric actions with the upper limb at different force levels. sEMG activities of the biceps brachii were recorded during the actions. Borg scales were used to evaluate the subjective sensation of local fatigue of the biceps brachii after the actions. sEMG activities were analyzed using the one-third band octave method, and an equation to determine the degree of fatigue was derived based on the relationship between the variable and the Borg scale. The results showed that the relationship could be expressed by a conic curve, and could be used to evaluate muscle fatigue during machine operation.

  2. Analysis of muscle fatigue conditions using time-frequency images and GLCM features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthick P.A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an attempt has been made to differentiate muscle non-fatigue and fatigue conditions using sEMG signals and texture representation of the time-frequency images. The sEMG signals are recorded from the biceps brachii muscle of 25 healthy adult volunteers during dynamic fatiguing contraction. The first and last curls of these signals are considered as the non-fatigue and fatigue zones, respectively. These signals are preprocessed and the time-frequency spectrum is computed using short time fourier transform (STFT. Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM is extracted from low (15–45 Hz, medium (46–95 Hz and high (96–150 Hz frequency bands of the time-frequency images. Further, the features such as contrast, correlation, energy and homogeneity are calculated from the resultant matrices. The results show that the high frequency band based features are able to differentiate non-fatigue and fatigue conditions. The features such as correlation, contrast and homogeneity extracted at angles 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135° are found to be distinct with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001. Hence, this framework can be used for analysis of neuromuscular disorders.

  3. Mechanisms of exertional fatigue in muscle glycogenoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Haller, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    , which may be important for maintaining muscle membrane excitability by decreasing chloride permeability, (2) loss of the osmotic effect related to lactate accumulation, which may account for absence of the normal increase in water content of exercised muscle, and thus promote higher than normal...... concentrations of extracellular potassium in exercising muscle and (3) exaggerated accumulation of ADP during exercise that may inhibit sodium-potassium and calcium-ATPases. Disorders of muscle glycogenolysis and glycolysis reveal the crucial role of these metabolic processes for supplying both anaerobic...

  4. Analysis of progression of fatigue conditions in biceps brachii muscles using surface electromyography signals and complexity based features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, P A; Makaram, Navaneethakrishna; Ramakrishnan, S

    2014-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a neuromuscular condition where muscle performance decreases due to sustained or intense contraction. It is experienced by both normal and abnormal subjects. In this work, an attempt has been made to analyze the progression of muscle fatigue in biceps brachii muscles using surface electromyography (sEMG) signals. The sEMG signals are recorded from fifty healthy volunteers during dynamic contractions under well defined protocol. The acquired signals are preprocessed and segmented in to six equal parts for further analysis. The features, such as activity, mobility, complexity, sample entropy and spectral entropy are extracted from all six zones. The results are found showing that the extracted features except complexity feature have significant variations in differentiating non-fatigue and fatigue zone respectively. Thus, it appears that, these features are useful in automated analysis of various neuromuscular activities in normal and pathological conditions.

  5. Muscle-Cooling Intervention to Reduce Fatigue and Fatigue-Induced Tremor in Novice and Experienced Surgeons: A Preliminary Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Lauren; Dancisak, Michael; Korndorffer, James

    2016-01-01

    A localized, intermittent muscle-cooling protocol was implemented to determine cooling garment efficacy in reducing upper extremity muscular fatigue and tremor in novice ( n  = 10) and experienced surgeons ( n  = 9). Subjects wore a muscle-cooling garment while performing multiple trials of a forearm exercise and paired suturing task to induce muscular fatigue and exercise-induced tremor. A reduction in tremor amplitude and an extension in time to fatigue were expected with muscle...

  6. Indoor mobility-related fatigue and muscle strength in nonagenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna; Ekmann, Anette; Thinggaard, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    needs to be considered when interpreting the results. Accordingly, participants without fatigue had significantly higher chances of being alive and having muscle strength above gender-specific median at first (RR 1.32, 95 % CI 1.07-1.58), second (RR 1.51, 1.06-1.96) and third (RR 1.39, 1...

  7. Performance Demands in Softball Pitching: A Comprehensive Muscle Fatigue Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corben, Jeffrey S; Cerrone, Sara A; Soviero, Julie E; Kwiecien, Susan Y; Nicholas, Stephen J; McHugh, Malachy P

    2015-08-01

    Monitoring pitch count is standard practice in minor league baseball but not in softball because of the perception that fast-pitch softball pitching is a less stressful motion. To examine muscle fatigue after fast-pitch softball performances to provide an assessment of performance demand. Descriptive laboratory study. Bilateral strength measurements (handheld dynamometer) were made on 19 female softball pitchers (mean age [±SD], 15.2 ± 1.2 years) before and after pitching a game (mean number of pitches, 99 ± 21; mean innings pitched, 5 ± 1). A total of 20 tests were performed on the dominant and nondominant sides: forearm (grip, wrist flexion/extension, pronation/supination, elbow flexion/extension), shoulder (flexion, abduction/adduction, external/internal rotation, empty can test), scapula (middle/lower trapezius, rhomboid), and hip (hip flexion/extension, abduction/adduction). Fatigue (percentage strength loss) was categorized based on bilateral versus unilateral presentation using paired t tests: bilateral symmetric (significant on dominant and nondominant and not different between sides), bilateral asymmetric (significant on dominant and nondominant but significantly greater on dominant), unilateral asymmetric (significant on dominant only and significantly greater than nondominant), or unilateral equivocal (significant on dominant only but not different from nondominant). Bilateral symmetric fatigue was evident for all hip (dominant, 19.3%; nondominant, 15.2%) and scapular tests (dominant, 19.2%; nondominant, 19.3%). In general, shoulder tests exhibited bilateral asymmetric fatigue (dominant, 16.9%; nondominant, 11.6%). Forearm tests were more variable, with bilateral symmetric fatigue in the elbow flexors (dominant, 22.5%; nondominant, 19.2%), and wrist flexors (dominant, 21.6%; nondominant, 19.0%), bilateral asymmetric fatigue in the supinators (dominant, 21.8%; nondominant, 15.5%), unilateral asymmetric fatigue in the elbow extensors (dominant, 22

  8. Effects of physical activity and inactivity on muscle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C. Bogdanis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to examine the mechanisms by which physical activity and inactivity modify muscle fatigue. It is well known that acute or chronic increases in physical activity result in structural, metabolic, hormonal, neural and molecular adaptations that increase the level of force or power that can be sustained by a muscle. These adaptations depend on the type, intensity and volume of the exercise stimulus, but recent studies have highlighted the role of high intensity, short duration exercise as a time-efficient method to achieve both anaerobic and aerobic/endurance type adaptations. The factors that determine the fatigue profile of a muscle during intense exercise include muscle fibre composition, neuromuscular characteristics high energy metabolite stores, buffering capacity, ionic regulation, capillarization and mitochondrial density. Muscle fiber type transformation during exercise training is usually towards the intermediate type IIA at the expense of both type I and type IIx myosin heavy chain isoforms. High intensity training results in increases of both glycolyic and oxidative enzymes, muscle capilarization, improved phosphocreatine resynthesis and regulation of K+, H+ and lactate ions. Decreases of the habitual activity level due to injury or sedentary lifestyle result in partial or even compete reversal of the adaptations due to previous training, manifested by reductions in fibre cross-sectional area, decreased oxidative capacity and capillarization. Complete immobilization due to injury results in markedly decreased force output and fatigue resistance. Muscle unloading reduces electromyographic activity and causes muscle atrophy and significant decreases in capillarization and oxidative enzymes activity. The last part of the review discusses the beneficial effects of intermittent high intensity exercise training in patients with different health conditions to demonstrate the powerful effect exercise on health and well

  9. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MUSCLE FATIGUE CHARACTERISTICS AND MARKERS OF ENDURANCE PERFORMANCE

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    Martyn G. Morris

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of a range of in-vivo whole muscle characteristics to determinants of endurance performance. Eleven healthy males completed a cycle ergometer step test to exhaustion for the determination of the lactate threshold, gross mechanical efficiency, peak power and VO2max. On two separate occasions, contractile and fatigue characteristics of the quadriceps femoris were collected using a specially designed isometric strength-testing chair. Muscle fatigue was then assessed by stimulating the muscle for 3 minutes. Force, rate of force development and rates of relaxation were calculated at the beginning and end of the 3 minute protocol and examined for reliability and in relation to lactate threshold, VO2max, gross mechanical efficiency and peak power. Muscle characteristics, rate of force development and relaxation rate were demonstrated to be reliable measures. Force drop off over the 3 minutes (fatigue index was related to lactate threshold (r = -0.72 p < 0.01 but not to VO2max. The rate of force development related to the peak power at the end of the cycle ergometer test (r = -0.75 p < 0.01. Rates of relaxation did not relate to any of the performance markers. We found in-vivo whole muscle characteristics, such as the fatigue index and rate of force development, relate to specific markers of peripheral, but not to central, fitness components. Our investigation suggests that muscle characteristics assessed in this way is reliable and could be feasibly utilised to further our understanding of the peripheral factors underpinning performance

  10. Muscle Fatigue in the Temporal and Masseter Muscles in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction

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    Krzysztof Woźniak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate muscle fatigue in the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD. Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 years (mean 21.50, SD 0.97 participated in this study. Electromyographical (EMG recordings were performed using a DAB-Bluetooth Instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany. Muscle fatigue was evaluated on the basis of a maximum effort test. The test was performed during a 10-second maximum isometric contraction (MVC of the jaws. An analysis of changes in the mean power frequency of the two pairs of temporal and masseter muscles (MPF% revealed significant differences in the groups of patients with varying degrees of temporomandibular disorders according to Di (P<0.0000. The study showed an increase in the muscle fatigue of the temporal and masseter muscles correlated with the intensity of temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms in patients. The use of surface electromyography in assessing muscle fatigue is an excellent diagnostic tool for identifying patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

  11. Muscle Activity Adaptations to Spinal Tissue Creep in the Presence of Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougarou, François

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to identify adaptations in muscle activity distribution to spinal tissue creep in presence of muscle fatigue. Methods Twenty-three healthy participants performed a fatigue task before and after 30 minutes of passive spinal tissue deformation in flexion. Right and left erector spinae activity was recorded using large-arrays surface electromyography (EMG). To characterize muscle activity distribution, dispersion was used. During the fatigue task, EMG amplitude root mean square (RMS), median frequency and dispersion in x- and y-axis were compared before and after spinal creep. Results Important fatigue-related changes in EMG median frequency were observed during muscle fatigue. Median frequency values showed a significant main creep effect, with lower median frequency values on the left side under the creep condition (p≤0.0001). A significant main creep effect on RMS values was also observed as RMS values were higher after creep deformation on the right side (p = 0.014); a similar tendency, although not significant, was observed on the left side (p = 0.06). A significant creep effects for x-axis dispersion values was observed, with higher dispersion values following the deformation protocol on the left side (p≤0.001). Regarding y-axis dispersion values, a significant creep x fatigue interaction effect was observed on the left side (p = 0.016); a similar tendency, although not significant, was observed on the right side (p = 0.08). Conclusion Combined muscle fatigue and creep deformation of spinal tissues led to changes in muscle activity amplitude, frequency domain and distribution. PMID:26866911

  12. Isometric muscle fatigue of the paravertebral and upper extremity muscles after whiplash injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastovic, Pejana; Gojanovic, Marija Definis; Berberovic, Marina; Pavlovic, Marko; Lesko, Josip; Galic, Gordan; Pandza, Maja

    2017-01-01

    Whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) result from injury of neck structures that most often occur during traffic accidents as a result of rapid acceleration-deceleration. The dominant symptoms manifest in the musculoskeletal system and include increased fatigue. Because of the frequency of whiplash injuries, a simple, cheap and useful diagnostic tool is needed to differentiate whiplash injury from healthy patients or those faking symptoms. To determine muscle fatigue in patients with whiplash injury in six body positions. Analytical cross-sectional study. Emergency center, university hospital. We studied patients with whiplash injury from vehicular traffic accidents who presented to the emergency center within 6 hours of sustaining the injury. We determined whiplash injury grade according to the Quebec Task Force (QTF) classification and measured isometric muscle endurance in six different body positions. Control subjects for each patient were matched by age, gender and anthropomorphic characteristics. Cut-off values were determined to distinguish patients with whiplash injury from controls and for determination of injury grade . QTF grade, time to muscle fatigue in seconds. From September 2013 to September 2016, we enrolled 75 patients with whiplash injury and 75 matching control subjects. In all six positions, the patients with whiplash injury felt muscle fatigue faster than equivalent controls (P whiplash injury grade in all six positions (P whiplash injury and grade. The size of the sample was small. An objective parameter such as electromyography is needed to confirm isometric muscle fatigue.

  13. The Investigation of Median Frequency Changes in Paraspinal Muscles Following Fatigue

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    Saeed Talebian

    2009-10-01

    Conclusion: Median frequency shift toward low values following fatigue in global and local paraspinal muscles was seen. However, median frequency values for the local stabilizer muscle were higher than median frequency values for the global muscles.

  14. Effects of muscle fatigue on the usability of a myoelectric human-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barszap, Alexander G; Skavhaug, Ida-Maria; Joshi, Sanjay S

    2016-10-01

    Electromyography-based human-computer interface development is an active field of research. However, knowledge on the effects of muscle fatigue for specific devices is limited. We have developed a novel myoelectric human-computer interface in which subjects continuously navigate a cursor to targets by manipulating a single surface electromyography (sEMG) signal. Two-dimensional control is achieved through simultaneous adjustments of power in two frequency bands through a series of dynamic low-level muscle contractions. Here, we investigate the potential effects of muscle fatigue during the use of our interface. In the first session, eight subjects completed 300 cursor-to-target trials without breaks; four using a wrist muscle and four using a head muscle. The wrist subjects returned for a second session in which a static fatiguing exercise took place at regular intervals in-between cursor-to-target trials. In the first session we observed no declines in performance as a function of use, even after the long period of use. In the second session, we observed clear changes in cursor trajectories, paired with a target-specific decrease in hit rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Are fatigue-related EMG-parameters correlated to trunk extensor muscles fatigue induced by the Sörensen test?

    OpenAIRE

    Demoulin Christophe; George, Florian; Matheve, Thomas; Jidovtseff, Boris; Vanderthommen, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The Sorensen test has been extensively studied and is a rapid, simple, and reproducible evaluation of the trunk extensor muscles [1]. It is often considered as a fatigue test because fatigue-related electromyographic (EMG) parameters change throughout the test [2]; however, only recently it has been confirmed that this test induces a decrease of trunk extensor force during a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) [3], which best characterises muscle fatigue. The main aim of this stud...

  16. Estimation of muscle fatigue by ratio of mean frequency to average rectified value from surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Jeffry Bonar; Yoshioka, Mototaka; Ozawa, Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new method to estimate muscle fatigue quantitatively from surface electromyography (EMG) is proposed. The ratio of mean frequency (MNF) to average rectified value (ARV) is used as the index of muscle fatigue, and muscle fatigue is detected when MNF/ARV falls below a pre-determined or pre-calculated baseline. MNF/ARV gives larger distinction between fatigued muscle and non-fatigued muscle. Experiment results show the effectiveness of our method in estimating muscle fatigue more correctly compared to conventional methods. An early evaluation based on the initial value of MNF/ARV and the subjective time when the subjects start feeling the fatigue also indicates the possibility of calculating baseline from the initial value of MNF/ARV.

  17. Recovery Effect of the Muscle Fatigue by the Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Kousuke; Nuruki, Atsuo; Tsujimura, Sei-Ichi; Tamari, Youzou; Yunokuchi, Kazutomo

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of magnetic stimulation for muscle fatigue. The six healthy subjects participated in the experiment with the repetition grasp using a hand dynamometer. The measurement of EMG (electromyography) and MMG (mechanomyography) is performed on the left forearm. All subjects performed MVC (maximum voluntary contraction), and repeated exercise in 80%MVC after the MVC measurement. The repetition task was entered when display muscular strength deteriorated. We used an EMG and MMG for the measurement of the muscle fatigue. Provided EMG and MMG waves were calculated integral calculus value (iEMG, and iMMG). The result of iEMG and iMMG were divided by muscular strength, because we calculate integral calculus value per the unit display muscular strength. The result of our study, we found recovery effect by the magnetic stimulation in voluntarily muscular strength and iEMG. However, we can not found in a figure of iMMG.

  18. Electrically-induced muscle fatigue affects feedforward mechanisms of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjo, F; Forestier, N

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effects of focal muscle fatigue induced by electromyostimulation (EMS) on Anticipatory Postural Adjustments (APAs) during arm flexions performed at maximal velocity. Fifteen healthy subjects performed self-paced arm flexions at maximal velocity before and after the completion of fatiguing electromyostimulation programs involving the medial and anterior deltoids and aiming to degrade movement peak acceleration. APA timing and magnitude were measured using surface electromyography. Following muscle fatigue, despite a lower mechanical disturbance evidenced by significant decreased peak accelerations (-12%, pcontrol trials (p>.11 for all analyses). The fatigue signals evoked by externally-generated contractions seem to be gated by the Central Nervous System and result in postural strategy changes which aim to increase the postural safety margin. EMS is widely used in rehabilitation and training programs for its neuromuscular function-related benefits. However and from a motor control viewpoint, the present results show that the use of EMS can lead to acute inaccuracies in predictive motor control. We propose that clinicians should investigate the chronic and global effects of EMS on motor control. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Capsaicin-sensitive muscle afferents modulate the monosynaptic reflex in response to muscle ischemia and fatigue in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Torre, G; Brunetti, O; Pettorossi, V E

    2002-01-01

    The role of muscle ischemia and fatigue in modulating the monosynaptic reflex was investigated in decerebrate and spinalized rats. Field potentials and fast motoneuron single units in the lateral gastrocnemious (LG) motor pool were evoked by dorsal root stimulation. Muscle ischemia was induced by occluding the LG vascular supply and muscle fatigue by prolonged tetanic electrical stimulation of the LG motor nerve. Under muscle ischemia the monosynaptic reflex was facilitated since the size of the early and late waves of the field potential and the excitability of the motoneuron units increased. This effect was abolished after L3-L6 dorsal rhizotomy, but it was unaffected after L3-L6 ventral rhizotomy. By contrast, the monosynaptic reflex was inhibited by muscle fatiguing stimulation, and this effect did not fully depend on the integrity of the dorsal root. However, when ischemia was combined with repetitive tetanic muscle stimulation the inhibitory effect of fatigue was significantly enhanced. Both the ischemia and fatigue effects were abolished by capsaicin injected into the LG muscle at a dose that blocked a large number of group III and IV muscle afferents. We concluded that muscle ischemia and fatigue activate different groups of muscle afferents that are both sensitive to capsaicin, but enter the spinal cord through different roots. They are responsible for opposite effects, when given separately: facilitation during ischemia and inhibition during fatigue; however, in combination, ischemia enhances the responsiveness of the afferent fibres to fatigue.

  20. Fuzzy approximate entropy analysis of chaotic and natural complex systems: detecting muscle fatigue using electromyography signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong-Bo; Guo, Jing-Yi; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2010-04-01

    In the present contribution, a complexity measure is proposed to assess surface electromyography (EMG) in the study of muscle fatigue during sustained, isometric muscle contractions. Approximate entropy (ApEn) is believed to provide quantitative information about the complexity of experimental data that is often corrupted with noise, short data length, and in many cases, has inherent dynamics that exhibit both deterministic and stochastic behaviors. We developed an improved ApEn measure, i.e., fuzzy approximate entropy (fApEn), which utilizes the fuzzy membership function to define the vectors' similarity. Tests were conducted on independent, identically distributed (i.i.d.) Gaussian and uniform noises, a chirp signal, MIX processes, Rossler equation, and Henon map. Compared with the standard ApEn, the fApEn showed better monotonicity, relative consistency, and more robustness to noise when characterizing signals with different complexities. Performance analysis on experimental EMG signals demonstrated that the fApEn significantly decreased during the development of muscle fatigue, which is a similar trend to that of the mean frequency (MNF) of the EMG signal, while the standard ApEn failed to detect this change. Moreover, fApEn of EMG demonstrated a better robustness to the length of the analysis window in comparison with the MNF of EMG. The results suggest that the fApEn of an EMG signal may potentially become a new reliable method for muscle fatigue assessment and be applicable to other short noisy physiological signal analysis.

  1. Nonlinear smooth orthogonal decomposition of kinematic features of sawing reconstructs muscle fatigue evolution as indicated by electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segala, David B; Gates, Deanna H; Dingwell, Jonathan B; Chelidze, David

    2011-03-01

    Tracking or predicting physiological fatigue is important for developing more robust training protocols and better energy supplements and/or reducing muscle injuries. Current methodologies are usually impractical and/or invasive and may not be realizable outside of laboratory settings. It was recently demonstrated that smooth orthogonal decomposition (SOD) of phase space warping (PSW) features of motion kinematics can identify fatigue in individual muscle groups. We hypothesize that a nonlinear extension of SOD will identify more optimal fatigue coordinates and provide a lower-dimensional reconstruction of local fatigue dynamics than the linear SOD. Both linear and nonlinear SODs were applied to PSW features estimated from measured kinematics to reconstruct muscle fatigue dynamics in subjects performing a sawing motion. Ten healthy young right-handed subjects pushed a weighted handle back and forth until voluntary exhaustion. Three sets of joint kinematic angles were measured from the right upper extremity in addition to surface electromyography (EMG) recordings. The SOD coordinates of kinematic PSW features were compared against independently measured fatigue markers (i.e., mean and median EMG spectrum frequencies of individual muscle groups). This comparison was based on a least-squares linear fit of a fixed number of the dominant SOD coordinates to the appropriate local fatigue markers. Between subject variability showed that at most four to five nonlinear SOD coordinates were needed to reconstruct fatigue in local muscle groups, while on average 15 coordinates were needed for the linear SOD. Thus, the nonlinear coordinates provided a one-order-of-magnitude improvement over the linear ones.

  2. Fatigue-related changes in motor-unit synchronization of quadriceps muscles within and across legs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, T.W.; Daffertshofer, A.; van Ditshuizen, J.C.; van den Heuvel, M.R.C.; Hofman, C.; Willigenburg, N.W.; Beek, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine effects of muscle fatigue on motor-unit synchronization of quadriceps muscles (rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis) within and between legs. We expected muscle fatigue to result in an increased common drive to different motor units of

  3. The Effect of Fatigued External Rotator Muscles of the Shoulder on the Shoulder Position Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Iida

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of fatigue in shoulder external rotator muscles on position sense of shoulder abduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. The study included 10 healthy subjects. Shoulder position sense was measured before and after a fatigue task involving shoulder external rotator muscles. The fatigue task was performed using an isokinetic machine. To confirm the muscle fatigue, electromyography (EMG was recorded, and an integrated EMG and median power frequency (MDF during 3 sec performed target torque were calculated. After the fatigue task, the MDF of the infraspinatus muscle significantly decreased. This indicates that the infraspinatus muscle was involved in the fatigue task. In addition, the shoulder position sense of internal and external rotation significantly decreased after the fatigue task. These results suggest that the fatigue reduced the accuracy of sensory input from muscle spindles. However, no significant difference was observed in shoulder position sense of abduction before and after the fatigue task. This may be due to the fact that infraspinatus muscle did not act as prime movers in shoulder abduction. These results suggest that muscle fatigue decreased position sense during movements in which the affected muscles acted as prime movers.

  4. Muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb based on sEMG and subjective assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Xiaoqi; Zhou, Qianxiang; Li, Yun

    2012-07-01

    All movements are driven by muscle contraction, and it is easy to cause muscle fatigue. Evaluation of muscle fatigue is a hot topic in the area of astronaut life support training and rehabilitation. If muscle gets into fatigue condition, it may reduce work efficiency and has an impact on psychological performance. Therefore it is necessary to develop an accurate and usable method on muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb. In this study, we developed a method based on surface electromyography (sEMG) and subjective assessment (Borg scale) to evaluate local muscle fatigue. Fifteen healthy young male subjects participated in the experiment. They performed isometric muscle contractions of the upper limb. sEMG of the biceps brachii were recorded during the entire process of isotonic muscle contraction and Borg scales of muscle fatigue were collected in certain times. sEMG were divided into several parts, and then mean energy of each parts were calculated by the one-twelfth band octave method. Equations were derived based on the relationship between the mean energy of sEMG and Borg scale. The results showed that cubic curve could describe the degree of local muscle fatigue, and could be used to evaluate and monitor local muscle fatigue during the entire process.

  5. Electromyogram and perceived fatigue changes in the trapezius muscle during typewriting and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mitsutoshi; Sato, Hirotaka; Ochi, Mamoru; Hosoya, Satoshi; Sadoyama, Tsugutake

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the development and recovery of muscle fatigue in the upper trapezius muscle by analyzing electromyographic signals. Six male subjects performed a simulated typewriting task for four 25-min sessions. During fatigue and the following rest periods, subjective fatigue and surface electromyography (EMG) from the trapezius muscle during isometric contraction at 30% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) were periodically measured in the interval. We detected a significant decrease in muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) (P = 0.008) and median frequency (MDF) (P = 0.026) as well as an increase in root mean square (RMS) (P = 0.039) and subjective fatigue (P = 0.0004) during the fatigue period. During the recovery period, subjective fatigue decreased drastically and significantly (P = 0.0004), however, the EMG parameters did not recover completely. Thus, physiological muscle fatigue in the trapezius developed in accordance with subjective muscle fatigue during typewriting. On the other hand, differences between the physiological and subjective parameters were found during recovery. Further studies should be necessary to reveal the discrepancy could be a major factor of a transition from temporal phenomena to serious chronic muscle fatigue and to identify the necessity of some guidelines to prevent VDT work-related chronic muscle fatigue in the trapezius.

  6. The positions effect of biarticular muscles on the walking fatigue of bipedal robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim FERNINI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to model a bipedal robot with springs like biarticular muscles and to study the positions effect of biarticular muscles on the walking fatigue of bipedal robots through the analysis of the works of the ground reaction force (GRF accumulated at joints and the analysis of the works done by biarticular muscles. We can define the walking fatigue in this paper by the fatigue of joints and muscles caused by the increment of the works accumulated at joints and the increment of the works done by biarticular muscles during the walk period of bipedal robots. It’s found from this study that the position of the muscle biceps femoris (BF has a strong impact on the fatigue of leg joints and the fatigue of the muscle itself during the walk period of bipedal robots.

  7. A Laboratory Experiment on Muscular Metabolism and Fatigue Using the Isolated Frog Muscle Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianuzzo, C. David; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment which demonstrates the association of particular metabolic biochemical changes and muscular fatigue. Highlights applications related to cellular energy metabolism, metabolic regulation, and muscle energetics. (ML)

  8. The effect of sustained low-intensity contractions on supraspinal fatigue in human elbow flexor muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karen; Gandevia, Simon C; Todd, Gabrielle

    2006-01-01

    Subjects quickly fatigue when they perform maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs). Much of the loss of force is from processes within muscle (peripheral fatigue) but some occurs because voluntary activation of the muscle declines (central fatigue). The role of central fatigue during submaximal...... contractions is not clear. This study investigated whether central fatigue developed during prolonged low-force voluntary contractions. Subjects (n=9) held isometric elbow flexions of 15% MVC for 43 min. Voluntary activation was measured during brief MVCs every 3 min. During each MVC, transcranial magnetic...... several minutes while MVC torque only returned to approximately 85% baseline. The resting twitch showed no recovery. Thus, as well as fatigue in the muscle, the prolonged low-force contraction produced progressive central fatigue, and some of this impairment of the subjects' ability to drive the muscle...

  9. The influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination during weightlifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Boyi; Ning, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar muscle fatigue is a potential risk factor for the development of low back pain. In this study, we investigated the influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns during weightlifting. Each of the 15 male subjects performed five repetitions of weightlifting tasks both before and after a lumbar extensor muscle fatiguing protocol. Lumbar muscle electromyography was collected to assess fatigue. Trunk kinematics was recorded to calculate lumbar-pelvic continuous relative phase (CRP) and CRP variability. Results showed that fatigue significantly reduced the average lumbar-pelvic CRP value (from 0.33 to 0.29 rad) during weightlifting. The average CRP variability reduced from 0.17 to 0.15 rad, yet this change ws statistically not significant. Further analyses also discovered elevated spinal loading during weightlifting after the development of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar extensor muscle fatigue should be avoided in an occupational environment. Lumbar extensor muscle fatigue generates more in-phase lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns and elevated spinal loading during lifting. Such increase in spinal loading may indicate higher risk of back injury. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar muscle fatigue should be avoided to reduce the risk of LBP.

  10. Construction Worker Fatigue Prediction Model Based on System Dynamic

    OpenAIRE

    Wahyu Adi Tri Joko; Ayu Ratnawinanda Lila

    2017-01-01

    Construction accident can be caused by internal and external factors such as worker fatigue and unsafe project environment. Tight schedule of construction project forcing construction worker to work overtime in long period. This situation leads to worker fatigue. This paper proposes a model to predict construction worker fatigue based on system dynamic (SD). System dynamic is used to represent correlation among internal and external factors and to simulate level of worker fatigue. To validate...

  11. Skeletal muscle fatigue and decreased efficiency: two sides of the same coin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Bruno; Rossiter, Harry B; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2015-04-01

    During high-intensity submaximal exercise, muscle fatigue and decreased efficiency are intertwined closely, and each contributes to exercise intolerance. Fatigue and muscle inefficiency share common mechanisms, for example, decreased "metabolic stability," muscle metabolite accumulation, decreased free energy of adenosine triphosphate breakdown, limited O2 or substrate availability, increased glycolysis, pH disturbance, increased muscle temperature, reactive oxygen species production, and altered motor unit recruitment patterns.

  12. Direct measurement of skeletal muscle fatigue in patients with chronic heart failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Buller, N P; Jones, D; Poole-Wilson, P A

    1991-01-01

    Skeletal muscle function was measured as force production and fatigue in both the quadriceps (a large locomotive muscle) and adductor pollicis (a small intrinsic hand muscle) in five healthy volunteers, five patients with mild chronic heart failure, and five patients with severe chronic heart failure. The quadriceps of patients with chronic heart failure had a reduced muscle cross sectional area, a reduced maximum isometric force production, and an increased tendency to fatigue. Isometric for...

  13. Surface electromyography based muscle fatigue detection using high-resolution time-frequency methods and machine learning algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, P A; Ghosh, Diptasree Maitra; Ramakrishnan, S

    2018-02-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) based muscle fatigue research is widely preferred in sports science and occupational/rehabilitation studies due to its noninvasiveness. However, these signals are complex, multicomponent and highly nonstationary with large inter-subject variations, particularly during dynamic contractions. Hence, time-frequency based machine learning methodologies can improve the design of automated system for these signals. In this work, the analysis based on high-resolution time-frequency methods, namely, Stockwell transform (S-transform), B-distribution (BD) and extended modified B-distribution (EMBD) are proposed to differentiate the dynamic muscle nonfatigue and fatigue conditions. The nonfatigue and fatigue segments of sEMG signals recorded from the biceps brachii of 52 healthy volunteers are preprocessed and subjected to S-transform, BD and EMBD. Twelve features are extracted from each method and prominent features are selected using genetic algorithm (GA) and binary particle swarm optimization (BPSO). Five machine learning algorithms, namely, naïve Bayes, support vector machine (SVM) of polynomial and radial basis kernel, random forest and rotation forests are used for the classification. The results show that all the proposed time-frequency distributions (TFDs) are able to show the nonstationary variations of sEMG signals. Most of the features exhibit statistically significant difference in the muscle fatigue and nonfatigue conditions. The maximum number of features (66%) is reduced by GA and BPSO for EMBD and BD-TFD respectively. The combination of EMBD- polynomial kernel based SVM is found to be most accurate (91% accuracy) in classifying the conditions with the features selected using GA. The proposed methods are found to be capable of handling the nonstationary and multicomponent variations of sEMG signals recorded in dynamic fatiguing contractions. Particularly, the combination of EMBD- polynomial kernel based SVM could be used to

  14. Optimal Elbow Angle for Extracting sEMG Signals During Fatiguing Dynamic Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R. Al-Mulla

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface electromyographic (sEMG activity of the biceps muscle was recorded from 13 subjects. Data was recorded while subjects performed dynamic contraction until fatigue and the signals were segmented into two parts (Non-Fatigue and Fatigue. An evolutionary algorithm was used to determine the elbow angles that best separate (using Davies-Bouldin Index, DBI both Non-Fatigue and Fatigue segments of the sEMG signal. Establishing the optimal elbow angle for feature extraction used in the evolutionary process was based on 70% of the conducted sEMG trials. After completing 26 independent evolution runs, the best run containing the optimal elbow angles for separation (Non-Fatigue and Fatigue was selected and then tested on the remaining 30% of the data to measure the classification performance. Testing the performance of the optimal angle was undertaken on nine features extracted from each of the two classes (Non-Fatigue and Fatigue to quantify the performance. Results showed that the optimal elbow angles can be used for fatigue classification, showing 87.90% highest correct classification for one of the features and on average of all eight features (including worst performing features giving 78.45%.

  15. Fatigue-induced changes in group IV muscle afferent activity: differences between high- and low-frequency electrically induced fatigues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darques, J L; Jammes, Y

    1997-03-07

    Recordings of group IV afferent activity of tibialis anterior muscle were performed in paralysed rabbits during runs of electrically induced fatigue produced by direct muscle stimulation at a high (100 Hz, high-frequency fatigue HFF) or a low rate (10 Hz, low-frequency fatigue LFF). In addition to analysis of afferent nerve action potentials, muscle force and compound muscle action potentials (M waves) elicited by direct muscle stimulation with single shocks were recorded. Changes in M wave configuration were used as an index of the altered propagation of membrane potentials and the associated efflux of potassium from muscle fibers. The data show that increased group IV afferent activity occurred during LFF as well as HFF trials and developed parallel with force failure. Enhanced afferent activity was significantly higher during LFF (maximal delta f(impulses) = 249 +/- 35%) than HFF (147 +/- 45%). No correlation was obtained between the responses of group IV afferents to LFF or to pressure exerted on tibialis anterior muscle. On the other hand, decreased M wave amplitude was minimal with LFF while it was pronounced with HFF. Close correlations were found between fatigue-induced activation of group IV afferents and decreases in force or M wave amplitude, but their strength was significantly higher with LFF compared to HFF. Thus, electrically induced fatigue activates group IV muscle afferents with a prominent effect of low-frequency stimulation. The mechanism of muscle afferent stimulation does not seem to be due to the sole increase in extracellular potassium concentration, but also by the efflux of muscle metabolites, present during fatiguing contractions at low rate of stimulation.

  16. Electromyographical manifestations of muscle fatigue during different levels of simulated light manual assembly work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, T.; Looze, M.P. de; Kingma, I.; Visser, B.; Dieën, J.H. van

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether objective electromyographical manifestations of muscle fatigue develop in the upper trapezius muscle in two assembly tasks involving contractions of different low-intensity levels (8% and 12% MVC) and whether these indications of fatigue are

  17. Effects of knee and ankle muscle fatigue on postural control in the unipedal stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizid, Riadh; Margnes, Eric; François, Yrieix; Jully, Jean Louis; Gonzalez, Gerard; Dupui, Philippe; Paillard, Thierry

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of acute muscle fatigue of the ankle and knee musculature on postural control by immediate measures after performing fatiguing tasks (POST condition). One group of subjects (n = 8) performed a fatiguing task by voluntary contractions of the triceps surae (group TRI) and the other (n = 9) performed a fatiguing task by voluntary contractions of the quadriceps femoris (group QUA). Each muscle group was exercised until the loss of maximal voluntary contraction torque reached 50% (isokinetic dynamometer). Posture was assessed by measuring the centre of foot pressure (COP) with a force platform during a test of unipedal quiet standing posture with eyes closed. Initially (in PRE condition), the mean COP velocity was not significantly different between group TRI and group QUA. In POST condition, the mean COP velocity increased more in group QUA than in group TRI. The postural control was more impaired by knee muscle fatigue than by ankle muscle fatigue.

  18. Sequential segmental neuromuscular stimulation reduces fatigue and improves perfusion in dynamic graciloplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonnevijlle, E D; Somia, N N; Abadia, G P; Stremel, R W; Maldonado, C J; Werker, P M; Kon, M; Barker, J H

    Dynamic graciloplasty is used as a treatment modality for total urinary incontinence caused by a paralyzed sphincter. A problem with this application is undesirable fatigue of the muscle caused by continuous electrical stimulation. Therefore, the neosphincter must be trained via a rigorous regimen

  19. Is rotating between static and dynamic work beneficial for our fatigue state?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luger, T.; Bosch, T.; Hoozemans, M.J.M.; Veeger,D.H.E.J.; Looze, M.P. de

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder disorders comprise a large part of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Risk factors, such as repetitiveness and monotony, may cause muscle fatigue and be attenuated by task rotation. We investigated rotation between a dynamic box-lifting task and a relatively static pick-and-place task

  20. Myoelectric manifestations of jaw elevator muscle fatigue and recovery in healthy and TMD subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castroflorio, T; Falla, D; Tartaglia, G M; Sforza, C; Deregibus, A

    2012-09-01

    The effects of muscle pain and fatigue on the control of jaw elevator muscles are not well known. Furthermore, the myoelectric manifestations of fatigue and recovery from fatigue in the masticatory muscles are not reported in literature. The main aims of this study were (i) to evaluate the possible use of surface electromyography (sEMG) as an objective measure of fatigue of the jaw elevator muscles, (ii) to compare the myoelectric manifestations of fatigue in the temporalis anterior and masseter muscles bilaterally, (iii) to assess recovery of the investigated muscles after an endurance test and (iv) to compare fatigue and recovery of the jaw elevator muscles in healthy subjects and patients with muscle-related temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The study was performed on twenty healthy volunteers and eighteen patients with muscle-related TMD. An intra-oral compressive-force sensor was used to measure the voluntary contraction forces close to the intercuspal position and to provide visual feedback of submaximal forces to the subject. Surface EMG signals were recorded with linear electrode arrays during isometric contractions at 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% of the maximum voluntary contraction force, during an endurance test and during the recovery phase. The results showed that (i) the slope of the mean power spectral frequency (MNF) and the initial average rectified value (ARV) could be used to monitor fatigue of the jaw elevators, (ii) the temporalis anterior and masseter muscle show the same myoelectric manifestations of fatigue and recovery and (iii) the initial values of MNF and ARV were lower in patients with muscle-related TMD. The assessment of myoelectric manifestations of fatigue in the masticatory muscles may assist in the clinical assessment of TMDs. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Effectiveness of the Wavelet Transform on the Surface EMG to Understand the Muscle Fatigue During Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M. S.; Mamun, Md.

    2012-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is the decline in ability of a muscle to create force. Electromyography (EMG) is a medical technique for measuring muscle response to nervous stimulation. During a sustained muscle contraction, the power spectrum of the EMG shifts towards lower frequencies. These effects are due to muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue is often a result of unhealthy work practice. In this research, the effectiveness of the wavelet transform applied to the surface EMG (SEMG) signal as a means of understanding muscle fatigue during walk is presented. Power spectrum and bispectrum analysis on the EMG signal getting from right rectus femoris muscle is executed utilizing various wavelet functions (WFs). It is possible to recognize muscle fatigue appreciably with the proper choice of the WF. The outcome proves that the most momentous changes in the EMG power spectrum are symbolized by WF Daubechies45. Moreover, this research has compared bispectrum properties to the other WFs. To determine muscle fatigue during gait, Daubechies45 is used in this research to analyze the SEMG signal.

  2. Methods for the assessment of peripheral muscle fatigue and its energy and metabolic determinants in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondelli, Rafaella Rezende; Dal Corso, Simone; Simões, Alexandre; Malaguti, Carla

    2009-11-01

    It has been well established that, in addition to the pulmonary involvement, COPD has systemic consequences that can lead to peripheral muscle dysfunction, with greater muscle fatigue, lower exercise tolerance and lower survival in these patients. In view of the negative repercussions of early muscle fatigue in COPD, the objective of this review was to discuss the principal findings in the literature on the metabolic and bioenergy determinants of muscle fatigue, its functional repercussions, as well as the methods for its identification and quantification. The anatomical and functional substrate of higher muscle fatigue in COPD appears to include lower levels of high-energy phosphates, lower mitochondrial density, early lactacidemia, higher serum ammonia and reduced muscle perfusion. These alterations can be revealed by contraction failure, decreased firing rates of motor units and increased recruitment of motor units in a given activity, which can be functionally detected by a reduction in muscle strength, power and endurance. This review article also shows that various types of muscle contraction regimens and protocols have been used in order to detect muscle fatigue in this population. With this understanding, rehabilitation strategies can be developed in order to improve the resistance to muscle fatigue in this population.

  3. Detecting and Predicting Muscle Fatigue during Typing By SEMG Signal Processing and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghoochani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Repetitive strain injuries are one of the most prevalent problems in occupational diseases. Repetition, vibration and bad postures of the extremities are physical risk factors related to work that can cause chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Repetitive work on a computer with low level contraction requires the posture to be maintained for a long time, which can cause muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue in shoulders and neck is one of the most prevalent problems reported with computer users especially during typing. Surface electromyography (SEMG signals are used for detecting muscle fatigue as a non-invasive method. Material and Methods: Nine healthy females volunteered for signal recoding during typing. EMG signals were recorded from the trapezius muscle, which is subjected to muscle fatigue during typing.  After signal analysis and feature extraction, detecting and predicting muscle fatigue was performed by using the MLP artificial neural network. Results: Recorded signals were analyzed in time and frequency domains for feature extraction. Results of classification showed that the MLP neural network can detect and predict muscle fatigue during typing with 80.79 % ± 1.04% accuracy. Conclusion: Intelligent classification and prediction of muscle fatigue can have many applications in human factors engineering (ergonomics, rehabilitation engineering and biofeedback equipment for mitigating the injuries of repetitive works.

  4. Fatigue is associated with muscle weakness in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voermans, N C; Knoop, H; Bleijenberg, G; van Engelen, B G

    2011-06-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that fatigue is a common and clinically important symptom. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue severity and subjective and objective measures of muscle weakness. Furthermore, the predictive value of muscle weakness for fatigue severity was determined, together with that of pain and physical activity. An explorative, cross-sectional, observational study. Thirty EDS patients, recruited from the Dutch patient association, were investigated at the neuromuscular outpatient department of a tertiary referral centre in The Netherlands. Muscle strength measured with manual muscle strength testing and hand-held dynamometry. Self-reported muscle weakness, pain, physical activity levels and fatigue were assessed with standardised questionnaires. Fatigue severity in EDS was significantly correlated with measured and self-reported muscle weakness (r=-0.408 for manual muscle strength, r=0.461 for hand-held dynamometry and r=0.603 for self-reported muscle weakness). Both muscle weakness and pain severity were significant predictors of fatigue severity in a multiple regression analysis. The results suggest a positive and direct relationship between fatigue severity and muscle weakness in EDS. Future research should focus on the relationship between fatigue, muscle weakness and objectively measured physical activity, preferably in a larger cohort of EDS patients. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Muscle-Cooling Intervention to Reduce Fatigue and Fatigue-Induced Tremor in Novice and Experienced Surgeons: A Preliminary Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lauren; Dancisak, Michael; Korndorffer, James

    2016-10-01

    A localized, intermittent muscle-cooling protocol was implemented to determine cooling garment efficacy in reducing upper extremity muscular fatigue and tremor in novice ( n  = 10) and experienced surgeons ( n  = 9). Subjects wore a muscle-cooling garment while performing multiple trials of a forearm exercise and paired suturing task to induce muscular fatigue and exercise-induced tremor. A reduction in tremor amplitude and an extension in time to fatigue were expected with muscle cooling as compared with control trials. Each subject completed an intervention session (5°C cooling condition) and a control session (32°C or thermal neutral condition). A paired samples t test indicated that tremor amplitude was significantly reduced ( t [8] = 1.89458; p  effect was not significant. Time to fatigue and suture time improved in both cohorts with muscle cooling, but the effect did not reach significance. Results from the pilot work suggest muscle cooling as an intervention for reduction of fatigue and tremor is very promising, warranting further investigation. Surgical specialties that require prolonged procedures might benefit more from this intervention.

  6. An Autonomous Wearable System for Predicting and Detecting Localised Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Colley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle fatigue is an established area of research and various types of muscle fatigue have been clinically investigated in order to fully understand the condition. This paper demonstrates a non-invasive technique used to automate the fatigue detection and prediction process. The system utilises the clinical aspects such as kinematics and surface electromyography (sEMG of an athlete during isometric contractions. Various signal analysis methods are used illustrating their applicability in real-time settings. This demonstrated system can be used in sports scenarios to promote muscle growth/performance or prevent injury. To date, research on localised muscle fatigue focuses on the clinical side and lacks the implementation for detecting/predicting localised muscle fatigue using an autonomous system. Results show that automating the process of localised muscle fatigue detection/prediction is promising. The autonomous fatigue system was tested on five individuals showing 90.37% accuracy on average of correct classification and an error of 4.35% in predicting the time to when fatigue will onset.

  7. An Autonomous Wearable System for Predicting and Detecting Localised Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mulla, Mohamed R.; Sepulveda, Francisco; Colley, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is an established area of research and various types of muscle fatigue have been clinically investigated in order to fully understand the condition. This paper demonstrates a non-invasive technique used to automate the fatigue detection and prediction process. The system utilises the clinical aspects such as kinematics and surface electromyography (sEMG) of an athlete during isometric contractions. Various signal analysis methods are used illustrating their applicability in real-time settings. This demonstrated system can be used in sports scenarios to promote muscle growth/performance or prevent injury. To date, research on localised muscle fatigue focuses on the clinical side and lacks the implementation for detecting/predicting localised muscle fatigue using an autonomous system. Results show that automating the process of localised muscle fatigue detection/prediction is promising. The autonomous fatigue system was tested on five individuals showing 90.37% accuracy on average of correct classification and an error of 4.35% in predicting the time to when fatigue will onset. PMID:22319367

  8. Calcium dynamics in vascular smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Amberg, Gregory C.; Navedo, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells are ultimately responsible for determining vascular luminal diameter and blood flow. Dynamic changes in intracellular calcium are a critical mechanism regulating vascular smooth muscle contractility. Processes influencing intracellular calcium are therefore important regulators of vascular function with physiological and pathophysiological consequences. In this review we discuss the major dynamic calcium signals identified and characterized in vascular smooth muscle cells....

  9. Influence of Lumbar Muscle Fatigue on Trunk Adaptations during Sudden External Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Jacques; Nougarou, François; Lardon, Arnaud; Dugas, Claude; Descarreaux, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: When the spine is subjected to perturbations, neuromuscular responses such as reflex muscle contractions contribute to the overall balance control and spinal stabilization mechanisms. These responses are influenced by muscle fatigue, which has been shown to trigger changes in muscle recruitment patterns. Neuromuscular adaptations, e.g., attenuation of reflex activation and/or postural oscillations following repeated unexpected external perturbations, have also been described. However, the characterization of these adaptations still remains unclear. Using high-density electromyography (EMG) may help understand how the nervous system chooses to deal with an unknown perturbation in different physiological and/or mechanical perturbation environments. Aim: To characterize trunk neuromuscular adaptations following repeated sudden external perturbations after a back muscle fatigue task using high-density EMG. Methods: Twenty-five healthy participants experienced a series of 15 sudden external perturbations before and after back muscle fatigue. Erector spinae muscle activity was recorded using high-density EMG. Trunk kinematics during perturbation trials were collected using a 3-D motion analysis system. A two-way repeated measure ANOVA was conducted to assess: (1) the adaptation effect across trials; (2) the fatigue effect; and (3) the interaction effect (fatigue × adaptation) for the baseline activity, the reflex latency, the reflex peak and trunk kinematic variables (flexion angle, velocity and time to peak velocity). Muscle activity spatial distribution before and following the fatigue task was also compared using t-tests for dependent samples. Results: An attenuation of muscle reflex peak was observed across perturbation trials before the fatigue task, but not after. The spatial distribution of muscle activity was significantly higher before the fatigue task compared to post-fatigue trials. Baseline activity showed a trend to higher values after muscle

  10. Influence of lumbar muscle fatigue on trunk adaptations during sudden external perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Abboud

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionWhen the spine is subjected to perturbations, neuromuscular responses such as reflex muscle contractions contribute to the overall balance control and spinal stabilization mechanisms. These responses are influenced by muscle fatigue, which has been shown to trigger changes in muscle recruitment patterns. Neuromuscular adaptations, e.g. attenuation of reflex activation and/or postural oscillations following repeated unexpected external perturbations, have also been described. However, the characterization of these adaptations still remains unclear. Using high-density electromyography (EMG may help understand how the nervous system chooses to deal with an unknown perturbation in different physiological and/or mechanical perturbation environments. AimTo characterize trunk neuromuscular adaptations following repeated sudden external perturbations after a back muscle fatigue task using high-density EMG.MethodsTwenty-five healthy participants experienced a series of 15 sudden external perturbations before and after back muscle fatigue. Erector spinae muscle activity was recorded using high-density EMG. Trunk kinematics during perturbation trials were collected using a 3-D motion analysis system. A two-way repeated measure ANOVA was conducted to assess 1 the adaptation effect across trials, 2 the fatigue effect, and 3 the interaction effect (fatigue x adaptation for the baseline activity, the reflex latency, the reflex peak and trunk kinematic variables (flexion angle, velocity and time to peak velocity. Muscle activity spatial distribution before and following the fatigue task was also compared using t-tests for dependent samples. ResultsAn attenuation of muscle reflex peak was observed across perturbation trials before the fatigue task, but not after. The spatial distribution of muscle activity was significantly higher before the fatigue task compared to post-fatigue trials. Baseline activity showed a trend to higher values after muscle

  11. Construction Worker Fatigue Prediction Model Based on System Dynamic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Adi Tri Joko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction accident can be caused by internal and external factors such as worker fatigue and unsafe project environment. Tight schedule of construction project forcing construction worker to work overtime in long period. This situation leads to worker fatigue. This paper proposes a model to predict construction worker fatigue based on system dynamic (SD. System dynamic is used to represent correlation among internal and external factors and to simulate level of worker fatigue. To validate the model, 93 construction workers whom worked in a high rise building construction projects, were used as case study. The result shows that excessive workload, working elevation and age, are the main factors lead to construction worker fatigue. Simulation result also shows that these factors can increase worker fatigue level to 21.2% times compared to normal condition. Beside predicting worker fatigue level this model can also be used as early warning system to prevent construction worker accident

  12. Effects of Kinesio taping on scapular kinematics of overhead athletes following muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, Gisele Garcia; Grüninger, Bruno; Mattiello, Stela Márcia

    2016-08-01

    Scapular kinematics alterations have been found following muscle fatigue. Considering the importance of the lower trapezius in coordinated scapular movement, this study aimed to investigate the effects of elastic taping (Kinesio taping, KT) for muscle facilitation on scapular kinematics of healthy overhead athletes following muscle fatigue. Twenty-eight athletes were evaluated in a crossover, single-blind, randomized design, in three sessions: control (no taping), KT (KT with tension) and sham (KT without tension). Scapular tridimensional kinematics and EMG of clavicular and acromial portions of upper trapezius, lower trapezius and serratus anterior were evaluated during arm elevation and lowering, before and after a fatigue protocol involving repetitive throwing. Median power frequency decline of serratus anterior was significantly lower in KT session compared to sham, possibly indicating lower muscle fatigue. However, the effects of muscle fatigue on scapular kinematics were not altered by taping conditions. Although significant changes were found in scapular kinematics following muscle fatigue, they were small and not considered relevant. It was concluded that healthy overhead athletes seem to present an adaptive mechanism that avoids the disruption of scapular movement pattern following muscle fatigue. Therefore, these athletes do not benefit from the use of KT to assist scapular movement under the conditions tested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Computation and Evaluation of Features of Surface Electromyogram to Identify the Force of Muscle Contraction and Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar P. Arjunan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between force of muscle contraction and muscle fatigue with six different features of surface electromyogram (sEMG was determined by conducting experiments on thirty-five volunteers. The participants performed isometric contractions at 50%, 75%, and 100% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. Six features were considered in this study: normalised spectral index (NSM5, median frequency, root mean square, waveform length, normalised root mean square (NRMS, and increase in synchronization (IIS index. Analysis of variance (ANOVA and linear regression analysis were performed to determine the significance of the feature with respect to the three factors: muscle force, muscle fatigue, and subject. The results show that IIS index of sEMG had the highest correlation with muscle fatigue and the relationship was statistically significant (P0.05.

  14. Computation and evaluation of features of surface electromyogram to identify the force of muscle contraction and muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Sridhar P; Kumar, Dinesh K; Naik, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between force of muscle contraction and muscle fatigue with six different features of surface electromyogram (sEMG) was determined by conducting experiments on thirty-five volunteers. The participants performed isometric contractions at 50%, 75%, and 100% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Six features were considered in this study: normalised spectral index (NSM5), median frequency, root mean square, waveform length, normalised root mean square (NRMS), and increase in synchronization (IIS) index. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and linear regression analysis were performed to determine the significance of the feature with respect to the three factors: muscle force, muscle fatigue, and subject. The results show that IIS index of sEMG had the highest correlation with muscle fatigue and the relationship was statistically significant (P 0.05).

  15. Evaluation of surgeon's muscle fatigue during thoracoscopic pulmonary lobectomy using interoperative surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seung-Hyun; Jung, Myung-Chul; Park, Seong Yong

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to document the physical stress experienced by a surgeon during thoracoscopic pulmonary lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection for lung cancer by measuring the intraoperative electromyography (EMG). Surface EMG was recorded during 12 cases of thoracoscopic lobectomy. During the operation, 16 channels of a wireless EMG were used to measure muscle activity and fatigue from the bilateral muscles of the splenius capitis (SC), upper trapezius (UT), middle deltoid (MD), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), extensor carpi radialis (ECR), lumbar erector spinae (LES), rectus femoralis (RF), and tibialis anterior (TA). The EMG signals were processed to collect the values of the root mean square for muscle activity and median frequency (MF) for muscle fatigue. All operations were completed without adverse events. The mean operating time was 99.16±35.15 minutes. During the operation, the mean muscle activity of all muscles was 21.91±12.85 mV. High muscle activity was observed in the bilateral FCR and ECR, whereas low muscle activity was observed in the bilateral SC and LES. The final MFs in the bilateral SC and LES were found to be decreased from the initial status, which implied increased muscle fatigue. The muscles of the right and left LES were significantly fatigued by up to 29% and 37% compared to their initial status (P=0.021 and P=0.007, respectively). The MFs of the bilateral LES decreased with time (an average decreases of 0.008/5 minutes, P=0.002 in right LES and 0.004/5 minutes, P=0.018 in left LES). During thoracoscopic lobectomy, muscle fatigue was observed in muscles related to a static posture, such as the bilateral SC, UT, and ES. Further studies are required to investigate the ergonomic adjustments needed to reduce muscle fatigue in these static muscles.

  16. Evaluation of Work Fatigue in Loading Workers Using Muscle Fatigue Assessment Method (MFA: A Case Study in a Brick Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haji Omid Kalte

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and purpose: Work fatigue is one of the main causes of workrelated musculoskeletal disorders and reduced productivity in industry. Therefore, it is vital to evaluate work fatigue, especially muscle fatigue, to determine the permissible workload. This study aimed to evaluate muscle fatigue of brick field workers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on transportation sector workers in Pey Dezh Brick Production Company, Golestan, Iran in 2015. In this research, the qualitative of Muscle Fatigue Assessment (MFA method was used to assess the level of fatigue. Duration of each task and frequency of efforts were determined using the level of effort to obtain a numerical result for comparison with the standard level. Results: The evaluated task was to remove paired bricks from the conveyor and transfer them to trailer truck by workers. The final results revealed that lower back tolerated the most amount of pressure (score=323, followed by the shoulders and wrist of the right hand (scores=313, which were assigned to the fatigue level. Therefore, the highest total fatigue of workload was imposed on these body parts. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the upper limbs of workers incurred the highest burden in lifting bricks, and there was a in risk of WMSDS due to high workload. Therefore, it is recommended that working systems be improved through rotating work and reducing the number of transferred bricks to avoid risks caused by accumulation of fatigue.

  17. Measuring the interactions between different locations in a muscle to monitor localized muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Adrian; Arjunan, Sridhar P; Kumar, Dinesh K

    2017-07-01

    In this study we investigated a technique for estimating the progression of localized muscle fatigue. This technique measures the dependence between motor units using high density surface electromyogram (HD-sEMG) and is based on the Normalized Mutual Information (NMI) measure. The NMI between every pair combination of the electrode array is computed to measure the interactions between electrodes. Participants in the experiment had an array of 64 electrodes (16 by 4) placed over the TA of their dominate leg such that the columns of the array ran parallel with the muscle fibers. The HD-sEMG was recorded whilst the participants maintained an isometric dorsiflexion with their dominate foot until task failure at 40% and 80% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). The interactions between different locations over the muscle were computed using the recorded HD-sEMG signals. The results show that the average interactions between various locations over the TA significantly increased during fatigue at both levels of contraction. This can be attributed to the dependence in the motor units.

  18. Fatigue Perceived by Multiple Sclerosis Patients Is Associated With Muscle Fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steens, Anneke; de Vries, Astrid; Hemmen, Jolien; Heersema, Thea; Heerings, Marco; Maurits, Natasha; Zijdewind, Inge

    Background. Fatigue is a debilitating symptom in multiple sclerosis (MS). Previous studies showed no association between fatigue as perceived by the patient and physiological measures of fatigability. Objective. The authors investigated associations between perceived fatigue and measures of

  19. The effectiveness of FES-evoked EMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Estigoni, Eduardo H; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Wahab, Ahmad Khairi Abdul; Davis, Glen M

    2014-07-14

    The evoked electromyographic signal (eEMG) potential is the standard index used to monitor both electrical changes within the motor unit during muscular activity and the electrical patterns during evoked contraction. However, technical and physiological limitations often preclude the acquisition and analysis of the signal especially during functional electrical stimulation (FES)-evoked contractions. Hence, an accurate quantification of the relationship between the eEMG potential and FES-evoked muscle response remains elusive and continues to attract the attention of researchers due to its potential application in the fields of biomechanics, muscle physiology, and rehabilitation science. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of eEMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue, particularly as a biofeedback descriptor of FES-evoked contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury. At the outset, 2867 citations were identified and, finally, fifty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria. Four hypotheses were proposed and evaluated to inform this review. The results showed that eEMG is effective at quantifying muscle force and fatigue during isometric contraction, but may not be effective during dynamic contractions including cycling and stepping. Positive correlation of up to r = 0.90 (p peak-to-peak amplitude of the eEMG and the decline in the force output during fatiguing isometric contractions has been reported. In the available prediction models, the performance index of the eEMG signal to estimate the generated muscle force ranged from 3.8% to 34% for 18 s to 70 s ahead of the actual muscle force generation. The strength and inherent limitations of the eEMG signal to assess muscle force and fatigue were evident from our findings with implications in clinical management of spinal cord injury (SCI) population.

  20. The Effectiveness of FES-Evoked EMG Potentials to Assess Muscle Force and Fatigue in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morufu Olusola Ibitoye

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The evoked electromyographic signal (eEMG potential is the standard index used to monitor both electrical changes within the motor unit during muscular activity and the electrical patterns during evoked contraction. However, technical and physiological limitations often preclude the acquisition and analysis of the signal especially during functional electrical stimulation (FES-evoked contractions. Hence, an accurate quantification of the relationship between the eEMG potential and FES-evoked muscle response remains elusive and continues to attract the attention of researchers due to its potential application in the fields of biomechanics, muscle physiology, and rehabilitation science. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of eEMG potentials to assess muscle force and fatigue, particularly as a biofeedback descriptor of FES-evoked contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury. At the outset, 2867 citations were identified and, finally, fifty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria. Four hypotheses were proposed and evaluated to inform this review. The results showed that eEMG is effective at quantifying muscle force and fatigue during isometric contraction, but may not be effective during dynamic contractions including cycling and stepping. Positive correlation of up to r = 0.90 (p < 0.05 between the decline in the peak-to-peak amplitude of the eEMG and the decline in the force output during fatiguing isometric contractions has been reported. In the available prediction models, the performance index of the eEMG signal to estimate the generated muscle force ranged from 3.8% to 34% for 18 s to 70 s ahead of the actual muscle force generation. The strength and inherent limitations of the eEMG signal to assess muscle force and fatigue were evident from our findings with implications in clinical management of spinal cord injury (SCI population.

  1. Effect of muscle acidity on muscle metabolism and fatigue during intense exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Madsen, K.; Kiens, Bente

    1996-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of muscle pH on muscle metabolism and development of fatigue during intense exercise. 2. Seven subjects performed intense exhaustive leg exercise on two occasions: with and without preceding intense intermittent arm exercise leading to high...... or moderate (control) blood lactate concentrations (HL and C, respectively). Prior to and immediately after each exercise bout, a muscle biopsy was taken from m. vastus lateralis of the active leg. Leg blood flow was measured and femoral arterial and venous blood samples were collected before and frequently...... during the exhaustive exercises. 3. The duration of the exercise was shorter in HL than in C (3.46 +/- 0.28 vs. 4.67 +/- 0.55 min; means +/- S.E.M.; P muscle pH was the same in C and HL (7.17 vs. 7.10), but at the end of exercise muscle pH was lower in HL than in C (6.82 vs. 6...

  2. Hyperexcitability to electrical stimulation and accelerated muscle fatiguability of taut bands in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Hui; Yin, Ming-Jing; Fan, Zhen-Zhen; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Ge, Hong-You; Yue, Shou-Wei

    2014-04-01

    Myofascial trigger points contribute significantly to musculoskeletal pain and motor dysfunction and may be associated with accelerated muscle fatiguability. The aim of this study was to investigate the electrically induced force and fatigue characteristics of muscle taut bands in rats. Muscle taut bands were dissected out and subjected to trains of electrical stimulation. The electrical threshold intensity for muscle contraction and maximum contraction force (MCF), electrical intensity dependent fatigue and electrical frequency dependent fatigue characteristics were assessed in three different sessions (n=10 each) and compared with non-taut bands in the biceps femoris muscle. The threshold intensity for muscle contraction and MCF at the 10th, 15th and 20th intensity dependent fatigue stimuli of taut bands were significantly lower than those of non-taut bands (all pbands were significantly lower than those at the 1st and 5th stimuli (all pbands than for non-taut bands (both pband itself was more excitable to electrical stimulation and significantly less fatigue resistant than normal muscle fibres.

  3. Muscle cocontraction following dynamics learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darainy, Mohammad; Ostry, David J

    2008-09-01

    Coactivation of antagonist muscles is readily observed early in motor learning, in interactions with unstable mechanical environments and in motor system pathologies. Here we present evidence that the nervous system uses coactivation control far more extensively and that patterns of cocontraction during movement are closely tied to the specific requirements of the task. We have examined the changes in cocontraction that follow dynamics learning in tasks that are thought to involve finely sculpted feedforward adjustments to motor commands. We find that, even following substantial training, cocontraction varies in a systematic way that depends on both movement direction and the strength of the external load. The proportion of total activity that is due to cocontraction nevertheless remains remarkably constant. Moreover, long after indices of motor learning and electromyographic measures have reached asymptotic levels, cocontraction still accounts for a significant proportion of total muscle activity in all phases of movement and in all load conditions. These results show that even following dynamics learning in predictable and stable environments, cocontraction forms a central part of the means by which the nervous system regulates movement.

  4. Locomotor muscle fatigue does not alter oxygen uptake kinetics during high-intensity exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Hopker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The slow component (VO2sc that develops during high-intensity aerobic exercise is thought to be strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue. We sought to experimentally test this hypothesis by pre-fatiguing the locomotor muscles used during subsequent high-intensity cycling exercise. Over two separate visits, eight healthy male participants were asked to either perform a non-metabolically stressful 100 intermittent drop-jumps protocol (pre fatigue condition or rest for 33 minutes (control condition according to a random and counterbalanced order. Locomotor muscle fatigue was quantified with 6-second maximal sprints at a fixed pedaling cadence of 90 rev·min-1. Oxygen kinetics and other responses (heart rate, capillary blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion, RPE were measured during two subsequent bouts of 6 min cycling exercise at 50% of the delta between the lactate threshold and VO2max determined during a preliminary incremental exercise test. All tests were performed on the same cycle ergometer. Despite significant locomotor muscle fatigue (P = 0.03, the VO2sc was not significantly different between the pre fatigue (464 ± 301 mL·min-1 and the control (556 ± 223 mL·min-1 condition (P = 0.50. Blood lactate response was not significantly different between conditions (P = 0.48 but RPE was significantly higher following the pre-fatiguing exercise protocol compared with the control condition (P < 0.01 suggesting higher muscle recruitment. These results demonstrate experimentally that locomotor muscle fatigue does not significantly alter the VO2 kinetic response to high intensity aerobic exercise, and challenge the hypothesis that the VO2sc is strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue.

  5. Fatigue and muscle-tendon stiffness after stretch-shortening cycle and isometric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toumi, Hechmi; Poumarat, Georges; Best, Thomas M; Martin, Alain; Fairclough, John; Benjamin, Mike

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare vertical jump performance after 2 different fatigue protocols. In the first protocol, subjects performed consecutive sets of 10 repetitions of stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) contractions. In the second protocol, successive sets of 10 repetitions of isometric contractions were performed for 10 s with the knee at 90 degrees of flexion. The exercises were stopped when the subjects failed to reach 50% of their maximum voluntary isometric contractions. Maximal isometric force and maximal concentric power were assessed by performing supine leg presses, squat jumps, and drop jumps. Surface EMG was used to determine changes in muscle activation before and after fatigue. In both groups, the fatigue exercises reduced voluntary isometric force, maximal concentric power, and drop jump performance. Kinematic data showed a decrease in knee muscle-tendon stiffness accompanied by a lengthened ground contact time. EMG analysis showed that the squat and drop jumps were performed similarly before and after the fatigue exercise for both groups. Although it was expected that the stiffness would decrease more after SSC than after isometric fatigue (as a result of a greater alteration of the reflex sensitivity SSC), our results showed that both protocols had a similar effect on knee muscle stiffness during jumping exercises. Both fatigue protocols induced muscle fatigue, and the decrease in jump performance was linked to a decrease in the strength and stiffness of the knee extensor muscles.

  6. The effect of a single dose of morphine on muscle fatigue indices in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Amiresmaili

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Endogenous opioids and addictive opiate drugs change many body functions. . Previous studies have referred to the effects of morphine on smooth and pulmonary muscles ., but the  effects of opioids on skeletal muscles is not known well. Thus, the current study aimed at assessing the effect of a single dose of morphine on muscle fatigue in male rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 male Wistar rats weighing 220-270 g were randomly divided into four equal groups: control (the mice were kept in their cages and received food and water, morphine receiving group, fatigue group (the mice in this group were kept running on  a treadmill . for120 minutes at a rate of 20 meters per minute, and morphine plus fatigue group. At the end of the experiments, blood samples were obtained from the corner of their eyes and were sent to the laboratory for measurement of muscle fatigue indexes including lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and creatine phosphokinase (CPK. Results: Administration of morphine to the fatigue group decreased running time compared with the control group (P=0.009. Furthermore, administration of morphine to the fatigue group significantly increased serum levels of LDH (P=0.009 and CPK (P=0.008. Conclusion: The present study showed that administration of a single dose of morphine in rats increases muscle fatigue biomarkers (LDH, CPK.

  7. A Review of Non-Invasive Techniques to Detect and Predict Localised Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R. Al-Mulla

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle fatigue is an established area of research and various types of muscle fatigue have been investigated in order to fully understand the condition. This paper gives an overview of the various non-invasive techniques available for use in automated fatigue detection, such as mechanomyography, electromyography, near-infrared spectroscopy and ultrasound for both isometric and non-isometric contractions. Various signal analysis methods are compared by illustrating their applicability in real-time settings. This paper will be of interest to researchers who wish to select the most appropriate methodology for research on muscle fatigue detection or prediction, or for the development of devices that can be used in, e.g., sports scenarios to improve performance or prevent injury. To date, research on localised muscle fatigue focuses mainly on the clinical side. There is very little research carried out on the implementation of detecting/predicting fatigue using an autonomous system, although recent research on automating the process of localised muscle fatigue detection/prediction shows promising results.

  8. A Review of Non-Invasive Techniques to Detect and Predict Localised Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mulla, Mohamed R.; Sepulveda, Francisco; Colley, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is an established area of research and various types of muscle fatigue have been investigated in order to fully understand the condition. This paper gives an overview of the various non-invasive techniques available for use in automated fatigue detection, such as mechanomyography, electromyography, near-infrared spectroscopy and ultrasound for both isometric and non-isometric contractions. Various signal analysis methods are compared by illustrating their applicability in real-time settings. This paper will be of interest to researchers who wish to select the most appropriate methodology for research on muscle fatigue detection or prediction, or for the development of devices that can be used in, e.g., sports scenarios to improve performance or prevent injury. To date, research on localised muscle fatigue focuses mainly on the clinical side. There is very little research carried out on the implementation of detecting/predicting fatigue using an autonomous system, although recent research on automating the process of localised muscle fatigue detection/prediction shows promising results. PMID:22163810

  9. Mechanisms Explaining Muscle Fatigue and Muscle Pain in Patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS): a Review of Recent Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwyn, Morris; Maes, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Here, we review potential causes of muscle dysfunction seen in many patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) such as the effects of oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS) and mitochondrial impairments together with reduced heat shock protein production and a range of metabolic abnormalities. Several studies published in the last few years have highlighted the existence of chronic O&NS, inflammation, impaired mitochondrial function and reduced heat shock protein production in many patients with ME/CFS. These studies have also highlighted the detrimental effects of chronically elevated O&NS on muscle functions such as reducing the time to muscle fatigue during exercise and impairing muscle contractility. Mechanisms have also been revealed by which chronic O&NS and or impaired heat shock production may impair muscle repair following exercise and indeed the adaptive responses in the striated muscle to acute and chronic increases in physical activity. The presence of chronic O&NS, low-grade inflammation and impaired heat shock protein production may well explain the objective findings of increased muscle fatigue, impaired contractility and multiple dimensions of exercise intolerance in many patients with ME/CFS.

  10. Cancer cachexia decreases specific force and accelerates fatigue in limb muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, B. M. [1225 Center Drive, HPNP Building Room 1142, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Frye, G. S.; Ahn, B.; Ferreira, L. F. [1864 Stadium Road, Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Judge, A.R., E-mail: arjudge@phhp.ufl.edu [1225 Center Drive, HPNP Building Room 1142, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle absolute force. •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle specific force. •C-26 cancer cachexia decreases fatigue resistance in the soleus muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs time to peak twitch tension in limb muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs one half twitch relaxation time in limb muscle. -- Abstract: Cancer cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome that is characterized by the loss of skeletal muscle mass and weakness, which compromises physical function, reduces quality of life, and ultimately can lead to mortality. Experimental models of cancer cachexia have recapitulated this skeletal muscle atrophy and consequent decline in muscle force generating capacity. However, more recently, we provided evidence that during severe cancer cachexia muscle weakness in the diaphragm muscle cannot be entirely accounted for by the muscle atrophy. This indicates that muscle weakness is not just a consequence of muscle atrophy but that there is also significant contractile dysfunction. The current study aimed to determine whether contractile dysfunction is also present in limb muscles during severe Colon-26 (C26) carcinoma cachexia by studying the glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the oxidative soleus muscle, which has an activity pattern that more closely resembles the diaphragm. Severe C-26 cancer cachexia caused significant muscle fiber atrophy and a reduction in maximum absolute force in both the EDL and soleus muscles. However, normalization to muscle cross sectional area further demonstrated a 13% decrease in maximum isometric specific force in the EDL and an even greater decrease (17%) in maximum isometric specific force in the soleus. Time to peak tension and half relaxation time were also significantly slowed in both the EDL and the solei from C-26 mice compared to controls. Since, in addition to postural control, the oxidative

  11. Cancer cachexia decreases specific force and accelerates fatigue in limb muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.M.; Frye, G.S.; Ahn, B.; Ferreira, L.F.; Judge, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle absolute force. •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle specific force. •C-26 cancer cachexia decreases fatigue resistance in the soleus muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs time to peak twitch tension in limb muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs one half twitch relaxation time in limb muscle. -- Abstract: Cancer cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome that is characterized by the loss of skeletal muscle mass and weakness, which compromises physical function, reduces quality of life, and ultimately can lead to mortality. Experimental models of cancer cachexia have recapitulated this skeletal muscle atrophy and consequent decline in muscle force generating capacity. However, more recently, we provided evidence that during severe cancer cachexia muscle weakness in the diaphragm muscle cannot be entirely accounted for by the muscle atrophy. This indicates that muscle weakness is not just a consequence of muscle atrophy but that there is also significant contractile dysfunction. The current study aimed to determine whether contractile dysfunction is also present in limb muscles during severe Colon-26 (C26) carcinoma cachexia by studying the glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the oxidative soleus muscle, which has an activity pattern that more closely resembles the diaphragm. Severe C-26 cancer cachexia caused significant muscle fiber atrophy and a reduction in maximum absolute force in both the EDL and soleus muscles. However, normalization to muscle cross sectional area further demonstrated a 13% decrease in maximum isometric specific force in the EDL and an even greater decrease (17%) in maximum isometric specific force in the soleus. Time to peak tension and half relaxation time were also significantly slowed in both the EDL and the solei from C-26 mice compared to controls. Since, in addition to postural control, the oxidative

  12. Muscle fatigue in relation to forearm pain and tenderness among professional computer users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, GF; Johnson, PW; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To examine the hypothesis that forearm pain with palpation tenderness in computer users is associated with increased extensor muscle fatigue. METHODS: Eighteen persons with pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness in the extensor muscle group of the right forearm...... response was not explained by differences in the MVC or body mass index. CONCLUSION: Computer users with forearm pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness had diminished forearm extensor muscle fatigue response. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether this result reflects an adaptive...... and twenty gender and age matched referents without such complaints were enrolled from the Danish NUDATA study of neck and upper extremity disorders among technical assistants and machine technicians. Fatigue of the right forearm extensor muscles was assessed by muscle twitch forces in response to low...

  13. Locomotor Muscle Fatigue Does Not Alter Oxygen Uptake Kinetics during High-Intensity Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopker, James G; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Azzalin, Andrea; Carpenter, Roger; Marcora, Samuele M

    2016-01-01

    The [Formula: see text] slow component ([Formula: see text]) that develops during high-intensity aerobic exercise is thought to be strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue. We sought to experimentally test this hypothesis by pre-fatiguing the locomotor muscles used during subsequent high-intensity cycling exercise. Over two separate visits, eight healthy male participants were asked to either perform a non-metabolically stressful 100 intermittent drop-jumps protocol (pre-fatigue condition) or rest for 33 min (control condition) according to a random and counterbalanced order. Locomotor muscle fatigue was quantified with 6-s maximal sprints at a fixed pedaling cadence of 90 rev·min -1 . Oxygen kinetics and other responses (heart rate, capillary blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion, RPE) were measured during two subsequent bouts of 6 min cycling exercise at 50% of the delta between the lactate threshold and [Formula: see text] determined during a preliminary incremental exercise test. All tests were performed on the same cycle ergometer. Despite significant locomotor muscle fatigue ( P = 0.03), the [Formula: see text] was not significantly different between the pre-fatigue (464 ± 301 mL·min -1 ) and the control (556 ± 223 mL·min -1 ) condition ( P = 0.50). Blood lactate response was not significantly different between conditions ( P = 0.48) but RPE was significantly higher following the pre-fatiguing exercise protocol compared with the control condition ( P locomotor muscle fatigue does not significantly alter the [Formula: see text] kinetic response to high intensity aerobic exercise, and challenge the hypothesis that the [Formula: see text] is strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue.

  14. Continuous Wavelet Transform Analysis of Surface Electromyography for Muscle Fatigue Assessment on the Elbow Joint Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwiyanto Triwiyanto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying muscle fatigue plays an important role in preventing the risks associated with musculoskeletal disorders. The effect of elbow-joint angle on time-frequency parameters during a repetitive motion provides valuable information in finding the most accurate position of the angle causing muscle fatigue. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of muscle fatigue on the spectral and time-frequency domain parameters derived from electromyography (EMG signals using the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT. Four male participants were recruited to perform a repetitive motion (flexion and extension movements from a non-fatigue to fatigue condition. EMG signals were recorded from the biceps muscle. The recorded EMG signals were then analyzed offline using the complex Morlet wavelet. The time-frequency domain data were analyzed using the time-averaged wavelet spectrum (TAWS and the Scale-Average Wavelet Power (SAWP parameters. The spectral domain data were analyzed using the Instantaneous Mean Frequency (IMNF and the Instantaneous Mean Power Spectrum (IMNP parameters. The index of muscle fatigue was observed by calculating the increase of the IMNP and the decrease of the IMNF parameters. After performing a repetitive motion from non-fatigue to fatigue condition, the average of the IMNF value decreased by 15.69% and the average of the IMNP values increased by 84%, respectively. This study suggests that the reliable frequency band to detect muscle fatigue is 31.10-36.19Hz with linear regression parameters of 0.979mV^2Hz^(-1 and 0.0095mV^2Hz^(-1 for R^2 and slope, respectively.

  15. Muscle mass as a target to reduce fatigue in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neefjes, Elisabeth C W; van den Hurk, Renske M; Blauwhoff-Buskermolen, Susanne; van der Vorst, Maurice J D L; Becker-Commissaris, Annemarie; de van der Schueren, Marian A E; Buffart, Laurien M; Verheul, Henk M W

    2017-08-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) reduces quality of life and the activity level of patients with cancer. Cancer related fatigue can be reduced by exercise interventions that may concurrently increase muscle mass. We hypothesized that low muscle mass is directly related to higher CRF. A total of 233 patients with advanced cancer starting palliative chemotherapy for lung, colorectal, breast, or prostate cancer were studied. The skeletal muscle index (SMI) was calculated as the patient's muscle mass on level L3 or T4 of a computed tomography scan, adjusted for height. Fatigue was assessed with the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-fatigue questionnaire (cut-off for fatigue fatigue score was 36 (interquartile range 26-44). A higher SMI on level L3 was significantly associated with less CRF for men (B 0.447, P 0.004) but not for women (B - 0.401, P 0.090). No association between SMI on level T4 and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-fatigue score was found (n = 82). The association between SMI and CRF may lead to the suggestion that male patients may be able to reduce fatigue by exercise interventions aiming at an increased muscle mass. In women with advanced cancer, CRF is more influenced by other causes, because it is not significantly related to muscle mass. To further reduce CRF in both men and women with cancer, multifactorial assessments need to be performed in order to develop effective treatment strategies. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  16. Electrical Stimulation Frequency and Skeletal Muscle Characteristics: Effects on Force and Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vromans

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This investigation aimed to determine the force and muscle surface electromyography (EMG responses to different frequencies of electrical stimulation (ES in two groups of muscles with different size and fiber composition (fast- and slow-twitch fiber proportions during a fatigue-inducing protocol. Progression towards fatigue was evaluated in the abductor pollicis brevis (APB and vastus lateralis (VL when activated by ES at three frequencies (10, 35, and 50Hz. Ten healthy adults (mean age: 23.2 ± 3.0 years were recruited; participants signed an IRB approved consent form prior to participation. Protocols were developed to 1 identify initial ES current intensity required to generate the 25% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC at each ES frequency and 2 evaluate changes in force and EMG activity during ES-induced contraction at each frequency while progressing towards fatigue. For both muscles, stimulation at 10Hz required higher current intensity of ES to generate the initial force. There was a significant decline in force in response to ES-induced fatigue for all frequencies and for both muscles (p<0.05. However, the EMG response was not consistent between muscles. During the progression towards fatigue, the APB displayed an initial drop in force followed by an increase in EMG activity and the VL displayed a decrease in EMG activity for all frequencies. Overall, it appeared that there were some significant interactions between muscle size and fiber composition during progression towards fatigue for different ES frequencies. It could be postulated that muscle characteristics (size and fiber composition should be considered when evaluating progression towards fatigue as EMG and force responses are not consistent between muscles.

  17. Assessment of Muscle Fatigue Associated with Prolonged Standing in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Abdul Rahman; Saman, Alias Mohd; Othman, Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine the psychological fatigue and analyze muscle activity of production workers who are performing processes jobs while standing for prolonged time periods. Methods The psychological fatigue experienced by the workers was obtained through questionnaire surveys. Meanwhile, muscle activity has been analyzed using surface electromyography (sEMG) measurement. Lower extremities muscles include: erector spinae, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius were concurrently measured for more than five hours of standing. Twenty male production workers in a metal stamping company participated as subjects in this study. The subjects were required to undergo questionnaire surveys and sEMG measurement. Results Results of the questionnaire surveys found that all subjects experienced psychological fatigue due to prolonged standing jobs. Similarly, muscle fatigue has been identified through sEMG measurement. Based on the non-parametric statistical test using the Spearman's rank order correlation, the left erector spinae obtained a moderate positive correlation and statistically significant (rs = 0.552, p fatigue and to muscle fatigue among the production workers. PMID:22953228

  18. Evidence of long term muscle fatigue following prolonged intermittent contractions based on mechano- and electromyograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, K; Blangsted, A K; Jørgensen, L V

    2003-01-01

    The focus of the present study is the long term element of muscle fatigue provoked by prolonged intermittent contractions at submaximal force levels and analysed by force, surface electromyography (EMG) and mechanomyogram (MMG). It was hypothesized that fatigue related changes in mechanical...... performance of the biceps muscle are more strongly reflected in low than in high force test contractions, more prominent in the MMG than in the EMG signal and less pronounced following contractions controlled by visual compared to proprioceptive feedback. Further, it was investigated if fatigue induced by 30...... min intermittent contractions at 30% as well as 10% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) lasted more than 30 min recovery. In six male subjects the EMG and MMG were recorded from the biceps brachii muscle during three sessions with fatiguing exercise at 10% with visual feedback and at 30% MVC...

  19. Normal paraspinal muscle electromyographic fatigue characteristics in patients with primary fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, M J; Colter, C; Klestov, A; Cooper, R G

    1993-08-01

    Paraspinal muscle fatigue mechanisms were compared in 14 primary fibromyalgia patients and 14 age and sex matched normal subjects using a standardized 60-s isometric endurance test of the paraspinal muscles, during which surface integrated electromyographic (IEMG) activity was recorded. Fatigue-induced IEMG increases were similar for both groups during the initial 40 s (up to 112 +/- 20% and 111 +/- 6% of initial values in patients and normal subjects respectively). Thereafter, IEMG fell significantly in patients (P BMI, range 19-25 in controls) those with a BMI BMI > 26 (n = 9) showed greater IEMG declines after 40 s than either normal subjects or in the fibromyalgia group as a whole. Paraspinal muscle fatigue mechanisms appear normal in primary fibromyalgia patients. Isometric force maintenance in overweight patients, despite IEMG declines, illustrates the action of intrinsic fatigue resistance mechanisms which were presumably utilized to a greater extent in these patients to cope with the extra load.

  20. Overexpression of antioxidant enzymes in diaphragm muscle does not alter contraction-induced fatigue or recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, Joseph M.; DeRuisseau, Keith C.; Whidden, Melissa A.; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan; Song, Wook; Vrabas, Ioannis S.; Powers, Scott K.

    2010-01-01

    Low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production are necessary to optimize muscle force production in unfatigued muscle. In contrast, sustained high levels of ROS production have been linked to impaired muscle force production and contraction-induced skeletal muscle fatigue. Using genetically engineered mice, we tested the hypothesis that the independent transgenic overexpression of catalase (CAT), copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD; SOD1) or manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD; SOD2) antioxidant enzymes would negatively affect force production in unfatigued diaphragm muscle but would delay the development of muscle fatigue and enhance force recovery after fatiguing contractions. Diaphragm muscle from wild-type littermates (WT) and from CAT, SOD1 and SOD2 overexpressing mice were subjected to an in vitro contractile protocol to investigate the force–frequency characteristics, the fatigue properties and the time course of recovery from fatigue. The CAT, SOD1 and SOD2 overexpressors produced less specific force (in N cm−2) at stimulation frequencies of 20–300 Hz and produced lower maximal tetanic force than WT littermates. The relative development of muscle fatigue and recovery from fatigue were not influenced by transgenic overexpression of any antioxidant enzyme. Morphologically, the mean cross-sectional area (in μm2) of diaphragm myofibres expressing myosin heavy chain type IIA was decreased in both CAT and SOD2 transgenic animals, and the percentage of non-contractile tissue increased in diaphragms from all transgenic mice. In conclusion, our results do not support the hypothesis that overexpression of independent antioxidant enzymes protects diaphragm muscle from contraction-induced fatigue or improves recovery from fatigue. Moreover, our data are consistent with the concept that a basal level of ROS is important to optimize muscle force production, since transgenic overexpression of major cellular antioxidants is associated with

  1. Correction to: Direct effects of doxorubicin on skeletal muscle contribute to fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norren, van K.; Helvoort, van A.; Agriles, J.M.; Tuijl, van S.; Arts, K.; Gorselink, M.; Laviano, A.; Kegler, D.; Haagsman, H.P.; Beek, van der E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced fatigue is a multidimensional symptom. Oxidative stress has been proposed as a working mechanism for anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity. In this study, doxorubicin (DOX) was tested on skeletal muscle function. Doxorubicin induced impaired ex vivo skeletal muscle relaxation

  2. Muscle fatigue and metabolic responses following three different antagonist pre-load resistance exercises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carregaro, Rodrigo; Cunha, Rafael; Oliveira, Carlos Gomes; Brown, Lee E.; Bottaro, Martim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preload of antagonist muscles can be achieved by reciprocal actions (RAs) or by opposing muscle actions. However, evidence concerning neuromuscular and fatigue responses are scarce. Objective: To compare the effects of different knee flexor (KF) preload methods on knee extension (KE) vastus

  3. Extrapulmonary features of bronchiectasis: muscle function, exercise capacity, fatigue, and health status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozalp Ozge

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are limited number of studies investigating extrapulmonary manifestations of bronchiectasis. The purpose of this study was to compare peripheral muscle function, exercise capacity, fatigue, and health status between patients with bronchiectasis and healthy subjects in order to provide documented differences in these characteristics for individuals with and without bronchiectasis. Methods Twenty patients with bronchiectasis (43.5 ± 14.1 years and 20 healthy subjects (43.0 ± 10.9 years participated in the study. Pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength (maximal expiratory pressure – MIP - and maximal expiratory pressure - MEP, and dyspnea perception using the Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale (MMRC were determined. A six-minute walk test (6MWT was performed. Quadriceps muscle, shoulder abductor, and hand grip strength (QMS, SAS, and HGS, respectively using a hand held dynamometer and peripheral muscle endurance by a squat test were measured. Fatigue perception and health status were determined using the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS and the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ, respectively. Results Number of squats, 6MWT distance, and LCQ scores as well as lung function testing values and respiratory muscle strength were significantly lower and MMRC and FSS scores were significantly higher in patients with bronchiectasis than those of healthy subjects (p p p p p  Conclusions Peripheral muscle endurance, exercise capacity, fatigue and health status were adversely affected by the presence of bronchiectasis. Fatigue was associated with dyspnea and health status. Respiratory muscle strength was related to peripheral muscle strength and health status, but not to fatigue, peripheral muscle endurance or exercise capacity. These findings may provide insight for outcome measures for pulmonary rehabilitation programs for patients with bronchiectasis.

  4. Age-related differences in muscle fatigue vary by contraction type: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avin, Keith G; Law, Laura A Frey

    2011-08-01

    During senescence, despite the loss of strength (force-generating capability) associated with sarcopenia, muscle endurance may improve for isometric contractions. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic meta-analysis of young versus older adults, considering likely moderators (ie, contraction type, joint, sex, activity level, and task intensity). A 2-stage systematic review identified potential studies from PubMed, CINAHL, PEDro, EBSCOhost: ERIC, EBSCOhost: Sportdiscus, and The Cochrane Library. Studies reporting fatigue tasks (voluntary activation) performed at a relative intensity in both young (18-45 years of age) and old (≥ 55 years of age) adults who were healthy were considered. Sample size, mean and variance outcome data (ie, fatigue index or endurance time), joint, contraction type, task intensity (percentage of maximum), sex, and activity levels were extracted. Effect sizes were (1) computed for all data points; (2) subgrouped by contraction type, sex, joint or muscle group, intensity, or activity level; and (3) further subgrouped between contraction type and the remaining moderators. Out of 3,457 potential studies, 46 publications (with 78 distinct effect size data points) met all inclusion criteria. A lack of available data limited subgroup analyses (ie, sex, intensity, joint), as did a disproportionate spread of data (most intensities ≥ 50% of maximum voluntary contraction). Overall, older adults were able to sustain relative-intensity tasks significantly longer or with less force decay than younger adults (effect size=0.49). However, this age-related difference was present only for sustained and intermittent isometric contractions, whereas this age-related advantage was lost for dynamic tasks. When controlling for contraction type, the additional modifiers played minor roles. Identifying muscle endurance capabilities in the older adult may provide an avenue to improve functional capabilities, despite a clearly established decrement in

  5. Impaired muscle strength may contribute to fatigue in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmsen, Wouter J; Ribbers, Gerard M; Zegers, Bart; Sneekes, Emiel M; Praet, Stephan F E; Heijenbrok-Kal, Majanka H; Khajeh, Ladbon; van Kooten, Fop; Neggers, Sebastiaan J C M M; van den Berg-Emons, Rita J

    2017-03-01

    Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (a-SAH) show long-term fatigue and face difficulties in resuming daily physical activities. Impaired muscle strength, especially of the lower extremity, impacts the performance of daily activities and may trigger the onset of fatigue complaints. The present study evaluated knee muscle strength and fatigue in patients with a-SAH. This study included 33 patients, 6 months after a-SAH, and 33 sex-matched and age-matched healthy controls. Isokinetic muscle strength of the knee extensors and flexors was measured at 60 and 180°/s. Maximal voluntary muscle strength was defined as peak torque and measured in Newton-meter. Fatigue was examined using the Fatigue Severity Scale. In patients with a-SAH, the maximal knee extension was 22% (60°/s) and 25% (180°/s) lower and maximal knee flexion was 33% (60°/s) and 36% (180°/s) lower compared with that of matched controls (P≤0.001). The Fatigue Severity Scale score was related to maximal knee extension (60°/s: r=-0.426, P=0.015; 180°/s: r=-0.376, P=0.034) and flexion (60°/s: r=-0.482, P=0.005; 180°/s: r=-0.344, P=0.083). The knee muscle strength was 28-47% lower in fatigued (n=13) and 11-32% lower in nonfatigued (n=20) patients; deficits were larger in fatigued patients (P<0.05), particularly when the muscle strength (peak torque) was measured at 60°/s. The present results indicate that patients with a-SAH have considerably impaired knee muscle strength, which is related to more severe fatigue. The present findings are exploratory, but showed that knee muscle strength may play a role in the severity of fatigue complaints, or vice versa. Interventions targeting fatigue after a-SAH seem necessary and may consider strengthening exercise training in order to treat a debilitating condition.

  6. EFFECTS OF AGE AND ACUTE MUSCLE FATIGUE ON REACTIVE POSTURAL CONTROL IN HEALTHY ADULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Evan V.; Foreman, K. Bo; Dibble, Lee E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Falls can cause moderate to severe injuries such as hip fractures and head trauma in older adults. While declines in muscle strength and sensory function contribute to increased falls in older adults, skeletal muscle fatigue is often overlooked as an additional contributor to fall risk. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of acute lower extremity muscle fatigue and age on reactive postural control in healthy adults. METHODS A sample of 16 individuals participated in this study (8 healthy older adults and 8 healthy young persons). Whole body kinematic and kinetic data were collected during anterior and posterior reproducible fall tests before (T0) and immediately after (T1) eccentric muscle fatiguing exercise, as well as after 15-minutes (T15) and 30-minutes (T30) of rest. FINDINGS Lower extremity joint kinematics of the stepping limb during the support (landing) phase of the anterior fall were significantly altered by the presence of acute muscle fatigue. Step velocity was significantly decreased during the anterior falls. Statistically significant main effects of age were found for step length in both fall directions. Effect sizes for all outcomes were small. No statistically significant interaction effects were found. INTERPRETATION Muscle fatigue has a measurable effect on lower extremity joint kinematics during simulated falls. These alterations appear to resolve within 15 minutes of recovery. The above deficits, coupled with a reduced step length, may help explain the increased fall risk in older adults. PMID:26351001

  7. Effects of age and acute muscle fatigue on reactive postural control in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Evan V; Foreman, K Bo; Dibble, Leland E

    2015-12-01

    Falls can cause moderate to severe injuries such as hip fractures and head trauma in older adults. While declines in muscle strength and sensory function contribute to increased falls in older adults, skeletal muscle fatigue is often overlooked as an additional contributor to fall risk. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of acute lower extremity muscle fatigue and age on reactive postural control in healthy adults. A sample of 16 individuals participated in this study (8 healthy older adults and 8 healthy young persons). Whole body kinematic and kinetic data were collected during anterior and posterior reproducible fall tests before (T0) and immediately after (T1) eccentric muscle fatiguing exercise, as well as after 15-min (T15) and 30-min (T30) of rest. Lower extremity joint kinematics of the stepping limb during the support (landing) phase of the anterior fall were significantly altered by the presence of acute muscle fatigue. Step velocity was significantly decreased during the anterior falls. Statistically significant main effects of age were found for step length in both fall directions. Effect sizes for all outcomes were small. No statistically significant interaction effects were found. Muscle fatigue has a measurable effect on lower extremity joint kinematics during simulated falls. These alterations appear to resolve within 15 min of recovery. The above deficits, coupled with a reduced step length, may help explain the increased fall risk in older adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Wireless sEMG Recording System and Its Application to Muscle Fatigue Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kang-Ming; Liu, Shin-Hong; Wu, Xuan-Han

    2012-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is an important measurement for monitoring exercise and fitness. Because if its high sampling frequency requirement, wireless transmission of sEMG data is a challenge. In this article a wireless sEMG measurement system with a sampling frequency of 2 KHz is developed based upon a MSP 430 microcontroller and Bluetooth transmission. Standard isotonic and isometric muscle contraction are clearly represented in the receiving user interface. Muscle fatigue detection is an important application of sEMG. Traditional muscle fatigue is detected from the median frequency of the sEMG power spectrum. The regression slope of the linear regression of median frequency is an important muscle fatigue index. A more negative slope value represents a higher muscle fatigue condition. To test the system performance, muscle fatigue detection was examined by having subjects run on a pedaled-multifunctional elliptical trainer for approximately 30 minutes at three loading levels. Ten subjects underwent a total of 60 exercise sessions to provide the experimental data. Results showed that the regression slope gradually decreases as expected, and there is a significant gender difference. PMID:22368481

  9. A Wireless sEMG Recording System and Its Application to Muscle Fatigue Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan-Han Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface electromyography (sEMG is an important measurement for monitoring exercise and fitness. Because if its high sampling frequency requirement, wireless transmission of sEMG data is a challenge. In this article a wireless sEMG measurement system with a sampling frequency of 2 KHz is developed based upon a MSP 430 microcontroller and Bluetooth transmission. Standard isotonic and isometric muscle contraction are clearly represented in the receiving user interface. Muscle fatigue detection is an important application of sEMG. Traditional muscle fatigue is detected from the median frequency of the sEMG power spectrum. The regression slope of the linear regression of median frequency is an important muscle fatigue index. A more negative slope value represents a higher muscle fatigue condition. To test the system performance, muscle fatigue detection was examined by having subjects run on a pedaled-multifunctional elliptical trainer for approximately 30 minutes at three loading levels. Ten subjects underwent a total of 60 exercise sessions to provide the experimental data. Results showed that the regression slope gradually decreases as expected, and there is a significant gender difference.

  10. Perceived exertion during muscle fatigue as reflected in movement-related cortical potentials: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Sun, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Ri-Hui

    2017-02-08

    The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism on perceived exertion during muscle fatigue. A total of 15 individuals in the fatigue group and 13 individuals in the nonfatigue group were recruited into this study, performing 200 intermittent handgrip contractions with 30% maximal voluntary contraction. The force, surface electromyography (sEMG), movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs), and rating perception of effort (RPE) were combined to evaluate the perceived exertion during muscle fatigue. The maximal handgrip force significantly decreased (Pfatigue. The RPE scores reported by the individuals and the motor potential amplitude of MRCPs in the fatigue group significantly increased (Pfatigue but could also reflect the peripheral local muscle fatigue.

  11. Fatigue in isometric contraction in a single muscle fibre: a compartmental calcium ion flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothiyal, K P; Ibramsha, M

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue in muscle is a complex biological phenomenon which has so far eluded a definite explanation. Many biochemical and physiological models have been suggested in the literature to account for the decrement in the ability of muscle to sustain a given level of force for a long time. Some of these models have been critically analysed in this paper and are shown to be not able to explain all the experimental observations. A new compartmental model based on the intracellular calcium ion movement in muscle is proposed to study the mechanical responses of a muscle fibre. Computer simulation is performed to obtain model responses in isometric contraction to an impulse and a train of stimuli of long duration. The simulated curves have been compared with experimentally observed mechanical responses of the semitendinosus muscle fibre of Rana pipiens. The comparison of computed and observed responses indicates that the proposed calcium ion model indeed accounts very well for the muscle fatigue.

  12. Exercise-induced muscle fatigue in the unaffected knee joint and its influence on postural control and lower limb kinematics in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wook Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of exercise-induced muscle fatigue in the unaffected knee joint on postural control and kinematic changes in stroke patients. Forty participants (20 stroke patients, 20 age-matched healthy participants were recruited. To induce fatigue, maximum voluntary isometric contractions were performed in the unaffected knee joint in a Leg Extension Rehab exercise machine using the pneumatic resistance. We measured static and dynamic balance and lower-limb kinematics during gait. Changes in postural control parameters anteroposterior sway speed and total center of pressure distance differed significantly between the stroke and control groups. In addition, changes in gait kinematic parameters knee and ankle angles of initial contact differed significantly between stroke (paretic and non-paretic and control groups. Muscle fatigue in the unaffected knee and ankle impaired postural control and debilitates kinematic movement of ipsilateral and contralateral lower limbs, and may place the fatigued stroke patients at greater risk for falls.

  13. Effect of ADP on slow-twitch muscle fibres of the rat: implications for muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, W A; Stephenson, D G

    2006-05-15

    Slow-twitch mechanically skinned fibres from rat soleus muscle were bathed in solutions mimicking the myoplasmic environment but containing different [ADP] (0.1 microm to 1.0 mm). The effect of ADP on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-content was determined from the magnitude of caffeine-induced force responses, while temporal changes in SR Ca2+-content allowed determination of the effective rates of the SR Ca2+-pump and of the SR Ca2+-leak. The SR Ca2+-pump rate, estimated at pCa (-log10[Ca2+]) 7.8, was reduced by 20% as the [ADP] was increased from 0.1 to 40 microm, with no further alteration when the [ADP] was increased to 1.0 mm. The SR Ca2+-leak rate constant was not altered by increasing [ADP] from 0.1 to 40 microm, but was increased by 26% when the [ADP] was elevated to 1.0 mm. This ADP-induced SR Ca2+-leak was insensitive to ruthenium red but was abolished by 2,5-di(tert-butyl)-1,4-hydroquinone (TBQ), indicating that the leak pathway is via the SR Ca2+-pump and not the SR Ca2+-release channel. The decrease in SR Ca2+-pump rate and SR Ca2+-leak rate when [ADP] was increased led to a 40% decrease in SR Ca2+-loading capacity. Elevation of [ADP] had only minor direct effects on the contractile apparatus of slow-twitch fibres. These results suggest that ADP has only limited depressing effects on the contractility of slow-twitch muscle fibres. This is in contrast to the marked effects of ADP on force responses in fast-twitch muscle fibres and may contribute to the fatigue-resistant nature of slow-twitch muscle fibres.

  14. Photobiomodulation delays the onset of skeletal muscle fatigue in a dose-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin-Kaiser, Kelly A; Borsa, Paul A; Baweja, Harsimran S; Moore, Molly A; Tillman, Mark D; George, Steven Z; Christou, Evangelos A

    2016-09-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy has been implicated as an effective ergogenic aid to delay the onset of muscle fatigue. The purpose of this study was to examine the dose-response ergogenic properties of PBM therapy and its ability to prolong time to task failure by enhancing muscle activity and delaying the onset of muscle fatigue using a static positioning task. Nine participants (24.3 ± 4.9 years) received three doses of near-infrared (NIR) light therapy randomly on three separate sessions (sham, 240, and 480 J). For the positioning task, participants held a 30 % one-repetition maximum (1-RM) load using the index finger until volitional fatigue. Surface electromyography (sEMG) of the first dorsal interosseous muscle was recorded for the length of the positioning task. Outcomes included time to task failure (TTF), muscle fatigue, movement accuracy, motor output variability, and muscle activity (sEMG). The 240-J dose significantly extended TTF by 26 % (p = 0.032) compared with the sham dose. TTF for the 240-J dose was strongly associated with a decrease in muscle fatigue (R (2) = 0.54, p = 0.024). Our findings show that a 240-J dose of NIR light therapy is efficacious in delaying the onset and extent of muscle fatigue during submaximal isometric positioning tasks. Our findings suggest that NIR light therapy may be used as an ergogenic aid during functional tasks or post-injury rehabilitation.

  15. Functional characterization of muscle fibres from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrangelo, T; Toniolo, L; Paoli, A; Fulle, S; Puglielli, C; Fanò, G; Reggiani, C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disabling condition characterized by unexplained chronic fatigue that impairs normal activities. Although immunological and psychological aspects are present, symptoms related to skeletal muscles, such as muscle soreness, fatigability and increased lactate accumulation, are prominent in CFS patients. In this case-control study, the phenotype of the same biopsy samples was analyzed by determining i) fibre-type proportion using myosin isoforms as fibre type molecular marker and gel electrophoresis as a tool to separate and quantify myosin isoforms, and ii) contractile properties of manually dissected, chemically made permeable and calcium-activated single muscle fibres. The results showed that fibre-type proportion was significantly altered in CSF samples, which showed a shift from the slow- to the fast-twitch phenotype. Cross sectional area, force, maximum shortening velocity and calcium sensitivity were not significantly changed in single muscle fibres from CSF samples. Thus, the contractile properties of muscle fibres were preserved but their proportion was changed, with an increase in the more fatigue-prone, energetically expensive fast fibre type. Taken together, these results support the view that muscle tissue is directly involved in the pathogenesis of CSF and it might contribute to the early onset of fatigue typical of the skeletal muscles of CFS patients.

  16. The compensatory interaction between motor unit firing behavior and muscle force during fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contessa, Paola; De Luca, Carlo J; Kline, Joshua C

    2016-10-01

    Throughout the literature, different observations of motor unit firing behavior during muscle fatigue have been reported and explained with varieties of conjectures. The disagreement amongst previous studies has resulted, in part, from the limited number of available motor units and from the misleading practice of grouping motor unit data across different subjects, contractions, and force levels. To establish a more clear understanding of motor unit control during fatigue, we investigated the firing behavior of motor units from the vastus lateralis muscle of individual subjects during a fatigue protocol of repeated voluntary constant force isometric contractions. Surface electromyographic decomposition technology provided the firings of 1,890 motor unit firing trains. These data revealed that to sustain the contraction force as the muscle fatigued, the following occurred: 1) motor unit firing rates increased; 2) new motor units were recruited; and 3) motor unit recruitment thresholds decreased. Although the degree of these adaptations was subject specific, the behavior was consistent in all subjects. When we compared our empirical observations with those obtained from simulation, we found that the fatigue-induced changes in motor unit firing behavior can be explained by increasing excitation to the motoneuron pool that compensates for the fatigue-induced decrease in muscle force twitch reported in empirical studies. Yet, the fundamental motor unit control scheme remains invariant throughout the development of fatigue. These findings indicate that the central nervous system regulates motor unit firing behavior by adjusting the operating point of the excitation to the motoneuron pool to sustain the contraction force as the muscle fatigues. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Instantaneous quantification of skeletal muscle activation, power production, and fatigue during cycle ergometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, A C; Cannon, D T; Cao, R; Porszasz, J; Casaburi, R; Knorst, M M; Rossiter, H B

    2015-03-01

    A rapid switch from hyperbolic to isokinetic cycling allows the velocity-specific decline in maximal power to be measured, i.e., fatigue. We reasoned that, should the baseline relationship between isokinetic power (Piso) and electromyography (EMG) be reproducible, then contributions to fatigue may be isolated from 1) the decline in muscle activation (muscle activation fatigue); and 2) the decline in Piso at a given activation (muscle fatigue). We hypothesized that the EMG-Piso relationship is linear, velocity dependent, and reliable for instantaneous fatigue assessment at intolerance during and following whole body exercise. Healthy participants (n = 13) completed short (5 s) variable-effort isokinetic bouts at 50, 70, and 100 rpm to characterize baseline EMG-Piso. Repeated ramp incremental exercise tests were terminated with maximal isokinetic cycling (5 s) at 70 rpm. Individual baseline EMG-Piso relationships were linear (r(2) = 0.95 ± 0.04) and velocity dependent (analysis of covariance). Piso at intolerance (two legs, 335 ± 88 W) was ∼45% less than baseline [630 ± 156 W, confidence interval of the difference (CIDifference) 211, 380 W, P fatigue and muscle fatigue (one leg) were 97 ± 55 and 60 ± 50 W, respectively. Mean bias ± limits of agreement for reproducibility were as follows: baseline Piso 1 ± 30 W; Piso at 0-min recovery 3 ± 35 W; and EMG at Piso 3 ± 14%. EMG power is linear, velocity dependent, and reproducible. Deviation from this relationship at the limit of tolerance can quantify the "activation" and "muscle" related components of fatigue during cycling. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Comparison of the effect of selected muscle groups fatigue on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During each session, postural control was assessed during two 30-s trials of bipedal stance with eyes close before and after the fatigue protocol. Fatigue protocols were performed by 60% of their unfatigued Maximum Voluntary Contraction of unilateral ankle plantar flexors, bilateral lumbar extensors and bilateral neck ...

  19. Dynamic contraction behaviour of pneumatic artificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumit, Marc D.; Pardoel, Scott

    2017-07-01

    The development of a dynamic model for the Pneumatic Artificial Muscle (PAM) is an imperative undertaking for understanding and analyzing the behaviour of the PAM as a function of time. This paper proposes a Newtonian based dynamic PAM model that includes the modeling of the muscle geometry, force, inertia, fluid dynamic, static and dynamic friction, heat transfer and valve flow while ignoring the effect of bladder elasticity. This modeling contribution allows the designer to predict, analyze and optimize PAM performance prior to its development. Thus advancing successful implementations of PAM based powered exoskeletons and medical systems. To date, most muscle dynamic properties are determined experimentally, furthermore, no analytical models that can accurately predict the muscle's dynamic behaviour are found in the literature. Most developed analytical models adequately predict the muscle force in static cases but neglect the behaviour of the system in the transient response. This could be attributed to the highly challenging task of deriving such a dynamic model given the number of system elements that need to be identified and the system's highly non-linear properties. The proposed dynamic model in this paper is successfully simulated through MATLAB programing and validated the pressure, contraction distance and muscle temperature with experimental testing that is conducted with in-house built prototype PAM's.

  20. An Exercise Model to Study Progressive Muscle Fatigue During Constant Work Rate Exercise on a Cycle Ergometer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fulco, Charles

    2003-01-01

    ... of the same muscles during the activity. However, conventional ergometric testing modes such as stationary cycling or treadmill exercise do not readily lend themselves to quantitating the progressive increase in muscle fatigue...

  1. Shoulder girdle muscle activity and fatigue in traditional and improved design carpet weaving workstations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahyari, Teimour; Mortazavi, Narges; Khalkhali, Hamid Reza; Sanjari, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in the neck and shoulder regions are common among carpet weavers. Working for prolonged hours in a static and awkward posture could result in an increased muscle activity and may lead to musculoskeletal disorders. Ergonomic workstation improvements can reduce muscle fatigue and the risk of musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study is to assess and to compare upper trapezius and middle deltoid muscle activity in 2 traditional and improved design carpet weaving workstations. These 2 workstations were simulated in a laboratory and 12 women carpet weavers worked for 3 h. Electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded during work in bilateral upper trapezius and bilateral middle deltoid. The root mean square (RMS) and median frequency (MF) values were calculated and used to assess muscle load and fatigue. Repeated measure ANOVA was performed to assess the effect of independent variables on muscular activity and fatigue. The participants were asked to report shoulder region fatigue on the Borg's Category-Ratio scale (Borg CR-10). Root mean square values in workstation A are significantly higher than in workstation B. Furthermore, EMG amplitude was higher in bilateral trapezius than in bilateral deltoid. However, muscle fatigue was not observed in any of the workstations. The results of the study revealed that muscle load in a traditional workstation was high, but fatigue was not observed. Further studies investigating other muscles involved in carpet weaving tasks are recommended. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  2. Central and peripheral fatigue development in the shoulder muscle with obesity during an isometric endurance task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajoutan, Mojdeh; Ghesmaty Sangachin, Mahboobeh; Cavuoto, Lora A

    2017-07-21

    Fatigue increases the likelihood of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders and injury. Due to the physiological and neuromuscular changes that accompany obesity, it may alter the fatigue development mechanism and exacerbate injury risk. The upper extremities have the highest incidence rates for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Therefore, the goals of this study were to investigate the effect of obesity on central vs. peripheral fatigue as well as on the physical signs of fatigue on the middle deltoid muscle. A measure of central activation ratio was used to quantify central fatigue by considering the increment in the torque output by superimposed twitch relative to its corresponding maximum voluntary contraction. For this purpose, electrical stimulation was delivered at the middle deltoid muscles of 22 non-obese (18 obese (30 motor units (p = 0.001) with fatigue was observed for individuals who are obese. Contrary to the effect of obesity on central fatigue, a trend toward reduced peripheral fatigue (p = 0.06) was observed for the obese group compared to the non-obese group. On average, a 14% higher rate of torque loss per second was observed among individuals with obesity in comparison to non-obese participants. The observed greater contribution of central fatigue during the sustained endurance tasks suggests that among young healthy obese individuals, the faster fatigue development with obesity, commonly reported in the literature, is most likely due to the central elements rather than the peripheral factors. This finding has implications for fatigue prevention programs during sustained exertions and can help to develop training, work, and rest schedules considering obesity.

  3. A Muscle Fibre Conduction Velocity Tracking ASIC for Local Fatigue Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsos, Ermis; Cretu, Vlad; Georgiou, Pantelis

    2016-12-01

    Electromyography analysis can provide information about a muscle's fatigue state by estimating Muscle Fibre Conduction Velocity (MFCV), a measure of the travelling speed of Motor Unit Action Potentials (MUAPs) in muscle tissue. MFCV better represents the physical manifestations of muscle fatigue, compared to the progressive compression of the myoelectic Power Spectral Density, hence it is more suitable for a muscle fatigue tracking system. This paper presents a novel algorithm for the estimation of MFCV using single threshold bit-stream conversion and a dedicated application-specified integrated circuit (ASIC) for its implementation, suitable for a compact, wearable and easy to use muscle fatigue monitor. The presented ASIC is implemented in a commercially available AMS 0.35 [Formula: see text] CMOS technology and utilizes a bit-stream cross-correlator that estimates the conduction velocity of the myoelectric signal in real time. A test group of 20 subjects was used to evaluate the performance of the developed ASIC, achieving good accuracy with an error of only 3.2% compared to Matlab.

  4. Exercise-induced quadriceps muscle fatigue in men and women: effects of arterial oxygen content and respiratory muscle work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominelli, Paolo B; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Griesdale, Donald E G; Peters, Carli M; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Sekhon, Mypinder; Dominelli, Giulio S; Henderson, William R; Foster, Glen E; Romer, Lee M; Koehle, Michael S; Sheel, A William

    2017-08-01

    High work of breathing and exercise-induced arterial hypoxaemia (EIAH) can decrease O 2 delivery and exacerbate exercise-induced quadriceps fatigue in healthy men. Women have a higher work of breathing during exercise, dedicate a greater fraction of whole-body V̇O2 towards their respiratory muscles and develop EIAH. Despite a greater reduction in men's work of breathing, the attenuation of quadriceps fatigue was similar between the sexes. The degree of EIAH was similar between sexes, and regardless of sex, those who developed the greatest hypoxaemia during exercise demonstrated the most attenuation of quadriceps fatigue. Based on our previous finding that women have a greater relative oxygen cost of breathing, women appear to be especially susceptible to work of breathing-related changes in quadriceps muscle fatigue. Reducing the work of breathing or eliminating exercise-induced arterial hypoxaemia (EIAH) during exercise decreases the severity of quadriceps fatigue in men. Women have a greater work of breathing during exercise, dedicate a greater fraction of whole-body V̇O2 towards their respiratory muscles, and demonstrate EIAH, suggesting women may be especially susceptible to quadriceps fatigue. Healthy subjects (8 male, 8 female) completed three constant load exercise tests over 4 days. During the first (control) test, subjects exercised at ∼85% of maximum while arterial blood gases and work of breathing were assessed. Subsequent constant load exercise tests were iso-time and iso-work rate, but with EIAH prevented by inspiring hyperoxic gas or work of breathing reduced via a proportional assist ventilator (PAV). Quadriceps fatigue was assessed by measuring force in response to femoral nerve stimulation. For both sexes, quadriceps force was equally reduced after the control trial (-27 ± 2% baseline) and was attenuated with hyperoxia and PAV (-18 ± 1 and -17 ± 2% baseline, P Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  5. Muscle Fatigue Analysis of the Deltoid during Three Head-Related Static Isometric Contraction Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxiang Cui

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the fatiguing characteristics of muscle-tendon units (MTUs within skeletal muscles during static isometric contraction tasks. The deltoid was selected as the target muscle and three head-related static isometric contraction tasks were designed to activate three heads of the deltoid in different modes. Nine male subjects participated in this study. Surface electromyography (SEMG signals were collected synchronously from the three heads of the deltoid. The performances of five SEMG parameters, including root mean square (RMS, mean power frequency (MPF, the first coefficient of autoregressive model (ARC1, sample entropy (SE and Higuchi’s fractal dimension (HFD, in quantification of fatigue, were evaluated in terms of sensitivity to variability ratio (SVR and consistency firstly. Then, the HFD parameter was selected as the fatigue index for further muscle fatigue analysis. The experimental results demonstrated that the three deltoid heads presented different activation modes during three head-related fatiguing contractions. The fatiguing characteristics of the three heads were found to be task-dependent, and the heads kept in a relatively high activation level were more prone to fatigue. In addition, the differences in fatiguing rate between heads increased with the increase in load. The findings of this study can be helpful in better understanding the underlying neuromuscular control strategies of the central nervous system (CNS. Based on the results of this study, the CNS was thought to control the contraction of the deltoid by taking the three heads as functional units, but a certain synergy among heads might also exist to accomplish a contraction task.

  6. Muscle K+, Na+, and Cl- disturbances and Na+-K+ pump inactivation: implications for fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, Michael J; Bangsbo, Jens; Renaud, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    (+)-ATPase activity during exercise stabilizes Na(+) and K(+) concentration gradients and membrane excitability and thus protects against fatigue. However, during intense contraction some Na(+)-K(+) pumps are inactivated and together with further ionic disturbances, likely precipitate muscle fatigue.......Membrane excitability is a critical regulatory step in skeletal muscle contraction and is modulated by local ionic concentrations, conductances, ion transporter activities, temperature, and humoral factors. Intense fatiguing contractions induce cellular K(+) efflux and Na(+) and Cl(-) influx......, causing pronounced perturbations in extracellular (interstitial) and intracellular K(+) and Na(+) concentrations. Muscle interstitial K(+) concentration may increase 1- to 2-fold to 11-13 mM and intracellular K(+) concentration fall by 1.3- to 1.7-fold; interstitial Na(+) concentration may decline by 10 m...

  7. Comparison of algorithms to quantify muscle fatigue in upper limb muscles based on sEMG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Lorenz; Hofmann, Ulrich G

    2016-11-01

    This work compared the performance of six different fatigue detection algorithms quantifying muscle fatigue based on electromyographic signals. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was obtained by an experiment from upper arm contractions at three different load levels from twelve volunteers. Fatigue detection algorithms mean frequency (MNF), spectral moments ratio (SMR), the wavelet method WIRM1551, sample entropy (SampEn), fuzzy approximate entropy (fApEn) and recurrence quantification analysis (RQA%DET) were calculated. The resulting fatigue signals were compared considering the disturbances incorporated in fatiguing situations as well as according to the possibility to differentiate the load levels based on the fatigue signals. Furthermore we investigated the influence of the electrode locations on the fatigue detection quality and whether an optimized channel set is reasonable. The results of the MNF, SMR, WIRM1551 and fApEn algorithms fell close together. Due to the small amount of subjects in this study significant differences could not be found. In terms of disturbances the SMR algorithm showed a slight tendency to out-perform the others. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Trunk muscle fatigue during a lateral isometric hold test: what are we evaluating?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagé Isabelle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Side bridge endurance protocols have been suggested to evaluate lateral trunk flexor and/or spine stabilizer muscles. To date, no study has investigated muscle recruitment and fatigability during these protocols. Therefore the purpose of our study was to quantify fatigue parameters in various trunk muscles during a modified side bridge endurance task (i.e. a lateral isometric hold test on a 45° roman chair apparatus and determine which primary trunk muscles get fatigued during this task. It was hypothesized that the ipsilateral external oblique and lumbar erector spinae muscles will exhibit the highest fatigue indices. Methods Twenty-two healthy subjects participated in this study. The experimental session included left and right lateral isometric hold tasks preceded and followed by 3 maximal voluntary contractions in the same position. Surface electromyography (EMG recordings were obtained bilaterally from the external oblique, rectus abdominis, and L2 and L5 erector spinae. Statistical analysis were conducted to compare the right and left maximal voluntary contractions (MVC, surface EMG activities, right vs. left holding times and decay rate of the median frequency as the percent change from the initial value (NMFslope. Results No significant left and right lateral isometric hold tests differences were observed neither for holding times (97.2 ± 21.5 sec and 96.7 ± 24.9 sec respectively nor for pre and post fatigue root mean square during MVCs. However, participants showed significant decreases of MVCs between pre and post fatigue measurements for both the left and right lateral isometric hold tests. Statistical analysis showed that a significantly NMFslope of the ipsilateral external oblique during both conditions, and a NMFslope of the contralateral L5 erector spinae during the left lateral isometric hold test were steeper than those of the other side’s respective muscles. Although some participants

  9. Evoked EMG-based torque prediction under muscle fatigue in implanted neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Zhang, Qin; Guiraud, David; Fattal, Charles

    2011-10-01

    In patients with complete spinal cord injury, fatigue occurs rapidly and there is no proprioceptive feedback regarding the current muscle condition. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the muscle state and assess the expected muscle response to improve the current FES system toward adaptive force/torque control in the presence of muscle fatigue. Our team implanted neural and epimysial electrodes in a complete paraplegic patient in 1999. We carried out a case study, in the specific case of implanted stimulation, in order to verify the corresponding torque prediction based on stimulus evoked EMG (eEMG) when muscle fatigue is occurring during electrical stimulation. Indeed, in implanted stimulation, the relationship between stimulation parameters and output torques is more stable than external stimulation in which the electrode location strongly affects the quality of the recruitment. Thus, the assumption that changes in the stimulation-torque relationship would be mainly due to muscle fatigue can be made reasonably. The eEMG was proved to be correlated to the generated torque during the continuous stimulation while the frequency of eEMG also decreased during fatigue. The median frequency showed a similar variation trend to the mean absolute value of eEMG. Torque prediction during fatigue-inducing tests was performed based on eEMG in model cross-validation where the model was identified using recruitment test data. The torque prediction, apart from the potentiation period, showed acceptable tracking performances that would enable us to perform adaptive closed-loop control through implanted neural stimulation in the future.

  10. Recognizing Family Dynamics in the Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Len

    2012-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is an increasingly common chronic medical condition that affects not only patients but also their families. Because family dynamics, particularly the family life cycle, can and does influence the disease process, those providing counseling to CFS patients and their families would do well to recognize these dynamics.…

  11. Predictive model of muscle fatigue after spinal cord injury in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Richard K; Chang, Ya-Ju; Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Lin, Cheng-Hsiang

    2006-07-01

    The fatigability of paralyzed muscle limits its ability to deliver physiological loads to paralyzed extremities during repetitive electrical stimulation. The purposes of this study were to determine the reliability of measuring paralyzed muscle fatigue and to develop a model to predict the temporal changes in muscle fatigue that occur after spinal cord injury (SCI). Thirty-four subjects underwent soleus fatigue testing with a modified Burke electrical stimulation fatigue protocol. The between-day reliability of this protocol was high (intraclass correlation, 0.96). We fit the fatigue index (FI) data to a quadratic-linear segmental polynomial model. FI declined rapidly (0.3854 per year) for the first 1.7 years, and more slowly (0.01 per year) thereafter. The rapid decline of FI immediately after SCI implies that a "window of opportunity" exists for the clinician if the goal is to prevent these changes. Understanding the timing of change in muscle endurance properties (and, therefore, load-generating capacity) after SCI may assist clinicians when developing therapeutic interventions to maintain musculoskeletal integrity.

  12. Normalised Mutual Information of High-Density Surface Electromyography during Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Bingham

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study has developed a technique for identifying the presence of muscle fatigue based on the spatial changes of the normalised mutual information (NMI between multiple high density surface electromyography (HD-sEMG channels. Muscle fatigue in the tibialis anterior (TA during isometric contractions at 40% and 80% maximum voluntary contraction levels was investigated in ten healthy participants (Age range: 21 to 35 years; Mean age = 26 years; Male = 4, Female = 6. HD-sEMG was used to record 64 channels of sEMG using a 16 by 4 electrode array placed over the TA. The NMI of each electrode with every other electrode was calculated to form an NMI distribution for each electrode. The total NMI for each electrode (the summation of the electrode’s NMI distribution highlighted regions of high dependence in the electrode array and was observed to increase as the muscle fatigued. To summarise this increase, a function, M(k, was defined and was found to be significantly affected by fatigue and not by contraction force. The technique discussed in this study has overcome issues regarding electrode placement and was used to investigate how the dependences between sEMG signals within the same muscle change spatially during fatigue.

  13. Effect of temperature on crossbridge force changes during fatigue and recovery in intact mouse muscle fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Nocella

    Full Text Available Repetitive or prolonged muscle contractions induce muscular fatigue, defined as the inability of the muscle to maintain the initial tension or power output. In the present experiments, made on intact fiber bundles from FDB mouse, fatigue and recovery from fatigue were investigated at 24°C and 35°C. Force and stiffness were measured during tetani elicited every 90 s during the pre-fatigue control phase and recovery and every 1.5 s during the fatiguing phase made of 105 consecutive tetani. The results showed that force decline could be split in an initial phase followed by a later one. Loss of force during the first phase was smaller and slower at 35°C than at 24°C, whereas force decline during the later phase was greater at 35°C so that total force depression at the end of fatigue was the same at both temperatures. The initial force decline occurred without great reduction of fiber stiffness and was attributed to a decrease of the average force per attached crossbridge. Force decline during the later phase was accompanied by a proportional stiffness decrease and was attributed to a decrease of the number of attached crossbridge. Similarly to fatigue, at both 24 and 35°C, force recovery occurred in two phases: the first associated with the recovery of the average force per attached crossbridge and the second due to the recovery of the pre-fatigue attached crossbridge number. These changes, symmetrical to those occurring during fatigue, are consistent with the idea that, i initial phase is due to the direct fast inhibitory effect of [Pi]i increase during fatigue on crossbridge force; ii the second phase is due to the delayed reduction of Ca(2+ release and /or reduction of the Ca(2+ sensitivity of the myofibrils due to high [Pi]i.

  14. The twitch interpolation technique for study of fatigue of human quadriceps muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, P M; Nørregaard, J; Mehlsen, J

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine if the twitch interpolation technique could be used to objectively measure fatigue in the quadriceps muscle in subjects performing submaximally. The 'true' maximum isometric quadriceps torque was determined in 21 healthy subject using the twitch interpolation...... technique. Then an endurance test was performed in which the subjects made repeated isometric contractions at 50% of the 'true' maximum torque for 4 s, separated by 6 s rest periods. During the test, the force response to single electrical stimulation (twitch amplitude) was measured at 50% and 25......). In conclusion, the twitch technique can be used for objectively measuring fatigue of the quadriceps muscle....

  15. Detection and Alert of muscle fatigue considering a Surface Electromyography Chaotic Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, V; Romero, J F; Amestegui, M

    2011-01-01

    This work propose a detection and alert algorithm for muscle fatigue in paraplegic patients undergoing electro-therapy sessions. The procedure is based on a mathematical chaotic model emulating physiological signals and Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT). The chaotic model developed is based on a logistic map that provides suitable data accomplishing some physiological signal class patterns. The CWT was applied to signals generated by the model and the resulting vector was obtained through Total Wavelet Entropy (TWE). In this sense, the presented work propose a viable and practical alert and detection algorithm for muscle fatigue.

  16. Detection and Alert of muscle fatigue considering a Surface Electromyography Chaotic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, V; Romero, J F [Engineering, Modeling and Applied Social Sciences Center, ABC Federal University, Santo Andr - SP (Brazil); Amestegui, M, E-mail: victoria.herrera@ufabc.edu.br [Engineering Faculty, Electronics Engineering, Universidad Mayor de San Andres, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of)

    2011-03-01

    This work propose a detection and alert algorithm for muscle fatigue in paraplegic patients undergoing electro-therapy sessions. The procedure is based on a mathematical chaotic model emulating physiological signals and Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT). The chaotic model developed is based on a logistic map that provides suitable data accomplishing some physiological signal class patterns. The CWT was applied to signals generated by the model and the resulting vector was obtained through Total Wavelet Entropy (TWE). In this sense, the presented work propose a viable and practical alert and detection algorithm for muscle fatigue.

  17. Acoustic Correlates of Fatigue in Laryngeal Muscles: Findings for a Criterion-Based Prevention of Acquired Voice Pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Victor J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to identify acoustic correlates of laryngeal muscle fatigue in conditions of vocal effort. Method: In a previous study, a technique of electromyography (EMG) served to define physiological signs of "voice fatigue" in laryngeal muscles involved in voicing. These signs correspond to spectral changes in contraction…

  18. Internal Oblique and Transversus Abdominis Muscle Fatigue Induced by Slumped Sitting Posture after 1 Hour of Sitting in Office Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooriput Waongenngarm

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Prolonged sitting led to increased body discomfort in the neck, shoulder, upper back, low back, and buttock. No sign of trunk muscle fatigue was detected over 1 hour of sitting in the upright and forward leaning postures. Prolonged slumped sitting may relate to IO/TrA muscle fatigue, which may compromise the stability of the spine, making it susceptible to injury.

  19. Mechanomyography-Based Wearable Monitor of Quasi-Isometric Muscle Fatigue for Motor Neural Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Eddy; Popović-Maneski, Lana; Nohama, Percy

    2018-02-01

    A motor neural prosthesis based on surface functional electrical stimulation (sFES) can restore functional movement (e.g., standing, walking) in patients with a spinal cord injury (SCI). sFES generates muscle contractions in antigravity muscles and allows balance-assisted standing. This induced standing has several benefits, such as improved cardiovascular function, decreased incidence of urinary infections, reduced joint contractures, and muscle atrophy. The duration of sFES assisted standing is limited due to the quick onset of muscle fatigue. Currently, there is no method available to reliably estimate real-time muscle fatigue during sFES. Simply monitoring the M-wave changes is not suitable due to the high signal disturbances that arise during multi-channel electrical stimulation. Mechanomyography (MMG) is immune to electrical stimulation artifacts and can be used to detect subtle vibrations on the surface of the skin related to activation of the underlying muscle's motor units (MU). The aim of this study was to develop a method for detecting muscle fatigue brought on by sFES. The method was tested in three different heads of the quadriceps muscle in SCI patients during electrically elicited quasi-isometric contraction. Six spinal cord-injured male volunteers, with no voluntary control of the quadriceps muscle participated in the study. Electrical bursts of voltage-controlled monophasic square pulses at frequencies of 1 kHz (50% duty cycle) at 50 Hz (15% duty cycle) were used to generate thigh muscle contractions that controlled the knee joint in the sagittal plane. The pulse amplitudes were set to position the knee joint at a 5° angle from the horizontal plane and when the knee angle dropped to 20° (e.g., the quadriceps were unable to hold the lower leg in the desired position), the test was terminated. Two data segments lasting 10 s each, at the beginning and end of each test, were analyzed. The muscle contraction was assessed by MMG sensors positioned on

  20. Reliability of surface electromyography in the assessment of paraspinal muscle fatigue: an updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni Bandpei, Mohammad A; Rahmani, Nahid; Majdoleslam, Basir; Abdollahi, Iraj; Ali, Shabnam Shah; Ahmad, Ashfaq

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the literature to determine whether surface electromyography (EMG) is a reliable tool to assess paraspinal muscle fatigue in healthy subjects and in patients with low back pain (LBP). A literature search for the period of 2000 to 2012 was performed, using PubMed, ProQuest, Science Direct, EMBASE, OVID, CINAHL, and MEDLINE databases. Electromyography, reliability, median frequency, paraspinal muscle, endurance, low back pain, and muscle fatigue were used as keywords. The literature search yielded 178 studies using the above keywords. Twelve articles were selected according to the inclusion criteria of the study. In 7 of the 12 studies, the surface EMG was only applied in healthy subjects, and in 5 studies, the reliability of surface EMG was investigated in patients with LBP or a comparison with a control group. In all of these studies, median frequency was shown to be a reliable EMG parameter to assess paraspinal muscles fatigue. There was a wide variation among studies in terms of methodology, surface EMG parameters, electrode location, procedure, and homogeneity of the study population. The results suggest that there seems to be a convincing body of evidence to support the merit of surface EMG in the assessment of paraspinal muscle fatigue in healthy subject and in patients with LBP. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effects of Vibration and Muscle Fatigue on Trunk Sensorimotor Control in Low Back Pain Patients.

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    Jean-Alexandre Boucher

    Full Text Available Changes in sensorimotor function and increased trunk muscle fatigability have been identified in patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP. This study assessed the control of trunk force production in conditions with and without local erector spinae muscle vibration and evaluated the influence of muscle fatigue on trunk sensorimotor control.Twenty non-specific cLBP patients and 20 healthy participants were asked to perform submaximal isometric trunk extension torque with and without local vibration stimulation, before and after a trunk extensor muscle fatigue protocol. Constant error (CE, variable error (VE as well as absolute error (AE in peak torque were computed and compared across conditions. Trunk extensor muscle activation during isometric contractions and during the fatigue protocol was measured using surface electromyography (sEMG.Force reproduction accuracy of the trunk was significantly lower in the patient group (CE = 9.81 ± 2.23 Nm; AE = 18.16 ± 3.97 Nm than in healthy participants (CE = 4.44 ± 1.68 Nm; AE = 12.23 ± 2.44 Nm. Local erector spinae vibration induced a significant reduction in CE (4.33 ± 2.14 Nm and AE (13.71 ± 3.45 Nm mean scores in the patient group. Healthy participants conversely showed a significant increase in CE (8.17 ± 2.10 Nm and AE (16.29 ± 2.82 Nm mean scores under vibration conditions. The fatigue protocol induced erector spinae muscle fatigue as illustrated by a significant decrease in sEMG median time-frequency slopes. Following the fatigue protocol, patients with cLBP showed significant decrease in sEMG root mean square activity at L4-5 level and responded in similar manner with and without vibration stimulation in regard to CE mean scores.Patients with cLBP have a less accurate force reproduction sense than healthy participants. Local muscle vibration led to significant trunk neuromuscular control improvements in the cLBP patients before and after a muscle fatigue protocol. Muscle vibration

  2. The Effects of Vibration and Muscle Fatigue on Trunk Sensorimotor Control in Low Back Pain Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Jacques; Nougarou, François; Normand, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Changes in sensorimotor function and increased trunk muscle fatigability have been identified in patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP). This study assessed the control of trunk force production in conditions with and without local erector spinae muscle vibration and evaluated the influence of muscle fatigue on trunk sensorimotor control. Methods Twenty non-specific cLBP patients and 20 healthy participants were asked to perform submaximal isometric trunk extension torque with and without local vibration stimulation, before and after a trunk extensor muscle fatigue protocol. Constant error (CE), variable error (VE) as well as absolute error (AE) in peak torque were computed and compared across conditions. Trunk extensor muscle activation during isometric contractions and during the fatigue protocol was measured using surface electromyography (sEMG). Results Force reproduction accuracy of the trunk was significantly lower in the patient group (CE = 9.81 ± 2.23 Nm; AE = 18.16 ± 3.97 Nm) than in healthy participants (CE = 4.44 ± 1.68 Nm; AE = 12.23 ± 2.44 Nm). Local erector spinae vibration induced a significant reduction in CE (4.33 ± 2.14 Nm) and AE (13.71 ± 3.45 Nm) mean scores in the patient group. Healthy participants conversely showed a significant increase in CE (8.17 ± 2.10 Nm) and AE (16.29 ± 2.82 Nm) mean scores under vibration conditions. The fatigue protocol induced erector spinae muscle fatigue as illustrated by a significant decrease in sEMG median time-frequency slopes. Following the fatigue protocol, patients with cLBP showed significant decrease in sEMG root mean square activity at L4-5 level and responded in similar manner with and without vibration stimulation in regard to CE mean scores. Conclusions Patients with cLBP have a less accurate force reproduction sense than healthy participants. Local muscle vibration led to significant trunk neuromuscular control improvements in the cLBP patients before and after a muscle

  3. Attenuated fatigue in slow twitch skeletal muscle during isotonic exercise in rats with chronic heart failure.

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    Morten Munkvik

    Full Text Available During isometric contractions, slow twitch soleus muscles (SOL from rats with chronic heart failure (chf are more fatigable than those of sham animals. However, a muscle normally shortens during activity and fatigue development is highly task dependent. Therefore, we examined the development of skeletal muscle fatigue during shortening (isotonic contractions in chf and sham-operated rats. Six weeks following coronary artery ligation, infarcted animals were classified as failing (chf if left ventricle end diastolic pressure was >15 mmHg. During isoflurane anaesthesia, SOL with intact blood supply was stimulated (1s on 1s off at 30 Hz for 15 min and allowed to shorten isotonically against a constant afterload. Muscle temperature was maintained at 37°C. In resting muscle, maximum isometric force (F(max and the concentrations of ATP and CrP were not different in the two groups. During stimulation, F(max and the concentrations declined in parallel sham and chf. Fatigue, which was evident as reduced shortening during stimulation, was also not different in the two groups. The isometric force decline was fitted to a bi-exponential decay equation. Both time constants increased transiently and returned to initial values after approximately 200 s of the fatigue protocol. This resulted in a transient rise in baseline tension between stimulations, although this effect which was less prominent in chf than sham. Myosin light chain 2s phosphorylation declined in both groups after 100 s of isotonic contractions, and remained at this level throughout 15 min of stimulation. In spite of higher energy demand during isotonic than isometric contractions, both shortening capacity and rate of isometric force decline were as well or better preserved in fatigued SOL from chf rats than in sham. This observation is in striking contrast to previous reports which have employed isometric contractions to induce fatigue.

  4. Muscle fatigue in women with primary biliary cirrhosis: Spectral analysis of surface electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, Maria Rosa; Tozzi, Alessandro; Grippo, Antonello; Galli, Andrea; Milani, Stefano; Amantini, Aldo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the myoelectric manifestations of peripheral fatigability in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis in comparison to healthy subjects. METHODS: Sixteen women with primary biliary cirrhosis without comorbidity and 13 healthy women matched for age and body mass index (BMI) completed the self-reported questionnaire fatigue impact scale. All subjects underwent surface electromyography assessment of peripheral fatigability. Anterior tibial muscle isometric voluntary contraction was executed for 20 s at 80% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction. During the exercise electromyographic signal series were recorded and root mean square (expression of central drive) as well as mean and median of electromyographic signal frequency spectrum (estimates of muscle fatigability) were computed. Each subject executed the trial two times. EMG parameters were normalized, then linear regression was applied and slopes were calculated. RESULTS: Seven patients were fatigued (median fatigue impact scale score: 38, range: 26-66) and 9 were not fatigued (median fatigue impact scale score: 7, range: 0-17). The maximal voluntary isometric contraction was similar in patients (82, 54-115 N) and controls (87, 74-101 N), and in patients with high (81, 54-115 N) and low fatigue impact scale scores (86, 65-106 N). Root mean square as well as mean and median of frequency spectrum slopes were compared with the Mann-Whitney U test, and no significant difference was found between fatigued and non-fatigued patients and controls. CONCLUSION: No instrumental evidence of peripheral fatigability can be found in women with primary biliary cirrhosis but no comorbidity, suggesting that fatigue in such patients may be of central origin. PMID:16937530

  5. Local Muscle Fatigue and 3D Kinematics of the Cervical Spine in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Daniel; Vogt, Lutz; Pippig, Torsten; Wall, Rudolf; Banzer, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    The authors aimed to further explore the effects of local muscle fatigue on cervical 3D kinematics and the interrelationship between these kinematic characteristics and local muscle endurance capacity in the unimpaired cervical spine. Twenty healthy subjects (38 ± 10 years; 5 women) performed 2 × 10 maximal cervical flexion-extension movements. Isometric muscle endurance tests (prone/supine lying) were applied between sets to induce local muscle fatigue quantified by Borg scale rates of perceived exertion (RPE) and slope in mean power frequency (MPF; surface electromyography; m. sternocleidomastoideus, m. splenius capitis). Cervical motion characteristics (maximal range of motion [ROM], coefficient of variation of the 10 repetitive movements, mean angular velocity, conjunct movements in transversal and frontal plane) were calculated from raw 3D ultrasonic movement data. Average isometric strength testing duration for flexion and extension correlated to the cervical ROM (r = .49/r = .48; p .05). Although subjects' cervical muscle endurance capacity and motor output seems to be conjugated, no impact of local cervical muscle fatigue on motor function was shown. These findings underline the importance of complementary measures to address muscular performance and kinematic characteristics in outcome assessment and functional rehabilitation of the cervical spine.

  6. Muscle fiber velocity and electromyographic signs of fatigue in fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver-Krol, E.G.; Rasker, Johannes J.; Henriquez, N.R.; Verheijen, W.G.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder of widespread muscular pain. We investigated possible differences in surface electromyography (sEMG) in clinically unaffected muscle between patients with FM and controls. Methods: sEMG was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 13 women with FM and

  7. Muscle Fatigue during Intermittent Exercise in Individuals with Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafeiridis, Andreas; Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Dipla, Konstantina; Salonikidis, Konstantinos; Karra, Chrisanthi; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2010-01-01

    This study examined fatigue profile during intermittent exercise in 10 men with mild to moderate mental retardation (MR) and 10 men without mental retardation (C). They performed 4 x 30 s maximal knee extensions and flexions with 1-min rest on an isokinetic dynamometer. Peak torque of flexors (PTFL) and extensors (PTEX), total work (TW), and…

  8. Pacing Strategy, Muscle Fatigue and Technique in 1500m Speed Skating and Cycling Time-Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoter, Inge K; MacIntosh, Brian R; Fletcher, Jared R; Pootz, Spencer; Zijdewind, Inge; Hettinga, Florentina J

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate pacing behavior and peripheral and central contributions to muscle fatigue in 1500m speed skating and cycling time-trials, when a faster or slower start is instructed. METHODS: Nine speed skaters and nine cyclists, all competing at regional or national level, performed two 1500m

  9. Development of fatigue and discomfort in the upper trapezius muscle during light manual work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, T.; Looze, M.P. de; Dieën, J.H. van

    2007-01-01

    Optimization of the temporal aspects of task design requires a better understanding of the development of muscle fatigue in the neck and shoulder region over time. The objective of the study was to investigate this in two production companies and to determine the relationship between objective and

  10. Comparison of the effect of selected muscle groups fatigue on postural control during bipedal stance in healthy young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Zahra Rojhani; Jahromi, Fatemeh Nikhalat

    2013-09-01

    The maintenance of balance is an essential requirement for the performance of daily tasks and sporting activities and muscular fatigue is a factor to impair postural control, so this study was done to compare the effect of selected muscle groups fatigue on postural control during bipedal stance in healthy subjects. Fifteen healthy female students (24.3 ± 2.6 years) completed three testing session with a break period of at least 2 days. During each session, postural control was assessed during two 30-s trials of bipedal stance with eyes close before and after the fatigue protocol. Fatigue protocols were performed by 60% of their unfatigued Maximum Voluntary Contraction of unilateral ankle plantar flexors, bilateral lumbar extensors and bilateral neck extensors. One of the three fatigue protocols was performed on each session. The result showed that fatigue had a significant effect on COP velocity and it increase COP velocity but there was not found any difference in postural sway between muscle groups. Localized muscle fatigue caused deficits in postural control regardless of the location of fatigue. Authors suggest the possibility of the contributions of central mechanisms to postural deficits due to fatigue and it seems that difference was not between muscle groups due to central fatigue.

  11. Shoulder External Rotation Fatigue and Scapular Muscle Activation and Kinematics in Overhead Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Mithun; Thigpen, Charles A.; Bunn, Kevin; Karas, Spero G.; Padua, Darin A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Glenohumeral external rotation (GH ER) muscle fatigue might contribute to shoulder injuries in overhead athletes. Few researchers have examined the effect of such fatigue on scapular kinematics and muscle activation during a functional movement pattern. Objective: To examine the effects of GH ER muscle fatigue on upper trapezius, lower trapezius, serratus anterior, and infraspinatus muscle activation and to examine scapular kinematics during a diagonal movement task in overhead athletes. Setting: Human performance research laboratory. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Patients or Other Participants: Our study included 25 overhead athletes (15 men, 10 women; age = 20 ± 2 years, height = 180 ± 11 cm, mass = 80 ± 11 kg) without a history of shoulder pain on the dominant side. Interventions: We tested the healthy, dominant shoulder through a diagonal movement task before and after a fatiguing exercise involving low-resistance, high-repetition, prone GH ER from 0° to 75° with the shoulder in 90° of abduction. Main Outcome Measure(s): Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activity for the upper trapezius, lower trapezius, serratus anterior, and infraspinatus. An electromyographic motion analysis system was used to assess 3-dimensional scapular kinematics. Repeated-measures analyses of variance (phase × condition) were used to test for differences. Results: We found a decrease in ascending-phase and descending-phase lower trapezius activity (F1,25 = 5.098, P = .03) and an increase in descending-phase infraspinatus activity (F1,25 = 5.534, P = .03) after the fatigue protocol. We also found an increase in scapular upward rotation (F1,24 = 3.7, P = .04) postfatigue. Conclusions: The GH ER muscle fatigue protocol used in this study caused decreased lower trapezius and increased infraspinatus activation concurrent with increased scapular upward rotation range of motion during the functional task. This highlights the interdependence of scapular

  12. Motor Unit Activity during Fatiguing Isometric Muscle Contraction in Hemispheric Stroke Survivors

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    Lara McManus

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced muscle weakness is commonly experienced following stroke and may be accompanied by increased susceptibility to fatigue. To examine the contributions of central and peripheral factors to isometric muscle fatigue in stroke survivors, this study investigates changes in motor unit (MU mean firing rate, and action potential duration during, and directly following, a sustained submaximal fatiguing contraction at 30% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. A series of short contractions of the first dorsal interosseous muscle were performed pre- and post-fatigue at 20% MVC, and again following a 10-min recovery period, by 12 chronic stroke survivors. Individual MU firing times were extracted using surface EMG decomposition and used to obtain the spike-triggered average MU action potential waveforms. During the sustained fatiguing contraction, the mean rate of change in firing rate across all detected MUs was greater on the affected side (-0.02 ± 0.03 Hz/s than on the less-affected side (-0.004 ± 0.003 Hz/s, p = 0.045. The change in firing rate immediately post-fatigue was also greater on the affected side than less-affected side (-13.5 ± 20 and 0.1 ± 19%, p = 0.04. Mean MU firing rates increased following the recovery period on the less-affected side when compared to the affected side (19.3 ± 17 and 0.5 ± 20%, respectively, p = 0.03. MU action potential duration increased post-fatigue on both sides (10.3 ± 1.2 to 11.2 ± 1.3 ms on the affected side and 9.9 ± 1.7 to 11.2 ± 1.9 ms on the less-affected side, p = 0.001 and p = 0.02, respectively, and changes in action potential duration tended to be smaller in subjects with greater impairment (p = 0.04. This study presents evidence of both central and peripheral fatigue at the MU level during isometric fatiguing contraction for the first time in stroke survivors. Together, these preliminary observations indicate that the response to an isometric fatiguing contraction differs between the

  13. Determination of muscle fatigue index for strength training in patients with Duchenne dystrophy

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    Adriano Rodrigues Oliveira

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Muscle weakness is the most prominent impairment in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and often involves the loss of functional ability as well as other limitations related to daily living. Thus, there is a need to maintain muscle strength in large muscle groups, such as the femoral quadriceps, which is responsible for diverse functional abilities. However, the load and duration of training for such rehabilitation has proven to be a great unknown, mainly due to the undesired appearance of muscle fatigue, which is a severe factor for the injury of muscle fibers. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to determine a fatigue index by means of surface electromyography (EMG for the parameterization of muscle strengthening physiotherapy training. METHODS: A cross-sectional study (case series was carried out involving four patients with DMD. Three pairs of surface electrodes were placed on the motor point of the Rectus femoris, Vastus lateralis and Vastus medialis of the dominant limb, maintaining the knee at 60º of flexion. The participants were instructed to perform the extension movement of this joint at four strength levels (100%, 80%, 60% and 40% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction. RESULTS: The slope of the linear regression line was used for the determination of the fatigue index, performed by Pearson's test on the median frequency of each strength level. CONCLUSION: Electromyographic measurements of the strength index for muscle training proved to be a simple accessible assessment method, as well as an extremely valuable tool, allowing the design of a muscle strength training program with an individualized load threshold.

  14. Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to help you find out what's causing your fatigue and recommend ways to relieve it. Fatigue itself is not a disease. Medical problems, treatments, and personal habits can add to fatigue. These include Taking certain medicines, such as antidepressants, ...

  15. Low-frequency fatigue, post-tetanic potentiation and their interaction at different muscle lengths following eccentric exercise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkelijkhuizen, J.M.; de Ruiter, C.J.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.; de Haan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Low-frequency fatigue (LFF) and post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) were quantified at different muscle lengths in rat medial gastrocnemius (GM) muscle. In situ experiments were performed on GM muscle-tendon complexes of anaesthetised (urethane, 1.5 g kg

  16. Exercise muscle fatigue detection system implementation via wireless surface electromyography and empirical mode decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kang-Ming; Liu, Shing-Hong; Wang, Jia-Jung; Cheng, Da-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is an important measurement for monitoring exercise and fitness. A wireless Bluetooth transmission sEMG measurement system with a sampling frequency of 2 KHz is developed. Traditional muscle fatigue is detected from the median frequency of the sEMG power spectrum. The regression slope of the linear regression of median frequency is an important muscle fatigue index. As fatigue increases, the power spectrum of the sEMG shifts toward lower frequencies. The goal of this study is to evaluate the sensitivity of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) quantifying the electrical manifestations of the local muscle fatigue during exercising in health people. We also compared this method with the raw data and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Five male and five female volunteers participated. Each subject was asked to run on a multifunctional pedaled elliptical trainer for about 30 minutes, twice a week, and there were a total of six recording times for each subject with a wireless EMG recording system. The results show that sensitivity of the highest frequency component of EMD is better than the highest frequency component of DWT, and raw data.

  17. Surface electromyography based muscle fatigue analysis for stroke patients at different Brunnstrom stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinjun Tu; Zhe Zhang; Xudong Gu; Qiang Fang

    2016-08-01

    Muscle fatigue analysis has been an important topic in sport and rehabilitation medicine due to its role in muscle performance evaluation and pathology investigation. This paper proposes a surface electromyography (sEMG) based muscle fatigue analysis approach which was specifically designed for stroke rehabilitation applications. 14 stroke patients from 5 different Brunnstrom recovery stage groups were involved in the experiment and features including median frequency and mean power frequency were extracted from the collected sEMG samples for investigation. After signal decomposition, the decline of motor unit firing rate of patients from different groups had also been studied. Statistically significant presence of fatigue had been observed in deltoideus medius and extensor digitorum communis of patients at early recovery stages (P0.01). It had also been discovered that the motor unit firing frequency declines with a range positively correlated to the recovery stage during repetitive movements. Based on the experiment result, it can be verified that as the recovery stage increases, the central nervous system's control ability strengthens and the patient motion becomes more stable and resistive to fatigue.

  18. Acute fatigue impairs neuromuscular activity of anterior cruciate ligament-agonist muscles in female team handball players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, M K; Bencke, J; Andersen, L L

    2011-01-01

    In sports, like team handball, fatigue has been associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. While effects of fatigue on muscle function are commonly assessed during maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC), such measurements may not relate to the muscle...... function during match play. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of muscle fatigue induced by a simulated handball match on neuromuscular strategy during a functional sidecutting movement, associated with the incidence of ACL injury. Fourteen female team handball players were tested...

  19. Sex comparisons of non-local muscle fatigue in human elbow flexors and knee extensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Beck, Travis W.; Wages, Nathan P.; Carr, Joshua C.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: To examine non-local muscle fatigue (NLMF) in both contralateral homologous and non-related heterogonous muscles for both sexes. Methods: Ten men and nine women participated in this study. After the familiarization visit, subjects completed four separate randomly sequenced experimental visits, during which the fatiguing interventions (six sets of 30-second maximal isometric contractions) were performed on either their right elbow flexors or knee extensors. Before (Pre-) and after (Post-) the fatiguing interventions, the isometric strength and the corresponding surface electromyographic (EMG) amplitude were measured for the non-exercised left elbow flexors or knee extensors. Results: For the non-exercised elbow flexors, the isometric strength decreased for both sexes (sex combined mean±SE: Pre vs. Post=339.67±18.02 N vs. 314.41±16.37 N; pisometric knee extension strength for men (Pre vs. Post =845.02±66.26 N vs. 817.39±67.64 N; p=0.019), but not for women. Conclusions: The presence of NMLF can be affected by factors such as sex and muscle being tested. Women are less likely to demonstrate NLMF in lower body muscle groups. PMID:29504584

  20. Effect of carnitine supplementation on fatigue level in the gastrocnemius muscle of trained and sedentary rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Anelice Gomez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n3p324 L-carnitine, considered to be of great value in metabolic processes, plays an important role in the mitochondrial β-oxidation process. It may be used to improve athletic performance and to maintain a higher workload during exercise. This study aimed to investigate the effect of L-carnitine supplementation on muscle fatigue in sciatic nerve-gastrocnemius muscle preparations in sedentary and trained rats. The animals were divided into 4 groups: non-supplemented sedentary (NSS, supplemented sedentary (SS, non-supplemented trained (NST, and supplemented trained (ST rats. The animals were trained in daily 1-h sessions (5 days/week and received chronic oral L-carnitine supplementation (1 mg/mL for 4 weeks. Muscle fatigue was determined by supramaximal tetanic stimulation of the sciatic nerve (50 Hz. Time values for strength reduction were significantly different (p<0.05 between NSS vs. SS and NST vs. ST rats. No significant differences were observed between SS vs. ST and NST vs. NSS rats. These findings demonstrate that L-carnitine lengthen the time required for induction of muscle fatigue.

  1. Novel Feature Modelling the Prediction and Detection of sEMG Muscle Fatigue towards an Automated Wearable System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R. Al-Mulla

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Surface Electromyography (sEMG activity of the biceps muscle was recorded from ten subjects performing isometric contraction until fatigue. A novel feature (1D spectro_std was used to extract the feature that modeled three classes of fatigue, which enabled the prediction and detection of fatigue. Initial results of class separation were encouraging, discriminating between the three classes of fatigue, a longitudinal classification on Non-Fatigue and Transition-to-Fatigue shows 81.58% correct classification with accuracy 0.74 of correct predictions while the longitudinal classification on Transition-to-Fatigue and Fatigue showed lower average correct classification of 66.51% with a positive classification accuracy 0.73 of correct prediction. Comparison of the 1D spectro_std with other sEMG fatigue features on the same dataset show a significant improvement in classification, where results show a significant 20.58% (p < 0.01 improvement when using the 1D spectro_std to classify Non-Fatigue and Transition-to-Fatigue. In classifying Transition-to-Fatigue and Fatigue results also show a significant improvement over the other features giving 8.14% (p < 0.05 on average of all compared features.

  2. Mobility-Related Fatigue, Walking Speed, and Muscle Strength in Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Rantanen, Taina

    2012-01-01

    history, as well as performance-based assessment of walking speed and maximal isometric strength of knee extension, body extension, and handgrip. Results. In the cross-sectional baseline analysis, one unit increase in fatigue score was associated with 0.03 m/s (b = −.03, p ... the degree to which muscle strength accounts for this association. Methods. The study is based on baseline (n = 523) and 5-year follow-up data (n = 292) from a cohort of 75-year-old persons. Standardized assessments include self-report measures of mobility-related fatigue (score range 0–6) and medical......, p strength accounted up to 21% and among men up to 24% for the association. In the prospective analysis, fatigue at baseline was predictive of change in walking speed...

  3. Stabilometric response during single-leg stance after lower limb muscle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. V. Bruniera

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study sought to analyze the effect of muscle fatigue induced by active isotonic resistance training at a moderate intensity by measuring the knee extension motion during the stabilometric response in a single-leg stance among healthy university students who perform resistance training on a regular basis. METHOD: Eleven healthy university students were subjected to a one-repetition maximum (1RM test. In addition, stabilometric assessment was performed before and after the intervention and consisted of a muscle fatiguing protocol, in which knee extension was selected as the fatiguing task. The Shapiro-Wilk test was used to investigate the normality of the data, and the Wilcoxon test was used to compare the stabilometric parameters before and after induction of muscle fatigue, at a significance level of p≤0.05. Descriptive statistics were used in the analysis of the volunteers' age, height, body mass, and body mass index (BMI. RESULTS: The sample population was 23.1±2.7 years of age, averaged 1.79.2±0.07 m in height and 75.6±8.0 Kg in weight, and had a BMI of 23.27±3.71 Kg.m-2. The volunteers performed exercises 3.36±1.12 days/week and achieved a load of 124.54±22.07 Kg on 1RM and 74.72±13.24 Kg on 60% 1RM. The center of pressure (CoP oscillation on the mediolateral plane before and after fatigue induction was 2.89±0.89 mm and 4.09±0.59 mm, respectively, while the corresponding values on the anteroposterior plane were 2.5±2.2 mm and 4.09±2.26 mm, respectively. The CoP oscillation amplitude on the anteroposterior and mediolateral planes exhibited a significant difference before and after fatigue induction (p=0.04 and p=0.05, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed that muscle fatigue affects postural control, particularly with the mediolateral and anteroposterior CoP excursion.

  4. SELECTIVE ACTIVATION OF THE RECTUS ABDOMINIS MUSCLE DURING LOW-INTENSITY AND FATIGUING TASKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo H. Marchetti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the potential selective activation of the rectus abdominis muscle, we conducted two experiments. In the first, subjects performed two controlled isometric exercises: the curl up (supine trunk raise and the leg raise (supine bent leg raise at low intensity (in which only a few motor units are recruited. In the second experiment, subjects performed the same exercises, but they were required to maintain a certain force level in order to induce fatigue. We recorded the electromyographic (EMG activities of the lower and upper portions of the rectus abdominis muscle during the exercises and used spatial-temporal and frequency analyses to describe muscle activation patterns. At low-intensity contractions, the ratio between the EMG intensities of the upper and lower portions during the curl up exercise was significantly larger than during the leg raise exercise (p = 0.02. A cross-correlation analysis indicated that the signals of the abdominal portions were related to each other and this relation did not differ between the tasks (p = 0.12. In the fatiguing condition, fatigue for the upper portion was higher than for the lower portion during the curl up exercise (p = 0.008. We conclude that different exercises evoked, to a certain degree, individualized activation of each part of the rectus abdominis muscle, but different portions of the rectus abdominis muscle contributed to the same task, acting like a functional unit. These results corroborate the relevance of varying exercise to modify activation patterns of the rectus abdominis muscle

  5. Detection of surface electromyography recording time interval without muscle fatigue effect for biceps brachii muscle during maximum voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Abdullah Ruhi; Arpinar-Avsar, Pinar

    2010-08-01

    The effects of fatigue on maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) parameters were examined by using force and surface electromyography (sEMG) signals of the biceps brachii muscles (BBM) of 12 subjects. The purpose of the study was to find the sEMG time interval of the MVC recordings which is not affected by the muscle fatigue. At least 10s of force and sEMG signals of BBM were recorded simultaneously during MVC. The subjects reached the maximum force level within 2s by slightly increasing the force, and then contracted the BBM maximally. The time index of each sEMG and force signal were labeled with respect to the time index of the maximum force (i.e. after the time normalization, each sEMG or force signal's 0s time index corresponds to maximum force point). Then, the first 8s of sEMG and force signals were divided into 0.5s intervals. Mean force, median frequency (MF) and integrated EMG (iEMG) values were calculated for each interval. Amplitude normalization was performed by dividing the force signals to their mean values of 0s time intervals (i.e. -0.25 to 0.25s). A similar amplitude normalization procedure was repeated for the iEMG and MF signals. Statistical analysis (Friedman test with Dunn's post hoc test) was performed on the time and amplitude normalized signals (MF, iEMG). Although the ANOVA results did not give statistically significant information about the onset of the muscle fatigue, linear regression (mean force vs. time) showed a decreasing slope (Pearson-r=0.9462, pfatigue starts after the 0s time interval as the muscles cannot attain their peak force levels. This implies that the most reliable interval for MVC calculation which is not affected by the muscle fatigue is from the onset of the EMG activity to the peak force time. Mean, SD, and range of this interval (excluding 2s gradual increase time) for 12 subjects were 2353, 1258ms and 536-4186ms, respectively. Exceeding this interval introduces estimation errors in the maximum amplitude calculations

  6. Effects of Quadriceps Muscle Fatigue on Stiff-Knee Gait in Patients with Hemiparesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudarham, Julien; Roche, Nicolas; Pradon, Didier; Delouf, Eric; Bensmail, Djamel; Zory, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between neuromuscular fatigue and locomotion has never been investigated in hemiparetic patients despite the fact that, in the clinical context, patients report to be more spastic or stiffer after walking a long distance or after a rehabilitation session. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of quadriceps muscle fatigue on the biomechanical gait parameters of patients with a stiff-knee gait (SKG). Thirteen patients and eleven healthy controls performed one gait analysis before a protocol of isokinetic quadriceps fatigue and two after (immediately after and after 10 minutes of rest). Spatiotemporal parameters, sagittal knee and hip kinematics, rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) kinematics and electromyographic (EMG) activity were analyzed. The results showed that quadriceps muscle weakness, produced by repetitive concentric contractions of the knee extensors, induced an improvement of spatiotemporal parameters for patients and healthy subjects. For the patient group, the increase in gait velocity and step length was associated with i) an increase of sagittal hip and knee flexion during the swing phase, ii) an increase of the maximal normalized length of the RF and VL and of the maximal VL lengthening velocity during the pre-swing and swing phases, and iii) a decrease in EMG activity of the RF muscle during the initial pre-swing phase and during the latter 2/3 of the initial swing phase. These results suggest that quadriceps fatigue did not alter the gait of patients with hemiparesis walking with a SKG and that neuromuscular fatigue may play the same functional role as an anti-spastic treatment such as botulinum toxin-A injection. Strength training of knee extensors, although commonly performed in rehabilitation, does not seem to be a priority to improve gait of these patients. PMID:24718087

  7. Muscular Activity and Fatigue in Lower-Limb and Trunk Muscles during Different Sit-To-Stand Tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Roldán-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Sit-to-stand (STS tests measure the ability to get up from a chair, reproducing an important component of daily living activity. As this functional task is essential for human independence, STS performance has been studied in the past decades using several methods, including electromyography. The aim of this study was to measure muscular activity and fatigue during different repetitions and speeds of STS tasks using surface electromyography in lower-limb and trunk muscles. This cross-sectional study recruited 30 healthy young adults. Average muscle activation, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, muscle involvement in motion and fatigue were measured using surface electrodes placed on the medial gastrocnemius (MG, biceps femoris (BF, vastus medialis of the quadriceps (QM, the abdominal rectus (AR, erector spinae (ES, rectus femoris (RF, soleus (SO and the tibialis anterior (TA. Five-repetition STS, 10-repetition STS and 30-second STS variants were performed. MG, BF, QM, ES and RF muscles showed differences in muscle activation, while QM, AR and ES muscles showed significant differences in MVC percentage. Also, significant differences in fatigue were found in QM muscle between different STS tests. There was no statistically significant fatigue in the BF, MG and SO muscles of the leg although there appeared to be a trend of increasing fatigue. These results could be useful in describing the functional movements of the STS test used in rehabilitation programs, notwithstanding that they were measured in healthy young subjects.

  8. Muscular Activity and Fatigue in Lower-Limb and Trunk Muscles during Different Sit-To-Stand Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Jiménez, Cristina; Bennett, Paul; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I

    2015-01-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) tests measure the ability to get up from a chair, reproducing an important component of daily living activity. As this functional task is essential for human independence, STS performance has been studied in the past decades using several methods, including electromyography. The aim of this study was to measure muscular activity and fatigue during different repetitions and speeds of STS tasks using surface electromyography in lower-limb and trunk muscles. This cross-sectional study recruited 30 healthy young adults. Average muscle activation, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, muscle involvement in motion and fatigue were measured using surface electrodes placed on the medial gastrocnemius (MG), biceps femoris (BF), vastus medialis of the quadriceps (QM), the abdominal rectus (AR), erector spinae (ES), rectus femoris (RF), soleus (SO) and the tibialis anterior (TA). Five-repetition STS, 10-repetition STS and 30-second STS variants were performed. MG, BF, QM, ES and RF muscles showed differences in muscle activation, while QM, AR and ES muscles showed significant differences in MVC percentage. Also, significant differences in fatigue were found in QM muscle between different STS tests. There was no statistically significant fatigue in the BF, MG and SO muscles of the leg although there appeared to be a trend of increasing fatigue. These results could be useful in describing the functional movements of the STS test used in rehabilitation programs, notwithstanding that they were measured in healthy young subjects.

  9. Oxidative Stress and COPD: The Impact of Oral Antioxidants on Skeletal Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Matthew J.; Groot, H. Jonathan; Van Reese; Zhao, Jia; Amann, Markus; Richardson, Russell S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Oxidative stress may contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study sought to determine the effect of an acute oral antioxidant cocktail (AOC: vitamins C, E, and alpha-lipoic acid) on skeletal muscle function during dynamic quadriceps exercise in COPD. METHODS Ten patients with COPD performed knee extensor exercise to exhaustion and isotime trials following either the AOC or placebo (PL). Pre- to post-exercise changes in quadriceps maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) and potentiated twitch forces (Qtw,pot) quantified quadriceps fatigue. RESULTS Under PL conditions, the plasma electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy signal was inversely correlated with the forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity ratio (FEV1/FVC), an index of lung dysfunction (r=−0.61, p=0.02), and MVC force (r=−0.56, p=0.04). AOC consumption increased plasma ascorbate levels (10.1±2.2 to 24.1±3.8 ug/ml, p<0.05) and attenuated the area under the curve of the EPR spectroscopy free radical signal (11.6±3.7 to 4.8±2.2 AU, p<0.05), but did not alter endurance time or quadriceps fatigue. The ability of the AOC to decrease the EPR spectroscopy signal, however, was prominent in those with high basal free radicals (n=5, PL: 19.7±5.8 to AOC: 5.8±4.5 AU, p<0.05) with minimal effects in those with low levels (n=5, PL: 1.6±0.5 to AOC: 3.4±1.1 AU). DISCUSSION These data document a relationship between directly measured free radicals and lung dysfunction, and the ability of the AOC to decrease oxidative stress in COPD. Acute amelioration of free radicals, however, does not appear to impact dynamic quadriceps exercise performance. PMID:23299763

  10. Estimation of muscle fatigue using surface electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taelman, Joachim; Vanderhaegen, Joke; Robijns, Mieke; Naulaers, Gunnar; Spaepen, Arthur; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    This study looks at various parameters, derived from surface electromyography (sEMG) and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) and their relationship in muscle fatigue during a static elbow flexion until exhaustion as well as during a semidynamic exercise.We found a linear increasing trend for a corrected amplitude parameter and a linear decreasing slope for the frequency content of the sEMG signal. The tissue oxygenation index (TOI) extracted from NIRS recordings showed a four-phase response for all the subjects. A strong correlation between frequency content of the sEMG signal and TOI was established. We can conclude that both sEMG and NIRS give complementary information concerning muscle fatigue.

  11. Effects of plantar-flexor muscle fatigue on the magnitude and regularity of center-of-pressure fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, M.; Hlavackova, P.; Vuillerme, N.

    2011-01-01

    Control of bipedal posture is highly automatized but requires attentional investment, the amount of which varies between participants and with postural constraints, such as plantar-flexor muscle fatigue. Elevated attentional demands for standing with fatigued plantar flexors have been demonstrated

  12. Influence of blood flow occlusion on the development of peripheral and central fatigue during small muscle mass handgrip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxterman, R M; Craig, J C; Smith, J R; Wilcox, S L; Jia, C; Warren, S; Barstow, T J

    2015-09-01

    Critical power represents an important threshold for neuromuscular fatigue development and may, therefore, dictate intensities for which exercise tolerance is determined by the magnitude of fatigue accrued. Peripheral fatigue appears to be constant across O2 delivery conditions for large muscle mass exercise, but this consistency is equivocal for smaller muscle mass exercise. We sought to determine the influence of blood flow occlusion during handgrip exercise on neuromuscular fatigue development and to examine the relationship between neuromuscular fatigue development and W '. Blood flow occlusion influenced the development of both peripheral and central fatigue, thus providing further evidence that the magnitude of peripheral fatigue is not constant across O2 delivery conditions for small muscle mass exercise. W ' appears to be related to the magnitude of fatigue accrued during exercise, which may explain the reported consistency of intramuscular metabolic perturbations and work performed for severe-intensity exercise. The influence of the muscle metabolic milieu on peripheral and central fatigue is currently unclear. Moreover, the relationships between peripheral and central fatigue and the curvature constant (W ') have not been investigated. Six men (age: 25 ± 4 years, body mass: 82 ± 10 kg, height: 179 ± 4 cm) completed four constant power handgrip tests to exhaustion under conditions of control exercise (Con), blood flow occlusion exercise (Occ), Con with 5 min post-exercise blood flow occlusion (Con + Occ), and Occ with 5 min post-exercise blood flow occlusion (Occ + Occ). Neuromuscular fatigue measurements and W ' were obtained for each subject. Each trial resulted in significant peripheral and central fatigue. Significantly greater peripheral (79.7 ± 5.1% vs. 22.7 ± 6.0%) and central (42.6 ± 3.9% vs. 4.9 ± 2.0%) fatigue occurred for Occ than for Con. In addition, significantly greater peripheral (83.0 ± 4.2% vs. 69.0 ± 6.2%) and central

  13. Assessment of skeletal muscle fatigue of road maintenance workers based on heart rate monitoring and myotonometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalkis Henrijs

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This research work is dedicated to occupational health problems caused by ergonomic risks. The research object was road building industry, where workers have to work very intensively, have long work hours, are working in forced/constrained work postures and overstrain during the work specific parts of their bodies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the work heaviness degree and to estimate the muscle fatigue of workers after one week work cycle. The study group consisted of 10 road construction and maintenance workers and 10 pavers aged between 20 and 60 years. Methods Physical load were analyzed by measuring heart rate (HR, work postures (OWAS and perceived exertion (RPE. Assessments of the muscles strain and functional state (tone were carried out using myotonometric (MYO measurements. The reliability of the statistical processing of heart rate monitoring and myotonometry data was determined using correlating analysis. Results This study showed that that road construction and repairing works should be considered as a hard work according to average metabolic energy consumption 8.1 ± 1.5 kcal/min; paving, in its turn, was a moderately hard work according to 7.2 ± 1.1 kcal/min. Several muscle tone levels were identified allowing subdivision of workers into three conditional categories basing on muscle tone and fatigue: I – absolute muscle relaxation and ability to relax; II – a state of equilibrium, when muscles are able to adapt to the work load and are partly able to relax; and III – muscle fatigue and increased tone. It was also found out that the increase of muscle tone and fatigue mainly depend on workers physical preparedness and length of service, and less – on their age. Conclusion We have concluded that a complex ergonomic analysis consisting of heart rate monitoring, assessment of compulsive working postures and myotonometry is appropriate to assess the work heaviness degree and can provide prognosis of

  14. Changes in Serum Free Amino Acids and Muscle Fatigue Experienced during a Half-Ironman Triathlon.

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    Francisco Areces

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between changes in serum free amino acids, muscle fatigue and exercise-induced muscle damage during a half-ironman triathlon. Twenty-six experienced triathletes (age = 37.0 ± 6.8 yr; experience = 7.4 ± 3.0 yr competed in a real half-ironman triathlon in which sector times and total race time were measured by means of chip timing. Before and after the race, a countermovement jump and a maximal isometric force test were performed, and blood samples were withdrawn to measure serum free amino acids concentrations, and serum creatine kinase levels as a blood marker of muscle damage. Total race time was 320 ± 37 min and jump height (-16.3 ± 15.2%, P 20%. However, neither the changes in serum free amino acids nor the tryptophan/BCAA ratio were related muscle fatigue or muscle damage during the race.

  15. Evaluating abdominal core muscle fatigue: Assessment of the validity and reliability of the prone bridging test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blaiser, C; De Ridder, R; Willems, T; Danneels, L; Vanden Bossche, L; Palmans, T; Roosen, P

    2018-02-01

    The aims of this study were to research the amplitude and median frequency characteristics of selected abdominal, back, and hip muscles of healthy subjects during a prone bridging endurance test, based on surface electromyography (sEMG), (a) to determine if the prone bridging test is a valid field test to measure abdominal muscle fatigue, and (b) to evaluate if the current method of administrating the prone bridging test is reliable. Thirty healthy subjects participated in this experiment. The sEMG activity of seven abdominal, back, and hip muscles was bilaterally measured. Normalized median frequencies were computed from the EMG power spectra. The prone bridging tests were repeated on separate days to evaluate inter and intratester reliability. Significant differences in normalized median frequency slope (NMF slope ) values between several abdominal, back, and hip muscles could be demonstrated. Moderate-to-high correlation coefficients were shown between NMF slope values and endurance time. Multiple backward linear regression revealed that the test endurance time could only be significantly predicted by the NMF slope of the rectus abdominis. Statistical analysis showed excellent reliability (ICC=0.87-0.89). The findings of this study support the validity and reliability of the prone bridging test for evaluating abdominal muscle fatigue. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Shoulder muscle fatigue during repetitive tasks as measured by electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sue A; Allread, W Gary; Le, Peter; Rose, Joseph; Marras, William S

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify shoulder muscle fatigue during repetitive exertions similar to motions found in automobile assembly tasks. Shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a common and costly problem in automotive manufacturing. Ten subjects participated in the study. There were three independent variables: shoulder angle, frequency, and force. There were two types of dependent measures: percentage change in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measures and change in electromyography (EMG) median frequency. The anterior deltoid and trapezius muscles were measured for both NIRS and EMG. Also, EMG was collected on the middle deltoid and biceps muscles. The results showed that oxygenated hemoglobin decreased significantly due to the main effects (shoulder angle, frequency, and force). The percentage change in oxygenated hemoglobin had a significant interaction attributable to force and repetition for the anterior deltoid muscle, indicating that as repetition increased, the magnitude of the differences between the forces increased. The interaction of repetition and shoulder angle was also significant for the percentage change in oxygenated hemoglobin. The median frequency decreased significantly for the main effects; however, no interactions were statistically significant. There was significant shoulder muscle fatigue as a function of shoulder angle, task frequency, and force level. Furthermore, percentage change in oxygenated hemoglobin had two statistically significant interactions, enhancing our understanding of these risk factors. Ergonomists should examine interactions of force and repetition as well as shoulder angle and repetition when evaluating the risk of shoulder MSDs.

  17. Fnip1 regulates skeletal muscle fiber type specification, fatigue resistance, and susceptibility to muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Nicholas L.; Banks, Glen B.; Tsang, Mark; Margineantu, Daciana; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Chan, Jacky; Torres, Michelle; Liggitt, H. Denny; Hirenallur-S, Dinesh K.; Hockenbery, David M.; Raftery, Daniel; Iritani, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscle is broadly characterized by the presence of two distinct categories of muscle fibers called type I “red” slow twitch and type II “white” fast twitch, which display marked differences in contraction strength, metabolic strategies, and susceptibility to fatigue. The relative representation of each fiber type can have major influences on susceptibility to obesity, diabetes, and muscular dystrophies. However, the molecular factors controlling fiber type specification remain incompletely defined. In this study, we describe the control of fiber type specification and susceptibility to metabolic disease by folliculin interacting protein-1 (Fnip1). Using Fnip1 null mice, we found that loss of Fnip1 increased the representation of type I fibers characterized by increased myoglobin, slow twitch markers [myosin heavy chain 7 (MyH7), succinate dehydrogenase, troponin I 1, troponin C1, troponin T1], capillary density, and mitochondria number. Cultured Fnip1-null muscle fibers had higher oxidative capacity, and isolated Fnip1-null skeletal muscles were more resistant to postcontraction fatigue relative to WT skeletal muscles. Biochemical analyses revealed increased activation of the metabolic sensor AMP kinase (AMPK), and increased expression of the AMPK-target and transcriptional coactivator PGC1α in Fnip1 null skeletal muscle. Genetic disruption of PGC1α rescued normal levels of type I fiber markers MyH7 and myoglobin in Fnip1-null mice. Remarkably, loss of Fnip1 profoundly mitigated muscle damage in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results indicate that Fnip1 controls skeletal muscle fiber type specification and warrant further study to determine whether inhibition of Fnip1 has therapeutic potential in muscular dystrophy diseases. PMID:25548157

  18. Influence of Skeletal Muscle Carnosine Content on Fatigue during Repeated Resistance Exercise in Recreationally Active Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanoske, Alyssa N.; Hoffman, Jay R.; Church, David D.; Baker, Kayla M.; Dodd, Sarah J.; Coker, Nicholas A.; Oliveira, Leonardo P.; Dawson, Virgil L.; Stout, Jeffrey R.

    2017-01-01

    Carnosine is a naturally occurring intramuscular dipeptide that is thought to attenuate fatigue during high-intensity exercise. Carnosine content is influenced by various factors, including gender and diet. Despite research reporting that carnosine content is lower in women compared to men and lower in vegetarians compared to omnivores, no investigations have examined carnosine content in women based on dietary protein intake and its effect on muscle fatigue. Twenty recreationally active women were assigned to either a high (HI; n = 5), moderate (MOD; n = 10), or low (LO; n = 5) group based upon intramuscular carnosine content of the vastus lateralis. Each participant underwent two unilateral maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) of the knee extensors separated by an isokinetic exercise protocol consisting of five sets of 50 repeated maximal unilateral contractions. Magnitude-based inferences were used to analyze group differences. Percent decline in rate of force development and peak torque (PT) during the MVICs and changes in PT and mean torque during the muscle-fatiguing protocol were lower in HI compared to both MOD and LO. Additionally, absolute and relative dietary protein intake were greater in HI compared to MOD or LO. Results indicated that greater intramuscular carnosine content was reflective of greater dietary protein intake and that individuals with higher carnosine content displayed a greater attenuation of fatigue compared to those with lower carnosine. PMID:28880219

  19. Biochemical and muscle studies in patients with acute onset post-viral fatigue syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Preedy, V R; Smith, D G; Salisbury, J R; Peters, T J

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate in detail various biochemical and pathophysiological indices of muscle pathology in acute onset post-viral fatigue syndrome (PVFS). METHODS--Twenty three patients with PVFS (of mean duration 4.6 years) were subjected to needle biopsy for histomorphometry and total RNA contents. Plasma analysis included serology and creatine kinase activities. Indices of whole body mass were also measured--namely, whole body potassium content and plasma carnosinase activities. RESULTS--Abo...

  20. Muscle dynamics in fish during steady swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shadwick, RE; Steffensen, JF; Katz, SL

    1998-01-01

    SYNOPSIS. Recent research in fish locomotion has been dominated by an interest in the dynamic mechanical properties of the swimming musculature. Prior observations have indicated that waves of muscle activation travel along the body of an undulating fish faster than the resulting waves of muscular...... position in swimming fish. Quantification of muscle contractile properties in cyclic contractions relies on in vitro experiments using strain and activation data collected in vivo. In this paper we discuss the relation between these parameters and body kinematics. Using videoradiographic data from swimming...... constant cross-section of red muscle along much of the body suggests that positive power for swimming is generated fairly uniformly along the length of the fish....

  1. Changes in motor cortex excitability associated with muscle fatigue in patients with Parkinson's disease

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    Milanović Slađan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a standard technique for noninvasive assessment of changes in central nervous system excitability. The aim of this study was to examine changes in responses to TMS in patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease (PD during sustained submaximal isometric voluntary contraction [60% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC] of the adductor pollicis muscle, as well as during a subsequent recovery period. Methods. Cortical excitability was tested by single TMS pulses of twice of the motor threshold intensity applied over the vertex. Testing was carried out during the sustained contraction phase every 10 s before and every 5 s after the endurance point, as well as at rest and during brief 60% MVC contractions before (control, immediately after the sustained contraction, and at 5 min intervals during the recovery period. Results. Although the PD patients could sustain the contraction at the required level for as long period of time as the healthy subjects (though contraction level subsided more rapidly after the endurance point, effects of muscle fatigue on the responses to TMS were different. In contrast to the findings observed in the healthy people where motor evoked potentials (MEP and EMG silent period (SP in fatigued muscle gradually diminished during contraction up to the endurance point, and increased thereafter, in the majority of patients no changes occurred in MEP size (peak and area of the adductor pollicis muscle, either before or after the endurance point. On the other hand, changes in the SP of this muscle differed among the subjects, showing a gradual increase, a decrease or no changes in duration. The trends of changes in both MEP size and SP duration in the musculus brachioradialis varied among the tested PD patients, without any consistent pattern, which was in contrast with the findings in the healthy people where both measures showed a gradual increase from the beginning of

  2. Influence of Synchronized Dead Point Elimination Crank on Cyclist Muscle Fatigue

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    Abdul Aziz Khadijah Akmal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of newly proposed bicycle’s crank to crank angle setting on the Vastus Lateralis (VL and Bicep Femoris (BF muscle activity during cycling. Procedures of Conconi Test were used throughout the experiment for the data collection purpose. The muscles activities were recorded using surface electromyography and software LabChart7. The raw data were further processed in time (Root-Mean-Square, RMS and frequency (Mean Power Frequency, MPF domain. It was found that 0° crank to crank setting (similar to conventional crank to crank angle setting caused the prime mover VL (Normalized RMS = 0.119 to fatigue more than BF (Normalized RMS = 0.102. This setting is expected to decrease the cycling performance. In addition, −5° is the best crank to crank angle setting that causes least fatigue to both VL and BF. In short, to increase the cycling performance by avoiding the fatigue to the main muscles, −5° is the suggested as setting angle for the proposed crank design.

  3. Fatigue Responses in Various Muscle Groups in Well-Trained Competitive Male Players after a Simulated Soccer Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fransson, Dan; Vigh-Larsen, Jeppe Foged; Fatouros, Ioannis G

    2018-01-01

    soccer protocol, following baseline measures of maximal voluntary contractions of multiple muscle groups and systemic markers of muscle damage and inflammation at 0, 24 and 48 h into recovery. All muscle groups had a strength decrement (p ≤ 0.05) at 0 h post-match with knee flexors (14 ± 3%) and hip...... decrement still persistent (4 ± 1%, p ≤ 0.05) for trunk muscles 24 h into recovery. Large inter-player variations were observed in game-induced fatigue and recovery patterns in the various muscle groups. Markers of muscle damage and inflammation peaked 0 h post-match (myoglobin) and 24 h into recovery...... (creatine kinase), respectively, but thereafter returned to baseline. Intermittent test performance correlated with creatine kinase activity 24 h after the Copenhagen Soccer Test (r = -0.70; p = 0.02). In conclusion, post-game fatigue is evident in multiple muscle groups with knee flexors showing...

  4. Assessment of muscle fatigue after an ultra-endurance triathlon using tensiomyography (TMG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Manso, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Ruiz, David; Rodríguez-Matoso, Dario; de Saa, Yves; Sarmiento, Samuel; Quiroga, Miriam

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we used tensiomyography (TMG) to assess muscle status immediately after an ultra-endurance triathlon. Maximal radial displacement or deformation of the muscle belly, contraction time, delay time, sustain time, and relaxation time were measured for both legs, and dependent t-tests were used to compare means between the beginning and end of the race. The 19 men assessed (age 37.9 ± 7.1 years; height 177.5 ± 4.6 cm; weight: 73.6 ± 6.5 kg) participated in the 2009 edition of the Lanzarote Ironman. Deterioration in the neural response was observed for contraction time (P = 0.008) and relaxation time (P = 0.011), with a moderate decrease in the response time (sustain time) and a loss in muscle stiffness (deformation of the muscle belly). The effect of muscle fatigue on the rectus femoris and biceps femoris was different. Barely any changes in contraction time, relaxation time, sustain time, and deformation of the muscle belly were observed, while only the contraction response time decreased to a significant extent (reduction in delay time; P = 0.003). The considerable loss in contractile capacity induced by a long-distance race was reflected in changes in the neuromuscular response and fluctuations in the contractile capacity of the muscle. These modifications, derived from a prolonged, exhausting effort, can be assessed in a simple, non-aggressive, non-invasive way using tensiomyography.

  5. TARGETED RADIOFREQUENCY THERAPY FOR TRAINING INDUCED MUSCLE FATIGUE EFFECTIVE OR NOT

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    Ondrej Prouza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Training induced muscle fatigue (hereinafter also referred as TIMF is leading to unwanted consequences among sportsmen and actively sporting people such as decreased muscle strength and additional painful discomfort and mobility issues. The knowledge about the mechanisms of influencing the fatigue induced processes in muscle tissue is not comprehensive. The conventional manual techniques, cold patches and conventional physiotherapy have some effect in improving these conditions, however, finding effective methods to influence these consequences appears beneficial in sports medicine. Such method could be Radiofrequency therapy up to 0.5 MHz, known as Targeted Radiofrequency Therapy (hereinafter also referred as TR-Therapy. Aim of this self-controlled study is to evaluate the effect of the TR-Therapy for over-exertion management including the effect on decreased muscle strength, limited range of motion and possible painful discomfort. Materials: 7 healthy and actively sporting participants underwent through 2 stages (Active stage – including overexertion of the forearm flexors and subsequent TR-Therapy session; and Control stage - including overexertion of the forearm flexors and subsequent resting period. Data for muscle strength in kg, active Range of Motion (ROM in (º and Pain and discomfort perception by 10 point Visual Analog Scale (VAS were obtained and evaluated. Results: 31% increase in the muscle strength during the active stage was observed and respectively 12% during the control stage, with level of significance p0.05. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest TR-Therapy as effective solution for muscle strength restoration after TIMF.

  6. Dynamic epigenetic responses to muscle contraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Zierath, Juleen R; Barrès, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a malleable organ that responds to a single acute exercise bout by inducing the expression of genes involved in structural, metabolic and functional adaptations. Several epigenetic mechanisms including histone H4 deacetylation and loss of promoter methylation have been implicated...... in modifying exercise-responsive gene expression. These transient changes suggest that epigenetic mechanisms are not restricted to early stages of human development but are broad dynamic controllers of genomic plasticity in response to environmental factors....

  7. Fatigue Responses in Various Muscle Groups in Well-Trained Competitive Male Players after a Simulated Soccer Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Dan; Vigh-Larsen, Jeppe Foged; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Krustrup, Peter; Mohr, Magni

    2018-03-01

    We examined the degree of post-game fatigue and the recovery pattern in various leg and upper-body muscle groups after a simulated soccer game. Well-trained competitive male soccer players (n = 12) participated in the study. The players completed the Copenhagen Soccer Test, a 2 x 45 min simulated soccer protocol, following baseline measures of maximal voluntary contractions of multiple muscle groups and systemic markers of muscle damage and inflammation at 0, 24 and 48 h into recovery. All muscle groups had a strength decrement ( p ≤ 0.05) at 0 h post-match with knee flexors (14 ± 3%) and hip abductors (6 ± 1%) demonstrating the largest and smallest impairment. However, 24 h into recovery all individual muscles had recovered. When pooled in specific muscle groups, the trunk muscles and knee joint muscles presented the largest decline 0 h post-match, 11 ± 2% for both, with the performance decrement still persistent (4 ± 1%, p ≤ 0.05) for trunk muscles 24 h into recovery. Large inter-player variations were observed in game-induced fatigue and recovery patterns in the various muscle groups. Markers of muscle damage and inflammation peaked 0 h post-match (myoglobin) and 24 h into recovery (creatine kinase), respectively, but thereafter returned to baseline. Intermittent test performance correlated with creatine kinase activity 24 h after the Copenhagen Soccer Test (r = -0.70; p = 0.02). In conclusion, post-game fatigue is evident in multiple muscle groups with knee flexors showing the greatest performance decrement. Fatigue and recovery patterns vary markedly between muscle groups and players, yet trunk muscles display the slowest recovery.

  8. Fatigue Responses in Various Muscle Groups in Well-Trained Competitive Male Players after a Simulated Soccer Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fransson Dan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We examined the degree of post-game fatigue and the recovery pattern in various leg and upper-body muscle groups after a simulated soccer game. Well-trained competitive male soccer players (n = 12 participated in the study. The players completed the Copenhagen Soccer Test, a 2 x 45 min simulated soccer protocol, following baseline measures of maximal voluntary contractions of multiple muscle groups and systemic markers of muscle damage and inflammation at 0, 24 and 48 h into recovery. All muscle groups had a strength decrement (p ≤ 0.05 at 0 h post-match with knee flexors (14 ± 3% and hip abductors (6 ± 1% demonstrating the largest and smallest impairment. However, 24 h into recovery all individual muscles had recovered. When pooled in specific muscle groups, the trunk muscles and knee joint muscles presented the largest decline 0 h post-match, 11 ± 2% for both, with the performance decrement still persistent (4 ± 1%, p ≤ 0.05 for trunk muscles 24 h into recovery. Large inter-player variations were observed in game-induced fatigue and recovery patterns in the various muscle groups. Markers of muscle damage and inflammation peaked 0 h post-match (myoglobin and 24 h into recovery (creatine kinase, respectively, but thereafter returned to baseline. Intermittent test performance correlated with creatine kinase activity 24 h after the Copenhagen Soccer Test (r = -0.70; p = 0.02. In conclusion, post-game fatigue is evident in multiple muscle groups with knee flexors showing the greatest performance decrement. Fatigue and recovery patterns vary markedly between muscle groups and players, yet trunk muscles display the slowest recovery.

  9. Fatigue-Induced Changes in Movement Pattern and Muscle Activity During Ballet Releve on Demi-Pointe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Lee, Wan-Chin; Chen, Yi-An; Hsue, Bih-Jen

    2016-08-01

    Fatigue in ballet dancers may lead to injury, particularly in the lower extremities. However, few studies have investigated the effects of fatigue on ballet dancers' performance and movement patterns. Thus, the current study examines the effect of fatigue on the balance, movement pattern, and muscle activities of the lower extremities in ballet dancers. Twenty healthy, female ballet dancers performed releve on demi-pointe before and after fatigue. The trajectory of the whole body movement and the muscle activities of the major lower extremity muscles were recorded continuously during task performance. The results show that fatigue increases the medial-lateral center of mass (COM) displacement and hip and trunk motion, but decreases the COM velocity and ankle motion. Moreover, fatigue reduces the activities of the hamstrings and tibialis anterior, but increases that of the soleus. Finally, greater proximal hip and trunk motions are applied to compensate for the effects of fatigue, leading to a greater COM movement. Overall, the present findings show that fatigue results in impaired movement control and may therefore increase the risk of dance injury.

  10. Relations between muscle endurance and subjectively reported fatigue, walking capacity, and participation in mildly affected adolescents with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eken, Maaike M.; Houdijk, Han; Doorenbosch, Caroline A. M.; Kiezebrink, Francisca E. M.; van Bennekom, Coen A. M.; Harlaar, Jaap; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relation between muscle endurance and subjectively reported fatigue, walking capacity, and participation in mildly affected adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) and peers with typical development. In this case-control study, knee extensor muscle endurance was estimated from

  11. Low-level activity of the trunk extensor muscles causes electromyographic manifestations of fatigue in absence of decreased oxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieën, J.H. van; Westebring van der; Putten, E.P.; Kingma, I.; Looze, M.P. de

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether trunk extensor fatigue occurs during low-level activity and whether this is associated with a drop in muscle tissue oxygenation. Electromyography (EMG) feedback was used to impose constant activity in a part of the trunk extensor muscles. We hypothesized

  12. Relations between muscle endurance and subjectively reported fatigue, walking capacity, and participation in mildly affected adolescents with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eken, Maaike M; Houdijk, Han; Doorenbosch, Caroline A M; Kiezebrink, Francisca E.M.; van Bennekom, Coen A.M.; Harlaar, Jaap; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the relation between muscle endurance and subjectively reported fatigue, walking capacity, and participation in mildly affected adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) and peers with typical development. Method: In this case–control study, knee extensor muscle endurance was

  13. Contribution of respiratory muscle blood flow to exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue in trained cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether the greater degree of exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue previously reported in highly trained athletes in hypoxia (compared with normoxia) could have a contribution from limited respiratory muscle blood flow. Seven trained cyclists completed three constant load 5 min...... exercise tests at inspired O(2) fractions (FIO2) of 0.13, 0.21 and 1.00 in balanced order. Work rates were selected to produce the same tidal volume, breathing frequency and respiratory muscle load at each FIO2 (63 +/- 1, 78 +/- 1 and 87 +/- 1% of normoxic maximal work rate, respectively). Intercostals......(-1) and 95.1 +/- 7.8 ml (100 ml)(-1) min(-1), respectively). Neither IMBF was different across hypoxia, normoxia and hyperoxia (53.6 +/- 8.5, 49.9 +/- 5.9 and 52.9 +/- 5.9 ml (100 ml)(-1) min(-1), respectively). We conclude that when respiratory muscle energy requirement is not different between...

  14. Effects of High-Intensity Blood Flow Restriction Exercise on Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neto Gabriel R.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Strength training combined with blood flow restriction (BFR have been used to improve the levels of muscle adaptation. The aim of this paper was to investigate the acute effect of high intensity squats with and without blood flow restriction on muscular fatigue levels. Twelve athletes (aged 25.95 ± 0.84 years were randomized into two groups: without Blood Flow Restriction (NFR, n = 6 and With Blood Flow Restriction (WFR, n = 6 that performed a series of free weight squats with 80% 1-RM until concentric failure. The strength of the quadriceps extensors was assessed in a maximum voluntary isometric contraction integrated to signals from the surface electromyogram. The average frequency showed significant reductions in the WFR group for the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis muscles, and intergroup only for the vastus medialis. In conclusion, a set of squats at high intensity with BFR could compromise muscle strength immediately after exercise, however, differences were not significant between groups.

  15. Recruitment order of motor units in human vastus lateralis muscle is maintained during fatiguing contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Alexander; De Luca, Carlo J

    2003-11-01

    Motor-unit firing patterns were studied in the vastus lateralis muscle of five healthy young men [21.4 +/- 0.9 (SD) yr] during a series of isometric knee extensions performed to exhaustion. Each contraction was held at a constant torque level, set to 20% of the maximal voluntary contraction at the beginning of the experiment. Electromyographic signals, recorded via a quadrifilar fine wire electrode, were processed with the precision decomposition technique to identify the firing times of individual motor units. In repeat experiments, whole-muscle mechanical properties were measured during the fatigue protocol using electrical stimulation. The main findings were a monotonic decrease in the recruitment threshold of all motor units and the progressive recruitment of new units, all without a change of the recruitment order. Motor units from the same subject showed a similar time course of threshold decline, but this decline varied among subjects (mean threshold decrease ranged from 23 to 73%). The mean threshold decline was linearly correlated (R2 >or= 0.96) with a decline in the elicited peak tetanic torque. In summary, the maintenance of recruitment order during fatigue strongly supports the notion that the observed common recruitment adaptations were a direct consequence of an increased excitatory drive to the motor unit pool. It is suggested that the increased central drive was necessary to compensate for the loss in force output from motor units whose muscle fibers were actively contracting. We therefore conclude that the control scheme of motor-unit recruitment remains invariant during fatigue at least in relatively large muscles performing submaximal isometric contractions.

  16. Pacing Strategy, Muscle Fatigue, and Technique in 1500-m Speed-Skating and Cycling Time Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoter, Inge K; MacIntosh, Brian R; Fletcher, Jared R; Pootz, Spencer; Zijdewind, Inge; Hettinga, Florentina J

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate pacing behavior and peripheral and central contributions to muscle fatigue in 1500-m speed-skating and cycling time trials when a faster or slower start is instructed. Nine speed skaters and 9 cyclists, all competing at regional or national level, performed two 1500-m time trials in their sport. Athletes were instructed to start faster than usual in 1 trial and slower in the other. Mean velocity was measured per 100 m. Blood lactate concentrations were measured. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), and potentiated twitch (PT) of the quadriceps muscles were measured to estimate central and peripheral contributions to muscle fatigue. In speed skating, knee, hip, and trunk angles were measured to evaluate technique. Cyclists showed a more explosive start than speed skaters in the fast-start time trial (cyclists performed first 300 m in 24.70 ± 1.73 s, speed skaters in 26.18 ± 0.79 s). Both trials resulted in reduced MVC (12.0% ± 14.5%), VA (2.4% ± 5.0%), and PT (25.4% ± 15.2%). Blood lactate concentrations after the time trial and the decrease in PT were greater in the fast-start than in the slow-start trial. Speed skaters showed higher trunk angles in the fast-start than in the slow-start trial, while knee angles remained similar. Despite similar instructions, behavioral adaptations in pacing differed between the 2 sports, resulting in equal central and peripheral contributions to muscle fatigue in both sports. This provides evidence for the importance of neurophysiological aspects in the regulation of pacing. It also stresses the notion that optimal pacing needs to be studied sport specifically, and coaches should be aware of this.

  17. Influence of mental workload on muscle endurance, fatigue, and recovery during intermittent static work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ranjana K; Agnew, Michael J

    2012-08-01

    Most occupational tasks involve some level of mental/cognitive processing in addition to physical work; however, the etiology of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) due to these demands remains unclear. The aim of this study was to quantify the interactive effects of physical and mental workload on muscle endurance, fatigue, and recovery during intermittent work. Twelve participants, balanced by gender, performed intermittent static shoulder abductions to exhaustion at 15, 35, and 55% of individual maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), in the absence (control) and presence (concurrent) of a mental arithmetic task. Changes in muscular capacity were determined using endurance time, strength decline, electromyographic (EMG) fatigue indicators, muscle oxygenation, and heart rate measures. Muscular recovery was quantified through changes in strength and physiological responses. Mental workload was associated with shorter endurance times, specifically at 35% MVC, and greater strength decline. EMG and oxygenation measures showed similar changes during fatigue manifestation during concurrent conditions compared to the control, despite shorter endurance times. Moreover, decreased heart rate variability during concurrent demand conditions indicated increased mental stress. Although strength recovery was not influenced by mental workload, a slower heart rate recovery was observed after concurrent demand conditions. The findings from this study provide fundamental evidence that physical capacity (fatigability and recovery) is adversely affected by mental workload. Thus, it is critical to determine or evaluate occupational demands based on modified muscular capacity (due to mental workload) to reduce risk of WMSD development.

  18. Influence of fatigue, stress, muscle soreness and sleep on perceived exertion during submaximal effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Monoem; Chaouachi, Anis; Wong, Del P; Castagna, Carlo; Hambli, Mourad; Hue, Olivier; Chamari, Karim

    2013-07-02

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the Hooper's Index variations (i.e., self-ratings of fatigue, stress, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and sleep) on rating of perceived exertion during a 10 min submaximal exercise training session (RPE-10 min) and then check the stability and the internal consistency of RPE-10 min. Seventeen junior soccer players took part in this study. The individual Hooper's indices taken before each training session were correlated with RPE-10 min during a constant intensity and duration effort (10 min) using Pearson product moment correlation. Intraclass correlation (ICC) was used to assess the internal consistency of the RPE-10 min. All individual correlations between RPE-10 min and quality of sleep and quantity of fatigue, stress, and DOMS were non-significant (p>0.05). No significant correlations were resulted between RPE-10 min and Hooper's Index in all athletes. The ICC of RPE-10 min was 0.77 thus demonstrating internal consistency. The results of the present study demonstrated the objectivity and utility of RPE as a psychological tool for monitoring training during traditional soccer training. Therefore, the results of the present study suggest that fatigue, stress, DOMS and sleep are not major contributors of perceived exertion during traditional soccer training without excessive training loads. It seems that psychobiological factors other than fatigue, stress, DOMS and sleep may have mediated the 10 min exercise perceptual intensity. © 2013.

  19. A phenomenological model of muscle fatigue and the power-endurance relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A; Green, S

    2012-11-01

    The relationship between power output and the time that it can be sustained during exercise (i.e., endurance) at high intensities is curvilinear. Although fatigue is implicit in this relationship, there is little evidence pertaining to it. To address this, we developed a phenomenological model that predicts the temporal response of muscle power during submaximal and maximal exercise and which was based on the type, contractile properties (e.g., fatiguability), and recruitment of motor units (MUs) during exercise. The model was first used to predict power outputs during all-out exercise when fatigue is clearly manifest and for several distributions of MU type. The model was then used to predict times that different submaximal power outputs could be sustained for several MU distributions, from which several power-endurance curves were obtained. The model was simultaneously fitted to two sets of human data pertaining to all-out exercise (power-time profile) and submaximal exercise (power-endurance relationship), yielding a high goodness of fit (R(2) = 0.96-0.97). This suggested that this simple model provides an accurate description of human power output during submaximal and maximal exercise and that fatigue-related processes inherent in it account for the curvilinearity of the power-endurance relationship.

  20. Acute effects of muscle fatigue on anticipatory and reactive postural control in older individuals: a systematic review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Evan V; Garg, Hina; Dibble, Leland E

    2015-01-01

    Falls are the leading cause of traumatic brain injury and fractures and the No. 1 cause of emergency department visits by older adults. Although declines in muscle strength and sensory function contribute to increased falls in older adults, skeletal muscle fatigue is often overlooked as an additional contributor to fall risk. In an effort to increase awareness of the detrimental effects of skeletal muscle fatigue on postural control, we sought to systematically review research studies examining this issue. The specific purpose of this review was to provide a detailed assessment of how anticipatory and reactive postural control tasks are influenced by acute muscle fatigue in healthy older individuals. An extensive search was performed using the CINAHL, Scopus, PubMed, SPORTDiscus, and AgeLine databases for the period from inception of each database to June 2013. This systematic review used standardized search criteria and quality assessments via the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine Methodology to Develop Systematic Reviews of Treatment Interventions (2008 version, revision 1.2, AACPDM, Milwaukee, Wisconsin). A total of 334 citations were found. Six studies were selected for inclusion, whereas 328 studies were excluded from the analytical review. The majority of articles (5 of 6) utilized reactive postural control paradigms. All studies incorporated extrinsic measures of muscle fatigue, such as declines in maximal voluntary contraction or available active range of motion. The most common biomechanical postural control task outcomes were spatial measures, temporal measures, and end-points of lower extremity joint kinetics. On the basis of systematic review of relevant literature, it appears that muscle fatigue induces clear deteriorations in reactive postural control. A paucity of high-quality studies examining anticipatory postural control supports the need for further research in this area. These results should serve to heighten

  1. Disrupted Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dynamics, Mitophagy, and Biogenesis during Cancer Cachexia: A Role for Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderVeen, Brandon N.; Fix, Dennis K.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a hallmark of cancer cachexia in both patients and preclinical models. Cachexia is prevalent in roughly 80% of cancer patients and accounts for up to 20% of all cancer-related deaths. Proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β have been widely examined for their regulation of cancer cachexia. An established characteristic of cachectic skeletal muscle is a disrupted capacity for oxidative metabolism, which is thought to contribute to cancer patient fatigue, diminished metabolic function, and muscle mass loss. This review's primary objective is to highlight emerging evidence linking cancer-induced inflammation to the dysfunctional regulation of mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy, and biogenesis in cachectic muscle. The potential for either muscle inactivity or exercise to alter mitochondrial dysfunction during cancer cachexia will also be discussed. PMID:28785374

  2. Effect of vibration during fatiguing resistance exercise on subsequent muscle activity during maximal voluntary isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Jeffrey M; Porcari, John P; Scheunke, Mark D

    2004-11-01

    This investigation was designed to determine if vibration during fatiguing resistance exercise would alter associated patterns of muscle activity. A cross-over design was employed with 8 subjects completing a resistance exercise bout once with a vibrating dumbbell (V) (44 Hz, 3 mm displacement) and once without vibration (NV). For both exercise bouts, 10 sets were performed with a load that induced concentric muscle failure during the 10th repetition. The appropriate load for each set was determined during a pretest. Each testing session was separated by 1 week. Electromyography (EMG) was obtained from the biceps brachii muscle at 12 different time points during a maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) at a 170 degrees elbow angle after each set of the dumbbell exercise. The time points were as follows: pre (5 minutes before the resistance exercise bout), T1-T10 (immediately following each set of resistance exercise), and post (15 minutes after the resistance exercise bout). EMG was analyzed for median power frequency (MPF) and maximum (mEMG). NV resulted in a significant decrease in MPF at T1-T4 (p recruitment of high threshold motor units during fatiguing contractions. This may indicate the usage of vibration with resistance exercise as an effective tool for strength training athletes.

  3. Blunted angiogenesis and hypertrophy are associated with increased fatigue resistance and unchanged aerobic capacity in old overloaded mouse muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballak, Sam B; Busé-Pot, Tinelies; Harding, Peter J; Yap, Moi H; Deldicque, Louise; de Haan, Arnold; Jaspers, Richard T; Degens, Hans

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesize that the attenuated hypertrophic response in old mouse muscle is (1) partly due to a reduced capillarization and angiogenesis, which is (2) accompanied by a reduced oxidative capacity and fatigue resistance in old control and overloaded muscles, that (3) can be rescued by the antioxidant resveratrol. To investigate this, the hypertrophic response, capillarization, oxidative capacity, and fatigue resistance of m. plantaris were compared in 9- and 25-month-old non-treated and 25-month-old resveratrol-treated mice. Overload increased the local capillary-to-fiber ratio less in old (15 %) than in adult (59 %) muscle (P muscles of old mice had a higher succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity (P < 0.05) and a slower fiber type profile (P < 0.05), the isometric fatigue resistance was similar in 9- and 25-month-old mice. In both age groups, the fatigue resistance was increased to the same extent after overload (P < 0.01), without a significant change in SDH activity, but an increased capillary density (P < 0.05). Attenuated angiogenesis during overload may contribute to the attenuated hypertrophic response in old age. Neither was rescued by resveratrol supplementation. Changes in fatigue resistance with overload and aging were dissociated from changes in SDH activity, but paralleled those in capillarization. This suggests that capillarization plays a more important role in fatigue resistance than oxidative capacity.

  4. The effect of motor learning and fatigue on pre-activation of the lower extremity muscles during different jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamelska, Anna M; Kot, Bartosz

    2017-09-22

    The first step in identifying risk factors for injuries is to characterize the myoelectric activity of different muscles after ground contact, especially when fatigue is a limiting factor. This study aimed at: (a) recording the myoelectric activity of calf muscles after ground contact during different types of jumps and (b) investigating the effect of motor learning and fatigue on muscle pre-activation. Twenty four male students aged 24.3 ± 1.2 years old performed three different motor activities: (a) Jump from a box with counter landing (JCL) on 30x30 cm plate (b) Drop jump with bounce drop jump (BDJ) and (c) BDJ followed by a jump on 51-cm step. The surface EMG was used to examine the following muscles: m. tibialis anterior (TA), m. gastrocnemius medialis (GM), m. gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), and m. soleus (S). The measurements were taken during different jumps before and after motor learning and fatigue stimulus. There were significant differences in pre-activation for TA between JCL and BDJ followed by a jump under the influence of fatigue (p<0.05). The differences were observed also during BDJ between non-fatigued and fatigued conditions. There was a statistically significant difference for GL between BDJ pre- and post-movement motor learning and BDJ pre- and post-fatigue influence. Current results indicate that myoelectric activity of muscles during motor activities is different, and the effect of motor learning and fatigue was shown. Thus, it could be important in the injury prevention in sport.

  5. Dynamic fatigue of a machinable glass-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, K. K.; Magida, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    To assess the stress-corrosion susceptibility of a machinable glass-ceramic, its dynamic fatigue behavior was investigated by measuring its strength as a function of stress rate. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for components of this material. This material was concluded to have only moderate resistance (N = 30) to stress corrosion in ambient conditions. The effects of specimen size on strength were assessed for the material used in this study; it was concluded that the Weibull edge-flaw scaling law adequately describes the observed strength-size relation.

  6. Muscle Activation During Landing Before and After Fatigue in Individuals With or Without Chronic Ankle Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Kathryn A.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Gribble, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Ankle instability is a common condition in physically active individuals. It often occurs during a jump landing or lateral motion, particularly when participants are fatigued. Objective: To compare muscle activation during a lateral hop prefatigue and postfatigue in individuals with or without chronic ankle instability (CAI). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 32 physically active participants volunteered for the study. Sixteen participants with CAI (8 men, 8 women; age = 20.50 ± 2.00 years, height = 172.25 ± 10.87 cm, mass = 69.13 ± 13.31 kg) were matched with 16 control participants without CAI (8 men, 8 women; age = 22.00 ± 3.30 years, height = 170.50 ± 9.94 cm, mass = 69.63 ± 14.82 kg) by age, height, mass, sex, and affected side. Intervention(s): Electromyography of the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, gluteus medius, and gluteus maximus was measured before and after a functional fatigue protocol. Main Outcome Measure(s): Activation of 4 lower extremity muscles was measured 200 milliseconds before and after landing from a lateral hop. Results: We observed no interactions. The group main effects for the peroneus longus demonstrated higher muscle activation in the CAI group (52.89% ± 11.36%) than in the control group (41.12% ± 11.36%) just before landing the lateral hop (F1,30 = 8.58, P = .01), with a strong effect size (d = 1.01). The gluteus maximus also demonstrated higher muscle activation in the CAI group (45.55% ± 12.08%) than in the control group (36.81% ± 12.08%) just before landing the lateral hop (F1,30 = 4.19, P = .049), with a moderate effect size (d = 0.71). We observed a main effect for fatigue for the tibialis anterior, with postfatigue activation higher than prefatigue activation (F1,30 = 7.45, P = .01). No differences were present between groups for the gluteus medius. Conclusions: Our results support the presence of a centralized feed

  7. Asymmetry and Thigh Muscle Coactivity in Fatigued Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Reconstructed Elite Skiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Matthew J; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, Walter

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The acute effects of fatigue on functional interlimb asymmetry and quadriceps/hamstring muscle activity levels, including preparatory coactivation during squat jump takeoff and landing, were evaluated in elite alpine ski racers with/without anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR......). METHODS: Twenty-two elite ski racers (ACLR, n = 11; control, n = 11) performed an 80-s repeated squat jump test (jump test) on a dual force plate system with simultaneous EMG recordings in vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris. Asymmetry index (AI) and jump height of body...

  8. Contactless measurement of muscles fatigue by tracking facial feature points in a video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irani, Ramin; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    their exercises when the level of the fatigue might be dangerous for the patients. The current technology for measuring tiredness, like Electromyography (EMG), requires installing some sensors on the body. In some applications, like remote patient monitoring, this however might not be possible. To deal...... with such cases, in this paper we present a contactless method based on computer vision techniques to measure tiredness by detecting, tracking, and analyzing some facial feature points during the exercise. Experimental results on several test subjects and comparing them against ground truth data show...... that the proposed system can properly find the temporal point of tiredness of the muscles when the test subjects are doing physical exercises....

  9. Strategies for Rapid Muscle Fatigue Reduction during FES Exercise in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Abdul Wahab, Ahmad Khairi; Davis, Glen M

    2016-01-01

    Rapid muscle fatigue during functional electrical stimulation (FES)-evoked muscle contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) is a significant limitation to attaining health benefits of FES-exercise. Delaying the onset of muscle fatigue is often cited as an important goal linked to FES clinical efficacy. Although the basic concept of fatigue-resistance has a long history, recent advances in biomedical engineering, physiotherapy and clinical exercise science have achieved improved clinical benefits, especially for reducing muscle fatigue during FES-exercise. This review evaluated the methodological quality of strategies underlying muscle fatigue-resistance that have been used to optimize FES therapeutic approaches. The review also sought to synthesize the effectiveness of these strategies for persons with SCI in order to establish their functional impacts and clinical relevance. Published scientific literature pertaining to the reduction of FES-induced muscle fatigue was identified through searches of the following databases: Science Direct, Medline, IEEE Xplore, SpringerLink, PubMed and Nature, from the earliest returned record until June 2015. Titles and abstracts were screened to obtain 35 studies that met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. Following the evaluation of methodological quality (mean (SD), 50 (6) %) of the reviewed studies using the Downs and Black scale, the largest treatment effects reported to reduce muscle fatigue mainly investigated isometric contractions of limited functional and clinical relevance (n = 28). Some investigations (n = 13) lacked randomisation, while others were characterised by small sample sizes with low statistical power. Nevertheless, the clinical significance of emerging trends to improve fatigue-resistance during FES included (i) optimizing electrode positioning, (ii) fine-tuning of stimulation patterns and other FES parameters, (iii) adjustments to the mode and frequency of exercise training

  10. Strategies for Rapid Muscle Fatigue Reduction during FES Exercise in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morufu Olusola Ibitoye

    Full Text Available Rapid muscle fatigue during functional electrical stimulation (FES-evoked muscle contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI is a significant limitation to attaining health benefits of FES-exercise. Delaying the onset of muscle fatigue is often cited as an important goal linked to FES clinical efficacy. Although the basic concept of fatigue-resistance has a long history, recent advances in biomedical engineering, physiotherapy and clinical exercise science have achieved improved clinical benefits, especially for reducing muscle fatigue during FES-exercise. This review evaluated the methodological quality of strategies underlying muscle fatigue-resistance that have been used to optimize FES therapeutic approaches. The review also sought to synthesize the effectiveness of these strategies for persons with SCI in order to establish their functional impacts and clinical relevance.Published scientific literature pertaining to the reduction of FES-induced muscle fatigue was identified through searches of the following databases: Science Direct, Medline, IEEE Xplore, SpringerLink, PubMed and Nature, from the earliest returned record until June 2015. Titles and abstracts were screened to obtain 35 studies that met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review.Following the evaluation of methodological quality (mean (SD, 50 (6 % of the reviewed studies using the Downs and Black scale, the largest treatment effects reported to reduce muscle fatigue mainly investigated isometric contractions of limited functional and clinical relevance (n = 28. Some investigations (n = 13 lacked randomisation, while others were characterised by small sample sizes with low statistical power. Nevertheless, the clinical significance of emerging trends to improve fatigue-resistance during FES included (i optimizing electrode positioning, (ii fine-tuning of stimulation patterns and other FES parameters, (iii adjustments to the mode and frequency of exercise

  11. Strategies for Rapid Muscle Fatigue Reduction during FES Exercise in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Abdul Wahab, Ahmad Khairi; Davis, Glen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid muscle fatigue during functional electrical stimulation (FES)-evoked muscle contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) is a significant limitation to attaining health benefits of FES-exercise. Delaying the onset of muscle fatigue is often cited as an important goal linked to FES clinical efficacy. Although the basic concept of fatigue-resistance has a long history, recent advances in biomedical engineering, physiotherapy and clinical exercise science have achieved improved clinical benefits, especially for reducing muscle fatigue during FES-exercise. This review evaluated the methodological quality of strategies underlying muscle fatigue-resistance that have been used to optimize FES therapeutic approaches. The review also sought to synthesize the effectiveness of these strategies for persons with SCI in order to establish their functional impacts and clinical relevance. Methods Published scientific literature pertaining to the reduction of FES-induced muscle fatigue was identified through searches of the following databases: Science Direct, Medline, IEEE Xplore, SpringerLink, PubMed and Nature, from the earliest returned record until June 2015. Titles and abstracts were screened to obtain 35 studies that met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. Results Following the evaluation of methodological quality (mean (SD), 50 (6) %) of the reviewed studies using the Downs and Black scale, the largest treatment effects reported to reduce muscle fatigue mainly investigated isometric contractions of limited functional and clinical relevance (n = 28). Some investigations (n = 13) lacked randomisation, while others were characterised by small sample sizes with low statistical power. Nevertheless, the clinical significance of emerging trends to improve fatigue-resistance during FES included (i) optimizing electrode positioning, (ii) fine-tuning of stimulation patterns and other FES parameters, (iii) adjustments to the mode and

  12. Effect of ascorbic acid on fatigue of skeletal muscle fibres in long term cold exposed sprague dawley rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, A.; Ayub, M.

    2011-01-01

    On exposure to prolonged cold temperature, the body responds for effective heat production both by shivering and non-shivering thermo genesis. Cold exposure increases the production of reactive oxygen species which influence the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca/sup ++/ release from the skeletal muscles and affect their contractile properties. The role of ascorbic acid supplementation on force of contraction during fatigue of cold exposed skeletal muscles was evaluated in this study. Method: Ninety healthy, male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups of control, cold exposed, and cold exposed with ascorbic acid 500 mg/L supplementation mixed in drinking water. Group II and III were given cold exposure by keeping their cages in ice-filled tubs for 1 hr/day for one month. After one month, the extensor digitorum longus muscle was dissected out and force of contraction during fatigue in the skeletal muscle fibres was analysed on a computerised data acquisition system. Results: The cold exposed group showed a significant delay in the force of contraction during fatigue of skeletal muscle fibres compared to control group. Group III showed easy fatigability and a better force of contraction than the cold exposed group. Conclusions: Ascorbic acid increases the force of contraction and decreases resistance to fatigue in the muscles exposed to chronic cold. (author)

  13. Liver overload in Brazilian triathletes after half-ironman competition is related muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger-Mendonça, Marcos; Bielavsky, Monica; Barbosa, Fernanda C R

    2008-01-01

    Triathlon competition is dependent on the athletes' ability to perform each discipline at optimal time, without excessive fatigue influencing the next one. Determine the effects of a long distance triathlon on biochemistry parameters related to liver function. Blood samples from six athletes were collected before (T = 0) and immediately after the triathlon competition (T = 1). AST, ALT and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) values were assessed. Significant changes after triathlon competition were found for AST and ALP and no significant changes were found for ALT over time. A series of metabolically alterations, mainly related to energy production and also to muscle and skeletal adaptations occurs during and after strenuous exercise. The altered status of those metabolical changes cannot directly reflect the intensity of any possible muscular or hepatic damage or overload and elevated AST/ALT ratio is better associated to skeletal muscle lesion during competition.

  14. Subcellular distribution of glycogen and decreased tetanic Ca2+ in fatigued single intact mouse muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Cheng, Arthur J; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In skeletal muscle fibres, glycogen has been shown to be stored at different subcellular locations: (i) between the myofibrils (intermyofibrillar); (ii) within the myofibrils (intramyofibrillar); and (iii) subsarcolemmal. Of these, intramyofibrillar glycogen has been implied as a critical regulator...... of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release. The aim of the present study was to test directly how the decrease in cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) during repeated tetanic contractions relates to the subcellular glycogen distribution. Single fibres of mouse flexor digitorum brevis muscles were fatigued with 70 Hz...... in tetanic [Ca(2+)]i, and hence force, is accompanied by major reductions in inter- and intramyofibrillar glycogen. The stronger correlation between decreased tetanic [Ca(2+)]i and reduced intramyofibrillar glycogen implies that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release critically depends on energy supply from...

  15. Effects of Fatigue on Frontal Plane Knee Motion, Muscle Activity, and Ground Reaction Forces In Men and Women During Landing

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Michael P.; Sizer, Phillip S.; James, C. Roger

    2009-01-01

    Women tear their Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) 2-8 times more frequently than men. Frontal plane knee motion can produce a pathological load in the ACL. During a state of fatigue the muscles surrounding the knee joint may lose the ability to protect the joint during sudden deceleration while landing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of fatigue and gender on frontal plane knee motion, EMG amplitudes, and GRF magnitudes during drop- jump landing. Pretest-posttest comp...

  16. The Effect of Pedaling and Fatigue on Changes of Knee Muscles Co-contraction During Running in Triathletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Anbarian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cycling fatigue on co-activation of knee muscles during running in novice triathletes. Methods: Twelve novice male triathletes aged 23.7±2.1 years participated in this quasi experimental study. Surface electromyographic activity from gastrocnemius, rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris and semitendinosus were recorded during support and non-support phases of running before and after cycling fatigue protocol. General and directed co-activation of the knee muscles were calculated. Paired t-test was used to analyze the data(p<0.05. Results: General co-activation was significantly reduced in propulsion sub-phase, total support and non-support phases after fatigue (p=0.001, but there were not any differences in heel contact and midstance sub-phases. Fatigue only altered directed co-activation of medial and lateral knee muscles during heel contact sub-phase (p=0.034. Extensor and flexor directed co-activation during non-support phase of running significantly decreased after fatigue (p=0.011. Conclusion: Changes in the co-activation during running after cycling fatigue can alter running pattern and reduce the knee function consequently, causing injuries to the lower limbs in novice triathletes.

  17. Combined effect of repetitive work and cold on muscle function and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksa, Juha; Ducharme, Michel B; Rintamäki, Hannu

    2002-01-01

    This study compared the effect of repetitive work in thermoneutral and cold conditions on forearm muscle electromyogram (EMG) and fatigue. We hypothesize that cold and repetitive work together cause higher EMG activity and fatigue than repetitive work only, thus creating a higher risk for overuse injuries. Eight men performed six 20-min work bouts at 25 degrees C (W-25) and at 5 degrees C while exposed to systemic (C-5) and local cooling (LC-5). The work was wrist flexion-extension exercise at 10% maximal voluntary contraction. The EMG activity of the forearm flexors and extensors was higher during C-5 (31 and 30%, respectively) and LC-5 (25 and 28%, respectively) than during W-25 (P forearm flexors at the end of W-25 was 15%. The corresponding values at the end of C-5 and LC-5 were 37% (P < 0.05 in relation to W-25) and 20%, respectively. Thus repetitive work in the cold causes higher EMG activity and fatigue than repetitive work in thermoneutral conditions.

  18. Hamstring Muscle Fatigue and Central Motor Output during a Simulated Soccer Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Paul W. M.; Lovell, Ric; Jeppesen, Gitte K.; Andersen, Kristoffer; Siegler, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine changes in hamstring muscle fatigue and central motor output during a 90-minute simulated soccer match, and the concomitant changes in hamstring maximal torque and rate of torque development. Method Eight amateur male soccer players performed a 90-minute simulated soccer match, with measures performed at the start of and every 15-minutes during each half. Maximal torque (Nm) and rate of torque development (RTD; Nm.s–1) were calculated from maximal isometric knee flexor contractions performed at 10° of flexion. Hamstring peripheral fatigue was assessed from changes in the size and shape of the resting twitch (RT). Hamstring central motor output was quantified from voluntary activation (%) and normalized biceps femoris (BF) and medial hamstrings (MH) electromyographic amplitudes (EMG/M). Results Maximal torque was reduced at 45-minutes by 7.6±9.4% (phamstring peripheral fatigue. Conclusion Centrally mediated reductions in maximal torque and rate of torque development provide insight into factors that may explain hamstring injury risk during soccer. Of particular interest were early reductions during the first-half of hamstring rate of torque development, and the decline in maximal EMG/M of biceps femoris in the latter stages of the half. These are important findings that may help explain why the hamstrings are particularly vulnerable to strain injury during soccer. PMID:25047547

  19. Effects of Mental Fatigue on Physical Endurance Performance and Muscle Activation Are Attenuated by Monetary Incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Denver M Y; Bray, Steven R

    2017-12-01

    Physical performance is impaired following cognitive control exertion. Incentives can ameliorate adverse carryover effects of cognitive control exertion but have not been investigated for physical endurance. This study examined the effect of monetary incentives on physical performance and muscle activation following exposure to a mentally fatiguing, cognitive control task. Participants (N = 82) performed two isometric endurance handgrip trials separated by a 12-min cognitive control manipulation using a 2 (high cognitive control [HCC]/low cognitive control [LCC]) × 2 (incentive/no incentive) design. Mental fatigue was significantly higher in the HCC conditions. Performance decreased in the HCC/no incentive condition but was unaffected in the HCC/incentive condition, which did not differ from the low cognitive control conditions. Electromyography data revealed increased muscle activation in the HCC/no incentive condition, which was also attenuated in the HCC/incentive condition. Findings show that incentives counteract the negative effects of HCC on physical endurance and alter central drive to motor units.

  20. The role of capsaicin-sensitive muscle afferents in fatigue-induced modulation of the monosynaptic reflex in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettorossi, V E; Della Torre, G; Bortolami, R; Brunetti, O

    1999-03-01

    1. The role of group III and IV afferent fibres of the lateral gastrocnemious muscle (LG) in modulating the homonymous monosynaptic reflex was investigated during muscle fatigue in spinalized rats. 2. Muscle fatigue was induced by a series of increasing tetanic electrical stimuli (85 Hz, 600 ms) delivered to the LG muscle nerve. Series consisted of increasing train numbers from 1 to 60. 3. Potentials from the spinal cord LG motor pool and from the ventral root were recorded in response to proprioceptive afferent stimulation and analysed before and during tetanic muscle activations. Both the pre- and postsynaptic waves showed an initial enhancement and, after a '12-train' series, an increasing inhibition. 4. The enhancement of the responses to muscle fatiguing stimulation disappeared after L3-L6 dorsal root section, while a partial reflex inhibition was still present. Conversely, after section of the corresponding ventral root, there was only a reduction in the inhibitory effect. 5. The monosynaptic reflex was also studied in animals in which a large number of group III and IV muscle afferents were eliminated by injecting capsaicin (10 mM) into the LG muscle. As a result of capsaicin treatment, the fatigue-induced inhibition of the pre- and postsynaptic waves disappeared, while the response enhancement remained. 6. We concluded that the monosynaptic reflex inhibition, but not the enhancement, was mediated by those group III and IV muscle afferents that are sensitive to the toxic action of capsaicin. The afferents that are responsible for the response enhancement enter the spinal cord through the dorsal root, while those responsible for the inhibition enter the spinal cord through both the ventral and dorsal roots.

  1. Assessment of Whole Body and Local Muscle Fatigue Using Electromyography and a Perceived Exertion Scale for Squat Lifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ahmad

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This research study aims at addressing the paradigm of whole body fatigue and local muscle fatigue detection for squat lifting. For this purpose, a comparison was made between perceived exertion with the heart rate and normalized mean power frequency (NMPF of eight major muscles. The sample consisted of 25 healthy males (age: 30 ± 2.2 years. Borg’s CR-10 scale was used for perceived exertion for two segments of the body (lower and upper and the whole body. The lower extremity of the body was observed to be dominant compared to the upper and whole body in perceived response. First mode of principal component analysis (PCA was obtained through the covariance matrix for the eight muscles for 25 subjects for NMPF of eight muscles. The diagonal entries in the covariance matrix were observed for each muscle. The muscle with the highest absolute magnitude was observed across all the 25 subjects. The medial deltoid and the rectus femoris muscles were observed to have the highest frequency for each PCA across 25 subjects. The rectus femoris, having the highest counts in all subjects, validated that the lower extremity dominates the sense of whole body fatigue during squat lifting. The findings revealed that it is significant to take into account the relation between perceived and measured effort that can help prevent musculoskeletal disorders in repetitive occupational tasks.

  2. Assessment of Whole Body and Local Muscle Fatigue Using Electromyography and a Perceived Exertion Scale for Squat Lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Imran; Kim, Jung-Yong

    2018-04-18

    This research study aims at addressing the paradigm of whole body fatigue and local muscle fatigue detection for squat lifting. For this purpose, a comparison was made between perceived exertion with the heart rate and normalized mean power frequency (NMPF) of eight major muscles. The sample consisted of 25 healthy males (age: 30 ± 2.2 years). Borg’s CR-10 scale was used for perceived exertion for two segments of the body (lower and upper) and the whole body. The lower extremity of the body was observed to be dominant compared to the upper and whole body in perceived response. First mode of principal component analysis (PCA) was obtained through the covariance matrix for the eight muscles for 25 subjects for NMPF of eight muscles. The diagonal entries in the covariance matrix were observed for each muscle. The muscle with the highest absolute magnitude was observed across all the 25 subjects. The medial deltoid and the rectus femoris muscles were observed to have the highest frequency for each PCA across 25 subjects. The rectus femoris, having the highest counts in all subjects, validated that the lower extremity dominates the sense of whole body fatigue during squat lifting. The findings revealed that it is significant to take into account the relation between perceived and measured effort that can help prevent musculoskeletal disorders in repetitive occupational tasks.

  3. Acute fatigue impairs neuromuscular activity of anterior cruciate ligament-agonist muscles in female team handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebis, M K; Bencke, J; Andersen, L L; Alkjaer, T; Suetta, C; Mortensen, P; Kjaer, M; Aagaard, P

    2011-12-01

    In sports, like team handball, fatigue has been associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. While effects of fatigue on muscle function are commonly assessed during maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC), such measurements may not relate to the muscle function during match play. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of muscle fatigue induced by a simulated handball match on neuromuscular strategy during a functional sidecutting movement, associated with the incidence of ACL injury. Fourteen female team handball players were tested for neuromuscular activity [electromyography (EMG)] during a sidecutting maneuver on a force plate, pre and post a simulated handball match. MVC was obtained during maximal isometric quadriceps and hamstring contraction. The simulated handball match consisted of exercises mimicking handball match activity. Whereas the simulated handball match induced a decrease in MVC strength for both the quadriceps and hamstring muscles (Phandball match play. Thus, screening procedures should involve functional movements to reveal specific fatigue-induced deficits in ACL-agonist muscle activation during high-risk phases of match play. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Changes in motor unit behavior following isometric fatigue of the first dorsal interosseous muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymer, William Z.; Lowery, Madeleine M.; Suresh, Nina L.

    2015-01-01

    The neuromuscular strategies employed to compensate for fatigue-induced muscle force deficits are not clearly understood. This study utilizes surface electromyography (sEMG) together with recordings of a population of individual motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) to investigate potential compensatory alterations in motor unit (MU) behavior immediately following a sustained fatiguing contraction and after a recovery period. EMG activity was recorded during abduction of the first dorsal interosseous in 12 subjects at 20% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), before and directly after a 30% MVC fatiguing contraction to task failure, with additional 20% MVC contractions following a 10-min rest. The amplitude, duration and mean firing rate (MFR) of MUAPs extracted with a sEMG decomposition system were analyzed, together with sEMG root-mean-square (RMS) amplitude and median frequency (MPF). MUAP duration and amplitude increased immediately postfatigue and were correlated with changes to sEMG MPF and RMS, respectively. After 10 min, MUAP duration and sEMG MPF recovered to prefatigue values but MUAP amplitude and sEMG RMS remained elevated. MU MFR and recruitment thresholds decreased postfatigue and recovered following rest. The increase in MUAP and sEMG amplitude likely reflects recruitment of larger MUs, while recruitment compression is an additional compensatory strategy directly postfatigue. Recovery of MU MFR in parallel with MUAP duration suggests a possible role for metabolically sensitive afferents in MFR depression postfatigue. This study provides insight into fatigue-induced neuromuscular changes by examining the properties of a large population of concurrently recorded single MUs and outlines possible compensatory strategies involving alterations in MU recruitment and MFR. PMID:25761952

  5. Dynamic Penile Corpora Cavernosa Reconstruction Using Bilateral Innervated Gracilis Muscles: A Preclinical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhuming; Liu, Liqiang; Xue, Bingjian; Fan, Jincai; Chen, Wenlin; Liu, Zheng

    2018-03-07

    Prosthesis-assisted penile reconstruction has been performed extensively to restore a cosmetically acceptable phallus. However, a large number of patients will undergo revision surgery for various prosthesis-related complications. To develop a 1-stage prosthesis-free dynamic cavernosa reconstruction method using bilateral innervated gracilis muscles and to investigate the feasibility and reliability of the surgical design. 10 fresh cadavers were dissected to assess the availability of bilateral gracilis muscles for functional cavernosa rebuilding. 11 mongrel female dogs were involved in the penile reconstruction surgery. The neophallus consisted of bilateral gracilis muscles as the neo-cavernosa, a right gracilis skin flap as the neourethra, and a lower abdominal flap with an anterior rectus sheath as the skin envelope and neo-tunica albuginea. The function and structure of the neo-phalli were assessed 7 months postoperatively. The neurovascular pedicle length of the gracilis muscles and the volume of the gracilis venter musculi were measured in the cadaveric investigation. The average dimensions of the canine neo-phalli at rest and during electrostimulated erection were obtained and the muscular fatigue-resistant curve was drawn. Histologic evaluations also were performed. The neurovascular pedicle length and volume of the gracilis muscles were sufficient to yield a nearly normal appearance of the neo-cavernosa in the cadaveric and animal studies. The muscular fatigue-resistant curve demonstrated adequate length, stiffness, and duration of erection of the neo-phalli to accomplish normal coitus. Histologic evaluations showed an intact neourethra and nearly normal muscle structure in the inner layer of the canine neo-cavernosa, except for significantly increased amount of collagen fibers and type I/III collagen ratio in the outer layer of the neo-cavernosa. The percentage of type II (fatigue-prone) muscle fibers did not change significantly. Our preclinical

  6. Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sleep. Fatigue is a lack of energy and motivation. Drowsiness and apathy (a feeling of not caring ... Call your provider right away if you have any of the following: Confusion or dizziness Blurred vision Little or no urine, or recent ...

  7. Electrically induced contraction levels of the quadriceps femoris muscles in healthy men: the effects of three patterns of burst-modulated alternating current and volitional muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michael G; Broughton, Alex J; Larsen, Ben R; Dinius, Josh W; Cimbura, Mac J; Davis, Matthew

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare electrically induced contraction levels produced by three patterns of alternating current in fatigued and nonfatigued skeletal muscles. Eighteen male volunteers without health conditions, with a mean (SD) age of 24.9 (3.4) yrs were randomly exposed to a fatiguing volitional isometric quadriceps contraction and one of three patterns of 2.5-KHz alternating current; two were modulated at 50 bursts per second (10% burst duty cycle with five cycles per burst and 90% burst duty cycle with 45 cycles per burst), and one pattern was modulated at 100 bursts per second (10% burst duty cycle with 2.5 cycles per burst). The electrically induced contraction levels produced by the three patterns of electrical stimulation were compared before and after the fatiguing contraction. The 10% burst duty cycles produced 42.9% (95% confidence interval, 29.1%-56.7%) and 32.1% (95% confidence interval, 18.2%-45.9%) more muscle force (P stronger muscle contractions. Furthermore, the stimulation patterns had no influence on the difference in muscle force before and after the fatiguing quadriceps contraction. Consequently, for clinical applications in which high forces are desired, the patterns using the 10% burst duty cycle may be helpful.

  8. Incubating Isolated Mouse EDL Muscles with Creatine Improves Force Production and Twitch Kinetics in Fatigue Due to Reduction in Ionic Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Stewart I.; Greenaway, Bronwen; Chan, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background Creatine supplementation can improve performance during high intensity exercise in humans and improve muscle strength in certain myopathies. In this present study, we investigated the direct effects of acute creatine incubation on isolated mouse fast-twitch EDL muscles, and examined how these effects change with fatigue. Methods and Results The extensor digitorum longus muscle from mice aged 12–14 weeks was isolated and stimulated with field electrodes to measure force characteristics in 3 different states: (i) before fatigue; (ii) immediately after a fatigue protocol; and (iii) after recovery. These served as the control measurements for the muscle. The muscle was then incubated in a creatine solution and washed. The measurement of force characteristics in the 3 different states was then repeated. In un-fatigued muscle, creatine incubation increased the maximal tetanic force. In fatigued muscle, creatine treatment increased the force produced at all frequencies of stimulation. Incubation also increased the rate of twitch relaxation and twitch contraction in fatigued muscle. During repetitive fatiguing stimulation, creatine-treated muscles took 55.1±9.5% longer than control muscles to lose half of their original force. Measurement of weight changes showed that creatine incubation increased EDL muscle mass by 7%. Conclusion Acute creatine application improves force production in isolated fast-twitch EDL muscle, and these improvements are particularly apparent when the muscle is fatigued. One likely mechanism for this improvement is an increase in Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile proteins as a result of ionic strength decreases following creatine incubation. PMID:21850234

  9. Incubating isolated mouse EDL muscles with creatine improves force production and twitch kinetics in fatigue due to reduction in ionic strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart I Head

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Creatine supplementation can improve performance during high intensity exercise in humans and improve muscle strength in certain myopathies. In this present study, we investigated the direct effects of acute creatine incubation on isolated mouse fast-twitch EDL muscles, and examined how these effects change with fatigue. METHODS AND RESULTS: The extensor digitorum longus muscle from mice aged 12-14 weeks was isolated and stimulated with field electrodes to measure force characteristics in 3 different states: (i before fatigue; (ii immediately after a fatigue protocol; and (iii after recovery. These served as the control measurements for the muscle. The muscle was then incubated in a creatine solution and washed. The measurement of force characteristics in the 3 different states was then repeated. In un-fatigued muscle, creatine incubation increased the maximal tetanic force. In fatigued muscle, creatine treatment increased the force produced at all frequencies of stimulation. Incubation also increased the rate of twitch relaxation and twitch contraction in fatigued muscle. During repetitive fatiguing stimulation, creatine-treated muscles took 55.1±9.5% longer than control muscles to lose half of their original force. Measurement of weight changes showed that creatine incubation increased EDL muscle mass by 7%. CONCLUSION: Acute creatine application improves force production in isolated fast-twitch EDL muscle, and these improvements are particularly apparent when the muscle is fatigued. One likely mechanism for this improvement is an increase in Ca(2+ sensitivity of contractile proteins as a result of ionic strength decreases following creatine incubation.

  10. Modeling the dynamic characteristics of pneumatic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, D B; Repperger, D W; Phillips, C A; Bandry, G

    2003-03-01

    A pneumatic muscle (PM) system was studied to determine whether a three-element model could describe its dynamics. As far as the authors are aware, this model has not been used to describe the dynamics of PM. A new phenomenological model consists of a contractile (force-generating) element, spring element, and damping element in parallel. The PM system was investigated using an apparatus that allowed precise and accurate actuation pressure (P) control by a linear servo-valve. Length change of the PM was measured by a linear potentiometer. Spring and damping element functions of P were determined by a static perturbation method at several constant P values. These results indicate that at constant P, PM behaves as a spring and damper in parallel. The contractile element function of P was determined by the response to a step input in P, using values of spring and damping elements from the perturbation study. The study showed that the resulting coefficient functions of the three-element model describe the dynamic response to the step input of P accurately, indicating that the static perturbation results can be applied to the dynamic case. This model is further validated by accurately predicting the contraction response to a triangular P waveform. All three elements have pressure-dependent coefficients for pressure P in the range 207 < or = P < or = 621 kPa (30 < or = P < or = 90 psi). Studies with a step decrease in P (relaxation of the PM) indicate that the damping element coefficient is smaller during relaxation than contraction.

  11. Effects of a Finger Tapping Fatiguing Task on M1-Intracortical Inhibition and Central Drive to the Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, Antonio; Madinabeitia-Mancebo, Elena; Cudeiro, Javier; Arias, Pablo

    2018-06-19

    The central drive to the muscle reduces when muscle force wanes during sustained MVC, and this is generally considered the neurophysiological footprint of central fatigue. The question is if force loss and the failure of central drive to the muscle are responsible mechanisms of fatigue induced by un-resisted repetitive movements. In various experimental blocks, we validated a 3D-printed hand-fixation system permitting the execution of finger-tapping and maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). Subsequently, we checked the suitability of the system to test the level of central drive to the muscle and developed an algorithm to test it at the MVC force plateau. Our main results show that the maximum rate of finger-tapping dropped at 30 s, while the excitability of inhibitory M1-intracortical circuits and corticospinal excitability increased (all by approximately 15%). Furthermore, values obtained immediately after finger-tapping showed that MVC force and the level of central drive to the muscle remained unchanged. Our data suggest that force and central drive to the muscle are not determinants of fatigue induced by short-lasting un-resisted repetitive finger movements, even in the presence of increased inhibition of the motor cortex. According to literature, this profile might be different in longer-lasting, more complex and/or resisted repetitive movements.

  12. THE ROLE OF LEG AND TRUNK MUSCLES PROPRIOCEPTION ON STATIC AND DYNAMIC POSTURAL CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEYED Hossein Hosseinimehr

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The proprioception information is a prerequisite for balance, body’s navigation system, and the movement coordinator. Due to changes between the angles of ankle, knee, and hip joints the aforementioned information are important in the coordination of the limbs and postural balance. The aim of this study was to investigate therole of leg and trunk muscles proprioception on static and dynamic postural control. Thirty males students of physical education and sport sciences (age =21.23 ± 2.95 years, height = 170.4 ± 5.1 cm, and weight = 70.7 ± 5.6 kg participated in this study volunteered. Vibration (100HZ was used to disturb of proprioception. Vibrationoperated on leg muscle (gasterocnemius and trunk muscles (erector spine muscle, at L1 level. Leg stance time and Star Excursion Balance Test were used for evaluation of static and dynamic postural control respectively.Subjects performed pre and post (with operated vibration leg stance time and star excursion balance test. Paired sample test used for investigation the effect of vibration on leg and trunk muscles in static and dynamic postural control. Result of this study showed in static postural control, there is no significant difference between pre and post test (operated vibration in leg and trunk muscles (p≤0.05. In contrast there is significant difference indynamic postural control between pre and post test in leg muscles in 8 directions of star excursion balance test (p≤0.05 while there is only significant difference in trunk muscle in antrolateral and lateral of star excursion balance test (p≤0.05. During physical training such conditions like fatigue and injury can disturbproprioceptions’ information. Thus, due to the importance of this information we recommend that coaches'additionally specific trainings any sport used specific exercises to enhance the proprioception information

  13. A study of fatigue in rabbit skeletal muscle by in vivo 31P MRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Keiko; Miura, Iwao

    1989-01-01

    Energy metabolism during exercise and recovery process of rabbit skeletal muscle was obserbed by in vivo 31 P MRS. The small value of the ratio of the intensities between inorganic phosphate and phosphocreatine at rest indicated that the observed moiety of muscle had high fast-twitch fiber content. More than half of ATP and almost all of phosphocreatine were depleted by electric stimulation at 4Hz. The extreme intracellular pH was 5.9. The recovery from this metabolic state was very slow, and only a small amount of ATP was resynthesized after 40 minutes of recovery. These phenomena show the characteristic features of the energy metabolism in the fatigue of fast-twitch muscle. The metabolic state as indicated by the intensity of phosphocreatine and intracellular pH during exercise was not always parallel to contraction power measured by straingauge. Two inorganic phosphate peaks were observed, which are regarded as the signals from fast-twitch fiber and slow-twitch fiber from their pH values. The ratios of these two peaks were different between 1Hz, 2Hz, and 4Hz electric stimulation. We conclude that we are observing the different recruitment of fiber types at different exercise level in vivo. (author)

  14. Acute fatigue-induced changes in muscle mechanical properties and neuromuscular activity in elite handball players following a handball match

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Michalsik, L B; Madsen, Klavs

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the acute fatigue development in muscle mechanical properties and neuromuscular activity in response to handball match play. Male elite handball players (n = 10) were tested before and after a simulated handball match for maximal isometric strength...... work (6.8%, P handball match play, which...

  15. Temperature effect on the rates of isometric force development and relaxation in the fresh and fatigued human adductor pollicis muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C J; Jones, D A; Sargeant, A J; de Haan, A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of temperature on the rates of isometric force development and relaxation in electrically activated fresh and fatigued human adductor pollicis muscle. Following immersion of the lower arm for 20 min in water baths of four different

  16. Fatigue Responses in Various Muscle Groups in Well-Trained Competitive Male Players after a Simulated Soccer Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fransson, Dan; Vigh-Larsen, Jeppe Foged; Fatouros, Ioannis G

    2018-01-01

    We examined the degree of post-game fatigue and the recovery pattern in various leg and upper-body muscle groups after a simulated soccer game. Well-trained competitive male soccer players (n = 12) participated in the study. The players completed the Copenhagen Soccer Test, a 2 x 45 min simulated...

  17. The Eligibility of Surface Electromyography in the Assessment of Paraspinal Muscles Fatigue Following Interventions in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Nahid Rahmani; Mohammad Ali Mohseni-Bandpei; Iraj Abdollahi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of paraspinal muscles endurance in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) seems to be of great importance. Many studies demonstrated that surface electromyography has merit to assess muscle fatigue using frequency spectrum. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the eligibility of the surface electromyography in the assessment of paraspinal muscles fatigue changes following different interventions in patients with chronic LBP. Materials & Methods: ...

  18. Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation on the Fatigue and Quality of Life Among Iranian Aging Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hassanpour-Dehkordi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the elderly population is increasing rapidly in developing countries which may decrease the physical activity and exercise and in turn could affect the elderly’s quality of life, this study aimed to investigate the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on the elderly’s quality of life in Iran. In a randomized clinical trial, participants were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. For the intervention group, muscular progressive relaxation was run three days per week for three months (totally 36 sessions. In relaxation, a patient contract a group of his/her muscles in each step and relaxes them after five seconds and finally loosens all muscles and takes five deep breaths. Each session lasts for 45 minutes. The instrument of data gathering consisted of questionnaires on individual’s demographic data and quality of life SF-36. After intervention, quality of life increased significantly in the patients undergoing muscular progressive relaxation and fatigue severity decreased significantly in the intervention group compared to prior to intervention. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference in mean score of physical performance, restricted activity after physical problem, energy, socially function, physical pain, overall hygiene, and quality of life between intervention and control groups. By implementing regular and continuous progressive muscle relaxation, quality of life could be increased in different dimensions in the elderly and the context could be provided to age healthily and enjoy higher health and autonomy. Therefore, all of the therapeutic staffs are recommended to implement this plan to promote the elderly’s quality of life.

  19. Impaired sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release rate after fatiguing stimulation in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Sjøgaard, G; Madsen, Klavs

    2000-01-01

    during the first 0.5-1 h the metabolic state recovered to resting levels, and a slow phase from 1-3 h characterized by a rather slow recovery of the mechanical properties. The recovery of SR Ca(2+) release rate was closely correlated to +dF/dt during the slow phase of recovery (r(2) = 0.51; P ... to 66% that persisted for 1 h, followed by a gradual recovery to 87% of prefatigue release rate at 3 h recovery. Tetanic force and rate of force development (+dF/dt) and relaxation (-dF/dt) were depressed by approximately 80% after stimulation. Recovery occurred in two phases: an initial phase, in which......The purpose of the study was to characterize the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function and contractile properties before and during recovery from fatigue in the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle. Fatiguing contractions (60 Hz, 150 ms/s for 4 min) induced a reduction of the SR Ca(2+) release rate...

  20. Strain in shock-loaded skeletal muscle and the time scale of muscular wobbling mass dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Kasper B; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Siebert, Tobias

    2017-10-16

    In terrestrial locomotion, muscles undergo damped oscillations in response to limb impacts with the ground. Muscles are also actuators that generate mechanical power to allow locomotion. The corresponding elementary contractile process is the work stroke of an actin-myosin cross-bridge, which may be forcibly detached by superposed oscillations. By experimentally emulating rat leg impacts, we found that full activity and non-fatigue must meet to possibly prevent forcible cross-bridge detachment. Because submaximal muscle force represents the ordinary locomotor condition, our results show that forcible, eccentric cross-bridge detachment is a common, physiological process even during isometric muscle contractions. We also calculated the stiffnesses of the whole muscle-tendon complex and the fibre material separately, as well as Young's modulus of the latter: 1.8 MPa and 0.75 MPa for fresh, fully active and passive fibres, respectively. Our inferred Young's modulus of the tendon-aponeurosis complex suggests that stiffness in series to the fibre material is determined by the elastic properties of the aponeurosis region, rather than the tendon material. Knowing these stiffnesses and the muscle mass, the complex' eigenfrequency for responses to impacts can be quantified, as well as the size-dependency of this time scale of muscular wobbling mass dynamics.

  1. The influence of mental fatigue and motivation on neural network dynamics; an EEG coherence study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorist, Monicque M.; Bezdan, Eniko; Caat, Michael ten; Span, Mark M.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to examine the effects of mental fatigue and motivation on neural network dynamics activated during task switching. Mental fatigue was induced by 2 h of continuous performance; after which subjects were motivated by using social comparison and monetary reward as

  2. Evoked EMG versus Muscle Torque during Fatiguing Functional Electrical Stimulation-Evoked Muscle Contractions and Short-Term Recovery in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estigoni, Eduardo H.; Fornusek, Che; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Smith, Richard M.; Davis, Glen M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether the relationship between muscle torque and m-waves remained constant after short recovery periods, between repeated intervals of isometric muscle contractions induced by functional electrical stimulation (FES). Eight subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI) were recruited for the study. All subjects had their quadriceps muscles group stimulated during three sessions of isometric contractions separated by 5 min of recovery. The evoked-electromyographic (eEMG) signals, as well as the produced torque, were synchronously acquired during the contractions and during short FES bursts applied during the recovery intervals. All analysed m-wave variables changed progressively throughout the three contractions, even though the same muscle torque was generated. The peak to peak amplitude (PtpA), and the m-wave area (Area) were significantly increased, while the time between the stimulus artefact and the positive peak (PosT) were substantially reduced when the muscles became fatigued. In addition, all m-wave variables recovered faster and to a greater extent than did torque after the recovery intervals. We concluded that rapid recovery intervals between FES-evoked exercise sessions can radically interfere in the use of m-waves as a proxy for torque estimation in individuals with SCI. This needs to be further investigated, in addition to seeking a better understanding of the mechanisms of muscle fatigue and recovery. PMID:25479324

  3. Phospholemman is not required for the acute stimulation of Na+-K+-ATPase α2-activity during skeletal muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Palanikumar; Radzyukevich, Tatiana L.; Hakim Javadi, Hesamedin; Stiner, Cory A.; Landero Figueroa, Julio A.; Lingrel, Jerry B

    2015-01-01

    The Na+-K+-ATPase α2-isoform in skeletal muscle is rapidly stimulated during muscle use and plays a critical role in fatigue resistance. The acute mechanisms that stimulate α2-activity are not completely known. This study examines whether phosphorylation of phospholemman (PLM/FXYD1), a regulatory subunit of Na+-K+-ATPase, plays a role in the acute stimulation of α2 in working muscles. Mice lacking PLM (PLM KO) have a normal content of the α2-subunit and show normal exercise capacity, in contrast to the greatly reduced exercise capacity of mice that lack α2 in the skeletal muscles. Nerve-evoked contractions in vivo did not induce a change in total PLM or PLM phosphorylated at Ser63 or Ser68, in either WT or PLM KO. Isolated muscles of PLM KO mice maintain contraction and resist fatigue as well as wild type (WT). Rb+ transport by the α2-Na+-K+-ATPase is stimulated to the same extent in contracting WT and contracting PLM KO muscles. Phosphorylation of sarcolemmal membranes prepared from WT but not PLM KO skeletal muscles stimulates the activity of both α1 and α2 in a PLM-dependent manner. The stimulation occurs by an increase in Na+ affinity without significant change in Vmax and is more effective for α1 than α2. These results demonstrate that phosphorylation of PLM is capable of stimulating the activity of both isozymes in skeletal muscle; however, contractile activity alone is not sufficient to induce PLM phosphorylation. Importantly, acute stimulation of α2, sufficient to support exercise and oppose fatigue, does not require PLM or its phosphorylation. PMID:26468207

  4. [Application of near infrared spectroscopy in study of occlusal splints and resistance of masticatory muscles to fatigue pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting; Huang, Dong-Xu

    2013-10-18

    To analyze the influence of occlusal splint on resistance capability of masticatory muscles to fatigue. In the study, 25 young male volunteers were randomly divided to 5 groups according to different splint placements: (1) no splint, (2) 1.5 mm thick soft splint, (3) 2 mm thick resin stability splint, (4) 4 mm thick resin stability splint, (5) buccolingual mock splint. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to measure blood oxygen content in human masticatory muscles during constant strong biting before and after the splint placement at seven time points: before, baseline after, 1 week after, and 2 weeks after splint placement, and immediately after, 1 week after, and 5 weeks after removing of splints. The strength of the biting force was maintained constantly at 30% level of the maximum biting force of each subject by biofeedback to the displayed value of an electro-myographic monitor. The time points of muscular fatigue and pain that appeared were recorded and the correlation between the subjective feeling and the NIRS measurement result was analyzed. The NIRS measurement curve had a point of inflection that had no significant difference with the time point of the muscle pain that appeared. Two weeks after placement of soft splint, the time point of the muscular fatigue and pain that appeared were 2.75 s and 8.00 s delayed respectively compared with that before placement of splint (P0.05) in the group of mock splint. The metabolic status of human masticatory muscles could be monitored in real time by using NIRS; soft splint delayed the appearing of muscle fatigue and muscle pain after two weeks of placement.

  5. Evaluation of Fatigue Life of CRM-Reinforced SMA and Its Relationship to Dynamic Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuha Salim Mashaan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test, dynamic creep (repeated load creep, and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test at temperature of 25°C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400 kPa. Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture.

  6. Evaluation of fatigue life of CRM-reinforced SMA and its relationship to dynamic stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdel Aziz, Mahrez; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herda Yati; Koting, Suhana

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA) has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test), dynamic creep (repeated load creep), and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test) at temperature of 25°C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400 kPa). Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture.

  7. Dynamics of the Skeletal Muscle Secretome during Myoblast Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Jeanette; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2010-01-01

    During recent years, increased efforts have focused on elucidating the secretory function of skeletal muscle. Through secreted molecules, skeletal muscle affects local muscle biology in an auto/paracrine manner as well as having systemic effects on other tissues. Here we used a quantitative...... proteomics platform to investigate the factors secreted during the differentiation of murine C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. Using triple encoding stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, we compared the secretomes at three different time points of muscle differentiation and followed the dynamics...... of the skeletal muscle as a prominent secretory organ. In addition to previously reported molecules, we identified many secreted proteins that have not previously been shown to be released from skeletal muscle cells nor shown to be differentially released during the process of myogenesis. We found 188...

  8. A modelling approach for exploring muscle dynamics during cyclic contractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A Ross

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hill-type muscle models are widely used within the field of biomechanics to predict and understand muscle behaviour, and are often essential where muscle forces cannot be directly measured. However, these models have limited accuracy, particularly during cyclic contractions at the submaximal levels of activation that typically occur during locomotion. To address this issue, recent studies have incorporated effects into Hill-type models that are oftentimes neglected, such as size-dependent, history-dependent, and activation-dependent effects. However, the contribution of these effects on muscle performance has yet to be evaluated under common contractile conditions that reflect the range of activations, strains, and strain rates that occur in vivo. The purpose of this study was to develop a modelling framework to evaluate modifications to Hill-type muscle models when they contract in cyclic loops that are typical of locomotor muscle function. Here we present a modelling framework composed of a damped harmonic oscillator in series with a Hill-type muscle actuator that consists of a contractile element and parallel elastic element. The intrinsic force-length and force-velocity properties are described using Bézier curves where we present a system to relate physiological parameters to the control points for these curves. The muscle-oscillator system can be geometrically scaled while preserving dynamic and kinematic similarity to investigate the muscle size effects while controlling for the dynamics of the harmonic oscillator. The model is driven by time-varying muscle activations that cause the muscle to cyclically contract and drive the dynamics of the harmonic oscillator. Thus, this framework provides a platform to test current and future Hill-type model formulations and explore factors affecting muscle performance in muscles of different sizes under a range of cyclic contractile conditions.

  9. Selective effects of different fatigue protocols on the function of upper body muscles assessed through the force-velocity relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Torrejón, Alejandro; Feriche, Belén; Morales-Artacho, Antonio J; Pérez-Castilla, Alejandro; Padial, Paulino; Jaric, Slobodan

    2018-02-01

    This study explored the feasibility of the force-velocity relationship (F-V) to detect the acute effects of different fatigue protocols on the selective changes of the maximal capacities of upper body muscles to produce force, velocity, and power. After determining the bench press one-repetition maximum (1RM), participants' F-V relationships were assessed during the bench press throw exercise on five separate sessions after performing one of the following fatiguing protocols: 60%1RM failure, 60%1RM non-failure, 80%1RM failure, 80%1RM non-failure, and no-fatigue. In the non-failure protocols, participants performed half the maximum number of repetitions than in their respective failure protocols. The main findings revealed that (1) all F-V relationships were highly linear (median r = 0.997 and r = 0.982 for averaged across participants and individual data, respectively), (2) the fatiguing protocols were ranked based on the magnitude of power loss as follows: 60%1RM failure > 80%1RM failure > 60%1RM non-failure > 80%1RM non-failure, while (3) the assessed maximum force and velocity outputs showed a particularly prominent reduction in the protocols based on the lowest and highest levels of fatigue (i.e., 80%1RM non-failure and 60%1RM failure), respectively. The results support the use of F-V to assess the effects of fatigue on the distinctive capacities of the muscles to produce force, velocity, and power output while performing multi-joint tasks, while the assessed maximum force and velocity capacities showed a particularly prominent reduction in the protocols based on the lowest and highest levels of fatigue (i.e., 80%1RM non-failure and 60%1RM failure), respectively.

  10. DYNAMIC STRAIN MAPPING AND REAL-TIME DAMAGE STATE ESTIMATION UNDER BIAXIAL RANDOM FATIGUE LOADING

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DYNAMIC STRAIN MAPPING AND REAL-TIME DAMAGE STATE ESTIMATION UNDER BIAXIAL RANDOM FATIGUE LOADING SUBHASISH MOHANTY*, ADITI CHATTOPADHYAY, JOHN N. RAJADAS, AND CLYDE...

  11. Foam Rolling for Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Recovery of Dynamic Performance Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcey, Gregory E. P.; Bradbury-Squires, David J.; Kawamoto, Jon-Erik; Drinkwater, Eric J.; Behm, David G.; Button, Duane C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: After an intense bout of exercise, foam rolling is thought to alleviate muscle fatigue and soreness (ie, delayed-onset muscle soreness [DOMS]) and improve muscular performance. Potentially, foam rolling may be an effective therapeutic modality to reduce DOMS while enhancing the recovery of muscular performance. Objective: To examine the effects of foam rolling as a recovery tool after an intense exercise protocol through assessment of pressure-pain threshold, sprint time, change-of-direction speed, power, and dynamic strength-endurance. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 8 healthy, physically active males (age = 22.1 ± 2.5 years, height = 177.0 ± 7.5 cm, mass = 88.4 ± 11.4 kg) participated. Intervention(s): Participants performed 2 conditions, separated by 4 weeks, involving 10 sets of 10 repetitions of back squats at 60% of their 1-repetition maximum, followed by either no foam rolling or 20 minutes of foam rolling immediately, 24, and 48 hours postexercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): Pressure-pain threshold, sprint speed (30-m sprint time), power (broad-jump distance), change-of-direction speed (T-test), and dynamic strength-endurance. Results: Foam rolling substantially improved quadriceps muscle tenderness by a moderate to large amount in the days after fatigue (Cohen d range, 0.59 to 0.84). Substantial effects ranged from small to large in sprint time (Cohen d range, 0.68 to 0.77), power (Cohen d range, 0.48 to 0.87), and dynamic strength-endurance (Cohen d = 0.54). Conclusions: Foam rolling effectively reduced DOMS and associated decrements in most dynamic performance measures. PMID:25415413

  12. Effects of Muscle Fatigue, Creep, and Musculoskeletal Pain on Neuromuscular Responses to Unexpected Perturbation of the Trunk: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Jacques; Lardon, Arnaud; Boivin, Frédéric; Dugas, Claude; Descarreaux, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Trunk neuromuscular responses have been shown to adapt under the influence of muscle fatigue, as well as spinal tissue creep or even with the presence of low back pain (LBP). Despite a large number of studies exploring how these external perturbations affect the spinal stability, characteristics of such adaptations remains unclear. Aim: The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the quality of evidence of studies investigating trunk neuromuscular responses to unexpected trunk perturbation. More specifically, the targeted neuromuscular responses were trunk muscle activity reflex and trunk kinematics under the influence of muscle fatigue, spinal creep, and musculoskeletal pain. Methods: A research of the literature was conducted in Pubmed, Embase, and Sport-Discus databases using terms related to trunk neuromuscular reflex responses, measured by electromyography (baseline activity, reflex latency, and reflex amplitude) and/or trunk kinematic, in context of unexpected external perturbation. Moreover, independent variables must be either trunk muscle fatigue or spinal tissue creep or LBP. All included articles were scored for their electromyography methodology based on the "Surface Electromyography for the Non-Invasive Assessment of Muscles (SENIAM)" and the "International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology (ISEK)" recommendations whereas overall quality of articles was scored using a specific quality checklist modified from the Quality Index. Meta-analysis was performed on reflex latency variable. Results: A final set of 29 articles underwent quality assessments. The mean quality score was 79%. No effect of muscle fatigue on erector spinae reflex latency following an unexpected perturbation, nor any other distinctive effects was found for back muscle fatigue and reflex parameters. As for spinal tissue creep effects, no alteration was found for any of the trunk reflex variables. Finally, the meta-analysis revealed an increased erector

  13. Fatigue-induced change in corticospinal drive to back muscles in elite rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Rick C; Strutton, Paul H; McGregor, Alison H; Davey, Nick J

    2002-09-01

    This study examined post-exercise changes in corticospinal excitability in five 'elite' rowers and six nonrowers. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was delivered to the motor cortex and bilateral electromyographic (EMG) recordings were made from erector spinae (ES) muscles at L3/L4 spinal level and from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle of the dominant hand. Each subject completed two exercise protocols on a rowing ergometer: a light exercise protocol at a sub-maximal output for 10 min and an intense exercise protocol at maximum output for 1 min. A trial of ten magnetic stimuli was delivered before each of the protocols and, on finishing exercise, further trials of ten stimuli were delivered every 2 min for a 16 min period. Amplitudes of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in each of the three test muscles were measured before exercise and during the recovery period after exercise. The non-rowers showed a brief facilitation of MEPs in ES 2 min after light and intense exercise that was only present in the elite rowers after intense exercise. In the period 4-16 min after light exercise, the mean (+/- S.E.M.) MEP amplitude (relative to pre-exercise levels) was less depressed in the elite rowers (79.4 +/- 2.1%) than in the non-rowers (60.9 +/- 2.5%) in the left ES but not significantly so in the right ES. MEP amplitudes in FDI were significantly larger in the elite rowers, averaging 119.0 +/- 3.1% pre-exercise levels, compared with 101.2 +/- 5.8% in the non-rowers. Pre-exercise MEP latencies were no different in the two groups. After light exercise MEP latencies became longer in the elite rowers (left ES, 16.1 +/- 0.5 ms; right ES, 16.1 +/- 0.4 ms; dominant FDI, 23.4 +/- 0.2 ms) than in the non-rowers (left ES, 15.0 +/- 0.3 ms; right ES, 15.2 +/- 0.3 ms; dominant FDI, 21.5 +/- 0.2 ms). There were no differences in MEP depression or latency between elite rowers and non-rowers after intense exercise. We conclude that the smaller degree of MEP depression in the

  14. Efficacy of kinesiology tape versus postural correction exercises on neck disability and axioscapular muscles fatigue in mechanical neck dysfunction: A randomized blinded clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Abd, Aliaa M; Ibrahim, Abeer R; El-Hafez, Haytham M

    2017-04-01

    Mechanical neck dysfunction (MND), with axioscapular muscles fatigue, is highly prevalent worldwide. While postural correction is commonly used for its treatment, efficacy of kinesiology tape (KT) has received considerable attention. To determine the effectiveness of KT versus correction exercises on neck disability, and axioscapular muscles fatigue in MND patients. 46 MND patients were randomly assigned into 1 of 2 groups receiving 4 weeks treatment of either KT or correction exercises. Neck disability and axioscapular muscles fatigue as median frequency of electromyography (EMG-MF) were measured pre and post treatment. Group-by-time interaction was not significant in the multivariable test. Post hoc tests revealed that KT produced more disability reduction than the postural exercises. However, there was no significant interaction for EMG-MF. KT has been found to be more effective than postural exercises to reduce neck disability. However, both modalities have similar effects to reduce axioscapular muscles fatigue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pilot study: Effects of drinking hydrogen-rich water on muscle fatigue caused by acute exercise in elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoki Kosuke

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle contraction during short intervals of intense exercise causes oxidative stress, which can play a role in the development of overtraining symptoms, including increased fatigue, resulting in muscle microinjury or inflammation. Recently it has been said that hydrogen can function as antioxidant, so we investigated the effect of hydrogen-rich water (HW on oxidative stress and muscle fatigue in response to acute exercise. Methods Ten male soccer players aged 20.9 ± 1.3 years old were subjected to exercise tests and blood sampling. Each subject was examined twice in a crossover double-blind manner; they were given either HW or placebo water (PW for one week intervals. Subjects were requested to use a cycle ergometer at a 75 % maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 for 30 min, followed by measurement of peak torque and muscle activity throughout 100 repetitions of maximal isokinetic knee extension. Oxidative stress markers and creatine kinase in the peripheral blood were sequentially measured. Results Although acute exercise resulted in an increase in blood lactate levels in the subjects given PW, oral intake of HW prevented an elevation of blood lactate during heavy exercise. Peak torque of PW significantly decreased during maximal isokinetic knee extension, suggesting muscle fatigue, but peak torque of HW didn’t decrease at early phase. There was no significant change in blood oxidative injury markers (d-ROMs and BAP or creatine kinease after exercise. Conclusion Adequate hydration with hydrogen-rich water pre-exercise reduced blood lactate levels and improved exercise-induced decline of muscle function. Although further studies to elucidate the exact mechanisms and the benefits are needed to be confirmed in larger series of studies, these preliminary results may suggest that HW may be suitable hydration for athletes.

  16. Deer Antler Extract Improves Fatigue Effect through Altering the Expression of Genes Related to Muscle Strength in Skeletal Muscle of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaw-Chyun Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deer antler is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine used in Asian countries for the tonic and the improvement of aging symptoms. The present study was designed to investigate the antifatigue effect and mechanism of Formosan sambar deer tip antler extract (FSDTAE. The swimming times to exhaustion of mice administered FSDTAE (8.2 mg/day for 28 days were apparently longer than those of the vehicle-treated mice in forced swim test. However, the indicators of fatigue, such as the reduction in glucose level and the increases in blood urea nitrogen and lactic acid levels, were not significantly inhibited by FSDTAE. Therefore, microarray analysis was further used to examine the anti-fatigue mechanism of FSDTAE. We selected genes with fold changes >2 or <−2 in skeletal muscle for pathway analysis. FSDTAE-affected genes were involved in 9 different signaling pathways, such as GnRH signaling pathway and insulin signaling pathway. All of the significantly expressed genes were classified into 8 different categories by their functions. The most enriched category was muscular system, and 6 upregulated genes, such as troponin I, troponin T1, cysteine and glycine-rich protein 2, myosin heavy polypeptide 7, tropomyosin 2, and myomesin family member 3, were responsible for the development and contraction of muscle. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that FSDTAE increased troponins mRNA expression in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, our findings suggested that FSDTAE might increase the muscle strength through the upregulation of genes responsible for muscle contraction and consequently exhibited the anti-fatigue effect in mice.

  17. Changes in force, surface and motor unit EMG during post-exercise development of low frequency fatigue in vastus lateralis muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.J.; Elzinga, M.J.; Verdijk, P.W.L.; van Mechelen, W.; de Haan, A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low frequency fatigue (LFF) on post-exercise changes in rectified surface EMG (rsEMG) and single motor unit EMG (smuEMG) in vastus lateralis muscle (n=9). On two experimental days the knee extensors were fatigued with a 60-s-isometric contraction (exercise) at 50%

  18. The Effects of Shoulder- Girdle Muscles Fatigue on Ground Reaction Force, Elbow and Shoulder Joint Angle, and Accuracy of the Athletic Performance in Handball Penalty Throws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Shiravand

    2017-09-01

    Discussion: As the subjects were professional, muscle fatigue did not have a significant effect on postural control, angles and angular velocity; but did affect the reaction force and accuracy of the throws before and after fatigue, which could ultimately affect the performance of athletes and competition results.

  19. Can a fatigue test of the isolated lumbar extensor muscles of untrained young men predict strength progression in a resistance exercise program?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmhout, P.; Staal, B.; Dijk, J. van; Harts, C.; Bertina, F.; Bie, R. de

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the predictive value of a fatigue test of the lumbar extensor muscles for training progression in a group of 28 healthy but predominantly sedentary male students, in an 8-week resistance exercise program. METHODS: A three-phased fatigue test

  20. Dynamic Postural Control in Female Athletes and Nonathletes After a Whole-Body Fatigue Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghbani, Fatemeh; Woodhouse, Linda J; Gaeini, Abbas A

    2016-07-01

    Baghbani, F, Woodhouse, LJ, and Gaeini, AA. Dynamic postural control in female athletes and nonathletes after a whole-body fatigue protocol. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1942-1947, 2016-Postural control is a crucial element in regular training of athletes, development of complex technical movement, and injury prevention; however, distributing factor of the postural control such as fatigue has been neglected by athletic trainers in novice and inexperienced athletes. The objective of this study was to compare changes in dynamic postural control of young female athletes and nonathletes after a fatigue protocol. Thirty females (15 athletes and 15 nonathletes) with no orthopedic problems were recruited to participate in this study. All participants completed the pre-SEBT (star excursion balance test) in 8 directions at baseline; then, they performed a 20-minute fatigue protocol after which post-SEBT was measured. Rating of perceived exertion was measured using the Borg scale immediately before, mid-way through (i.e., after the third station), and after performing the fatigue protocol (i.e., immediately before the post-SEBT). Female nonathlete groups had significant differences in dynamic balance performance after fatigue in the medial, posteromedial, and posterior directions (p postural control of the novice with progressing the exercise time. Our findings could also help coaches to develop trainings focused on the 3 directions of medial, posteromedial, and posterior directions and aimed at exercises increasing fatigue resistance.

  1. Effect of BCAA intake during endurance exercises on fatigue substances, muscle damage substances, and energy metabolism substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Jeong, Woo-Seok; Lee, Ha-Yan

    2013-12-01

    The increase rate of utilization of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) by muscle is reduced to its plasma concentration during prolonged exercise leading to glycogen. BCAA supplementation would reduce the serum activities of intramuscular enzymes associated with muscle damage. To examine the effects of BCAA administration on fatigue substances (serotonin, ammonia and lactate), muscle damage substances (CK and LDH) and energy metabolism substances (FFA and glucose) after endurance exercise. Subjects (n = 26, college-aged males) were randomly divided into an experimental (n = 13, EXP) and a placebo (n = 13, CON) group. Subjects both EXP and CON performed a bout of cycle training (70% VO2max intensity) to exhaustion. Subject in the EXP were administrated BCAA (78ml/kg·w) prior to the bout of cycle exercise. Fatigue substances, muscle damage substances and energy metabolism substances were measured before ingesting BCAAs and placebos, 10 min before exercise, 30 min into exercise, immediately after exercise, and 30 min after exercise. Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measure ANCOVA, correlation and statistical significance was set at p BCAA decreased serum concentrations of the intramuscular enzymes as CK and LDH following exhaustive exercise. This observation suggests that BCAA supplementation may reduce the muscle damage associated with endurance exercise.

  2. Abnormalities of AMPK activation and glucose uptake in cultured skeletal muscle cells from individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey E Brown

    Full Text Available Post exertional muscle fatigue is a key feature in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS. Abnormalities of skeletal muscle function have been identified in some but not all patients with CFS. To try to limit potential confounders that might contribute to this clinical heterogeneity, we developed a novel in vitro system that allows comparison of AMP kinase (AMPK activation and metabolic responses to exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells from CFS patients and control subjects.Skeletal muscle cell cultures were established from 10 subjects with CFS and 7 age-matched controls, subjected to electrical pulse stimulation (EPS for up to 24h and examined for changes associated with exercise.In the basal state, CFS cultures showed increased myogenin expression but decreased IL6 secretion during differentiation compared with control cultures. Control cultures subjected to 16 h EPS showed a significant increase in both AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake compared with unstimulated cells. In contrast, CFS cultures showed no increase in AMPK phosphorylation or glucose uptake after 16 h EPS. However, glucose uptake remained responsive to insulin in the CFS cells pointing to an exercise-related defect. IL6 secretion in response to EPS was significantly reduced in CFS compared with control cultures at all time points measured.EPS is an effective model for eliciting muscle contraction and the metabolic changes associated with exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells. We found four main differences in cultured skeletal muscle cells from subjects with CFS; increased myogenin expression in the basal state, impaired activation of AMPK, impaired stimulation of glucose uptake and diminished release of IL6. The retention of these differences in cultured muscle cells from CFS subjects points to a genetic/epigenetic mechanism, and provides a system to identify novel therapeutic targets.

  3. Tensiomyographic Markers Are Not Sensitive for Monitoring Muscle Fatigue in Elite Youth Athletes: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimo Wiewelhove

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tensiomyography (TMG is an indirect measure of a muscle's contractile properties and has the potential as a technique for detecting exercise-induced skeletal muscle fatigue. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity of tensiomyographic markers to identify reduced muscular performance in elite youth athletes.Methods: Fourteen male junior tennis players (age: 14.9 ± 1.2 years with an international (International Tennis Federation ranking position participated in this pre-post single group trial. They completed a 4-day high-intensity interval training (HIT microcycle, which was composed of seven training sessions. TMG markers; countermovement jump (CMJ performance (criterion measure of fatigue; delayed onset muscle soreness; and perceived recovery and stress were measured 24 h before and after the training program. The TMG measures included maximal radial deformation of the rectus femoris muscle belly (Dm, contraction time between 10 and 90% Dm (Tc and the rate of deformation until 10% (V10 and 90% Dm (V90, respectively. Diagnostic characteristics were assessed with a receiver-operating curve (ROC analysis and a contingency table, in which the area under the curve (AUC, Youden's index, sensitivity, specificity, and the diagnostic effectiveness (DE of TMG measures were reported. A minimum AUC of 0.70 and a lower confidence interval (CI >0.50 classified “good” diagnostic markers to assess performance changes.Results: Twenty-four hours after the microcycle, CMJ performance was observed to be significantly (p < 0.001 reduced (Effect Size [ES] = −0.68, and DOMS (ES = 3.62 as well as perceived stress were significantly (p < 0.001 increased. In contrast, Dm (ES = −0.35, Tc (ES = 0.04, V10 (ES = −0.32, and V90 (ES = −0.33 remained unchanged (p > 0.05 throughout the study. ROC analysis and the data derived from the contingency table revealed that none of the tensiomyographic markers were effective diagnostic

  4. Fatigue with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21, 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 551 Fatigue WHAT IS FATIGUE? IS FATIGUE IMPORTANT? HOW DO ... It can be physical or psychological. With physical fatigue , your muscles cannot do things as easily as ...

  5. Smooth muscle fatigue due to repeated urinary bladder neurostimulation: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bross, S; Schumacher, S; Scheepe, J R; Seif, C; Jünemann, K P; Alken, P

    1999-01-01

    The presented study investigates the influence of different pause lengths between two consecutive stimulations of the S3 roots on intravesical pressure during bladder neurostimulation. In eight male foxhounds (aged 7-18 months), laminectomy and placement of a modified Brindley electrode were performed. In four series with different pause lengths between two consecutive stimulations (1, 3, 5, and 15 min), the maximum intravesical pressure was measured during stimulation. The changes in intravesical pressure were registered in these four series, each series with six stimulations. A 15-min interval elapsed before the commencement of each series. In the series with a pause length of 15 min, the consecutive stimulations did not result in significant changes in maximum intravesical pressure. In the 5-min series, a significant decrease in intravesical pressure was not observed after the third stimulation. In the 3-min series, a significant decrease was seen at almost every stimulation (average decrease of 3.8% per stimulation) and in the 1-min series, a significant decrease was also observed at almost every stimulation (average decrease of 5.9% per stimulation). The results of repeated bladder neurostimulation demonstrate that the maximum intravesical pressure is dependent on the pause length between two consecutive stimulations. The detrusor muscle showed reversible and short-lived signs of fatigue. This implies the importance of a minimum 5-min interval between two subsequent stimulations. A pause length <5 min leads to a falsification of the results and thus to lower validity of the investigation.

  6. Intramuscular pressure and EMG relate during static contractions but dissociate with movement and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgaard, Gisela; Jensen, Bente R.; Hargens, Allan R.

    2004-01-01

    Intramuscular pressure (IMP) and electromyography (EMG) mirror muscle force in the nonfatigued muscle during static contractions. The present study explores whether the constant IMP-EMG relationship with increased force may be extended to dynamic contractions and to fatigued muscle. IMP and EMG...... with speed of abduction. In the nonfatigued supraspinatus muscle, a linear relationship was found between IMP and EMG; in contrast, during fatigue and recovery, significant timewise changes of the IMP-to-EMG ratio occurred. The results indicate that IMP should be included along with EMG when mechanical load...... sharing between muscles is evaluated during dynamic and fatiguing contractions....

  7. Muscle Fatigue in the Three Heads of the Triceps Brachii During a Controlled Forceful Hand Grip Task with Full Elbow Extension Using Surface Electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Asraf; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Badlishah Ahmad, R; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Islam, Anamul; Sundaraj, Sebastian

    2015-06-27

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the time to fatigue and compare the fatiguing condition among the three heads of the triceps brachii muscle using surface electromyography during an isometric contraction of a controlled forceful hand grip task with full elbow extension. Eighteen healthy subjects concurrently performed a single 90 s isometric contraction of a controlled forceful hand grip task and full elbow extension. Surface electromyographic signals from the lateral, long and medial heads of the triceps brachii muscle were recorded during the task for each subject. The changes in muscle activity among the three heads of triceps brachii were measured by the root mean square values for every 5 s period throughout the total contraction period. The root mean square values were then analysed to determine the fatiguing condition for the heads of triceps brachii muscle. Muscle fatigue in the long, lateral, and medial heads of the triceps brachii started at 40 s, 50 s, and 65 s during the prolonged contraction, respectively. The highest fatiguing rate was observed in the long head (slope = -2.863), followed by the medial head (slope = -2.412) and the lateral head (slope = -1.877) of the triceps brachii muscle. The results of the present study concurs with previous findings that the three heads of the triceps brachii muscle do not work as a single unit, and the fiber type/composition is different among the three heads.

  8. Investigation of mental fatigue through EEG signal processing based on nonlinear analysis: Symbolic dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azarnoosh, Mahdi; Motie Nasrabadi, Ali; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Firoozabadi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: Mental fatigue indices’ variation discussed during simple long-term attentive task. Symbolic dynamics of reaction time and EEG signal determine mental state variation. Nonlinear quantifiers such as entropy can display chaotic behaviors of the brain. Frontal and central lobes of the brain are effective in attention investigations. Mental fatigue causes a reduction in the complexity of the brain’s activity. Abstract: To investigate nonlinear analysis of attention physiological indices this study used a simple repetitive attentive task in four consecutive trials that resulted in mental fatigue. Traditional performance indices, such as reaction time, error responses, and EEG signals, were simultaneously recorded to evaluate differences between the trials. Performance indices analysis demonstrated that a selected task leads to mental fatigue. In addition, the study aimed to find a method to determine mental fatigue based on nonlinear analysis of EEG signals. Symbolic dynamics was selected as a qualitative method used to extract some quantitative qualifiers such as entropy. This method was executed on the reaction time of responses, and EEG signals to distinguish mental states. The results revealed that nonlinear analysis of reaction time, and EEG signals of the frontal and central lobes of the brain could differentiate between attention, and occurrence of mental fatigue in trials. In addition, the trend of entropy variation displayed a reduction in the complexity of mental activity as fatigue occurred.

  9. Effects of photobiomodulation therapy (pulsed LASER 904 nm) on muscle oxygenation and performance in exercise-induced skeletal muscle fatigue in young women: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Murilo X.; Toma, Renata L.; Jones, Brett J. L.; Cyprien, Thomas P.; Tier, Matthew R.; Wallace, Cameron A.; Renno, Ana C. M.; Sabapathy, Surendran; Laakso, E.-Liisa

    2017-02-01

    Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMt) has been used to increase muscle performance and improve recovery when applied before exercise. We aimed to evaluate the effects of PBMt using LASER on muscle oxygenation and performance. The study was a randomized, participant and assessor-blinded, within-subject crossover trial with placebo control to test the viability of the methods. Five physically active young women were randomly assigned to either placebo, or active PBMt (12 diode cluster probe; 904 nm; 60 mW; 250 Hz; 43.2 J per site, 129.6 J total) in contact over rectus femoris (RF) muscle of the dominant limb immediately before an isokinetic fatigue protocol. A one-week wash-out period preceded cross-over. Electromyography and isokinetic performance measures were evaluated. Absolute concentrations of deoxygenated haemoglobin and myoglobin (deoxy[Hb + Mb]) of the RF, an index of local microvascular fractional O2 extraction, was monitored continuously by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Total haemoglobin concentration as an indicator of microvascular haematocrit was calculated as the sum of the deoxy[Hb + Mb] and oxy[Hb + Mb] signals. PBMt pre-conditioning reduced time to peak torque when compared to placebo (P0.05). PBMt before exercise improves indicators of muscle performance, potentially by increasing local matching of bulk and microvascular O2 delivery relative to skeletal muscle O2 utilisation. Further work is required to understand the effect of PBMt on haemodynamic and metabolic characteristics of muscle.

  10. EFFECTS OF FATIGUE ON FRONTAL PLANE KNEE MOTION, MUSCLE ACTIVITY, AND GROUND REACTION FORCES IN MEN AND WOMEN DURING LANDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Smith

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Women tear their Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL 2-8 times more frequently than men. Frontal plane knee motion can produce a pathological load in the ACL. During a state of fatigue the muscles surrounding the knee joint may lose the ability to protect the joint during sudden deceleration while landing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of fatigue and gender on frontal plane knee motion, EMG amplitudes, and GRF magnitudes during drop- jump landing. Pretest-posttest comparison group design was used. Twenty-six volunteers (14 women; 12 Men; Mean ± standard deviation age = 24.5 ± 2.7 yrs; height = 1.73 ± 0.09 m; mass = 74.3 ± 11.8 kg participated in the study. Knee frontal plane ranges of motion and positions, ground reaction force peak magnitudes, and surface EMG RMS amplitudes from five lower extremity muscles (vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, medial hamstring, lateral hamstring, and lateral gastrocnemius were obtained during the landing phase of a drop-jump. MANOVA and ANOVA indicated that peak GRF significantly (p < 0.05; 2.50 ± 0.75 BW vs. 2.06 ± 0.93 BW decreased during fatigued landings. No other variables exhibited a fatigue main effect, although there was a significant (p < 0.05 fatigue by gender interaction for the frontal plane range of motion from initial contact to max knee flexion variable. Follow-up analyses failed to reveal significant gender differences at the different levels of fatigue for this variable. Additionally, no variables exhibited a significant gender main effect. Single subject analysis indicated that fatigue significantly altered frontal plane knee motion, peak GRF, and EMG in some subjects and the direction of differences varied by individual. Fatigue altered some aspects of landing performance in both men and women, but there were no gender differences. Additionally, both group and single subject analyses provided valuable but different information about factors representing

  11. Single molecular image of cytosolic free Ca2+ of skeletal muscle cells in rats pre- and post-exercise-induced fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Heming; Zhao, Yanping; Liu, Zhiming

    2009-08-01

    A growing body of literature indicated the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration of skeletal muscle cells changes significantly during exercise-induced fatigue. But it is confusing whether cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration increase or decrease. Furthermore, current researches mainly adopt muscle tissue homogenate as experiment material, but the studies based on cellular and subcellular level is seldom. This study is aimed to establish rat skeletal muscle cell model of exercise-induced fatigue, and confirm the change of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration of skeletal muscle cells in rats preand post- exercise-induced fatigue. In this research, six male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: control group (n=3) and exercise-induced fatigue group (n=3). The former group were allowed to freely move and the latter were forced to loaded swimming to exhaustive. Three days later, all the rats were sacrificed, the muscle tissue from the same site of skeletal muscle were taken out and digested to cells. After primary culture of the two kinds of skeletal muscle cells from tissue, a fluorescent dye-Fluo-3 AM was used to label the cytosolic free Ca2+. The fluorescent of Ca2+ was recorded by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results indicated that, the Ca2+ fluorescence intensity of cells from the rat of exercise-induced fatigue group was significantly higher than those in control group. In conclusion, cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration of skeletal muscle cells has a close relation with exercise-induced fatigue, and the increase of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration may be one of the important factors of exercise-induced fatigue.

  12. Estimating the progression of muscle fatigue based on dependence between motor units using high density surface electromyogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Adrian; Arjunan, Sridhar P; Kumar, Dinesh K

    2016-08-01

    In this study we have tested the hypothesis regarding the increase in synchronization with the onset of muscle fatigue. For this aim, we have investigated the difference in the synchronicity between high density surface electromyogram (sEMG) channels of the rested muscles and when at the limit of endurance. Synchronization was measured by computing and normalizing the mutual information between the sEMG signals recorded from the high-density array electrode locations. Ten volunteers (Age range: 21 and 35 years; Mean age = 26 years; Male = 6, Female = 4) participated in our experiment. The participants performed isometric dorsiflexion of their dominate foot at two levels of contraction; 40% and 80% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) until task failure. During the experiment an array of 64 electrodes (16 by 4) placed over the TA parallel to the muscle fiber was used to record the HD-sEMG. Normalized Mutual Information (NMI) between electrodes was calculated using the HD-sEMG data and then analyzed. The results show that that the average NMI of the TA significantly increased during fatigue at both levels of contraction. There was a statistically significant difference between NMI of the rested muscle compared with it being at the point of task failure.

  13. Investigation of Innervation Zone Shift with Continuous Dynamic Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Nishihara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Innervation zone (IZ has been identified as the origin of action potential propagation in isometric contraction. However, IZ shifts with changes in muscle length during muscle activity. The IZ shift has been estimated using raw EMG signals. This study aimed to investigate the movement of IZ location during continuous dynamic muscle contraction, using a computer program. Subjects flexed their elbow joint as repetitive dynamic muscle contractions. EMG signals were recorded from the biceps brachii muscle using an eight-channel surface electrode array. Approximately 100 peaks from EMG signals were detected for each channel and summed to estimate the IZ location. For each subject, the estimated IZ locations were subtracted from the IZ location during isometric contractions with the elbow flexed at 90°. The results showed that the IZ moved significantly with elbow joint movement from 45° to 135°. However, IZ movement was biased with only a 3.9 mm IZ shift on average when the elbow angle was acute but a 16 mm IZ shift on average when it was obtuse. The movement of IZ location during continuous dynamic muscle contraction can be investigated using this signal processing procedure without subjective judgment.

  14. Evaluation of muscle fatigue of wheelchair basketball players with spinal cord injury using recurrence quantification analysis of surface EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, S; Pourmoghaddam, A; Hieronymus, M; Thrasher, T A

    2012-11-01

    Wheelchair basketball is the most popular exercise activity among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this study was to investigate muscular endurance and fatigue in wheelchair basketball athletes with SCI using surface electromyography (SEMG) and maximal torque values. SEMG characteristics of 10 wheelchair basketball players (WBP) were compared to 13 able-bodied basketball players and 12 sedentary able-bodied subjects. Participants performed sustained isometric elbow flexion at 50% maximal voluntary contraction until exhaustion. Elbow flexion torque and SEMG signals were recorded from three elbow flexor muscles: biceps brachii longus, biceps brachii brevis and brachioradialis. SEMG signals were clustered into 0.5-s epochs with 50% overlap. Root mean square (RMS) and median frequency (MDF) of SEMG signals were calculated for each muscle and epoch as traditional fatigue monitoring. Recurrence quantification analysis was used to extract the percentage of determinism (%DET) of SEMG signals. The slope of the %DET for basketball players and WBP showed slower increase with time than the sedentary able-bodied control group for three different elbow flexor muscles, while no difference was observed for the slope of the %DET between basketball and WBP. This result indicated that the athletes are less fatigable during the task effort than the nonathletes. Normalized MDF slope decay exhibited similar results between the groups as %DET, while the slope of the normalized RMS failed to show any significant differences among the groups (p > 0.05). MDF and %DET could be useful for the evaluation of muscle fatigue in wheelchair basketball training. No conclusions about special training for WBP could be determined.

  15. Simulated laparoscopy using a head-mounted display vs traditional video monitor: an assessment of performance and muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maithel, S K; Villegas, L; Stylopoulos, N; Dawson, S; Jones, D B

    2005-03-01

    The direction of visual gaze may be an important ergonomic factor that affects operative performance. We designed a study to determine whether a head-mounted display (HMD) worn by the surgeon would improve task performance and/or reduce muscle fatigue during a laparoscopic task when compared to the use of a traditional video monitor display (VMD). Surgical residents (n = 30) were enrolled in the study. A junior group, consisting of 15 postgraduate year (PGY) = 1 subjects with no previous laparoscopic experience, and a senior group, consisting of 15 PGY 4 and PGY 5 subjects with experience, completed a laparoscopic task that was repeated four times using the Computer Enhanced Laparoscopic Training System (CELTS). Groups alternated between using the HMD with the task placed in a downward frontal position and the VMD with the task at a 30 degrees lateral angle. The CELTS module assessed task completion time, depth perception, path length of instruments, response orientation, motion smoothness; the system then generated an overall score. Electromyography (EMG) was used to record sternocleidomastoid muscle activity. Display preference was surveyed. The senior residents performed better than the junior residents overall on all parameters (p < 0.05) except for motion smoothness, where there was no difference. In both groups, the HMD significantly improved motion smoothness when compared to the VMD (p < 0.05). All other parameters were equal. There was less muscle fatigue when using the VMD (p < 0.05). We found that 66% of the junior residents but only 20% of the senior residents preferred the HMD. The CELTS module demonstrated evidence of construct validity by differentiating the performances of junior and senior residents. By aligning the surgeon's visual gaze with the instruments, HMD improved smoothness of motion. Experienced residents preferred the traditional monitor display. Although the VMD produced less muscle fatigue, inexperienced residents preferred the HMD

  16. Mixed martial arts induces significant fatigue and muscle damage up to 24 hours post-combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoul, Nihel; Tabben, Montassar; Miarka, Bianca; Tourny, Claire; Chamari, Karim; Coquart, Jeremy

    2017-06-22

    This study investigates the physiological/physical responses to a simulated mixed martial arts (MMA) competition over 24 hr. Twelve fighters performed a simulated MMA competition, consisting of three 5-min MMA matches. Physiological/physical data were assessed before (Trest), directly after round 1 (Trd1), round 2 (Trd2) and round 3 (Trd3), and then 30-min (Trecovery30min) and/or 24-hr (Trecovery24h) post-competition. Heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and blood lactate concentration ([La]) were assessed at Trest, Trd1, Trd2 and Trd3. Biological data were collected at Trest, Trd3, Trecovery30min and Trecovery24h. Physical tests were performed at Trest, Trecovery30min and Trecovery24h. HR, RPE and [La] were high during competition. Leukocytes, hemoglobin, total protein and glycemia were increased at Trd3 compared with all other time points (p<0.05). Cortisol was increased at Trd3 compared with Trest and Trecovery24h (p<0.05). Testosterone was higher at Trd3 and Trecovery30min than Trest (p<0.001). Higher values of uric acid were noted during recovery periods (p<0.001). Lactate dehydrogenase was lower at Trest compared with Trd3, Trecovery30min and Trecovery24h (p<0.05). Countermovement jump was higher at Trest than Trecovery30min (p=0.020). Consequently, MMA is a high-intensity intermittent combat sport that induces significant fatigue and muscle damage, both of which are still present 24-hr post-competition.

  17. Preventive and Regenerative Foam Rolling are Equally Effective in Reducing Fatigue-Related Impairments of Muscle Function following Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Fleckenstein, Jan Wilke, Lutz Vogt, Winfried Banzer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives of the study were to compare the effects of a single bout of preventive or regenerative foam rolling (FR on exercise-induced neuromuscular exhaustion. Single-centre randomised-controlled study was designed. Forty-five healthy adults (22 female; 25±2 yrs were allocated to three groups: 1 FR of the lower limb muscles prior to induction of fatigue, 2 FR after induction of fatigue, 3 no-treatment control. Neuromuscular exhaustion was provoked using a standardized and validated functional agility short-term fatigue protocol. Main outcome measure was the maximal isometric voluntary force of the knee extensors (MIVF. Secondary outcomes included pain and reactive strength (RSI. Preventive (-16% and regenerative FR (-12% resulted in a decreased loss in MIVF compared to control (-21%; p 0.8, p < 0.1. Differences over time (p < 0.001 between groups regarding pain and RSI did not turn out to be clinically meaningful. A single bout of foam rolling reduces neuromuscular exhaustion with reference to maximal force production. Regenerative rather than preventive foam rolling seems sufficient to prevent further fatigue.

  18. The effects of moderate fatigue on dynamic balance control and attentional demands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teasdale Normand

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During daily activities, the active control of balance often is a task per se (for example, when standing in a moving bus. Other constraints like fatigue can add to the complexity of this balance task. In the present experiment, we examined how moderate fatigue induced by fast walking on a treadmill challenged dynamic balance control. We also examined if the attentional demands for performing the balance task varied with fatigue. Methods Subjects (n = 10 performed simultaneously a dynamic balance control task and a probe reaction time task (RT (serving as an indicator of attentional demands before and after three periods of moderate fatigue (fast walking on a treadmill. For the balance control task, the real-time displacement of the centre of pressure (CP was provided on a monitor placed in front of the subject, at eye level. Subjects were asked to keep their CP within a target (moving box moving upward and downward on the monitor. The tracking performance was measured (time spent outside the moving box and the CP behavior analyzed (mean CP speed and mean frequency of the CP velocity. Results Moderate fatigue led to an immediate decrement of the performance on the balance control task; increase of the percentage of time spent outside the box and increase of the mean CP speed. Across the three fatigue periods, subjects improved their tracking performance and reduced their mean CP speed. This was achieved by increasing their frequency of actions; mean frequency of the CP velocity were higher for the fatigue periods than for the no fatigue periods. Fatigue also induced an increase in the attentional demands suggesting that more cognitive resources had to be allocated to the balance task with than without fatigue. Conclusion Fatigue induced by fast walking had an initial negative impact on the control of balance. Nonetheless, subjects were able to compensate the effect of the moderate fatigue by increasing the frequency of

  19. Skeletal muscle bioenergetics during all-out exercise: mechanistic insight into the oxygen uptake slow component and neuromuscular fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxterman, Ryan M; Layec, Gwenael; Hureau, Thomas J; Amann, Markus; Richardson, Russell S

    2017-05-01

    Although all-out exercise protocols are commonly used, the physiological mechanisms underlying all-out exercise performance are still unclear, and an in-depth assessment of skeletal muscle bioenergetics is lacking. Therefore, phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS) was utilized to assess skeletal muscle bioenergetics during a 5-min all-out intermittent isometric knee-extensor protocol in eight healthy men. Metabolic perturbation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis rates, ATP cost of contraction, and mitochondrial capacity were determined from intramuscular concentrations of phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (P i ), diprotonated phosphate ([Formula: see text]), and pH. Peripheral fatigue was determined by exercise-induced alterations in potentiated quadriceps twitch force (Q tw ) evoked by supramaximal electrical femoral nerve stimulation. The oxidative ATP synthesis rate (ATP OX ) attained and then maintained peak values throughout the protocol, despite an ~63% decrease in quadriceps maximal force production. ThusATP OX normalized to force production (ATP OX gain) significantly increased throughout the exercise (1st min: 0.02 ± 0.01, 5th min: 0.04 ± 0.01 mM·min -1 ·N -1 ), as did the ATP cost of contraction (1st min: 0.048 ± 0.019, 5th min: 0.052 ± 0.015 mM·min -1 ·N -1 ). Additionally, the pre- to postexercise change in Q tw (-52 ± 26%) was significantly correlated with the exercise-induced change in intramuscular pH ( r = 0.75) and [Formula: see text] concentration ( r = 0.77). In conclusion, the all-out exercise protocol utilized in the present study elicited a "slow component-like" increase in intramuscular ATP OX gain as well as a progressive increase in the phosphate cost of contraction. Furthermore, the development of peripheral fatigue was closely related to the perturbation of specific fatigue-inducing intramuscular factors (i.e., pH and [Formula: see text] concentration). NEW & NOTEWORTHY The physiological mechanisms

  20. Research on Dynamic Parameters and Position Accuracy of Pneumatics Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvard Sadovskij

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with pneumatic muscle MAS-20-200N-AA-MC-O, its dynamic properties and positioning accuracy as well as overviews experimental and theoretical works. The paper introduces the diagrams of vibration acceleration, discusses displacement dependence on pressure and load and presents a diagram of speed dependence on operating pressure. Vibroacceleration has been measured employing two accelerometers. Measurements have been carried out in three mutually perpendicular directions: x, y and z. The most important one is direction z, because this way the muscle performs a valuable displacement along the axis of the muscle, since this direction is the movement of the working muscle.Article in Lithuanian

  1. Research on Dynamic Parameters and Position Accuracy of Pneumatics Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvard Sadovskij

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with pneumatic muscle MAS-20-200N-AA-MC-O, its dynamic properties and positioning accuracy as well as overviews experimental and theoretical works. The paper introduces the diagrams of vibration acceleration, discusses displacement dependence on pressure and load and presents a diagram of speed dependence on operating pressure. Vibroacceleration has been measured employing two accelerometers. Measurements have been carried out in three mutually perpendicular directions: x, y and z. The most important one is direction z, because this way the muscle performs a valuable displacement along the axis of the muscle, since this direction is the movement of the working muscle.Article in Lithuanian

  2. DNA methylation dynamics in muscle development and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira eCarrio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic modification for mammalian development and is crucial for the establishment and maintenance of cellular identity. Traditionally, DNA methylation has been considered as a permanent repressive epigenetic mark. However, the application of genome-wide approaches has allowed the analysis of DNA methylation in different genomic contexts revealing a more dynamic regulation than originally thought, since active DNA methylation and demethylation occur during cellular differentiation and tissue specification. Satellite cells are the primary stem cells in adult skeletal muscle and are responsible for postnatal muscle growth, hypertrophy, and muscle regeneration. This review outlines the published data regarding DNA methylation changes along the skeletal muscle program, in both physiological and pathological conditions, to better understand the epigenetic mechanisms that control myogenesis

  3. The Effects of Load Carriage and Muscle Fatigue on Lower-Extremity Joint Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Frame, Jeff; Ozimek, Elicia; Leib, Daniel; Dugan, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Military personnel are commonly afflicted by lower-extremity overuse injuries. Load carriage and muscular fatigue are major stressors during military basic training. Purpose: To examine effects of load carriage and muscular fatigue on lower-extremity joint mechanics during walking. Method: Eighteen men performed the following tasks: unloaded…

  4. Effects of CFRP Strengthening on Dynamic and Fatigue Responses of Composite Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittisak Kuntiyawichai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of CFRP strengthening on dynamic and fatigue responses of composite bridge using finite element program ABAQUS. Dynamic and fatigue responses of composite bridge due to truck load based on AASHTO standard are investigated. Two types of CFRP strengthening techniques, CFRP sheets and CFRP deck, are applied to both the damaged and undamaged bridges. For the case of damaged bridge, two through-thickness crack sizes, 3 mm and 6 mm in depth, are assumed at midspan of the steel girders. Furthermore, effects of the number of steel girders on the dynamic and fatigue responses are also considered. The results show that the maximum responses of composite bridges occur for dual lane cases. By using CFRP as a strengthening material, the maximum stress and deflection of the steel girders reduce and consequently increase the fatigue life of the girders. After introducing initial crack into the steel girders of the composite bridges, the fatigue life of the bridges is dramatically reduced. However, the overall performance of the damaged composite bridge can be improved by using CFRP, albeit with less effectiveness. Therefore, if cracks are found, steel welding must be performed before strengthening the composite bridge by CFRP.

  5. Cancer survivors exhibit a different relationship between muscle strength and health-related quality of life/fatigue compared to healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, S; Tsubaki, A; Fu, J B; Mitobe, Y; Onishi, H; Tsuji, T

    2018-05-16

    We investigated the difference in relationship between muscle strength and quality of life (QOL)/fatigue in long-term cancer survivors and healthy subjects. Thirty-six cancer survivors and 29 healthy subjects were assessed for body composition and bone status at the calcaneus using the Osteo Sono Assessment Index. Muscle strength was evaluated via handgrip and knee extensor strength. Health-related QOL was assessed using the Medical Outcome Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey. Fatigue was measured using the brief fatigue inventory. Cancer survivors exhibited lower QOL scores in the physical functioning, physical role function, bodily pain and general health domains (p < .05). Grip and knee extension muscle strength in cancer survivors was positively correlated with the physical function and bodily pain of QOL (p < .05). The usual fatigue subscale score was only significantly higher in cancer survivors than in healthy subjects (p < .05). However, there were no correlations between muscle strength and fatigue in cancer survivors. Our results showed that muscle strength was an important factor for improving QOL in cancer survivors. We believe that the findings of this study will be relevant in the context of planning rehabilitation for cancer survivors. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The Effects of Cervical Muscle Fatigue on Balance – A Study with Elite Amateur Rugby League Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Gosselin, Michael J. Fagan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neck muscle fatigue has been shown to alter an individual’s balance in a similar way to that reported in subjects suffering from neck pain or subjects that have suffered a neck injury. The main purpose of the present study was to quantify the effects of neck fatigue on neck muscle electromyography (EMG activity, balance, perceived fatigue and perceived stability. Forty four elite amateur rugby league players resisted with their neck muscles approximately 35% maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC force for 15 minutes in eight different directions. Sway velocity and surface electromyography were measured. Questionnaires were used to record perceived effort and stability. Repeated measures ANOVA showed that after 15 minutes isometric contraction, significant changes were seen in sway velocity, perceived sway and EMG median frequency. There were no differences in perceived efforts. The changes in sway velocity and median frequency were more pronounced after extension and right and left posterior oblique contractions but there was no significant difference in sway velocity after contraction in the right lateral flexion, right anterior oblique and left anterior oblique direction of contraction. All the subjects showed oriented whole-body leaning in the plane of the contraction. The experiment produced significantly altered and perceived altered balance in this group of physically fit individuals. The results may contribute to our understanding of normal functional capacities of athletes and will provide a basis for further investigation in healthy non-athletes and participants that have suffered neck injuries. This may ultimately help develop accurate and valid rehabilitation outcome measures.

  7. Spectral analysis of the electromyograph of the erector spinae muscle before and after a dynamic manual load-lifting test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Cardozo

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the spectral behavior of the erector spinae muscle during isometric contractions performed before and after a dynamic manual load-lifting test carried out by the trunk in order to determine the capacity of muscle to perform this task. Nine healthy female students participated in the experiment. Their average age, height, and body mass (± SD were 20 ± 1 years, 1.6 ± 0.03 m, and 53 ± 4 kg, respectively. The development of muscle fatigue was assessed by spectral analysis (median frequency and root mean square with time. The test consisted of repeated bending movements from the trunk, starting from a 45º angle of flexion, with the application of approximately 15, 25 and 50% of maximum individual load, to the stand up position. The protocol used proved to be more reliable with loads exceeding 50% of the maximum for the identification of muscle fatigue by electromyography as a function of time. Most of the volunteers showed an increase in root mean square versus time on both the right (N = 7 and the left (N = 6 side, indicating a tendency to become fatigued. With respect to the changes in median frequency of the electromyographic signal, the loads used in this study had no significant effect on either the right or the left side of the erector spinae muscle at this frequency, suggesting that a higher amount and percentage of loads would produce more substantial results in the study of isotonic contractions.

  8. Effect of sex and fatigue on muscle stiffness and musculoarticular stiffness of the knee joint in a young active population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; De Vito, Giuseppe; Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of sex and fatigue on knee extensor peak torque (PT), muscle stiffness (MS) of the vastus lateralis (VL) and knee joint musculoarticular stiffness (MAS) in young adults. Twenty-two male and 22 female recreational athletes participated. Males were characterised by higher relaxed [pre-: males 364.43 (52.00) N · m -1 , females 270.27 (37.25) N · m -1 ; post-: males 446.75 (83.27) N · m -1 , females 307.39 (38.58) N · m -1 ] and contracted [pre-: males 495.07 (71.04) N · m -1 , females 332.34 (85.42) N · m -1 ; post-: males 546.37 (90.74) N · m -1 , females 349.21 (85.55) N · m -1 ] MS of the VL, and knee joint MAS [pre-: males 1450.11 (507.98) N · m -1 , females 1027.99 (227.33) N · m -1 ; post-: males 1345.81 (404.90) N · m -1 , females 952.78 (192.38) N · m -1 ] than females pre- and post-fatigue. A similar finding was observed in pre-fatigue normalised knee extensor PT [pre-: males 2.77 (0.42) N · m kg -1 , females 2.41 (0.40) N · m kg -1 , post-: males 2.53 (0.54) N · m kg -1 , females 2.26 (0.44) N · m kg -1 ]. After the fatigue protocol, normalised knee extensor PT and knee joint MAS decreased, whilst relaxed and contracted MS of the VL increased in both sexes. These observed differences may contribute to the higher risk of knee injury in females and following the onset of fatigue.

  9. Fibromyalgia is Associated With Altered Skeletal Muscle Characteristics Which May Contribute to Post-Exertional Fatigue in Post-Menopausal Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Symons, T. Brock; Long, Douglas E.; Lee, Jonah D.; Shang, Yu; Chomentowski, Peter J.; Yu, Guoqiang; Crofford, Leslie J.; Peterson, Charlotte A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify muscle physiological properties that may contribute to post-exertional fatigue and malaise in women with fibromyalgia (FM). Methods Healthy postmenopausal women with (n=11) and without (n=11) fibromyalgia, age 51–70 years, participated in this study. Physical characteristics along with self-reported questionnaires were evaluated. Strength loss and tissue oxygenation in response to a fatiguing exercise protocol were used to quantify fatigability and the local muscle hemodynamic profile. Muscle biopsies were obtained to assess between-group differences in baseline muscle properties using histochemical, immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses. Results No significant difference in muscle fatigue in response to exercise was apparent between healthy controls and subjects with FM. However, self-reported fatigue and pain were correlated to prolonged loss of strength following 12-min of recovery in subjects with FM. Although there was no difference in percent SDH positive (type I) and SDH negative (type II) fibers or in mean fiber cross-sectional area between groups, subjects with FM showed greater size variability and altered fiber size distribution. Only in healthy controls, fatigue-resistance was strongly correlated with the size of SDH positive fibers and hemoglobin oxygenation. By contrast, subjects with FM with the highest percentage of SDH positive fibers recovered strength most effectively, which was correlated to capillary density. However, overall, capillary density was lower in subjects with FM. Conclusion Peripheral mechanisms i.e. altered muscle fiber size distribution and decreased capillary density may contribute to post-exertional fatigue in subjects with FM. Understanding these defects in fibromyalgic muscle may provide valuable insight for treatment. PMID:23124535

  10. Low cell pH depresses peak power in rat skeletal muscle fibres at both 30 degrees C and 15 degrees C: implications for muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, S T; Dave, H; Peters, J R; Fitts, R H

    2006-09-15

    Historically, an increase in intracellular H(+) (decrease in cell pH) was thought to contribute to muscle fatigue by direct inhibition of the cross-bridge leading to a reduction in velocity and force. More recently, due to the observation that the effects were less at temperatures closer to those observed in vivo, the importance of H(+) as a fatigue agent has been questioned. The purpose of this work was to re-evaluate the role of H(+) in muscle fatigue by studying the effect of low pH (6.2) on force, velocity and peak power in rat fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibres at 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C. Skinned fast type IIa and slow type I fibres were prepared from the gastrocnemius and soleus, respectively, mounted between a force transducer and position motor, and studied at 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C and pH 7.0 and 6.2, and fibre force (P(0)), unloaded shortening velocity (V(0)), force-velocity, and force-power relationships determined. Consistent with previous observations, low pH depressed the P(0) of both fast and slow fibres, less at 30 degrees C (4-12%) than at 15 degrees C (30%). However, the low pH-induced depressions in slow type I fibre V(0) and peak power were both significantly greater at 30 degrees C (25% versus 9% for V(0) and 34% versus 17% for peak power). For the fast type IIa fibre type, the inhibitory effect of low pH on V(0) was unaltered by temperature, while for peak power the inhibition was reduced at 30 degrees C (37% versus 18%). The curvature of the force-velocity relationship was temperature sensitive, and showed a higher a/P(0) ratio (less curvature) at 30 degrees C. Importantly, at 30 degrees C low pH significantly depressed the ratio of the slow type I fibre, leading to less force and velocity at peak power. These data demonstrate that the direct effect of low pH on peak power in both slow- and fast-twitch fibres at near-in vivo temperatures (30 degrees C) is greater than would be predicted based on changes in P(0), and that the

  11. Nanosecond electric pulses modulate skeletal muscle calcium dynamics and contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Chris; Jirjis, Michael B.; Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2017-02-01

    Irreversible electroporation therapy is utilized to remove cancerous tissues thru the delivery of rapid (250Hz) and high voltage (V) (1,500V/cm) electric pulses across microsecond durations. Clinical research demonstrated that bipolar (BP) high voltage microsecond pulses opposed to monophasic waveforms relieve muscle contraction during electroporation treatment. Our group along with others discovered that nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP) can activate second messenger cascades, induce cytoskeletal rearrangement, and depending on the nsEP duration and frequency, initiate apoptotic pathways. Of high interest across in vivo and in vitro applications, is how nsEP affects muscle physiology, and if nuances exist in comparison to longer duration electroporation applications. To this end, we exposed mature skeletal muscle cells to monopolar (MP) and BP nsEP stimulation across a wide range of electric field amplitudes (1-20 kV/cm). From live confocal microscopy, we simultaneously monitored intracellular calcium dynamics along with nsEP-induced muscle movement on a single cell level. In addition, we also evaluated membrane permeability with Yo-PRO-1 and Propidium Iodide (PI) across various nsEP parameters. The results from our findings suggest that skeletal muscle calcium dynamics, and nsEP-induced contraction exhibit exclusive responses to both MP and BP nsEP exposure. Overall the results suggest in vivo nsEP application may elicit unique physiology and field applications compared to longer pulse duration electroporation.

  12. Antagonist muscle moment is increased in ACL deficient subjects during maximal dynamic knee extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Magnusson, S Peter

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Coactivation of the hamstring muscles during dynamic knee extension may compensate for increased knee joint laxity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient subjects. This study examined if antagonist muscle coactivation during maximal dynamic knee extension was elevated...

  13. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT LEVELS OF LOCALIZED MUSCLE FATIGUE ON KNEE POSITION SENSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S. Gear

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There is little information available regarding how proprioceptive abilities decline as the amount of exertion increases during exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of different levels of fatigue on knee joint position sense. A repeated measures design was used to examine changes in active joint reposition sense (AJRS prior to and following three levels of fatigue. Eighteen participants performed knee extension and flexion isokinetic exercise until torque output was 90%, 70%, or 50% of the peak hamstring torque for three consecutive repetitions. Active joint reposition sense at 15, 30, or 45 degrees was tested following the isokinetic exercise session. Following testing of the first independent measure, participants were given a 20 minute rest period. Testing procedures were repeated for two more exercise sessions following the other levels of fatigue. Testing of each AJRS test angle was conducted on three separate days with 48 hours between test days. Significant main effect for fatigue was indicated (p = 0.001. Pairwise comparisons indicated a significant difference between the pre-test and following 90% of peak hamstring torque (p = 0.02 and between the pre-test and following 50% of peak hamstring torque (p = 0.02. Fatigue has long been theorized to be a contributing factor in decreased proprioceptive acuity, and therefore a contributing factor to joint injury. The findings of the present study indicate that fatigue may have an effect on proprioception following mild and maximum fatigue.

  14. Reduced Dual-Task Performance in MS Patients Is Further Decreased by Muscle Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkorte, Ria; Heersema, Dorothea J; Zijdewind, Inge

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) can be accompanied by motor, cognitive, and sensory impairments. Additionally, MS patients often report fatigue as one of their most debilitating symptoms. It is, therefore, expected that MS patients will have difficulties in performing cognitive-motor dual tasks (DTs), especially in a fatiguing condition. To determine whether MS patients are more challenged by a DT than controls in a fatiguing and less-fatiguing condition and whether DT performance is associated with perceived fatigue. A group of 19 MS patients and 19 age-, sex-, and education-matched controls performed a cognitive task (2-choice reaction time task) separately or concurrent with a low-force or a high-force motor task (index finger abduction at 10% or 30% maximal voluntary contraction). MS patients performed less well on a cognitive task than controls. Cognitive task performance under DT conditions decreased more for MS patients. Moreover, under high-force DT conditions, cognitive performance declined in both groups but to a larger degree for MS patients. Besides a decline in cognitive task performance, MS patients also showed a stronger decrease in motor performance under high-force DT conditions. DT costs were positively related to perceived fatigue as measured by questionnaires. Compared with controls, MS patients performed less well on DTs as demonstrated by a reduction in both cognitive and motor performances. This performance decrease was stronger under fatiguing conditions and was related to the sense of fatigue of MS patients. These data illustrate problems that MS patients may encounter in daily life because of their fatigue. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Neck muscle fatigue alters the cervical flexion relaxation ratio in sub-clinical neck pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihhosseinian, Mahboobeh; Holmes, Michael W R; Ferguson, Brad; Murphy, Bernadette

    2015-06-01

    The cervical flexion relaxation ratio is lower in neck pain patients compared to healthy controls. Fatigue modulates the onset and offset angles of the silent period in both the lumbar and cervical spine in healthy individuals; however, this response has not been studied with neck pain patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if cervical extensor fatigue would alter the parameters of the cervical flexion relaxation more in a neck pain group than a healthy control group. Thirteen healthy and twelve neck pain patients participated. Cervical extensor activity was examined bilaterally and kinematics of the neck and head were collected. An isometric, repetitive neck extension task at 70% of maximum elicited fatigue. Participants performed 3 trials of maximal cervical flexion both pre and post fatigue. The healthy controls and neck pain groups fatigued after 56 (41) and 39 (31) repetitions, respectively. There was a significant interaction effect for the flexion relaxation ratio between the control and neck pain groups from pre to post fatigue trials (F1,96=22.67, P=0.0001), but not for onset and offset angles (F1, 96=0.017, P=0.897), although the onset and offset angles did decrease significantly for both groups following fatigue (F1,96=9.26, P=0.002). Individuals with mild to moderate neck pain have significant differences in their neuromuscular control relative to controls, experienced myoelectric fatigue with fewer repetitions in a shorter time, had a lower cervical flexion relaxation ratio at baseline and had an inability to decrease this ratio further in response to fatigue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of taurine and β-alanine supplementation on taurine transporter protein and fatigue resistance in skeletal muscle from mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Deanna M; Murphy, Robyn M; Mollica, Janelle P; Hayes, Alan; Goodman, Craig A

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of taurine and β-alanine supplementation on muscle function and muscle taurine transporter (TauT) protein expression in mdx mice. Wild-type (WT) and mdx mice (5 months) were supplemented with taurine or β-alanine for 4 weeks, after which in vitro contractile properties, fatigue resistance and force recovery, and the expression of the TauT protein and proteins involved in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling were examined in fast-twitch muscle. There was no difference in basal TauT protein expression or basal taurine content between mdx than WT muscle. Supplementation with taurine and β-alanine increased and reduced taurine content, respectively, in muscle from WT and mdx mice but had no effect of TauT protein. Taurine supplementation reduced body and muscle mass, and enhanced fatigue resistance and force recovery in mdx muscle. β-Alanine supplementation enhanced fatigue resistance in WT and mdx muscle. There was no difference in the basal expression of key E-C coupling proteins [ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1), dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase 1 (SERCA1) or calsequestrin 1 (CSQ1)] between WT and mdx mice, and the expression of these proteins was not altered by taurine or β-alanine supplementation. These findings suggest that TauT protein expression is relatively insensitive to changes in muscle taurine content in WT and mdx mice, and that taurine and β-alanine supplementation may be viable therapeutic strategies to improve fatigue resistance of dystrophic skeletal muscle.

  17. Differences in Muscle Oxygenation, Perceived Fatigue and Recovery between Long-Track and Short-Track Speed Skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinga, Florentina J; Konings, Marco J; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    Due to the technical nature of speed skating, that is affecting physiological mechanisms such as oxygenation and blood flow, this sport provides a unique setting allowing us to uncover novel mechanistic insights of the physiological response to exercise in elite middle-distance and endurance sports. The present study aimed to examine the influence of skating mode (short-track vs. long-track) on muscle oxygenation, perceived fatigue, and recovery in elite speed skating. Muscle oxygenation of 12 talented short-track speed skaters was continuously monitored during a long-track (LT) and a short-track (ST) skating time-trial of maximal effort using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) on the m. vastus lateralis for both legs. Video captures were made of each testing session for further interpretation of the muscle oxygenation. To determine recovery, perceived exertion was measured 2 and 4 h after each testing sessions. Repeated measures ANOVA's were used for statistical analysis ( p skating (TSI%-slope: left = 0.050 ± 0.052, right = 0.001 ± 0.053, p skating modes in muscle oxygenation. Respectively, two ( ST = 5.8 ± 2.0; LT = 4.2 ± 1.5) and 4 h ( ST = 4.6 ± 1.9; LT = 3.1 ± 1.6) after the time-trials, a higher rate of perceived exertion was found for ST. Based on our results, ST seems more physiologically demanding, and longer periods of recovery are needed after training compared to LT. Technical aspects unique to the exercise mode seem to impact on oxygenation, affecting processes related to the regulation of exercise intensity such as fatigue and recovery.

  18. Assessing the Therapeutic Effect of 630 nm Light-Emitting Diodes Irradiation on the Recovery of Exercise-Induced Hand Muscle Fatigue with Surface Electromyogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the effect of light emitting diode therapy (LEDT on exercise-induced hand muscle fatigue by measuring the surface electromyography (sEMG of flexor digitorum superficialis. Ten healthy volunteers were randomly placed in the equal sized LEDT group and control group. All subjects performed a sustained fatiguing isometric contraction with the combination of four fingertips except thumb at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC until exhaustion. The active LEDT or an identical passive rest therapy was then applied to flexor digitorum superficialis. Each subject was required to perform a re-fatigue task immediately after therapy which was the same as the pre-fatigue task. Average rectified value (ARV and fractal dimension (FD of sEMG were calculated. ARV and FD were significantly different between active LEDT and passive rest groups at 20%–50%, 70%–80%, and 100% of normalized contraction time (P<0.05. Compared to passive rest, active LEDT induced significantly smaller increase in ARV values and decrease in FD values, which shows that LEDT is effective on the recovery of muscle fatigue. Our preliminary results also suggest that ARV and FD are potential replacements of biochemical markers to assess the effects of LEDT on muscle fatigue.

  19. Changes of postural control and muscle activation pattern in response to external perturbations after neck flexor fatigue in young subjects with and without chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Chien, Andy; Hsu, Wei-Li; Yen, Ling-Wei; Lin, Yang-Hua; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have identified sensorimotor disturbances and greater fatigability of neck muscles in patients with neck pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neck pain and neck flexor fatigue on standing balance following postural perturbations. Twenty patients with chronic neck pain (CNP) (24.7±3.6 year-old) and 20 age-matched asymptomatic subjects (22.1±2.2 year-old) were recruited. Subjects stood barefoot on a force plate and experienced backward perturbations before and after neck flexor fatigue. Center of pressure, electromyography of cervical and lumbar muscles, and head/trunk accelerations were recorded. Two-way ANOVA (pain×fatigue) was used for statistical analysis. CNP group showed larger body sway during quiet standing but not during perturbed standing compared with asymptomatic adults. In both groups, neck flexor fatigue resulted in greater body sway during the quiet standing but smaller body sway during perturbed standing, increased neck muscle activations and decreased lumbar muscle activations, as well as increased time to maximal head acceleration. Disturbed balance control was observed in CNP patients during the quiet standing. However, a rigid strategy was used to minimize the postural sway and to protect the head against backward perturbations in both CNP and asymptomatic young adults after neck flexor fatigue. The results facilitate the understanding of how the subjects with chronic neck pain and with neck muscle fatigue deal with the challenging condition. Further studies are needed to verify if such phenomenon could be changed after the intervention of specific flexor muscle retraining and balance control exercises. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Controlled chaos: three-dimensional kinematics, fiber histochemistry, and muscle contractile dynamics of autotomized lizard tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Timothy E; Lipsett, Kathryn R; Syme, Douglas A; Russell, Anthony P

    2013-01-01

    The ability to shed an appendage occurs in both vertebrates and invertebrates, often as a tactic to avoid predation. The tails of lizards, unlike most autotomized body parts of animals, exhibit complex and vigorous movements once disconnected from the body. Despite the near ubiquity of autotomy across groups of lizards and the fact that this is an extraordinary event involving the self-severing of the spinal cord, our understanding of why and how tails move as they do following autotomy is sparse. We herein explore the histochemistry and physiology of the tail muscles of the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), a species that exhibits vigorous and variable tail movements following autotomy. To confirm that the previously studied tail movements of this species are generally representative of geckos and therefore suitable for in-depth muscle studies, we quantified the three-dimensional kinematics of autotomized tails in three additional species. The movements of the tails of all species were generally similar and included jumps, flips, and swings. Our preliminary analyses suggest that some species of gecko exhibit short but high-frequency movements, whereas others exhibit larger-amplitude but lower-frequency movements. We then compared the ATPase and oxidative capacity of muscle fibers and contractile dynamics of isolated muscle bundles from original tails, muscle from regenerate tails, and fast fibers from an upper limb muscle (iliofibularis) of the leopard gecko. Histochemical analysis revealed that more than 90% of the fibers in original and regenerate caudal muscles had high ATPase but possessed a superficial layer of fibers with low ATPase and high oxidative capacity. We found that contraction kinetics, isometric force, work, power output, and the oscillation frequency at which maximum power was generated were lowest in the original tail, followed by the regenerate tail and then the fast fibers of the iliofibularis. Muscle from the original tail exhibited

  1. A novel dynamic cardiac simulator utilizing pneumatic artificial muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Yan, Jie; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Li, Hongyi; Li, Changji

    2013-01-01

    With the development of methods and skills of minimally invasive surgeries, equipments for doctors' training and practicing are in high demands. Especially for the cardiovascular surgeries, operators are requested to be familiar with the surgical environment of a beating heart. In this paper, we present a new dynamic cardiac simulator utilizing pneumatic artificial muscle to realize heartbeat. It's an artificial left ventricular of which the inner chamber is made of thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) with an anatomical structure of the real human heart. It is covered by another layer of material forming the artificial muscle which actuates the systole and diastole uniformly and omnidirectionally as the cardiac muscle does. Preliminary experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the simulator. The results indicated that the pressure at the terminal of the aorta could be controlled within the range of normal human systolic pressure, which quantitatively validated the new actuating mode of the heart-beating is effective.

  2. Muscle conduction velocity, surface electromyography variables, and echo intensity during concentric and eccentric fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Izal, Miriam; Lusa Cadore, Eduardo; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2014-03-01

    Concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) contractions may involve different mechanisms related to changes in sarcolemma status and the consequent alteration of action potential transmission along muscle fibers. Muscle conduction velocity (CV), surface electromyography signal (sEMG), muscle quality, and blood lactate concentrations were analyzed during CON and ECC actions. Compared with ECC, the CON protocol resulted in greater muscle force losses, blood lactate concentrations, and changes in sEMG parameters. Similar reductions in CV were detected in both protocols. Higher echo intensity values were observed 2 days after ECC due to greater muscle damage. The effects of the muscle damage produced by ECC exercise on the transmission of action potentials along muscle fibers (measured as the CV) may be comparable with the effects of hydrogen accumulation produced by CON exercise (related to greater lactate concentrations), which causes greater force loss and change in other sEMG variables during CON than during ECC actions.

  3. Automated modal tracking and fatigue assessment of a wind turbine based on continuous dynamic monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the implementation of a dynamic monitoring system at a 2.0 MW onshore wind turbine. The system is composed by two components aiming at the structural integrity and fatigue assessment. The first component enables the continuous tracking of modal characteristics of the wind turbine (natural frequency values, modal damping ratios and mode shapes in order to detect abnormal deviations of these properties, which may be caused by the occurrence of structural damage. On the other hand, the second component allows the estimation of the remaining fatigue lifetime of the structure based on the analysis of the measured cycles of structural vibration.

  4. Validation of single ball rolling contact fatigue machine dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Bryan [SKF Aeroengine, Falconer (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Single ball test machines are a common method for accelerated rolling contact fatigue testing of bearing materials. Historically, it has always been assumed that the force applied by the retaining bars is negligible, without any data to support this claim. In this study, strain gauges were placed on the retaining bars to determine the load experienced by the retaining bars. This value was then compared to the applied load. It was found that a load of approximately 4 N was transferred to the retainer by the test ball during steady state operation, when a 8385 N load was applied to the ball via the rings. A simulation of the system was also created and successfully predicted the expected loads with reasonable accuracy. This information, as well as the technique of strain gauging the retaining bars, may be useful in the development of similar testing machinery.

  5. Loss of knee extensor torque complexity during fatiguing isometric muscle contractions occurs exclusively above the critical torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethick, Jamie; Winter, Samantha L; Burnley, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The complexity of knee extensor torque time series decreases during fatiguing isometric muscle contractions. We hypothesized that because of peripheral fatigue, this loss of torque complexity would occur exclusively during contractions above the critical torque (CT). Nine healthy participants performed isometric knee extension exercise (6 s of contraction, 4 s of rest) on six occasions for 30 min or to task failure, whichever occurred sooner. Four trials were performed above CT (trials S1-S4, S1 being the lowest intensity), and two were performed below CT (at 50% and 90% of CT). Global, central, and peripheral fatigue were quantified using maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) with femoral nerve stimulation. The complexity of torque output was determined using approximate entropy (ApEn) and the detrended fluctuation analysis-α scaling exponent (DFA-α). The MVC torque was reduced in trials below CT [by 19 ± 4% (means ± SE) in 90%CT], but complexity did not decrease [ApEn for 90%CT: from 0.82 ± 0.03 to 0.75 ± 0.06, 95% paired-samples confidence intervals (CIs), 95% CI = -0.23, 0.10; DFA-α from 1.36 ± 0.01 to 1.32 ± 0.03, 95% CI -0.12, 0.04]. Above CT, substantial reductions in MVC torque occurred (of 49 ± 8% in S1), and torque complexity was reduced (ApEn for S1: from 0.67 ± 0.06 to 0.14 ± 0.01, 95% CI = -0.72, -0.33; DFA-α from 1.38 ± 0.03 to 1.58 ± 0.01, 95% CI 0.12, 0.29). Thus, in these experiments, the fatigue-induced loss of torque complexity occurred exclusively during contractions performed above the CT. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. The dynamics of stress and fatigue across menopause: attractors, coupling, and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Swanson, Lisa; Wong, Alexander E; Pincus, David; Butner, Jonathan E; Hahn-Holbrook, Jennifer; Koithan, Mary; Wann, Kathryn; Woods, Nancy F

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the regulatory dynamics between stress and fatigue experienced by women during the menopausal transition (MT) and early postmenopause (EPM). Fatigue and perceived stress are commonly experienced by women during the MT and EPM. We sought to discover relationships between these symptoms and to employ these symptoms as possible markers for resilience. Participants were drawn from the longitudinal Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study. Eligible women completed questionnaires on 60+ occasions (annual health reports and monthly health diaries) (n = 56 women). The total number of observations across the sample was 4,224. STRAW+10 criteria were used to stage women in either in late reproductive, early or late transition, or EPM stage. Change values were generated for fatigue and stress and analyzed with a multilevel structural equation model; slopes indicate how quickly a person returns to homeostasis after a perturbation. Coupling of stress and fatigue was modeled to evaluate resilience, the notion of maintaining stability during change. Eligible women were on average 35 years old (SD = 4.71), well educated, employed, married or partnered, and white. Fit indices suggested the model depicts the relationships of stress and fatigue (χ(9 df) = 7.638, P = 0.57, correction factor = 4.9244; root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) 90% CI = 0.000 ≤ 0.000 ≤ 0.032; comparative fit index (CFI) = 1.00). A loss in model fit across stages suggests that the four stages differed in their dynamics (χΔ(12 df) = 21.181, P = .048). All stages showed fixed-point attractor dynamics: fatigue became less stable over time; stress generally became more stable over time. Coupling relationships of stress on fatigue show evidence for shifts in regulatory relationships with one another across the MT. Results are suggestive of general dysregulation via disruptions to coupling relationships of stress and

  7. Dynamic Characteristics of a New Machine for Fatigue Testing of Railway Axles – Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel FRYDRÝŠEK

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There were done some proposal calculations for a new testing machine. This new testing machine is determined for a dynamic fatigue testing of railway axles. The railway axles are subjected to bending and rotation (centrifugal effects. For the right proposition of a new machine is very important to know the basic dynamic characteristics of whole system. These dynamic characteristics are solved via FEM (MSC.Marc/Mentat software in combination with SBRA (Simulation-Based Reliability Assessment Method (probabilistic Monte Carlo approach, Anthill and Python software. The proposed dimensions and springs of a new machine for fatigue testing of railway axles were used for manufacturing. Application of the SBRA method connected with FEM in these areas is a new and innovative trend in mechanics. This paper is continuation of former work (i.e. easier deterministic approach already presented in this journal in 2007.

  8. Selective Efficacy of Static and Dynamic Imagery in Different States of Physical Fatigue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Ferreira Dias Kanthack

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence that motor imagery contributes to improved motor performance, and recent work showed that dynamic motor imagery (dMI might provide additional benefits by comparison with traditional MI practice. However, the efficacy of motor imagery in different states of physical fatigue remains largely unknown, especially as imagery accuracy may be hampered by the physical fatigue states elicited by training. We investigated the effect of static motor imagery (sMI and dMI on free-throw accuracy in 10 high-level basketball athletes, both in a non-fatigued state (Experiment 1 and immediately after an incremental running test completed until exhaustion (20 m shuttle run-test-Experiment 2. We collected perceived exhaustion and heart rate to quantify the subjective experience of fatigue and energy expenditure. We found that dMI brought better shooting performance than sMI, except when athletes were physically exhausted. These findings shed light on the conditions eliciting optimal use of sMI and dMI. In particular, considering that the current physical state affects body representation, performing dMI under fatigue may result in mismatches between actual and predicted body states.

  9. Human fatigue expression recognition through image-based dynamic multi-information and bimodal deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Wang, Zengcai; Wang, Xiaojin; Qi, Yazhou; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Guoxin

    2016-09-01

    Human fatigue is an important cause of traffic accidents. To improve the safety of transportation, we propose, in this paper, a framework for fatigue expression recognition using image-based facial dynamic multi-information and a bimodal deep neural network. First, the landmark of face region and the texture of eye region, which complement each other in fatigue expression recognition, are extracted from facial image sequences captured by a single camera. Then, two stacked autoencoder neural networks are trained for landmark and texture, respectively. Finally, the two trained neural networks are combined by learning a joint layer on top of them to construct a bimodal deep neural network. The model can be used to extract a unified representation that fuses landmark and texture modalities together and classify fatigue expressions accurately. The proposed system is tested on a human fatigue dataset obtained from an actual driving environment. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method performs stably and robustly, and that the average accuracy achieves 96.2%.

  10. Effects of experimental muscle pain on muscle activity and co-ordination during static and dynamic motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven-Nielsen, T; Svensson, P; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    1997-04-01

    The relation between muscle pain, muscle activity, and muscle co-ordination is still controversial. The present human study investigates the influence of experimental muscle pain on resting, static, and dynamic muscle activity. In the resting and static experiments, the electromyography (EMG) activity and the contraction force of m. tibialis anterior were assessed before and after injection of 0.5 ml hypertonic saline (5%) into the same muscle. In the dynamic experiment, injections of 0.5 ml hypertonic saline (5%) were performed into either m. tibialis anterior (TA) or m. gastrocnemius (GA) and the muscle activity and co-ordination were investigated during gait on a treadmill by EMG recordings from m. TA and m. GA. At rest no evidence of EMG hyperactivity was found during muscle pain. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) during muscle pain was significantly lower than the control condition (P Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1993, pp. 311-327.) which predicts increased activity of antagonistic muscle and decreased activity of agonistic muscle during experimental and clinical muscle pain.

  11. Membrane proteins involved in potassium shifts during muscle activity and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Hansen, T.; Juel, C.

    2006-01-01

    while trying to manipulate the opening probability or transport capacity of these proteins during electrical stimulation of isolated soleus muscles. All experiments were made with excised muscle from male Wistar rats. Kir2.1 channels were almost undetectable in the sarcolemmal membrane but present...... muscle contractions, whereas Kir2.1 and NKCC1 may have a role in K+ reuptake. channels and cotransporters; T tubule...

  12. Skeletal muscle properties and fatigue resistance in relation to smoking history

    OpenAIRE

    W?st, Rob C. I.; Morse, Christopher I.; de Haan, Arnold; Rittweger, J?rn; Jones, David A.; Degens, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Although smoking-related diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are often accompanied by increased peripheral muscle fatigability, the extent to which this is a feature of the disease or a direct effect of smoking per se is not known. Skeletal muscle function was investigated in terms of maximal voluntary isometric torque, activation, contractile properties and fatigability, using electrically evoked contractions of the quadriceps muscle of 40 smokers [19 men and 21 w...

  13. Investigating the effects of maximal anaerobic fatigue on dynamic postural control using the Y-Balance Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, William; Dolan, Kara; Reid, Niamh; Coughlan, Garrett F; Caulfield, Brian

    2018-01-01

    The Y Balance Test is one of the most commonly used dynamic balance assessments, providing an insight into the integration of the sensorimotor subsystems. In recent times, there has been an increase in interest surrounding it's use in various clinical populations demonstrating alterations in motor function. Therefore, it is important to examine the effect physiological influences such as fatigue play in dynamic postural control, and establish a timeframe for its recovery. Descriptive laboratory study. Twenty male and female (age 23.75±4.79years, height 174.12±8.45cm, mass 69.32±8.76kg) partaking in competitive sport, completed the Y Balance Test protocol at 0, 10 and 20min, prior to a modified 60s Wingate fatiguing protocol. Post-fatigue assessments were then completed at 0, 10 and 20 min post-fatiguing intervention. Intraclass correlation coefficients demonstrated excellent intra-session reliability (0.976-0.982) across the three pre-fatigue YBT tests. Post-hoc paired sample t-tests demonstrated that all three reach directions demonstrated statistically significant differences between pre-fatigue and the first post-fatigue measurement (anterior; p=0.019, posteromedial; p=0.019 & posterolateral; p=0.003). The anterior reach direction returned to pre-fatigue levels within 10min (p=0.632). The posteromedial reach direction returned to pre-fatigue levels within 20min (p=0.236), while the posterolateral direction maintained a statistically significant difference at 20min (p=0.023). Maximal anaerobic fatigue has a negative effect on normalised Y balance test scores in all three directions. Following the fatiguing protocol, dynamic postural control returns to pre-fatigue levels for the anterior (20min). Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Differences in muscle oxygenation, perceived fatigue and recovery between long-track and short-track speed skating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina Johanna Hettinga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the technical nature of speed skating, that is affecting physiological mechanisms such as oxygenation and blood flow, this sport provides a unique setting allowing us to uncover novel mechanistic insights of the physiological response to exercise in elite middle-distance and endurance sports. The present study aimed to examine the influence of skating mode (short-track vs. long-track on muscle oxygenation, perceived fatigue, and recovery in elite speed skating. Muscle oxygenation of twelve talented short-track speed skaters was continuously monitored during a long-track (LT and a short-track (ST skating time-trials of maximal effort using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS on the m. vastus lateralis for both legs. Video captures were made of each testing session for further interpretation of the muscle oxygenation. To determine recovery, perceived exertion was measured two and four hours after each testing sessions. Repeated measures ANOVA’s were used for statistical analysis (p<.05. After a rapid desaturation in both legs directly after the start, an asymmetry in muscle oxygenation between both legs was found during LT (tissue saturation-index (TSI%-slope: left=0.053±0.032; right=0.023±0.020, p<.05 and ST speed skating (TSI%-slope: left=0.050±0,052, right=0.001 ±0.053, p<.05. Re-Resaturation of the right leg was relatively lower in ST compared to LT. For the left leg, no difference was found between skating modes in muscle oxygenation. Respectively, two (ST=5.8±2.0; LT=4.2±1.5 and four hours (ST=4.6±1.9; LT=3.1±1.6 after the time-trials, a higher rate of perceived exertion was found for ST. Based on our results, ST seems more physiologically demanding, and longer periods of recovery are needed after training compared to LT. Technical aspects unique to the exercise mode seem to impact on oxygenation, affecting processes related to the regulation of exercise intensity such as fatigue and recovery.

  15. Increased blood pressure can reduce fatigue of thenar muscles paralyzed after spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, JE; Ribot-Ciscar, E; Zijdewind, Inge; Thomas, CK

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether increases in blood pressure, and presumably muscle perfusion pressure, improve the endurance of thenar muscles paralyzed chronically by cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Resting mean arterial pressure (MAP) was low in all eight subjects (64 +/- 2 mmHg).

  16. No Effects of Antioxidant Supplementation in Triathletes on Maximal Oxygen Uptake, 31P-NMRS Detected Muscle Energy Metabolism and Muscle Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A.N.; Mizuno, M.; Ratkevicius, Aivaras

    1999-01-01

    Antioxidative vitamins, coenzyme Q 10 electrical stimulation, isometric exercise, low frequency fatigue......Antioxidative vitamins, coenzyme Q 10 electrical stimulation, isometric exercise, low frequency fatigue...

  17. Effect of dynamic strain aging on isotropic hardening in low cycle fatigue for carbon manganese steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zhi Yong; Chaboche, Jean-Louis; Wang, Qing Yuan; Wagner, Danièle; Bathias, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Carbon–manganese steel A48 (French standard) is used in steam generator pipes of nuclear reactor pressure vessels at high temperatures (about 200 °C). The steel is sensitive to dynamic strain aging in monotonic tensile test and low cycle fatigue test at certain temperature range and strain rate. Its isotropic hardening behavior observed from experiments has a hardening, softening and hardening evolution with the effect of dynamic strain aging. The isotropic hardening model is improved by coupling the dislocation and dynamic strain aging theory to describe the behavior of A48 at 200 °C

  18. Effect of dynamic strain aging on isotropic hardening in low cycle fatigue for carbon manganese steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhi Yong, E-mail: huangzy@scu.edu.cn [Sichuan University, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, No. 29 Jiuyanqiao Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Chaboche, Jean-Louis [ONERA, DMSM, 29 avenue de la Division Lecerc, F-92320 Chatillon (France); Wang, Qing Yuan [Sichuan University, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, No. 29 Jiuyanqiao Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Wagner, Danièle; Bathias, Claude [Université ParisOuest Nanterre La Défense (France)

    2014-01-01

    Carbon–manganese steel A48 (French standard) is used in steam generator pipes of nuclear reactor pressure vessels at high temperatures (about 200 °C). The steel is sensitive to dynamic strain aging in monotonic tensile test and low cycle fatigue test at certain temperature range and strain rate. Its isotropic hardening behavior observed from experiments has a hardening, softening and hardening evolution with the effect of dynamic strain aging. The isotropic hardening model is improved by coupling the dislocation and dynamic strain aging theory to describe the behavior of A48 at 200 °C.

  19. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  20. Functional coordination of muscles underlying changes in behavioural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernooij, Carlijn A; Rao, Guillaume; Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K; Temprado, Jean-Jacques

    2016-06-10

    The dynamical systems approach addresses Bernstein's degrees of freedom problem by assuming that the neuro-musculo-skeletal system transiently assembles and dismantles its components into functional units (or synergies) to meet task demands. Strikingly, little is known from a dynamical point of view about the functioning of the muscular sub-system in this process. To investigate the interaction between the dynamical organisation at muscular and behavioural levels, we searched for specific signatures of a phase transition in muscular coordination when a transition is displayed at the behavioural level. Our results provide evidence that, during Fitts' task when behaviour switches to a different dynamical regime, muscular activation displays typical signatures of a phase transition; a reorganisation in muscular coordination patterns accompanied by a peak in the variability of muscle activation. This suggests that consistent changes occur in coordination processes across the different levels of description (i.e., behaviour and muscles). Specifically, in Fitts' task, target size acts as a control parameter that induces a destabilisation and a reorganisation of coordination patterns at different levels of the neuro-musculo-skeletal system.

  1. Simultaneous electromyography and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy--with application to muscle fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Thomsen, C; Sinkjaer, T

    1992-01-01

    changes in human muscle. The aim of this study was to develop a method by which EMG and NMR spectroscopy measurements could be performed simultaneously. All measurements were performed in a whole body 1.5 Tesla NMR scanner. A calf muscle ergometer, designed for use in a whole body NMR scanner, was used....... The subject had the left foot strapped to the ergometer. The anterior tibial EMG was recorded by bipolar surface electrodes. A surface coil was strapped to the anterior tibial muscle next to the EMG electrodes. Simultaneous measurements of surface EMG and surface coil 31P NMR spectroscopy were performed...

  2. Inhaled β-agonist therapy and respiratory muscle fatigue as under-recognised causes of lactic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Emily; Mazer, Jeffrey; Carino, Gerardo

    2013-10-14

    A 49-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presented with significant tachypnoea, fevers, productive cough and increased work of breathing for the previous 4 days. Laboratory data showed elevated lactate of 3.2 mEq/L. Continuous inhaled ipratropium and albuterol nebuliser treatments were administered. Lactate levels increased to 5.5 and 3.9 mEq/L, at 6 and 12 h, respectively. No infectious source was found and the lactic acidosis cleared as the patient improved. The lactic acidosis was determined to be secondary to respiratory muscle fatigue and inhaled β-agonist therapy, two under-recognised causes of lactic acidosis in patients presenting with respiratory distress. Lactic acidosis is commonly used as a clinical marker for sepsis and shock, but in the absence of tissue hypoperfusion and severe hypoxia, alternative aetiologies for elevated levels should be sought to avoid unnecessary and potentially harmful medical interventions.

  3. Effect of Ankle Taping and Fatigue on Dynamic Stability in Athletes With and Without Chronic Ankle Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Pourkhani

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion In the athletes with chronic ankle instability, taping without fatigue improved dynamic balance in the vertical direction. Taping after fatigue could not improve dynamic stability in the athletes with and without chronic ankle instability. Future researchers should examine injured and uninjured participants tested under these conditions to determine if these results are useful in selecting appropriate prophylactic method that can treat or prevent injury to the ankle during functional activities.

  4. Effects of non-fatiguing respiratory muscle loading induced by expiratory flow limitation during strenuous incremental cycle exercise on metabolic stress and circulating natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland-Debord, Camille; Morelot-Panzini, Capucine; Similowski, Thomas; Duranti, Roberto; Laveneziana, Pierantonio

    2017-12-01

    Exercise induces release of cytokines and increase of circulating natural killers (NK) lymphocyte during strong activation of respiratory muscles. We hypothesised that non-fatiguing respiratory muscle loading during exercise causes an increase in NK cells and in metabolic stress indices. Heart rate (HR), ventilation (VE), oesophageal pressure (Pes), oxygen consumption (VO 2 ), dyspnoea and leg effort were measured in eight healthy humans (five men and three women, average age of 31 ± 4 years and body weight of 68 ± 10 kg), performing an incremental exercise testing on a cycle ergometer under control condition and expiratory flow limitation (FL) achieved by putting a Starling resistor. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, at peak of exercise and at iso-workload corresponding to that reached at the peak of FL exercise during control exercise. Diaphragmatic fatigue was evaluated by measuring the tension time index of the diaphragm. Respiratory muscle overloading caused an earlier interruption of exercise. Diaphragmatic fatigue did not occur in the two conditions. At peak of flow-limited exercise compared to iso-workload, HR, peak inspiratory and expiratory Pes, NK cells and norepinephrine were significantly higher. The number of NK cells was significantly related to ΔPes (i.e. difference between the most and the less negative Pes) and plasmatic catecholamines. Loading of respiratory muscles is able to cause an increase of NK cells provided that activation of respiratory muscles is intense enough to induce a significant metabolic stress.

  5. Empirical modeling of dynamic behaviors of pneumatic artificial muscle actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramatunge, Kanchana Crishan; Leephakpreeda, Thananchai

    2013-11-01

    Pneumatic Artificial Muscle (PAM) actuators yield muscle-like mechanical actuation with high force to weight ratio, soft and flexible structure, and adaptable compliance for rehabilitation and prosthetic appliances to the disabled as well as humanoid robots or machines. The present study is to develop empirical models of the PAM actuators, that is, a PAM coupled with pneumatic control valves, in order to describe their dynamic behaviors for practical control design and usage. Empirical modeling is an efficient approach to computer-based modeling with observations of real behaviors. Different characteristics of dynamic behaviors of each PAM actuator are due not only to the structures of the PAM actuators themselves, but also to the variations of their material properties in manufacturing processes. To overcome the difficulties, the proposed empirical models are experimentally derived from real physical behaviors of the PAM actuators, which are being implemented. In case studies, the simulated results with good agreement to experimental results, show that the proposed methodology can be applied to describe the dynamic behaviors of the real PAM actuators. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The The Effects of Cold Water Immersion on Anaerobic Power, Dynamic Balance and Muscle Activation After a karate kumite fighting in Female Karateka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher Afshar Nezhad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many athletes are using specific techniques to minimize fatigue and accelerate recovery processes. Cold water immersion (CWI is one of the most popular interventions used by athletes to potentially return to their pre-fatigue performance level. the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of CWI on anaerobic performance, balance and muscle activation of female karateka after a simulated match. 15 young female karateka (age: 18.7±1.7 years, body mass: 55.5±6.3 kg, height:165±5.1 cm with at least three years' experience in karate kumite fighting were included in the study. After three round 3-minute competition, participants were grouped into a CWI group (20 min at 12±1°C and a control group (CTL. Anaerobic power (30 s Wingate test, and dynamic balance (Star-Excursion test were measured before the competition and 24 h after intervention. Surface electromyography (EMG was sampled from quadriceps femoris muscles. Peak normalized muscle activation levels and force were identified during maximal isometric test. A significant decrease in the anaerobic performance after the competition was observed for both groups (p<0.05. CWI were effective in enhancing the anaerobic performance after competition compared with the CTL. Dynamic balance decreased for two groups, although CWI resulted in the smallest reduction in balance. There was a significant difference in peak and mean RMS values of the EMG in Rectus Femoris but not Vastus muscles after the CWI intervention when compared to CTL (p<0.05. CWI improve recovery related to dynamic balance and anaerobic performance of karate kumite fighter. It can be concluded that CWI appears to promote muscle activation and reduce fatigue that is related to better performance in 24 hours post intervention.

  7. Validity and everyday clinical applicability of lumbar muscle fatigue assessment methods in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge H; Gobbo, Massimiliano; Peranzoni, Matteo; Naik, Ganesh; Imperio, Grace; Cleland, Joshua A; Negrini, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    This systematic literature review aimed at examining the validity and applicability in everyday clinical rehabilitation practise of methods for the assessment of back muscle fatiguability in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain (CNSLBP). Extensive research was performed in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Embase, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) databases from their inception to September 2014. Potentially relevant articles were also manually looked for in the reference lists of the identified publications. Studies examining lumbar muscle fatigue in people with CNSLBP were selected. Two reviewers independently selected the articles, carried out the study quality assessment and extracted the results. A modified Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) scale was used to evaluate the scientific rigour of the selected works. Twenty-four studies fulfilled the selection criteria and were included in the systematic review. We found conflicting data regarding the validity of methods used to examine back muscle fatigue. The Biering-Sorensen test, performed in conjunction with surface electromyography spectral analysis, turned out to be the most widely used and comparatively, the most optimal modality currently available to assess objective back muscle fatigue in daily clinical practise, even though critical limitations are discussed. Future research should address the identification of an advanced method for lower back fatigue assessment in patients with CNSLBP which, eventually, might provide physical therapists with an objective and reliable test usable in everyday clinical practise. Implications for Rehabilitation Despite its limitations, the Biering-Sorensen test is currently the most used, convenient and easily available fatiguing test for lumbar muscles. To increase validity and reliability of the Biering

  8. Modification of working conditions based on ergo THK reducing workload, muscle tension, and fatigue of rice milling workers in J village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruliati, L. P.; Adiputra, N.; Sutjana, I. D. P.; Sutajaya, I. M.

    2017-11-01

    Rice mill is one of the businesses in informal sector. From the rice milling process, ergonomic problems arise when employees work with bent position that done repeatedly to lift grain sacks to be transferred to peeler machine. This situation will affect the comfort of work, thus increasing the workload, muscle tension, and fatigue. The consequence will certainly affect the health and productivity of workers. In this study introduces ergo Tri Hita Karana (ergo THK) as an ergonomics intervention model which solves ergonomics problems of the cultural aspects of THK. The study aim is to determine the modification of working conditions based Ergo THK to reduce workload, muscle tension and fatigue. This research uses Randomized Pretest and Posttest Control Group Design experimental design. The subjects were 30 male rice mill workers with an age range of 16 until 56 years, and then divided into 15 subjects in the control group and 15 subjects in the treatment group. The results showed that the average posttest workloads in the control group are 136.950 more less 0.297 and in the treatment group are 107.60 more less 0.396. Significance analysis showed that after the two groups done their activities, the average workload significantly different p less than 0.005. The amount of reduction in the workload between the two groups was 21.43 percent. In muscle tension posttest showed that the mean score of the muscle tension in the control group was 62.67 more less 7.31 and the treatment group was 20.96 more less 2.96. Significance analysis showed that both groups mean muscle-tension results were significantly different p less than 0.005. The amount of reduction in tension between the control group and the treatment group while working was 66.55 percent. At fatigue posttest showed that the mean score of fatigue in the control group was 76.40 more less 13.51 and the treatment group was 55.53 more less 9.51. Significant analysis showed that the mean fatigue of both groups

  9. Musculus gastrocnemius tetanus kinetics in alcohol-intoxicated rats with experimentally-induced hindlimb vascular ischemia under conditions of low-frequence muscle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Melnychuk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol intoxication and ischemic injury of skeletal muscles often accompany each other. It is shown that patients hospitalized with chronic alcoholism develop muscle fatigue. Skeletal muscle dysfunction in alcohol-dependent patients is caused by ethanol-associated myofibrillar atrophy and metabolic disbalance, while compression-ischemic lesions result from unconsciousness of the patient, in case of taking the critical alcohol dose. Therefore, the aim of this study is to discover typical m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanic kinetics changes in alcohol intoxicated rats with experimentally induced vascular ischemia of hindlimb muscles under conditions of low-frequency progressive muscle fatigue. Experiments were carried out on 10 young male Wistar rats (149.5 ± 5.8 g kept under standard vivarium conditions and diet. The investigation was conducted in two phases: chronic (30 days and acute (3 hours experiment. All surgical procedures were carried out aseptically under general anesthesia. Ishemic m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanic kinetic changes and force productivity in alcohol intoxicated rats were investigated in the isometric mode, with direct electrical stimulation. The fatigue of m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. was evaluated by three characteristic criteria: the first sag effect, the secondary force rise, the second sag effect. There have been 10 similar experiments: 5 series in each study group with 10 tetanic runs in each series. The highest amplitude of the native m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanus relative to isoline was taken as 100% force response. The same pattern of m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. low-frequency fatigue development was found in both rat groups under study. It is evidenced by the absence of substantial m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanus kinetics differences in alcohol intoxicated rats, compared with non-alcohol intoxicated rats during fatigue test. However, the appreciable m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanic force reduction

  10. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Artificial Muscles Based on Nematic Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, M.; Kant, R.; de Gennes, P.-G.

    1997-07-01

    A scheme based on nemato-mechanical conversion has been proposed for potential artificial muscle applications (de Gennes P.-G., Hébert M. and Kant R., to appear in Macromol. Symp. (1996)). As the temperature in a nematic gel is reduced through the transition temperature, strong uniaxial deformation is encountered. We briefly expose the dynamics of contraction/elongation in this system. Work and dissipative losses are calculated for an operating cycle to get an approximative expression of the ratio work/losses, which can then be compared with real muscular efficiencies.

  11. Dynamic mechanical assessment of muscle hyperalgesia in humans: The dynamic algometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchietti, Sara; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is often associated with a nonhomogeneous distribution of mechanical hyperalgesia. Consequently, new methods able to detect this distribution are needed. OBJECTIVE: To develop and test a new method for assessing muscle hyperalgesia with high temporal and spatial resolution that provides complementary information compared with information obtained by traditional static pressure algometry. METHODS: The dynamic pressure algometer was tested bilaterally on the tibialis anterior muscle in 15 healthy subjects and compared with static pressure algometry. The device consisted of a wheel that was rolled over the muscle tissue with a fixed velocity and different predefined forces. The pain threshold force was determined and pain intensity to a fixed-force stimulation was continuously rated on a visual analogue scale while the wheel was rolling over the muscle. The pressure pain sensitivity was evaluated before, during, and after muscle pain and hyperalgesia induced unilaterally by either injection of hypertonic saline (0.5 mL, 6%) into the tibialis anterior or eccentric exercise evoking delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). RESULTS: The intraclass correlation coefficient was >0.88 for the dynamic thresholds; thus, the method was reliable. Compared with baseline, both techniques detected hyperalgesia at the saline injection site and during DOMS (Palgometer also detected the widespread, patchy distribution of sensitive loci during DOMS, which was difficult to evaluate using static pressure algometry. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The present study showed that dynamic pressure algometry is a reliable tool for evaluating muscle hyperalgesia (threshold and pain rating) with high temporal and spatial resolution. It can be applied as a simple clinical bed-side test and as a quantitative tool in pharmacological profiling studies. PMID:25664539

  12. Torque decrease during submaximal evoked contractions of the quadriceps muscle is linked not only to muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkowski, Boris; Lepers, Romuald; Martin, Alain

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the neuromuscular mechanisms involved in the torque decrease induced by submaximal electromyostimulation (EMS) of the quadriceps muscle. It was hypothesized that torque decrease after EMS would reflect the fatigability of the activated motor units (MUs), but also a reduction in the number of MUs recruited as a result of changes in axonal excitability threshold. Two experiments were performed on 20 men to analyze 1) the supramaximal twitch superimposed and evoked at rest during EMS (Experiment 1, n = 9) and 2) the twitch response and torque-frequency relation of the MUs activated by EMS (Experiment 2, n = 11). Torque loss was assessed by 15 EMS-evoked contractions (50 Hz; 6 s on/6 s off), elicited at a constant intensity that evoked 20% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. The same stimulation intensity delivered over the muscles was used to induce the torque-frequency relation and the single electrical pulse evoked after each EMS contraction (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, supramaximal twitch was induced by femoral nerve stimulation. Torque decreased by ~60% during EMS-evoked contractions and by only ~18% during MVCs. This was accompanied by a rightward shift of the torque-frequency relation of MUs activated and an increase of the ratio between the superimposed and posttetanic maximal twitch evoked during EMS contraction. These findings suggest that the torque decrease observed during submaximal EMS-evoked contractions involved muscular mechanisms but also a reduction in the number of MUs recruited due to changes in axonal excitability. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Effects of contraction duration on low-frequency fatigue in voluntary and electrically induced exercise of quadriceps muscle in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratkevicius, A; Skurvydas, A; Povilonis, E; Quistorff, B; Lexell, J

    1998-04-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate if low-frequency fatigue (LFF) dependent on the duration of repeated muscle contractions and to compare LFF in voluntary and electrically induced exercise. Male subjects performed three 9-min periods of repeated isometric knee extensions at 40% maximal voluntary contraction with contraction plus relaxation periods of 30 plus 60 s, 15 plus 30 s and 5 plus 10 s in protocols 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The same exercise protocols were repeated using feedback-controlled electrical stimulation at 40% maximal tetanic torque. Before and 15 min after each exercise period, knee extension torque at 1, 7, 10, 15, 20, 50 and 100 Hz was assessed. During voluntary exercise, electromyogram root mean square (EMGrms) of the vastus lateralis muscle was evaluated. The 20-Hz torque:100-Hz torque (20:100 Hz torque) ratio was reduced more after electrically induced than after voluntary exercise (P exercise, the decrease in 20:100 Hz torque ratio was gradually (P exercise, the decrease in 20:100 Hz torque ratio and the increase in EMGrms were greater in protocol 1 (P exercise and that the electrically induced exercise produced a more pronounced LFF compared to voluntary exercise of submaximal intensity. It is suggested that compensatory recruitment of faster-contracting motor units is an additional factor affecting the severity of LFF during voluntary exercise.

  14. Ginsenoside Rb1 improves postoperative fatigue syndrome by reducing skeletal muscle oxidative stress through activation of the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 pathway in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Mao, Xiang-Yu; Liu, Shu; Chen, Wei-Zhe; Huang, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Chang-Jing; Chen, Bi-Cheng; Shen, Xian; Yu, Zhen

    2014-10-05

    Ginsenoside Rb1 is reported to possess anti-fatigue activity, but the mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms responsible for the anti-fatigue effect of ginsenoside Rb1 on postoperative fatigue syndrome induced by major small intestinal resection (MSIR) in aged rat. Aged rats with MSIR were administrated with ginsenoside Rb1 (15 mg/kg) once a day from 3 days before surgery to the day of sacrifice, or with saline as corresponding controls. Rats without MSIR but going through the same surgery procedure were administrated with saline as blank controls. Anti-fatigue effect was assessed by an open field test; superoxide dismutase, reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde in skeletal muscle were determined. The mRNA levels of Akt2 and Nrf2 in skeletal muscle were measured by real-time quantitative PCR. The activation of Akt and Nrf2 was examined by western blot and immunohistofluorescence. Our results revealed that ginsenoside Rb1 significantly increased the journey and the rearing frequency, decreased the time of rest in aged rats with MSIR. In addition, ginsenoside Rb1 significantly reduced reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde release and increased the superoxide dismutase activity of skeletal muscle in aged rats with MSIR. Ginsenoside Rb1 also increased the expression of Akt2 and Nrf2 mRNA, up-regulated Akt phosphorylation and Nrf2 nuclear translocation. These findings indicate that ginsenoside Rb1 has an anti-fatigue effect on postoperative fatigue syndrome in aged rat, and the mechanism possibly involves activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway with subsequent Nrf2 nuclear translocation and induction of antioxidant enzymes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Nuclear Receptor, Nor-1, Markedly Increases Type II Oxidative Muscle Fibers and Resistance to Fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Pearen, Michael A.; Eriksson, Natalie A.; Fitzsimmons, Rebecca L.; Goode, Joel M.; Martel, Nick; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Muscat, George E. O.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NR) have been implicated as regulators of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. The orphan NR4A subgroup has emerged as regulators of metabolic function. Targeted silencing of neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (Nor-1)/NR4A3 in skeletal muscle cells suggested that this NR was necessary for oxidative metabolism in vitro. To investigate the in vivo role of Nor-1, we have developed a mouse model with preferential expression of activated Nor-1 in skeletal muscle. In skeletal...

  16. Reactive oxygen species and fatigue-induced prolonged low-frequency force depression in skeletal muscle fibres of rats, mice and SOD2 overexpressing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Joseph D; Place, Nicolas; Yamada, Takashi; Silva, José P; Andrade, Francisco H; Dahlstedt, Anders J; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Katz, Abram; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Westerblad, Håkan

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle often shows a delayed force recovery after fatiguing stimulation, especially at low stimulation frequencies. In this study we focus on the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in this fatigue-induced prolonged low-frequency force depression. Intact, single muscle fibres were dissected from flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles of rats and wild-type and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) overexpressing mice. Force and myoplasmic free [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) were measured. Fibres were stimulated at different frequencies before and 30 min after fatigue induced by repeated tetani. The results show a marked force decrease at low stimulation frequencies 30 min after fatiguing stimulation in all fibres. This decrease was associated with reduced tetanic [Ca(2+)](i) in wild-type mouse fibres, whereas rat fibres and mouse SOD2 overexpressing fibres instead displayed a decreased myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity. The SOD activity was approximately 50% lower in wild-type mouse than in rat FDB muscles. Myoplasmic ROS increased during repeated tetanic stimulation in rat fibres but not in wild-type mouse fibres. The decreased Ca(2+) sensitivity in rat fibres could be partially reversed by application of the reducing agent dithiothreitol, whereas the decrease in tetanic [Ca(2+)](i) in wild-type mouse fibres was not affected by dithiothreitol or the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. In conclusion, we describe two different causes of fatigue-induced prolonged low-frequency force depression, which correlate to differences in SOD activity and ROS metabolism. These findings may have clinical implications since ROS-mediated impairments in myofibrillar function can be counteracted by reductants and antioxidants, whereas changes in SR Ca(2+) handling appear more resistant to interventions.

  17. Back muscle fatigue of younger and older adults with and without chronic low back pain using two protocols: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rubens A; Vieira, Edgar R; Cabrera, Marcos; Altimari, Leandro R; Aguiar, Andreo F; Nowotny, Alexandre H; Carvalho, Adriana F; Oliveira, Marcio R

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare back muscle fatigue of younger and older participants with and without chronic low back pain (CLBP). Twenty participants without and 20 with nonspecific CLBP participated in this study. Each group contained 10 younger (50% males; mean age: 31 ± 6 yrs) and 10 older adults (50% males; age mean: 71 ± 7 yrs). Two isometric fatigue protocols were presented randomly: (1) to maintain the unsupported trunk at the horizontal position while on a 45° Roman chair for a minute, and (2) to maintain a 10% of body weight box close to the trunk in the upright position for a minute. Surface electromyography (EMG) signals from the back (multifidus and iliocostalis) and one hip (biceps femoris) muscles were recorded bilaterally, and the median frequency fatigue estimate from linear regression slopes of the EMG time-series was computed. There were no significant (P > 0.05) age effects, and group-by-age interaction in both isometric and functional fatigue tasks. However, the CLBP groups (both younger and old) displayed more back fatigue than people without CLBP in both fatigue protocols (P size varying of d = 0.17-0.32). This study was sensitive to discriminate that individuals with CLBP did present significantly more pronounced EMG back fatigue than people without CLBP, in both younger and older adults. These results have significant clinical implications for low back pain rehabilitation programs with regard to endurance assessment in both younger and older. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dietary fish oil delays hypoxic skeletal muscle fatigue and enhances caffeine-stimulated contractile recovery in the rat in vivo hindlimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Gregory E; McLennan, Peter L

    2017-06-01

    Oxygen efficiency influences skeletal muscle contractile function during physiological hypoxia. Dietary fish oil, providing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), reduces the oxygen cost of muscle contraction. This study used an autologous perfused rat hindlimb model to examine the effects of a fish oil diet on skeletal muscle fatigue during an acute hypoxic challenge. Male Wistar rats were fed a diet rich in saturated fat (SF), long-chain (LC) n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6 PUFA), or LC n-3 PUFA DHA from fish oil (FO) (8 weeks). During anaesthetised and ventilated conditions (normoxia 21% O 2 (SaO 2 -98%) and hypoxia 14% O 2 (SaO 2 -89%)) the hindlimb was perfused at a constant flow and the gastrocnemius-plantaris-soleus muscle bundle was stimulated via sciatic nerve (2 Hz, 6-12V, 0.05 ms) to established fatigue. Caffeine (2.5, 5, 10 mM) was supplied to the contracting muscle bundle via the arterial cannula to assess force recovery. Hypoxia, independent of diet, attenuated maximal twitch tension (normoxia: 82 ± 8; hypoxia: 41 ± 2 g·g -1 tissue w.w.). However, rats fed FO sustained higher peak twitch tension compared with the SF and n-6 PUFA groups (P recovery was enhanced in the FO-fed animals (SF: 41 ± 3; n-6 PUFA: 40 ± 4; FO: 52 ± 7% recovery; P < 0.05). These results support a physiological role of DHA in skeletal muscle membranes when exposed to low-oxygen stress that is consistent with the attenuation of muscle fatigue under physiologically normoxic conditions.

  19. Fatigue performance improvement in AISI 4140 steel by dynamic strain aging and dynamic precipitation during warm laser shock peening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Chang [School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Suslov, Sergey; Kim, Bong Joong; Stach, Eric A. [School of Materials Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cheng, Gary J., E-mail: gjcheng@purdue.edu [School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Warm laser shock peening (WLSP) is a thermomechanical treatment technique combining the advantages of laser shock peening and dynamic strain aging (DSA). Through DSA, WLSP of steel increases the dislocation density and stabilizes the dislocation structure by pinning of mobile dislocations by carbon atoms. In addition, WLSP generates nanoscale carbide precipitates through strain-induced precipitation. The carbide precipitates stabilize the microstructure by dislocation pinning. This results in higher stability of the dislocation structure and thus improves the stability of the compressive residual stress. In this study the mechanism of fatigue performance improvement in AISI 4140 steel by WLSP is investigated. It is found that microstructures formed after WLSP lead to a higher stability of dislocation structures and residual stress, which are beneficial for fatigue performance.

  20. Fatigue performance improvement in AISI 4140 steel by dynamic strain aging and dynamic precipitation during warm laser shock peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Chang; Suslov, Sergey; Kim, Bong Joong; Stach, Eric A.; Cheng, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    Warm laser shock peening (WLSP) is a thermomechanical treatment technique combining the advantages of laser shock peening and dynamic strain aging (DSA). Through DSA, WLSP of steel increases the dislocation density and stabilizes the dislocation structure by pinning of mobile dislocations by carbon atoms. In addition, WLSP generates nanoscale carbide precipitates through strain-induced precipitation. The carbide precipitates stabilize the microstructure by dislocation pinning. This results in higher stability of the dislocation structure and thus improves the stability of the compressive residual stress. In this study the mechanism of fatigue performance improvement in AISI 4140 steel by WLSP is investigated. It is found that microstructures formed after WLSP lead to a higher stability of dislocation structures and residual stress, which are beneficial for fatigue performance.

  1. Power and fatigue related characteristics of the equine locomotory muscle. Development, exercise and pathological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbroek, N.J.

    2007-01-01

    The locomotory muscles represent an important determinant of the athletic potential of the horse and hence the ability to compete at a high level. For efficient raising and training, it would be useful to predict the potential of a horse early in life based on the characteristics of the locomotory

  2. Fatigue is associated with muscle weakness in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Knoop, H.; Bleijenberg, G.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that

  3. Cyclic fatigue resistance of ProTaper Universal instruments when subjected to static and dynamic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Hélio P; Britto, Izabelle M O; Elias, Carlos N; Machado de Oliveira, Julio C; Neves, Mônica A S; Moreira, Edson J L; Siqueira, José F

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated the number of cycles to fracture of ProTaper Universal S2 instruments when subjected to static and dynamic cyclic fatigue tests. ProTaper Universal S2 instruments were used until fracture in an artificial curved canal under rotational speed of 300 rpm in either a static or a dynamic test model. Afterward, the length of the fractured segments was measured and fractured surfaces and helical shafts analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The number of cycles to fracture was significantly increased when instruments were tested in the dynamic model (Pductile mode. Plastic deformation was not observed in the helical shaft of fractured instruments. The number of cycles to fracture ProTaper Universal S2 instruments significantly increased with the use of instruments in a dynamic cyclic fatigue test compared with a static model. These findings reinforce the need for performing continuous pecking motions during rotary instrumentation of curved root canals. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Muscle fatigue resistance during stimulated contractions is reduced in young male smokers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morse, C.I.; Wust, R.C.I.; Jones, D.A.; de Haan, A.; Degens, H.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether muscle function is compromised in healthy smokers in comparison with activity-matched non-smokers. Methods: Nine male smokers (aged 22.2 ± 2.5 years: mean ± SD) with a smoking history of 2.5 ± 3.1 pack years, and ten male control participants (25.4 ± 2.9 years) matched for

  5. Neuromuscular function of the quadriceps muscle during isometric maximal, submaximal and submaximal fatiguing voluntary contractions in knee osteoarthrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett Mau-Moeller

    and neuromuscular activation, but also with an impaired position and torque control at submaximal torque levels, an altered EMG-torque relationship and a higher performance fatigability of the quadriceps muscle. It is recommended that the rehabilitation includes strengthening and fatiguing exercises at maximal and submaximal force levels.

  6. Dynamic fatigue of a lithia-alumina-silica glass-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.

    1990-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glass-ceramic in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N = 20) to stress corrosion in ambient conditions. Analysis also indicated the elements should survive applied stresses incurred during grinding and polishing operations.

  7. Crystallographic fatigue crack growth in a polycrystal: simulations based on FEM and discrete dislocation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolino, G.; Sauzay, M.; Bertolino, G.; Doquet, V.

    2003-01-01

    An attempt to model the variability of short cracks development in high-cycle fatigue is made by coupling finite element calculations of the stresses ahead of a microcrack in a polycrystal with simulations of crack growth along slip planes based on discrete dislocations dynamics. The model predicts a large scatter in growth rates related to the roughness of the crack path. It also describes the influence of the mean grain size and the fact that overloads may suppress the endurance limit by allowing arrested cracks to cross the grain boundaries. (authors)

  8. Muscle Fiber Type Composition and Knee Extension Isometric Strength Fatigue Patterns in Power- and Endurance-Trained Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Walter; And Others

    1980-01-01

    There is a degree of uniqueness in fatigue patterns, particularly between different levels of absolute maximum strength. Caution should be used when analyzing fatigue curves among subjects with unspecified strength levels. (CJ)

  9. Force Sense of the Knee Not Affected by Fatiguing the Knee Extensors and Flexors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allison, Katelyn F.; Sell, Timothy C.; Benjaminse, Anne; Lephart, Scott M.

    Context: Knee injuries commonly occur in later stages of competition, indicating that fatigue may influence dynamic knee stability. Force sense (FS) is a submodality of proprioception influenced by muscle mechanoreceptors, which, if negatively affected by fatigue, may result in less-effective

  10. Localized muscle fatigue: review of three experiments Fadiga muscular localizada: revisão de três estudos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatigue considerably affects rehabilitation and ergonomics. Many approaches to this complex phenomenon, ranging from physiological to psychological, have been used to obtain meaningful fatigue measurements. However, none of the methods in the literature measure fatigue directly. It is therefore of considerable interest to determine which indirect methods best represent the state. Method: Fatiguing contraction was measured at maximum voluntary contraction (MVC and 40% MVC in the biceps brachii, quadriceps and erector spinae muscles (three separate experiments. The most-reported objective measurements (contraction force, median electromyographic frequency, heart rate, muscle bed oxygenation and muscle blood volume and subjective measurements (visual analog score, body part discomfort rating and perceived exertion rate were simultaneously recorded. The data from the three experiments underwent separate statistical analysis. Descriptive statistics, linear mixed effects (to examine force fatigue predictability and trend analysis (with between and within-subject correlations were calculated. Results: Univariate ANOVA on all objective variables showed that gender was a significant factor (pContexto: A fadiga afeta consideravelmente a reabilitação e ergonomia. Muitas abordagens a este fenômeno complexo, incluindo fisiológicas e psicológicas, têm sido utilizadas para obter medidas significativas da fadiga. No entanto, nenhum dos métodos descritos na literatura mede diretamente a fadiga. É, portanto de interesse a determinação de quais dos métodos indiretos melhor representa a condição de fadiga. Método: A fadiga por contração foi medida na contração voluntária máxima (CVM e 40% da CVM em músculos bíceps braquial, quadríceps e músculos eretores da coluna (três avaliações independentes. As medidas objetivas mais relatadas (força de contração, freqüência mediana na eletromiografia, freqüência cardíaca, oxigena

  11. GSNOR Deficiency Enhances In Situ Skeletal Muscle Strength, Fatigue Resistance, and RyR1 S-Nitrosylation Without Impacting Mitochondrial Content and Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Younghye; Cao, Yenong; Zhu, Jingjing; Xu, Yuanyuan; Balkan, Wayne; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Diaz, Francisca; Kerrick, W. Glenn; Hare, Joshua M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Nitric oxide (NO) plays important, but incompletely defined roles in skeletal muscle. NO exerts its regulatory effects partly though S-nitrosylation, which is balanced by denitrosylation by enzymes such as S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), whose functions in skeletal muscle remain to be fully deciphered. Results: GSNOR null (GSNOR−/−) tibialis anterior (TA) muscles showed normal growth and were stronger and more fatigue resistant than controls in situ. However, GSNOR−/− lumbrical muscles showed normal contractility and Ca2+ handling in vitro, suggesting important differences in GSNOR function between muscles or between in vitro and in situ environments. GSNOR−/− TA muscles exhibited normal mitochondrial content, and capillary densities, but reduced type IIA fiber content. GSNOR inhibition did not impact mitochondrial respiratory complex I, III, or IV activities. These findings argue that enhanced GSNOR−/− TA contractility is not driven by changes in mitochondrial content or activity, fiber type, or blood vessel density. However, loss of GSNOR led to RyR1 hypernitrosylation, which is believed to increase muscle force output under physiological conditions. cGMP synthesis by soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) was decreased in resting GSNOR−/− muscle and was more responsive to agonist (DETANO, BAY 41, and BAY 58) stimulation, suggesting that GSNOR modulates cGMP production in skeletal muscle. Innovation: GSNOR may act as a “brake” on skeletal muscle contractile performance under physiological conditions by modulating nitrosylation/denitrosylation balance. Conclusions: GSNOR may play important roles in skeletal muscle contractility, RyR1 S-nitrosylation, fiber type specification, and sGC activity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 165–181. PMID:27412893

  12. Spin-trappers and vitamin E prolong endurance to muscle fatigue in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novelli, G.P.; Bracciotti, G.; Falsini, S. (Univ. of Florence (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    The involvement of free radicals in endurance to muscle effort is suggested by experimental and clinical data. Therefore, experiments have been performed to observe the effect of trapping free radicals on endurance to swimming in mice. Animals were injected intraperitoneally with each of three spin-trappers (N-tert-Butyl-alpha-Phenyl-Nitrone (PBN),alpha-4-Pyridyil-1-Oxide-N-tert-Butyl-Nitrone (POBN) and 5,5-Dimethyl-1-Pirrolyn-N-Oxide (DMPO): 0.2 ml of 10(-1) molar solution). Each mouse was submitted to a swimming test to control resistance to exhaustion (a) without any treatment, (b) after administration of each spin-trapper in a random order (c) after saline. Control experiments were performed with saline and with vitamin E. Endurance to swimming was greatly prolonged by pretreatment with all the spin-trappers (DMPO less than 0.0001; POBN less than 0.0001; PBN less than 0.001) and with Vitamin E. Experiments state that compared to treatment with spin-trappers or Vitamin E, administration of saline alone did not enhance time to exhaustion so that the increase in time to exhaustion with the various free radical scavengers was not the effect of training. Therefore, free radicals could be considered as one of the factors terminating muscle effort in mice.

  13. Brain Dynamics in Predicting Driving Fatigue Using a Recurrent Self-Evolving Fuzzy Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Lin, Yang-Yin; Wu, Shang-Lin; Chuang, Chun-Hsiang; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a generalized prediction system called a recurrent self-evolving fuzzy neural network (RSEFNN) that employs an on-line gradient descent learning rule to address the electroencephalography (EEG) regression problem in brain dynamics for driving fatigue. The cognitive states of drivers significantly affect driving safety; in particular, fatigue driving, or drowsy driving, endangers both the individual and the public. For this reason, the development of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that can identify drowsy driving states is a crucial and urgent topic of study. Many EEG-based BCIs have been developed as artificial auxiliary systems for use in various practical applications because of the benefits of measuring EEG signals. In the literature, the efficacy of EEG-based BCIs in recognition tasks has been limited by low resolutions. The system proposed in this paper represents the first attempt to use the recurrent fuzzy neural network (RFNN) architecture to increase adaptability in realistic EEG applications to overcome this bottleneck. This paper further analyzes brain dynamics in a simulated car driving task in a virtual-reality environment. The proposed RSEFNN model is evaluated using the generalized cross-subject approach, and the results indicate that the RSEFNN is superior to competing models regardless of the use of recurrent or nonrecurrent structures.

  14. Stress Analysis and Fatigue Behaviour of PTFE-Bronze Layered Journal Bearing under Real-Time Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, M. S.; Kaplan, E.; Cuvalcı, O.

    2018-01-01

    The present paper is based on experimental studies and numerical simulations on the surface fatigue failure of the PTFE-bronze layered journal bearings under real-time loading. ‘Permaglide Plain Bearings P10’ type journal bearings were experimentally tested under different real time dynamic loadings by using real time journal bearing test system in our laboratory. The journal bearing consists of a PTFE-bronze layer approximately 0.32 mm thick on the steel support layer with 2.18 mm thick. Two different approaches have been considered with in experiments: (i) under real- time constant loading with varying bearing widths, (ii) under different real-time loadings at constant bearing widths. Fatigue regions, micro-crack dispersion and stress distributions occurred at the journal bearing were experimentally and theoretically investigated. The relation between fatigue region and pressure distributions were investigated by determining the circumferential pressure distribution under real-time dynamic loadings for the position of every 10° crank angles. In the theoretical part; stress and deformation distributions at the surface of the journal bearing analysed by using finite element methods to determine the relationship between stress and fatigue behaviour. As a result of this study, the maximum oil pressure and fatigue cracks were observed in the most heavily loaded regions of the bearing surface. Experimental results show that PTFE-Bronze layered journal bearings fatigue behaviour is better than the bearings include white metal alloy.

  15. The Effect of Local Fatigue Induced at Proximal and Distal Muscles of Lower Extremity in Sagittal Plane on Visual Dependency in Quiet Standing Postural Stability of Healthy Young Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manijeh Soleymani-Far

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of local muscle fatigue induced at proximal and distal segments of lower extremity on sagittal plane mover on visual dependency in quiet standing postural stability. Materials & Methods: In this Quasi–experimental study (before – after comparison sagittal plane prime movers of the ankle and hip musculature were fatigued using isokinetic contractions at two test sessions with a randomized order and one week interval. Twenty five healthy young female students were َselected by using non probability selection and sample of convenience and asked to maintain single leg upright posture as immobile as possible. RMS and SD of Center of Pressure displacements were assessed in 30 seconds and consequently, the eyes were closed after 15 seconds. A analysis of variance (ANOVA for repeated measures was used to analyze the effect of the following factors over two periods of 5 seconds immediately before and after eye closure: (1 fatigue, (2 vision, (3 segment of fatigue. Results: The main effects of each within-subject factors (fatigue, vision and segment of fatigue were significant (P<0.05. The analysis of RMS and SD of Center of Pressure demonstrated a significant interaction between fatigue and vision, and fatigue and segment of fatigue so that the effects of Fatigue on Proximal segment and eye closed conditions were increased. Conclusion: The visual dependency for control of postural stability incremented following muscle fatigue. Proximal muscle fatigue lead to exaggeration of visual dependency for control of postural stability. Based on the present results, emphasis on the proprioception of proximal segment of lower extremity may be recommended for postural stability training.

  16. Quantification of dynamic property of pneumatic muscle actuator for design of therapeutic robot control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; Huang, He; He, Jiping

    2006-01-01

    Robot-assisted therapy has shown potential in neuromotor rehabilitation. A therapeutic robot driven by pneumatic muscle actuators has been developed in our research group. However, the design of fine and real-time feedback robot control is a challenge. One of the difficulties is the lack of a general dynamic model of the pneumatic muscle actuator. In this study, a phenomenological model has been developed to quantify the dynamic behavior of pneumatic muscle actuator by fitting the experimental length response of the pneumatic muscle, to a step pressure input. In addition, comparison of the dynamic responses of two pneumatic muscles of different dimensions has also been studied. Several control strategies for the pneumatic muscle actuator are discussed based on the results from this study.

  17. Positron emission tomography detects greater blood flow and less blood flow heterogeneity in the exercising skeletal muscles of old compared with young men during fatiguing contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudroff, Thorsten; Weissman, Jessica A; Bucci, Marco; Seppänen, Marko; Kaskinoro, Kimmo; Heinonen, Ilkka; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate blood flow and its heterogeneity within and among the knee muscles in five young (26 ± 6 years) and five old (77 ± 6 years) healthy men with similar levels of physical activity while they performed two types of submaximal fatiguing isometric contraction that required either force or position control. Positron emission tomography (PET) and [15O]-H2O were used to determine blood flow at 2 min (beginning) and 12 min (end) after the start of the tasks. Young and old men had similar maximal forces and endurance times for the fatiguing tasks. Although muscle volumes were lower in the older subjects, total muscle blood flow was similar in both groups (young men: 25.8 ± 12.6 ml min−1; old men: 25.1 ± 15.4 ml min−1; age main effect, P = 0.77) as blood flow per unit mass of muscle in the exercising knee extensors was greater in the older (12.5 ± 6.2 ml min−1 (100 g)−1) than the younger (8.6 ± 3.6 ml min−1 (100 g)−1) men (age main effect, P = 0.001). Further, blood flow heterogeneity in the exercising knee extensors was significantly lower in the older (56 ± 27%) than the younger (67 ± 34%) men. Together, these data show that although skeletal muscles are smaller in older subjects, based on the intact neural drive to the muscle and the greater, less heterogeneous blood flow per gram of muscle, old fit muscle achieves adequate exercise hyperaemia. Key points The results of previous studies that attempted to demonstrate the effects of ageing on skeletal muscle blood flow are controversial because these studies used indirect assessments of skeletal muscle blood flow obtained via whole limb blood flow measurements that provide no information on the distribution of blood flow within particular muscles. We used positron emission tomography to measure blood flow per gram of muscle in old and young men with similar levels of physical activity

  18. In-Vivo Measurement of Muscle Tension: Dynamic Properties of the MC Sensor during Isometric Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srđan Đorđević

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue structure in our body and plays an essential role for producing motion through integrated action with bones, tendons, ligaments and joints, for stabilizing body position, for generation of heat through cell respiration and for blood glucose disposal. A key function of skeletal muscle is force generation. Non-invasive and selective measurement of muscle contraction force in the field and in clinical settings has always been challenging. The aim of our work has been to develop a sensor that can overcome these difficulties and therefore enable measurement of muscle force during different contraction conditions. In this study, we tested the mechanical properties of a “Muscle Contraction” (MC sensor during isometric muscle contraction in different length/tension conditions. The MC sensor is attached so that it indents the skin overlying a muscle group and detects varying degrees of tension during muscular contraction. We compared MC sensor readings over the biceps brachii (BB muscle to dynamometric measurements of force of elbow flexion, together with recordings of surface EMG signal of BB during isometric contractions at 15° and 90° of elbow flexion. Statistical correlation between MC signal and force was very high at 15° (r = 0.976 and 90° (r = 0.966 across the complete time domain. Normalized SD or σN = σ/max(FMC was used as a measure of linearity of MC signal and elbow flexion force in dynamic conditions. The average was 8.24% for an elbow angle of 90° and 10.01% for an elbow of angle 15°, which indicates high linearity and good dynamic properties of MC sensor signal when compared to elbow flexion force. The next step of testing MC sensor potential will be to measure tension of muscle-tendon complex in conditions when length and tension change simultaneously during human motion.

  19. Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, S; Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D

    2000-01-01

    +. Calf muscle pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale. On average, [K+]I was 4.4 mmol l(-1) at rest and increased during minutes 3-5 of incremental exercise by approximately 1-7 mmol l(-1) as a positive function of power output. K+ release also increased as a function of exercise intensity......Changes in the concentration of interstitial K+ surrounding skeletal muscle fibres ([K+]I) probably play some role in the regulation of cardiovascular adjustments to muscular activity, as well as in the aetiology of muscle pain and fatigue during high-intensity exercise. However, there is very...... little information on the response of [K+]I to exercise in human skeletal muscle. Five young healthy subjects performed plantar flexion exercise for four 5 min periods at increasing power outputs ( approximately 1-6 W) with 10 min intervening recovery periods, as well as for two 5 min periods...

  20. Muscle blood flow at onset of dynamic exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rådegran, G; Saltin, B

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the temporal relationship between blood flow, blood pressure, and muscle contractions, we continuously measured femoral arterial inflow with ultrasound Doppler at onset of passive exercise and voluntary, one-legged, dynamic knee-extensor exercise in humans. Blood velocity and inflow increased (P dicrotic and diastolic blood pressure notches, respectively. Mechanical hindrance occurred (P dicrotic notch. The increase in blood flow (Q) was characterized by a one-component (approximately 15% of peak power output), two-component (approximately 40-70% of peak power output), or three-component exponential model (> or = 75% of peak power output), where Q(t) = Qpassive + delta Q1.[1 - e-(t - TD1/tau 1)]+ delta Q2.[1 - e-(t - TD2/tau 2)]+ delta Q3.[1 - e-(t - TD3/tau 3)]; Qpassive, the blood flow during passive leg movement, equals 1.17 +/- 0.11 l/min; TD is the onset latency; tau is the time constant; delta Q is the magnitude of blood flow rise; and subscripts 1-3 refer to the first, second, and third components of the exponential model, respectively. The time to reach 50% of the difference between passive and voluntary asymptotic blood flow was approximately 2.2-8.9 s. The blood flow leveled off after approximately 10-150 s, related to the power outputs. It is concluded that the elevation in blood flow with the first duty cycle(s) is due to muscle mechanical factors, but vasodilators initiate a more potent amplification within the second to fourth contraction.

  1. Fatigue behaviour of core-spun yarns containing filament by means of cyclic dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esin, S.; Osman, B.

    2017-10-01

    The behaviour of yarns under dynamic loading is important that leads to understand the growth characteristics which is exposed to repetitive loadings during usage of fabric made from these yarns. Fabric growth is undesirable property that originated from low resilience characteristics of fabric. In this study, the effects of the filament fineness and yarn linear density on fatigue behaviour of rigid-core spun yarns were determined. Cotton covered yarns containing different filament fineness of polyester (PET) draw textured yarns (DTY) (100d/36f, 100d/96f, 100d/144f, 100d/192f and 100d/333f) and yarn linear densities (37 tex, 30 tex, 25 tex and 21 tex) were manufactured by using a modified ring spinning system at the same spinning parameters. Repetitive loads were applied for 25 cycles at levels between 0.1 and 3 N. Dynamic modulus and dynamic strain of yarn samples were analyzed statistically. Results showed that filament fineness and yarn linear density have significance effect on dynamic modulus and dynamic strain after cyclic loading.

  2. Selective fatigue of fast motor units after electrically elicited muscle contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Taku; Kimura, Tetsuya; Moritani, Toshio

    2004-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the electrophysiological manifestations of selective fast motor unit (MU) activation by electrical stimulation (ES) of knee extensor muscles. In six male subjects, test contraction measurement at 40% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was performed before and at every 5 min (5, 10, 15 and 20 min) during 20-min low intensity intermittent exercise of either ES or voluntary contractions (VC) at 10% MVC (5-s isometric contraction and 5-s rest cycles). Both isolated intramuscular MU spikes obtained from three sets of bipolar fine-wire electrodes and surface electromyogram (EMG) were simultaneously recorded and were analyzed by means of a computer-aided intramuscular spike amplitude-frequency analysis and frequency power spectral analysis, respectively. Results indicated that mean MU spike amplitude, particularly those MUs with relatively large amplitude, was significantly reduced while those MUs with small spike amplitude increased their firing rate during the 40% MVC test contraction after the ES. This was accompanied by the increased amplitude of surface EMG (rmsEMG). However, no such significant changes in the intramuscular and surface EMGs were observed after VC. These findings indicated differential MU activation patterns in terms of MU recruitment and rate coding characteristics during ES and VC, respectively. Our data strongly suggest the possibility of "an inverse size principle" of MU recruitment during ES.

  3. The effects of elevated levels of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO₃) on the acute power output and time to fatigue of maximally stimulated mouse soleus and EDL muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, M F; Tallis, J; Price, M J; James, R S

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the effects of elevated buffer capacity [~32 mM HCO₃(-)] through administration of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO₃) on maximally stimulated isolated mouse soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles undergoing cyclical length changes at 37 °C. The elevated buffering capacity was of an equivalent level to that achieved in humans with acute oral supplementation. We evaluated the acute effects of elevated [HCO₃(-)] on (1) maximal acute power output (PO) and (2) time to fatigue to 60 % of maximum control PO (TLIM60), the level of decline in muscle PO observed in humans undertaking similar exercise, using the work loop technique. Acute PO was on average 7.0 ± 4.8 % greater for NaHCO₃-treated EDL muscles (P < 0.001; ES = 2.0) and 3.6 ± 1.8 % greater for NaHCO₃-treated SOL muscles (P < 0.001; ES = 2.3) compared to CON. Increases in PO were likely due to greater force production throughout shortening. The acute effects of NaHCO₃ on EDL were significantly greater (P < 0.001; ES = 0.9) than on SOL. Treatment of EDL (P = 0.22; ES = 0.6) and SOL (P = 0.19; ES = 0.9) with NaHCO₃ did not alter the pattern of fatigue. Although significant differences were not observed in whole group data, the fatigability of muscle performance was variable, suggesting that there might be inter-individual differences in response to NaHCO₃ supplementation. These results present the best indication to date that NaHCO₃ has direct peripheral effects on mammalian skeletal muscle resulting in increased acute power output.

  4. Cognitive and Physical Fatigue Tasks Enhance Pain, Cognitive Fatigue and Physical Fatigue in People with Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Dana L; Keffala, Valerie J; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia is a condition characterized by chronic widespread muscle pain and fatigue. The primary objective of this study was to determine if pain, perceived cognitive fatigue, and perceived physical fatigue were enhanced in participants with fibromyalgia compared to healthy controls during a cognitive fatigue task, a physical fatigue task and a dual fatigue task. Methods Twenty four people with fibromyalgia and 33 healthy controls completed pain, fatigue and function measures. A cognitive fatigue task (Controlled Oral Word Association Test) and physical fatigue task (Valpar peg test) were done individually and combined for a dual fatigue task. Resting pain, perceived cognitive fatigue and perceived physical fatigue were assessed during each task using visual analogue scales. Function was assessed with shoulder range of motion and grip. Results People with fibromyalgia had significantly higher increases in pain, cognitive fatigue and physical fatigue when compared to healthy controls after completion of a cognitive fatigue task, a physical fatigue task, or a dual fatigue task (pfatigue tasks, respectively. Conclusions These data show that people with fibromyalgia show larger increases in pain, perceived cognitive fatigue and perceived physical fatigue to both cognitive and physical fatigue tasks compared to healthy controls. The increases in pain and fatigue during cognitive and physical fatigue tasks could influence subject participation in daily activities and rehabilitation. PMID:25074583

  5. Impact of C 60 fullerene on the dynamics of force-speed changes in soleus muscle of rat at ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozdrenko, D M; Bogutska, K I; Prylutskyy, Yu I; Korolovych, V F; Evstigneev, M P; Ritter, U; Scharff, P

    2015-01-01

    The effect of C60 fullerene nanoparticles (30-90 nm) on dynamics of force response development to stimulated soleus muscle of rat with ischemic pathology, existing in muscle during the first 5 hours and first 5 days after 2 hours of ischemia and further reperfusion, was investigated using the tensometric method. It was found that intravenous and intramuscular administration of C60 fullerene with a single dose of 1 mg/kg exert different therapeutic effects dependent on the investigated macroparameters of muscle contraction. The intravenous drug administration was shown to be the most optimal for correction of the velocity macroparameters of contraction due to muscle tissue ischemic damage. In contrast, the intramuscular administration displays protective action with respect to motions associated with generation of maximal force response or continuous contractions elevating the level of muscle fatigue. Hence, C60 fullerene, being a strong antioxidant, may be considered as a promising agent for effective therapy of pathological states of the muscle system caused by pathological action of free radical processes.

  6. An Accurate and Dynamic Computer Graphics Muscle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, David Asher

    1997-01-01

    A computer based musculo-skeletal model was developed at the University in the departments of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering. This model accurately represents human shoulder kinematics. The result of this model is the graphical display of bones moving through an appropriate range of motion based on inputs of EMGs and external forces. The need existed to incorporate a geometric muscle model in the larger musculo-skeletal model. Previous muscle models did not accurately represent muscle geometries, nor did they account for the kinematics of tendons. This thesis covers the creation of a new muscle model for use in the above musculo-skeletal model. This muscle model was based on anatomical data from the Visible Human Project (VHP) cadaver study. Two-dimensional digital images from the VHP were analyzed and reconstructed to recreate the three-dimensional muscle geometries. The recreated geometries were smoothed, reduced, and sliced to form data files defining the surfaces of each muscle. The muscle modeling function opened these files during run-time and recreated the muscle surface. The modeling function applied constant volume limitations to the muscle and constant geometry limitations to the tendons.

  7. Dynamic and cyclic fatigue of engine-driven rotary nickel-titanium endodontic instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïkel, Y; Serfaty, R; Bateman, G; Senger, B; Allemann, C

    1999-06-01

    The absence of adequate testing standards for engine-driven nickel-titanium (NiTi) instruments necessitates further study of these instruments in all areas. This study examined three groups of engine-driven rotary NiTi endodontic instruments (Profile, Hero, and Quantec) and assessed the times for dynamic fracture in relation to the radius of curvature to which the instruments were subjected during preparation, with the instrument diameter determined by size and taper and the mode by which the fracture occurred. Ten instruments were randomly selected representing each size and taper for each group and for each radius of curvature: 600 in total. The instruments were rotated at 350 rpm and introduced into a tempered steel curve that simulated a canal. Two radii of curvature of canals were used: 5 and 10 mm. Time at fracture was noted for all files, and the fracture faces of each file were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Radius of curvature was found to be the most significant factor in determining the fatigue resistance of the files. As radius of curvature decreased, fracture time decreased. Taper of files was found to be significant in determining fracture time. As diameter increased, fracture time decreased. In all cases, fracture was found to be of a ductile nature, thus implicating cyclic fatigue as a major cause of failure and necessitating further analyses and setting of standards in this area.

  8. Dynamic Regulation of Sarcomeric Actin Filaments in Striated Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2010-01-01

    In striated muscle, the actin cytoskeleton is differentiated into myofibrils. Actin and myosin filaments are organized in sarcomeres and specialized for producing contractile forces. Regular arrangement of actin filaments with uniform length and polarity is critical for the contractile function. However, the mechanisms of assembly and maintenance of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle are not completely understood. Live imaging of actin in striated muscle has revealed that actin sub...

  9. Dynamic adaptation of tendon and muscle connective tissue to mechanical loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Koskinen, Satu Osmi Anneli

    2008-01-01

    The connective tissue of tendon and skeletal muscle is a crucial structure for force transmission. A dynamic adaptive capacity of these tissues in healthy individuals is evident from reports of altered gene expression and protein levels of the fibrillar and network-forming collagens, when subjected...... in this article provide strong evidence for the highly adaptable nature of connective tissue in muscle and tendon....

  10. Evaluation of muscle activity for loaded and unloaded dynamic squats during vertical whole-body vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Tom J; Kenno, Kenji A; Jakobi, Jennifer M

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine if the addition of a light external load would enhance whole-body vibration (WBV)-induced increases in muscle activity during dynamic squatting in 4 leg muscles. Thirteen recreationally active male university students performed a series of dynamic squats (unloaded with no WBV, unloaded with WBV, loaded with no WBV, and loaded with WBV). The load was set to 30% of body mass and WBV included 25-, 35-, and 45-Hz frequencies with 4-mm amplitude. Muscle activity was recorded with surface electromyography (EMG) on the vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA), and gastrocnemius (GC) and is reported as EMGrms (root mean square) normalized to %maximal voluntary exertion. During unloaded dynamic squats, exposure to WBV (45 Hz) significantly (p squat exercise in all muscles but decreased the TA. This loaded level of muscle activity was further increased with WBV (45 Hz) in all muscles. The WBV-induced increases in muscle activity in the loaded condition (approximately 3.5%) were of a similar magnitude to the WBV-induced increases during the unloaded condition (approximately 2.5%) demonstrating the addition of WBV to unloaded or loaded dynamic squatting results in an increase in muscle activity. These results demonstrate the potential effectiveness of using external loads with exposure to WBV.

  11. Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) is a progressive wave tube test facility that is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to...

  12. Effects of Force Load, Muscle Fatigue, and Magnetic Stimulation on Surface Electromyography during Side Arm Lateral Raise Task: A Preliminary Study with Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liu; Wang, Ying; Hao, Dongmei; Rong, Yao; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Song; Zheng, Dingchang

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively investigate the effects of force load, muscle fatigue, and extremely low-frequency (ELF) magnetic stimulation on surface electromyography (SEMG) signal features during side arm lateral raise task. SEMG signals were recorded from 18 healthy subjects on the anterior deltoid using a BIOSEMI ActiveTwo system during side lateral raise task (with the right arm 90 degrees away from the body) with three different loads on the forearm (0 kg, 1 kg, and 3 kg; their order was randomized between subjects). The arm maintained the loads until the subject felt exhausted. The first 10 s recording for each load was regarded as nonfatigue status and the last 10 s before the subject was exhausted was regarded as fatigue status. The subject was then given a five-minute resting between different loads. Two days later, the same experiment was repeated on every subject, and this time the ELF magnetic stimulation was applied to the subject's deltoid muscle during the five-minute rest period. Three commonly used SEMG features, root mean square (RMS), median frequency (MDF), and sample entropy (SampEn), were analyzed and compared between different loads, nonfatigue/fatigue status, and ELF stimulation and no stimulation. Variance analysis results showed that the effect of force load on RMS was significant ( p 0.05). In comparison with nonfatigue status, for all the different force loads with and without ELF stimulation, RMS was significantly larger at fatigue (all p < 0.001) and MDF and SampEn were significantly smaller (all p < 0.001).

  13. Effects of Force Load, Muscle Fatigue, and Magnetic Stimulation on Surface Electromyography during Side Arm Lateral Raise Task: A Preliminary Study with Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to quantitatively investigate the effects of force load, muscle fatigue, and extremely low-frequency (ELF magnetic stimulation on surface electromyography (SEMG signal features during side arm lateral raise task. SEMG signals were recorded from 18 healthy subjects on the anterior deltoid using a BIOSEMI ActiveTwo system during side lateral raise task (with the right arm 90 degrees away from the body with three different loads on the forearm (0 kg, 1 kg, and 3 kg; their order was randomized between subjects. The arm maintained the loads until the subject felt exhausted. The first 10 s recording for each load was regarded as nonfatigue status and the last 10 s before the subject was exhausted was regarded as fatigue status. The subject was then given a five-minute resting between different loads. Two days later, the same experiment was repeated on every subject, and this time the ELF magnetic stimulation was applied to the subject’s deltoid muscle during the five-minute rest period. Three commonly used SEMG features, root mean square (RMS, median frequency (MDF, and sample entropy (SampEn, were analyzed and compared between different loads, nonfatigue/fatigue status, and ELF stimulation and no stimulation. Variance analysis results showed that the effect of force load on RMS was significant (p0.05. In comparison with nonfatigue status, for all the different force loads with and without ELF stimulation, RMS was significantly larger at fatigue (all p<0.001 and MDF and SampEn were significantly smaller (all p<0.001.

  14. Standard practice for verification of constant amplitude dynamic forces in an axial fatigue testing system

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for the dynamic verification of cyclic force amplitude control or measurement accuracy during constant amplitude testing in an axial fatigue testing system. It is based on the premise that force verification can be done with the use of a strain gaged elastic element. Use of this practice gives assurance that the accuracies of forces applied by the machine or dynamic force readings from the test machine, at the time of the test, after any user applied correction factors, fall within the limits recommended in Section 9. It does not address static accuracy which must first be addressed using Practices E 4 or equivalent. 1.2 Verification is specific to a particular test machine configuration and specimen. This standard is recommended to be used for each configuration of testing machine and specimen. Where dynamic correction factors are to be applied to test machine force readings in order to meet the accuracy recommended in Section 9, the verification is also specific to the c...

  15. A low cycle fatigue model for low carbon manganese steel including the effect of dynamic strain aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhi Yong, E-mail: huangzy@scu.edu.cn [Sichuan University, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, No.29 Jiuyanqiao Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Wagner, Danièle [Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense (France); Wang, Qing Yuan; Khan, Muhammad Kashif [Sichuan University, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, No.29 Jiuyanqiao Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Chaboche, Jean–Louis [ONERA, DMSM, 29 avenue de la Division Lecerc, F-92320, Chatillon (France)

    2016-01-27

    Carbon–manganese steel A48 (French standards) is used in steam generator pipes of the nuclear power plant where it is subjected to the cyclic thermal load. The Dynamic Strain Aging (DSA) influences the mechanical behavior of the steel in low cycle fatigue (LCF) at favorable temperature and strain rate. The peak stress of A48 steel experiences hardening–softening–hardening (HSH) evolution at 200 °C and 0.4% s{sup −1} strain rate in fatigue loading. In this study, isotropic and kinematic hardening rules with DSA effect have been modified. The HSH evolution of cyclic stress associated with cumulative plastic deformation has also been estimated.

  16. Cognitive fatigue in patients with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Berit; Schweden, Tabea L K; Mehl, Theresa; Menge, Uwe; Zierz, Stephan

    2017-09-01

    Cognitive fatigue has frequently been reported in myasthenia gravis (MG). However, objective assessment of cognitive fatigability has never been evaluated. Thirty-three MG patients with stable generalized disease and 17 healthy controls underwent a test battery including repeated testing of attention and concentration (d2-R) and Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test. Fatigability was based on calculation of linear trend (LT) reflecting dynamic performance within subsequent constant time intervals. Additionally, fatigue questionnaires were used. MG patients showed a negative LT in second d2-R testing, indicating cognitive fatigability. This finding significantly differed from stable cognitive performance in controls (P fatigue was significantly higher in MG patients compared with controls (P fatigue is not correlated with objective findings. Muscle Nerve 56: 449-457, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. TauG-guidance of dynamic balance control during gait initiation in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Omid; Stensdotter, Ann-Katrin; Van der Meer, Audrey L H

    2016-08-01

    Impaired postural control has been reported in static conditions in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, but postural control in dynamic tasks have not yet been investigated. Thus, we investigated measurements from a force plate to evaluate dynamic balance control during gait initiation in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia compared to matched healthy controls. Thirty female participants (10 per group) performed five trials of gait initiation. Center of pressure (CoP) trajectory of the initial weight shift onto the supporting foot in the mediolateral direction (CoPX) was analyzed using General Tau Theory. We investigated the hypothesis that tau of the CoPX motion-gap (τCoPx) is coupled onto an intrinsic tauG-guide (τG) by keeping the relation τCoPx=KτG, where K is a scaling factor that determines the relevant kinematics of a movement. Mean K values were 0.57, 0.55, and 0.50 in fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and healthy controls, respectively. Both patient groups showed K values significantly higher than 0.50 (P0.5). The findings revealed a lower level of dynamic postural control in both fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome compared to controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Design and Dynamic Model of a Frog-inspired Swimming Robot Powered by Pneumatic Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ji-Zhuang; Zhang, Wei; Kong, Peng-Cheng; Cai, He-Gao; Liu, Gang-Feng

    2017-09-01

    Pneumatic muscles with similar characteristics to biological muscles have been widely used in robots, and thus are promising drivers for frog inspired robots. However, the application and nonlinearity of the pneumatic system limit the advance. On the basis of the swimming mechanism of the frog, a frog-inspired robot based on pneumatic muscles is developed. To realize the independent tasks by the robot, a pneumatic system with internal chambers, micro air pump, and valves is implemented. The micro pump is used to maintain the pressure difference between the source and exhaust chambers. The pneumatic muscles are controlled by high-speed switch valves which can reduce the robot cost, volume, and mass. A dynamic model of the pneumatic system is established for the simulation to estimate the system, including the chamber, muscle, and pneumatic circuit models. The robot design is verified by the robot swimming experiments and the dynamic model is verified through the experiments and simulations of the pneumatic system. The simulation results are compared to analyze the functions of the source pressure, internal volume of the muscle, and circuit flow rate which is proved the main factor that limits the response of muscle pressure. The proposed research provides the application of the pneumatic muscles in the frog inspired robot and the pneumatic model to study muscle controller.

  19. The Effort to Reduce a Muscle Fatigue Through Gymnastics Relaxation and Ergonomic Approach for Computer Users in Central Building State University of Medan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultom, Syamsul; Darma Sitepu, Indra; Hasibuan, Nurman

    2018-03-01

    Fatigue due to long and continuous computer usage can lead to problems of dominant fatigue associated with decreased performance and work motivation. Specific targets in the first phase have been achieved in this research such as: (1) Identified complaints on workers using computers, using the Bourdon Wiersma test kit. (2) Finding the right relaxation & work posture draft for a solution to reduce muscle fatigue in computer-based workers. The type of research used in this study is research and development method which aims to produce the products or refine existing products. The final product is a prototype of back-holder, monitoring filter and arranging a relaxation exercise as well as the manual book how to do this while in front of the computer to lower the fatigue level for computer users in Unimed’s Administration Center. In the first phase, observations and interviews have been conducted and identified the level of fatigue on the employees of computer users at Uniemd’s Administration Center using Bourdon Wiersma test and has obtained the following results: (1) The average velocity time of respondents in BAUK, BAAK and BAPSI after working with the value of interpretation of the speed obtained value of 8.4, WS 13 was in a good enough category, (2) The average of accuracy of respondents in BAUK, in BAAK and in BAPSI after working with interpretation value accuracy obtained Value of 5.5, WS 8 was in doubt-category. This result shows that computer users experienced a significant tiredness at the Unimed Administration Center, (3) the consistency of the average of the result in measuring tiredness level on computer users in Unimed’s Administration Center after working with values in consistency of interpretation obtained Value of 5.5 with WS 8 was put in a doubt-category, which means computer user in The Unimed Administration Center suffered an extreme fatigue. In phase II, based on the results of the first phase in this research, the researcher offers

  20. Dynamic strain ageing in Inconel® Alloy 783 under tension and low cycle fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagesha, A.; Goyal, Sunil; Nandagopal, M.; Parameswaran, P.; Sandhya, R.; Mathew, M.D.; Mannan, Sarwan K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Low cycle fatigue (LCF) and tensile tests were performed on Inconel ® Alloy 783. ► A stable cyclic stress response followed by continuous softening was noted under LCF. ► Material exhibited DSA in the temperature range, 573–723 K. ► Occurrence of DSA reduced the extent of cycling softening in LCF. ► Both interstitial and substitutional atoms were found to be responsible for DSA. - Abstract: Low cycle fatigue (LCF) tests were performed on Inconel ® Alloy 783 at a strain rate of 3 × 10 −3 s −1 and a strain amplitude of ±0.6%, employing various temperatures in the range 300–923 K. A continuous reduction in the LCF life was observed with increase in the test temperature. The material generally showed a stable stress response followed by a region of continuous softening up to failure. However, in the temperature range of 573–723 K, the alloy was seen to exhibit dynamic strain ageing (DSA) which was observed to reduce the extent of cyclic softening. With a view to identifying the operative mechanisms responsible for DSA, tensile tests were conducted at temperatures in the range, 473–798 K with strain rates varying from 3 × 10 −5 s −1 to 3 × 10 −3 s −1 . Interaction of dislocations with interstitial (C) and substitutional (Cr) atoms respectively, in the lower and higher temperature regimes was found to be responsible for DSA. Further, the friction stress, as determined using the stabilised stress–strain hysteresis loops, was seen to show a more prominent peak in the DSA range, compared to the maximum tensile stress.

  1. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Kiens, Bente; Saltin, Bengt

    1988-01-01

    uptake was not compensated for by increased uptake of free fatty acids but was accompanied by decreases in plasma insulin and increases in plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine. During work with large muscle masses, arterial lactate increased to approximately 6 mM, and net leg lactate release reverted......To study the role of muscle mass in glucoregulation, six subjects worked with the knee extensors of one leg on a specially constructed cycle ergometer. The knee extensors of one leg worked either alone or in combination with the knee extensors of the other leg and/or with the arms. Substrate usage...... to net lactate uptake. Decreased glucose uptake could not be explained by decreased perfusion. It is concluded that thigh muscle glucose uptake is affected by the size of the total muscle mass engaged in exercise. The decrease in thigh glucose uptake, when arm cranking was added and O2 uptake...

  2. Real-time Fatigue and Free-Living Physical Activity in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Cancer Survivors and Healthy Controls: A Preliminary Examination of the Temporal, Dynamic Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Kim, Inah; Park, Chang; Peters, Tara

    Fatigue and physical inactivity, critical problems facing cancer survivors, impact overall health and functioning. Our group designed a novel methodology to evaluate the temporal, dynamic patterns in real-world settings. Using real-time technology, the temporal, dynamic relationship between real-time fatigue and free-living is described and compared in cancer survivors who were treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (n = 25) and age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n = 25). Subjects wore wrist actigraphs on their nondominant hand to assess free-living physical activity, measured in 1-minute epochs, over 7 days. Subjects entered real-time fatigue assessments directly into the subjective event marker of the actigraph 5 times per day. Running averages of mean 1-minute activity counts 30, 60, and 120 minutes before and after each real-time fatigue score were correlated with real-time fatigue using generalized estimating equations, RESULTS:: A strong inverse relationship exists between real-time fatigue and subsequent free-living physical activity. This inverse relationship suggests that increasing real-time fatigue limits subsequent physical activity (B range= -0.002 to -0.004; P < .001). No significant differences in the dynamic patterns of real-time fatigue and free-living physical activity were found between groups. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document the temporal and potentially causal relationship between real-time fatigue and free-living physical activity in real-world setting. These findings suggest that fatigue drives the subsequent physical activity and the relationship may not be bidirectional. Understanding the temporal, dynamic relationship may have important health implications for developing interventions to address fatigue in cancer survivors.

  3. Protein Availability and Satellite Cell Dynamics in Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Baubak; Hawley, John A; Camera, Donny M

    2018-06-01

    Human skeletal muscle satellite cells are activated in response to both resistance and endurance exercise. It was initially proposed that satellite cell proliferation and differentiation were only required to support resistance exercise-induced hypertrophy. However, satellite cells may also play a role in muscle fibre remodelling after endurance-based exercise and extracellular matrix regulation. Given the importance of dietary protein, particularly branched chain amino acids, in supporting myofibrillar and mitochondrial adaptations to both resistance and endurance-based training, a greater understanding of how protein intake impacts satellite cell activity would provide further insight into the mechanisms governing skeletal muscle remodelling with exercise. While many studies have investigated the capacity for protein ingestion to increase post-exercise rates of muscle protein synthesis, few investigations have examined the role for protein ingestion to modulate satellite cell activity. Here we review the molecular mechanisms controlling the activation of satellite cells in response to mechanical stress and protein intake in both in vitro and in vivo models. We provide a mechanistic framework that describes how protein ingestion may enhance satellite activity and promote exercise adaptations in human skeletal muscle.

  4. A randomized controlled trial on the effects of combined aerobic-resistance exercise on muscle strength and fatigue, glycemic control and health-related quality of life of type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas-Carus, Pablo; Ortega-Alonso, Alfredo; Pietilainen, Kirsi H; Santos, Vitoria; Goncalves, Helena; Ramos, Jorge; Raimundo, Armando

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effects of a 12-weeks combined aerobic-resistance exercise therapy on fatigue and isokinetic muscle strength, glycemic control and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in moderately affected type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. A randomized controlled trial design was employed. Forty-three T2DM patients were assigned to an exercise group (N.=22), performing 3 weekly sessions of 60 minutes of combined aerobic-resistance exercise for 12-weeks; or a no exercise control group (N.=21). Both groups were evaluated at a baseline and after 12-weeks of exercise therapy for: 1) muscle strength and fatigue by isokinetic dynamometry; 2) plasma glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C); and 3) HRQoL utilizing the SF-36 questionnaire. The exercise therapy led to improvements in muscle fatigue in knee extensors (-55%) and increased muscle strength in knee flexors and extensors (+15 to +30%), while HbA1C decreased (-18%). In addition, the exercising patients showed sizeable improvements in HRQoL: physical function (+53%), vitality (+21%) and mental health (+40%). Twelve-weeks of combined aerobic-resistance exercise was highly effective to improve muscle strength and fatigue, glycemic control and several aspects of HRQoL in T2DM patients. These data encourage the use of aerobic and resistance exercise in the good clinical care of T2DM.

  5. Economy, Movement Dynamics, and Muscle Activity of Human Walking at Different Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter Christian; Guul, Martin Kjær; Nielsen, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    The complex behaviour of human walking with respect to movement variability, economy and muscle activity is speed dependent. It is well known that a U-shaped relationship between walking speed and economy exists. However, it is an open question if the movement dynamics of joint angles and centre...... of mass and muscle activation strategy also exhibit a U-shaped relationship with walking speed. We investigated the dynamics of joint angle trajectories and the centre of mass accelerations at five different speeds ranging from 20 to 180% of the predicted preferred speed (based on Froude speed) in twelve...... healthy males. The muscle activation strategy and walking economy were also assessed. The movement dynamics was investigated using a combination of the largest Lyapunov exponent and correlation dimension. We observed an intermediate stage of the movement dynamics of the knee joint angle and the anterior...

  6. The window of my eyes: Task disengagement and mental fatigue covary with pupil dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopstaken, J.; Linden, D. van der; Bakker, A.B.; Kompier, M.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Although mental fatigue is a complex, multi-facetted state that involves changes in motivation, cognition, and mood, one of its main characteristics is reduced task engagement. Despite its relevance for performance and safety, knowledge about the underlying neurocognitive processes in mental fatigue

  7. Isometric and Dynamic Control of Neck Muscles : Reflexive contributions and muscle synergies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bruijn, E.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the central nervous system (CNS) stabilizes the head using reflexive feedback and cocontraction. The major reflexive pathways in the neck are through muscle spindles generating the cervicocollic reflex (CCR) and through the vestibular organ generating the vestibulocollic

  8. Changes in urinary amino acids excretion in relationship with muscle activity markers over a professional cycling stage race: in search of fatigue markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, Roberto; Barassi, Alessandra; Perego, Silvia; Sansoni, Veronica; Rossi, Alessandra; Damele, Clara Anna Linda; Melzi D'Eril, Gianlodovico; Banfi, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between metabolic effort, muscular damage/activity indices, and urinary amino acids profile over the course of a strenuous prolonged endurance activity, as a cycling stage race is, in order to identify possible fatigue markers. Nine professional cyclists belonging to a single team, competing in the Giro d'Italia cycling stage race, were anthropometrically characterized and sampled for blood and urine the day before the race started, and on days 12 and 23 of the race. Diet was kept the same over the race, and power output and energy expenditure were recorded. Sera were assayed for muscle markers (lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatine kinase activities, and blood urea nitrogen), and creatinine, all corrected for plasma volume changes. Urines were profiled for amino acid concentrations, normalized on creatinine excretion. Renal function, in terms of glomerular filtration rate, was monitored by MDRD equation corrected on body surface area. Creatine kinase activity and blood urea were increased during the race as did serum creatinine while kidney function remained stable. Among the amino acids, taurine, glycine, cysteine, leucine, carnosine, 1-methyl histidine, and 3-methyl histidine showed a net decreased, while homocysteine was increased. Taurine and the dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) were significantly correlated with the muscle activity markers and the indices of effort. In conclusion, the metabolic profile is modified strikingly due to the effort. Urinary taurine and carnosine seem useful tools to evaluate the muscle damage and possibly the fatigue status on a long-term basis.

  9. The Pleiotropic Effect of Physical Exercise on Mitochondrial Dynamics in Aging Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Barbieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decline in human muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia is one of the principal hallmarks of the aging process. Regular physical exercise and training programs are certain powerful stimuli to attenuate the physiological skeletal muscle alterations occurring during aging and contribute to promote health and well-being. Although the series of events that led to these muscle adaptations are poorly understood, the mechanisms that regulate these processes involve the “quality” of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Aerobic/endurance exercise helps to maintain and improve cardiovascular fitness and respiratory function, whereas strength/resistance-exercise programs increase muscle strength, power development, and function. Due to the different effect of both exercises in improving mitochondrial content and quality, in terms of biogenesis, dynamics, turnover, and genotype, combined physical activity programs should be individually prescribed to maximize the antiaging effects of exercise.

  10. Dynamic imaging of skeletal muscle contraction in three orthogonal directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopata, R.G.; van Dijk, J.P; Pillen, S.; Nillisen, M.M.; Maas, H.; Thijssen, J.M.; Stegeman, D.F.; Korte, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a multidimensional strain estimation method using biplane ultrasound is presented to assess local relative deformation (i.e., local strain) in three orthogonal directions in skeletal muscles during induced and voluntary contractions. The method was tested in the musculus biceps

  11. Dynamic imaging of skeletal muscle contraction in three orthogonal directions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopata, R.G.P.; Dijk, J.P. van; Pillen, S.; Nillesen, M.M.; Maas, H.; Thijssen, J.M.; Stegeman, D.F.; Korte, C.L. de

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a multidimensional strain estimation method using biplane ultrasound is presented to assess local relative deformation (i.e., local strain) in three orthogonal directions in skeletal muscles during induced and voluntary contractions. The method was tested in the musculus biceps

  12. Dynamical Coordination of Hand Intrinsic Muscles for Precision Grip in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Wei, Na; Cheng, Mei; Hou, Xingguo; Song, Jun

    2018-03-12

    This study investigated the effects of diabetes mellitus (DM) on dynamical coordination of hand intrinsic muscles during precision grip. Precision grip was tested using a custom designed apparatus with stable and unstable loads, during which the surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) were recorded simultaneously. Recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) was applied to quantify the dynamical structure of sEMG signals of the APB and FDI; and cross recurrence quantification analysis (CRQA) was used to assess the intermuscular coupling between the two intrinsic muscles. This study revealed that the DM altered the dynamical structure of muscle activation for the FDI and the dynamical intermuscular coordination between the APB and FDI during precision grip. A reinforced feedforward mechanism that compensates the loss of sensory feedbacks in DM may be responsible for the stronger intermuscular coupling between the APB and FDI muscles. Sensory deficits in DM remarkably decreased the capacity of online motor adjustment based on sensory feedback, rendering a lower adaptability to the uncertainty of environment. This study shed light on inherent dynamical properties underlying the intrinsic muscle activation and intermuscular coordination for precision grip and the effects of DM on hand sensorimotor function.

  13. Failure of activation of spinal motoneurones after muscle fatigue in healthy subjects studied by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgit; Westlund, Barbro; Krarup, Christian

    2003-01-01

    . This points to increased probability of repetitive spinal MN activation during fatigue even if some MNs in the pool failed to discharge. Silent period duration following cortical stimulation lengthened by an average of 55 ms after the contraction and recovered within a time course similar to that of the TST......During a sustained maximal effort a progressive decline in the ability to drive motoneurones (MNs) develops. We used the recently developed triple stimulation technique (TST) to study corticospinal conduction after fatiguing exercise in healthy subjects. This method employs a collision technique...... conventional transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and responses to peripheral nerve stimulation were recorded following the same fatigue protocol. The size of both the MEPs and the peripheral responses increased after the contraction and were in direct contrast to the decrease in size of the TST response...

  14. Failure of activation of spinal motoneurones after muscle fatigue in healthy subjects studied by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgit; Westlund, Barbro; Krarup, Christian

    2003-01-01

    During a sustained maximal effort a progressive decline in the ability to drive motoneurones (MNs) develops. We used the recently developed triple stimulation technique (TST) to study corticospinal conduction after fatiguing exercise in healthy subjects. This method employs a collision technique....... This points to increased probability of repetitive spinal MN activation during fatigue even if some MNs in the pool failed to discharge. Silent period duration following cortical stimulation lengthened by an average of 55 ms after the contraction and recovered within a time course similar to that of the TST...

  15. Transcriptional and Chromatin Dynamics of Muscle Regeneration After Severe Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-12

    02127. 2Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge , MA 02142, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Cambridge , MA 02138, Dept. of Stem Cell and...Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge , MA 02138. 3United States Army Institute of Environmental Medicine - Military Performance Division, Natick...throughout the regenerative process in a mouse model of traumatic muscle injury. We first illustrate how the transcriptional landscape of coding and

  16. Three-Dimensional Muscle Architecture and Comprehensive Dynamic Properties of Rabbit Gastrocnemius, Plantaris and Soleus: Input for Simulation Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Tobias; Leichsenring, Kay; Rode, Christian; Wick, Carolin; Stutzig, Norman; Schubert, Harald; Blickhan, Reinhard; Böl, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The vastly increasing number of neuro-muscular simulation studies (with increasing numbers of muscles used per simulation) is in sharp contrast to a narrow database of necessary muscle parameters. Simulation results depend heavily on rough parameter estimates often obtained by scaling of one muscle parameter set. However, in vivo muscles differ in their individual properties and architecture. Here we provide a comprehensive dataset of dynamic (n = 6 per muscle) and geometric (three-dimensional architecture, n = 3 per muscle) muscle properties of the rabbit calf muscles gastrocnemius, plantaris, and soleus. For completeness we provide the dynamic muscle properties for further important shank muscles (flexor digitorum longus, extensor digitorum longus, and tibialis anterior; n = 1 per muscle). Maximum shortening velocity (normalized to optimal fiber length) of the gastrocnemius is about twice that of soleus, while plantaris showed an intermediate value. The force-velocity relation is similar for gastrocnemius and plantaris but is much more bent for the soleus. Although the muscles vary greatly in their three-dimensional architecture their mean pennation angle and normalized force-length relationships are almost similar. Forces of the muscles were enhanced in the isometric phase following stretching and were depressed following shortening compared to the corresponding isometric forces. While the enhancement was independent of the ramp velocity, the depression was inversely related to the ramp velocity. The lowest effect strength for soleus supports the idea that these effects adapt to muscle function. The careful acquisition of typical dynamical parameters (e.g. force-length and force-velocity relations, force elongation relations of passive components), enhancement and depression effects, and 3D muscle architecture of calf muscles provides valuable comprehensive datasets for e.g. simulations with neuro-muscular models, development of more realistic muscle models, or

  17. Three-Dimensional Muscle Architecture and Comprehensive Dynamic Properties of Rabbit Gastrocnemius, Plantaris and Soleus: Input for Simulation Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Siebert

    Full Text Available The vastly increasing number of neuro-muscular simulation studies (with increasing numbers of muscles used per simulation is in sharp contrast to a narrow database of necessary muscle parameters. Simulation results depend heavily on rough parameter estimates often obtained by scaling of one muscle parameter set. However, in vivo muscles differ in their individual properties and architecture. Here we provide a comprehensive dataset of dynamic (n = 6 per muscle and geometric (three-dimensional architecture, n = 3 per muscle muscle properties of the rabbit calf muscles gastrocnemius, plantaris, and soleus. For completeness we provide the dynamic muscle properties for further important shank muscles (flexor digitorum longus, extensor digitorum longus, and tibialis anterior; n = 1 per muscle. Maximum shortening velocity (normalized to optimal fiber length of the gastrocnemius is about twice that of soleus, while plantaris showed an intermediate value. The force-velocity relation is similar for gastrocnemius and plantaris but is much more bent for the soleus. Although the muscles vary greatly in their three-dimensional architecture their mean pennation angle and normalized force-length relationships are almost similar. Forces of the muscles were enhanced in the isometric phase following stretching and were depressed following shortening compared to the corresponding isometric forces. While the enhancement was independent of the ramp velocity, the depression was inversely related to the ramp velocity. The lowest effect strength for soleus supports the idea that these effects adapt to muscle function. The careful acquisition of typical dynamical parameters (e.g. force-length and force-velocity relations, force elongation relations of passive components, enhancement and depression effects, and 3D muscle architecture of calf muscles provides valuable comprehensive datasets for e.g. simulations with neuro-muscular models, development of more realistic

  18. A dynamic fatigue study of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses using small scale indentation flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabbs, T.P.; Lawn, B.R.; Kelly, P.L.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamic fatigue characteristics of two glasses, soda-lime silicate and borosilicate, in water have been studied using a controlled indentation flaw technique. It is argued that the indentation approach offers several advantages over more conventional fatigue testing procedures: (i) the reproducibility of data is relatively high, eliminating statistics as a basis of analysis: (ii) the flaw ultimately responsible for failure is well defined and may be conveniently characterised before and after (and during, if necessary) the strength test; (iii) via adjustment of the indentation load, the size of the flaw can be suitably predetermined. Particular attention is devoted to the third point because of the facility it provides for systematic investigation of the range of flaw sizes over which macroscopic crack behaviour remains applicable. The first part of the paper summarises the essential fracture mechanics theory of the extension of an indentation flaw to failure. In the next part of the paper the results of dynamic fatigue tests on glass rods in distilled water are described. Data are obtained for Vickers indentation loads in the range 0.05 to 100 N, corresponding to contact dimensions of 2 to 100 μm. Finally, the implications of the results in relation to the response of 'natural' flaws are discussed. (author)

  19. Oral dosing of chemical indicators for in vivo monitoring of Ca2+ dynamics in insect muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinandus

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a remarkably facile staining protocol to visually investigate dynamic physiological events in insect tissues. We attempted to monitor Ca2+ dynamics during contraction of electrically stimulated living muscle. Advances in circuit miniaturization and insect neuromuscular physiology have enabled the hybridization of living insects and man-made electronic components, such as microcomputers, the result of which has been often referred as a Living Machine, Biohybrid, or Cyborg Insect. In order for Cyborg Insects to be of practical use, electrical stimulation parameters need to be optimized to induce desired muscle response (motor action and minimize the damage in the muscle due to the electrical stimuli. Staining tissues and organs as well as measuring the dynamics of chemicals of interest in muscle should be conducted to quantitatively and systematically evaluate the effect of various stimulation parameters on the muscle response. However, existing staining processes require invasive surgery and/or arduous procedures using genetically encoded sensors. In this study, we developed a non-invasive and remarkably facile method for staining, in which chemical indicators can be orally administered (oral dosing. A chemical Ca2+ indicator was orally introduced into an insect of interest via food containing the chemical indicator and the indicator diffused from the insect digestion system to the target muscle tissue. We found that there was a positive relationship between the fluorescence intensity of the indicator and the frequency of electrical stimulation which indicates the orally dosed indicator successfully monitored Ca2+ dynamics in the muscle tissue. This oral dosing method has a potential to globally stain tissues including neurons, and investigating various physiological events in insects.

  20. Oral dosing of chemical indicators for in vivo monitoring of Ca2+ dynamics in insect muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinandus; Arai, Satoshi; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Suzuki, Madoka; Sato, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a remarkably facile staining protocol to visually investigate dynamic physiological events in insect tissues. We attempted to monitor Ca2+ dynamics during contraction of electrically stimulated living muscle. Advances in circuit miniaturization and insect neuromuscular physiology have enabled the hybridization of living insects and man-made electronic components, such as microcomputers, the result of which has been often referred as a Living Machine, Biohybrid, or Cyborg Insect. In order for Cyborg Insects to be of practical use, electrical stimulation parameters need to be optimized to induce desired muscle response (motor action) and minimize the damage in the muscle due to the electrical stimuli. Staining tissues and organs as well as measuring the dynamics of chemicals of interest in muscle should be conducted to quantitatively and systematically evaluate the effect of various stimulation parameters on the muscle response. However, existing staining processes require invasive surgery and/or arduous procedures using genetically encoded sensors. In this study, we developed a non-invasive and remarkably facile method for staining, in which chemical indicators can be orally administered (oral dosing). A chemical Ca2+ indicator was orally introduced into an insect of interest via food containing the chemical indicator and the indicator diffused from the insect digestion system to the target muscle tissue. We found that there was a positive relationship between the fluorescence intensity of the indicator and the frequency of electrical stimulation which indicates the orally dosed indicator successfully monitored Ca2+ dynamics in the muscle tissue. This oral dosing method has a potential to globally stain tissues including neurons, and investigating various physiological events in insects.

  1. Effects of local fatigue on myoelectrical activity of erector spine muscles and the center for pressure displacement of the feet during balance recovery following postural perturbation in kyphotic subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rooholah Rezaee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: kyphosis deformity affects postural control. Muscular fatigue is one of the factors that can impair the mechanism of body balance. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of local fatigue on the myoelectrical activity of erector spine muscles and the center for pressure displacement of the feet during balance recovery following postural perturbation in kyphotic subjects. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 12 male students with>40 degrees thoracic kyphosis and 12 controls were selected to participate in the study. A flexible ruler was used to measure thoracic kyphosis. For postural control assessment, each subject underwent unexpected, forward-backward perturbations while standing on a foot scan mounted on a movable plate triggered by a weight equivalent to 10% of the subjects’ body weight. Experimental procedure was measured before (3 trails and after (3 trials the fatigue protocol. The myoelectric activity of the erector spine and multi fidus was compared in the groups using repeated measures of ANOVA and independent t-test (P<0.05. Results: There was no significant difference in the foot center of pressure displacement in both groups after muscular fatigue. After fatigue, there was an increase in the activity of longissimus thoracis (P=0.001 and iliocostalis thoracis (P= 0.001 in control group, while no significant difference was reported for the muscular activity of multifidus (p=0.084. The activity of langisimus thoracis was significantly increased (P=0.028 in kyphtic group after fatigue. Conclusion: erector spine muscles fatigue could not significantly affect the postural control in both groups, but the electrical activity of erector spine muscles during balance recovery following postural perturbation in kyphotic subjects was different than the controls.

  2. Dynamics of force and muscle stimulation in human vertical jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M.F.; van Zandwijk, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the importance of stimulation dynamics for force development in human vertical jumping. METHODS: Maximum height squat jumps were performed by 21 male subjects. As a measure of signal dynamics, rise time (RT) was used, i.e., the time taken

  3. Fatigue in soccer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Krustrup, Peter; Bangsbo, Jens

    2005-01-01

    This review describes when fatigue may develop during soccer games and the potential physiological mechanisms that cause fatigue in soccer. According to time?-?motion analyses and performance measures during match-play, fatigue or reduced performance seems to occur at three different stages......, acidity or the breakdown of creatine phosphate. Instead, it may be related to disturbances in muscle ion homeostasis and an impaired excitation of the sarcolemma. Soccer players' ability to perform maximally is inhibited in the initial phase of the second half, which may be due to lower muscle...... concentrations in a considerable number of individual muscle fibres. In a hot and humid environment, dehydration and a reduced cerebral function may also contribute to the deterioration in performance. In conclusion, fatigue or impaired performance in soccer occurs during various phases in a game, and different...

  4. Study on the Mechanical Properties of Stay Cable HDPE Sheathing Fatigue in Dynamic Bridge Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danhui Dan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available As the main force-bearing component of a cable-stayed bridge, a durable stay cable is paramount to the safety and durability of the entire bridge. High-density polyethylene (HDPE sheathing is the main protective component of a stay cable and is the key to insuring cable durability. To address the issue of HDPE sheathing fracture on service, strain level data for in-service, HDPE bridge cable sheathing was used in this study as the basis for HDPE material aging and fatigue testing. A fatigue yield phenomenon with a yield platform on the hysteresis curve of the fatigue cycles is observed by the fatigue test. The parameters to describe this phenomenon are proposed and defined in this paper. A preliminary examination of the relationship between these parameters and the factors, such as the number of cycles, the strain amplitude, and strain rate, are presented. Based on the results obtained, it is suggested that the condition of fatigue yield of HDPE sheathing be defined as the fatigue durability limit state for the purposes of durability design, assessment, and protection of cable-stayed bridges.

  5. Cardiac supporting device using artificial rubber muscle: preliminary study to active dynamic cardiomyoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Goto, Takeshi; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic cardiomyoplasty is a surgical treatment that utilizes the patient's skeletal muscle to support circulation. To overcome the limitations of autologous skeletal muscles in dynamic cardiomyoplasty, we studied the use of a wrapped-type cardiac supporting device using pneumatic muscles. Four straight rubber muscles (Fluidic Muscle, FESTO, Esslingen, Germany) were used and connected to pressure sensors, solenoid valves, a controller and an air compressor. The driving force was compressed air. A proportional-integral-derivative system was employed to control the device movement. An overflow-type mock circulation system was used to analyze the power and the controllability of this new device. The device worked powerfully with pumped flow against afterload of 88 mmHg, and the beating rate and contraction/dilatation time were properly controlled using simple software. Maximum pressure inside the ventricle and maximum output were 187 mmHg and 546.5 ml/min, respectively, in the setting of 50 beats per minute, a contraction/dilatation ratio of 1:2, a preload of 18 mmHg, and an afterload of 88 mmHg. By changing proportional gain, contraction speed could be modulated. This study showed the efficacy and feasibility of a pneumatic muscle for use in a cardiac supporting device.

  6. Biomechanics and muscle coordination of human walking. Part I: introduction to concepts, power transfer, dynamics and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, Felix E; Neptune, Richard R; Kautz, Steven A

    2002-12-01

    Current understanding of how muscles coordinate walking in humans is derived from analyses of body motion, ground reaction force and EMG measurements. This is Part I of a two-part review that emphasizes how muscle-driven dynamics-based simulations assist in the understanding of individual muscle function in walking, especially the causal relationships between muscle force generation and walking kinematics and kinetics. Part I reviews the strengths and limitations of Newton-Euler inverse dynamics and dynamical simulations, including the ability of each to find the contributions of individual muscles to the acceleration/deceleration of the body segments. We caution against using the concept of biarticular muscles transferring power from one joint to another to infer muscle coordination principles because energy flow among segments, even the adjacent segments associated with the joints, cannot be inferred from computation of joint powers and segmental angular velocities alone. Rather, we encourage the use of dynamical simulations to perform muscle-induced segmental acceleration and power analyses. Such analyses have shown that the exchange of segmental energy caused by the forces or accelerations induced by a muscle can be fundamentally invariant to whether the muscle is shortening, lengthening, or neither. How simulation analyses lead to understanding the coordination of seated pedaling, rather than walking, is discussed in this first part because the dynamics of pedaling are much simpler, allowing important concepts to be revealed. We elucidate how energy produced by muscles is delivered to the crank through the synergistic action of other non-energy producing muscles; specifically, that a major function performed by a muscle arises from the instantaneous segmental accelerations and redistribution of segmental energy throughout the body caused by its force generation. Part II reviews how dynamical simulations provide insight into muscle coordination of walking.

  7. Dynamic measurement of pennation angle of gastrocnemius muscles during contractions based on ultrasound imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yongjin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle fascicle pennation angle (PA is an important parameter related to musculoskeletal functions, and ultrasound imaging has been widely used for measuring PA, but manually and frame by frame in most cases. We have earlier reported an automatic method to estimate aponeurosis orientation based on Gabor transform and Revoting Hough Transform (RVHT. Methods In this paper, we proposed a method to estimate the overall orientation of muscle fascicles in a region of interest, in order to complete computing the orientation of the other side of the pennation angle, but the side found by RVHT. The measurements for orientations of both fascicles and aponeurosis were conducted in each frame of ultrasound images, and then the dynamic change of pennation angle during muscle contraction was obtained automatically. The method for fascicle orientation estimation was evaluated using synthetic images with different noise levels and later on 500 ultrasound images of human gastrocnemius muscles during isometric plantarflexion. Results The muscle fascicle orientations were also estimated manually by two operators. From the results it’s found that the proposed automatic method demonstrated a comparable performance to the manual method. Conclusions With the proposed methods, ultrasound measurement for muscle pennation angles can be more widely used for functional assessment of muscles.

  8. Increased probability of repetitive spinal motoneuron activation by transcranial magnetic stimulation after muscle fatigue in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgit; Felding, Ulrik Ascanius; Krarup, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Triple stimulation technique (TST) has previously shown that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) fails to activate a proportion of spinal motoneurons (MNs) during motor fatigue. The TST response depression without attenuation of the conventional motor evoked potential suggested increased...... probability of repetitive spinal MN activation during exercise even if some MNs failed to discharge by the brain stimulus. Here we used a modified TST (Quadruple stimulation; QuadS and Quintuple stimulation; QuintS) to examine the influence of fatiguing exercise on second and third MN discharges after......, reflecting that a greater proportion of spinal MNs were activated 2 or 3 times by the transcranial stimulus. The size of QuadS responses did not return to pre-contraction levels during 10 min observation time indicating long-lasting increase in excitatory input to spinal MNs. In addition, the post...

  9. MicroRNAs dynamically remodel gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjae Park

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle cells (SMCs express a unique set of microRNAs (miRNAs which regulate and maintain the differentiation state of SMCs. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of miRNAs during the development of gastrointestinal (GI SMCs in a transgenic animal model. We generated SMC-specific Dicer null animals that express the reporter, green fluorescence protein, in a SMC-specific manner. SMC-specific knockout of Dicer prevented SMC miRNA biogenesis, causing dramatic changes in phenotype, function, and global gene expression in SMCs: the mutant mice developed severe dilation of the intestinal tract associated with the thinning and destruction of the smooth muscle (SM layers; contractile motility in the mutant intestine was dramatically decreased; and SM contractile genes and transcriptional regulators were extensively down-regulated in the mutant SMCs. Profiling and bioinformatic analyses showed that SMC phenotype is regulated by a complex network of positive and negative feedback by SMC miRNAs, serum response factor (SRF, and other transcriptional factors. Taken together, our data suggest that SMC miRNAs are required for the development and survival of SMCs in the GI tract.

  10. Decreased task duration and unchanged trunk muscle activity in low-back pain patients during stair climbing after back extensor muscle fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Østergaard, Gert Værge; Brogner, Heidi Marie

    Low-back pain (LBP) is a major problem. Spine control and stability mechanisms are important but the knowledge of these parameters in functions is sparse. 7 healthy / 5 recurrent mild-to-moderate LBP patients participated in assessment of abdominal, lumbar and gluteal muscles' surface EMG and video...

  11. Increasing blood flow to exercising muscle attenuates systemic cardiovascular responses during dynamic exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Masashi; Ichinose-Kuwahara, Tomoko; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2015-11-15

    Reducing blood flow to working muscles during dynamic exercise causes metabolites to accumulate within the active muscles and evokes systemic pressor responses. Whether a similar cardiovascular response is elicited with normal blood flow to exercising muscles during dynamic exercise remains unknown, however. To address that issue, we tested whether cardiovascular responses are affected by increases in blood flow to active muscles. Thirteen healthy subjects performed dynamic plantarflexion exercise for 12 min at 20%, 40%, and 60% of peak workload (EX20, EX40, and EX60) with their lower thigh enclosed in a negative pressure box. Under control conditions, the box pressure was the same as the ambient air pressure. Under negative pressure conditions, beginning 3 min after the start of the exercise, the box pressure was decreased by 20, 45, and then 70 mmHg in stepwise fashion with 3-min step durations. During EX20, the negative pressure had no effect on blood flow or the cardiovascular responses measured. However, application of negative pressure increased blood flow to the exercising leg during EX40 and EX60. This increase in blood flow had no significant effect on systemic cardiovascular responses during EX40, but it markedly attenuated the pressor responses otherwise seen during EX60. These results demonstrate that during mild exercise, normal blood flow to exercising muscle is not a factor eliciting cardiovascular responses, whereas it elicits an important pressor effect during moderate exercise. This suggests blood flow to exercising muscle is a major determinant of cardiovascular responses during dynamic exercise at higher than moderate intensity. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. [Dynamic study of the female levator ani muscle using MRI 3D vectorial modeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Vincent; Ami, Olivier; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse

    2010-06-01

    The levator ani muscle has a major role in the female pelvic floor, and is involved in the pathophysiology of pelvic prolapse and stress urinary incontinence. We conducted an anatomical and morphological study of this muscle using dynamic 3D vectorial reconstruction MRI, in order to analyze the contraction of two major components of the levator ani: the iliococcygeus and pubococcygeus. Three volunteer healthy continent nulliparous women aged from 19 to 22 underwent dynamic pelvic MRI. Coronal T2-weighted pelvic images were obtained in the supine position, at rest, holding back, and during Valsalva stress effort. 3D vectorial models were reconstructed by manual segmentation of the source images, and were set up on bony anatomic marks. Iliococcygeus and pubococcygeus volumes were measured in the three positions. Volumetrics, displacement and dynamic morphing changes were analyzed with 3D vectorial animation software. The urogenital hiatus extended more holding back (mean +4.31 mm) than on effort (mean +2.78 mm). The iliococcygeus lowered (mean -3.95 mm) and deviated outward (mean +3.01 mm). The basic tone of the iliococcygeus muscle gives it a dome shape, and its reflex contraction against abdominal strain ensures anal and urinary continence The levator ani is more than a pelvic diaphragm: it is a truly dynamic pelvic floor. Its points of support on the stiff osseous frame allow it to retain the pelvic organs. The levator ani muscle seems to prevent anal prolapse during stress strain.

  13. Computational cognitive modeling of the temporal dynamics of fatigue from sleep loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Matthew M; Gunzelmann, Glenn; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2017-12-01

    Computational models have become common tools in psychology. They provide quantitative instantiations of theories that seek to explain the functioning of the human mind. In this paper, we focus on identifying deep theoretical similarities between two very different models. Both models are concerned with how fatigue from sleep loss impacts cognitive processing. The first is based on the diffusion model and posits that fatigue decreases the drift rate of the diffusion process. The second is based on the Adaptive Control of Thought - Rational (ACT-R) cognitive architecture and posits that fatigue decreases the utility of candidate actions leading to microlapses in cognitive processing. A biomathematical model of fatigue is used to control drift rate in the first account and utility in the second. We investigated the predicted response time distributions of these two integrated computational cognitive models for performance on a psychomotor vigilance test under conditions of total sleep deprivation, simulated shift work, and sustained sleep restriction. The models generated equivalent predictions of response time distributions with excellent goodness-of-fit to the human data. More importantly, although the accounts involve different modeling approaches and levels of abstraction, they represent the effects of fatigue in a functionally equivalent way: in both, fatigue decreases the signal-to-noise ratio in decision processes and decreases response inhibition. This convergence suggests that sleep loss impairs psychomotor vigilance performance through degradation of the quality of cognitive processing, which provides a foundation for systematic investigation of the effects of sleep loss on other aspects of cognition. Our findings illustrate the value of treating different modeling formalisms as vehicles for discovery.

  14. Dynamic fatigue on repolarization of lead zirconate-titanate base ceramics with various ferroelectric hardness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilyachenko, V.G.; Semenchev, A.F.; Sklyarova, E.N.; Kuznetsova, E.M.

    2006-01-01

    One studied experimentally changes of the residual polarization in lead zirconate-titanate base ceramics with various ferroelectric hardness under the effect of a strong varying field. The twinning and untwinning of crystallites accompanying repolarization is assumed to be the basic mechanism of propagation of the crystalline structure defects governing the fatigue rates of the ferroelectric-soft ceramics. In ferroelectric-hard ceramics crystallites the stable configurations of mechanical twins, the result of the secondary twinning, are formed when the hysteresis loop is formed. At repolarization in the mentioned structures one observes no motion of the twin boundaries, and the fatigue rates are low ones [ru

  15. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolato, Elena; Farace, Paolo; Asperio, Roberto M; Marzola, Pasquina; Lunati, Ernesto; Sbarbati, Andrea; Osculati, Francesco [Dipartimento di Scienze Morfologico-Biomediche, Sezione di Anatomia ed Istologia, Università di Verona, Verona, I-37194 (Italy)

    2002-06-05

    Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) at high field intensity (4.7 T). The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6) and 20-month-old (n = 6) rats. At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology.

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolato, Elena; Farace, Paolo; Asperio, Roberto M; Marzola, Pasquina; Lunati, Ernesto; Sbarbati, Andrea; Osculati, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) at high field intensity (4.7 T). The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6) and 20-month-old (n = 6) rats. At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sbarbati Andrea

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI at high field intensity (4.7 T. The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. Methods The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6 and 20-month-old (n = 6 rats. Results At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. Conclusion The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology.

  18. Evaluation of methods for extraction of the volitional EMG in dynamic hybrid muscle activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizrahi Joseph

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hybrid muscle activation is a modality used for muscle force enhancement, in which muscle contraction is generated from two different excitation sources: volitional and external, by means of electrical stimulation (ES. Under hybrid activation, the overall EMG signal is the combination of the volitional and ES-induced components. In this study, we developed a computational scheme to extract the volitional EMG envelope from the overall dynamic EMG signal, to serve as an input signal for control purposes, and for evaluation of muscle forces. Methods A "synthetic" database was created from in-vivo experiments on the Tibialis Anterior of the right foot to emulate hybrid EMG signals, including the volitional and induced components. The database was used to evaluate the results obtained from six signal processing schemes, including seven different modules for filtration, rectification and ES component removal. The schemes differed from each other by their module combinations, as follows: blocking window only, comb filter only, blocking window and comb filter, blocking window and peak envelope, comb filter and peak envelope and, finally, blocking window, comb filter and peak envelope. Results and conclusion The results showed that the scheme including all the modules led to an excellent approximation of the volitional EMG envelope, as extracted from the hybrid signal, and underlined the importance of the artifact blocking window module in the process. The results of this work have direct implications on the development of hybrid muscle activation rehabilitation systems for the enhancement of weakened muscles.

  19. Clinical neurophysiology of fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwarts, M J; Bleijenberg, G; van Engelen, B G M

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue is a multidimensional concept covering both physiological and psychological aspects. Chronic fatigue is a typical symptom of diseases such as cancer, multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD) and cerebrovascular disorders but is also presented by people in whom no defined somatic disease has been established. If certain criteria are met, chronic fatigue syndrome can be diagnosed. The 4-item Abbreviated Fatigue Questionnaire allows the extent of the experienced fatigue to be assessed with a high degree of reliability and validity. Physiological fatigue has been well defined and originates in both the peripheral and central nervous system. The condition can be assessed by combining force and surface-EMG measurements (including frequency analyses and muscle-fibre conduction estimations), twitch interpolation, magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and analysis of changes in the readiness potential. Fatigue is a well-known phenomenon in both central and peripheral neurological disorders. Examples of the former conditions are multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and stroke. Although it seems to be a universal symptom of many brain disorders, the unique characteristics of the concomitant fatigue also point to a specific relationship with several of these syndromes. As regards neuromuscular disorders, fatigue has been reported in patients with post-polio syndrome, myasthenia gravis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type-I. More than 60% of all neuromuscular patients suffer from severe fatigue, a prevalence resembling that of patients with MS. Except for several rare myopathies with specific metabolic derangements leading to exercise-induced muscle fatigue, most studies have not identified a prominent peripheral cause for the fatigue in this population. In contrast, the central activation of the diseased neuromuscular system is generally found to be suboptimal. The

  20. Effect of intensified training on muscle ion kinetics, fatigue development and repeated short term performance in endurance trained cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Thomas Gunnar Petursson; Christensen, Peter Møller; Thomassen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of intensified training in combination with a reduced training volume on muscle ion kinetics, transporters and work capacity were examined. Eight well-trained cyclists replaced their regular training with speed-endurance training (12x30-s sprints) 2-3 times per wk and aerobic high...

  1. Blood flow and oxygenation in peritendinous tissue and calf muscle during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, H; Green, Sara Marie Ehrenreich

    2000-01-01

    1. Circulation around tendons may act as a shunt for muscle during exercise. The perfusion and oxygenation of Achilles' peritendinous tissue was measured in parallel with that of calf muscle during exercise to determine (1) whether blood flow is restricted in peritendinous tissue during exercise......, and (2) whether blood flow is coupled to oxidative metabolism. 2. Seven individuals performed dynamic plantar flexion from 1 to 9 W. Radial artery and popliteal venous blood were sampled for O2, peritendinous blood flow was determined by 133Xe-washout, calf blood flow by plethysmography, cardiac output...

  2. Hyperthermia and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The present review addresses mechanisms of importance for hyperthermia-induced fatigue during short intense activities and prolonged exercise in the heat. Inferior performance during physical activities with intensities that elicit maximal oxygen uptake is to a large extent related to perturbation...... of the cardiovascular function, which eventually reduces arterial oxygen delivery to the exercising muscles. Accordingly, aerobic energy turnover is impaired and anaerobic metabolism provokes peripheral fatigue. In contrast, metabolic disturbances of muscle homeostasis are less important during prolonged exercise...... in the heat, because increased oxygen extraction compensates for the reduction in systemic blood flow. The decrease in endurance seems to involve changes in the function of the central nervous system (CNS) that lead to fatigue. The CNS fatigue appears to be influenced by neurotransmitter activity...

  3. Changes in force, surface and motor unit EMG during post-exercise development of low frequency fatigue in vastus lateralis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, C J; Elzinga, M J H; Verdijk, P W L; van Mechelen, W; de Haan, A

    2005-08-01

    We investigated the effects of low frequency fatigue (LFF) on post-exercise changes in rectified surface EMG (rsEMG) and single motor unit EMG (smuEMG) in vastus lateralis muscle (n = 9). On two experimental days the knee extensors were fatigued with a 60-s-isometric contraction (exercise) at 50% maximal force capacity (MFC). On the first day post-exercise (15 s, 3, 9, 15, 21 and 27 min) rsEMG and electrically-induced (surface stimulation) forces were investigated. SmuEMG was obtained on day two. During short ramp and hold (5 s) contractions at 50% MFC, motor unit discharges of the same units were followed over time. Post-exercise MFC and tetanic force (100 Hz stimulation) recovered to about 90% of the pre-exercise values, but recovery with 20 Hz stimulation was less complete: the 20-100 Hz force ratio (mean +/- SD) decreased from 0.65+/-0.06 (pre-exercise) to 0.56+/-0.04 at 27 min post-exercise (Pexercise rsEMG (% pre-exercise maximum) and motor unit discharge rate were 51.1 +/- 12.7% and 14.1 +/- 3.7 (pulses per second; pps) respectively, 15 s post-exercise the respective values were 61.4 +/- 15.4% (P0.05). Thereafter, rsEMG (at 50% MFC) remained stable but motor unit discharge rate significantly increased to 17.7 +/- 3.9 pps 27 min post-exercise. The recruitment threshold decreased (Pexercise to 25.2 +/- 6.7% 27 min post-exercise. The increase in discharge rate was significantly greater than could be expected from the decrease in recruitment threshold. Thus, post-exercise LFF was compensated by increased motor unit discharge rates which could only partly be accounted for by the small decrease in motor unit recruitment threshold.

  4. Dynamics of muscle strength improvement during isokinetic rehabilitation of athletes with ACL rupture and chondromalacia patellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnica Bakrac, N

    2003-03-01

    To assess quantitatively dynamics and extent of the increase in muscle strength during isokinetic rehabilitation. daily measurements of muscle strength; detailed testing at the beginning and at the end of rehabilitation. Cybex Rehabilitation Center, Zagreb. 44 athletes (31 m, 13 F, age 16-35), 3 injury-defined groups: athletes with ACL rupture (non-reconstructed and reconstructed) and chondromalacia patellae. all subjects underwent isokinetic rehabilitation on Cybex Orthotron KT2 device, using individually designed protocols (extension and flexion exercises, concentric muscle contractions, 15 treatments). monitoring of daily progress on rehabilitation device and detailed testing on diagnostic device. All patients showed considerable improvement. Muscle strength improved on average 141% (SD=110) in ACL-reconstructed group, 144% (SD=130) for chondromalacia patellae group and 150% (SD=74) for ACL-non-reconstructed group, comparing to initial strength. Dynamic status tested on Cybex Otrhotron diagnostic device prior and after rehabilitation strongly correlated with final progress monitored on the rehabilitation device. Isokinetic rehabilitation is a quick and effective method in treating knee injuries in athletes. Both types of objective criteria have shown significant increase in muscle strength. The improvement of muscle strength was on the average 149% (SD=101), which is about 10% daily for 15 treatments. The greatest progress, 19% per day, occurred during first five days. The athletes were able to resume their sport activities as follows: patients from chondromalacia patellae group, and most of them from the non-reconstructed ACL group were back in competition within a month, while 75% from the ACL reconstructed group came back within 3 months, and the rest of them within 5 months.

  5. An application of dynamic CT for diagnosis of abnormal external ocular muscle movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Kazumi; Ogura, Yuuko; Takeshita, Gen; Koga, Sukehiko; Katada, Kazuhiro; Anno, Hirofumi.

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the movements of retrobulbar structures radiologically, we have developed a new technique called 'external ocular muscle movement CT' (EOM CT), in which dynamic CT scanning is performed while the patient performs controlled eye movements. This new technique was applied in one volunteer and 72 patients with external ophthalmoplegia due to orbital mass lesion, hyperthyroid ophthalmopathy, blowout fracture, and other retrobulbar lesions. EOM CT permits the assessment of extraocular muscle contraction in cases of blowout fracture, the evaluation of muscular contraction in hypertrophy of the extraocular muscles, and the diagnosis of adhesions between the extraocular muscles and intraorbital masses. Radiation dose to the lens from EOM CT was measured using a phantom and TLD, and was compared with that of conventional CT scanning with a 5 mm slice thickness. The dose to the lens from EOM CT was three times higher than that for conventional CT in axial scanning, but in the coronal section of the retrobulbar region, the dose to the lens from EOM CT decreases to one twelfth of that of conventional CT. EOM CT promises to be a powerful modality for functional evaluation of the extraocular muscles and other retrobulbar structures. (author)

  6. Dynamic gene expression in fish muscle during recovery growth induced by a fasting-refeeding schedule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esquerré Diane

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recovery growth is a phase of rapid growth that is triggered by adequate refeeding of animals following a period of weight loss caused by starvation. In this study, to obtain more information on the system-wide integration of recovery growth in muscle, we undertook a time-course analysis of transcript expression in trout subjected to a food deprivation-refeeding sequence. For this purpose complex targets produced from muscle of trout fasted for one month and from muscle of trout fasted for one month and then refed for 4, 7, 11 and 36 days were hybridized to cDNA microarrays containing 9023 clones. Results Significance analysis of microarrays (SAM and temporal expression profiling led to the segregation of differentially expressed genes into four major clusters. One cluster comprising 1020 genes with high expression in muscle from fasted animals included a large set of genes involved in protein catabolism. A second cluster that included approximately 550 genes with transient induction 4 to 11 days post-refeeding was dominated by genes involved in transcription, ribosomal biogenesis, translation, chaperone activity, mitochondrial production of ATP and cell division. A third cluster that contained 480 genes that were up-regulated 7 to 36 days post-refeeding was enriched with genes involved in reticulum and Golgi dynamics and with genes indicative of myofiber and muscle remodelling such as genes encoding sarcomeric proteins and matrix compounds. Finally, a fourth cluster of 200 genes overexpressed only in 36-day refed trout muscle contained genes with function in carbohydrate metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. Remarkably, among the genes induced were several transcriptional regulators which might be important for the gene-specific transcriptional adaptations that underlie muscle recovery. Conclusion Our study is the first demonstration of a coordinated expression of functionally related genes during muscle recovery growth

  7. ADAMTS9-Regulated Pericellular Matrix Dynamics Governs Focal Adhesion-Dependent Smooth Muscle Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Mead

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Focal adhesions anchor cells to extracellular matrix (ECM and direct assembly of a pre-stressed actin cytoskeleton. They act as a cellular sensor and regulator, linking ECM to the nucleus. Here, we identify proteolytic turnover of the anti-adhesive proteoglycan versican as a requirement for maintenance of smooth muscle cell (SMC focal adhesions. Using conditional deletion in mice, we show that ADAMTS9, a secreted metalloprotease, is required for myometrial activation during late gestation and for parturition. Through knockdown of ADAMTS9 in uterine SMC, and manipulation of pericellular versican via knockdown or proteolysis, we demonstrate that regulated pericellular matrix dynamics is essential for focal adhesion maintenance. By influencing focal adhesion formation, pericellular versican acts upstream of cytoskeletal assembly and SMC differentiation. Thus, pericellular versican proteolysis by ADAMTS9 balances pro- and anti-adhesive forces to maintain an SMC phenotype, providing a concrete example of the dynamic reciprocity of cells and their ECM. : Mead et al. identify a proteolytic mechanism that actively maintains a pericellular microenvironment conducive to uterine smooth muscle activation prior to parturition. They show that pericellular matrix proteolysis by the secreted metalloprotease ADAMTS9 is crucial for maintenance of focal adhesions in uterine smooth muscle cells, and its absence impairs parturition. Keywords: metalloprotease, extracellular matrix, smooth muscle, proteoglycan, myometrium, parturition, uterus, focal adhesion, proteolysis, interference reflection microscopy

  8. Dynamic Properties and Fatigue Life of Stone Mastic Asphalt Mixtures Reinforced with Waste Tyre Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuha Salim Mashaan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, virgin polymer modified asphalt mixes are comparatively more expensive for road pavement. One way to reduce the expense of such construction and to make it more convenient is the application of inexpensive polymer, such as waste polymer. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adding waste tyre rubber (crumb rubber modifier (CRM on the stiffness and fatigue properties of stone mastic asphalt (SMA mixtures. Various percentages of waste CRM with size of 0.60 mm were added to SMA mixtures. Indirect tensile stiffness modulus test was conducted at temperatures of 5, 25, and 40°C. Indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (2000, 2500, and 3000 N. The results show that the stiffness modulus of reinforced SMA samples containing various contents of CRM is significantly high in comparison with that of nonreinforced samples, and the stiffness modulus of reinforced samples is in fact less severely affected by the increased temperature compared to the nonreinforced samples. Further, the results show that CRM reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue lives compared to the nonreinforced mixtures help in and promotion of sustainable technology by recycling of waste materials in much economical and environmental-friendly manner.

  9. Unsteady locomotion: integrating muscle function with whole body dynamics and neuromuscular control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biewener, Andrew A.; Daley, Monica A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary By integrating studies of muscle function with analysis of whole body and limb dynamics, broader appreciation of neuromuscular function can be achieved. Ultimately, such studies need to address non-steady locomotor behaviors relevant to animals in their natural environments. When animals move slowly they likely rely on voluntary coordination of movement involving higher brain centers. However, when moving fast, their movements depend more strongly on responses controlled at more local levels. Our focus here is on control of fast-running locomotion. A key observation emerging from studies of steady level locomotion is that simple spring-mass dynamics, which help to economize energy expenditure, also apply to stabilization of unsteady running. Spring-mass dynamics apply to conditions that involve lateral impulsive perturbations, sudden changes in terrain height, and sudden changes in substrate stiffness or damping. Experimental investigation of unsteady locomotion is challenging, however, due to the variability inherent in such behaviors. Another emerging principle is that initial conditions associated with postural changes following a perturbation define different context-dependent stabilization responses. Distinct stabilization modes following a perturbation likely result from proximo-distal differences in limb muscle architecture, function and control strategy. Proximal muscles may be less sensitive to sudden perturbations and appear to operate, in such circumstances, under feed-forward control. In contrast, multiarticular distal muscles operate, via their tendons, to distribute energy among limb joints in a manner that also depends on the initial conditions of limb contact with the ground. Intrinsic properties of these distal muscle–tendon elements, in combination with limb and body dynamics, appear to provide rapid initial stabilizing mechanisms that are often consistent with spring-mass dynamics. These intrinsic mechanisms likely help to simplify the

  10. NMClab, a model to assess the contributions of muscle visco-elasticity and afferent feedback to joint dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; Mugge, Winfred; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a neuromusculoskeletal system results from the complex mechanical interaction between muscle visco-elasticity resulting from (co-)contraction and afferent feedback from muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs. As a result of the multiple interactions the individual effect of

  11. Fatigue Fighters in Sjogren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor to find a specific cause and treatment for your fatigue. The possibilities may include systemic inflammation, poor sleep, fibromyalgia, depression, hypothyroidism, muscle inflammation or side-effects of medications. Know ...

  12. Chronic Effects of Different Rest Intervals Between Sets on Dynamic and Isometric Muscle Strength and Muscle Activity in Trained Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambassi Filho, José Claudio; Gurjão, André Luiz Demantova; Ceccato, Marilia; Prado, Alexandre Konig Garcia; Gallo, Luiza Herminia; Gobbi, Sebastião

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the chronic effects of different rest intervals (RIs) between sets on dynamic and isometric muscle strength and muscle activity. We used a repeated-measures design (pretraining and posttraining) with independent groups (different RI). Twenty-one resistance-trained older women (66.4 ± 4.4 years) were randomly assigned to either a 1-minute RI group (G-1 min; n = 10) or 3-minute RI group (G-3 min; n = 11). Both groups completed 3 supervised sessions per week during 8 weeks. In each session, participants performed 3 sets of 15 repetitions of leg press exercise, with a load that elicited muscle failure in the third set. Fifteen maximum repetitions, maximal voluntary contraction, peak rate of force development, and integrated electromyography activity of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis muscles were assessed pretraining and posttraining. There was a significant increase in load of 15 maximum repetitions posttraining for G-3 min only (3.6%; P 0.05). The findings suggest that different RIs between sets did not influence dynamic and isometric muscle strength and muscle activity in resistance-trained older women.

  13. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on dynamic hyperinflation in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrovic M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Milos Petrovic,1 Michael Reiter,2 Harald Zipko,3 Wolfgang Pohl,1 Theodor Wanke11Pulmonary Department and Karl Landsteiner Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pulmology, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria; 2Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Otto Wagner Hospital, Vienna, Austria; 3FH Campus Vienna, University of Applied Sciences – Health Department, Vienna, AustriaAbstract: Dynamic hyperinflation has important clinical consequences in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Given that most of these patients have respiratory and peripheral muscle weakness, dyspnea and functional exercise capacity may improve as a result of inspiratory muscle training (IMT. The aim of the study was to analyze the effects of IMT on exercise capacity, dyspnea, and inspiratory fraction (IF during exercise in patients with COPD. Daily inspiratory muscle strength and endurance training was performed for 8 weeks in 10 patients with COPD GOLD II and III. Ten patients with COPD II and III served as a control group. Maximal inspiratory pressure (Pimax and endurance time during resistive breathing maneuvers (tlim served as parameter for inspiratory muscle capacity. Before and after training, the patients performed an incremental symptom limited exercise test to maximum and a constant load test on a cycle ergometer at 75% of the peak work rate obtained in the pretraining incremental test. ET was defined as the duration of loaded pedaling. Following IMT, there was a statistically significant increase in inspiratory muscle performance of the Pimax from 7.75 ± 0.47 to 9.15 ± 0.73 kPa (P < 0.01 and of tlim from 348 ± 54 to 467 ± 58 seconds (P < 0.01. A significant increase in IF, indicating decreased dynamic hyperinflation, was observed during both exercise tests. Further, the ratio of breathing frequency to minute ventilation (bf/V'E decreased significantly, indicating an improved breathing pattern. A significant decrease in

  14. Enhanced Dynamic Model of Pneumatic Muscle Actuator with Elman Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Hošovský

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To make effective use of model-based control system design techniques, one needs a good model which captures system’s dynamic properties in the range of interest. Here an analytical model of pneumatic muscle actuator with two pneumatic artificial muscles driving a rotational joint is developed. Use of analytical model makes it possible to retain the physical interpretation of the model and the model is validated using open-loop responses. Since it was considered important to design a robust controller based on this model, the effect of changed moment of inertia (as a representation of uncertain parameter was taken into account and compared with nominal case. To improve the accuracy of the model, these effects are treated as a disturbance modeled using the recurrent (Elman neural network. Recurrent neural network was preferred over feedforward type due to its better long-term prediction capabilities well suited for simulation use of the model. The results confirm that this method improves the model performance (tested for five of the measured variables: joint angle, muscle pressures, and muscle forces while retaining its physical interpretation.

  15. Acute effects of short and long duration dynamic stretching protocols on muscle strength

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    Christiano Francisco dos Santos

    Full Text Available Objective Compare the acute effects of dynamic stretching protocols on the isokinetic performance of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles at two velocities in adult males.Methodology Included the participation of 14 males (21 ± 2.6 years; 178 ± 0.4 cm; 73.2 ± 20.9 kg were assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer before and after following a short or long-duration dynamic stretching protocol or a control protocol. The results were assessed by a two-way ANOVA and a Scheffé’s post hoc test at a 5% significance level.Results No difference was found in the variables assessed at 180°/s after LDDS. At 60°/s, LDDS reduced the power of the knee flexors. The control protocol reduced the power of the knee flexors and increased the power of the extensors. At 60°/s, the work of the knee flexors exhibited a reduction after LDDS. The control protocol resulted in a reduction in the work of the flexors. The peak torque angle exhibited a reduction in the extensors and flexors after LDDS and SDDS.Conclusion Dynamic stretching did not cause any change in the peak torque, which points to its possible use in activities involving velocity and muscle strength. The executing dynamic stretching before physical activities such as running and high-intensity sports might be beneficial by promoting increases in heart rate and in body temperature.

  16. Avaliação da fadiga muscular pela mecanomiografia durante a aplicação de um protocolo de EENM Muscle fatigue assessment by mechanomyography during application of NMES protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Faller

    2009-10-01

    contraction. In clinical practice, it becomes necessary to monitor muscle fatigue during NMES protocols to adjust the parameters of electrical current stimulation and, thus, increase stimulation time. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to use mechanomyography (MMG as a means of evaluating peripheral muscle fatigue during the execution of an NMES protocol. METHODS: An MMG signal acquisition system and an experimental protocol were developed. During in vivo tests, 10 participants performed maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs for knee extension. A maximization phase was conducted with dynamic contractions generated by NMES at 10% of MVC (100 Hz, 400 µs on the quadriceps muscle, and the main NMES protocol occurred at 30% of MVC (50 Hz, 400 µs. Simultaneously, MMG RMS (amplitude and MMG MPF (frequency signals of the rectus femoris and the knee extension torque were acquired. RESULTS: The tendency line of the MMG RMS was descendant, indicating that MMG RMS correlates with torque amplitude. However, MMG MPF did not show a significant correlation with torque for the present NMES protocol. CONCLUSIONS: MMG is a technique that can be simultaneously applied to NMES because there is no electrical interference and it can be used during functional movements in the NMES-generated muscle contraction. Article registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR under the number ACTRN12609000866202.

  17. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to L-carnitine and faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise (ID 738, 1492, 1493), skeletal muscle tissue repair (ID 738, 1492, 1493), increase in endurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to provide a scientific opinion on a list of health claims pursuant to Article 13 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. This opinion addresses the scientific substantiation of health...... claims in relation to L-carnitine and faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise, skeletal muscle tissue repair, increase in endurance capacity, maintenance of normal blood LDL-cholesterol concentrations, contribution to normal spermatogenesis, “energy metabolism”, and increasing L...

  18. Dynamic exophthalmos and lateral strabismus in a dog caused by masticatory muscle myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Sarah L; Plummer, Caryn E; Greenberg, Shari M; Craft, William F; Conway, Julia A; Perez, Mayrim L; Cooke, Kirsten L; Winter, Matthew D

    2015-11-01

    A 5.5-year-old neutered male mixed-breed dog was presented for evaluation of a 5-month history of deviation of the right globe upon opening the mouth and a 1-month history of conjunctivitis in the same eye. Clinical findings, diagnostic imaging results, treatment and follow-up are described. When the mouth was opened, the right globe deviated rostrally and laterally. There was no pain or resistance to opening the mouth, or resistance to retropulsion of the globe. No other abnormalities were observed. Computed tomography was performed, revealing a contrast-enhancing region associated with the right masseter muscle impinging into the right orbit; this was more pronounced with the mouth open. Cytology revealed a small number of mildly to moderately atypical mesenchymal cells. Histopathology was consistent with polyphasic myositis, with a predominance of lymphocytes and plasma cells. No infectious agents were identified. Serum antibody titers for Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum were negative. Serum titers for 2 M antibody were positive at 1:500, consistent with a diagnosis of masticatory muscle myositis. Therapy with prednisone was initiated. During a follow-up period of 5 months, there was no recurrence of clinical signs, and the dose of prednisone was reduced by 25%. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of masticatory muscle myositis causing dynamic exophthalmos and strabismus in a dog. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  19. Dynamic and Fatigue Analysis of an 18th Century Steel Arch Bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boumechra, Nadir; Hamdaoui, Karim

    2008-01-01

    Within the 'Oran-Tlemcen' railway line realization project (159 km), several bridges were built by the Railroads Algerian West Company. 7 km from the east of Tlemcen city, this railway line must cross a very broken mountainous collar, that's why the French engineer 'Gustave Eiffel' was solicited to construct a 68 m length bridge. In 1890, an arch steel truss bridge was realized. The bridge presents 300 m of apron curvature radius and, currently, is considered as one of the most important monuments of the Algerian historical heritage. Considering the age of the bridge and the evolution of the railway loads in time, it was essential to check the good behavior of the studied structure. For that, analyses to verify the physical and mechanical properties of the growth iron members are made. A finite element model of the bridge was built and numerical simulations were drawn. The structural vibration conducted analysis permit to understand the behavior of this particular structure, then to evaluate (in detail) the rate of the structure fatigue

  20. Comparing localized and nonlocalized dynamic 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in exercising muscle at 7T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerspeer, Martin; Robinson, Simon; Nabuurs, Christine I; Scheenen, Tom; Schoisengeier, Adrian; Unger, Ewald; Kemp, Graham J; Moser, Ewald

    2012-01-01

    By improving spatial and anatomical specificity, localized spectroscopy can enhance the power and accuracy of the quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. Localized and nonlocalized dynamic 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a surface coil was compared during aerobic exercise and recovery of human calf muscle. For localization, a short echo time single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy sequence with adiabatic refocusing (semi-LASER) was applied, enabling the quantification of phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate, and pH value in a single muscle (medial gastrocnemius) in single shots (TR = 6 s). All measurements were performed in a 7 T whole body scanner with a nonmagnetic ergometer. From a series of equal exercise bouts we conclude that: (a) with localization, measured phosphocreatine declines in exercise to a lower value (79 ± 7% cf. 53 ± 10%, P = 0.002), (b) phosphocreatine recovery shows shorter half time (t1/2 = 34 ± 7 s cf. t1/2 = 42 ± 7 s, nonsignificant) and initial postexercise phosphocreatine resynthesis rate is significantly higher (32 ± 5 mM/min cf. 17 ± 4 mM/min, P = 0.001) and (c) in contrast to nonlocalized 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, no splitting of the inorganic phosphate peak is observed during exercise or recovery, just an increase in line width during exercise. This confirms the absence of contaminating signals originating from weaker-exercising muscle, while an observed inorganic phosphate line broadening most probably reflects variations across fibers in a single muscle. Magn Reson Med, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22334374