WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamic model atmospheres

  1. Radiative and dynamical modeling of Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Spiga, Aymeric

    2016-04-01

    Jupiter's atmosphere harbours a rich meteorology, with alternate westward and eastward zonal jets, waves signatures and long-living storms. Recent ground-based and spacecraft measurements have also revealed a rich stratospheric dynamics, with the observation of thermal signatures of planetary waves, puzzling meridional distribution of hydrocarbons at odds with predictions of photochemical models, and a periodic equatorial oscillation analogous to the Earth's quasi-biennal oscillation and Saturn's equatorial oscillation. These recent observations, along with the many unanswered questions (What drives and maintain the equatorial oscillations? How important is the seasonal forcing compared to the influence of internal heat? What is the large-scale stratospheric circulation of these giant planets?) motivated us to develop a complete 3D General Circulation Model (GCM) of Saturn and Jupiter. We aim at exploring the large-scale circulation, seasonal variability, and wave activity from the troposphere to the stratosphere of these giant planets. We will briefly present how we adapted our existing Saturn GCM to Jupiter. One of the main change is the addition of a stratospheric haze layer made of fractal aggregates in the auroral regions (poleward of 45S and 30N). This haze layer has a significant radiative impact by modifying the temperature up to +/- 15K in the middle stratosphere. We will then describe the results of radiative-convective simulations and how they compare to recent Cassini and ground-based temperature measurements. These simulations reproduce surprisingly well some of the observed thermal vertical and meridional gradients, but several important mismatches at low and high latitudes suggest that dynamics also plays an important role in shaping the temperature field. Finally, we will present full GCM simulations and discuss the main resulting features (waves and instabilities). We will also and discuss the impact of the choice of spatial resolution and

  2. Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics: Modeling Atmospheric Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    The first year of work on this project has been completed. This report provides a summary of the progress made and the plan for the coming year. Also included with this report is a preprint of an article that was accepted for publication in Journal of Geophysical Research and describes in detail most of the results from the first year of effort. The goal for the first year was to develop a radiation belt electron model for fitting to data from the SAMPEX and Polar satellites that would provide an empirical description of the electron losses into the upper atmosphere. This was largely accomplished according to the original plan (with one exception being that, for reasons described below, the inclusion of the loss cone electrons in the model was deferred). The main concerns at the start were to accurately represent the balance between pitch angle diffusion and eastward drift that determines the dominant features of the low altitude data, and then to accurately convert the model into simulated data based on the characteristics of the particular electron detectors. Considerable effort was devoted to achieving these ends. Once the model was providing accurate results it was applied to data sets selected from appropriate periods in 1997, 1998, and 1999. For each interval of -30 to 60 days, the model parameters were calculated daily, thus providing good short and long term temporal resolution, and for a range of radial locations from L = 2.7 to 3.9. .

  3. Meteorological fluid dynamics asymptotic modelling, stability and chaotic atmospheric motion

    CERN Document Server

    Zeytounian, Radyadour K

    1991-01-01

    The author considers meteorology as a part of fluid dynamics. He tries to derive the properties of atmospheric flows from a rational analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations, at the same time analyzing various types of initial and boundary problems. This approach to simulate nature by models from fluid dynamics will be of interest to both scientists and students of physics and theoretical meteorology.

  4. A dynamic model reduction algorithm for atmospheric chemistry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillana, Mauricio; Le Sager, Philippe; Jacob, Daniel J.; Brenner, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the chemical composition of our atmosphere is essential to address a wide range of environmental issues from air quality to climate change. Current models solve a very large and stiff system of nonlinear advection-reaction coupled partial differential equations in order to calculate the time evolution of the concentration of over a hundred chemical species. The numerical solution of this system of equations is difficult and the development of efficient and accurate techniques to achieve this has inspired research for the past four decades. In this work, we propose an adaptive method that dynamically adjusts the chemical mechanism to be solved to the local environment and we show that the use of our approach leads to accurate results and considerable computational savings. Our strategy consists of partitioning the computational domain in active and inactive regions for each chemical species at every time step. In a given grid-box, the concentration of active species is calculated using an accurate numerical scheme, whereas the concentration of inactive species is calculated using a simple and computationally inexpensive formula. We demonstrate the performance of the method by application to the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model.

  5. Dynamical Analysis of the Lorenz-84 Atmospheric Circulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical behaviors of the Lorenz-84 atmospheric circulation model are investigated based on qualitative theory and numerical simulations. The stability and local bifurcation conditions of the Lorenz-84 atmospheric circulation model are obtained. It is also shown that when the bifurcation parameter exceeds a critical value, the Hopf bifurcation occurs in this model. Then, the conditions of the supercritical and subcritical bifurcation are derived through the normal form theory. Finally, the chaotic behavior of the model is also discussed, the bifurcation diagrams and Lyapunov exponents spectrum for the corresponding parameter are obtained, and the parameter interval ranges of limit cycle and chaotic attractor are calculated in further. Especially, a computer-assisted proof of the chaoticity of the model is presented by a topological horseshoe theory.

  6. An unstructured-mesh atmospheric model for nonhydrostatic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Szmelter, Joanna; Wyszogrodzki, Andrzej A.

    2013-12-01

    A three-dimensional semi-implicit edge-based unstructured-mesh model is developed that integrates nonhydrostatic anelastic equations, suitable for simulation of small-to-mesoscale atmospheric flows. The model builds on nonoscillatory forward-in-time MPDATA approach using finite-volume discretization and admitting unstructured meshes with arbitrarily shaped cells. The numerical advancements are evaluated with canonical simulations of convective planetary boundary layer and strongly (stably) stratified orographic flows, epitomizing diverse aspects of highly nonlinear nonhydrostatic dynamics. The unstructured-mesh solutions are compared to equivalent results generated with an established structured-grid model and observation.

  7. Dynamical vegetation-atmosphere modelling of the boreal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui; Stordal, Frode; Berntsen, Terje K.; Bryn, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation interacts with climate on seasonal to inter-annual time scales through albedo, roughness, evapotranspiration, CO2 sequestration and by influencing snow accumulation and ablation. The Scandinavian mountains and high latitudes is a hot spot for land-atmosphere feedback, as the future's increased winter minimum temperature supports a boreal tree line advance, lowering the surface albedo. The northern ecosystem is dominated by mires, boreal forests and alpine heaths, in addition to agricultural land. Model studies have shown that vegetation-climate feedbacks are strong enough to lead to regime shifts in vegetation and local climate in boreal regions. Biogeophysical factors, such as albedo, the Bowen ratio, and surface roughness, are all involved in these feedbacks, and they are also altered by land use change such as reforestation. For calculations of the dynamical coupling between the atmosphere and the vegetation we have used the Earth System Model NorESM, which includes several advanced features in its land surface model (CLM4.5), such as the inclusion of the radiative forcing due to black carbon and dust deposit onto snow, improved representation of fire, permafrost and its hydrological impact, a new snow cover fraction parameterization reflecting the hysteresis in fractional snow cover for a given snow depth between accumulation and melt phases, as well as dynamic vegetation coupled with carbon-nitrogen cycles. These new features improve the representation of surface albedo feedback in Arctic. We have performed experiments with coupled as well fixed ocean for the current as a quadrupled atmospheric CO2 situation. This model configuration is used to study changes in vegetation in a high end radiative forcing case. It is contrasted with an experiment where vegetation dynamics is neglected. Changes in the features of the vegetation along with surface fluxes, albedo and atmospheric temperatures are analysed, with main emphasis on the boreal zone. In

  8. Experiments of reconstructing discrete atmospheric dynamic models from data (I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhenshan; Zhu, Yanyu; Deng, Ziwang

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, we give some experimental results of our study in reconstructing discrete atmospheric dynamic models from data. After a great deal of numerical experiments, we found that the logistic map, x n + 1 = 1- μx {2/n}, could be used in monthly mean temperature prediction when it was approaching the chaotic region, and its predictive results were in reverse states to the practical data. This means that the nonlinear developing behavior of the monthly mean temperature system is bifurcating back into the critical chaotic states from the chaotic ones.

  9. Observations and Modeling of Solar Flare Atmospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Solar flares are one of the most energetic events in solar atmosphere, which last minutes to tens of minutes. The eruption of a solar flare involves energy release, plasma heating, particle acceleration, mass flows, waves, etc. A solar flare releases a large amount of energy, and its emission spans a wide wavelength range. Solar flares are usually accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs); therefore they could significantly affect the space environments between the Earth and the Sun. At present, we do not fully understand the whole flare process. There are still many important questions to be resolved, such as when and where is the energy released? How long does the energy release last? What are the main ways of energy release? And how does the solar atmosphere respond to the energy release? To address these questions, we study in detail the flare heating and dynamic evolution. We first give a brief review of previous flare studies (Chapter 1), and introduce the observing instruments (Chapter 2) and the modeling method (Chapter 3) related to this thesis work. Then we use spectral data to investigate the chromospheric evaporation (Chapter 4). Based on the results, we further explore the flare heating problem. With observationally inferred heating functions, we model two flare loops, and compare the results with observations (Chapter 5). A consistency is achieved between modeling and observations. In addition, we model two different sets of flare loop systems with quite different heating profiles and dynamic evolutions (Chapter 6). The details are described as below. Firstly, we investigate the chromospheric evaporation in the flare on 2007 January 16 using line profiles observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. Three points with different magnetic polarities at flare ribbons are analyzed in detail. We find that the three points show different patterns of upflows and downflows in the impulsive phase of the flare. The

  10. Manual for Dynamic Modelling of Soil Response to Atmospheric Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posch MB; Hettelingh J-P; Slootweg J; LED; UNECE Working Group on Effects; ICP M&M Coordination Center for Effects

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this manual is to inform the network of National Focal Centers (NFCs) about the requirements of methodologies for the dynamic modelling of geochemical processes in soils in particular. This information is necessary to support European air quality policies with knowledge on time dela

  11. A Dynamical model of the atmospheric turbulence from the unstable stratification to the stable stratification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShidaLIU; ZuguangZheng; 等

    1996-01-01

    We analyse the behavior of the nonlinear dynamical systems which are the truncated-spectrum model of the atmospheric turbulence equation.It shows that the chaos can appear in the Lorenz equation obtained by simple equations for the unstable stratification(Ri0),And the chaos can also appear in Burgers-Chao equations for the stable stratification(Ri>0,Ra<0),The atmospheric turbulence is intermittent in the stable stratified atmosphere.

  12. Design of a new dynamical core for global atmospheric models based on some efficient numerical methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bin; WAN Hui; JI Zhongzhen; ZHANG Xin; YU Rucong; YU Yongqiang; LIU Hongtao

    2004-01-01

    A careful study on the integral properties of the primitive hydrostatic balance equations for baroclinic atmosphere is carried out, and a new scheme todesign the global adiabatic model of atmospheric dynamics ispresented. This scheme includes a method of weighted equal-areamesh and a fully discrete finite difference method with quadraticand linear conservations for solving the primitive equationsystem. Using this scheme, we established a new dynamical corewith adjustable high resolution acceptable to the availablecomputer capability, which can be very stable without anyfiltering and smoothing. Especially, some important integralproperties are kept unchanged, such as the anti-symmetries of thehorizontal advection operators and the vertical convectionoperator, the mass conservation, the effective energy conservationunder the standard stratification approximation, and so on. Somenumerical tests on the new dynamical core, respectively regardingits global conservations and its integrated performances inclimatic modeling, incorporated with the physical packagesfrom the Community Atmospheric Model Version 2 (CAM2) of NationalCenter for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), are included.

  13. Understanding dynamics of large-scale atmospheric vortices with moist-convective shallow water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, M.; Zeitlin, V.

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric jets and vortices which, together with inertia-gravity waves, constitute the principal dynamical entities of large-scale atmospheric motions, are well described in the framework of one- or multi-layer rotating shallow water models, which are obtained by vertically averaging of full “primitive” equations. There is a simple and physically consistent way to include moist convection in these models by adding a relaxational parameterization of precipitation and coupling precipitation with convective fluxes with the help of moist enthalpy conservation. We recall the construction of moist-convective rotating shallow water model (mcRSW) model and give an example of application to upper-layer atmospheric vortices.

  14. Dynamics of Massive Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemke, Rei; Kaspi, Yohai

    2017-08-01

    The many recently discovered terrestrial exoplanets are expected to hold a wide range of atmospheric masses. Here the dynamic-thermodynamic effects of atmospheric mass on atmospheric circulation are studied using an idealized global circulation model by systematically varying the atmospheric surface pressure. On an Earth analog planet, an increase in atmospheric mass weakens the Hadley circulation and decreases its latitudinal extent. These changes are found to be related to the reduction of the convective fluxes and net radiative cooling (due to the higher atmospheric heat capacity), which, respectively, cool the upper troposphere at mid-low latitudes and warm the troposphere at high latitudes. These together decrease the meridional temperature gradient, tropopause height and static stability. The reduction of these parameters, which play a key role in affecting the flow properties of the tropical circulation, weakens and contracts the Hadley circulation. The reduction of the meridional temperature gradient also decreases the extraction of mean potential energy to the eddy fields and the mean kinetic energy, which weakens the extratropical circulation. The decrease of the eddy kinetic energy decreases the Rhines wavelength, which is found to follow the meridional jet scale. The contraction of the jet scale in the extratropics results in multiple jets and meridional circulation cells as the atmospheric mass increases.

  15. Trends in Mesospheric Dynamics and Chemistry: Simulations With a Model of the Entire Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, G. P.

    2005-05-01

    The cooling resulting from infrared CO2 radiative transfer is a major contribution to the energy budget of the middle atmosphere and thermosphere. The rapid increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration resulting from anthropogenic emissions is therefore expected to lead, in general, to a substantial cooling in this height range. This can potentially be counteracted by heating due to absorption of near infrared radiation by CO2. Changes in ozone as a consequence of increasing methane and water vapor may also have an impact on the energy budget as dynamical changes caused by increased tropospheric temperatures. By means of numerical simulations with a general circulation and chemistry model of the entire atmosphere we will address the following questions: 1.) Can state-of-the-art atmospheric modeling explain the mesospheric temperature trends observed during the last decades? 2.)Which part of the temperature changes resulting from an increase of atmospheric CO2 is caused by local changes in the radiative budget and which part is influenced by remote dynamical effects? The model used is the newly developed Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA) that resolves the atmosphere from the Earth's surface up to about 250 km altitude, and is based on the 3-D dynamics from the ECHAM5 general circulation model and the chemistry scheme from MOZART-3. Results from different time slice experiment representative of years 1970 and 2000, and for a doubling of CO2 will be presented.

  16. A consistent turbulence formulation for the dynamic wake meandering model in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; Veldkamp, Dick; Wedel-Heinen, Jens Jakob

    This thesis describes the further development and validation of the dynamic meandering wake model for simulating the flow field and power production of wind farms operating in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The overall objective of the conducted research is to improve the modelling capabil...... intensity. This power drop is comparable to measurements from the North Hoyle and OWEZ wind farms....

  17. An Exact Solvable Model of Rocket Dynamics in Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, H.; Pinho, M. O.; Portes, D., Jr.; Santiago, A.

    2009-01-01

    In basic physics courses at undergraduate level, the dynamics of self-propelled bodies is presented as an example of momentum conservation law applied to systems with time-varying mass. However, is often studied the simple situation of free motion or the motion under the action of a constant gravitational field. In this work, we investigate the…

  18. An Exact Solvable Model of Rocket Dynamics in Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, H.; Pinho, M. O.; Portes, D., Jr.; Santiago, A.

    2009-01-01

    In basic physics courses at undergraduate level, the dynamics of self-propelled bodies is presented as an example of momentum conservation law applied to systems with time-varying mass. However, is often studied the simple situation of free motion or the motion under the action of a constant gravitational field. In this work, we investigate the…

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics model of stratified atmospheric boundary-layer flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman; Bechmann, Andreas; Sogachev, Andrey;

    2015-01-01

    For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on computational fluid dynamics models of the neutrally stratified surface-layer. So far, physical processes that are important to the whole atmospheric boundary-layer, such as the Coriolis effect, buoyancy forces and heat...

  20. A consistent turbulence formulation for the dynamic wake meandering model in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, R.-E.

    2013-07-15

    This thesis describes the further development and validation of the dynamic meandering wake model for simulating the flow field and power production of wind farms operating in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The overall objective of the conducted research is to improve the modelling capability of the dynamics wake meandering model to a level where it is sufficiently mature to be applied in industrial applications and for an augmentation of the IEC-standard for wind turbine wake modelling. Based on a comparison of capabilities of the dynamic wake meandering model to the requirement of the wind industry, four areas were identified as high prioritizations for further research: 1. the turbulence distribution in a single wake. 2. multiple wake deficits and build-up of turbulence over a row of turbines. 3. the effect of the atmospheric boundary layer on wake turbulence and wake deficit evolution. 4. atmospheric stability effects on wake deficit evolution and meandering. The conducted research is to a large extent based on detailed wake investigations and reference data generated through computational fluid dynamics simulations, where the wind turbine rotor has been represented by an actuator line model. As a consequence, part of the research also targets the performance of the actuator line model when generating wind turbine wakes in the atmospheric boundary layer. Highlights of the conducted research: 1. A description is given for using the dynamic wake meandering model as a standalone flow-solver for the velocity and turbulence distribution, and power production in a wind farm. The performance of the standalone implementation is validated against field data, higher-order computational fluid dynamics models, as well as the most common engineering wake models in the wind industry. 2. The EllipSys3D actuator line model, including the synthetic methods used to model atmospheric boundary layer shear and turbulence, is verified for modelling the evolution of wind

  1. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prusa, Joseph

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the physics of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer- reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  2. Aggressive shadowing of a low-dimensional model of atmospheric dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lieb-Lappen, Ross M

    2011-01-01

    Predictions of the future state of the Earth's atmosphere suffer from the consequences of chaos: numerical weather forecast models quickly diverge from observations as uncertainty in the initial state is amplified by nonlinearity. One measure of the utility of a forecast is its shadowing time, informally given by the period of time for which the forecast is a reasonable description of reality. The present work uses the Lorenz 096 coupled system, a simplified nonlinear model of atmospheric dynamics, to extend a recently developed technique for lengthening the shadowing time of a dynamical system. Ensemble forecasting is used to make forecasts with and without inflation, a method whereby the ensemble is regularly expanded artificially along dimensions whose uncertainty is contracting. The first goal of this work is to compare model forecasts, with and without inflation, to a true trajectory created by integrating a modified version of the same model. The second goal is to establish whether inflation can increas...

  3. Evaluating Direct Radiative Effects of Absorbing Aerosols on Atmospheric Dynamics with Aquaplanet and Regional Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Ö.; Tegen, I.; Quaas, J.

    2015-12-01

    Effects of absorbing aerosol on atmospheric dynamics are usually investigated with help of general circulation models or also regional models that represent the atmospheric system as realistic as possible. Reducing the complexity of models used to study the effects of absorbing aerosol on atmospheric dynamics helps to understand underlying mechanisms. In this study, by using ECHAM6 General Circulation Model (GCM) in an Aquaplanet setting and using simplified aerosol climatology, an initial idealization step has been taken. The analysis only considers direct radiative effects, furthering the reduction of complex model results. The simulations include cases including aerosol radiative forcing, no aerosol forcing, coarse mode aerosol forcing only (as approximation for mineral dust forcing) and forcing with increased aerosol absorption. The results showed that increased absorption affects cloud cover mainly in subtropics. Hadley circulation is found to be weakened in the increased absorption case. To compare the results of the idealized model with a more realistic model setting, the results of the regional model COSMO-MUSCAT that includes interactive mineral dust aerosol and considers the effects of dust radiative forcing are also analyzed. The regional model computes the atmospheric circulation for the year 2007 twice, including the feedback of dust and excluding the dust aerosol forcing. It is investigated to which extent the atmospheric response to the dust forcing agrees with the simplified Aquaplanet results. As expected, in the regional model mineral dust causes an increase in the temperature right above the dust layer while reducing the temperature close to the surface. In both models the presence of aerosol forcing leads to increased specific humidity, close to ITCZ. Notwithstanding the difference magnitudes, comparisons of the global aquaplanet and the regional model showed similar patterns. Further detailed comparisons will be presented.

  4. A moist aquaplanet variant of the Held-Suarez test for atmospheric model dynamical cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Diana R.; Jablonowski, Christiane

    2016-04-01

    A moist idealized test case (MITC) for atmospheric model dynamical cores is presented. The MITC is based on the Held-Suarez (HS) test that was developed for dry simulations on "a flat Earth" and replaces the full physical parameterization package with a Newtonian temperature relaxation and Rayleigh damping of the low-level winds. This new variant of the HS test includes moisture and thereby sheds light on the nonlinear dynamics-physics moisture feedbacks without the complexity of full-physics parameterization packages. In particular, it adds simplified moist processes to the HS forcing to model large-scale condensation, boundary-layer mixing, and the exchange of latent and sensible heat between the atmospheric surface and an ocean-covered planet. Using a variety of dynamical cores of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), this paper demonstrates that the inclusion of the moist idealized physics package leads to climatic states that closely resemble aquaplanet simulations with complex physical parameterizations. This establishes that the MITC approach generates reasonable atmospheric circulations and can be used for a broad range of scientific investigations. This paper provides examples of two application areas. First, the test case reveals the characteristics of the physics-dynamics coupling technique and reproduces coupling issues seen in full-physics simulations. In particular, it is shown that sudden adjustments of the prognostic fields due to moist physics tendencies can trigger undesirable large-scale gravity waves, which can be remedied by a more gradual application of the physical forcing. Second, the moist idealized test case can be used to intercompare dynamical cores. These examples demonstrate the versatility of the MITC approach and suggestions are made for further application areas. The new moist variant of the HS test can be considered a test case of intermediate complexity.

  5. Analytical Models of Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Atmospheric Dynamics via the Shallow Water System

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Within the context of exoplanetary atmospheres, we present a comprehensive linear analysis of forced, damped, magnetized shallow water systems, exploring the effects of dimensionality, geometry (Cartesian, pseudo-spherical and spherical), rotation, magnetic tension and hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction. Across a broad range of conditions, we find that the key governing equation for atmospheres and quantum harmonic oscillators are identical, even when forcing (stellar irradiation), sources of friction (molecular viscosity, Rayleigh drag and magnetic drag) and magnetic tension are included. The global atmospheric structure is largely controlled by a single, key parameter that involves the Rossby and Prandtl numbers. This near-universality breaks down when either molecular viscosity or magnetic drag varies significantly across latitude or a poloidal magnetic field is present, suggesting that these effects will introduce qualitative changes to the familiar chevron-shaped feature witnessed in simulatio...

  6. Realistic Modeling of Multi-Scale MHD Dynamics of the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiashvili, Irina; Mansour, Nagi N.; Wray, Alan; Couvidat, Sebastian; Yoon, Seokkwan; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Realistic 3D radiative MHD simulations open new perspectives for understanding the turbulent dynamics of the solar surface, its coupling to the atmosphere, and the physical mechanisms of generation and transport of non-thermal energy. Traditionally, plasma eruptions and wave phenomena in the solar atmosphere are modeled by prescribing artificial driving mechanisms using magnetic or gas pressure forces that might arise from magnetic field emergence or reconnection instabilities. In contrast, our 'ab initio' simulations provide a realistic description of solar dynamics naturally driven by solar energy flow. By simulating the upper convection zone and the solar atmosphere, we can investigate in detail the physical processes of turbulent magnetoconvection, generation and amplification of magnetic fields, excitation of MHD waves, and plasma eruptions. We present recent simulation results of the multi-scale dynamics of quiet-Sun regions, and energetic effects in the atmosphere and compare with observations. For the comparisons we calculate synthetic spectro-polarimetric data to model observational data of SDO, Hinode, and New Solar Telescope.

  7. Dynamics and predictability of a low-order wind-driven ocean-atmosphere coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2014-04-01

    The dynamics of a low-order coupled wind-driven ocean-atmosphere system is investigated with emphasis on its predictability properties. The low-order coupled deterministic system is composed of a baroclinic atmosphere for which 12 dominant dynamical modes are only retained (Charney and Straus in J Atmos Sci 37:1157-1176, 1980) and a wind-driven, quasi-geostrophic and reduced-gravity shallow ocean whose field is truncated to four dominant modes able to reproduce the large scale oceanic gyres (Pierini in J Phys Oceanogr 41:1585-1604, 2011). The two models are coupled through mechanical forcings only. The analysis of its dynamics reveals first that under aperiodic atmospheric forcings only dominant single gyres (clockwise or counterclockwise) appear, while for periodic atmospheric solutions the double gyres emerge. In the present model domain setting context, this feature is related to the level of truncation of the atmospheric fields, as indicated by a preliminary analysis of the impact of higher wavenumber ("synoptic" scale) modes on the development of oceanic gyres. In the latter case, double gyres appear in the presence of a chaotic atmosphere. Second the dynamical quantities characterizing the short-term predictability (Lyapunov exponents, Lyapunov dimension, Kolmogorov-Sinaï (KS) entropy) displays a complex dependence as a function of the key parameters of the system, namely the coupling strength and the external thermal forcing. In particular, the KS-entropy is increasing as a function of the coupling in most of the experiments, implying an increase of the rate of loss of information about the localization of the system on its attractor. Finally the dynamics of the error is explored and indicates, in particular, a rich variety of short term behaviors of the error in the atmosphere depending on the (relative) amplitude of the initial error affecting the ocean, from polynomial ( at 2 + bt 3 + ct 4) up to exponential-like evolutions. These features are explained

  8. Dynamics in Atmospheric Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindzen, Richard A.

    2005-08-01

    Motion is manifest in the atmosphere in an almost infinite variety of ways. In Dynamics in Atmospheric Physics, Dr. Richard Lindzen describes the nature of motion in the atmosphere, develops fluid dynamics relevant to the atmosphere, and explores the role of motion in determining the climate and atmospheric composition. The author presents the material in a lecture note style, and the emphasis throughout is on describing phenomena that are at the frontiers of current research, but due attention is given to the methodology of research and to the historical background of these topics. The author's treatment and choice of topics is didactic. Problems at the end of each chapter will help students assimilate the material. In general the discussions emphasize physical concepts, and throughout Dr. Lindzen makes a concerted effort to avoid the notion that dynamic meteorology is simply the derivation of equations and their subsequent solution. His desire is that interested students will delve further into solution details. The book is intended as a text for first year graduate students in the atmospheric sciences. Although the material in the book is self contained, a familiarity with differential equations is assumed; some background in fluid mechanics is helpful.

  9. Dynamics and predictability of a low-order wind-driven ocean - atmosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of a low order coupled wind-driven Ocean-Atmosphere (OA) system is investigated with emphasis on its predictability properties. The low-order coupled deterministic system is composed of a baroclinic atmosphere for which 12 dominant dynamical modes are only retained (Charney and Straus, 1980) and a wind-driven, quasi-geostrophic and reduced-gravity shallow ocean whose field is truncated to four dominant modes able to reproduce the large scale oceanic gyres (Pierini, 2011). The two models are coupled through mechanical forcings only. The analysis of its dynamics reveals first that under aperiodic atmospheric forcings only dominant single gyres (clockwise or counterclockwise) appear. This feature is expected to be related with the specific domain choice over which the coupled system is defined. Second the dynamical quantities characterizing the short-term predictability (Lyapunov exponents, Lyapunov dimension, Kolmogorov-Sinaï (KS) entropy) displays a complex dependence as a function of the key parameters of the system, namely the coupling strength and the external thermal forcing. In particular, the KS-entropy is increasing as a function of the coupling in most of the experiments, implying an increase of the rate of loss of information about the localization of the system on his attractor. Finally the dynamics of the error is explored and indicates, in particular, a rich variety of short term behaviors of the error in the atmosphere depending on the (relative) amplitude of the initial error affecting the ocean, from polynomial (at2 + bt3 + ct4) up to purely exponential evolutions. These features are explained and analyzed in the light of the recent findings on error growth (Nicolis et al, 2009). References Charney J G, Straus DM (1980) Form-Drag Instability, Multiple Equilibria and Propagating Planetary Waves in Baroclinic, Orographically Forced, Planetary Wave Systems. J Atmos Sci 37: 1157-1176. Nicolis C, Perdigao RAP, Vannitsem S (2009) Dynamics of

  10. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the

  11. DYNAMICO, an atmospheric dynamical core for high-performance climate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubos, Thomas; Meurdesoif, Yann; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Fita, Lluis; Hourdin, Frédéric; Kageyama, Masa; Traore, Abdoul-Khadre; Guerlet, Sandrine; Polcher, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Institut Pierre Simon Laplace has developed a very scalable atmospheric dynamical core, DYNAMICO, based on energy-conserving finite-difference/finite volume numerics on a quasi-uniform icosahedral-hexagonal mesh. Scalability is achieved by combining hybrid MPI/OpenMP parallelism to asynchronous I/O. This dynamical core has been coupled to radiative transfer physics tailored to the atmosphere of Saturn, allowing unprecedented simulations of the climate of this giant planet. For terrestrial climate studies DYNAMICO is being integrated into the IPSL Earth System Model IPSL-CM. Preliminary aquaplanet and AMIP-style simulations yield reasonable results when compared to outputs from IPSL-CM5. The observed performance suggests that an order of magnitude may be gained with respect to IPSL-CM CMIP5 simulations either on the duration of simulations or on their resolution. Longer simulations would be of interest for the study of paleoclimate, while higher resolution could improve certain aspects of the modeled climate such as extreme events, as will be explored in the HighResMIP project. Following IPSL's strategic vision of building a unified global-regional modelling system, a fully-compressible, non-hydrostatic prototype of DYNAMICO has been developed, enabling future convection-resolving simulations. Work supported by ANR project "HEAT", grant number CE23_2014_HEAT Dubos, T., Dubey, S., Tort, M., Mittal, R., Meurdesoif, Y., and Hourdin, F.: DYNAMICO-1.0, an icosahedral hydrostatic dynamical core designed for consistency and versatility, Geosci. Model Dev., 8, 3131-3150, doi:10.5194/gmd-8-3131-2015, 2015.

  12. An unstructured-mesh atmospheric model for nonhydrostatic dynamics: Towards optimal mesh resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmelter, Joanna; Zhang, Zhao; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2015-08-01

    The paper advances the limited-area anelastic model (Smolarkiewicz et al. (2013) [45]) for investigation of nonhydrostatic dynamics in mesoscale atmospheric flows. New developments include the extension to a tetrahedral-based median-dual option for unstructured meshes and a static mesh adaptivity technique using an error indicator based on inherent properties of the Multidimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA). The model employs semi-implicit nonoscillatory forward-in-time integrators for soundproof PDEs, built on MPDATA and a robust non-symmetric Krylov-subspace elliptic solver. Finite-volume spatial discretisation adopts an edge-based data structure. Simulations of stratified orographic flows and the associated gravity-wave phenomena in media with uniform and variable dispersive properties verify the advancement and demonstrate the potential of heterogeneous anisotropic discretisation with large variation in spatial resolution for study of complex stratified flows that can be computationally unattainable with regular grids.

  13. Partial Overhaul and Initial Parallel Optimization of KINETICS, a Coupled Dynamics and Chemistry Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Howard; Willacy, Karen; Allen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    KINETICS is a coupled dynamics and chemistry atmosphere model that is data intensive and computationally demanding. The potential performance gain from using a supercomputer motivates the adaptation from a serial version to a parallelized one. Although the initial parallelization had been done, bottlenecks caused by an abundance of communication calls between processors led to an unfavorable drop in performance. Before starting on the parallel optimization process, a partial overhaul was required because a large emphasis was placed on streamlining the code for user convenience and revising the program to accommodate the new supercomputers at Caltech and JPL. After the first round of optimizations, the partial runtime was reduced by a factor of 23; however, performance gains are dependent on the size of the data, the number of processors requested, and the computer used.

  14. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the

  15. A new multi-tracer transport scheme for the dynamical core of NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erath, C.

    2012-04-01

    The integration of a conservative semi-Lagrangian multi-tracer transport scheme (CSLAM) in NCAR's High-Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME) is considered here. HOMME is a highly scalable atmospheric modeling framework, and its current horizontal discretization relies on spectral element (SE) and/or discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods on the cubed-sphere. It is one dynamical core of NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The main advantage of CSLAM is that the upstream cell (trajectories) information and computation of weights of integrals can be reused for each additional tracer. This makes CSLAM particularly interesting for global atmospheric modeling with growing number of tracers, e.g. more than 100 tracers for the chemistry version of CAM. An algorithm specifically designed for multiple processors and on the cubed-sphere grid for CSLAM in HOMME is a challenging task. HOMME is running on an element ansatz on the six cube faces. Inside these elements we create an Eulerian finite volume grid of equiangular gnomonic type, which represents the arrival grid in the scheme. But CSLAM relies on backward trajectories, which entails a departure grid. That means departure and arrival grid don't necessary have to be on the same element and certainly not on the same cube face. Also the reconstruction for higher order modeling needs a patch of tracer values which extend the element. Here we consider a third order reconstruction method. Therefore, we introduce a halo for the tracer values in the cell centers of a cube-element. The size of this halo depends on the Courant number (CFL condition) and the reconstruction type. Note that for a third order scheme and CFL number communication can be limited to one per time step. This data structure allows us to consider an element with its halo as one task where we have to be extra carful for elements which share a cube edge due to projection and orientation reasons. We stress that the reconstruction coefficients for elements

  16. Vorticity-divergence semi-Lagrangian global atmospheric model SL-AV20: dynamical core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstykh, Mikhail; Shashkin, Vladimir; Fadeev, Rostislav; Goyman, Gordey

    2017-05-01

    SL-AV (semi-Lagrangian, based on the absolute vorticity equation) is a global hydrostatic atmospheric model. Its latest version, SL-AV20, provides global operational medium-range weather forecast with 20 km resolution over Russia. The lower-resolution configurations of SL-AV20 are being tested for seasonal prediction and climate modeling. The article presents the model dynamical core. Its main features are a vorticity-divergence formulation at the unstaggered grid, high-order finite-difference approximations, semi-Lagrangian semi-implicit discretization and the reduced latitude-longitude grid with variable resolution in latitude. The accuracy of SL-AV20 numerical solutions using a reduced lat-lon grid and the variable resolution in latitude is tested with two idealized test cases. Accuracy and stability of SL-AV20 in the presence of the orography forcing are tested using the mountain-induced Rossby wave test case. The results of all three tests are in good agreement with other published model solutions. It is shown that the use of the reduced grid does not significantly affect the accuracy up to the 25 % reduction in the number of grid points with respect to the regular grid. Variable resolution in latitude allows us to improve the accuracy of a solution in the region of interest.

  17. Validation of Atmospheric Dynamics (VADY) - representation of circulation types/dynamical modes in the decadal-prediction model system of MPI-ESM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Benjamin; Jacobeit, Jucundus; Beck, Christoph; Philipp, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The climate research program "Medium-range Climate Predictions" (MiKlip), funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research in Germany (BMBF), has the aim to improve a climate model system (MPI-ESM) in such a way that it can provide reliable decadal predictions of climate, including extreme weather events. A substantial part of the development process is a comprehensive model validation. Within MiKlip, it includes comparisons of model simulations and observations in order to allow statements about the performance of the model and to give particular recommendations for the further development of the model. The research project "Validation of Atmospheric Dynamics" (VADY), conducted by the cooperation partners "Institute of Geography at the University of Augsburg" (IGUA) and the "German Aerospace Centre" (DLR), contributes to model validation within MiKlip with a special focus on atmospheric waves (DLR) and circulation dynamics (IGUA). Within the framework of VADY, DLR validates the representation of atmospheric waves on different levels and scales based on suitable activity indices (e.g. the so-called large-scale dynamical activity index (LDAI), which is a measure for the activity of planetary waves). The focus of IGUA is on the model validation with respect to the representation of atmospheric circulation types, dynamical modes and the teleconnectivity of the atmospheric circulation. The present contribution provides results of the model validation concerning circulation types/dynamical modes. Results are shown for both the frequency of occurrence and internal characteristics (e. g. persistence or intensity), and for different classification methods (e. g. based on PCA or clustering techniques). The representation of circulation types/dynamical modes will be compared for different generations of the MPI-ESM decadal-prediction model (baseline0, baseline1, prototype) in order to clarify both advances and limitations in the development of the model. Furthermore

  18. Evolution and challenges of dynamic global vegetation models for some aspects of plant physiology and elevated atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, L. F. C.; Arenque, B. C.; Aidar, S. T.; Moura, M. S. B.; Von Randow, C.; Tourigny, E.; Menezes, R. S. C.; Ometto, J. P. H. B.

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) simulate surface processes such as the transfer of energy, water, CO2, and momentum between the terrestrial surface and the atmosphere, biogeochemical cycles, carbon assimilation by vegetation, phenology, and land use change in scenarios of varying atmospheric CO2 concentrations. DGVMs increase the complexity and the Earth system representation when they are coupled with atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) or climate models. However, plant physiological processes are still a major source of uncertainty in DGVMs. The maximum velocity of carboxylation (Vcmax), for example, has a direct impact over productivity in the models. This parameter is often underestimated or imprecisely defined for the various plant functional types (PFTs) and ecosystems. Vcmax is directly related to photosynthesis acclimation (loss of response to elevated CO2), a widely known phenomenon that usually occurs when plants are subjected to elevated atmospheric CO2 and might affect productivity estimation in DGVMs. Despite this, current models have improved substantially, compared to earlier models which had a rudimentary and very simple representation of vegetation-atmosphere interactions. In this paper, we describe this evolution through generations of models and the main events that contributed to their improvements until the current state-of-the-art class of models. Also, we describe some main challenges for further improvements to DGVMs.

  19. Evolution and challenges of dynamic global vegetation models for some aspects of plant physiology and elevated atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, L F C; Arenque, B C; Aidar, S T; Moura, M S B; Von Randow, C; Tourigny, E; Menezes, R S C; Ometto, J P H B

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) simulate surface processes such as the transfer of energy, water, CO2, and momentum between the terrestrial surface and the atmosphere, biogeochemical cycles, carbon assimilation by vegetation, phenology, and land use change in scenarios of varying atmospheric CO2 concentrations. DGVMs increase the complexity and the Earth system representation when they are coupled with atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) or climate models. However, plant physiological processes are still a major source of uncertainty in DGVMs. The maximum velocity of carboxylation (Vcmax), for example, has a direct impact over productivity in the models. This parameter is often underestimated or imprecisely defined for the various plant functional types (PFTs) and ecosystems. Vcmax is directly related to photosynthesis acclimation (loss of response to elevated CO2), a widely known phenomenon that usually occurs when plants are subjected to elevated atmospheric CO2 and might affect productivity estimation in DGVMs. Despite this, current models have improved substantially, compared to earlier models which had a rudimentary and very simple representation of vegetation-atmosphere interactions. In this paper, we describe this evolution through generations of models and the main events that contributed to their improvements until the current state-of-the-art class of models. Also, we describe some main challenges for further improvements to DGVMs.

  20. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  1. Diagnosing the possible dynamics controlling Sahel precipitation in the short-range ensemble community atmospheric model hindcasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-heng; Lin, Yen-heng; Lo, Min-hui; Yang, Shu-chih

    2016-11-01

    The actual dynamics and physical mechanisms affecting the Sahel precipitation pattern and amplitude in the climate models remain under debate due to the inconsistent drying and rainfall variability/pattern among them. We diagnose the boreal summer rainfall pattern in the Sahel and its possible causes using short-range ensemble hindcasts based on NCAR community atmospheric model with the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (CAM-LETKF) data assimilation. The CAM-LETKF assimilation was conducted using 64 ensemble members with an assimilation cycle of 6-h. By comparing the superior and inferior groups within these 64 ensembles, we confirmed the influence of the Atlantic in the West Sahel rainfall (a robust feature in the ensembles) and a severe model bias resulting from erroneously modeled locations and magnitudes of low-level Sahara heat low (SHL) and African easterly jet (AEJ). This bias is highly related to atmospheric jet dynamics as shown in recent studies and local wave instability triggered mainly by the boundary-layer temperature gradient and amplified by land-atmosphere interactions. In particular, our results demonstrated that more accurate divergence and convergence fields resulting from improved SHL and AEJ in the superior groups enabled more accurate rainbelt patterns to be discerned, thus improving the ensemble mean model hindcast prediction by more than 25 % in precipitation and 16 % in temperature. We concluded that the use of low-resolution climate models to project future rainfall in the Sahel requires caution because the model hindcasts may quickly diverge even the same boundary conditions and forcings are applied. The model bias may easily grow up within a few months in the short-range CAM-LETKF hindcast, let along the free model centennial simulations. Unconstrained future climate model projections for the Sahel must more effectively capture the short-term key boundary-layer dynamics in the boreal summer to be credible regardless model dynamics

  2. Diagnosing the possible dynamics controlling Sahel precipitation in the short-range ensemble community atmospheric model hindcasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-heng; Lin, Yen-heng; Lo, Min-hui; Yang, Shu-chih

    2016-01-01

    The actual dynamics and physical mechanisms affecting the Sahel precipitation pattern and amplitude in the climate models remain under debate due to the inconsistent drying and rainfall variability/pattern among them. We diagnose the boreal summer rainfall pattern in the Sahel and its possible causes using short-range ensemble hindcasts based on NCAR community atmospheric model with the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (CAM-LETKF) data assimilation. The CAM-LETKF assimilation was conducted using 64 ensemble members with an assimilation cycle of 6-h. By comparing the superior and inferior groups within these 64 ensembles, we confirmed the influence of the Atlantic in the West Sahel rainfall (a robust feature in the ensembles) and a severe model bias resulting from erroneously modeled locations and magnitudes of low-level Sahara heat low (SHL) and African easterly jet (AEJ). This bias is highly related to atmospheric jet dynamics as shown in recent studies and local wave instability triggered mainly by the boundary-layer temperature gradient and amplified by land-atmosphere interactions. In particular, our results demonstrated that more accurate divergence and convergence fields resulting from improved SHL and AEJ in the superior groups enabled more accurate rainbelt patterns to be discerned, thus improving the ensemble mean model hindcast prediction by more than 25 % in precipitation and 16 % in temperature. We concluded that the use of low-resolution climate models to project future rainfall in the Sahel requires caution because the model hindcasts may quickly diverge even the same boundary conditions and forcings are applied. The model bias may easily grow up within a few months in the short-range CAM-LETKF hindcast, let along the free model centennial simulations. Unconstrained future climate model projections for the Sahel must more effectively capture the short-term key boundary-layer dynamics in the boreal summer to be credible regardless model dynamics

  3. Synthetic photometry for carbon-rich giants. IV. An extensive grid of dynamic atmosphere and wind models

    CERN Document Server

    Eriksson, Kjell; Höfner, Susanne; Aringer, Bernhard; Wachter, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    The evolution and spectral properties of stars on the AGB are significantly affected by mass loss through dusty stellar winds. Dynamic atmosphere and wind models are an essential tool for studying these evolved stars, both individually and as members of stellar populations, to understand their contribution to the integrated light and chemical evolution of galaxies. This paper is part of a series testing state-of-the-art atmosphere and wind models of carbon stars against observations, and making them available for use in various theoretical and observational studies. We have computed low-resolution spectra and photometry (in the wavelength range 0.35-25 mu) for a grid of 540 dynamic models with stellar parameters typical of solar-metallicity C-rich AGB stars and with a range of pulsation amplitudes. The models cover the dynamic atmosphere and dusty outflow (if present), assuming spherical symmetry, and taking opacities of gas-phase species and dust grains consistently into account. To characterize the time-dep...

  4. Downscale cascades in tracer transport test cases: an intercomparison of the dynamical cores in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kent

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The accurate modelling of cascades to unresolved scales is an important part of the tracer transport component of dynamical cores of weather and climate models. This paper aims to investigate the ability of the advection schemes in the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5 to model this cascade. In order to quantify the effects of the different advection schemes in CAM5, four two-dimensional tracer transport test cases are presented. Three of the tests stretch the tracer below the scale of coarse resolution grids to ensure the downscale cascade of tracer variance. These results are compared with a high resolution reference solution, which is simulated on a resolution fine enough to resolve the tracer during the test. The fourth test has two separate flow cells, and is designed so that any tracer in the Western Hemisphere should not pass into the Eastern Hemisphere. This is to test whether the diffusion in transport schemes, often in the form of explicit hyper-diffusion terms or implicit through monotonic limiters, contains unphysical mixing.

    An intercomparison of three of the dynamical cores of the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model version 5 is performed. The results show that the finite-volume (CAM-FV and spectral element (CAM-SE dynamical cores model the downscale cascade of tracer variance better than the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme of the Eulerian spectral transform core (CAM-EUL. Each scheme tested produces unphysical mass in the Eastern Hemisphere of the separate cells test.

  5. Downscale cascades in tracer transport test cases: an intercomparison of the dynamical cores in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kent

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The accurate modeling of cascades to unresolved scales is an important part of the tracer transport component of dynamical cores of weather and climate models. This paper aims to investigate the ability of the advection schemes in the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5 to model this cascade. In order to quantify the effects of the different advection schemes in CAM5, four two-dimensional tracer transport test cases are presented. Three of the tests stretch the tracer below the scale of coarse resolution grids to ensure the downscale cascade of tracer variance. These results are compared with a high resolution reference solution, which is simulated on a resolution fine enough to resolve the tracer during the test. The fourth test has two separate flow cells, and is designed so that any tracer in the western hemisphere should not pass into the eastern hemisphere. This is to test whether the diffusion in transport schemes, often in the form of explicit hyper-diffusion terms or implicit through monotonic limiters, contains unphysical mixing.

    An intercomparison of three of the dynamical cores of the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model version 5 is performed. The results show that the finite-volume (CAM-FV and spectral element (CAM-SE dynamical cores model the downscale cascade of tracer variance better than the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme of the Eulerian spectral transform core (CAM-EUL. Each scheme tested produces unphysical mass in the eastern hemisphere of the separate cells test.

  6. The Aliso Canyon Natural Gas Leak : Large Eddy Simulations for Modeling Atmospheric Dynamics and Interpretation of Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, K.; Thorpe, A. K.; Duren, R. M.; Thompson, D. R.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has supported the development and demonstration of a measurement capability to accurately locate greenhouse gas sources and measure their flux to the atmosphere over urban domains. However, uncertainties in transport models which form the basis of all top-down approaches can significantly affect our capability to attribute sources and predict their flux to the atmosphere. Reducing uncertainties between bottom-up and top-down models will require high resolution transport models as well as validation and verification of dispersion models over an urban domain. Tracer experiments involving the release of Perfluorocarbon Tracers (PFTs) at known flow rates offer the best approach for validating dispersion / transport models. However, tracer experiments are limited by cost, ability to make continuous measurements, and environmental concerns. Natural tracer experiments, such as the leak from the Aliso Canyon underground storage facility offers a unique opportunity to improve and validate high resolution transport models, test leak hypothesis, and to estimate the amount of methane released.High spatial resolution (10 m) Large Eddy Simulations (LES) coupled with WRF atmospheric transport models were performed to simulate the dynamics of the Aliso Canyon methane plume and to quantify the source. High resolution forward simulation results were combined with aircraft and tower based in-situ measurements as well as data from NASA airborne imaging spectrometers. Comparison of simulation results with measurement data demonstrate the capability of the LES models to accurately model transport and dispersion of methane plumes over urban domains.

  7. The Atmospheric Dynamics of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín; Lebonnois, Sebastien; Imamura, Takeshi; Read, Peter; Luz, David

    2017-08-01

    We review our current knowledge of the atmospheric dynamics of Venus prior to the Akatsuki mission, in the altitude range from the surface to approximately the cloud tops located at about 100 km altitude. The three-dimensional structure of the wind field in this region has been determined with a variety of techniques over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales (from the mesoscale to planetary, from days to years, in daytime and nighttime), spanning a period of about 50 years (from the 1960s to the present). The global panorama is that the mean atmospheric motions are essentially zonal, dominated by the so-called super-rotation (an atmospheric rotation that is 60 to 80 times faster than that of the planetary body). The zonal winds blow westward (in the same direction as the planet rotation) with a nearly constant speed of ˜ 100 m s^{-1} at the cloud tops (65-70 km altitude) from latitude 50°N to 50°S, then decreasing their speeds monotonically from these latitudes toward the poles. Vertically, the zonal winds decrease with decreasing altitude towards velocities ˜ 1-3 m s^{-1} in a layer of thickness ˜ 10 km close to the surface. Meridional motions with peak speeds of ˜ 15 m s^{-1} occur within the upper cloud at 65 km altitude and are related to a Hadley cell circulation and to the solar thermal tide. Vertical motions with speeds ˜1-3 m s^{-1} occur in the statically unstable layer between altitudes of ˜ 50 - 55 km. All these motions are permanent with speed variations of the order of ˜10%. Various types of wave, from mesoscale gravity waves to Rossby-Kelvin planetary scale waves, have been detected at and above cloud heights, and are considered to be candidates as agents for carrying momentum that drives the super-rotation, although numerical models do not fully reproduce all the observed features. Momentum transport by atmospheric waves and the solar tide is thought to be an indispensable component of the general circulation of the Venus atmosphere

  8. Dynamic Equilibrium Inter-annual Snow Modeling for Wyoming using Reconstructed Regional Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, N.; Johnson, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The inland glacier retreat has often been considered as one of clearest evidences of the global warming last several decades. However, when we try to model the evolution of the inland inter-annual snow storage including glaciers using a standard energy and mass balance snow model, it is impossible to keep the snow storage constant under a constant climate condition. This study treats the inland glaciers as a dynamic equilibrium system that remains constant under static climate condition. We introduced a sub-grid scale parameterization that moves snow/ice from high elevation areas to valleys as the equilibrating factor of the system. This movement of snow/ice occurs by means of wind re-distribution, avalanches, and glaciation. The physically-based model of a dynamic equilibrium snow system at a regional scale was applied to the entire state of Wyoming for long-term simulation. The developed snow model, named RegSnow model, was coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to estimate the snow surface energy fluxes during the 33-year-long historical period for transient model calibration. The RegSnow model predicted that 82.2% of interannual snow and ice storage in Wyoming may disappear by 2100 under the RCP4.5 emission scenario based on the climate projection by CMIP5 GCMs.

  9. Atmospheric emissions modeling of energetic biomass alternatives using system dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szarka, N. [University of Leoben (Austria). Chair of System Analysis and Environmental Engineering; University of Concepcion (Chile). Environmental Sciences Center; Kakucs, O.; Wolfbauer, J. [University of Leoben (Austria). Chair of System Analysis and Environmental Engineering; Bezama, A. [University of Concepcion (Chile). Environmental Sciences Center

    2008-01-15

    To simulate the quantitative effects of regional biomass alternatives for energetic purpose (BfE) on air pollutant emissions, a system dynamics model was developed and applied for the EuRegion Austrian-Hungarian cross-border area. The dynamic simulation program Vensim{sup R} was used to build an overall regional model with economic, social and environmental sectors. Within this model, the here-introduced regional air pollution sub-model (RegAir) includes the important human-made emissions of 10 pollutants resulting from all relevant source sectors within the region investigated. Emissions from activities related to biomass production, transport, conversion and final energy consumption were built in detail. After building and calibrating the RegAir model, seven quantitative test scenarios were defined and implemented into the world. Through the scenarios simulation, effects on air emissions were followed and compared over time. The results of these simulations show a significant reduction of CO{sub 2} emission, especially in cases where fossil fuel displacement in heating devices is achieved on the largest scale. On the contrary, traditional air pollutants increase by most BfE options. The results of the RegAir model simulations of BfE alternatives over two decades provide useful quantifications of various air emissions and identify the less pollutant BfE alternatives in the dynamic context of the relevant air pollution sources of the region. After minor structural modification and appropriate calibration, RegAir can be applied to other regions as well. However, it is stated that, to finally decide on the overall most-appropriate options at a regional level, other environmental as well as economic and social effects must be taken into consideration, being the latter the goal of the mentioned overall regional model which serves as a model frame to the RegAir tool. (author)

  10. Synthetic photometry for carbon-rich giants. IV. An extensive grid of dynamic atmosphere and wind models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, K.; Nowotny, W.; Höfner, S.; Aringer, B.; Wachter, A.

    2014-06-01

    Context. The evolution and spectral properties of stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) are significantly affected by mass loss through dusty stellar winds. Dynamic atmosphere and wind models are an essential tool for studying these evolved stars, both individually and as members of stellar populations, to understand their contribution to the integrated light and chemical evolution of galaxies. Aims: This paper is part of a series with the purpose of testing state-of-the-art atmosphere and wind models of C-type AGB stars against observations, and making them available to the community for use in various theoretical and observational studies. Methods: We have computed low-resolution spectra and photometry (in the wavelength range 0.35-25 μm) for a grid of 540 dynamic models with stellar parameters typical of solar-metallicity C-rich AGB stars and with a range of pulsation amplitudes. The models cover the dynamic atmosphere and dusty outflow (if present), assuming spherical symmetry, and taking opacities of gas-phase species and dust grains consistently into account. To characterize the time-dependent dynamic and photometric behaviour of the models in a concise way we defined a number of classes for models with and without winds. Results: Comparisons with observed data in general show a quite satisfactory agreement for example regarding mass-loss rates vs. (J - K) colours or K magnitudes vs. (J - K) colours. Some exceptions from the good overall agreement, however, are found and attributed to the range of input parameters (e.g. relatively high carbon excesses) or intrinsic model assumptions (e.g. small particle limit for grain opacities). Conclusions: While current results indicate that some changes in model assumptions and parameter ranges should be made in the future to bring certain synthetic observables into better agreement with observations, it seems unlikely that these pending improvements will significantly affect the mass-loss rates of the models

  11. The dynamic atmospheres of Mira stars: comparing the CODEX models to PTI time series of TU Andromedae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillen, M.; Verhoelst, T.; Degroote, P.; Acke, B.; van Winckel, H.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Our comprehension of stellar evolution on the AGB still faces many difficulties. To improve on this, a quantified understanding of large-amplitude pulsator atmospheres and interpretation in terms of their fundamental stellar parameters are essential. Aims: We wish to evaluate the effectiveness of the recently released CODEX dynamical model atmospheres in representing M-type Mira variables through a confrontation with the time-resolved spectro-photometric and interferometric PTI data set of TU And. Methods: We calibrated the interferometric K-band time series to high precision. This results in 50 nights of observations, covering 8 subsequent pulsation cycles. At each phase, the flux at 2.2 μm is obtained, along with the spectral shape and visibility points in 5 channels across the K-band. We compared the data set to the relevant dynamical, self-excited CODEX models. Results: Both spectrum and visibilities are consistently reproduced at visual minimum phases. Near maximum, our observations show that the current models predict a photosphere that is too compact and hot, and we find that the extended atmosphere lacks H2O opacity. Since coverage in model parameter space is currently poor, more models are needed to make firm conclusions on the cause of the discrepancies. We argue that for TU And, the discrepancy could be lifted by adopting a lower value of the mixing length parameter combined with an increase in the stellar mass and/or a decrease in metallicity, but this requires the release of an extended model grid. Figure 4 and Table 1 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Point vortex models and the dynamics of strong vortices in the atmosphere and oceans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aref, H.; Stremler, M.A. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics

    2001-07-01

    Point vortex dynamics has a special 'flavor' since it combines fluid mechanics, which usually entails the solution of partial differential equations, with the theory of dynamical systems, which is usually concerned with a small number of ordinary differential equations. Modern developments have shown that very complicated things can happen already for a small number of ODEs. In the case of classical point vortices on the unbounded plane, the two-vortex problem is integrable and very simple. Furthermore, one has the interesting result that the three-vortex problem is integrable. Generally, dynamical three-body problems are non-integrable unless the system in question is integrable for any number of particles. Four point vortices, on the other hand, can display chaotic motion. Indeed, the transition from integrability to chaos occurs already for the problem of passive advection of a particle in the flow field produced by the integrable three-vortex motion. The motion of the advected particle can be chaotic. This insight led to the concept of chaotic advection, which has since emerged as a general paradigm of flow kinematics and fluid mixing, and has been actively pursued in the context of very viscous flows. Here again there are important connections to geophysical fluid dynamics. Thus, Zimmerman and collaborators have emphasized that the mixing in shallow tidal basins, such as the Wadden sea, is probably more appropriately described by chaotic advection than by turbulent transport models. (orig.)

  13. Nonisothermal Pluto atmosphere models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, W.B.; Yelle, R.V.; Lunine, J.I. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1990-03-01

    The present thermal profile calculation for a Pluto atmosphere model characterized by a high number fraction of CH4 molecules encompasses atmospheric heating by solar UV flux absorption and conductive transport cooling to the surface of Pluto. The stellar occultation curve predicted for an atmosphere of several-microbar surface pressures (which entail the existence of a substantial temperature gradient close to the surface) agrees with observations and implies that the normal and tangential optical depth of the atmosphere is almost negligible. The minimum period for atmospheric methane depletion is calculated to be 30 years. 29 refs.

  14. Geophysical Plasmas and Atmospheric Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    will be submitted to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 32 - .- I. LIMITATIONS ON STRATOSPHERIC DYNAMICS We have performed an investigation of...Amplitudes" which will be submitted to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 1i 33 A& J. GENERAL CIRCULATION MODEL STUDIES Comparison computer runs...In tis case, as clearly shov.i by Petvia-mensona. I ths cseas ceary sou byPetia- cavities requires a local theory going beyond the limitshvilli,’ the

  15. The dynamic atmospheres of Mira stars: comparing the CODEX models to PTI time series of TU And

    CERN Document Server

    Hillen, M; Degroote, P; Acke, B; van Winckel, H

    2012-01-01

    Our comprehension of stellar evolution on the AGB still faces many difficulties. To improve on this, a quantified understanding of large-amplitude pulsator atmospheres and interpretation in terms of their fundamental stellar parameters are essential. We wish to evaluate the effectiveness of the recently released CODEX dynamical model atmospheres in representing M-type Mira variables through a confrontation with the time-resolved spectro-photometric and interferometric PTI data set of TU And. We calibrated the interferometric K-band time series to high precision. This results in 50 nights of observations, covering 8 subsequent pulsation cycles. At each phase, the flux at 2.2$\\mu$m is obtained, along with the spectral shape and visibility points in 5 channels across the K-band. We compared the data set to the relevant dynamical, self-excited CODEX models. Both spectrum and visibilities are consistently reproduced at visual minimum phases. Near maximum, our observations show that the current models predict a pho...

  16. Mid-to-late Holocene temperature evolution and atmospheric dynamics over Europe in regional model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Emmanuele; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    data set over most of the domain for the time periods under investigation. Through the analysis of variations in atmospheric circulation we suggest that, even though the wintertime discrepancies between the two data sets in some areas are most likely due to high pollen uncertainties, in general the model seems to underestimate the changes in the amplitude of the North Atlantic Oscillation, overestimating the contribution of secondary modes of variability.

  17. Dynamics of the Venus atmospheric superrotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Masahiro

    It has been shown by Takagi and Matsuda (2006, 2007) that the thermal tides excited at the cloud levels propagate downward to the ground, and induce mean flow in the opposite direction to the Venus rotation at about 0-10 km levels. Surface friction acting on this counter flow can provide the Venus atmosphere with net angular momentum required for its superrotation. By using a nonlinear dynamical model, it has been confirmed that this mechanism generates the atmospheric superrotation extending from the ground to 80 km, whose vertical structure is consistent with observations. However, a mean zonal component of the solar heating is excluded in this model. Numerical experiments with the mean zonal solar heating imply that dynamical effects of the mean meridional circulation cannot be neglected. It is also necessary to construct a radiation scheme suitable for the Venus atmosphere with enormous optical depth. We are currently working on these tasks.

  18. The Dynamic Atmospheres of Mira Stars: Comparing the CODEX Models to PTI Time Series Observations of TU Andromedae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillen, M.; Verhoelst, T.; Degroote, P.; Acke, B.; Van Winckel, H.

    2015-08-01

    We present our already-published evaluation of the effectiveness of the CODEX models, released in 2011, in representing the atmospheres of M-type Mira variables. We present a high-precision interferometric K-band time series of TU And, consisting of 50 nights that cover eight consecutive pulsation cycles. At each phase, the flux at 2.2μm was obtained, along with the spectral shape and visibility points in five channels across the K band. We show a comparison between these data and the dynamical self-excited CODEX model which gives the closest match in stellar parameters yet available. Both the spectrum and the visibilities are consistently reproduced around visual minimum phases. Near the maximum phases, however, the current models predict a photosphere that is too hot and compact, surrounded by an extended atmosphere that lacks H2O opacity, compared to the observations. A better coverage in the model parameter space is needed to make firm conclusions as to the cause of the discrepancies. In the case of TU And, the discrepancy might be lifted by adopting a lower value of the mixing length parameter combined with an increased stellar mass and/or a decreased metallicity.

  19. The impact of the atmospheric model and of the space weather data on the dynamics of clouds of space debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Alexis; Lemaitre, Anne

    2016-06-01

    New tools are necessary to deal with more than hundred thousands of space debris, thus our aim is to develop software able to propagate numerous trajectories and manage collisions or fragmentations. Specifically in low orbits Earth, gravity and atmospheric drag are the two main forces that affect the dynamics of the artificial satellites or space debris. NIMASTEP, the local orbit propagator, initially designed for high altitudes, has been adapted to low altitude orbits. To study the future debris environment, we propose a suitable model of space weather and we compare three different atmospheric density models (Jacchia-Bowman 2008, DTM-2013, and TD-88) able to propagate with accuracy and efficiency a large population of space debris on long time scales. We compare the results in different altitudes and during the reentry regime; we show, with a ballistic coefficient constant, a trend to underestimate or overestimate the decrease of the semi-major axis, specifically during the periods of high solar activity. We parallelize our software and use the calculation power of a computing cluster, we propagate a huge cloud of debris and we show that its global evolution is in agreement with the observations on several years.

  20. Near-infrared spectro-interferometry of Mira variables and comparisons to 1D dynamic model atmospheres and 3D convection simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkowski, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Freytag, B.; Scholz, M.; Höfner, S.; Karovicova, I.; Whitelock, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We aim at comparing spectro-interferometric observations of Mira variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with the latest 1D dynamic model atmospheres based on self-excited pulsation models (CODEX models) and with 3D dynamic model atmospheres including pulsation and convection (CO5BOLD models) to better understand the processes that extend the molecular atmosphere to radii where dust can form. Methods: We obtained a total of 20 near-infrared K-band spectro-interferometric snapshot observations of the Mira variables o Cet, R Leo, R Aqr, X Hya, W Vel, and R Cnc with a spectral resolution of about 1500. We compared observed flux and visibility spectra with predictions by CODEX 1D dynamic model atmospheres and with azimuthally averaged intensities based on CO5BOLD 3D dynamic model atmospheres. Results: Our visibility data confirm the presence of spatially extended molecular atmospheres located above the continuum radii with large-scale inhomogeneities or clumps that contribute a few percent of the total flux. The detailed structure of the inhomogeneities or clumps show a variability on time scales of 3 months and above. Both modeling attempts provided satisfactory fits to our data. In particular, they are both consistent with the observed decrease in the visibility function at molecular bands of water vapor and CO, indicating a spatially extended molecular atmosphere. Observational variability phases are mostly consistent with those of the best-fit CODEX models, except for near-maximum phases, where data are better described by near-minimum models. Rosseland angular diameters derived from the model fits are broadly consistent between those based on the 1D and the 3D models and with earlier observations. We derived fundamental parameters including absolute radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities for our sources. Conclusions: Our results provide a first observational support for theoretical results that shocks induced by convection and pulsation in the

  1. Linear versus Nonlinear Filtering with Scale-Selective Corrections for Balanced Dynamics in a Simple Atmospheric Model

    KAUST Repository

    Subramanian, Aneesh C.

    2012-11-01

    This paper investigates the role of the linear analysis step of the ensemble Kalman filters (EnKF) in disrupting the balanced dynamics in a simple atmospheric model and compares it to a fully nonlinear particle-based filter (PF). The filters have a very similar forecast step but the analysis step of the PF solves the full Bayesian filtering problem while the EnKF analysis only applies to Gaussian distributions. The EnKF is compared to two flavors of the particle filter with different sampling strategies, the sequential importance resampling filter (SIRF) and the sequential kernel resampling filter (SKRF). The model admits a chaotic vortical mode coupled to a comparatively fast gravity wave mode. It can also be configured either to evolve on a so-called slow manifold, where the fast motion is suppressed, or such that the fast-varying variables are diagnosed from the slow-varying variables as slaved modes. Identical twin experiments show that EnKF and PF capture the variables on the slow manifold well as the dynamics is very stable. PFs, especially the SKRF, capture slaved modes better than the EnKF, implying that a full Bayesian analysis estimates the nonlinear model variables better. The PFs perform significantly better in the fully coupled nonlinear model where fast and slow variables modulate each other. This suggests that the analysis step in the PFs maintains the balance in both variables much better than the EnKF. It is also shown that increasing the ensemble size generally improves the performance of the PFs but has less impact on the EnKF after a sufficient number of members have been used.

  2. Statistical and Dynamical Properties of Covariant Lyapunov Vectors in a Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Model - Multiscale Effects, Geometric Degeneracy, and Error Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vannitsem, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    We study a simplified coupled atmosphere-ocean model using the formalism of covariant Lyapunov vectors (CLVs), which link physically-based directions of perturbations to growth/decay rates. The model is obtained via a severe truncation of quasi-geostrophic equations for the two fluids, and includes a simple yet physically meaningful representation of their dynamical/thermodynamical coupling. The model has 36 degrees of freedom, and the parameters are chosen so that a chaotic behaviour is observed. One finds two positive Lyapunov exponents (LEs), sixteen negative LEs, and eighteen near-zero LEs. The presence of many near-zero LEs results from the vast time-scale separation between the characteristic time scales of the two fluids, and leads to nontrivial error growth properties in the tangent space spanned by the corresponding CLVs, which are geometrically very degenerate. Such CLVs correspond to two different classes of ocean/atmosphere coupled modes. The tangent space spanned by the CLVs corresponding to the ...

  3. Modeling of Cometary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombosi, Tamas

    2004-01-01

    The NASA supported project 'Modeling of Cometary Atmospheres' has been quite successful in broadening our understanding of the cometary environment. We list peer reviewed publications and conference presentation that have been made as a result of studies performed under this project. Following the list we present details of a selection of the results.

  4. Vertical Scan (V-SCAN) for 3-D Grid Adaptive Mesh Refinement for an atmospheric Model Dynamical Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronova, N. G.; Vandenberg, D.; Oehmke, R.; Stout, Q. F.; Penner, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    One of the major building blocks of a rigorous representation of cloud evolution in global atmospheric models is a parallel adaptive grid MPI-based communication library (an Adaptive Blocks for Locally Cartesian Topologies library -- ABLCarT), which manages the block-structured data layout, handles ghost cell updates among neighboring blocks and splits a block as refinements occur. The library has several modules that provide a layer of abstraction for adaptive refinement: blocks, which contain individual cells of user data; shells - the global geometry for the problem, including a sphere, reduced sphere, and now a 3D sphere; a load balancer for placement of blocks onto processors; and a communication support layer which encapsulates all data movement. A major performance concern with adaptive mesh refinement is how to represent calculations that have need to be sequenced in a particular order in a direction, such as calculating integrals along a specific path (e.g. atmospheric pressure or geopotential in the vertical dimension). This concern is compounded if the blocks have varying levels of refinement, or are scattered across different processors, as can be the case in parallel computing. In this paper we describe an implementation in ABLCarT of a vertical scan operation, which allows computing along vertical paths in the correct order across blocks transparent to their resolution and processor location. We test this functionality on a 2D and a 3D advection problem, which tests the performance of the model’s dynamics (transport) and physics (sources and sinks) for different model resolutions needed for inclusion of cloud formation.

  5. Structure and dynamics of the summertime atmospheric boundary layer over the Antarctic plateau: 1. Measurements and model validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van As, D.; van den Broeke, M.R.; Helsen, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Profile mast, tethersonde and radiosonde measurements are used to describe the structure and dynamics of the summertime atmospheric boundary layer over the slightly sloping snow surface at Kohnen base (75°00'S, 0°04'E, 2892 m above sea level), located on the interior plateau of East Antarctica.

  6. Chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Venot, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    The past twenty years have revealed the diversity of planets that exist in the Universe. It turned out that most of exoplanets are different from the planets of our Solar System and thus, everything about them needs to be explored. Thanks to current observational technologies, we are able to determine some information about the atmospheric composition, the thermal structure and the dynamics of these exoplanets, but many questions remain still unanswered. To improve our knowledge about exoplanetary systems, more accurate observations are needed and that is why the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is an essential space mission. Thanks to its large spectral coverage and high spectral resolution, EChO will provide exoplanetary spectra with an unprecedented accuracy, allowing to improve our understanding of exoplanets. In this work, we review what has been done to date concerning the chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres and what are the main characteristics of warm exoplanet atmospheres, which a...

  7. High-resolution modeling of atmospheric dynamics in the Nepalese Himalaya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collier, Emily; Immerzeel, Walter W.

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude meteorological processes in the Himalaya are influenced by complex interactions between the topography and the monsoon and westerly circulation systems. In this study, we use the Weather Research and Forecasting model configured with high spatial resolution to understand seasonal patte

  8. Near-infrared spectro-interferometry of Mira variables and comparisons to 1D dynamic model atmospheres and 3D convection simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Wittkowski, M; Freytag, B; Scholz, M; Hoefner, S; Karovicova, I; Whitelock, P A

    2016-01-01

    We obtained a total of 20 near-infrared K-band spectro-interferometric snapshot observations of the Mira variables o Cet, R Leo, R Aqr, X Hya, W Vel, and R Cnc with a spectral resolution of about 1500. We compared observed flux and visibility spectra with predictions by CODEX 1D dynamic model atmospheres and with azimuthally averaged intensities based on CO5BOLD 3D dynamic model atmospheres including convection. Our visibility data confirm the presence of spatially extended molecular atmospheres located above the continuum radii with large-scale inhomogeneities or clumps that contribute a few percent of the total flux. The detailed structure of the inhomogeneities or clumps show a variability on time scales of 3 months and above. Both modeling attempts provided satisfactory fits to our data. In particular, they are both consistent with the observed decrease in the visibility function at molecular bands of water vapor and CO, indicating a spatially extended molecular atmosphere. Observational variability phase...

  9. MARCS model atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plez, B [GRAAL, CNRS, UMR5024, Universite Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier, Cedex 5 (France) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: bertrand.plez@graal.univ-montp2.fr

    2008-12-15

    In this review presented at the Symposium A Stellar Journey in Uppsala, June 2008, I give an account of the historical development of the MARCS code, and its premises from the first version published in 1975 to the 2008 grid. The primary driver for the development team who constantly strive to include the best possible physical data, is the science that can be done with the models. A few preliminary comparisons of M star model spectra to spectrophotometric observations are presented. Particular results related to opacity effects are discussed. The size of errors in spectral energy distribution (SED) and model thermal stratification is estimated for different densities of wavelength sampling. The number of points used in the MARCS 2008 grid (108 000) is large enough to ensure errors of only a few K in all models of the grid, except the optically very thin layers of metal-poor stars. Errors in SEDs may reach about 10% locally in the UV. The published sampled SEDs are thus adequate to compute synthetic broadband photometry, but higher resolution spectra will be computed in the near future and published as well on the MARCS site (marcs.astro.uu.se). Test model calculations with TiO line opacity accounted for in scattering show significant cooling of the upper atmospheric layers of red giants. Rough estimates of radiative and collisional time scales for electronic transitions of TiO indicate that scattering may well be the dominant mechanism in these lines. However, models constructed with this hypothesis are incompatible with optical observations of TiO (Arcturus) or IR observations of OH (Betelgeuse), although they may succeed in explaining H{sub 2}O line observations. More work is needed in that direction.

  10. Atmospheric dynamics of tidally synchronized extrasolar planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, James Y-K

    2008-12-13

    Tidally synchronized planets present a new opportunity for enriching our understanding of atmospheric dynamics on planets. Subject to an unusual forcing arrangement (steady irradiation on the same side of the planet throughout its orbit), the dynamics on these planets may be unlike that on any of the Solar System planets. Characterizing the flow pattern and temperature distribution on the extrasolar planets is necessary for reliable interpretation of data currently being collected, as well as for guiding future observations. In this paper, several fundamental concepts from atmospheric dynamics, likely to be central for characterization, are discussed. Theoretical issues that need to be addressed in the near future are also highlighted.

  11. A Dynamic Model for Simulating Atmospheric, Surface and Soil Water Interactions in Hillslope of Loess Area Under Natural Conditions and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of atmospheric, surface and soil water interactions (water transformation) in hillslope under natural conditions was analyzed, and a dynamic model was developed to simulate infiltration, overland flow and soil water movement during natural rainfall in hillslope, by bringing forward concepts such as rainfall intensity on slope and a correction coefficient of saturated soil water content for soil surface seal. Some factors, including slope angle, slope orientation and raindrop inclination, which affect the rainfall amount on slope, were taken into account while developing the dynamic model. The effect of surface seal on infiltration and water balance under a boundary condition of the second kind was also considered. Application of the model in a field experiment showed that the model simulated precisely the infiltration, overland flow and soil water movement in hillslope under natural rainfall conditions.

  12. A Dynamic Model for Simulating Atmospheric,Surface and Soil Water Interactions in Hillslope of Loess Area Under Natural Conditions and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGSHUHAN; NIEGUANGYONG; 等

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of atmospheric,surface and soil water interactions( water transformation) in hillslope under natural conditions was analyzed,and a dynamic model was developed to simulate infiltration,overland flow and soil water movement during natural rainfall in hillslope,by bringing froward concepts such as rainfall intensity on slope and a correction coefficient of saturated soil water content for soil surface seal.Some factors,including slope angle,slope orientation and raindrop inclination,which affect the rainfall amount on slope, were taken into account while developing the dynamic model.The effect of surface seal on infiltration and water balance under a boundary condition of the second kind was aslo considered. Application of the model in a field experiment showed that the model simulated precisely the infiltration,overland flow and sol water monvement in hillsope under natural rainfall conditions.

  13. Application of a dynamical two-box surface-atmosphere model to the Mount Pinatubo cooling event

    CERN Document Server

    Knox, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the global temperature change due to the Mt. Pinatubo eruption using a simple two-layer model of the atmosphere and surface to obtain results consistent with satellite data. Current highly complex models exist to model this and other temperature anomalies, but because of their complexity are not easily analyzed by those not directly involved. Through analytic and numerical analysis we find a principal characteristic response time of 5 to 8 months and a climate sensitivity of 0.17 to 0.20 C/(W/m^2), corresponding to a negative instantaneous feedback. Our solutions were fit to the data, reproducing the results of a one-box model, and providing somewhat more detailed information about the feedbacks related to surface layer temperature. The formalism for coupling of the surface layer to the thermocline is set up but not applied.

  14. Decoupling Jupiter's deep and atmospheric flows using the upcoming Juno gravity measurements and a dynamical inverse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2017-04-01

    Observations of the flow on Jupiter exists essentially only for the cloud-level, which is dominated by strong east-west jet-streams. These have been suggested to result from dynamics in a superficial thin weather-layer, or alternatively be a manifestation of deep interior cylindrical flows. However, it is possible that the observed wind is indeed superficial, yet there exists a completely decoupled deep flow. To date, all models linking the wind, via the induced density anomalies, to the gravity field, to be measured by Juno, consider only flow that is a projection of the observed cloud-level wind. Here we explore the possibility of complex wind dynamics that include both the shallow weather-layer wind, and a deep flow that is decoupled from the flow above it. The upper flow is based on the observed cloud-level flow and is set to decay with depth. The deep flow is constructed to produce cylindrical structures with variable width and magnitude, thus allowing for a wide range of possible scenarios for the unknown deep flow. The combined flow is then related to the density anomalies and gravitational moments via a dynamical model. An adjoint inverse model is used for optimizing the parameters controlling the setup of the deep and surface-bound flows, so that these flows can be reconstructed given a gravity field. We show that the model can be used for examination of various scenarios, including cases in which the deep flow is dominating over the surface wind, and discuss the uncertainties associated with the model solution. The flexibility of the adjoint method allows for a wide range of dynamical setups, so that when new observations and physical understanding will arise, these constraints could be easily implemented and used to better decipher Jupiter flow dynamics.

  15. First simulation results of Titan's atmosphere dynamics with a global 3-D non-hydrostatic circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Mingalev

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the first results of a 3-D General Circulation Model of Titan's atmosphere which differs from traditional models in that the hydrostatic equation is not used and all three components of the neutral gas velocity are obtained from the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. The current version of our GCM is, however, a simplified version, as it uses a predescribed temperature field in the model region thereby avoiding the complex simulation of radiative transfer based on the energy equation. We present the first simulation results and compare them to the results of existing GCMs and direct wind observations. The wind speeds obtained from our GCM correspond well with data obtained during the Huygens probe descent through Titan's atmosphere. We interpret the most unexpected feature of these data which consist of the presence of a non-monotonicity of the altitude profile of the zonal wind speed between 60 and 75 km.

  16. Titan's Atmospheric Dynamics and Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. M.; Baines, K. H.; Bird, M. K.; Tokano, T.; West, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Titan, after Venus, is the second example of an atmosphere with a global cyclostrophic circulation in the solar system, but a circulation that has a strong seasonal modulation in the middle atmosphere. Direct measurement of Titan's winds, particularly observations tracking the Huygens probe at 10degS, indicate that the zonal winds are generally in the sense of the satellites rotation. They become cyclostrophic approx. 35 km above the surface and generally increase with altitude, with the exception of a sharp minimum centered near 75 km, where the wind velocity decreases to nearly zero. Zonal winds derived from the temperature field retrieved from Cassini measurements, using the thermal wind equation, indicate a strong winter circumpolar vortex, with maximum winds at mid northern latitudes of 190 ms-' near 300 km. Above this level, the vortex decays. Curiously, the zonal winds and temperatures are symmetric about a pole that is offset from the surface pole by approx.4 degrees. The cause of this is not well understood, but it may reflect the response of a cyclostrophic circulation to the offset between the equator, where the distance to the rotation axis is greatest, and the solar equator. The mean meridional circulation can be inferred from the temperature field and the meridional distribution of organic molecules and condensates and hazes. Both the warm temperatures in the north polar region near 400 km and the enhanced concentration of several organic molecules suggests subsidence there during winter and early spring. Stratospheric condensates are localized at high northern latitudes, with a sharp cut-off near 50degN. Titan's winter polar vortex appears to share many of the same characteristics of winter vortices on Earth-the ozone holes. Global mapping of temperatures, winds, and composition in he troposphere, by contrast, is incomplete. The few suitable discrete clouds that have bee found for tracking indicate smaller velocities than aloft, consistent with the

  17. Atmospheric dynamics of terrestrial exoplanets over a wide range of orbital and atmospheric parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspi, Yohai

    2014-01-01

    The recent discoveries of terrestrial exoplanets and super Earths extending over a broad range of orbital and physical parameters suggests that these planets will span a wide range of climatic regimes. Characterization of the atmospheres of warm super Earths has already begun and will be extended to smaller and more distant planets over the coming decade. The habitability of these worlds may be strongly affected by their three-dimensional atmospheric circulation regimes, since the global climate feedbacks that control the inner and outer edges of the habitable zone---including transitions to Snowball-like states and runaway-greenhouse feedbacks---depend on the equator-to-pole temperature differences, pattern of relative humidity, and other aspects of the dynamics. Here, using an idealized moist atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) including a hydrological cycle, we study the dynamical principles governing the atmospheric dynamics on such planets. We show how the planetary rotation rate, planetary mass,...

  18. Status and future of hydrodynamical model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, H G

    2004-01-01

    Since about 25 years ago work has been dedicated to the development of hydrodynamical model atmospheres for cool stars (of A to T spectral type). Despite their obviously sounder physical foundation in comparison with standard hydrostatic models, their general application has been rather limited. In order to understand why this is, and how to progress, we review the present status of hydrodynamical modelling of cool star atmospheres. The development efforts were and are motivated by the theoretical interest of understanding the dynamical processes operating in stellar atmospheres. To show the observational impact, we discuss examples in the fields of spectroscopy and stellar structure where hydrodynamical modelling provided results on a level qualitatively beyond standard models. We stress present modelling challenges, and highlight presently possible and future observations that would be particularly valuable in the interplay between model validation and interpretation of observables, to eventually widen the ...

  19. The dynamical core, physical parameterizations, and basic simulation characteristics of the atmospheric component AM3 of the GFDL global coupled model CM3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, L.J.; Wyman, B.L.; Hemler, R.S.; Horowitz, L.W.; Ming, Y.; Zhao, M.; Golaz, J.-C.; Ginoux, P.; Lin, S.-J.; Schwarzkopf, M.D.; Austin, J.; Alaka, G.; Cooke, W.F.; Delworth, T.L.; Freidenreich, S.M.; Gordon, C.T.; Griffies, S.M.; Held, I.M.; Hurlin, W.J.; Klein, S.A.; Knutson, T.R.; Langenhorst, A.R.; Lee, H.-C.; Lin, Y.; Magi, B.I.; Malyshev, S.L.; Milly, P.C.D.; Naik, V.; Nath, M.J.; Pincus, R.; Ploshay, J.J.; Ramaswamy, V.; Seman, C.J.; Shevliakova, E.; Sirutis, J.J.; Stern, W.F.; Stouffer, R.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Winton, M.; Wittenberg, A.T.; Zeng, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) has developed a coupled general circulation model (CM3) for the atmosphere, oceans, land, and sea ice. The goal of CM3 is to address emerging issues in climate change, including aerosol-cloud interactions, chemistry-climate interactions, and coupling between the troposphere and stratosphere. The model is also designed to serve as the physical system component of earth system models and models for decadal prediction in the near-term future-for example, through improved simulations in tropical land precipitation relative to earlier-generation GFDL models. This paper describes the dynamical core, physical parameterizations, and basic simulation characteristics of the atmospheric component (AM3) of this model. Relative to GFDL AM2, AM3 includes new treatments of deep and shallow cumulus convection, cloud droplet activation by aerosols, subgrid variability of stratiform vertical velocities for droplet activation, and atmospheric chemistry driven by emissions with advective, convective, and turbulent transport. AM3 employs a cubed-sphere implementation of a finite-volume dynamical core and is coupled to LM3, a new land model with ecosystem dynamics and hydrology. Its horizontal resolution is approximately 200 km, and its vertical resolution ranges approximately from 70 m near the earth's surface to 1 to 1.5 km near the tropopause and 3 to 4 km in much of the stratosphere. Most basic circulation features in AM3 are simulated as realistically, or more so, as in AM2. In particular, dry biases have been reduced over South America. In coupled mode, the simulation of Arctic sea ice concentration has improved. AM3 aerosol optical depths, scattering properties, and surface clear-sky downward shortwave radiation are more realistic than in AM2. The simulation of marine stratocumulus decks remains problematic, as in AM2. The most intense 0.2% of precipitation rates occur less frequently in AM3 than observed. The last two decades of

  20. Atmospheric circulation of hot Jupiters: Coupled radiative-dynamical general circulation model simulations of HD 189733b and HD 209458b

    CERN Document Server

    Showman, Adam P; Lian, Yuan; Marley, Mark S; Freedman, Richard S; Knutson, Heather A; Charbonneau, David

    2008-01-01

    We present global, three-dimensional numerical simulations of HD 189733b and HD 209458b that couple the atmospheric dynamics to a realistic representation of non-gray cloud-free radiative transfer. The model, which we call the Substellar and Planetary Atmospheric Radiation and Circulation (SPARC) model, adopts the MITgcm for the dynamics and uses the radiative model of McKay, Marley, Fortney, and collaborators for the radiation. Like earlier work with simplified forcing, our simulations develop a broad eastward equatorial jet, mean westward flow at higher latitudes, and substantial flow over the poles at low pressure. For HD 189733b, our simulations without TiO and VO opacity can explain the broad features of the observed 8 and 24-micron light curves, including the modest day-night flux variation and the fact that the planet/star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. Our simulations also provide reasonable matches to the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8, 8, 16, and 24 microns and the grou...

  1. Construction of an Eulerian atmospheric dispersion model based on the advection algorithm of M. Galperin: dynamic cores v.4 and 5 of SILAM v.5.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sofiev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents dynamic cores v.4 and v.5 of the System for Integrated modeLling of Atmospheric coMposition SILAM v.5.5 based on the advection algorithm of Michael Galperin. This advection routine, so far weakly presented in international literature, is non-diffusive, positively defined, stable with regard to Courant number significantly above one, and very efficient computationally. For the first time, we present a rigorous description of its original version, along with several updates that improve its monotonicity and allow applications to long-living species in conditions of complex atmospheric flows. The other extension allows the scheme application to dynamics of aerosol spectra. The scheme is accompanied with the previously developed vertical diffusion algorithm, which encapsulates the dry deposition process as a boundary condition. Connection to chemical transformation modules is outlined, accounting for the specifics of transport scheme. Quality of the advection routine is evaluated using a large set of tests. The original approach has been previously compared with several classic algorithms widely used in operational models. The basic tests were repeated for the updated scheme, along with demanding global 2-D tests recently suggested in literature, which allowed positioning the scheme with regard to sophisticated state-of-the-art approaches. The model performance appeared close to the top of the list with very modest computational costs.

  2. Evaluation of wildland fire smoke plume dynamics and aerosol load using UV scanning lidar and fire-atmosphere modelling during the Mediterranean Letia 2010 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy-Cancellieri, V.; Augustin, P.; Filippi, J. B.; Mari, C.; Fourmentin, M.; Bosseur, F.; Morandini, F.; Delbarre, H.

    2014-03-01

    Vegetation fires emit large amount of gases and aerosols which are detrimental to human health. Smoke exposure near and downwind of fires depends on the fire propagation, the atmospheric circulations and the burnt vegetation. A better knowledge of the interaction between wildfire and atmosphere is a primary requirement to investigate fire smoke and particle transport. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the usefulness of an UV scanning lidar to characterise the fire smoke plume and consequently validate fire-atmosphere model simulations. An instrumented burn was conducted in a Mediterranean area typical of ones frequently subject to wildfire with low dense shrubs. Using lidar measurements positioned near the experimental site, fire smoke plume was thoroughly characterised by its optical properties, edge and dynamics. These parameters were obtained by combining methods based on lidar inversion technique, wavelet edge detection and a backscatter barycentre technique. The smoke plume displacement was determined using a digital video camera coupled with the lidar. The simulation was performed using a mesoscale atmospheric model in a large eddy simulation configuration (Meso-NH) coupled to a fire propagation physical model (ForeFire), taking into account the effect of wind, slope and fuel properties. A passive numerical scalar tracer was injected in the model at fire location to mimic the smoke plume. The simulated fire smoke plume width remained within the edge smoke plume obtained from lidar measurements. The maximum smoke injection derived from lidar backscatter coefficients and the simulated passive tracer was around 200 m. The vertical position of the simulated plume barycentre was systematically below the barycentre derived from the lidar backscatter coefficients due to the oversimplified properties of the passive tracer compared to real aerosol particles. Simulated speed and horizontal location of the plume compared well with the observations derived from

  3. Evaluation of vegetation fire smoke plume dynamics and aerosol load using UV scanning lidar and fire-atmosphere modelling during the Mediterranean Letia 2010 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy-Cancellieri, V.; Augustin, P.; Filippi, J. B.; Mari, C.; Fourmentin, M.; Bosseur, F.; Morandini, F.; Delbarre, H.

    2013-08-01

    Vegetation fires emit large amount of gases and aerosols which are detrimental to human health. Smoke exposure near and downwind of fires depends on the fire propagation, the atmospheric circulations and the burnt vegetation. A better knowledge of the interaction between wildfire and atmosphere is a primary requirement to investigate fire smoke and particle transport. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the usefulness of an UV scanning lidar to characterize the fire smoke plume and consequently validate fire-atmosphere model simulations. An instrumented burn was conducted in a Mediterranean area typical of ones frequently concern by wildfire with low dense shrubs. Using Lidar measurements positioned near the experimental site, fire smoke plume was thoroughly characterized by its optical properties, edge and dynamics. These parameters were obtained by combining methods based on lidar inversion technique, wavelet edge detection and a backscatter barycenter technique. The smoke plume displacement was determined using a digital video camera coupled with the Lidar. The simulation was performed using a meso-scale atmospheric model in a large eddy simulation configuration (Meso-NH) coupled to a fire propagation physical model (ForeFire) taking into account the effect of wind, slope and fuel properties. A passive numerical scalar tracer was injected in the model at fire location to mimic the smoke plume. The simulated fire smoke plume width remained within the edge smoke plume obtained from lidar measurements. The maximum smoke injection derived from lidar backscatter coefficients and the simulated passive tracer was around 200 m. The vertical position of the simulated plume barycenter was systematically below the barycenter derived from the lidar backscatter coefficients due to the oversimplified properties of the passive tracer compared to real aerosols particles. Simulated speed and horizontal location of the plume compared well with the observations derived from

  4. Assessing atmospheric bias correction for dynamical consistency using potential vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheta, Eytan; Evans, Jason P.; Sharma, Ashish

    2014-12-01

    Correcting biases in atmospheric variables prior to impact studies or dynamical downscaling can lead to new biases as dynamical consistency between the ‘corrected’ fields is not maintained. Use of these bias corrected fields for subsequent impact studies and dynamical downscaling provides input conditions that do not appropriately represent intervariable relationships in atmospheric fields. Here we investigate the consequences of the lack of dynamical consistency in bias correction using a measure of model consistency—the potential vorticity (PV). This paper presents an assessment of the biases present in PV using two alternative correction techniques—an approach where bias correction is performed individually on each atmospheric variable, thereby ignoring the physical relationships that exists between the multiple variables that are corrected, and a second approach where bias correction is performed directly on the PV field, thereby keeping the system dynamically coherent throughout the correction process. In this paper we show that bias correcting variables independently results in increased errors above the tropopause in the mean and standard deviation of the PV field, which are improved when using the alternative proposed. Furthermore, patterns of spatial variability are improved over nearly all vertical levels when applying the alternative approach. Results point to a need for a dynamically consistent atmospheric bias correction technique which results in fields that can be used as dynamically consistent lateral boundaries in follow-up downscaling applications.

  5. Lagrangian Modeling of the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-08-01

    Like watching a balloon borne by the breeze, a Lagrangian model tracks a parcel of air as it flows through the atmosphere. Whether running forward or backward in time, Lagrangian models offer a powerful tool for tracking and understanding the fates, or origins, of atmospheric flows. In the AGU monograph Lagrangian Modeling of the Atmosphere, editors John Lin, Dominik Brunner, Christoph Gerbig, Andreas Stohl, Ashok Luhar, and Peter Webley explore the nuances of the modeling technique. In this interview Eos talks to Lin about the growing importance of Lagrangian modeling as the world settles on climate change mitigation strategies, the societal value of operational modeling, and how recent advances are making it possible to run these complex calculations at home.

  6. Decoupling Jupiter's deep and atmospheric flows using the upcoming Juno gravity measurements and a dynamical inverse model

    CERN Document Server

    Galanti, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the flow on Jupiter exists essentially only for the cloud-level, which is dominated by strong east-west jet-streams. These have been suggested to result from dynamics in a superficial thin weather-layer, or alternatively be a manifestation of deep interior cylindrical flows. However, it is possible that the observed winds are indeed superficial, yet there exists deep flow that is completely decoupled from it. To date, all models linking the wind, via the induced density anomalies, to the gravity field, to be measured by Juno, consider only flow that is a projection of the observed could-level wind. Here we explore the possibility of complex wind dynamics that include both the shallow weather-layer wind, and a deep flow that is decoupled from the flow above it. The upper flow is based on the observed cloud-level flow and is set to decay with depth. The deep flow is constructed to produce cylindrical structures with variable width and magnitude, thus allowing for a wide range of possible scenari...

  7. Winter NH low-frequency variability in a hierarchy of low-order stochastic dynamical models of earth-atmosphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan

    2017-01-01

    The origin of winter Northern Hemispheric low-frequency variability (hereafter, LFV) is regarded to be related to the coupled earth-atmosphere system characterized by the interaction of the jet stream with mid-latitude mountain ranges. On the other hand, observed LFV usually appears as transitions among multiple planetary-scale flow regimes of Northern Hemisphere like NAO + , AO +, AO - and NAO - . Moreover, the interaction between synoptic-scale eddies and the planetary-scale disturbance is also inevitable in the origin of LFV. These raise a question regarding how to incorporate all these aspects into just one framework to demonstrate (1) a planetary-scale dynamics of interaction of the jet stream with mid-latitude mountain ranges can really produce LFV, (2) such a dynamics can be responsible for the existence of above multiple flow regimes, and (3) the role of interaction with eddy is also clarified. For this purpose, a hierarchy of low-order stochastic dynamical models of the coupled earth-atmosphere system derived empirically from different timescale ranges of indices of Arctic Oscillation (AO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Pacific/North American (PNA), and length of day (LOD) and related probability density function (PDF) analysis are employed in this study. The results seem to suggest that the origin of LFV cannot be understood completely within the planetary-scale dynamics of the interaction of the jet stream with mid-latitude mountain ranges, because (1) the existence of multiple flow regimes such as NAO+, AO+, AO- and NAO- resulted from processes with timescales much longer than LFV itself, which may have underlying dynamics other than topography-jet stream interaction, and (2) we find LFV seems not necessarily to come directly from the planetary-scale dynamics of the interaction of the jet stream with mid-latitude mountain, although it can produce similar oscillatory behavior. The feedback/forcing of synoptic-scale eddies on the planetary

  8. ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS OF TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANETS OVER A WIDE RANGE OF ORBITAL AND ATMOSPHERIC PARAMETERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspi, Yohai [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, 234 Herzl st., 76100, Rehovot (Israel); Showman, Adam P., E-mail: yohai.kaspi@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, 1629 University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The recent discoveries of terrestrial exoplanets and super-Earths extending over a broad range of orbital and physical parameters suggest that these planets will span a wide range of climatic regimes. Characterization of the atmospheres of warm super-Earths has already begun and will be extended to smaller and more distant planets over the coming decade. The habitability of these worlds may be strongly affected by their three-dimensional atmospheric circulation regimes, since the global climate feedbacks that control the inner and outer edges of the habitable zone—including transitions to Snowball-like states and runaway-greenhouse feedbacks—depend on the equator-to-pole temperature differences, patterns of relative humidity, and other aspects of the dynamics. Here, using an idealized moist atmospheric general circulation model including a hydrological cycle, we study the dynamical principles governing the atmospheric dynamics on such planets. We show how the planetary rotation rate, stellar flux, atmospheric mass, surface gravity, optical thickness, and planetary radius affect the atmospheric circulation and temperature distribution on such planets. Our simulations demonstrate that equator-to-pole temperature differences, meridional heat transport rates, structure and strength of the winds, and the hydrological cycle vary strongly with these parameters, implying that the sensitivity of the planet to global climate feedbacks will depend significantly on the atmospheric circulation. We elucidate the possible climatic regimes and diagnose the mechanisms controlling the formation of atmospheric jet streams, Hadley and Ferrel cells, and latitudinal temperature differences. Finally, we discuss the implications for understanding how the atmospheric circulation influences the global climate.

  9. 2D modeling and simulation of the flow dynamics, electric field and reactions in a low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure nitrogen plasma sharp-end plate-to-plane configuration and CVD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wilde, Juray; Lorant, Christophe; Descamps, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    In atmospheric-pressure plasma reactors, the flow dynamics can be complex, determine the reactor performance and complicate scale-up. Coupling computational fluid dynamics to the calculation of the electric field and plasma chemistry is challenging because of the numerical stiffness introduced by the difference in time scale of the different phenomena involved. Focusing on low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure pure nitrogen plasma, a model and model reduction based solution strategy to deal with the numerical stiffness are presented and evaluated. The influence of the electric field on the flow dynamics and species concentration fields is first qualitatively studied by means of 2D simulations of a sharp-end plate-to-plane configuration. Next, a specific reactor prototype for low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for in-line surface treatments is simulated to illustrate the importance of accounting for the detailed flow dynamics.

  10. ESA's atmospheric composition and dynamics mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, Thorsten; Laur, Henri; Hoersch, Bianca; Ingmann, Paul; Wehr, Tobias; Langen, Joerg; Veihelmann, Ben

    For almost 15 years, ESA is providing atmospheric chemistry and composition information to the user community. In 1995, this commitment started with the GOME instrument on-board ERS-2. This mission was continued and extended with the GOMOS, MIPAS and SCIAMACHY instruments on-board of ENVISAT launched in 2002. ESA is prepared to continue Envisat through 2013 in the frame of the mission extension. To respond to GMES requirements, ESA develops the Sentinel 5 Precursor mission to be launched in 2014, to continue and improve the European measurement capabilities initiated with GOME and SCIAMACHY, and continued with EUMETSAT's GOME-2 and the Dutch OMI instrument on the NASA Aura platform. In addition the Sentinel 4 and 5 missions are prepared, further improving the monitoring capabilities with geostationary observation capabilities and continuing the Low Earth Orbit Sentinel 5 Precursor well beyond 2025. At the same time, ESA is preparing two atmospheric Earth Explorer Missions. With ADM-Aeolus, a novel lidar system for the retrieval of wind speed vectors from space is being developed and planned to be launched in 2012. EarthCARE will investigate the Clouds-Aerosol-radiation-interaction with a lidar, cloud radar (provided by JAXA), multi-spectral imager and broad band radiometric instruments collocated on one platform. A major goal is the development of synergistic retrievals exploiting information from different sensors in one algorithm. The mission is planned to start in 2014. In parallel the Phase A studies for the ESA Earth Explorer 7 are ongoing. One of the three candidate missions is PREMIER, an infrared limb-imaging spectrometer and millimetre-wave limb-sounder planned to be launched in 2016. In addition the call of ideas for the Earth Explorer 8 has been published and the corresponding Letters of Intend have been received, including a number of proposals for mission in the atmospheric composition and dynamics domain. At the same time, the access to ESA Third

  11. Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos: Applications in Atmospheric Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric flows, an example of turbulent fluid flows, exhibit fractal fluctuations of all space-time scales ranging from turbulence scale of mm - sec to climate scales of thousands of kilometers - years and may be visualized as a nested continuum of weather cycles or periodicities, the smaller cycles existing as intrinsic fine structure of the larger cycles. The power spectra of fractal fluctuations exhibit inverse power law form signifying long - range correlations identified as self - organized criticality and are ubiquitous to dynamical systems in nature and is manifested as sensitive dependence on initial condition or 'deterministic chaos' in finite precision computer realizations of nonlinear mathematical models of real world dynamical systems such as atmospheric flows. Though the self-similar nature of atmospheric flows have been widely documented and discussed during the last three to four decades, the exact physical mechanism is not yet identified. There now exists an urgent need to develop and inco...

  12. Creating A Group Harmonious And Dynamic Atmosphere In Jefc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋志俐

    2001-01-01

    With the rapid development of foreign language teaching, a group harmonious and dynamic atmosphere shows its importance in JEFC. It helps the students to learn English lieasantly and effectively and help the teachers to teach English easily and happily. It also helps to improve the teachers'teaching efficiently. However. the problem of the harmonious and dynamic atmosphere in class may result in anxiety among students. This paper aims at discussing the anxiety and the harmonious, dynamic atmosphere. It falls into three parts. The first part provides the analys is of the negative effects of anxiety in JEFC. The second introduces the positive effects of group harmonious,dynamic atmosphere in JEFC and the third discusses how to create the group harmonious, dynamic classroom atmosphere. This paper stresses the importance of the harmonious, dynamic atmosphere and introduce to use flexibly 5steps teaching way to create the harmonious and dynamic atmosphere.

  13. CAB Furnace Atmosphere Visualisation Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P F Stratton; A P Richardson

    2004-01-01

    In today's automotive industry almost all car and truck radiators, oil coolers and air conditioning heat exchangers are manufactured using Nocolok Controlled Atmosphere Brazing (CAB). One of the most critical elements of the brazing process is the atmosphere used to protect the flux. Oxygen content is the major variable affecting the performance of the nitrogen atmosphere. Furnace design and flow rate are the major factors affecting oxygen content. Optimisation of these atmosphere parameters has a significant impact on operating cost, and on the quality and consistency of the brazed product.Computational fluid dynamics provides a tool to visualise the atmosphere conditions within the furnace and to explore the effects of changing some of the variables. Modelling the atmosphere in a typical CAB furnace has shown the importance of the integrity of the curtains in maintaining the low oxygen levels required for successful Nocolok brazing. For a given set of curtains it has shown that the only effective way of decreasing oxygen levels is to increase atmosphere gas flow.

  14. CAB Furnace Atmosphere Visualisation Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PFStratton; APRichardson

    2004-01-01

    In today's automotive industry almost all car and truck radiators, oil coolers and air conditioning heat exchangers are manufactured using Nocolok Controlled Atmosphere Brazing (CAB). One of the most critical elements of the brazing process is the atmosphere used to protect the flux. Oxygen content is the major variable affecting the performance of the nitrogen atmosphere. Furnace design and flow rate are the major factors affecting oxygen content. Optimisation of these atmosphere parameters has a significant impact on operating cost, and on the quality and consistency of the brazed product. Computational fluid dynamics provides a tool to visualise the atmosphere conditions within the furnace and to explore the effects of changing some of the variables. Modelling the atmosphere in a typical CAB furnace has shown the importance of the integrity of the curtains in maintaining the low oxygen levels required for successful Nocolok brazing. For a given set of curtains it has shown that the only effective way of decreasing oxygen levels is to increase atmosphere gas flow.

  15. Modelling land surface - atmosphere interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Højmark

    related to inaccurate land surface modelling, e.g. enhanced warm bias in warm dry summer months. Coupling the regional climate model to a hydrological model shows the potential of improving the surface flux simulations in dry periods and the 2 m air temperature in general. In the dry periods......The study is investigates modelling of land surface – atmosphere interactions in context of fully coupled climatehydrological model. With a special focus of under what condition a fully coupled model system is needed. Regional climate model inter-comparison projects as ENSEMBLES have shown bias...... representation of groundwater in the hydrological model is found to important and this imply resolving the small river valleys. Because, the important shallow groundwater is found in the river valleys. If the model does not represent the shallow groundwater then the area mean surface flux calculation...

  16. Electron and proton kinetics and dynamics in flaring atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Zharkova, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    This timely book presents new research results on high-energy particle physics related to solar flares, covering the theory and applications of the reconnection process in a clear and comprehensible way. It investigates particle kinetics and dynamics in flaring atmospheres and their diagnostics from spectral observations, while providing an analysis of the observation data and techniques and comparing various models. Written by an internationally acclaimed expert, this is vital reading for all solar, astro-, and plasma physicists working in the field.

  17. A General Strategy for Physics-Based Model Validation Illustrated with Earthquake Phenomenology, Atmospheric Radiative Transfer, and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sornette, Didier; Kamm, James R; Ide, Kayo

    2007-01-01

    Validation is often defined as the process of determining the degree to which a model is an accurate representation of the real world from the perspective of its intended uses. Validation is crucial as industries and governments depend increasingly on predictions by computer models to justify their decisions. In this article, we survey the model validation literature and propose to formulate validation as an iterative construction process that mimics the process occurring implicitly in the minds of scientists. We thus offer a formal representation of the progressive build-up of trust in the model, and thereby replace incapacitating claims on the impossibility of validating a given model by an adaptive process of constructive approximation. This approach is better adapted to the fuzzy, coarse-grained nature of validation. Our procedure factors in the degree of redundancy versus novelty of the experiments used for validation as well as the degree to which the model predicts the observations. We illustrate the n...

  18. Dynamics of atmospheres with a non-dilute condensible component

    CERN Document Server

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond T

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of characteristics for the host of recently discovered exoplanets opens up a great deal of fertile new territory for geophysical fluid dynamics, particularly when the fluid flow is coupled to novel thermodynamics, radiative transfer or chemistry. In this paper, we survey one of these new areas-the climate dynamics of atmospheres with a non-dilute condensible component, defined as the situation in which a condensible component of the atmosphere makes up a substantial fraction of the atmospheric mass within some layer. Non-dilute dynamics can occur for a wide range of condensibles, generically applying near both the inner and the outer edges of the conventional habitable zone and in connection with runaway greenhouse phenomena. It also applies in a wide variety of other planetary circumstances. We first present a number of analytical results developing some key features of non-dilute atmospheres, and then show how some of these features are manifest in simulations with a general circulation model ...

  19. Dynamical Opacity-Sampling Models of Mira Variables. II: Time-Dependent Atmospheric Structure and Observable Properties of 4 M-Type Model Series

    CERN Document Server

    Ireland, Michael J; Wood, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    We present 4 model series of the CODEX dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables with solar abundances, designed to have parameters similar to $o$ Cet, R Leo and R Cas. We demonstrate that the CODEX models provide a clear physical basis for the molecular shell scenario used to explain interferometric observations of Mira variables. We show that these models generally provide a good match to photometry and interferometry at wavelengths between the near-infrared and the radio, and make the model outputs publicly available. These model also demonstrate that, in order to match visible and infrared observations, the Fe-poor silicate grains that form within 3 continuum radii must have small grain radii and therefore can not drive the winds from O-rich Mira variables.

  20. Dynamic wake meandering modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Madsen Aagaard, Helge; Bingöl, Ferhat;

    , are an integrated part the model complex. For design applications, the computational efficiency of wake deficit prediction is a key issue. Two computationally low cost models are developed for this purpose. The character of the added wake turbulence, generated by the up-stream turbine in the form of shed......We present a consistent, physically based theory for the wake meandering phenomenon, which we consider of crucial importance for the overall description of wind turbine loadings in wind farms. In its present version the model is confined to single wake situations. The model philosophy does, however......, have the potential to include also mutual wake interaction phenomenons. The basic conjecture behind the dynamic wake meandering model is that wake transportation in the atmospheric boundary layer is driven by the large scale lateral- and vertical turbulence components. Based on this conjecture...

  1. Thermodynamic and dynamic linkage between the inter-model spread of Arctic sea ice concentrations and Northern Hemisphere atmospheric and oceanic circulations in CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ho Nam; Keenlyside, Noel; Omrani, Nour-Eddine

    2017-04-01

    While all CMIP5 models simulate the decline of Arctic sea ice concentrations (SIC) in a warming climate, the magnitude of such changes has a large inter-model spread that contributes to the uncertainty of projected climate change. It is thus important to understand the underlying thermodynamic and dynamic causes of the inter-model spread. In this presentation, we will use the budget analysis to quantify how much the large-scale thermodynamic and dynamic factors contributes to the inter-model spread of SIC over the Arctic in the historical run of CMIP5 models. Our preliminary results show that the primary factor is the thermodynamic processes related to the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, and the secondary factor is the wind-driven circulations related to the NAO and the Aleutian low. The dominant spatial patterns linking the inter-model spread of SIC and these factors could be obtained from the SVD analysis. We will also discuss the linkage between the inter-model spread of SIC and the large-scale circulation features over the Northern Hemisphere.

  2. The Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boville, B. A.; Garcia, R. R.; Sassi, F.; Kinnison, D.; Roble, R. G.

    The Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) is an upward exten- sion of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model. WACCM simulates the atmosphere from the surface to the lower thermosphere (140 km) and includes both dynamical and chemical components. The salient points of the model formulation will be summarized and several aspects of its performance will be discussed. Comparison with observations indicates that WACCM produces re- alistic temperature and zonal wind distributions. Both the mean state and interannual variability will be summarized. Temperature inversions in the midlatitude mesosphere have been reported by several authors and are also found in WACCM. These inver- sions are formed primarily by planetary wave forcing, but the background state on which they form also requires gravity wave forcing. The response to sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies will be examined by com- paring simulations with observed SSTs for 1950-1998 to a simulation with clima- tological annual cycle of SSTs. The response to ENSO events is found to extend though the winter stratosphere and mesosphere and a signal is also found at the sum- mer mesopause. The experimental framework allows the ENSO signal to be isolated, because no other forcings are included (e.g. solar variability and volcanic eruptions) which complicate the observational record. The temperature and wind variations asso- ciated with ENSO are large enough to generate significant perturbations in the chem- ical composition of the middle atmosphere, which will also be discussed.

  3. Model for Simulation Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1976-01-01

    A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance, a co....... The method is unique in modeling the three velocity components simultaneously, and it is found that important cross-statistical features are reasonably well-behaved. It is concluded that the model provides a practical, operational simulator of atmospheric turbulence.......A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance......, a correct spectral shape, and non-Gaussian statistics, is selected in order to evaluate the model turbulence. An actual turbulence record is analyzed in detail providing both a standard for comparison and input statistics for the generalized spectral analysis, which in turn produces a set of orthonormal...

  4. Interaction between global-scale atmospheric vortices: Modeling with Hamiltonian dynamic system of antipodal point vortices on a rotating sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, Igor I; Chefranov, A G

    2016-01-01

    We get point vortices dynamics equations on a rotating sphere surface directly from the hydrodynamic equations as representing their weak exact solution contrary to the conventional case of the use of a kinematic relationship between a given singular vortex field and velocity field. It is first time that the effect of a sphere rotation on the vortices interaction is accounted for in exact form. We show that only the stream function of a vortex pair of antipodal vortices (APV), and only it satisfies the original three-dimensional hydrodynamics equations on a sphere. We prove that only APV pair with two point vortices in the diameter-conjugated points of a sphere with equal by quantity but different sign circulations may be correctly considered as an elementary (stationary, not self-affecting) singular point object on a sphere. We suggest using the axis connecting the two point vortices in an APV for describing of an axis of rotation of the global vortices introduced in (Barrett, 1958) to reflect the observed g...

  5. Dynamic wake meandering modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Gunner C.; Aagaard Madsen, H.; Bingoel, F. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    We present a consistent, physically based theory for the wake meandering phenomenon, which we consider of crucial importance for the overall description of wind turbine loadings in wind farms. In its present version the model is confined to single wake situations. The model philosophy does, however, have the potential to include also mutual wake interaction phenomenons. The basic conjecture behind the dynamic wake meandering model is that wake transportation in the atmospheric boundary layer is driven by the large scale lateral- and vertical turbulence components. Based on this conjecture a stochastic model of the downstream wake meandering is formulated. In addition to the kinematic formulation of the dynamics of the 'meandering frame of reference', models characterizing the mean wake deficit as well as the added wake turbulence, described in the meandering frame of reference, are an integrated part the model complex. For design applications, the computational efficiency of wake deficit prediction is a key issue. Two computationally low cost models are developed for this purpose. The character of the added wake turbulence, generated by the up-stream turbine in the form of shed and trailed vorticity, has been approached by analytical as well as by numerical studies. The dynamic wake meandering philosophy has been verified by comparing model predictions with extensive full-scale measurements. These comparisons have demonstrated good agreement, both qualitatively and quantitatively, concerning both flow characteristics and turbine load characteristics. Contrary to previous attempts to model wake loading, the dynamic wake meandering approach opens for a unifying description in the sense that turbine power and load aspects can be treated simultaneously. This capability is a direct and attractive consequence of the model being based on the underlying physical process, and it potentially opens for optimization of wind farm topology, of wind farm operation as

  6. Simulation of all-scale atmospheric dynamics on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Szmelter, Joanna; Xiao, Feng

    2016-10-01

    The advance of massively parallel computing in the nineteen nineties and beyond encouraged finer grid intervals in numerical weather-prediction models. This has improved resolution of weather systems and enhanced the accuracy of forecasts, while setting the trend for development of unified all-scale atmospheric models. This paper first outlines the historical background to a wide range of numerical methods advanced in the process. Next, the trend is illustrated with a technical review of a versatile nonoscillatory forward-in-time finite-volume (NFTFV) approach, proven effective in simulations of atmospheric flows from small-scale dynamics to global circulations and climate. The outlined approach exploits the synergy of two specific ingredients: the MPDATA methods for the simulation of fluid flows based on the sign-preserving properties of upstream differencing; and the flexible finite-volume median-dual unstructured-mesh discretisation of the spatial differential operators comprising PDEs of atmospheric dynamics. The paper consolidates the concepts leading to a family of generalised nonhydrostatic NFTFV flow solvers that include soundproof PDEs of incompressible Boussinesq, anelastic and pseudo-incompressible systems, common in large-eddy simulation of small- and meso-scale dynamics, as well as all-scale compressible Euler equations. Such a framework naturally extends predictive skills of large-eddy simulation to the global atmosphere, providing a bottom-up alternative to the reverse approach pursued in the weather-prediction models. Theoretical considerations are substantiated by calculations attesting to the versatility and efficacy of the NFTFV approach. Some prospective developments are also discussed.

  7. Stochastic models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2003-01-01

    Simple stochastic differential equation models have been applied by several researchers to describe the dispersion of tracer particles in the planetary atmospheric boundary layer and to form the basis for computer simulations of particle paths. To obtain the drift coefficient, empirical vertical...... velocity distributions that depend on height above the ground both with respect to standard deviation and skewness are substituted into the stationary Fokker/Planck equation. The particle position distribution is taken to be uniform *the well/mixed condition( and also a given dispersion coefficient...

  8. Stochastic models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2003-01-01

    Simple stochastic differential equation models have been applied by several researchers to describe the dispersion of tracer particles in the planetary atmospheric boundary layer and to form the basis for computer simulations of particle paths. To obtain the drift coefficient, empirical vertical...... positions close to the boundaries. Different rules have been suggested in the literature with justifications based on simulation studies. Herein the relevant stochastic differential equation model is formulated in a particular way. The formulation is based on the marginal transformation of the position...... dependent particle velocity into a position independent Gaussian velocity. Boundary conditions are obtained from Itos rule of stochastic differentiation. The model directly point at a canonical rule of reflection for the approximating random walk with finite time step. This reflection rule is different from...

  9. Predictive models of forest dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Drew; Pacala, Stephen

    2008-06-13

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) have shown that forest dynamics could dramatically alter the response of the global climate system to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide over the next century. But there is little agreement between different DGVMs, making forest dynamics one of the greatest sources of uncertainty in predicting future climate. DGVM predictions could be strengthened by integrating the ecological realities of biodiversity and height-structured competition for light, facilitated by recent advances in the mathematics of forest modeling, ecological understanding of diverse forest communities, and the availability of forest inventory data.

  10. Wake Dynamics in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markfort, Corey D.

    The goal of this research is to advance our understanding of atmospheric boundary layer processes over heterogeneous landscapes and complex terrain. The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is a relatively thin (˜ 1 km) turbulent layer of air near the earth's surface, in which most human activities and engineered systems are concentrated. Its dynamics are crucially important for biosphere-atmosphere couplings and for global atmospheric dynamics, with significant implications on our ability to predict and mitigate adverse impacts of land use and climate change. In models of the ABL, land surface heterogeneity is typically represented, in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, as changes in aerodynamic roughness length and surface heat and moisture fluxes. However, many real landscapes are more complex, often leading to massive boundary layer separation and wake turbulence, for which standard models fail. Trees, building clusters, and steep topography produce extensive wake regions currently not accounted for in models of the ABL. Wind turbines and wind farms also generate wakes that combine in complex ways to modify the ABL. Wind farms are covering an increasingly significant area of the globe and the effects of large wind farms must be included in regional and global scale models. Research presented in this thesis demonstrates that wakes caused by landscape heterogeneity must be included in flux parameterizations for momentum, heat, and mass (water vapor and trace gases, e.g. CO2 and CH4) in ABL simulation and prediction models in order to accurately represent land-atmosphere interactions. Accurate representation of these processes is crucial for the predictions of weather, air quality, lake processes, and ecosystems response to climate change. Objectives of the research reported in this thesis are: 1) to investigate turbulent boundary layer adjustment, turbulent transport and scalar flux in wind farms of varying configurations and develop an improved

  11. Turbulence dynamics in unsteady atmospheric flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, Mostafa; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2016-11-01

    Unsteady pressure-gradient forcing in geophysical flows challenges the quasi-steady state assumption, and can strongly impact the mean wind and higher-order turbulence statistics. Under such conditions, it is essential to understand when turbulence is in quasi-equilibrium, and what are the implications of unsteadiness on flow characteristics. The present study focuses on the unsteady atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) where pressure gradient, Coriolis, buoyancy, and friction forces interact. We perform a suite of LES with variable pressure-gradient. The results indicate that the dynamics are mainly controlled by the relative magnitudes of three time scales: Tinertial, Tturbulence, and Tforcing. It is shown that when Tf Tt , the turbulence is no longer in a quasi-equilibrium state due to highly complex mean-turbulence interactions; consequently, the log-law and turbulence closures are no longer valid in these conditions. However, for longer and, surprisingly, for shorter forcing times, quasi-equilibrium is maintained. Varying the pressure gradient in the presence of surface buoyancy fluxes primarily influences the buoyant destruction in the stable ABLs, while under unstable conditions it mainly influences the transport terms. NSF-PDM under AGS-10266362. Cooperative Institute for Climate Science, NOAA-Princeton University under NA08OAR4320752. Simulations performed at NCAR, and Della server at Princeton University.

  12. Seasonal Predictability in a Model Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai

    2001-07-01

    The predictability of atmospheric mean-seasonal conditions in the absence of externally varying forcing is examined. A perfect-model approach is adopted, in which a global T21 three-level quasigeostrophic atmospheric model is integrated over 21 000 days to obtain a reference atmospheric orbit. The model is driven by a time-independent forcing, so that the only source of time variability is the internal dynamics. The forcing is set to perpetual winter conditions in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and perpetual summer in the Southern Hemisphere.A significant temporal variability in the NH 90-day mean states is observed. The component of that variability associated with the higher-frequency motions, or climate noise, is estimated using a method developed by Madden. In the polar region, and to a lesser extent in the midlatitudes, the temporal variance of the winter means is significantly greater than the climate noise, suggesting some potential predictability in those regions.Forecast experiments are performed to see whether the presence of variance in the 90-day mean states that is in excess of the climate noise leads to some skill in the prediction of these states. Ensemble forecast experiments with nine members starting from slightly different initial conditions are performed for 200 different 90-day means along the reference atmospheric orbit. The serial correlation between the ensemble means and the reference orbit shows that there is skill in the 90-day mean predictions. The skill is concentrated in those regions of the NH that have the largest variance in excess of the climate noise. An EOF analysis shows that nearly all the predictive skill in the seasonal means is associated with one mode of variability with a strong axisymmetric component.

  13. Exact results in modeling planetary atmospheres-I. Gray atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevallier, L. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Laboratoire LUTH, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France)]. E-mail: loic.chevallier@obspm.fr; Pelkowski, J. [Institut fuer Meteorologie und Geophysik, J.W. Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Robert Mayer Strasse 1, D-60325 Frankfurt (Germany); Rutily, B. [Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69000 (France) and Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, F-69622 (France) and Centre de Recherche Astronomique de Lyon, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, Saint-Genis Laval cedex, F-69561 (France) and CNRS, UMR 5574; Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2007-04-15

    An exact model is proposed for a gray, isotropically scattering planetary atmosphere in radiative equilibrium. The slab is illuminated on one side by a collimated beam and is bounded on the other side by an emitting and partially reflecting ground. We provide expressions for the incident and reflected fluxes on both boundary surfaces, as well as the temperature of the ground and the temperature distribution in the atmosphere, assuming the latter to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Tables and curves of the temperature distribution are included for various values of the optical thickness. Finally, semi-infinite atmospheres illuminated from the outside or by sources at infinity is dealt with.

  14. Dynamical seasonal climate prediction using an ocean-atmosphere coupled climate model developed in partnership between South Africa and the IRI

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Beraki, AF

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent increase in availability of high-performance computing (HPC) resources in South Africa allowed the development of an ocean–atmosphere coupled general circulation model (OAGCM). The ECHAM4.5-South African Weather Service (SAWS) Modular...

  15. CFD Modeling of Non-Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman

    to the atmospheric boundary-layer, are mostly ignored so far. In order to decrease the uncertainty of wind resource assessment, the present work focuses on atmospheric flows that include atmospheric stability and the Coriolis effect. Within the present work a RANS model framework is developed and implemented......For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on Computational Fluid Dynamics models that focus on modeling the airflow in a neutrally stratified surface-layer. Physical processes like the Coriolis force, buoyancy forces and heat transport, that are important...

  16. Dynamical variability in Saturn Equatorial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Hueso, R.; Rojas, J. F.; French, R. G.; Grupo Ciencias Planetarias Team

    2003-05-01

    Historical ground-based and recent HST observations show that Saturn's Equatorial Atmosphere is the region where the most intense large-scale dynamical variability took place at cloud level in the planet. Large-scale convective storms (nicknamed the ``Great White Spots") occurred in 1876, 1933 and 1990. The best studied case (the 1990 storm), produced a dramatic change in the cloud aspect in the years following the outburst of September 1990. Subsequently, a new large storm formed in 1994 and from 1996 to 2002 our HST observations showed periods of unusual cloud activity in the southern part of the Equator. This contrast with the aspect observed during the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters in 1980 and 1981 when the Equator was calm, except for some mid-scale plume-like features seen in 1981. Cloud-tracking of the features have revealed a dramatic slow down in the equatorial winds from maximum velocities of ˜ 475 m/s in 1980-1981 to ˜ 275 m/s during 1996-2002, as we have recently reported in Nature, Vol. 423, 623 (2003). We discuss the possibility that seasonal and ring-shadowing effects are involved in generating this activity and variability. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Spanish MCYT PNAYA 2000-0932. SPH acknowledges a PhD fellowship from the Spanish MECD and RH a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco. RGF was supported in part by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program NAG5-10197 and STSCI Grant GO-08660.01A.

  17. Deciphering Jupiter's atmospheric dynamics using the upcoming Juno gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, Yohai; Galanti, Eli

    2016-07-01

    This summer, the Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in course for close flybys of the planet, obtaining a high precision gravity spectrum of Jupiter. This data can be used to estimate the depth of Jupiter's observed cloud-level wind, and decipher the possible internal flows, that might be decoupled from the surface wind. In this talk, we discuss the Juno gravity experiment, and the possible outcomes with regard to the flows on Jupiter. We show several ways in which the gravity spectrum might be used to study the large scale flows: 1. measurements of the high order even harmonics which beyond J10 are dominated by the dynamics; 2. measurements of odd gravity harmonics which have no contribution from a static planet, and therefore are a pure signature of dynamics; 3. upper limits on the depth of the surface flow can be obtained by comparing low order even harmonics from dynamical models to the difference between the measured low order even harmonics and the largest possible values of a static planet; 4. direct latitudinally varying measurements of the gravity field exerted on the spacecraft. We will discuss how these methods may be applied given the expected sensitivities of the Juno gravity experiment. In addition, we present an inverse adjoint model, which allows given the gravity data, to infer the flows that produce it. This will allow, hopefully, to make significant progress in one of the longest-standing question in planetary atmospheric dynamics regarding the nature of the flows on the giant planets.

  18. Analysis Regarding the Effects of Atmospheric Turbulence on Aircraft Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela STROE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper will analyze the Gust Load Alleviation (GLA systems which can be used to reduce the effects of atmospheric turbulences generated by wind gusts on vertical acceleration of aircraft. Their purpose is to reduce airframe loads and to improve passenger comfort. The dynamic model of the aircraft is more realistic than a rigid-body model, since it includes the structural flexibility; due to its complexity, such model can make feedback control design for gust load alleviation more challenging. The gust is generated with the Dryden power spectral density model. This kind of model lends itself well to frequency-domain performance specifications in the form of the weighting functions. Two classical analytical representations for the power spectral density (PSD function of atmospheric turbulence as given by Von Kármán and Dryden, were used. The analysis is performed for a set of specified values for flight velocity and altitude (as test cases, with different gust signals that must be generated with the required intensity, scale lengths and PSD functions.

  19. Exact Solutions for a Higher-Order Nonlinear Schr(o)dinger Equation in Atmospheric Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    By giving prior assumptions on the form of the solutions, we succeed to find several exact solutions for a higher-order nonlinear Schrodinger equation derived from one important model in the study of atmospheric and ocean dynamical systems. Our analytical solutions include bright and dark solitary waves, and periodical solutions, which can be used to explain atmospheric phenomena.

  20. Optical models of the molecular atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, V. E.; Makushkin, Y. S.; Mitsel, A. A.; Ponomarev, Y. N.; Rudenko, V. P.; Firsov, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of optical and laser methods for performing atmospheric investigations has stimulated the development of the optical models of the atmosphere. The principles of constructing the optical models of molecular atmosphere for radiation with different spectral composition (wideband, narrowband, and monochromatic) are considered in the case of linear and nonlinear absorptions. The example of the development of a system which provides for the modeling of the processes of optical-wave energy transfer in the atmosphere is presented. Its physical foundations, structure, programming software, and functioning were considered.

  1. Quality assessment of atmospheric surface fields over the Baltic Sea from an ensemble of regional climate model simulations with respect to ocean dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Markus Meier

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Climate model results for the Baltic Sea region from an ensemble of eight simulations using the Rossby Centre Atmosphere model version 3 (RCA3 driven with lateral boundary data from global climate models (GCMs are compared with results from a downscaled ERA40 simulation and gridded observations from 1980-2006. The results showed that data from RCA3 scenario simulations should not be used as forcing for Baltic Sea models in climate change impact studies because biases of the control climate significantly affect the simulated changes of future projections. For instance, biases of the sea ice cover in RCA3 in the present climate affect the sensitivity of the model's response to changing climate due to the ice-albedo feedback. From the large ensemble of available RCA3 scenario simulations two GCMs with good performance in downscaling experiments during the control period 1980-2006 were selected. In this study, only the quality of atmospheric surface fields over the Baltic Sea was chosen as a selection criterion. For the greenhouse gas emission scenario A1B two transient simulations for 1961-2100 driven by these two GCMs were performed using the regional, fully coupled atmosphere-ice-ocean model RCAO. It was shown that RCAO has the potential to improve the results in downscaling experiments driven by GCMs considerably, because sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentrations are calculated more realistically with RCAO than when RCA3 has been forced with surface boundary data from GCMs. For instance, the seasonal 2 m air temperature cycle is closer to observations in RCAO than in RCA3 downscaling simulations. However, the parameterizations of air-sea fluxes in RCAO need to be improved.

  2. Dynamic Data-Driven Event Reconstruction for Atmospheric Releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosovic, B; Belles, R; Chow, F K; Monache, L D; Dyer, K; Glascoe, L; Hanley, W; Johannesson, G; Larsen, S; Loosmore, G; Lundquist, J K; Mirin, A; Neuman, S; Nitao, J; Serban, R; Sugiyama, G; Aines, R

    2007-02-22

    Accidental or terrorist releases of hazardous materials into the atmosphere can impact large populations and cause significant loss of life or property damage. Plume predictions have been shown to be extremely valuable in guiding an effective and timely response. The two greatest sources of uncertainty in the prediction of the consequences of hazardous atmospheric releases result from poorly characterized source terms and lack of knowledge about the state of the atmosphere as reflected in the available meteorological data. In this report, we discuss the development of a new event reconstruction methodology that provides probabilistic source term estimates from field measurement data for both accidental and clandestine releases. Accurate plume dispersion prediction requires the following questions to be answered: What was released? When was it released? How much material was released? Where was it released? We have developed a dynamic data-driven event reconstruction capability which couples data and predictive models through Bayesian inference to obtain a solution to this inverse problem. The solution consists of a probability distribution of unknown source term parameters. For consequence assessment, we then use this probability distribution to construct a ''''composite'' forward plume prediction which accounts for the uncertainties in the source term. Since in most cases of practical significance it is impossible to find a closed form solution, Bayesian inference is accomplished by utilizing stochastic sampling methods. This approach takes into consideration both measurement and forward model errors and thus incorporates all the sources of uncertainty in the solution to the inverse problem. Stochastic sampling methods have the additional advantage of being suitable for problems characterized by a non-Gaussian distribution of source term parameters and for cases in which the underlying dynamical system is non-linear. We initially

  3. Revisiting the Carrington Event: Updated modeling of atmospheric effects

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Brian C; Snyder, Brock R

    2011-01-01

    The terrestrial effects of major solar events such as the Carrington white-light flare and subsequent geomagnetic storm of August-September 1859 are of considerable interest, especially in light of recent predictions that such extreme events will be more likely over the coming decades. Here we present results of modeling the atmospheric effects, especially production of odd nitrogen compounds and subsequent depletion of ozone, by solar protons associated with the Carrington event. This study combines approaches from two previous studies of the atmospheric effect of this event. We investigate changes in NOy compounds as well as depletion of O3 using a two-dimensional atmospheric chemistry and dynamics model. Atmospheric ionization is computed using a range-energy relation with four different proxy proton spectra associated with more recent well-known solar proton events. We find that changes in atmospheric constituents are in reasonable agreement with previous studies, but effects of the four proxy spectra use...

  4. Performance Engineering in the Community Atmosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, P; Mirin, A; Drake, J; Sawyer, W

    2006-05-30

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is the atmospheric component of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and is the primary consumer of computer resources in typical CCSM simulations. Performance engineering has been an important aspect of CAM development throughout its existence. This paper briefly summarizes these efforts and their impacts over the past five years.

  5. Dynamic Latent Classification Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Shengtong; Martínez, Ana M.; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    as possible. Motivated by this problem setting, we propose a generative model for dynamic classification in continuous domains. At each time point the model can be seen as combining a naive Bayes model with a mixture of factor analyzers (FA). The latent variables of the FA are used to capture the dynamics...... in the process as well as modeling dependences between attributes....

  6. Studying urban land-atmospheric interactions by coupling an urban canopy model with a single column atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J.; Wang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Studying urban land-atmospheric interactions by coupling an urban canopy model with a single column atmospheric models Jiyun Song and Zhi-Hua Wang School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, PO Box 875306, Tempe, AZ 85287-5306 Landuse landcover changes in urban area will modify surface energy budgets, turbulent fluxes as well as dynamic and thermodynamic structures of the overlying atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In order to study urban land-atmospheric interactions, we coupled a single column atmospheric model (SCM) to a cutting-edge single layer urban canopy model (SLUCM). Modification of surface parameters such as the fraction of vegetation and engineered pavements, thermal properties of building and pavement materials, and geometrical features of street canyon, etc. in SLUCM dictates the evolution of surface balance of energy, water and momentum. The land surface states then provide lower boundary conditions to the overlying atmosphere, which in turn modulates the modification of ABL structure as well as vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and tracer gases. The coupled SLUCM-SCM model is tested against field measurements of surface layer fluxes as well as profiles of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer under convective conditions. After model test, SLUCM-SCM is used to simulate the effect of changing urban land surface conditions on the evolution of ABL structure and dynamics. Simulation results show that despite the prescribed atmospheric forcing, land surface states impose significant impact on the physics of the overlying vertical atmospheric layer. Overall, this numerical framework provides a useful standalone modeling tool to assess the impacts of urban land surface conditions on the local hydrometeorology through land-atmospheric interactions. It also has potentially far-reaching implications to urban ecohydrological services for cities under future expansion and climate challenges.

  7. Atmosphere, Ocean and Climate Dynamics An Introductory Text

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, John

    1961-01-01

    For advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students in atmospheric, oceanic, and climate science, Atmosphere, Ocean and Climate Dynamics is an introductory textbook on the circulations of the atmosphere and ocean and their interaction, with an emphasis on global scales. It will give students a good grasp of what the atmosphere and oceans look like on the large-scale and why they look that way. The role of the oceans in climate and paleoclimate is also discussed. The combination of observations, theory and accompanying illustrative laboratory experiments sets this text apart by making i

  8. Local Dynamics of Baroclinic Waves in the Martian Atmosphere

    KAUST Repository

    Kavulich, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    The paper investigates the processes that drive the spatiotemporal evolution of baroclinic transient waves in the Martian atmosphere by a simulation experiment with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Mars general circulation model (GCM). The main diagnostic tool of the study is the (local) eddy kinetic energy equation. Results are shown for a prewinter season of the Northern Hemisphere, in which a deep baroclinic wave of zonal wavenumber 2 circles the planet at an eastward phase speed of about 70° Sol-1 (Sol is a Martian day). The regular structure of the wave gives the impression that the classical models of baroclinic instability, which describe the underlying process by a temporally unstable global wave (e.g., Eady model and Charney model), may have a direct relevance for the description of the Martian baroclinic waves. The results of the diagnostic calculations show, however, that while the Martian waves remain zonally global features at all times, there are large spatiotemporal changes in their amplitude. The most intense episodes of baroclinic energy conversion, which take place in the two great plain regions (Acidalia Planitia and Utopia Planitia), are strongly localized in both space and time. In addition, similar to the situation for terrestrial baroclinic waves, geopotential flux convergence plays an important role in the dynamics of the downstream-propagating unstable waves. © 2013 American Meteorological Society.

  9. Operator constraint principle for simplifying atmospheric dynamical equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the qualitative theory of atmospheric dynamical equations, a new method for simplifying equations, the operator constraint principle, is presented. The general rule of the method and its mathematical strictness are discussed. Moreover, the way that how to use the method to simplify equations rationally and how to get the simplified equations with harmonious and consistent dynamics is given.

  10. Atmospheric dynamics of Earth-like tidally locked aquaplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Merlis, Timothy M

    2010-01-01

    We present simulations of atmospheres of Earth-like aquaplanets that are tidally locked to their star, that is, planets whose orbital period is equal to the rotation period about their spin axis, so that one side always faces the star and the other side is always dark. As extreme cases illustrating the effects of slow and rapid rotation, we consider planets with rotation periods equal to one current Earth year and one current Earth day. The dynamics responsible for the surface climate (e.g., winds, temperature, precipitation) and the general circulation of the atmosphere are discussed in light of existing theories of atmospheric circulations. For example, as expected from the increasing importance of Coriolis accelerations relative to inertial accelerations as the rotation rate increases, the winds are approximately isotropic and divergent at leading order in the slowly rotating atmosphere but are predominantly zonal and rotational in the rapidly rotating atmosphere. Free-atmospheric horizontal temperature va...

  11. Observing and modeling the dynamic atmosphere of the low mass-loss C-star R Sculptoris at high angular resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sacuto, Stéphane; Hron, Josef; Nowotny, Walter; Paladini, Claudia; Verhoelst, Tijl; Höfner, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    We study the circumstellar environment of the carbon-rich star R Scl using the near- and mid-infrared high spatial resolution observations from the ESO-VLTI instruments VINCI and MIDI. These observations aim at increasing our knowledge of the dynamic processes in play within the very close circumstellar environment where the mass loss of AGB stars is initiated. Data are interpreted using a self-consistent dynamic model. Interferometric observations do not show any significant variability effect at the 16 m baseline between phases 0.17 and 0.23 in the K band, and for both the 15 m baseline between phases 0.66 and 0.97 and the 31 m baseline between phases 0.90 and 0.97 in the N band. We find fairly good agreement between the dynamic model and the spectrophotometric data from 0.4 to 25 $\\mu$m. The model agrees well with the time-dependent flux data at 8.5 $\\mu$m, whereas it is too faint at 11.3 and 12.5 $\\mu$m. The VINCI visibilities are reproduced well, meaning that the extension of the model is suitable in the...

  12. Dynamics of Undisturbed Midlatitude Atmospheric Electricity: From Observations to Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, S. V.; Afinogenov, K. V.; Shikhova, N. M.

    2014-04-01

    Long-term dynamics of the electric field of the midlatitude near-surface atmosphere in a wide range of temporal scales is analyzed according to multiyear observatory and seasonal field observations. It is found that the daily dynamics of the aeroelectric field at mid-latitudes most authentically repeats a diurnal variation for the winter months. It is stated that short-period pulsations of the electric field have a self-similar power-law spectrum. Spatio-temporal scales of the self-similarity interval are estimated and the nature of the generalized diffusive process of the aeroelectric pulsation generation is defined. Characteristics of the turbulent ΔE pulsations are analyzed. Estimates of interrelation between the dynamic (fractal dimensions, intermittency indices) and power (degrees of spectral index and structure function) ΔE characteristics are obtained. Mutual correlations between atmospheric electric field variations, vertical atmospheric electrical current density, space charge density, and atmospheric electrical conductivity are studied. It is shown that variations of the light atmospheric ion number density and space charge density are related with variations of the Radon-222 emanations. Spectral analysis of the space charge density variations is carried out. It is shown that the electrodynamic state of the surface atmosphere depends on the convective state of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  13. Atmospheric Boundary Layers: Modeling and Parameterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution we deal with the representation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for modeling studies of weather, climate, and air quality. As such we review the major characteristics of the ABL, and summarize the basic parameterizations for the description of atmospheric turbulence and

  14. Modeling the atmospheric chemistry of TICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Michael V.; Burns, Douglas S.; Chynwat, Veeradej; Moore, William; Plitz, Angela; Rottmann, Shawn; Hearn, John

    2009-05-01

    An atmospheric chemistry model that describes the behavior and disposition of environmentally hazardous compounds discharged into the atmosphere was coupled with the transport and diffusion model, SCIPUFF. The atmospheric chemistry model was developed by reducing a detailed atmospheric chemistry mechanism to a simple empirical effective degradation rate term (keff) that is a function of important meteorological parameters such as solar flux, temperature, and cloud cover. Empirically derived keff functions that describe the degradation of target toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) were derived by statistically analyzing data generated from the detailed chemistry mechanism run over a wide range of (typical) atmospheric conditions. To assess and identify areas to improve the developed atmospheric chemistry model, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were performed to (1) quantify the sensitivity of the model output (TIC concentrations) with respect to changes in the input parameters and (2) improve, where necessary, the quality of the input data based on sensitivity results. The model predictions were evaluated against experimental data. Chamber data were used to remove the complexities of dispersion in the atmosphere.

  15. Chapter 13. Atmospheric Dynamics and Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. M.; Baines, K. H.; Bird, M. K.; Tokano, T.

    2009-01-01

    Titan, after Venus, is the second example in the solar system of an atmosphere with a global cyclostrophic circulation, but in this case a circulation that has a strong seasonal modulation in the middle atmosphere. Direct measurement of Titan's winds, particularly observations tracking the Huygens probe at 10 deg S, indicate that the zonal winds are mostly in the sense of the satellite's rotation. They generally increase with altitude and become cyclostrophic near 35 km above the surface. An exception to this is a sharp minimum centered near 75 km, where the wind velocity decreases to nearly zero. Zonal winds derived from temperatures retrieved from Cassini orbiter measurements, using the thermal wind equation, indicate a strong winter circumpolar vortex, with maximum winds of 190 m/s at mid northern latitudes near 300 km. Above this level, the vortex decays. Curiously, the stratospheric zonal winds and temperatures in both hemispheres are symmetric about a pole that is offset from the surface pole by about 4 deg. The cause of this is not well understood, but it may reflect the response of a cyclostrophic circulation to the onset between the equator, where the distance to the rotation axis is greatest, and the seasonally varying subsolar latitude. The mean meridional circulation can be inferred from the temperature field and the meridional distribution of organic molecules and condensates and hazes. Both the warm temperatures near 400 km and the enhanced concentration of several organic molecules suggest subsidence in the north polar region during winter and early spring. Stratospheric condensates are localized at high northern latitudes, with a sharp cut-off near 50 deg N. Titan's winter polar vortex appears to share many of the same characteristics of isolating high and low-latitude air masses as do the winter polar vortices on Earth that envelop the ozone holes. Global mapping of temperatures, winds, and composition in the troposphere, by contrast, is incomplete

  16. The molecular dynamics of atmospheric reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanyi, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed information about the chemistry of the upper atmosphere took the form of quantitative data concerning the rate of reaction into specified states of product vibration, rotation and translation for exothermic reaction, as well as concerning the rate of reaction from specified states of reagent vibration, rotation and translation for endothermic reaction. The techniques used were variants on the infrared chemiluminescence method. Emphasis was placed on reactions that formed, and that removed, vibrationally-excited hydroxyl radicals. Fundamental studies were also performed on exothermic reactions involving hydrogen halides.

  17. Gravity-Wave Dynamics in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    of wave-induced downslope winds. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 32(2):320–339, 1975. [12] P. K. Kundu and I. M. Cohen. Fluid Mechanics . Elsevier...Wave Beams and Local Generation of Solitary Waves in the Ocean Thermocline”, Journal of Fluid Mechanics , 593, 297-313 (2007) Akylas, T. R. & Druecke...334–348, 1992. [4] T. H. Bell. Lee waves in stratified flows with simple harmonic time-dependence. Journal of Fluid Mechanics , 67(FEB25):705–722

  18. Improvement in soil-plant-atmosphere modelling of {sup 14}C dynamics and the application of two models to data from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limer, Laura M.C. [Quintessa Limited, 633/635 Birchwood Boulevard, WA3 7QU, Warrington (United Kingdom); Le Dizes-Maurel, Severine; Maro, Denis [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV, SERIS, LM2E, Cadarache, Saint-Paul Lez Durance (France); Klos, Ryk [Aleksandria Sciences Limited, S7 2DD, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Norden, Maria [Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SE-171 16, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    The need to address radiological impacts from {sup 14}C released to the biosphere has been recognised for some time. However, because of its role in biological processes and its ecological cycling, the standard methods employed to model long-term radionuclide transport and accumulation in the biosphere cannot be used satisfactorily for {sup 14}C. The degree of complexity in any {sup 14}C model used must be balanced against the availability of supporting data and the assessment context. In 2011, the model SSPAM14C was developed on behalf of the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), with the intention to usage in both long-term and short-term release assessments (Limer et al., 2013). As part of the model testing it was applied to data collected during laboratory experiments performed by Imperial College London in the 1990's (Tucker and Shaw, 1997). Independently, IRSN has also been developing its own {sup 14}C model, TOCATTA (Le Dizes et al., 2012), and has previously tested it against field data collected by IRSN, between 2006 and 2008, in the vicinity of the La Hague nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in France (Aulagnier et al., 2012). The main conclusion drawn from these comparisons highlighted the need to develop an hourly time step model of {sup 14}C transfer based more thoroughly on knowledge arising from plant physiology, soil science and meteorology (Farquhar and von Caemmerer, 1982). These models have undergone further development, and have been applied here to the La Hague field data as it represents a medium term data set with both short term variation and a sizeable time series of measurements against which to compare the models. By increasing the temporal resolution of the IRSN model, a new version called TOCATTA-ccan simulate the impact of intermittent {sup 14}C releases occurring either the day or night (Aulagnier et al., 2013). Simplification of the soil sub-model in SSPAM14C is also shown to be justified for application to operational release

  19. Ensemble data assimilation in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Raeder, K.; Anderson, J. L.; Liu, H.-L.

    2014-08-01

    We present results pertaining to the assimilation of real lower, middle, and upper atmosphere observations in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) using the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) ensemble adjustment Kalman filter. The ability to assimilate lower atmosphere observations of aircraft and radiosonde temperature and winds, satellite drift winds, and Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate refractivity along with middle/upper atmosphere temperature observations from SABER and Aura MLS is demonstrated. The WACCM+DART data assimilation system is shown to be able to reproduce the salient features, and variability, of the troposphere present in the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Re-Analysis. In the mesosphere, the fit of WACCM+DART to observations is found to be slightly worse when only lower atmosphere observations are assimilated compared to a control experiment that is reflective of the model climatological variability. This differs from previous results which found that assimilation of lower atmosphere observations improves the fit to mesospheric observations. This discrepancy is attributed to the fact that due to the gravity wave drag parameterizations, the model climatology differs significantly from the observations in the mesosphere, and this is not corrected by the assimilation of lower atmosphere observations. The fit of WACCM+DART to mesospheric observations is, however, significantly improved compared to the control experiment when middle/upper atmosphere observations are assimilated. We find that assimilating SABER observations reduces the root-mean-square error and bias of WACCM+DART relative to the independent Aura MLS observations by ˜50%, demonstrating that assimilation of middle/upper atmosphere observations is essential for accurate specification of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region in WACCM+DART. Last, we demonstrate that

  20. The impact of winter 2012 cold outbreak over the Northern Adriatic Sea dynamics: preliminary comparison among data and high resolution operational atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davolio, Silvio; Miglietta, Mario M.; Carniel, Sandro; Benetazzo, Alvise; Buzzi, Andrea; Drofa, Oxana; Falco, Pierpaolo; Fantini, Maurizio; Malguzzi, Piero; Ricchi, Antonio; Russo, Aniello; Paccagnella, Tiziana; Sclavo, Mauro

    2013-04-01

    Shelf dense water formation (DWF) events may be taking place during winter time on the broad, shallow shelf in the northern region of the Adriatic basin exposed to the Bora winds, bringing cold, dry air from the north-east down the Dinaric Alps. Indeed, the resulting intense evaporation and cooling of the shelf waters may produce North Adriatic Dense Water (NAdDW), which then tends to sink and ''cascade'' all the way to the southern basin. During these rather episodic formation processes, more frequent during winter time, the main controlling factors are intense cold wind out- breaks, the ambient water density, preconditioned during late autumn, and also other factors, e.g. river discharges. When such processes of buoyancy extraction happen, several isopycnic surfaces outcrop and very often the whole water column (20-25 m deep) may be ventilated. However, the general process of northern water masses flowing to the southern part of the Adriatic basin is complex and far from being completely understood. In order to understand and model these processes, it is mandatory to utilize high resolution meteorological forcing fields and circulation models, at least to model particular events in Adriatic marine circulation, if not its longer term (e.g., seasonal) characteristics. The use of low resolution winds in fact necessarily implies a calibration factor to better match surface fluxes and to reproduce wind-driven circulation. This is particularly evident in the case of the cross-basin Bora pattern, because the complexity and small scale of Adriatic orography is often poorly reproduced in atmospheric models, while Bora flow is composed of an alternation of high and low wind speed 'strips' crossing the Adriatic in correspondence of the fine scale (10-100 km) Balkanic orographic gaps. Within the framework of activities of the Italian flagship Project "RITMARE" and of the FIRB "DECALOGO", we focused on the current meteorological modeling capabilities to describe an event of

  1. Dynamics of global atmospheric CO2 concentration from 1850 to 2010: a linear approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Nemani, R.

    2014-09-01

    The increase in anthropogenic CO2 emissions largely followed an exponential path between 1850 and 2010, and the corresponding increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration were almost constantly proportional to the emissions by the so-called "airborne fraction". These observations suggest that the dynamics of atmospheric CO2 concentration through this time period may be properly approximated as a linear system. We demonstrate this hypothesis by deriving a linear box-model to describe carbon exchanges between the atmosphere and the surface reservoirs under the influence of disturbances such as anthropogenic CO2 emissions and global temperature changes. We show that the box model accurately simulates the observed atmospheric CO2 concentrations and growth rates across interannual to multi-decadal time scales. The model also allows us to analytically examine the dynamics of such changes/variations, linking its characteristic disturbance-response functions to bio-geophysically meaningful parameters. In particular, our results suggest that the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations have significantly promoted the gross carbon uptake by the terrestrial biosphere. However, such "fertilization" effects are partially offset by enhanced carbon release from surface reservoirs promoted by warmer temperatures. The result of these interactions appears to be a decline in net efficiency in sequestering atmospheric CO2 by ∼30% since 1960s. We believe that the linear modeling framework outlined in this paper provides a convenient tool to diagnose the observed atmospheric CO2 dynamics and monitor their future changes.

  2. A Vertical Grid Module for Baroclinic Models of the Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, John B [ORNL

    2008-04-01

    The vertical grid of an atmospheric model assigns dynamic and thermo- dynamic variables to grid locations. The vertical coordinate is typically not height but one of a class of meteorological variables that vary with atmo- spheric conditions. The grid system is chosen to further numerical approx- imations of the boundary conditions so that the system is terrain following at the surface. Lagrangian vertical coordinates are useful in reducing the numerical errors from advection processes. That the choices will effect the numercial properties and accuracy is explored in this report. A MATLAB class for Lorentz vertical grids is described and applied to the vertical struc- ture equation and baroclinic atmospheric circulation. A generalized meteo- rolgoical coordinate system is developed which can support σ, isentropic θ vertical coordinate, or Lagrangian vertical coordinates. The vertical atmo- spheric column is a MATLAB class that includes the kinematic and ther- modynamic variables along with methods for computing geopoentials and terms relevant to a 3D baroclinc atmospheric model.

  3. Non-hydrostatic general circulation model of the Venus atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Alexander V.; Mingalev, Igor; Orlov, Konstantin; Ignatiev, Nikolay

    We present the first non-hydrostatic global circulation model of the Venus atmosphere based on the complete set of gas dynamics equations. The model employs a spatially uniform triangular mesh that allows to avoid artificial damping of the dynamical processes in the polar regions, with altitude as a vertical coordinate. Energy conversion from the solar flux into atmospheric motion is described via explicitly specified heating and cooling rates or, alternatively, with help of the radiation block based on comprehensive treatment of the Venus atmosphere spectroscopy, including line mixing effects in CO2 far wing absorption. Momentum equations are integrated using the semi-Lagrangian explicit scheme that provides high accuracy of mass and energy conservation. Due to high vertical grid resolution required by gas dynamics calculations, the model is integrated on the short time step less than one second. The model reliably repro-duces zonal superrotation, smoothly extending far below the cloud layer, tidal patterns at the cloud level and above, and non-rotating, sun-synchronous global convective cell in the upper atmosphere. One of the most interesting features of the model is the development of the polar vortices resembling those observed by Venus Express' VIRTIS instrument. Initial analysis of the simulation results confirms the hypothesis that it is thermal tides that provides main driver for the superrotation.

  4. Soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, J.P.; Sucksdorff, Y. [Finnish Environment Agency, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In this study the soil/vegetation/atmosphere-model based on the formulation of Deardorff was refined to hour basis and applied to a field in Vihti. The effect of model parameters on model results (energy fluxes, temperatures) was also studied as well as the effect of atmospheric conditions. The estimation of atmospheric conditions on the soil-vegetation system as well as an estimation of the effect of vegetation parameters on the atmospheric climate was estimated. Areal surface fluxes, temperatures and moistures were also modelled for some river basins in southern Finland. Land-use and soil parameterisation was developed to include properties and yearly variation of all vegetation and soil types. One classification was selected to describe the hydrothermal properties of the soils. Evapotranspiration was verified against the water balance method

  5. Atmosphere of Mars - Mariner IV models compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, V. R.; Fjeldbo, G.; Fjeldbo, W. C.

    1966-01-01

    Mariner IV models of three Mars atmospheric layers analogous to terrestrial E, F-1 and F-2 layers, considering relative mass densities, temperatures, carbon dioxide photodissociation and ionization profile

  6. Impact of land use change on the land atmosphere carbon flux of South and South East Asia: A Synthesis of Dynamic Vegetation Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervarich, M.; Shu, S.; Jain, A. K.; Poulter, B.; Stocker, B.; Arneth, A.; Viovy, N.; Kato, E.; Wiltshire, A.; Koven, C.; Sitch, S.; Zeng, N.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding our present day carbon cycle and possible solutions to recent increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide is dependent upon quantifying the terrestrial carbon budget. Currently, global land cover and land use change is estimated to emit 0.9 PgC yr-1 compared to emissions due to fossil fuel combustion and cement production of 8.4 PgC yr-1. South and Southeast Asia (India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Burma, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Philippines, Indonesia, Pakistan, Myanmar, and Singapore) is a region of rapid land cover and land use change due to the continuous development of agriculture, deforestation, reforestation, afforestation, and the increased demand of land for people to live. In this study, we synthesize outputs of nine models participated in Global Carbon Budget Project to identify the carbon budget of South and southeast Asia, diagnose the contribution of land cover and land use change to carbon emissions and assess areas of uncertainty in the suite of models. Uncertainty is determined using the standard deviation and the coefficient of variation of net ecosystem exchange and its component parts. Results show the region's terrestrial biosphere was a source of carbon emissions from the 1980 to the early 1990s. During the same time period, land cover and land use change increasingly contributed to carbon emission. In the most recent two decades, the region became a carbon sink since emission due to land cover land use changes. Spatially, the greatest total emissions occurred in the tropical forest of Southeast Asia. Additionally, this is the subregion with the greatest uncertainty and greatest biomass. Model uncertainty is shown to be proportional to total biomass. The atmospheric impacts of ENSO are shown to suppress the net biosphere productivity in South and Southeast Asia leading to years of increased carbon emissions.

  7. Classroom Demonstrations Of Atmosphere-ocean Dynamics: Baroclinic Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurnou, Jonathan; Nadiga, B. T.

    2008-09-01

    Here we will present simple hands-on experimental demonstrations that show how baroclinic instabilities develop in rotating fluid dynamical systems. Such instabilities are found in the Earth's oceans and atmosphere as well as in the atmospheres and oceans of planetary bodies throughout the solar system and beyond. Our inexpensive experimental apparatus consists of a vinyl-record player, a wide shallow pan, and a weighted, dyed block of ice. Most directly, these demonstrations can be used to explain winter-time atmospheric weather patterns observed in Earth's mid-latitudes.

  8. Atmospheric dynamics of Earth-like tidally locked aquaplanets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapio Schneider

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present simulations of atmospheres of Earth-like aquaplanets that are tidally locked to their star, that is, planets whose orbital period is equal to the rotation period about their spin axis, so that one side always faces the star and the other side is always dark. Such simulations are of interest in the study of tidally locked terrestrial exoplanets and as illustrations of how planetary rotation and the insolation distribution shape climate. As extreme cases illustrating the effects of slow and rapid rotation, we consider planets with rotation periods equal to one current Earth year and one current Earth day. The dynamics responsible for the surface climate (e.g., winds, temperature, precipitation and the general circulation of the atmosphere are discussed in light of existing theories of atmospheric circulations. For example, as expected from the increasing importance of Coriolis accelerations relative to inertial accelerations as the rotation rate increases, the winds are approximately isotropic and divergent at leading order in the slowly rotating atmosphere but are predominantly zonal and rotational in the rapidly rotating atmosphere. Free-atmospheric horizontal temperature variations in the slowly rotating atmosphere are generally weaker than in the rapidly rotating atmosphere. Interestingly, the surface temperature on the night side of the planets does not fall below ~240 K in either the rapidly or slowly rotating atmosphere; that is, heat transport from the day side to the night side of the planets efficiently reduces temperature contrasts in either case. Rotational waves and eddies shape the distribution of winds, temperature, and precipitation in the rapidly rotating atmosphere; in the slowly rotating atmosphere, these distributions are controlled by simpler divergent circulations. Both the slowly and rapidly rotating atmospheres exhibit equatorial superrotation. Systematic variation of the planetary rotation rate shows that the

  9. Description and implementation of a MiXed Layer model (MXL, v1.0) for the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer in the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, R. H. H.; Pozzer, A.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new submodel for the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy): the MiXed Layer (MXL) model for the diurnal dynamics of the convective boundary layer, including explicit representations of entrainment and surface fluxes. This submodel is embedded in a new MESSy base model (VERTICO), which represents a single atmospheric column. With the implementation of MXL in MESSy, MXL can be used in combination with other MESSy submodels that represent processes related to atmospheric chemistry. For instance, the coupling of MXL with more advanced modules for gas-phase chemistry (such as the Mainz Isoprene Mechanism 2 (MIM2)), emissions, dry deposition and organic aerosol formation than in previous versions of the MXL code is possible. Since MXL is now integrated in the MESSy framework, it can take advantage of future developments of this framework, such as the inclusion of new process submodels. The coupling of MXL with submodels that represent other processes relevant to chemistry in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) yields a computationally inexpensive tool that is ideally suited for the analysis of field data, for evaluating new parametrizations for 3-D models, and for performing systematic sensitivity analyses. A case study for the DOMINO campaign in southern Spain is shown to demonstrate the use and performance of MXL/MESSy in reproducing and analysing field observations.

  10. Geophysical Plasmas and Atmospheric Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    by Keskinen and Ossakow [1982a] and references therein). Recently, considerable quantitative progress has been made, especially in the area of...distributions. This is especially germane to an interpretation of the interior dynamics, because the sources are generally not considered to be part of the...S ::I. SOME CURRE!N NOTION’S RELA-E’ TO DOU3_-LAYER EVOLUION in :his section, : introduce some concepts that have been proposed to be

  11. Constraining hot Jupiter’s atmospheric structure and dynamics through Doppler shifted emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jisheng; Kempton, Eliza; Rauscher, Emily

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, astronomers have begun successfully observing the atmospheres of extrasolar planets using ground-based telescopes equipped with spectrographs capable of observing at high spectral resolution (R~105). Such studies are capable of diagnosing the atmospheric structure, composition, and dynamics (winds and rotation) of both transiting and non-transiting exoplanets. However, few studies have examined how the 3-D atmospheric dynamics could alter the emitted light of hot Jupiters at such high spectral resolution. Here, we present a model to explore such influence on the hot Jupiters’ thermal emission spectra. Our aim is to investigate the extent to which the effects of 3-D atmospheric dynamics are imprinted on planet-averaged thermal emission spectra. We couple together a 3-D general circulation model of hot Jupiter atmospheric dynamics (Rauscher & Menou, 2012) with a radiative transfer solver to predict the planet’s disk-integrated emission spectrum as a function of its orbital phase. For the first time, we self-consistently include the effects of the line-of-sight atmospheric motions (resulting from winds and rotation) in the calculation to produce Doppler-shifted spectral line profiles that result from the atmospheric dynamics. We focus our study on three benchmark hot Jupiters, HD 189733b, HD 209458b, and WASP-43b which have been the focus of previous detailed observational studies. We find that the high-resolution Doppler shifted thermal emission spectra can be used to diagnose key properties of the dynamical atmosphere - the planet’s longitudinal temperature and wind structure, and its rotation rate.

  12. Using Existing Arctic Atmospheric Mercury Measurements to Refine Global and Regional Scale Atmospheric Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. W.; Dastoor, A.; Steffen, A.; Nghiem, S. V.; Agnan, Y.; Obrist, D.

    2015-12-01

    Northern hemisphere background atmospheric concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) have been declining by up to 25% over the last ten years at some lower latitude sites. However, this decline has ranged from no decline to 9% over 10 years at Arctic long-term measurement sites. Measurements also show a highly dynamic nature of mercury (Hg) species in Arctic air and snow from early spring to the end of summer when biogeochemical transformations peak. Currently, models are unable to reproduce this variability accurately. Estimates of Hg accumulation in the Arctic and Arctic Ocean by models require a full mechanistic understanding of the multi-phase redox chemistry of Hg in air and snow as well as the role of meteorology in the physicochemical processes of Hg. We will show how findings from ground-based atmospheric Hg measurements like those made in spring 2012 during the Bromine, Ozone and Mercury Experiment (BROMEX) near Barrow, Alaska can be used to reduce the discrepancy between measurements and model output in the Canadian GEM-MACH-Hg model. The model is able to reproduce and to explain some of the variability in Arctic Hg measurements but discrepancies still remain. One improvement involves incorporation of new physical mechanisms such as the one we were able to identify during BROMEX. This mechanism, by which atmospheric mercury depletion events are abruptly ended via sea ice leads opening and inducing shallow convective mixing that replenishes GEM (and ozone) in the near surface atmospheric layer, causing an immediate recovery from the depletion event, is currently lacking in models. Future implementation of this physical mechanism will have to incorporate current remote sensing sea ice products but also rely on the development of products that can identify sea ice leads quantitatively. In this way, we can advance the knowledge of the dynamic nature of GEM in the Arctic and the impact of climate change along with new regulations on the overall

  13. Models for Dynamic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    be applied to formulate, analyse and solve these dynamic problems and how in the case of the fuel cell problem the model consists of coupledmeso and micro scale models. It is shown how data flows are handled between the models and how the solution is obtained within the modelling environment....

  14. Dynamics of Soil Organic Carbon Under Uncertain Climate Change and Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhong-Bing; ZHANG Ren-Duo

    2012-01-01

    Climate change and elevated atmospheric CO2 should affect the dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC).SOC dynamics under uncertain patterns of climate warming and elevated atmospheric CO2 as well as with different soil erosion extents at Nelson Farm during 1998-2100 were simulated using stochastic modelling.Results based on numerous simulations showed that SOC decreased with elevated atmospheric temperature but increased with atmospheric CO2 concentration.Therefore,there was a counteract effect on SOC dynamics between climate warming and elevated CO2.For different soil erosion extents,warming 1 ℃ and elevated atmospheric CO2 resulted in SOC increase at least 15%,while warming 5 ℃ and elevated CO2 resulted in SOC decrease more than 29%.SOCpredictions with uncertainty assessment were conducted for different scenarios of soil erosion,climate change,and elevated CO2.Statistically,SOC decreased linearly with the probability.SOC also decreased with time and the degree of soil erosion.For example,in 2100 with a probability of 50%,SOC was 1617,1 167,and 892 g m-2,respectively,for no,minimum,and maximum soil erosion.Under climate warming 5 ℃ and elevated CO2,the soil carbon pools became a carbon source to the atmosphere (P > 95%).The results suggested that stochastic modelling could be a useful tool to predict future SOC dynamics under uncertain climate change and elevated CO2.

  15. A model of the primordial lunar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Prabal; Elkins-Tanton, Lindy; Petro, Noah; Mandell, Avi

    2017-09-01

    We create the first quantitative model for the early lunar atmosphere, coupled with a magma ocean crystallization model. Immediately after formation, the moon's surface was subject to a radiative environment that included contributions from the early Sun, a post-impact Earth that radiated like a mid-type M dwarf star, and a cooling global magma ocean. This radiative environment resulted in a largely Earth-side atmosphere on the Moon, ranging from ∼104 to ∼102 pascals, composed of heavy volatiles (Na and SiO). This atmosphere persisted through lid formation and was additionally characterized by supersonic winds that transported significant quantities of moderate volatiles and likely generated magma ocean waves. The existence of this atmosphere may have influenced the distribution of some moderate volatiles and created temperature asymmetries which influenced ocean flow and cooling. Such asymmetries may characterize young, tidally locked rocky bodies with global magma oceans and subject to intense irradiation.

  16. Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System Modeling, Calibration, and Error Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.; VanNorman, John; Siemers, Paul M.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Munk, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI)/Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System (MEADS) project installed seven pressure ports through the MSL Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heatshield to measure heatshield surface pressures during entry. These measured surface pressures are used to generate estimates of atmospheric quantities based on modeled surface pressure distributions. In particular, the quantities to be estimated from the MEADS pressure measurements include the dynamic pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip. This report describes the calibration of the pressure transducers utilized to reconstruct the atmospheric data and associated uncertainty models, pressure modeling and uncertainty analysis, and system performance results. The results indicate that the MEADS pressure measurement system hardware meets the project requirements.

  17. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  18. Deterministic Chaos in Tropical Atmospheric Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Waelbroeck, H

    1994-01-01

    Abstract: We examine an 11-year data set from the tropical weather station of Tlaxcala, Mexico. We find that mutual information drops quickly with the delay, to a positive value which relaxes to zero with a time scale of 20 days. We also examine the mutual dependence of the observables and conclude that the data set gives the equivalent of 8 variables per day, known to a precision of $2\\%$. We determine the effective dimension of the attractor to be $D_{eff} \\approx 11.7$ at the scale $3.5\\% < R/R_{max} < 8\\%$. We find evidence that the effective dimension increases as $R/R_{max} \\to 0$, supporting a conjecture by Lorenz that the climate system may consist of a large number of weakly coupled subsystems, some of which have low-dimensional attractors. We perform a local reconstruction of the dynamics in phase space; the short-term predictability is modest and agrees with theoretical estimates. Useful skill in predictions of 10-day rainfall accumulation anomalies reflects the persistence of weather pattern...

  19. Deterministic Chaos in Tropical Atmospheric Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waelbroeck, H.

    1995-07-01

    An 11-year dataset from the tropical weather station of Tlaxcala, Mexico, is examined. It is found that mutual information drops quickly with the delay, to a positive value that relaxes to zero with a timescale of 20 days. The mutual dependence of the observables is also examined and it is concluded that the dataset gives the equivalent of eight variables per day, known to a precision of 2%. It is determined that the effective dimension of the attractor is Deff 11.7 at the scale 3.5% < R/Rmax < 8%. Evidence is found that the effective dimension increases as R/Rmax 0, supporting a conjecture by Lorenz that the climate system may consist of a large number of weakly coupled subsystems, some of which have low-dimensional attractors. A local reconstruction of the dynamics in phase space is performed; the short-term predictability is modest and agrees with theoretical estimates. Useful skill in predictions of 10-day rainfall accumulation anomalies reflects the persistence of weather patterns, which follow the 20-day decay rate of the mutual information.

  20. Systematic evaluation of atmospheric chemistry-transport model CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Siour, Guillaume; Couvidat, Florian; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Turquety, Solene

    2017-04-01

    Regional-scale atmospheric chemistry-transport models (CTM) are used to develop air quality regulatory measures, to support environmentally sensitive decisions in the industry, and to address variety of scientific questions involving the atmospheric composition. Model performance evaluation with measurement data is critical to understand their limits and the degree of confidence in model results. CHIMERE CTM (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/) is a French national tool for operational forecast and decision support and is widely used in the international research community in various areas of atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, and environment (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/CW-articles.php). This work presents the model evaluation framework applied systematically to the new CHIMERE CTM versions in the course of the continuous model development. The framework uses three of the four CTM evaluation types identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS): operational, diagnostic, and dynamic. It allows to compare the overall model performance in subsequent model versions (operational evaluation), identify specific processes and/or model inputs that could be improved (diagnostic evaluation), and test the model sensitivity to the changes in air quality, such as emission reductions and meteorological events (dynamic evaluation). The observation datasets currently used for the evaluation are: EMEP (surface concentrations), AERONET (optical depths), and WOUDC (ozone sounding profiles). The framework is implemented as an automated processing chain and allows interactive exploration of the results via a web interface.

  1. Stellar model atmospheres with magnetic line blanketing

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O; Shulyak, D

    2004-01-01

    Model atmospheres of A and B stars are computed taking into account magnetic line blanketing. These calculations are based on the new stellar model atmosphere code LLModels which implements direct treatment of the opacities due to the bound-bound transitions and ensures an accurate and detailed description of the line absorption. The anomalous Zeeman effect was calculated for the field strengths between 1 and 40 kG and a field vector perpendicular to the line of sight. The model structure, high-resolution energy distribution, photometric colors, metallic line spectra and the hydrogen Balmer line profiles are computed for magnetic stars with different metallicities and are discussed with respect to those of non-magnetic reference models. The magnetically enhanced line blanketing changes the atmospheric structure and leads to a redistribution of energy in the stellar spectrum. The most noticeable feature in the optical region is the appearance of the 5200 A depression. However, this effect is prominent only in ...

  2. New atmospheric model of Epsilon Eridani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieytes, Mariela; Fontenla, Juan; Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    We present a new semi-empirical model of the atmosphere of the widely studied K-dwarf Epsilon Eridani (HD 22049). The model is build to reproduce the visible spectral observations from 3800 to 6800 Angstrom and the h and k Mg II lines profiles. The computations were carried out using the Solar-Stellar Radiation Physical Modeling (SSRPM) tools, which calculate non-LTE population for the most important species in the stellar atmosphere. We show a comparison between the synthetic and observed spectrum, obtaining a good agreement in all the studied spectral range.

  3. Predictability of large-scale atmospheric motions: Lyapunov exponents and error dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2017-03-01

    The deterministic equations describing the dynamics of the atmosphere (and of the climate system) are known to display the property of sensitivity to initial conditions. In the ergodic theory of chaos, this property is usually quantified by computing the Lyapunov exponents. In this review, these quantifiers computed in a hierarchy of atmospheric models (coupled or not to an ocean) are analyzed, together with their local counterparts known as the local or finite-time Lyapunov exponents. It is shown in particular that the variability of the local Lyapunov exponents (corresponding to the dominant Lyapunov exponent) decreases when the model resolution increases. The dynamics of (finite-amplitude) initial condition errors in these models is also reviewed, and in general found to display a complicated growth far from the asymptotic estimates provided by the Lyapunov exponents. The implications of these results for operational (high resolution) atmospheric and climate modelling are also discussed.

  4. Effects of eustatic sea-level change, ocean dynamics, and nutrient utilization on atmospheric pCO2 and seawater composition over the last 130 000 years: a model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmann, K.; Schneider, B.; Sarnthein, M.

    2016-02-01

    We have developed and employed an Earth system model to explore the forcings of atmospheric pCO2 change and the chemical and isotopic evolution of seawater over the last glacial cycle. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus (DP), reactive nitrogen, molecular oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), 13C-DIC, and 14C-DIC were calculated for 24 ocean boxes. The bi-directional water fluxes between these model boxes were derived from a 3-D circulation field of the modern ocean (Opa 8.2, NEMO) and tuned such that tracer distributions calculated by the box model were consistent with observational data from the modern ocean. To model the last 130 kyr, we employed records of past changes in sea-level, ocean circulation, and dust deposition. According to the model, about half of the glacial pCO2 drawdown may be attributed to marine regressions. The glacial sea-level low-stands implied steepened ocean margins, a reduced burial of particulate organic carbon, phosphorus, and neritic carbonate at the margin seafloor, a decline in benthic denitrification, and enhanced weathering of emerged shelf sediments. In turn, low-stands led to a distinct rise in the standing stocks of DIC, TA, and nutrients in the global ocean, promoted the glacial sequestration of atmospheric CO2 in the ocean, and added 13C- and 14C-depleted DIC to the ocean as recorded in benthic foraminifera signals. The other half of the glacial drop in pCO2 was linked to inferred shoaling of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and more efficient utilization of nutrients in the Southern Ocean. The diminished ventilation of deep water in the glacial Atlantic and Southern Ocean led to significant 14C depletions with respect to the atmosphere. According to our model, the deglacial rapid and stepwise rise in atmospheric pCO2 was induced by upwelling both in the Southern Ocean and subarctic North Pacific and promoted by a drop in nutrient utilization in the Southern Ocean. The deglacial sea

  5. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Instead of computing a large number of coarsely zoned hydrodynamic models covering the entire atmospheric instability strip, the author computed a single model as well as computer limitations allow. The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks was modified to include radiative transfer effects in optically thin zones.

  6. Dynamic term structure models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller; Meldrum, Andrew

    This paper studies whether dynamic term structure models for US nominal bond yields should enforce the zero lower bound by a quadratic policy rate or a shadow rate specification. We address the question by estimating quadratic term structure models (QTSMs) and shadow rate models with at most four...

  7. Key features of the IPSL ocean atmosphere model and its sensitivity to atmospheric resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marti, Olivier; Braconnot, P.; Bellier, J.; Brockmann, P.; Caubel, A.; Noblet, N. de; Friedlingstein, P.; Idelkadi, A.; Kageyama, M. [Unite Mixte CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, IPSL/LSCE, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Dufresne, J.L.; Bony, S.; Codron, F.; Fairhead, L.; Grandpeix, J.Y.; Hourdin, F.; Musat, I. [Unite Mixte CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique-ENS-UPCM, IPSL/LMD, Paris Cedex 05 (France); Benshila, R.; Guilyardi, E.; Levy, C.; Madec, G.; Mignot, J.; Talandier, C. [unite mixte CNRS-IRD-UPMC, IPLS/LOCEAN, Paris Cedex 05 (France); Cadule, P.; Denvil, S.; Foujols, M.A. [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace des Sciences de l' Environnement (IPSL), Paris Cedex 05 (France); Fichefet, T.; Goosse, H. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Institut d' Astronomie et de Geophysique Georges Lemaitre, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Krinner, G. [Unite mixte CNRS-UJF Grenoble, LGGE, BP96, Saint-Martin-d' Heres (France); Swingedouw, D. [CNRS/CERFACS, Toulouse (France)

    2010-01-15

    This paper presents the major characteristics of the Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL) coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. The model components and the coupling methodology are described, as well as the main characteristics of the climatology and interannual variability. The model results of the standard version used for IPCC climate projections, and for intercomparison projects like the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP 2) are compared to those with a higher resolution in the atmosphere. A focus on the North Atlantic and on the tropics is used to address the impact of the atmosphere resolution on processes and feedbacks. In the North Atlantic, the resolution change leads to an improved representation of the storm-tracks and the North Atlantic oscillation. The better representation of the wind structure increases the northward salt transports, the deep-water formation and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. In the tropics, the ocean-atmosphere dynamical coupling, or Bjerknes feedback, improves with the resolution. The amplitude of ENSO (El Nino-Southern oscillation) consequently increases, as the damping processes are left unchanged. (orig.)

  8. Coupled atmosphere-wildland fire modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Henri Balbi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Simulating the interaction between fire and atmosphere is critical to the estimation of the rate of spread of the fire. Wildfire’s convection (i.e., entire plume can modify the local meteorology throughout the atmospheric boundary layer and consequently affect the fire propagation speed and behaviour. In this study, we use for the first time the Méso-NH meso-scale numerical model coupled to the point functional ForeFire simplified physical front-tracking wildfire model to investigate the differences introduced by the atmospheric feedback in propagation speed and behaviour. Both numerical models have been developed as research tools for operational models and are currently used to forecast localized extreme events. These models have been selected because they can be run coupled and support decisions in wildfire management in France and Europe. The main originalities of this combination reside in the fact that Méso-NH is run in a Large Eddy Simulation (LES configuration and that the rate of spread model used in ForeFire provides a physical formulation to take into account the effect of wind and slope. Simulations of typical experimental configurations show that the numerical atmospheric model is able to reproduce plausible convective effects of the heat produced by the fire. Numerical results are comparable to estimated values for fire-induced winds and present behaviour similar to other existing numerical approaches.

  9. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, David P.; Ces, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchy of line-by-line, narrow-band, and broadband infrared radiation models are discussed for ozone, a radiatively important atmospheric trace gas. It is shown that the narrow-band (Malkmus) model is in near-precise agreement with the line-by-line model, thus providing a means of testing narrow-band Curtis-Godson scaling, and it is found that this scaling procedure leads to errors in atmospheric fluxes of up to 10 percent. Moreover, this is a direct consequence of the altitude dependence of the ozone mixing ratio. Somewhat greater flux errors arise with use of the broadband model, due to both a lesser accuracy of the broadband scaling procedure and to inherent errors within the broadband model, despite the fact that this model has been tuned to the line-by-line model.

  10. A sustained oscillation in a toy-model of the coupled atmosphere-ocean system

    CERN Document Server

    Bothe, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Interaction between atmospheric mid-latitude flow and wind-driven ocean circulation is studied coupling two idealized low-order spectral models. The barotropic Charney-DeVore model with three components simulates a bimodal mid-latitude atmospheric circulation in a channel with two stable flow patterns induced by topography. The wind-driven ocean double gyre circulation in a square basin (of half the channel length) is modeled by an equivalent barotropic formulation of the Veronis model with 21 components, which captures Rossby-wave dynamics and nonlinear decadal variability. When coupled, the atmosphere forces the ocean by wind-stress while, simultaneously, the ocean affects the atmosphere by thermal forcing in terms of a vorticity source. Coupled atmosphere-ocean simulations show two stable flow patterns associated with the topographically induced atmospheric bimodality and a sustained oscillation due to interaction between atmospheric bimodality and oceanic Rossby dynamics. The oscillation is of inter-annua...

  11. The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title, Alan M.; AIA Team

    2006-06-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on SDO will provide revolutionary coverage of the entire visible solar hemisphere, observed from photospheric to coronal temperatures, at 1-arcsecond resolution, with a characteristic cadence of 10 seconds for each channel. The AIA comprises four dual normal-incidence telescopes that enable it to cycle through a set of EUV channels centered on strong emission lines of iron (ranging from Fe IX through XXIII) and helium (304A), plus two UV channels near 1600A and a broad band visible channel. Combined with the (vector-)magnetic imagery from SDO/HMI, the AIA observations will significantly further our understanding of the dynamics of the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere and heliosphere, both in quiescent and eruptive stages. The comprehensive thermal coverage of the corona will open new avenues of study for coronal energetics and seismology, which will benefit from the excellent calibration against the SDO/EVE spectral irradiance measurements. The AIA data will be easily accessible on the web, with a time delay that is expected to be of the order of 15 minutes to 1 hour. Users will be able to browse the data through summary web pages that are complemented by a comprehensive metadata catalog. Data analysis will be supported through the freely available SolarSoft libraries and through modules in a flexible, evolving pipeline data analysis system to be operated at the AIA-HMI Joint Science Operations Center. We plan to incorporate feature recognition software, automated movie making, coronal field modeling, and other supporting analysis software. We invite the broad ILWS community to contact us with ideas to collaborate on any aspect of the AIA Investigation. Details on the AIA instrument, the Science Investigation, and related news can be found at http://aia.lmsal.com.

  12. Atmospheric neutrino flux calculation using the NRLMSISE00 atmospheric model

    CERN Document Server

    Honda, M; Kajita, T; Kasahara, K; Midorikawa, S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we extend the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux~\\cite{hkkm2004,hkkms2006,hkkm2011} to the sites in polar and tropical regions. In our earliest full 3D-calculation~\\cite{hkkm2004}, we used DPMJET-III~\\cite{dpm} for the hadronic interaction model above 5~GeV, and NUCRIN~\\cite{nucrin} below 5~GeV. We modified DPMJET-III as in Ref.~\\cite{hkkms2006} to reproduce the experimental muon spectra better, mainly using the data observed by BESS group~\\cite{BESSTeVpHemu}. In a recent work~\\cite{hkkm2011}, we introduced JAM interaction model for the low energy hadronic interactions. JAM is a nuclear interaction model developed with PHITS (Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System)~\\cite{phits}. In Ref.~\\cite{hkkm2011}, we could reproduce the observed muon flux at the low energies at balloon altitude with DPMJET-III above 32 GeV and JAM below that better than the combination of DPMJET-III above 5~GeV and NUCRIN below that. Besides the interaction model, we have also improved the calculation sche...

  13. The implementation of a MiXed Layer model (MXL, v1.0) for the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer in the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, R. H. H.; Pozzer, A.

    2014-10-01

    We present a new submodel for the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy): the MiXed Layer (MXL) model for the diurnal dynamics of the convective boundary layer, including explicit representations of entrainment and surface fluxes. Through the MESSy interface, MXL is coupled with modules that represent other processes relevant to chemistry in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In combination, these provide a computationally inexpensive tool that is ideally suited for the analysis of field data, for evaluating new parametrizations for 3-D models, and for performing systematic sensitivity analyses. A case study for the DOMINO campaign in Southern Spain is shown to demonstrate the use and performance of MXL/MESSy in reproducing and analysing field observations.

  14. Coupling approaches used in atmospheric entry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, M. I.

    2012-09-01

    While a planet orbits the Sun, it is subject to impact by smaller objects, ranging from tiny dust particles and space debris to much larger asteroids and comets. Such collisions have taken place frequently over geological time and played an important role in the evolution of planets and the development of life on the Earth. Though the search for near-Earth objects addresses one of the main points of the Asteroid and Comet Hazard, one should not underestimate the useful information to be gleaned from smaller atmospheric encounters, known as meteors or fireballs. Not only do these events help determine the linkages between meteorites and their parent bodies; due to their relative regularity they provide a good statistical basis for analysis. For successful cases with found meteorites, the detailed atmospheric path record is an excellent tool to test and improve existing entry models assuring the robustness of their implementation. There are many more important scientific questions meteoroids help us to answer, among them: Where do these objects come from, what are their origins, physical properties and chemical composition? What are the shapes and bulk densities of the space objects which fully ablate in an atmosphere and do not reach the planetary surface? Which values are directly measured and which are initially assumed as input to various models? How to couple both fragmentation and ablation effects in the model, taking real size distribution of fragments into account? How to specify and speed up the recovery of a recently fallen meteorites, not letting weathering to affect samples too much? How big is the pre-atmospheric projectile to terminal body ratio in terms of their mass/volume? Which exact parameters beside initial mass define this ratio? More generally, how entering object affects Earth's atmosphere and (if applicable) Earth's surface? How to predict these impact consequences based on atmospheric trajectory data? How to describe atmospheric entry

  15. Models of magnetized neutron star atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V; Werner, K

    2009-01-01

    We present a new computer code for modeling magnetized neutron star atmospheres in a wide range of magnetic fields (10^{12} - 10^{15} G) and effective temperatures (3 \\times 10^5 - 10^7 K). The atmosphere is assumed to consist either of fully ionized electron-ion plasmas or of partially ionized hydrogen. Vacuum resonance and partial mode conversion are taken into account. Any inclination of the magnetic field relative to the stellar surface is allowed. We use modern opacities of fully or partially ionized plasmas in strong magnetic fields and solve the coupled radiative transfer equations for the normal electromagnetic modes in the plasma. Using this code, we study the possibilities to explain the soft X-ray spectra of isolated neutron stars by different atmosphere models. In particular, the outgoing spectrum using the "sandwich" model (thin atmosphere with a hydrogen layer above a helium layer) is constructed. Thin partially ionized hydrogen atmospheres with vacuum polarization are shown to be able to improv...

  16. Modelling Saturn's atmospheric circulations and cloud structure with OPUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchowski, L. C.; Read, P. L.; Yamazaki, Y. H.

    2009-04-01

    We are investigating Saturn's atmospheric circulations and cloud structure in the Northern and Southern hemisphere as initial value problems by use of the Oxford Planetary Unified model System (OPUS), a sophisticated GCM based on the UK Met Office Unified Model. Solving an extended form of the Hydrodynamic Primitive Equations, OPUS is capable of including 40 vertical levels from 0.1 bar to 100 bar. The model was initiated with temperature and balanced thermal wind profiles recently obtained by Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS). A simple cloud scheme for the Jovian planets has been added to OPUS and is employed to model the three major cloud decks (ammonia, ammonium-hydrosulfide and water) on Saturn and the advection of these clouds with the atmosphere. We have already conducted several numerical studies with OPUS, simulating jet scale meridional circulations, the formation of cloud bands and discrete turbulent features on Jupiter. By modelling the dynamics and clouds of Saturn in a similar way, we are hoping to gain further insight into the formation of circulation cells over the zonal jet streams as well as to examine the distribution of atmospheric condensates in response to these motions. The model will also be used to numerically investigate the characteristic features in Saturn's Northern hemisphere. It is envisioned to directly compare the atmospheric configurations obtained for Saturn with previous results from the Jupiter model.

  17. Modeling Planetary Atmospheric Energy Deposition By Energetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Gronoff, Guillaume; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    The structure, dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary upper atmospheres are in large part determined by the available sources of energy. In addition to the solar EUV flux, the solar wind and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are also important sources. Both of these particle populations can significantly affect an atmosphere, causing atmospheric loss and driving chemical reactions. Attention has been paid to these sources from the standpoint of the radiation environment for humans and electronics, but little work has been done to evaluate their impact on planetary atmospheres. At unmagnetized planets or those with crustal field anomalies, in particular, the solar wind and SEPs of all energies have direct access to the atmosphere and so provide a more substantial energy source than at planets having protective global magnetic fields. Additionally, solar wind and energetic particle fluxes should be more significant for planets orbiting more active stars, such as is the case in the early history of the solar system for paleo-Venus and Mars. Therefore quantification of the atmospheric energy input from the solar wind and SEP events is an important component of our understanding of the processes that control their state and evolution. We have applied a full Lorentz motion particle transport model to study the effects of particle precipitation in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Such modeling has been previously done for Earth and Mars using a guiding center precipitation model. Currently, this code is only valid for particles with small gyroradii in strong uniform magnetic fields. There is a clear necessity for a Lorentz formulation, hence, a systematic study of the ionization, excitation, and energy deposition has been conducted, including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons). The result is a robust examination of the influence of energetic ion transport on the Venus and Mars upper atmosphere which

  18. Atmospheric Circulation on Hot Jupiters: Modeling and Observable Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Emily Christine

    2010-12-01

    Hot Jupiters are unlike any planets in our Solar System and yet one of the most common types of extrasolar planet discovered. These gas giants orbit their parent stars with periods of a few days. Expected to be tidally locked into synchronous rotation, hot Jupiters experience intense, asymmetric heating from stellar irradiation, such that day-night temperature contrasts could reach hundreds of degrees Kelvin. This unique state of radiative forcing, as well as the slow rotation rates of these planets, places hot Jupiters within a new regime of atmospheric circulation. Hot Jupiters have also been the first type of extrasolar planet with direct detections of their atmospheres, through measurements of emitted, reflected, and transmitted light. This thesis investigates observational methods to distinguish between various atmospheric models, observational signatures of potential atmospheric variability, and presents a three dimensional model with which to study hot Jupiter circulation patterns. First, we find that eclipse mapping is a technique that can be used to image the day sides of these planets and although this is beyond the ability of current instruments, it will be achievable with future missions, such as the James Webb Space Telescope. Second, we consider the signatures of large-scale atmospheric variability in measurements of secondary eclipses and thermal orbital phase curves. For various models we predict the amount of variation in eclipse depth, and the amplitudes and detailed shapes of phase curves. Lastly, we develop a three-dimensional model of hot Jupiter atmospheric dynamics with simplified forcing and adopt a set-up nearly identical to work by another group to facilitate code inter-comparison. Our results are broadly consistent with theirs, with a transonic flow and the hottest region of the atmosphere advected eastward of the substellar point. However, we note important differences and identify areas of concern for future modeling efforts.

  19. Evidence of coupling in ocean-atmosphere dynamics over the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane; Ghil, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The investigation of low-frequency variability (LFV) in the mid-latitude atmosphere, for instance of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), is currently attracting considerable interest. One of the main reasons is LFV's potential to enable predictions beyond the generally accepted upper bound of weather forecasting skill of 10-15 days in mid-latitudes. To understand the development of the LFV in the atmosphere, it is necessary to clarify how it interacts with the other components of the climate system, in particular the ocean. The usual strategy to clarify the coupling between the ocean and the atmosphere is to analyze the one-way sensitivity of either component to forcing by the other. In the present work, we adopt a different strategy by investigating the projections of atmospheric and oceanic fields, based on reanalysis datasets, onto a reduced phase space. The latter ocean-atmosphere subspace is dynamically defined here by relying on the leading modes of the Vannitsem et al. (2015) idealized low-order model. This approach allows one to isolate the dominant modes of the coupled system's observed variability. The coupled projection is then analyzed using multichannel singular spectrum analysis (M-SSA). The results suggest that a dominant low-frequency signal with a 25-30-yr period already mentioned in the literature is a common mode of variability of the atmosphere and the ocean. A new score for evaluating the internal nature of the common variability is then introduced and it confirms the presence of coupled dynamics in the ocean-atmosphere system that includes a significant large-scale atmospheric component. The physical nature of this coupled dynamics is also discussed. Reference Vannitsem S., J. Demaeyer, L. de Cruz, and M. Ghil, Low-frequency variability and heat transport in a low-order nonlinear coupled ocean-atmosphere model, Physica D, 309, 71-85, 2015.

  20. Impacts of Aerosol Shortwave Radiation Absorption on the Dynamics of an Idealized Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde Barbaro, E.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Krol, M.C.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the impact of aerosol heat absorption on convective atmospheric boundary-layer (CBL) dynamics. Numerical experiments using a large-eddy simulation model enabled us to study the changes in the structure of a dry and shearless CBL in depthequilibrium for different vertical profiles of

  1. Discrete dynamical models

    CERN Document Server

    Salinelli, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the analysis of discrete dynamical systems. The content is presented by an unitary approach that blends the perspective of mathematical modeling together with the ones of several discipline as Mathematical Analysis, Linear Algebra, Numerical Analysis, Systems Theory and Probability. After a preliminary discussion of several models, the main tools for the study of linear and non-linear scalar dynamical systems are presented, paying particular attention to the stability analysis. Linear difference equations are studied in detail and an elementary introduction of Z and Discrete Fourier Transform is presented. A whole chapter is devoted to the study of bifurcations and chaotic dynamics. One-step vector-valued dynamical systems are the subject of three chapters, where the reader can find the applications to positive systems, Markov chains, networks and search engines. The book is addressed mainly to students in Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Economic...

  2. Global Deep Convection Models of Saturn's Atmospheric Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Cuff, Keith; Gastine, Thomas; Wicht, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini mission, along with previous missions and ground-based observations, has revealed a rich variety of atmospheric phenomena and time variability on Saturn. Some examples of dynamical features are: zonal flows with multiple jet streams, turbulent tilted shear flows that seem to power the jets, the north polar hexagon, the south polar cyclone, large anticyclones in "storm alley", numerous convective storms (white spots) of various sizes, and the 2010/2011 great storm, which destroyed an array of vortices dubbed the "string of pearls". Here we use the anelastic dynamo code MagIC, in non-magnetic mode, to study rotating convection in a spherical shell. The thickness of the shell is set to approximate the depth of the low electrical conductivity deep atmosphere of Saturn, and the convective forcing is set to yield zonal flows of similar velocity (Rossby number) to those of Saturn. Internal heating and the outer entropy boundary conditions allow simple modelling of atmospheric layers with neutral stability or stable stratification. In these simulations we can identify several saturnian and jovian atmospheric features, with some variations. We find that large anticyclonic vortices tend to form in the first anticyclonic shear zones away from the equatorial jet. Cyclones form at the poles, and polar polygonal jet streams, comparable to Saturn's hexagon, may or may not form, depending on the model conditions. Strings of small scale vortical structures arise as convective plumes near boundaries of shear zones. They typically precede larger scale convective storms that spawn propagating shear flow disturbances and anticyclonic vortices, which tend to drift across anticyclonic shear zones, toward the equator (opposite the drift direction of Saturn's 2010/2011 storm). Our model results indicate that many identifiable dynamical atmospheric features seen on Jupiter and Saturn arise from deep convection, shaped by planetary rotation, underlying and interacting with stably

  3. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar re

  4. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar re

  5. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar

  6. A High-Order Multiscale Global Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Ram

    2016-04-01

    The High-Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME), developed at NCAR, is a petascale hydrostatic framework, which employs the cubed-sphere grid system and high-order continuous or discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods. Recently, the HOMME framework is being extended to a non-hydrostatic dynamical core, named as the "High-Order Multiscale Atmospheric Model (HOMAM)." The spatial discretization is based on DG or high-order finite-volume methods. Orography is handled by the terrain-following height-based coordinate system. To alleviate the stringent CFL stability requirement resulting from the vertical aspects of the dynamics, an operator-splitting time integration scheme based on the horizontally explicit and vertically implicit (HEVI) philosophy is adopted for HOMAM. Preliminary results with the benchmark test cases proposed in the Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison project (DCMIP) test-suite will be presented in the seminar.

  7. Modeling dynamic swarms

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanem, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes the problem of modeling video sequences of dynamic swarms (DSs). We define a DS as a large layout of stochastically repetitive spatial configurations of dynamic objects (swarm elements) whose motions exhibit local spatiotemporal interdependency and stationarity, i.e., the motions are similar in any small spatiotemporal neighborhood. Examples of DS abound in nature, e.g., herds of animals and flocks of birds. To capture the local spatiotemporal properties of the DS, we present a probabilistic model that learns both the spatial layout of swarm elements (based on low-level image segmentation) and their joint dynamics that are modeled as linear transformations. To this end, a spatiotemporal neighborhood is associated with each swarm element, in which local stationarity is enforced both spatially and temporally. We assume that the prior on the swarm dynamics is distributed according to an MRF in both space and time. Embedding this model in a MAP framework, we iterate between learning the spatial layout of the swarm and its dynamics. We learn the swarm transformations using ICM, which iterates between estimating these transformations and updating their distribution in the spatiotemporal neighborhoods. We demonstrate the validity of our method by conducting experiments on real and synthetic video sequences. Real sequences of birds, geese, robot swarms, and pedestrians evaluate the applicability of our model to real world data. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Framework of Distributed Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean-Wave Modeling System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Yuanqiao; HUANG Liwen; DENG Jian; ZHANG Jinfeng; WANG Sisi; WANG Lijun

    2006-01-01

    In order to research the interactions between the atmosphere and ocean as well as their important role in the intensive weather systems of coastal areas, and to improve the forecasting ability of the hazardous weather processes of coastal areas, a coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave modeling system has been developed.The agent-based environment framework for linking models allows flexible and dynamic information exchange between models. For the purpose of flexibility, portability and scalability, the framework of the whole system takes a multi-layer architecture that includes a user interface layer, computational layer and service-enabling layer. The numerical experiment presented in this paper demonstrates the performance of the distributed coupled modeling system.

  9. A Petascale Non-Hydrostatic Atmospheric Dynamical Core in the HOMME Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufo, Henry [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The High-Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME) is a framework for building scalable, conserva- tive atmospheric models for climate simulation and general atmospheric-modeling applications. Its spatial discretizations are based on Spectral-Element (SE) and Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods. These are local methods employing high-order accurate spectral basis-functions that have been shown to perform well on massively parallel supercomputers at any resolution and scale particularly well at high resolutions. HOMME provides the framework upon which the CAM-SE community atmosphere model dynamical-core is constructed. In its current incarnation, CAM-SE employs the hydrostatic primitive-equations (PE) of motion, which limits its resolution to simulations coarser than 0.1 per grid cell. The primary objective of this project is to remove this resolution limitation by providing HOMME with the capabilities needed to build nonhydrostatic models that solve the compressible Euler/Navier-Stokes equations.

  10. Past and future effects of atmospheric deposition on the forest ecosystem at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest: simulations with the dynamic model ForSAFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim Belyazid; Scott Bailey; Harald. Sverdrup

    2010-01-01

    The Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study presents a unique opportunity for studying long-term ecosystem responses to changes in anthropogenic factors. Following industrialisation and the intensification of agriculture, the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) has been subject to increased loads of atmospheric deposition, particularly sulfur and nitrogen. The deposition of...

  11. Seasonal changes in Titan's middle-atmosphere chemistry and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Nixon, C. A.; de Kok, R.; Vinatier, S.; Coustenis, A.; Sefton-Nash, E.; Calcutt, S. B.; Flasar, F. M.

    2013-09-01

    Titan is the largest satellite of Saturn and is the only moon in our solar system with a significant atmo- sphere. Titan's middle-atmosphere (stratosphere and mesosphere) circulation usually comprises a single hemisphere to hemisphere meridional circulation cell, with upwelling air in the summer hemisphere and sub- siding air at the winter pole with an associated winter polar vortex. Titan has an axial tilt (obliquity) of 26.7°, so during its 29.5 Earth year annual cycle pronounced seasonal effects are encountered as the relative solar insolation in each hemisphere changes. The most dramatic of these changes is the reversal in global meridional circulation as the peak solar heating switches hemispheres after an equinox. Titan's northern spring equinox occurred in August 2009, and since then many middle-atmosphere changes have been observed by Cassini that were previously impossible to study (1,2,3,4). Here we present a detailed analysis of the post equinox changes in middle-atmosphere temperature and composition measured with Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS), use these to infer changes in atmospheric circulation, and explore implications for atmospheric photochemical and dynamical processes. Our results show that the meridional circulation has now reversed (1).

  12. Dynamic causal modelling revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, K J; Preller, Katrin H; Mathys, Chris; Cagnan, Hayriye; Heinzle, Jakob; Razi, Adeel; Zeidman, Peter

    2017-02-17

    This paper revisits the dynamic causal modelling of fMRI timeseries by replacing the usual (Taylor) approximation to neuronal dynamics with a neural mass model of the canonical microcircuit. This provides a generative or dynamic causal model of laminar specific responses that can generate haemodynamic and electrophysiological measurements. In principle, this allows the fusion of haemodynamic and (event related or induced) electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, it enables Bayesian model comparison of competing hypotheses about physiologically plausible synaptic effects; for example, does attentional modulation act on superficial or deep pyramidal cells - or both? In this technical note, we describe the resulting dynamic causal model and provide an illustrative application to the attention to visual motion dataset used in previous papers. Our focus here is on how to answer long-standing questions in fMRI; for example, do haemodynamic responses reflect extrinsic (afferent) input from distant cortical regions, or do they reflect intrinsic (recurrent) neuronal activity? To what extent do inhibitory interneurons contribute to neurovascular coupling? What is the relationship between haemodynamic responses and the frequency of induced neuronal activity? This paper does not pretend to answer these questions; rather it shows how they can be addressed using neural mass models of fMRI timeseries. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Models of ash-laden intrusions in a stratified atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Andrew; Johnson, Chris; Sparks, Steve; Huppert, Herbert; Woodhouse, Mark; Phillips, Jeremy

    2013-04-01

    Recent volcanic eruptions and the associated dispersion of ash through the atmosphere have led to widespread closures of airspace, for example the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajokull and 2011 eruption of Puyehue-Cordón Caulle. These episodes bring into sharp focus the need to predict quantitatively the transport and deposition of fine ash and in particular, its interaction with atmospheric wind. Many models of this process are based upon capturing the physics of advection with the wind, turbulence-induced diffusion and gravitational settling. Buoyancy-induced processes, associated with the density of the ash cloud and the background stratification of the atmosphere, are neglected and it is this issue that we address in this contribution. In particular, we suggest that the buoyancy-induced motion may account for the relatively thin distal ash layers that have been observed in the atmosphere and their relatively weak cross-wind spreading. We formulate a new model for buoyancy-driven spreading in the atmosphere in which we treat the evolving ash layer as relatively shallow so that its motion is predominantly horizontal and the pressure locally hydrostatic. The motion is driven by horizontal pressure gradients along with interfacial drag between the flowing ash layer and the surrounding atmosphere. Ash-laden fluid is delivered to this intrusion from a plume source and has risen through the atmosphere to its height of neutral buoyancy. The ash particles are then transported horizontally by the intrusion and progressively settle out of it to sediment through the atmosphere and form the deposit on the ground. This model is integrated numerically and analysed asymptotically in various regimes, including scenarios in which the atmosphere is quiescent and in which there is a sustained wind. The results yield predictions for the variation of the thickness of the intrusion with distance from the source and for how the concentration of ash is reduced due to settling. They

  14. Dynamical Modeling of Mars' Paleoclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mark I.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes work undertaken under a one-year grant from the NASA Mars Fundamental Research Program. The goal of the project was to initiate studies of the response of the Martian climate to changes in planetary obliquity and orbital elements. This work was undertaken with a three-dimensional numerical climate model based on the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Skyhi General Circulation Model (GCM). The Mars GCM code was adapted to simulate various obliquity and orbital parameter states. Using a version of the model with a basic water cycle (ice caps, vapor, and clouds), we examined changes in atmospheric water abundances and in the distribution of water ice sheets on the surface. This work resulted in a paper published in the Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets. In addition, the project saw the initial incorporation of a regolith water transport and storage scheme into the model. This scheme allows for interaction between water in the pores of the near subsurface (<3m) and the atmosphere. This work was not complete by the end of the one-year grant, but is now continuing within the auspices of a three-year grant of the same title awarded by the Mars Fundamental Research Program in late 2003.

  15. Global Atmospheric Models for Cosmic Ray Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Will, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of atmospheric parameters -- such as temperature, pressure, and humidity -- is very important for a proper reconstruction of air showers, especially with the fluorescence technique. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) provides altitude-dependent profiles of these state variables of the atmosphere and several more. Every three hours, a new data set on 23 constant pressure level plus an additional surface values is available for the entire globe. These GDAS data are now used in the standard air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The validity of the data was verified by comparisons with monthly models that were averaged from on-site meteorological radio soundings and weather station measurements obtained at the Observatory in Malarg\\"ue. Comparisons of reconstructions using the GDAS data and the monthly models are also presented. Since GDAS is a global model, the data can potentially be used for other cosmic and gamma ray detectors. Several studies were already performed ...

  16. Dynamic responses of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration to global temperature changes between 1850 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weile; Nemani, Ramakrishna

    2016-02-01

    Changes in Earth's temperature have significant impacts on the global carbon cycle that vary at different time scales, yet to quantify such impacts with a simple scheme is traditionally deemed difficult. Here, we show that, by incorporating a temperature sensitivity parameter (1.64 ppm yr-1 °C-1) into a simple linear carbon-cycle model, we can accurately characterize the dynamic responses of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration to anthropogenic carbon emissions and global temperature changes between 1850 and 2010 ( r 2 > 0.96 and the root-mean-square error reservoir (~12 year) approximates the long-term temperature sensitivity of global atmospheric CO2 concentration (~15 ppm °C-1), generally consistent with previous estimates based on reconstructed CO2 and climate records over the Little Ice Age. Our results suggest that recent increases in global surface temperatures, which accelerate the release of carbon from the surface reservoirs into the atmosphere, have partially offset surface carbon uptakes enhanced by the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and slowed the net rate of atmospheric CO2 sequestration by global land and oceans by ~30% since the 1960s. The linear modeling framework outlined in this paper thus provides a useful tool to diagnose the observed atmospheric CO2 dynamics and monitor their future changes.

  17. Models of magnetized neutron star atmospheres: thin atmospheres and partially ionized hydrogen atmospheres with vacuum polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V F; Werner, K

    2009-01-01

    Observed X-ray spectra of some isolated magnetized neutron stars display absorption features, sometimes interpreted as ion cyclotron lines. Modeling the observed spectra is necessary to check this hypothesis and to evaluate neutron star parameters.We develop a computer code for modeling magnetized neutron star atmospheres in a wide range of magnetic fields (10^{12} - 10^{15} G) and effective temperatures (3 \\times 10^5 - 10^7 K). Using this code, we study the possibilities to explain the soft X-ray spectra of isolated neutron stars by different atmosphere models. The atmosphere is assumed to consist either of fully ionized electron-ion plasmas or of partially ionized hydrogen. Vacuum resonance and partial mode conversion are taken into account. Any inclination of the magnetic field relative to the stellar surface is allowed. We use modern opacities of fully or partially ionized plasmas in strong magnetic fields and solve the coupled radiative transfer equations for the normal electromagnetic modes in the plas...

  18. Consistency Problem with Tracer Advection in the Atmospheric Model GAMIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Kai; WAN Hui; WANG Bin; ZHANG Meigen

    2008-01-01

    The radon transport test,which is a widely used test case for atmospheric transport models,is carried out to evaluate the tracer advection schemes in the Grid-Point Atmospheric Model of IAP-LASG (GAMIL).TWO of the three available schemes in the model are found to be associated with significant biases in the polar regions and in the upper part of the atmosphere,which implies potentially large errors in the simulation of ozone-like tracers.Theoretical analyses show that inconsistency exists between the advection schemes and the discrete continuity equation in the dynamical core of GAMIL and consequently leads to spurious sources and sinks in the tracer transport equation.The impact of this type of inconsistency is demonstrated by idealized tests and identified as the cause of the aforementioned biases.Other potential effects of this inconsistency are also discussed.Results of this study provide some hints for choosing suitable advection schemes in the GAMIL model.At least for the polar-region-concentrated atmospheric components and the closely correlated chemical species,the Flux-Form Semi-Lagrangian advection scheme produces more reasonable simulations of the large-scale transport processes without significantly increasing the computational expense.

  19. Tropical Pacific internal atmospheric dynamics and resolution in a coupled GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Hosmay; Kirtman, Ben P.

    2015-01-01

    A noise reduction technique, namely the interactive ensemble (IE) approach is adopted to reduce noise at the air-sea interface due to internal atmospheric dynamics in a state-of-the-art coupled general circulation model (CGCM). The IE technique uses multiple realization of atmospheric general circulation models coupled to a single ocean general circulation model. The ensembles mean fluxes from the atmospheric simulations are communicated to the ocean component. Each atmospheric simulation receives the same SST coming from the ocean component. The only difference among the atmospheric simulations comes from perturbed initial conditions, thus the atmospheric states are, in principle synoptically independent. The IE technique can be used to better understand the importance of weather noise forcing of natural variability such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). To study the impact of weather noise and resolution in the context of a CGCM, two IE experiments are performed at different resolutions. Atmospheric resolution is an important issue since the noise statistics will depend on the spatial scales resolved. A simple formulation to extract atmospheric internal variability is presented. The results are compared to their respective control cases where internal atmospheric variability is left unchanged. The noise reduction has a major impact on the coupled simulation and the magnitude of this effect strongly depends on the horizontal resolution of the atmospheric component model. Specifically, applying the noise reduction technique reduces the overall climate variability more effectively at higher resolution. This suggests that "weather noise" is more important in sustaining climate variability as resolution increases. ENSO statistics, dynamics, and phase asymmetry are all modified by the noise reduction, in particular ENSO becomes more regular with less phase asymmetry when noise is reduced. All these effects are more marked for the higher resolution case. In

  20. THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. WILLIAMS [and others

    1999-08-01

    The LANL atmospheric transport and diffusion models are composed of two state-of-the-art computer codes. The first is an atmospheric wind model called HOThlAC, Higher Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric circulations. HOTMAC generates wind and turbulence fields by solving a set of atmospheric dynamic equations. The second is an atmospheric diffusion model called RAPTAD, Random Particle Transport And Diffusion. RAPTAD uses the wind and turbulence output from HOTMAC to compute particle trajectories and concentration at any location downwind from a source. Both of these models, originally developed as research codes on supercomputers, have been modified to run on microcomputers. Because the capability of microcomputers is advancing so rapidly, the expectation is that they will eventually become as good as today's supercomputers. Now both models are run on desktop or deskside computers, such as an IBM PC/AT with an Opus Pm 350-32 bit coprocessor board and a SUN workstation. Codes have also been modified so that high level graphics, NCAR Graphics, of the output from both models are displayed on the desktop computer monitors and plotted on a laser printer. Two programs, HOTPLT and RAPLOT, produce wind vector plots of the output from HOTMAC and particle trajectory plots of the output from RAPTAD, respectively. A third CONPLT provides concentration contour plots. Section II describes step-by-step operational procedures, specifically for a SUN-4 desk side computer, on how to run main programs HOTMAC and RAPTAD, and graphics programs to display the results. Governing equations, boundary conditions and initial values of HOTMAC and RAPTAD are discussed in Section III. Finite-difference representations of the governing equations, numerical solution procedures, and a grid system are given in Section IV.

  1. Corruption dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malafeyev, O. A.; Nemnyugin, S. A.; Rylow, D.; Kolpak, E. P.; Awasthi, Achal

    2017-07-01

    The corruption dynamics is analyzed by means of the lattice model which is similar to the three-dimensional Ising model. Agents placed at nodes of the corrupt network periodically choose to perfom or not to perform the act of corruption at gain or loss while making decisions based on the process history. The gain value and its dynamics are defined by means of the Markov stochastic process modelling with parameters established in accordance with the influence of external and individual factors on the agent's gain. The model is formulated algorithmically and is studied by means of the computer simulation. Numerical results are obtained which demonstrate asymptotic behaviour of the corruption network under various conditions.

  2. Dynamic Systems Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Dan ŞANDOR

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available System Dynamics was introduced by Jay W. Forrester in the 1960s. Since then the methodology was adopted in many areas of natural or social sciences. This article tries to present briefly how this methodology works, both as Systems Thinking and as Modelling with Vensim computer software.

  3. A Global Atmospheric Model of Meteoric Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wuhu; Marsh, Daniel R.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Janches, Diego; Hoffner, Josef; Yi, Fan; Plane, John M. C.

    2013-01-01

    The first global model of meteoric iron in the atmosphere (WACCM-Fe) has been developed by combining three components: the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), a description of the neutral and ion-molecule chemistry of iron in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), and a treatment of the injection of meteoric constituents into the atmosphere. The iron chemistry treats seven neutral and four ionized iron containing species with 30 neutral and ion-molecule reactions. The meteoric input function (MIF), which describes the injection of Fe as a function of height, latitude, and day, is precalculated from an astronomical model coupled to a chemical meteoric ablation model (CABMOD). This newly developed WACCM-Fe model has been evaluated against a number of available ground-based lidar observations and performs well in simulating the mesospheric atomic Fe layer. The model reproduces the strong positive correlation of temperature and Fe density around the Fe layer peak and the large anticorrelation around 100 km. The diurnal tide has a significant effect in the middle of the layer, and the model also captures well the observed seasonal variations. However, the model overestimates the peak Fe+ concentration compared with the limited rocket-borne mass spectrometer data available, although good agreement on the ion layer underside can be obtained by adjusting the rate coefficients for dissociative recombination of Fe-molecular ions with electrons. Sensitivity experiments with the same chemistry in a 1-D model are used to highlight significant remaining uncertainties in reaction rate coefficients, and to explore the dependence of the total Fe abundance on the MIF and rate of vertical transport.

  4. Dynamic modelling of windmills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akhmatov, Vladislav; Knudsen, Hans

    1999-01-01

    An empirical dynamic model of windmills is set up based on analysis of measured Fourier spectra of the active electric power from a wind farm. The model is based on the assumption that eigenswings of the mechanical construction of the windmills excited by the phenomenon of vortex tower interaction...... will be transferred through the shaft to the electrical generator and result in disturbances of the active electric power supplied by the windmills. The results of the model are found to be in agreement with measurements in the frequency range of the model that is from 0.1 to 10 Hz....

  5. Toward GEOS-6, A Global Cloud System Resolving Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, William M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is committed to observing and understanding the weather and climate of our home planet through the use of multi-scale modeling systems and space-based observations. Global climate models have evolved to take advantage of the influx of multi- and many-core computing technologies and the availability of large clusters of multi-core microprocessors. GEOS-6 is a next-generation cloud system resolving atmospheric model that will place NASA at the forefront of scientific exploration of our atmosphere and climate. Model simulations with GEOS-6 will produce a realistic representation of our atmosphere on the scale of typical satellite observations, bringing a visual comprehension of model results to a new level among the climate enthusiasts. In preparation for GEOS-6, the agency's flagship Earth System Modeling Framework [JDl] has been enhanced to support cutting-edge high-resolution global climate and weather simulations. Improvements include a cubed-sphere grid that exposes parallelism; a non-hydrostatic finite volume dynamical core, and algorithm designed for co-processor technologies, among others. GEOS-6 represents a fundamental advancement in the capability of global Earth system models. The ability to directly compare global simulations at the resolution of spaceborne satellite images will lead to algorithm improvements and better utilization of space-based observations within the GOES data assimilation system

  6. Towards an energy-conserving quasi-hydrostatic deep-atmosphere dynamical core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tort, Marine; Dubos, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Towards an energy-conserving quasi-hydrostatic deep-atmosphere dynamical core Marine Tort1 & Thomas Dubos1 1 Laboratoire Météorologique Dynamique, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, FRANCE Atmosphere dynamics of our planet is quite well described by traditional primitive equations based on the so-called shallow-atmosphere approximation. Thus, the model is dynamically consistent (in the sense that it possesses conservation principles for mass, energy, potential vorticity and angular momentum) when certain metric terms and the cosφ Coriolis terms are neglected (Phillips, 1966). Nevertheless, to simulate planetary atmospheres, the shallow-atmosphere approximation should be relaxed because of the low planet radius (such as Titan) or the depth of their atmospheres (such as Jupiter or Saturne). Non-traditional terms have some dynamical effects (Gerkema and al., 2008) but they are little-known and rarely integrated into general circulation dynamical cores (Wood and Staniforth, 2002). As an example, the french GCM of the Laboratoire Météorologique Dynamique (LMD-Z) integrates the traditional primitive equations discretized from their curl (vector-invariant) form based on a finite different scheme whose conserves exactly potential vorticity (Sadourny, 1975a,b). We considered an orthogonal curvilinear system and we first derived a curl form of global, deep-atmosphere quasi-hydrostatic model in which prognostic variable is absolute axial momentum instead of relative velocity vector. Given the close relationship between the curl form and Hamiltonian formulation of the previous equations, we generalized Sadourny's energy-conserving formulation by discretizing the Poisson bracket and the energy themselves (Salmon, 1983; Gassmann, 2013). The substantial computing infrastructure of the dynamical core is the same but the modification of the hydrostatic balance requires a mass-based vertical coordinate (Wood and Staniforth, 2003). The new discretization has been implemented into

  7. Dynamic Network Models

    CERN Document Server

    Armbruster, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze random networks that change over time. First we analyze a dynamic Erdos-Renyi model, whose edges change over time. We describe its stationary distribution, its convergence thereto, and the SI contact process on the network, which has relevance for connectivity and the spread of infections. Second, we analyze the effect of node turnover, when nodes enter and leave the network, which has relevance for network models incorporating births, deaths, aging, and other demographic factors.

  8. Dynamical framework with blocking topography coordinates for atmospheric GCM and its validation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhaohui; ZHANG Ming; LIANG Danqing; WANG Aihui; ZHANG Dongling; ZENG Qingcun

    2003-01-01

    The dynamical framework with Blocking Topography Coordinates (hereafter, BTC), which is suited to handle the steep topography for the atmospheric general circulation models, is presented in this paper, together with its validation results. The integral properties of both the differential and finite-difference equations for the BTC dynamical core are: gross mass conservation, quadratic conservation for advection terms, Coriolis force does not change the kinetic energy, conservation of total available energy. The improved nonlinear iteration scheme is utilized for the time-integration. The energy conservation for BTC dynamical core is validated by using the integration results from 9-layer and 21-layer version respectively. Comparison results show that, the changes of the kinetic energy and total available potential energy during the integration are quite close for both the BTC dynamical framework and the dynamical framework of IAP 9-level and IAP 21-level AGCM, and this may suggest that the BTC dynamical core can be used for long-term integration with good computational stability. Furthermore, the BTC dynamical core has the advantage over the terrain following (sigma) coordinates in its better representation of the influence of the large-scale topography on the atmospheric general circulation. Finally, the correctness and reasonableness of the BTC dynamical core has been further proved by the numerical simulation of the topography influence on the quasi-stationary planetary wave with 21-layer version of BTC dynamical framework.

  9. Parallel computing in atmospheric chemistry models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.

    1996-02-01

    Studies of atmospheric chemistry are of high scientific interest, involve computations that are complex and intense, and require enormous amounts of I/O. Current supercomputer computational capabilities are limiting the studies of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and will certainly not be able to handle the upcoming coupled chemistry/climate models. To enable such calculations, the authors have developed a computing framework that allows computations on a wide range of computational platforms, including massively parallel machines. Because of the fast paced changes in this field, the modeling framework and scientific modules have been developed to be highly portable and efficient. Here, the authors present the important features of the framework and focus on the atmospheric chemistry module, named IMPACT, and its capabilities. Applications of IMPACT to aircraft studies will be presented.

  10. Modal aerosol dynamics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, E.R.; McMurry, P.H.; Shankar, U.; Binkowski, F.S.

    1991-02-01

    The report presents the governing equations for representing aerosol dynamics, based on several different representations of the aerosol size distribution. Analytical and numerical solution techniques for these governing equations are also reviewed. Described in detail is a computationally efficient numerical technique for simulating aerosol behavior in systems undergoing simultaneous heat transfer, fluid flow, and mass transfer in and between the gas and condensed phases. The technique belongs to a general class of models known as modal aerosol dynamics (MAD) models. These models solve for the temporal and spatial evolution of the particle size distribution function. Computational efficiency is achieved by representing the complete aerosol population as a sum of additive overlapping populations (modes), and solving for the time rate of change of integral moments of each mode. Applications of MAD models for simulating aerosol dynamics in continuous stirred tank aerosol reactors and flow aerosol reactors are provided. For the application to flow aerosol reactors, the discussion is developed in terms of considerations for merging a MAD model with the SIMPLER routine described by Patankar (1980). Considerations for incorporating a MAD model into the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Regional Particulate Model are also described. Numerical and analytical techniques for evaluating the size-space integrals of the modal dynamics equations (MDEs) are described. For multimodal logonormal distributions, an analytical expression for the coagulation integrals of the MDEs, applicable for all size regimes, is derived, and is within 20% of accurate numerical evaluation of the same moment coagulation integrals. A computationally efficient integration technique, based on Gauss-Hermite numerical integration, is also derived.

  11. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lauros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical profile of particle number distribution does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by biosphere.

    Simulation of aerosol concentration inside the atmospheric boundary layer during nucleation days shows highly dynamical picture, where particle formation is coupled with chemistry and turbulent transport. We have demonstrated suitability of our turbulent mixing scheme in reproducing most important characteristics of particle dynamics inside the atmospheric boundary layer. Deposition and particle flux simulations show that deposition affects noticeably only the smallest particles at the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  12. Modelling sea ice dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, Jens; Kleine, Eckhard

    2017-04-01

    Sea ice remains one of the frontiers of ocean modelling and is of vital importance for the correct forecasts of the northern oceans. At large scale, it is commonly considered a continuous medium whose dynamics is modelled in terms of continuum mechanics. Its specifics are a matter of constitutive behaviour which may be characterised as rigid-plastic. The new developed sea ice dynamic module bases on general principles and follows a systematic approach to the problem. Both drift field and stress field are modelled by a variational property. Rigidity is treated by Lagrangian relaxation. Thus one is led to a sensible numerical method. Modelling fast ice remains to be a challenge. It is understood that ridging and the formation of grounded ice keels plays a role in the process. The ice dynamic model includes a parameterisation of the stress associated with grounded ice keels. Shear against the grounded bottom contact might lead to plastic deformation and the loss of integrity. The numerical scheme involves a potentially large system of linear equations which is solved by pre-conditioned iteration. The entire algorithm consists of several components which result from decomposing the problem. The algorithm has been implemented and tested in practice.

  13. Study of atmospheric dynamics and pollution in the coastal area of English Channel using clustering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Anton; Dmitriev, Egor; Delbarre, Hervé; Augustin, Patrick; Gengembre, Cyril; Fourmenten, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The problem of atmospheric contamination by principal air pollutants was considered in the industrialized coastal region of English Channel in Dunkirk influenced by north European metropolitan areas. MESO-NH nested models were used for the simulation of the local atmospheric dynamics and the online calculation of Lagrangian backward trajectories with 15-minute temporal resolution and the horizontal resolution down to 500 m. The one-month mesoscale numerical simulation was coupled with local pollution measurements of volatile organic components, particulate matter, ozone, sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Principal atmospheric pathways were determined by clustering technique applied to backward trajectories simulated. Six clusters were obtained which describe local atmospheric dynamics, four winds blowing through the English Channel, one coming from the south, and the biggest cluster with small wind speeds. This last cluster includes mostly sea breeze events. The analysis of meteorological data and pollution measurements allows relating the principal atmospheric pathways with local air contamination events. It was shown that contamination events are mostly connected with a channelling of pollution from local sources and low-turbulent states of the local atmosphere.

  14. Reaction Profiles and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Cyanide Radical Reactions Relevant to Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinidad Pérez-Rivera, Danilo; Romani, Paul N.; Lopez-Encarnacion, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Titan's atmosphere is arguably the atmosphere of greatest interest that we have an abundance of data for from both ground based and spacecraft observations. As we have learned more about Titan's atmospheric composition, the presence of pre-biotic molecules in its atmosphere has generated more and more fascination about the photochemical process and pathways it its atmosphere. Our computational laboratory has been extensively working throughout the past year characterizing nitrile synthesis reactions, making significant progress on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions of .CN with the hydrocarbons acetylene (C2H2), propylene (CH3CCH), and benzene (C6H6), developing a clear picture of the mechanistic aspects through which these three reactions proceed. Specifically, first principles calculations of the reaction profiles and molecular dynamics studies for gas-phase reactions of .CN and C2H2, .CN and CH3CCH, and .CN and C6H6 have been carried out. A very accurate determination of potential energy surfaces of these reactions will allow us to compute the reaction rates which are indispensable for photochemical modeling of Titan's atmosphere.The work at University of Puerto Rico at Cayey was supported by Puerto Rico NASA EPSCoR IDEAS-ER program (2015-2016) and DTPR was sponsored by the Puerto Rico NASA Space Grant Consortium Fellowship. *E-mail: juan.lopez15@upr.edu

  15. Organic chemistry in the atmosphere. [laboratory modeling of Titan atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.

    1974-01-01

    The existence of an at least moderately complex organic chemistry on Titan is stipulated based on clear evidence of methane, and at least presumptive evidence of hydrogen in its atmosphere. The ratio of methane to hydrogen is the highest of any atmosphere in the solar system. Irradiation of hydrogen/methane mixtures produces aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. A very reasonable hypothesis assumes that the red cloud cover of Titan is made of organic chemicals. Two-carbon hydrocarbons experimentally produced from irradiated mixtures of methane, ammonia, water, and hydrogen bear out the possible organic chemistry of the Titanian environment.

  16. Using observations to evaluate biosphere-atmosphere interactions in models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julia; Konings, Alexandra G.; Alemohammad, Seyed H.; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere interactions influence the hydrologic cycle by altering climate and weather patterns (Charney, 1975; Koster et al., 2006; Seneviratne et al., 2006), contributing up to 30% of precipitation and radiation variability in certain regions (Green et al., 2017). They have been shown to contribute to the persistence of drought in Europe (Seneviratne et al., 2006), as well as to increase rainfall in the Amazon (Spracklen et al., 2012). Thus, a true representation of these feedbacks in Earth System Models (ESMs) is crucial for accurate forecasting and planning. However, it has been difficult to validate the performance of ESMs since often-times surface and atmospheric flux data are scarce and/or difficult to observe. In this study, we use the results of a new global observational study (using remotely sensed solar-induced fluorescence to represent the biosphere flux) (Green et al., 2017) to determine how well a suite of 13 ESMs capture biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks. We perform a Conditional Multivariate Granger Causality analysis in the frequency domain with radiation, precipitation and temperature as atmospheric inputs and GPP as the biospheric input. Performing the analysis in the frequency domain allows for separation of feedbacks at different time-scales (subseasonal, seasonal or interannual). Our findings can be used to determine whether there is agreement between models, as well as, to pinpoint regions or time-scales of model bias or inaccuracy, which will provide insight on potential improvement. We demonstrate that in addition to the well-known problem of convective parameterization over land in models, the main issue in representing feedbacks between the land and the atmosphere is due to the misrepresentation of water stress. These results provide a direct quantitative assessment of feedbacks in models and how to improve them. References: Charney, J.G. Dynamics of deserts and drought in the Sahel. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological

  17. MODA - A hybrid atmospheric pollutant dispersion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favaron, M.; Oliveti Selmi, O. [Servizi Territorio srl, Milan (Italy); Sozzi, R. [Agenzia Regionale Protezione Ambiente (ARPA) Lazio, Rieti (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    MODA is a Gaussian-hybrid atmospheric dispersion model, intended for regulatory applications, and designed to meet the following requirements: ability to operate in complex terrain, standard use of a refined description of turbulence, operational efficiency (in terms of both speed and ease to change simulation parameters), ease of integration in modelling interfaces, output compatibility with the widely-used ISC3. MODA can operate in two modes: a standard mode, in which the pollutant dispersion is treated as Gaussian, and an advanced mode, in which the hybrid relations are used to compute the pollutant concentrations. (orig.)

  18. Dynamics and heat and mass transfer under spreading of liquid-droplet aviation fuel in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, Vladimir; Zharova, Irina; Kozlov, Eugene; Tkachenko, Aleksey

    2014-08-01

    A physical-mathematical model of dynamics and heat and mass transfer during spreading of liquid-droplet aviation fuel in the atmosphere is presented. The optimal emergency discharge height of kerosene for different Russian regions was evaluated based on the proposed mathematical model. The developed model can be used to select the height limit of reset kerosene, guaranteeing complete evaporation of the droplets in the atmosphere to the different aircraft velocities.

  19. Modeling earthquake dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Arthur; Durand, Marilou

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate questions arising in Parsons and Geist (Bull Seismol Soc Am 102:1-11, 2012). Pseudo causal models connecting magnitudes and waiting times are considered, through generalized regression. We do use conditional model (magnitude given previous waiting time, and conversely) as an extension to joint distribution model described in Nikoloulopoulos and Karlis (Environmetrics 19: 251-269, 2008). On the one hand, we fit a Pareto distribution for earthquake magnitudes, where the tail index is a function of waiting time following previous earthquake; on the other hand, waiting times are modeled using a Gamma or a Weibull distribution, where parameters are functions of the magnitude of the previous earthquake. We use those two models, alternatively, to generate the dynamics of earthquake occurrence, and to estimate the probability of occurrence of several earthquakes within a year or a decade.

  20. Airship dynamics modeling: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwen; Nahon, Meyer; Sharf, Inna

    2011-04-01

    The resurgence of airships has created a need for dynamics models and simulation capabilities adapted to these lighter-than-air vehicles. However, the modeling techniques for airship dynamics have lagged behind and are less systematic than those for fixed-wing aircraft. A state-of-the-art literature review is presented on airship dynamics modeling, aiming to provide a comprehensive description of the main problems in this area and a useful source of references for researchers and engineers interested in modern airship applications. The references are categorized according to the major topics in this area: aerodynamics, flight dynamics, incorporation of structural flexibility, incorporation of atmospheric turbulence, and effects of ballonets. Relevant analytical, numerical, and semi-empirical techniques are discussed, with a particular focus on how the main differences between lighter-than-air and heavier-than-air aircraft have been addressed in the modeling. Directions are suggested for future research on each of these topics.

  1. Shockwave and cavitation bubble dynamics of atmospheric air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leela Ch.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The generation and evolution of laser induced shock waves (SWs and the hot core plasma (HCP created by focusing 7 ns, 532 nm laser pulses in ambient air is studied using time resolved shadowgraphic imaging technique. The dynamics of rapidly expanding plasma releasing SWs into the ambient atmosphere were studied for time delays ranging from nanoseconds to milliseconds with ns temporal resolution. The SW is observed to get detached from expanding HCP at around 3μs. Though the SWs were found to expand spherically following the Sedov-Taylor theory, the rapidly expanding HCP shows asymmetric expansion during both the expansion and cooling phase similar to that of inertial cavitation bubble (CB dynamics. The asymmetric expansion of HCP leads to oscillation of the plasma boundary, eventually leading to collapse by forming vortices formed by the interaction of ambient air.

  2. Model atmospheres - Tool for identifying interstellar features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, P. C.; Slojkowski, S. E.; Rodriguez-Bell, T.; York, D.

    1993-01-01

    Model atmosphere parameters are derived for 14 early A stars with rotation velocities, from optical spectra, in excess of 80 km/s. The models are compared with IUE observations of the stars in regions where interstellar lines are expected. In general, with the assumption of solar abundances, excellent fits are obtained in regions longward of 2580 A, and accurate interstellar equivalent widths can be derived using models to establish the continuum. The fits are poorer at shorter wavelengths, particularly at 2026-2062 A, where the stellar model parameters seem inadequate. Features indicating mass flows are evident in stars with known infrared excesses. In gamma TrA, variability in the Mg II lines is seen over the 5-year interval of these data, and also over timescales as short as 26 days. The present technique should be useful in systematic studies of episodic mass flows in A stars and for stellar abundance studies, as well as interstellar features.

  3. Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana [Physics Department, West University of Timisoara, V Parvan 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Pop, Nicolina [Department of Physical Foundations of Engineering, Politehnica University of Timisoara, V Parvan 2, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Calinoiu, Delia [Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Politehnica University of Timisoara, Mihai Viteazu 1, 300222 Timisoara (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, Ångström's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

  4. A global hybrid coupled model based on Atmosphere-SST feedbacks

    CERN Document Server

    Cimatoribus, Andrea A; Dijkstra, Henk A

    2011-01-01

    A global hybrid coupled model is developed, with the aim of studying the effects of ocean-atmosphere feedbacks on the stability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. The model includes a global ocean general circulation model and a statistical atmosphere model. The statistical atmosphere model is based on linear regressions of data from a fully coupled climate model on sea surface temperature both locally and hemispherically averaged, being the footprint of Atlantic meridional overturning variability. It provides dynamic boundary conditions to the ocean model for heat, freshwater and wind-stress. A basic but consistent representation of ocean-atmosphere feedbacks is captured in the hybrid coupled model and it is more than ten times faster than the fully coupled climate model. The hybrid coupled model reaches a steady state with a climate close to the one of the fully coupled climate model, and the two models also have a similar response (collapse) of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulati...

  5. Modeling Atmospheric Activity of Cool Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, C. J.

    2003-10-01

    This review discusses a set of simple models for cool-star activity with which we compute (1) photospheric field patterns on stars of different activity levels, (2) the associated outer-atmospheric field configurations, and (3) the soft X-ray emission that is expected to result from the ensemble of loop atmospheres in the coronae of these stars. The model is based on empirically-determined properties of solar activity. It allows us to extrapolate to stars of significantly higher and lower activity than seen on the present-day Sun through its cycle. With it, we can, for example, gain insight into stellar field patterns (including a possible formation mechanism for polar starspots), as well as in the properties of coronal heating (helpful in the identification of the quiescent coronal heating mechanism). Lacking comprehensive theoretical understanding, the model's reliance on empirical solar data means that the multitude of processes involved are approximated to be independent of rotation rate, activity level, and fundamental stellar parameters, or -- where unavoidably necessary -- assumed to simply scale with activity. An evaluation of the most important processes involved guides a discussion of the limits of the model, of the limitations in our knowledge, and of future needs. "I propose to adopt such rules as will ensure the testability of scientific statements; which is to say, their falsifiability." Karl Popper (1902-1994)

  6. Improved ambiguity resolution for URTK with dynamic atmosphere constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weiming; Liu, Wenjian; Zou, Xuan; Li, Zongnan; Chen, Liang; Deng, Chenlong; Shi, Chuang

    2016-12-01

    Raw observation processing method with prior knowledge of ionospheric delay could strengthen the ambiguity resolution (AR), but it does not make full use of the relatively longer wavelength of wide-lane (WL) observation. Furthermore, the accuracy of calculated atmospheric delays from the regional augmentation information has quite different in quality, while the atmospheric constraint used in the current methods is usually set to an empirical value. A proper constraint, which matches the accuracy of calculated atmospheric delays, can most effectively compensate the residual systematic biases caused by large inter-station distances. Therefore, the standard deviation of the residual atmospheric parameters should be fine-tuned. This paper presents an atmosphere-constrained AR method for undifferenced network RTK (URTK) rover, whose ambiguities are sequentially fixed according to their wavelengths. Furthermore, this research systematically analyzes the residual atmospheric error and finds that it mainly varies along the positional relationship between the rover and the chosen reference stations. More importantly, its ionospheric part of certain location will also be cyclically influenced every day. Therefore, the standard deviation of residual ionospheric error can be modeled by a daily repeated cosine or other functions with the help of data one day before, and applied by rovers as pseudo-observation. With the data collected at 29 stations from a continuously operating reference station network in Guangdong Province (GDCORS) in China, the efficiency of the proposed approach is confirmed by improving the success and error rates of AR for 10-20 % compared to that of the WL-L1-IF one, as well as making much better positioning accuracy.

  7. Turbulence, superrotation, and general circulation models of the atmosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izakov, M. N.

    2016-09-01

    The data obtained in space-borne measurements and the findings of turbulence theory show that turbulence, of both small and large scales, has a decisive influence on the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere of Venus. The small-scale turbulence generates anomalous convection, while large-scale turbulence induces the return spectral flux of energy that is the main element of the superrotation mechanism in the atmosphere. Ways for improving the general circulation model of the atmosphere of Venus are proposed.

  8. Structural dynamic modifications via models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Kundra

    2000-06-01

    Structural dynamic modification techniques attempt to reduce dynamic design time and can be implemented beginning with spatial models of structures, dynamic test data or updated models. The models assumed in this discussion are mathematical models, namely mass, stiffness, and damping matrices of the equations of motion of a structure. These models are identified/extracted from dynamic test data viz. frequency response functions (FRFs). Alternatively these models could have been obtained by adjusting or updating the finite element model of the structure in the light of the test data. The methods of structural modification for getting desired dynamic characteristics by using modifiers namely mass, beams and tuned absorbers are discussed.

  9. The PHOENIX Model Atmosphere Grid for Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, F.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new project for a 1D static though full NLTE model atmosphere grid ranging T_{eff}= 15,000 to 1500 K in 100K steps, surface gravities ranging from log g= -0.5 to 6.0 in steps of 0.25 dex, and metallicity ranging from [M/H]=-2.5 to +0.5 in steps of 0.25 dex accounting for alpha element enrichment of [α/H]= +0.0, +0.2, +0.4 and C/O enhancement.

  10. Spectral Analysis and Atmospheric Models of Microflares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Fang; Yu-Hua Tang; Zhi Xu

    2006-01-01

    By use of the high-resolution spectral data obtained with THEMIS on 2002 September 5, the spectra and characteristics of five well-observed microflares have been analyzed. Our results indicate that some of them are located near the longitudinal magnetic polarity inversion lines. All the microflares are accompanied by mass motions. The most obvious characteristic of the Hα microflare spectra is the emission at the center of both Hα and CaII 8542(A) lines. For the first time both thermal and non-thermal semi-empirical atmospheric models for the conspicuous and faint microflares are computed. In computing the non-thermal models, we assume that the electron beam resulting from magnetic reconnection is produced in the chromosphere, because it requires lower energies for the injected particles.It is found there is obvious heating in the low chromosphere. The temperature enhancement is about 1000-2200 K in the thermal models. If the non-thermal effects are included, then the required temperature increase can be reduced by 100-150 K. These imply that the Hα microflares can probably be produced by magnetic reconnection in the solar Iower atmosphere.The radiative and kinetic energies of the Hα microflares are estimated and the total energy is found to be 1027 - 4× 1028 erg.

  11. Dynamic evolution of coherent vortex dipole in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhong; Zeng, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The analytical expression for the cross-spectral density function of Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams with coherent vortex dipole (CVD) propagating through atmospheric turbulence is derived, which enables us to study the evolution process of CVD propagating through atmospheric turbulence, where the influences of the beams parameters and atmospheric turbulence parameters on the ratio of critical off-axis distance to the waist width are stressed. It shows that the evolution process of the CVD depends on the off-axis distance. The larger the off-axis distance is, the more the number of CVD is. When the off-axis distance is zero, the position of coherent vortices with positive and negative topological charge of CVD propagating through atmospheric turbulence is always symmetry. When the off-axis distance is big enough, compared with the situation at source plane, the orientation of the positive coherent vortex of inherent CVD and negative coherent vortex of that rotates 180° in the far field. The larger the structure constant and the waist width are, as well as the smaller the spatial correlation length and the inner scale are, the smaller the ratio ac/w0 is. Besides, the ratio ac/w0 will no longer change when the spatial correlation length or the inner scale increases to a certain value, whereas the outer scale has no effect on the ratio.

  12. Uncertainty and Sensitivity in Surface Dynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettner, Albert J.; Syvitski, James P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Papers for this special issue on 'Uncertainty and Sensitivity in Surface Dynamics Modeling' heralds from papers submitted after the 2014 annual meeting of the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System or CSDMS. CSDMS facilitates a diverse community of experts (now in 68 countries) that collectively investigate the Earth's surface-the dynamic interface between lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere, by promoting, developing, supporting and disseminating integrated open source software modules. By organizing more than 1500 researchers, CSDMS has the privilege of identifying community strengths and weaknesses in the practice of software development. We recognize, for example, that progress has been slow on identifying and quantifying uncertainty and sensitivity in numerical modeling of earth's surface dynamics. This special issue is meant to raise awareness for these important subjects and highlight state-of-the-art progress.

  13. The Middle Miocene climate as modelled in an atmosphere-ocean-biosphere model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krapp

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean-biosphere model for the Middle Miocene 15 million years ago. The model is insofar more consistent than previous models because it captures the essential interactions between ocean and atmosphere and between atmosphere and vegetation. The Middle Miocene topography, which alters both large-scale ocean and atmospheric circulations, causes a global warming of 0.7 K compared to present day. Higher than present-day CO2 levels of 480 and 720 ppm cause a global warming of 2.8 and 4.9 K. The associated water vapour feedback enhances the greenhouse effect which leads to a polar amplification of the warming. These results suggest that higher than present-day CO2 levels are necessary to drive the warm Middle Miocene climate, also because the dynamic vegetation model simulates a denser vegetation which is in line with fossil records. However, we do not find a flatter than present-day equator-to-pole temperature gradient as has been suggested by marine and terrestrial proxies. Instead, a compensation between atmospheric and ocean heat transport counteracts the flattening of the temperature gradient. The acclaimed role of the large-scale ocean circulation in redistributing heat cannot be supported by our results. Including full ocean dynamics, therefore, does not solve the problem of the flat temperature gradient during the Middle Miocene.

  14. Transmission Spectra of Three-Dimensional Hot Jupiter Model Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Fortney, J J; Showman, A P; Lian, Y; Freedman, R S; Marley, M S; Lewis, N K

    2009-01-01

    We compute models of the transmission spectra of planets HD 209458b, HD 189733b, and generic hot Jupiters. We examine the effects of temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity for the generic planets as a guide to understanding transmission spectra in general. We find that carbon dioxide absorption at 4.4 and 15 microns is prominent at high metallicity, and is a clear metallicity indicator. For HD 209458b and HD 189733b, we compute spectra for both one-dimensional and three-dimensional model atmospheres and examine the differences between them. The differences are usually small, but can be large if atmospheric temperatures are near important chemical abundance boundaries. The calculations for the 3D atmospheres, and their comparison with data, serve as constraints on these dynamical models that complement the secondary eclipse and light curve data sets. For HD 209458b, even if TiO and VO gases are abundant on the day side, their abundances can be considerably reduced on the cooler planetary limb. However, ...

  15. The Explicit Planetary Isentropic-Coordinate (EPIC) Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, T. E.; Fischer, A. S.; Gierasch, P. J.; Harrington, J.; LeBeau, R. P.; Santori, C. M.

    1998-04-01

    We describe a new general circulation model (GCM) designed for planetary atmospheric studies called the EPIC model. This is a finite-difference model based on the isentropic-coordinate scheme of Hsu and Arakawa (1990.Mon. Wea. Rev.118, 1933-1959). We report on previously undocumented modifications, additions, and key practical issues that experience running the model has revealed to be important. The model integrates the hydrostatic primitive equations, which are valid for large-scale atmospheric dynamics and include gravity waves (buoyancy waves), planetary waves (Rossby waves), and horizontally propagating sound waves (Lamb waves), but not vertically propagating sound waves because of the hydrostatic approximation. The vertical coordinate is entropy in the form of potential temperature, which coincides with material surfaces for adiabatic motion. This means that there is no vertical velocity except where there is heating, which improves accuracy and helps the model maintain conservation properties over long integrations. An isentropic vertical coordinate is natural for the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, which are believed to have essentially adiabatic interiors that match up with the bottom of the model and is also excellent for middle-atmosphere studies on any planet. Radiative processes are parameterized by Newtonian cooling, and the latent heat of ortho-para hydrogen conversion is included when appropriate, with a suitably defined mean potential temperature. The model is written with general map factors that make it easy to configure in oblate spherical, cylindrical, or Cartesian coordinates. The code includes optional Message Passing Interface (MPI) library calls and hence runs on any Unix-based parallel computer or network cluster. An optional graphical user interface to commercial visualization software facilitates control of the model and analysis of output. Memory is allocated dynamically such that the user does not recompile to

  16. The Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model (ARTM) - Validation of a long-term atmospheric dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettrich, Sebastian; Wildermuth, Hans; Strobl, Christopher; Wenig, Mark

    2016-04-01

    In the last couple of years, the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model (ARTM) has been developed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) and the Society for Plant and Reactor Security (GRS). ARTM is an atmospheric dispersion model for continuous long-term releases of radionuclides into the atmosphere, based on the Lagrangian particle model. This model, developed in the first place as a more realistic replacement for the out-dated Gaussian plume models, is currently being optimised for further scientific purposes to study atmospheric dispersion in short-range scenarios. It includes a diagnostic wind field model, allows for the application of building structures and multiple sources (including linear, 2-and 3-dimensional source geometries), and considers orography and surface roughness. As an output it calculates the activity concentration, dry and wet deposition and can model also the radioactive decay of Rn-222. As such, ARTM requires to undergo an intense validation process. While for short-term and short-range models, which were mainly developed for examining nuclear accidents or explosions, a few measurement data-sets are available for validation, data-sets for validating long-term models are very sparse and the existing ones mostly prove to be not applicable for validation. Here we present a strategy for the validation of long-term Lagrangian particle models based on the work with ARTM. In our validation study, the first part we present is a comprehensive analysis of the model sensitivities on different parameters like e.g. (simulation grid size resolution, starting random number, amount of simulation particles, etc.). This study provides a good estimation for the uncertainties of the simulation results and consequently can be used to generate model outputs comparable to the available measurements data at various distances from the emission source. This comparison between measurement data from selected scenarios and simulation results

  17. Synthetic-Eddy Method for Urban Atmospheric Flow Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, D.; Gorman, G. J.; Gomes, J. L. M. A.; Pain, C. C.; Apsimon, H.

    2010-08-01

    The computational fluid dynamics code Fluidity, with anisotropic mesh adaptivity, is used as a multi-scale obstacle-accommodating meteorological model. A novel method for generating realistic inlet boundary conditions based on the view of turbulence as a superposition of synthetic eddies is adopted. It is able to reproduce prescribed first-order and second-order one-point statistics and turbulence length scales. The aim is to simulate an urban boundary layer. The model is validated against two standard benchmark tests: a plane channel flow numerical simulation and a flow past a cube physical simulation. The performed large-eddy simulations are in good agreement with both reference models giving confidence that the model can be used to successfully simulate urban atmospheric flows.

  18. Nonlinear dynamics of the atmospheric pollutants in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, Alejandro; Barrera-Ferrer, Amilcar; Angulo-Brown, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    The atmospheric pollution in the Metropolitan Zone of Mexico City (MZMC) is a serious problem with social, economical and political consequences, in virtue that it is the region which concentrates both the greatest country population and a great part of commercial and industrial activities. According to the World Health Organization, maximum permissible concentrations of atmospheric pollutants are exceeded frequently. In the MZMC, the environmental monitoring has been limited to criteria pollutants, named in this way due to when their levels are measured in the atmosphere, they indicate in a precise way the air quality. The Automatic Atmospheric Monitoring Network monitors and registers the values of pollutants concentration in air in the MZMC. Actually, it is integrated by approximately 35 automatic-equipped remote stations, which report an every-hour register. Local and global invariant quantities have been widely used to describe the fractal properties of diverse time series. In the study of certain time series, many times it is assumed that they are monofractal, which means that they can be described only with one fractal dimension. But this hypothesis is unrealistic because a lot of time series are heterogeneous and non stationary, so their scaling properties are not the same throughout time and therefore they may require more fractal dimensions for their description. Complexity of the atmospheric pollutants dynamics suggests us to analyze its time series of hourly concentration registers with the multifractal formalism. So, in this work, air concentration time series of MZMC criteria pollutants were studied with the proposed method. The chosen pollutants to perform this analysis are ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and PM10 (particles less than 10 micrometers). We found that pollutants air concentration time series are multifractal. When we calculate the degree of multifractality for each time series we know that while more

  19. Dynamic Mesh CFD Simulations of Orion Parachute Pendulum Motion During Atmospheric Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstrom, Logan D.; Schwing, Alan M.; Robinson, Stephen K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the usage of computational fluid dynamics to study the effects of pendulum motion dynamics of the NASAs Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle parachute system on the stability of the vehicles atmospheric entry and decent. Significant computational fluid dynamics testing has already been performed at NASAs Johnson Space Center, but this study sought to investigate the effect of bulk motion of the parachute, such as pitching, on the induced aerodynamic forces. Simulations were performed with a moving grid geometry oscillating according to the parameters observed in flight tests. As with the previous simulations, OVERFLOW computational fluid dynamics tool is used with the assumption of rigid, non-permeable geometry. Comparison to parachute wind tunnel tests is included for a preliminary validation of the dynamic mesh model. Results show qualitative differences in the flow fields of the static and dynamic simulations and quantitative differences in the induced aerodynamic forces, suggesting that dynamic mesh modeling of the parachute pendulum motion may uncover additional dynamic effects.

  20. Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lichuan; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik;

    2016-01-01

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere......-wave-coupled regional climate model, separately and combined. The swell influence on atmospheric mixing is introduced into the atmospheric mixing length formula by adding a swell-induced contribution to the mixing. The swell influence on the wind stress under wind-following swell, moderate-range wind, and near......-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress...

  1. Dynamical Behavior of Meteor in AN Atmosphere: Theory vs Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, Maria

    Up to now the only quantities which directly follow from the available meteor observations are its brightness, the height above sea level, the length along the trajectory, and as a consequence its velocity as a function of time. Other important parameters like meteoroid's mass, its shape, bulk and grain density, temperature remain unknown and should be found based on physical theories and special experiments. In this study I will consider modern methods for evaluating meteoroid parameters from observational data, and some of their applications. The study in particular takes an approach in modelling the meteoroids' mass and other properties from the aerodynamical point of view, e.g. from the rate of body deceleration in the atmosphere as opposed to conventionally used luminosity [1]. An analytical model of the atmospheric entry is calculated for registered meteors using published observational data and evaluating parameters describing drag, ablation and rotation rate of meteoroid along the luminous segment of the trajectory. One of the special features of this approach is the possibility of considering a change in body shape during its motion in the atmosphere. The correct mathematical modelling of meteor events is necessary for further studies of consequences for collisions of cosmic bodies with the Earth [2]. It also helps us to estimate the key parameters of the meteoroids, including deceleration, pre-entry mass, terminal mass, ablation coefficient, effective destruction enthalpy, and heat-transfer coefficient. With this information, one can use models for the dust influx onto Earth to estimate the number of meteors detected by a camera of a given sensitivity. References 1. Gritsevich M. I. Determination of Parameters of Meteor Bodies based on Flight Obser-vational Data // Advances in Space Research, 44, p. 323-334, 2009. 2. Gritsevich M. I., Stulov V. P. and Turchak L. I. Classification of Consequences for Col-lisions of Natural Cosmic Bodies with the Earth

  2. Comparing different dynamic stall models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holierhoek, J.G. [Unit Wind Energy, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands, ZG, Petten (Netherlands); De Vaal, J.B.; Van Zuijlen, A.H.; Bijl, H. [Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-07-16

    The dynamic stall phenomenon and its importance for load calculations and aeroelastic simulations is well known. Different models exist to model the effect of dynamic stall; however, a systematic comparison is still lacking. To investigate if one is performing better than another, three models are used to simulate the Ohio State University measurements and a set of data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames experimental study of dynamic stall and compare results. These measurements were at conditions and for aerofoils that are typical for wind turbines, and the results are publicly available. The three selected dynamic stall models are the ONERA model, the Beddoes-Leishman model and the Snel model. The simulations show that there are still significant differences between measurements and models and that none of the models is significantly better in all cases than the other models. Especially in the deep stall regime, the accuracy of each of the dynamic stall models is limited.

  3. On the use of inexact, pruned hardware in atmospheric modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düben, Peter D; Joven, Jaume; Lingamneni, Avinash; McNamara, Hugh; De Micheli, Giovanni; Palem, Krishna V; Palmer, T N

    2014-06-28

    Inexact hardware design, which advocates trading the accuracy of computations in exchange for significant savings in area, power and/or performance of computing hardware, has received increasing prominence in several error-tolerant application domains, particularly those involving perceptual or statistical end-users. In this paper, we evaluate inexact hardware for its applicability in weather and climate modelling. We expand previous studies on inexact techniques, in particular probabilistic pruning, to floating point arithmetic units and derive several simulated set-ups of pruned hardware with reasonable levels of error for applications in atmospheric modelling. The set-up is tested on the Lorenz '96 model, a toy model for atmospheric dynamics, using software emulation for the proposed hardware. The results show that large parts of the computation tolerate the use of pruned hardware blocks without major changes in the quality of short- and long-time diagnostics, such as forecast errors and probability density functions. This could open the door to significant savings in computational cost and to higher resolution simulations with weather and climate models.

  4. The role of vegetation dynamics in the control of atmospheric CO{sub 2} content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitch, Stephen

    2000-04-01

    This thesis contains a description of the Lund-Potsdam-Jena Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (LPJ-DGVM) and its application to infer the role of vegetation dynamics on atmospheric CO{sub 2} content at different time-scales. The model combines vegetation dynamics and biogeochemistry in a modular framework. Individual modules describe ecosystems processes, including vegetation resource competition and production, tissue turnover, growth, fire and mortality, soil and litter biogeochemistry, including the effects of CO{sub 2} on these processes. The model simulates realistic post-disturbance succession in different environments. Seasonal exchange of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere is modelled in reasonable agreement with observation. Global estimates of carbon stocks in soil, litter and vegetation are within their acceptable ranges and the model captures the present-day patterns in vegetation. Fire return intervals are simulated correctly in most regions. Results emphasise the important role of the terrestrial biosphere in both the seasonal cycle and in the inter-annual variability in the growth rate of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. LPJ successfully reproduced both the amplitude and phase of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO{sub 2} content as measured at a global network of monitoring stations. The model predicted a small net terrestrial biosphere uptake of CO{sub 2} during the 1980s with a strong CO{sub 2} fertilisation effect, which enhances plant production, reduced by the effects of climate and land use change. Historical land use change and CO{sub 2} fertilisation have been the dominant, albeit opposing factors governing the response of the terrestrial biosphere with respect to carbon storage during the 20th century. LPJ is run using one future climate and atmospheric CO{sub 2} scenario until 2200. Enhanced production due to the CO{sub 2} fertilisation effect eventually reaches an asymptote, and consequently the ability of

  5. Dynamic Linear Models with R

    CERN Document Server

    Campagnoli, Patrizia; Petris, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    State space models have gained tremendous popularity in as disparate fields as engineering, economics, genetics and ecology. Introducing general state space models, this book focuses on dynamic linear models, emphasizing their Bayesian analysis. It illustrates the fundamental steps needed to use dynamic linear models in practice, using R package.

  6. Human population and atmospheric carbon dioxide growth dynamics: Diagnostics for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüsler, A. D.; Sornette, D.

    2014-10-01

    We analyze the growth rates of human population and of atmospheric carbon dioxide by comparing the relative merits of two benchmark models, the exponential law and the finite-time-singular (FTS) power law. The later results from positive feedbacks, either direct or mediated by other dynamical variables, as shown in our presentation of a simple endogenous macroeconomic dynamical growth model describing the growth dynamics of coupled processes involving human population (labor in economic terms), capital and technology (proxies by CO2 emissions). Human population in the context of our energy intensive economies constitutes arguably the most important underlying driving variable of the content of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Using some of the best databases available, we perform empirical analyses confirming that the human population on Earth has been growing super-exponentially until the mid-1960s, followed by a decelerated sub-exponential growth, with a tendency to plateau at just an exponential growth in the last decade with an average growth rate of 1.0% per year. In contrast, we find that the content of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has continued to accelerate super-exponentially until 1990, with a transition to a progressive deceleration since then, with an average growth rate of approximately 2% per year in the last decade. To go back to CO2 atmosphere contents equal to or smaller than the level of 1990 as has been the broadly advertised goals of international treaties since 1990 requires herculean changes: from a dynamical point of view, the approximately exponential growth must not only turn to negative acceleration but also negative velocity to reverse the trend.

  7. Dynamic Behavior and Unstable State Evolution of Ocean-Atmosphere Oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Wenjie; FENG Guolin

    2005-01-01

    It is mathematically and thoroughly proved in this paper that the nonlinear stochastic ocean-atmosphere oscillator model possesses a stable limit cycle; then the model equations are transformed into the FokkerPlanck equation (FPE), and the evolution of El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) from unstable state to stable state is studied from the point of view of nonequilibrium system dynamics. The study results reveal that although the complex nonlinear ocean-atmosphere oscillator model possesses multiequilibrium states,the real climatic system possesses only a quasi-normal state and a strong ENSO cycle stable state. The first passage time between states is also given in this paper, and the theoretical computational results agree with observational data.

  8. NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP): Research Summaries 1997-1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylo, M. J.; DeCola, P. L.; Kaye, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Under the mandate contained in the FY 1976 NASA Authorization Act, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed and is implementing a comprehensive program of research, technology development, and monitoring of the Earth's upper atmosphere, with emphasis on the upper troposphere and stratosphere. This program aims at expanding our chemical and physical understanding to permit both the quantitative analysis of current perturbations as well as the assessment of possible future changes in this important region of our environment. It is carried out jointly by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP), both managed within the Research Division in the Office of Earth Science at NASA. Significant contributions to this effort have also been provided by the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) of NASA's Office of Aero-Space Technology. The long-term objectives of the present program are to perform research to: understand the physics, chemistry, and transport processes of the upper troposphere and the stratosphere and their control on the distribution of atmospheric chemical species such as ozone; assess possible perturbations to the composition of the atmosphere caused by human activities and natural phenomena (with a specific emphasis on trace gas geographical distributions, sources, and sinks and the role of trace gases in defining the chemical composition of the upper atmosphere); understand the processes affecting the distributions of radiatively active species in the atmosphere, and the importance of chemical-radiative-dynamical feedbacks on the meteorology and climatology of the stratosphere and troposphere; and understand ozone production, loss, and recovery in an atmosphere with increasing abundances of greenhouse gases. The current report is composed of two parts. Part 1 summarizes the objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported

  9. Dynamics of the global Sun from interior to outer atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, Carolus

    2012-07-01

    The Sun is the only star whose magnetic activity can be resolved in stunning detail. Current observational capabilities range from full-sphere coverage to measurements of details more than 10,000 times smaller than that. Acoustic waves enable us to probe the dynamics of the deep interior, while heliospheric imagers reveal the evolution of coronal mass ejections to beyond the orbit of the Earth. This comprehensive view of a magnetically active star, complemented by rapid advances in numerical capabilities, are revealing how the coupled system of interior, atmosphere, and heliosphere evolves dynamically through the sunspot cycle, punctuated by flux emergence, field eruptions, and irradiance variations. The Sun is not only a touchstone for the interpretation of many astrophysical observations, but its variability affects our society in more ways than we routinely appreciate; this drives a need to understand it well enough that forecasts of its electromagnetic weather can be made. This lecture, starting from the very different perspectives of astrophysical curiosity and societal need, focuses on trends near the frontier of our knowledge about the Sun's functioning as a global system.

  10. High resolution transmission spectroscopy as a diagnostic for Jovian exoplanet atmospheres: constraints from theoretical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112 (United States); Perna, Rosalba [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Heng, Kevin, E-mail: kemptone@grinnell.edu [University of Bern, Center for Space and Habitability, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-11-01

    We present high resolution transmission spectra of giant planet atmospheres from a coupled three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model that includes Doppler shifts which arise from winds and planetary motion. We model Jovian planets covering more than two orders of magnitude in incident flux, corresponding to planets with 0.9-55 day orbital periods around solar-type stars. The results of our 3D dynamical models reveal certain aspects of high resolution transmission spectra that are not present in simple one-dimensional (1D) models. We find that the hottest planets experience strong substellar to anti-stellar (SSAS) winds, resulting in transmission spectra with net blueshifts of up to 3 km s{sup –1}, whereas less irradiated planets show almost no net Doppler shifts. We find only minor differences between transmission spectra for atmospheres with temperature inversions and those without. Compared to 1D models, peak line strengths are significantly reduced for the hottest atmospheres owing to Doppler broadening from a combination of rotation (which is faster for close-in planets under the assumption of tidal locking) and atmospheric winds. Finally, high resolution transmission spectra may be useful in studying the atmospheres of exoplanets with optically thick clouds since line cores for very strong transitions should remain optically thick to very high altitude. High resolution transmission spectra are an excellent observational test for the validity of 3D atmospheric dynamics models, because they provide a direct probe of wind structures and heat circulation. Ground-based exoplanet spectroscopy is currently on the verge of being able to verify some of our modeling predictions, most notably the dependence of SSAS winds on insolation. We caution that interpretation of high resolution transmission spectra based on 1D atmospheric models may be inadequate, as 3D atmospheric motions can produce a noticeable effect on the absorption

  11. Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lichuan; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik; Guo Larsén, Xiaoli

    2016-07-01

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere-wave-coupled regional climate model, separately and combined. The swell influence on atmospheric mixing is introduced into the atmospheric mixing length formula by adding a swell-induced contribution to the mixing. The swell influence on the wind stress under wind-following swell, moderate-range wind, and near-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress reduces the near-surface wind speed. Introducing the wave influence roughness length has a larger influence than does adding the swell influence on mixing. Compared with measurements, adding the swell influence on both atmospheric mixing and wind stress gives the best model performance for the wind speed. The influence varies with wave characteristics for different sea basins. Swell occurs infrequently in the studied area, and one could expect more influence in high-swell-frequency areas (i.e., low-latitude ocean). We conclude that the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress should be considered when developing climate models.

  12. Global Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Models in LASG/IAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞永强; 张学洪; 郭裕福

    2004-01-01

    Coupled ocean-atmospheric general circulation models are the only tools to quantitatively simulate the climate system. Since the end of the 1980s, a group of scientists in the State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), have been working to develop a global OGCM and a global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (CGCM). From the original flux anomalycoupling model developed in the beginning of the 1990s to the latest directly-coupling model, LASG scientists have developed four global coupled GCMs. This study summarizes the development history of these models and describes the third and fourth coupled GCMs and selected applications. Strengths and weaknesses of these models are highlighted.

  13. Modelling the atmosphere of the carbon-rich Mira RU Vir

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, G; Hron, J; Aringer, B; Groenewegen, M A T; Nowotny, W

    2015-01-01

    Context. We study the atmosphere of the carbon-rich Mira RU Vir using the mid-infrared high spatial resolution interferometric observations from VLTI/MIDI. Aims. The aim of this work is to analyse the atmosphere of the carbon-rich Mira RU Vir, with state of the art models, in this way deepening the knowledge of the dynamic processes at work in carbon-rich Miras. Methods. We compare spectro-photometric and interferometric measurements of this carbon-rich Mira AGB star, with the predictions of different kinds of modelling approaches (hydrostatic model atmospheres plus MOD-More Of Dusty, self-consistent dynamic model atmospheres). A geometric model fitting tool is used for a first interpretation of the interferometric data. Results. The results show that a joint use of different kind of observations (photometry, spectroscopy, interferometry) is essential to shed light on the structure of the atmosphere of a carbon-rich Mira. The dynamic model atmospheres fit well the ISO spectrum in the wavelength range {\\lambda...

  14. Finite-difference numerical modelling of gravito-acoustic wave propagation in a windy and attenuating atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    in press; International audience; Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena such as tectonic events or explosions or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modelled in a 3D attenuating and windy atmosphere extending from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to pro...

  15. Modelling dynamic roughness during floods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paarlberg, Andries; Dohmen-Janssen, Catarine M.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Termes, A.P.P.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a dynamic roughness model to predict water levels during floods. Hysteresis effects of dune development are explicitly included. It is shown that differences between the new dynamic roughness model, and models where the roughness coefficient is calibrated, are most

  16. Active Upper-atmosphere Chemistry and Dynamics from Polar Circulation Reversal on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph; Nixon, Conor A.; DeKok, Remco; Vinatier, Sandrine; Coustenis, Athena; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Calcutt, Simon B.; Flasar, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Saturn's moon Titan has a nitrogen atmosphere comparable to Earth's, with a surface pressure of 1.4 bar. Numerical models reproduce the tropospheric conditions very well but have trouble explaining the observed middle-atmosphere temperatures, composition and winds. The top of the middle-atmosphere circulation has been thought to lie at an altitude of 450 to 500 kilometres, where there is a layer of haze that appears to be separated from the main haze deck. This 'detached' haze was previously explained as being due to the colocation of peak haze production and the limit of dynamical transport by the circulation's upper branch. Herewe report a build-up of trace gases over the south pole approximately two years after observing the 2009 post-equinox circulation reversal, from which we conclude that middle-atmosphere circulation must extend to an altitude of at least 600 kilometres. The primary drivers of this circulation are summer-hemisphere heating of haze by absorption of solar radiation and winter-hemisphere cooling due to infrared emission by haze and trace gases; our results therefore imply that these effects are important well into the thermosphere (altitudes higher than 500 kilometres). This requires both active upper-atmosphere chemistry, consistent with the detection of high-complexity molecules and ions at altitudes greater than 950 kilometres, and an alternative explanation for the detached haze, such as a transition in haze particle growth from monomers to fractal structures.

  17. Dynamic causal modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, K J; Harrison, L; Penny, W

    2003-08-01

    In this paper we present an approach to the identification of nonlinear input-state-output systems. By using a bilinear approximation to the dynamics of interactions among states, the parameters of the implicit causal model reduce to three sets. These comprise (1) parameters that mediate the influence of extrinsic inputs on the states, (2) parameters that mediate intrinsic coupling among the states, and (3) [bilinear] parameters that allow the inputs to modulate that coupling. Identification proceeds in a Bayesian framework given known, deterministic inputs and the observed responses of the system. We developed this approach for the analysis of effective connectivity using experimentally designed inputs and fMRI responses. In this context, the coupling parameters correspond to effective connectivity and the bilinear parameters reflect the changes in connectivity induced by inputs. The ensuing framework allows one to characterise fMRI experiments, conceptually, as an experimental manipulation of integration among brain regions (by contextual or trial-free inputs, like time or attentional set) that is revealed using evoked responses (to perturbations or trial-bound inputs, like stimuli). As with previous analyses of effective connectivity, the focus is on experimentally induced changes in coupling (cf., psychophysiologic interactions). However, unlike previous approaches in neuroimaging, the causal model ascribes responses to designed deterministic inputs, as opposed to treating inputs as unknown and stochastic.

  18. Vesicle dynamics during the atmospheric entry heating of cosmic spherules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genge, M. J.

    2017-03-01

    Cosmic spherules are unique igneous objects that form by melting due to gas drag heating during atmospheric entry heating. Vesicles are an important component of many cosmic spherules since they suggest their precursors had finite volatile contents. Vesicle abundances in spherules decrease through the series porphyritic, glassy, barred, to cryptocrystalline spherules. Anomalous hollow spherules, with large off-center vesicles occur in both porphyritic and glassy spheres. Numerical simulation of the dynamic behavior of vesicles during atmospheric flight is presented that indicates vesicles rapidly migrate due to deceleration and separate from nonporphyritic particles. Modest rotation rates of tens of radians s-1 are, however, sufficient to impede loss of vesicles and may explain the presence of small solitary vesicles in barred, cryptocrystalline and glassy spherules. Rapid rotation at spin rates of several thousand radians s-1 are required to concentrate vesicles at the rotational axis and leads to rapid growth by coalescence and either separation or retention depending on the orientation of the rotational axis. Complex rapid rotations that concentrate vesicles in the core of particles are proposed as a mechanism for the formation of hollow spherules. High vesicle contents in porphyritic spherules suggest volatile-rich precursors; however, calculation of volatile retention indicates these have lost >99.9% of volatiles to degassing prior to melting. The formation of hollow spherules, by rapid spin, necessarily implies preatmospheric rotations of several thousand radians s-1. These particles are suggested to represent immature dust, recently released from parent bodies, in which rotations have not been slowed by magnetic damping.

  19. A Modular Arbitrary-Order Ocean-Atmosphere Model: MAOOAM v1.0

    CERN Document Server

    De Cruz, L; Vannitsem, S

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a reduced-order quasi-geostrophic coupled ocean-atmosphere model that allows for an arbitrary number of atmospheric and oceanic modes to be retained in the spectral decomposition. The modularity of this new model allows one to easily modify the model physics. Using this new model, coined "Modular Arbitrary-Order Ocean-Atmosphere Model" (maooam), we analyse the dependence of the model dynamics on the truncation level of the spectral expansion, and unveil spurious behaviour that may exist at low resolution by a comparison with the higher resolution versions. In particular, we assess the robustness of the coupled low-frequency variability when the number of modes is increased. An "optimal" version is proposed for which the ocean resolution is sufficiently high while the total number of modes is small enough to allow for a tractable and extensive analysis of the dynamics.

  20. Dynamic oxygenation of the early atmosphere and oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Timothy W.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Reinhard, Christopher T.

    2014-05-01

    The traditional view of the oxygenation of the early atmosphere and oceans depicts irreversibly rising abundances in two large steps: one at the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) ca. 2.3-2.4 billion years ago (Ga) and another near the end of the Neoproterozoic. This talk will explore how the latest data challenge this paradigm. Recent results reveal a far more dynamic history of early oxygenation, one with both rising and falling levels, long periods of sustained low concentrations even after the GOE, complex feedback relationships that likely coupled nutrients and ocean redox, and dramatic changes tied through still-emerging cause-and-effect relationships to first-order tectonic, climatic, and evolutionary events. In the face of increasing doubt about the robustness of organic biomarker records from the Archean, researchers are increasingly reliant on inorganic geochemical proxies for the earliest records of oxygenic photosynthesis. Proxy data now suggest oxygenesis at ca. 3.0 Ga with a likelihood of local oxygen build up in the surface ocean long before the GOE, as well as low (and perhaps transient) accumulation in the atmosphere against a backdrop of mostly less than ca. 0.001% of the present atmospheric concentration. By the GOE, the balance between oxygen sources and sinks shifted in favor of persistent accumulation, although sedimentary recycling of non-mass-dependent sulfur isotope signatures allows for the possibility of rising and falling atmospheric oxygen before the GOE as traditionally defined by the sulfur isotope record. Recycling may also hinder our ability to precisely date the transition to permanent oxygen accumulation beyond trace levels. Diverse data point to a dramatic increase in biospheric oxygen following the GOE, coincident with the largest positive carbon isotope excursion in Earth history, followed by an equally dramatic drop. This decline in Earth surface redox potential ushered in more than a billion years of dominantly low oxygen levels in

  1. Atmospheric circulation of tidally-locked exoplanets: a suite of benchmark tests for dynamical solvers

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin; Phillipps, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    The complexity of atmospheric modelling and its inherent non-linearity, together with the limited amount of data of exoplanets available, motivate model intercomparisons and benchmark tests. In the geophysical community, the Held-Suarez test is a standard benchmark for comparing dynamical core simulations of the Earth's atmosphere with different solvers, based on statistically-averaged flow quantities. In the present study, we perform analogues of the Held-Suarez test for tidally-locked exoplanets with the GFDL-Princeton Flexible Modeling System (FMS) by subjecting both the spectral and finite difference dynamical cores to a suite of tests, including the standard benchmark for Earth, a hypothetical tidally-locked Earth, a "shallow" hot Jupiter model and a "deep" model of HD 209458b. We find qualitative and quantitative agreement between the solvers for the Earth, tidally-locked Earth and shallow hot Jupiter benchmarks, but the agreement is less than satisfactory for the deep model of HD 209458b. Further inves...

  2. The Atmospheric Dynamics of Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. M.

    2009-01-01

    Comparative studies of Jupiter and Saturn often emphasize their similarities, but recent observations have highlighted important differences. The stratospheres of both planets exhibit an equatorial oscillation reminiscent of that in Earth's middle atmosphere. Jupiter's oscillation has a 4-5 year period, not linked to its season, and it has been modeled as an analog to the terrestrial quasi-biennial oscillation, driven by the stresses associated with vertically propagating waves. Saturn's equatorial oscillation is nearly semiannual, but wave activity may still be a driver. Jupiter's internal rotation rate is inferred from its steady modulated radio emission. Saturn's internal rotation is more enigmatic. It has been inferred from the modulation of the body's kilometric radio emission, but this period has varied by 1% over the last 25 years. Saturn's equatorial winds are also puzzling, as those inferred from cloud tracking by Cassini and more recent HST observations are weaker than those from Voyager. Whether this is attributable to a difference in altitudes of the tracked clouds in winds with vertical shear or a real temporal change in the winds is not known. Both winter and summer poles of Saturn exhibit very compact circumpolar vortices with warm cores, indicating subsidence. Titan's middle atmosphere is characterized by global cyclostrophic winds, particularly the strong circumpolar vortex in the winter hemisphere. In many ways, the spatial distribution of temperature, gaseous constituents, and condensates is reminiscent of conditions in terrestrial winter vortices, albeit with different chemistry. The meridional contrast in Titan's tropospheric temperatures is small, only a few kelvins.

  3. An Otto Engine Dynamic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Florian Ion Tiberiu Petrescu; Relly Victoria Virgil Petrescu

    2016-01-01

    Otto engine dynamics are similar in almost all common internal combustion engines. We can speak so about dynamics of engines: Lenoir, Otto, and Diesel. The dynamic presented model is simple and original. The first thing necessary in the calculation of Otto engine dynamics, is to determine the inertial mass reduced at the piston. One uses then the Lagrange equation. Kinetic energy conservation shows angular speed variation (from the shaft) with inertial masses. One uses and elastic constant of...

  4. Evaluation of atmospheric aerosol and tropospheric ozone effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min

    The increasing human activities have produced large amounts of air pollutants ejected into the atmosphere, in which atmospheric aerosols and tropospheric ozone are considered to be especially important because of their negative impacts on human health and their impacts on global climate through either their direct radiative effect or indirect effect on land-atmosphere CO2 exchange. This dissertation dedicates to quantifying and evaluating the aerosol and tropospheric ozone effects on global terrestrial ecosystem dynamics using a modeling approach. An ecosystem model, the integrated Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (iTem), is developed to simulate biophysical and biogeochemical processes in terrestrial ecosystems. A two-broad-band atmospheric radiative transfer model together with the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measured atmospheric parameters are used to well estimate global downward solar radiation and the direct and diffuse components in comparison with observations. The atmospheric radiative transfer modeling framework were used to quantify the aerosol direct radiative effect, showing that aerosol loadings cause 18.7 and 12.8 W m -2 decrease of direct-beam Photosynthetic Active Radiation (PAR) and Near Infrared Radiation (NIR) respectively, and 5.2 and 4.4 W m -2 increase of diffuse PAR and NIR, respectively, leading to a total 21.9 W m-2 decrease of total downward solar radiation over the global land surface during the period of 2003-2010. The results also suggested that the aerosol effect may be overwhelmed by clouds because of the stronger extinction and scattering ability of clouds. Applications of the iTem with solar radiation data and with or without considering the aerosol loadings shows that aerosol loading enhances the terrestrial productions [Gross Primary Production (GPP), Net Primary Production (NPP) and Net Ecosystem Production (NEP)] and carbon emissions through plant respiration (RA) in global terrestrial ecosystems over the

  5. Generalized Manning Condensation Model Captures the RNA Ion Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Ryan L.; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Mandic, Ana; Whitford, Paul C.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.; Mohanty, Udayan; Onuchic, José N.

    2016-01-01

    RNA is highly sensitive to the ionic environment, and typically requires Mg2+ to form compact structures. There is a need for models capable of describing the ion atmosphere surrounding RNA with quantitative accuracy. We present a model of RNA electrostatics and apply it within coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation. The model treats Mg2+ ions explicitly to account for ion-ion correlations neglected by mean field theories. Since mean-field theories capture KCl well, it is treated implicitly by a generalized Manning counterion condensation model. The model extends Manning condensation to deal with arbitrary RNA conformations, non-limiting KCl concentrations, and the ion inaccessible volume of RNA. The model is tested against experimental measurements of the excess Mg2+ associated with the RNA, Γ2+, because Γ2+ is directly related to the Mg2+-RNA interaction free energy. The excellent agreement with experiment demonstrates the model captures the ionic dependence of the RNA free energy landscape. PMID:26197147

  6. Atmospheric dynamics. Constrained work output of the moist atmospheric heat engine in a warming climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, F; Zika, J; Mudryk, L; Kushner, P J; Kjellsson, J; Döös, K

    2015-01-30

    Incoming and outgoing solar radiation couple with heat exchange at Earth's surface to drive weather patterns that redistribute heat and moisture around the globe, creating an atmospheric heat engine. Here, we investigate the engine's work output using thermodynamic diagrams computed from reanalyzed observations and from a climate model simulation with anthropogenic forcing. We show that the work output is always less than that of an equivalent Carnot cycle and that it is constrained by the power necessary to maintain the hydrological cycle. In the climate simulation, the hydrological cycle increases more rapidly than the equivalent Carnot cycle. We conclude that the intensification of the hydrological cycle in warmer climates might limit the heat engine's ability to generate work.

  7. Model atmospheres with periodic shocks. [pulsations and mass loss in variable stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. H.

    1989-01-01

    The pulsation of a long-period variable star generates shock waves which dramatically affect the structure of the star's atmosphere and produce conditions that lead to rapid mass loss. Numerical modeling of atmospheres with periodic shocks is being pursued to study the processes involved and the evolutionary consequences for the stars. It is characteristic of these complex dynamical systems that most effects result from the interaction of various time-dependent processes.

  8. Model atmospheres with periodic shocks. [pulsations and mass loss in variable stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. H.

    1989-01-01

    The pulsation of a long-period variable star generates shock waves which dramatically affect the structure of the star's atmosphere and produce conditions that lead to rapid mass loss. Numerical modeling of atmospheres with periodic shocks is being pursued to study the processes involved and the evolutionary consequences for the stars. It is characteristic of these complex dynamical systems that most effects result from the interaction of various time-dependent processes.

  9. Formulations of moist thermodynamics for atmospheric modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Marquet, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Internal energy, enthalpy and entropy are the key quantities to study thermodynamic properties of the moist atmosphere, because they correspond to the First (internal energy and enthalpy) and Second (entropy) Laws of thermodynamics. The aim of this chapter is to search for analytical formulas for the specific values of enthalpy and entropy and for the moist-air mixture composing the atmosphere. The Third Law of thermodynamics leads to the definition of absolute reference values for thermal enthalpies and entropies of all atmospheric species. It is shown in this Chapter 22 that it is possible to define and compute a general moist-air entropy potential temperature, which is really an equivalent of the moist-air specific entropy in all circumstances (saturated, or not saturated). Similarly, it is shown that it is possible to define and compute the moist-air specific enthalpy, which is different from the thermal part of what is called Moist-Static-Energy in atmospheric studies.

  10. 1-D Radiative-Convective Model for Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cecilia W. S.; Robinson, Tyler D.

    2016-10-01

    We present a one dimensional radiative-convective model to study the thermal structure of terrestrial exoplanetary atmospheres. The radiative transfer and equilibrium chemistry in our model is based on similar methodologies in models used for studying Extrasolar Giant Planets (Fortney et al. 2005b.) We validated our model in the optically thin and thick limits, and compared our pressure-temperature profiles against the analytical solutions of Robinson & Catling (2012). For extrasolar terrestrial planets with pure hydrogen atmospheres, we evaluated the effects of H2-H2 collision induced absorption and identified the purely roto-translational band in our modeled spectra. We also examined how enhanced atmospheric metallicities affect the temperature structure, chemistry, and spectra of terrestrial exoplanets. For a terrestrial extrasolar planet whose atmospheric compostion is 100 times solar orbiting a sun-like star at 2 AU, our model resulted in a reducing atmosphere with H2O, CH4, and NH3 as the dominant greenhouse gases.

  11. Atomic hydrogen distribution. [in Titan atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarie, N.

    1974-01-01

    Several possible H2 vertical distributions in Titan's atmosphere are considered with the constraint of 5 km-A a total quantity. Approximative calculations show that hydrogen distribution is quite sensitive to two other parameters of Titan's atmosphere: the temperature and the presence of other constituents. The escape fluxes of H and H2 are also estimated as well as the consequent distributions trapped in the Saturnian system.

  12. Spectral Characteristics of Atmospheric Turbulence Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuojunXINShida; LIUShikouLIU; 等

    1996-01-01

    In this paper,KdV-Burgers equation can be regarded as the normal equation of atmospheric turbulence in the stable boundary layer.On the basis of the travelling wave analytic solution of KdV-Burgers equation,the turbulent spectrum is obtained.We observe that the behavior of the spectra is consistent with actual turbulent spectra of stable atmospheric boundary layer.

  13. Atmospheric Modeling Using Accelerometer Data During Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Robert H.; Lugo, Rafael A.; Baird, Darren T.; Cianciolo, Alicia D.; Bougher, Stephen W.; Zurek, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft is a NASA orbiter designed to explore the Mars upper atmosphere, typically from 140 to 160 km altitude. In addition to the nominal science mission, MAVEN has performed several Deep Dip campaigns in which the orbit's closest point of approach, also called periapsis, was lowered to an altitude range of 115 to 135 km. MAVEN accelerometer data were used during mission operations to estimate atmospheric parameters such as density, scale height, along-track gradients, and wave structures. Density and scale height estimates were compared against those obtained from the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model and used to aid the MAVEN navigation team in planning maneuvers to raise and lower periapsis during Deep Dip operations. This paper describes the processes used to reconstruct atmosphere parameters from accelerometers data and presents the results of their comparison to model and navigation-derived values.

  14. Interaction of Atmospheric Turbulence with Blade Boundary Layer Dynamics on a 5MW Wind Turbine using Blade-Boundary-Layer-Resolved CFD with hybrid URANS-LES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayakumar, Ganesh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Brasseur, James [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Lavely, Adam; Jayaraman, Balaji; Craven, Brent

    2016-01-04

    We describe the response of the NREL 5 MW wind turbine blade boundary layer to the passage of atmospheric turbulence using blade-boundary-layer-resolved computational fluid dynamics with hybrid URANS-LES modeling.

  15. Cluster Analysis of Atmospheric Dynamics and Pollution Transport in a Coastal Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Anton; Dmitriev, Egor; Maksimovich, Elena; Delbarre, Hervé; Augustin, Patrick; Gengembre, Cyril; Fourmentin, Marc; Locoge, Nadine

    2016-06-01

    Summertime atmospheric dynamics in the coastal zone of the industrialized Dunkerque agglomeration in northern France was characterized by a cluster analysis of back trajectories in the context of pollution transport. The MESO-NH atmospheric model was used to simulate the local dynamics at multiple scales with horizontal resolution down to 500 m, and for the online calculation of the Lagrangian backward trajectories with 30-min temporal resolution. Airmass transport was performed along six principal pathways obtained by the weighted k-means clustering technique. Four of these centroids corresponded to a range of wind speeds over the English Channel: two for wind directions from the north-east and two from the south-west. Another pathway corresponded to a south-westerly continental transport. The backward trajectories of the largest and most dispersed sixth cluster contained low wind speeds, including sea-breeze circulations. Based on analyses of meteorological data and pollution measurements, the principal atmospheric pathways were related to local air-contamination events. Continuous air quality and meteorological data were collected during the Benzene-Toluene-Ethylbenzene-Xylene 2006 campaign. The sites of the pollution measurements served as the endpoints for the backward trajectories. Pollutant transport pathways corresponding to the highest air contamination were defined.

  16. Cluster Analysis of Atmospheric Dynamics and Pollution Transport in a Coastal Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Anton; Dmitriev, Egor; Maksimovich, Elena; Delbarre, Hervé; Augustin, Patrick; Gengembre, Cyril; Fourmentin, Marc; Locoge, Nadine

    2016-11-01

    Summertime atmospheric dynamics in the coastal zone of the industrialized Dunkerque agglomeration in northern France was characterized by a cluster analysis of back trajectories in the context of pollution transport. The MESO-NH atmospheric model was used to simulate the local dynamics at multiple scales with horizontal resolution down to 500 m, and for the online calculation of the Lagrangian backward trajectories with 30-min temporal resolution. Airmass transport was performed along six principal pathways obtained by the weighted k-means clustering technique. Four of these centroids corresponded to a range of wind speeds over the English Channel: two for wind directions from the north-east and two from the south-west. Another pathway corresponded to a south-westerly continental transport. The backward trajectories of the largest and most dispersed sixth cluster contained low wind speeds, including sea-breeze circulations. Based on analyses of meteorological data and pollution measurements, the principal atmospheric pathways were related to local air-contamination events. Continuous air quality and meteorological data were collected during the Benzene-Toluene-Ethylbenzene-Xylene 2006 campaign. The sites of the pollution measurements served as the endpoints for the backward trajectories. Pollutant transport pathways corresponding to the highest air contamination were defined.

  17. Mesoscale, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, O.

    1994-01-01

    Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen.......Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen....

  18. Dynamics of the middle atmosphere as observed by the ARISE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, E.

    2015-12-01

    It has been strongly demonstrated that variations in the circulation of the middle atmosphere influence weather and climate all the way to the Earth's surface. A key part of this coupling occurs through the propagation and breaking of planetary and gravity waves. However, limited observations prevent to faithfully reproduce the dynamics of the middle atmosphere in numerical weather prediction and climate models. The main challenge of the ARISE (Atmospheric dynamics InfraStructure in Europe) project is to combine existing national and international observation networks including: the International infrasound monitoring system developed for the CTBT (Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) verification, the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) lidar network, European observation infrastructures at mid latitudes (OHP observatory), tropics (Maïdo observatory), high latitudes (ALOMAR and EISCAT), infrasound stations which form a dense European network and satellites. The ARISE network is unique by its coverage (polar to equatorial regions in the European longitude sector), its altitude range (from troposphere to mesosphere and ionosphere) and the involved scales both in time (from seconds to tens of years) and space (from tens of meters to thousands of kilometers). Advanced data products are produced with the scope to assimilate data in the Weather Prediction models to improve future forecasts over weeks and seasonal time scales. ARISE observations are especially relevant for the monitoring of extreme events such as thunderstorms, volcanoes, meteors and at larger scales, deep convection and stratospheric warming events for physical processes description and study of long term evolution with climate change. Among the applications, ARISE fosters integration of innovative methods for remote detection of non-instrumented volcanoes including distant eruption characterization to provide notifications with reliable confidence indices to the

  19. Influence of vortex dynamics and atmospheric turbulence on the early evolution of a contrail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Paugam

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study describes three-dimensional numerical simulations of the evolution of an aircraft contrail during the first 30 min following the emission of exhausts. The wake is modeled as a vortex pair descending in a stratified atmosphere where turbulent fluctuations are sustained in the late dissipation regime. The focus of the study is laid on the interactions between vortex dynamics, atmospheric turbulence and contrail microphysics, and their role in determining the growth and the distribution of ice crystals. The atmospheric turbulence is synthesized using a methodology developed to force anisotropic turbulent fluctuations. The results show the feasibility of three-dimensional simulations of the early development of a contrail in supersaturated conditions before its transition into a contrail-cirrus. %(when radiative heating and sedimentation are no more negligible. It is shown that in case of strongly supersaturated and shear-free atmosphere the optical depth is maintained as the contrail spreads by turbulent diffusion in the late dissipation regime.

  20. Hadley cell dynamics of a cold and virtually dry Snowball Earth atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Aiko; Held, Isaac; Marotzke, Jochem

    2010-05-01

    We use the full-physics atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 to investigate a cold and virtually dry Snowball Earth atmosphere that results from specifying sea ice as the surface boundary condition everywhere, corresponding to a frozen aquaplanet, while keeping total solar irradiance at its present-day value of 1365 Wm-2. The aim of this study is the investigation of the zonal-mean circulation of a Snowball Earth atmosphere, which, due to missing moisture, might constitute an ideal though yet unexplored testbed for theories of atmospheric dynamics. To ease comparison with theories, incoming solar insolation follows permanent equinox conditions with disabled diurnal cycle. The meridional circulation consists of a thermally direct cell extending from the equator to 45 N/S with ascent in the equatorial region, and a weak thermally indirect cell with descent between 45 and 65 N/S and ascent in the polar region. The former cell corresponds to the present-day Earth's Hadley cell, while the latter can be viewed as an eddy-driven Ferrell cell; the present-day Earth's direct polar cell is missing. The Hadley cell itself is subdivided into a vigorous cell confined to the troposphere and a weak deep cell reaching well into the stratosphere. The dynamics of the vigorous Snowball Earth Hadley cell differ substantially from the dynamics of the present-day Hadley cell. The zonal momentum balance shows that in the poleward branch of the vigorous Hadley cell, mean flow meridional advection of absolute vorticity is not only balanced by eddy momentum flux convergence but also by vertical diffusion. Inside the poleward branch, eddies are more important in the upper part and vertical diffusion is more important in the lower part. Vertical diffusion also contributes to the meridional momentum balance as it decelerates the vigorous Hadley cell by downgradient momentum mixing between its poleward and equatorward branch. Zonal winds, therefore, are not in thermal wind balance in

  1. 2-D Chemical-Dynamical Modeling of Venus's Sulfur Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierson, Carver J.; Zhang, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Over the last decade a combination of ground based and Venus Express observations have been made of the concentration of sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere, both above [1, 2] and below the clouds [3, 4]. These observations put constraints on both the vertical and meridional variations of the major sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere.. It has also been observed that SO2 concentrations varies on both timescales of hours and years [1,4]. The spatial and temporal distribution of tracer species is owing to two possibilities: mutual chemical interaction and dynamical tracer transport.Previous Chemical modeling of Venus's middle atmosphere has only been explored in 1-D. We will present the first 2-D (altitude and latitude) chemical-dynamical model for Venus's middle atmosphere. The sulfur chemistry is based on of the 1D model of Zhang et al. 2012 [5]. We do model runs over multiple Venus decades testing two scenarios: first one with varying sulfur fluxes from below, and second with secular dynamical perturbations in the atmosphere [6]. By comparing to Venus Express and ground based observations, we put constraints on the dynamics of Venus's middle atmosphere.References: [1] Belyaev et al. Icarus 2012 [2] Marcq et al. Nature geoscience, 2013 [3] Marcq et al. JGR:Planets, 2008 [4] Arney et al. JGR:Planets, 2014 [5] Zhang et al. Icarus 2012 [6] Parish et al. Icarus 2012

  2. An Analytic Radiative-Convective Model for Planetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Tyler D; 10.1088/0004-637X/757/1/104

    2012-01-01

    We present an analytic 1-D radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries, (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunli...

  3. Isothermal evaporation of ethanol in a dynamic gas atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, Adriyan S; Wilson, Michael A; Kannangara, G S Kamali; Feng, Hai; Newman, Phillip A

    2012-01-12

    Optimization of evaporation and pyrolysis conditions for ethanol are important in carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis. The activation enthalpy (ΔH(‡)), the activation entropy (ΔS(‡)), and the free energy barrier (ΔG(‡)) to evaporation have been determined by measuring the molar coefficient of evaporation, k(evap), at nine different temperatures (30-70 °C) and four gas flow rates (25-200 mL/min) using nitrogen and argon as carrier gases. At 70 °C in argon, the effect of the gas flow rate on k(evap) and ΔG(‡) is small. However, this is not true at temperatures as low as 30 °C, where the increase of the gas flow rate from 25 to 200 mL/min results in a nearly 6 times increase of k(evap) and decrease of ΔG(‡) by ~5 kJ/mol. Therefore, at 30 °C, the effect of the gas flow rate on the ethanol evaporation rate is attributed to interactions of ethanol with argon molecules. This is supported by simultaneous infrared spectroscopic analysis of the evolved vapors, which demonstrates the presence of different amounts of linear and cyclic hydrogen bonded ethanol aggregates. While the amount of these aggregates at 30 °C depends upon the gas flow rate, no such dependence was observed during evaporation at 70 °C. When the evaporation was carried out in nitrogen, ΔG(‡) was almost independent of the evaporation temperature (30-70 °C) and the gas flow rate (25-200 mL/min). Thus the evaporation of ethanol in a dynamic gas atmosphere at different temperatures may go via different mechanisms depending on the nature of the carrier gas.

  4. Computer Modelling of Dynamic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rybakin

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of numerical modeling of dynamic problems are summed in the article up. These problems are characteristic for various areas of human activity, in particular for problem solving in ecology. The following problems are considered in the present work: computer modeling of dynamic effects on elastic-plastic bodies, calculation and determination of performances of gas streams in gas cleaning equipment, modeling of biogas formation processes.

  5. Structure and dynamical effects of the thermal tide in the Venus atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Ando, Hiroki; Matsuda, Yoshihisa

    2016-10-01

    We investigate structure and dynamical effects of the thermal tide in the Venus atmosphere by using a general circulation model (GCM). The thermal tide is important for the Venus atmospheric dynamics (Fels and Lindzen, 1974; Plumb, 1975; Newman and Leovy, 1992; Takagi and Matsuda, 2007). However, its three-dimensional structure has not been fully investigated so far. It is expected that detailed wind distributions of the thermal tide will be obtained by the Venus Climate Orbiter Akatsuki in the near future. It is necessary to investigate its structure so that the observational results can be interpreted in terms of dynamics. The GCM used in the present study is AFES for Venus (Sugimoto et al., 2014a, b). The resolution is set to T64L120. The model atmosphere extends from the ground to ~120 km. The infrared radiative transfer process is simplified by the Newtonian cooling approximation. See Sugimoto et al. (2014a, b) for more model details. The initial state is an idealized superrotating flow in solid body rotation. The GCM is integrated for 5 Earth years. The result shows that the semidiurnal and diurnal tides are predominant in low and high latitudes poleward of 60 degrees, respectively. The diurnal tide is trapped at 55-75 km levels; the phase is almost unchanged in the vertical direction. This result indicates that the subsolar-antisolar (SS-AS) circulation is predominant at these levels. The strong upward wind is located at early afternoon and near the morning and evening terminators. The vertical velocity of the SS-AS circulation is 0.04 m/s, which is ~10 times as fast as that of the mean meridional circulation (MMC). Titov et al. (2012) pointed out that dark regions are observed in the evening region, suggesting that the dark material is transported from below. These results suggest that the SS-AS circulation is quite important to the material transport at the cloud levels in the Venus atmosphere. The preliminary analysis also shows that the MMC at 50-90 km

  6. Modeling the effects of atmospheric emissions on groundwater composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.J.

    1994-12-31

    A composite model of atmospheric, unsaturated and groundwater transport is developed to evaluate the processes determining the distribution of atmospherically derived contaminants in groundwater systems and to test the sensitivity of simulated contaminant concentrations to input parameters and model linkages. One application is to screen specific atmospheric emissions for their potential in determining groundwater age. Temporal changes in atmospheric emissions could provide a recognizable pattern in the groundwater system. The model also provides a way for quantifying the significance of uncertainties in the tracer source term and transport parameters on the contaminant distribution in the groundwater system, an essential step in using the distribution of contaminants from local, point source atmospheric emissions to examine conceptual models of groundwater flow and transport.

  7. Dynamics models of soil organic carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGLi-xia; PANJian-jun

    2003-01-01

    As the largest pool of terrestrial organic carbon, soils interact strongly with atmosphere composition, climate, and land change. Soil organic carbon dynamics in ecosystem plays a great role in global carbon cycle and global change. With development of mathematical models that simulate changes in soil organic carbon, there have been considerable advances in understanding soil organic carbon dynamics. This paper mainly reviewed the composition of soil organic matter and its influenced factors, and recommended some soil organic matter models worldwide. Based on the analyses of the developed results at home and abroad, it is suggested that future soil organic matter models should be developed toward based-process models, and not always empirical ones. The models are able to reveal their interaction between soil carbon systems, climate and land cover by technique and methods of GIS (Geographical Information System) and RS (Remote Sensing). These models should be developed at a global scale, in dynamically describing the spatial and temporal changes of soil organic matter cycle. Meanwhile, the further researches on models should be strengthen for providing theory basis and foundation in making policy of green house gas emission in China.

  8. A Atmospheric Dispersion Model for the Sudbury, Ontario, Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, Frank Jones

    1982-03-01

    A mathematical model was developed and tested to predict the relationship between sulphur oxide and trace metal emissions from smelters in the Sudbury, Ontario area, and atmospheric, precipitation, lake water and sediment chemistry. The model consists of atmospheric and lake chemistry portions. The atmospheric model is a Gaussian crosswind concentration distribution modification to a box model with a uniform vertical concentration gradient limited by a mixing height. In the near-field Briggs' plume rise and vertical dispersion terms are utilized. Oxidation, wet and dry deposition mechanisms are included to account for the gas, liquid and solid phases separately. Important improvements over existing models include (1) near- and far-field conditions treated in a single model; (2) direct linkage of crosswind dispersion to hourly meteorological observations; (3) utilization of maximum to minimum range of input parameters to realistically model the range of outputs; (4) direct linkage of the atmospheric model to a lake model. Precipitation chemistry as calculated by the atmospheric model is related to lake water and sediment chemistry utilizing a mass balance approach and assuming a continuously stirred reactor (CSTR) model to describe lake circulation. All inputs are atmospheric, modified by hydrology, soil chemistry and sedimentation. Model results were tested by comparison with existing atmospheric and precipitation chemistry measurements, supplemented with analyses of lake water and sediment chemistry collected in a field program. Eight pollutant species were selected for modeling: sulphur dioxide, sulphate ion, hydrogen ion, copper, nickel, lead, zinc, and iron. The model effectively predicts precipitation chemistry within 150 km of Sudbury, with an average prediction to measurement ratio of 90 percent. Atmospheric concentrations are effectively predicted within 80 km, with an average prediction to measurement ratio of 81 percent. Lake chemistry predictions are

  9. Launch Vehicle Dynamics Demonstrator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    Launch Vehicle Dynamics Demonstrator Model. The effect of vibration on launch vehicle dynamics was studied. Conditions included three modes of instability. The film includes close up views of the simulator fuel tank with and without stability control. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030984. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  10. Generative models of conformational dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmead, Christopher James

    2014-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of the conformational dynamics of proteins can be performed using either Molecular Dynamics or Monte Carlo procedures. The ensembles of three-dimensional structures produced during simulation can be analyzed in a number of ways to elucidate the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system. The goal of this chapter is to review both traditional and emerging methods for learning generative models from atomistic simulation data. Here, the term 'generative' refers to a model of the joint probability distribution over the behaviors of the constituent atoms. In the context of molecular modeling, generative models reveal the correlation structure between the atoms, and may be used to predict how the system will respond to structural perturbations. We begin by discussing traditional methods, which produce multivariate Gaussian models. We then discuss GAMELAN (GRAPHICAL MODELS OF ENERGY LANDSCAPES), which produces generative models of complex, non-Gaussian conformational dynamics (e.g., allostery, binding, folding, etc.) from long timescale simulation data.

  11. Use of coupled ozone fields in a 3-D circulation model of the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Reddmann

    Full Text Available With a detailed chemistry scheme for the middle atmosphere up to 70 km which has been added to the 3-D Karlsruhe simulation model of the middle atmosphere (KASIMA, the effects of coupling chemistry and dynamics through ozone are studied for the middle atmosphere. An uncoupled version using an ozone climatology for determining heating rates and a coupled version using on-line ozone are compared in a 10-month integration with meteorological analyses for the winter 1992/93 as the lower boundary condition. Both versions simulate the meteorological situation satisfactorily, but exhibit a too cold lower stratosphere. The on-line ozone differs from the climatological data between 20 and 40 km by exhibiting too high ozone values, whereas in the lower mesosphere the ozone values are too low. The coupled model version is stable and differs only above 40 km significantly from the uncoupled version. Direct heating effects are identified to cause most of the differences. The well-known negative correlation between temperature and ozone is reproduced in the model. As a result, the coupled version slightly approaches the climatological ozone field. Further feedback effects are studied by using the on-line ozone field as a basis for an artificial climatology. For non-disturbed ozone conditions realistic monthly and zonally averaged ozone data are sufficient to determine the heating rates for modelling the middle atmosphere.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere · composition and chemistry · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics.

  12. Fractal Models of Earthquake Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Pathikrit; Kamal,; Samanta, Debashis

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of earthquakes is based on the theory of plate tectonics. Earthquake dynamics is the study of the interactions of plates (solid disjoint parts of the lithosphere) which produce seismic activity. Over the last about fifty years many models have come up which try to simulate seismic activity by mimicking plate plate interactions. The validity of a given model is subject to the compliance of the synthetic seismic activity it produces to the well known empirical laws which describe the statistical features of observed seismic activity. Here we present a review of two such models of earthquake dynamics with main focus on a relatively new model namely The Two Fractal Overlap Model.

  13. Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

    2006-08-04

    The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the ocean’s thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

  14. Global wetland contribution to 2000–2012 atmospheric methane growth rate dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, Benjamin; Bousquet, Philippe; Canadell, Josep G.; Ciais, Philippe; Peregon, Anna; Saunois, Marielle; Arora, Vivek K.; Beerling, David J.; Brovkin, Victor; Jones, Chris D.; Joos, Fortunat; Gedney, Nicola; Ito, Akihito; Kleinen, Thomas; Koven, Charles D.; McDonald, Kyle; Melton, Joe R.; Peng, Changhui; Peng, Shushi; Prigent, Catherine; Schroeder, Ronny; Riley, William J.; Saito, Makoto; Spahni, Renato; Tian, Hanqin; Taylor, Lyla; Viovy, Nicolas; Wilton, David; Wiltshire, Andy; Xu, Xiyan; Zhang, Bowen; Zhang, Zhen; Zhu, Qiuan

    2017-09-01

    Increasing atmospheric methane (CH4) concentrations have contributed to approximately 20% of anthropogenic climate change. Despite the importance of CH4 as a greenhouse gas, its atmospheric growth rate and dynamics over the past two decades, which include a stabilization period (1999–2006), followed by renewed growth starting in 2007, remain poorly understood. We provide an updated estimate of CH4 emissions from wetlands, the largest natural global CH4 source, for 2000–2012 using an ensemble of biogeochemical models constrained with remote sensing surface inundation and inventory-based wetland area data. Between 2000–2012, boreal wetland CH4 emissions increased by 1.2 Tg yr‑1 (‑0.2–3.5 Tg yr‑1), tropical emissions decreased by 0.9 Tg yr‑1 (‑3.2‑1.1 Tg yr‑1), yet globally, emissions remained unchanged at 184 ± 22 Tg yr‑1. Changing air temperature was responsible for increasing high-latitude emissions whereas declines in low-latitude wetland area decreased tropical emissions; both dynamics are consistent with features of predicted centennial-scale climate change impacts on wetland CH4 emissions. Despite uncertainties in wetland area mapping, our study shows that global wetland CH4 emissions have not contributed significantly to the period of renewed atmospheric CH4 growth, and is consistent with findings from studies that indicate some combination of increasing fossil fuel and agriculture-related CH4 emissions, and a decrease in the atmospheric oxidative sink.

  15. Dynamical Opacity-Sampling Models of Mira Variables. I: Modelling Description and Analysis of Approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Ireland, M J; Wood, P R

    2008-01-01

    We describe the Cool Opacity-sampling Dynamic EXtended (CODEX) atmosphere models of Mira variable stars, and examine in detail the physical and numerical approximations that go in to the model creation. The CODEX atmospheric models are obtained by computing the temperature and the chemical and radiative states of the atmospheric layers, assuming gas pressure and velocity profiles from Mira pulsation models, which extend from near the H-burning shell to the outer layers of the atmosphere. Although the code uses the approximation of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) and a grey approximation in the dynamical atmosphere code, many key observable quantities, such as infrared diameters and low-resolution spectra, are predicted robustly in spite of these approximations. We show that in visible light, radiation from Mira variables is dominated by fluorescence scattering processes, and that the LTE approximation likely under-predicts visible-band fluxes by a factor of two.

  16. Dynamic programming models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Denardo, Eric V

    2003-01-01

    Introduction to sequential decision processes covers use of dynamic programming in studying models of resource allocation, methods for approximating solutions of control problems in continuous time, production control, more. 1982 edition.

  17. Building dynamic spatial environmental models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    An environmental model is a representation or imitation of complex natural phenomena that can be discerned by human cognitive processes. This thesis deals with the type of environmental models referred to as dynamic spatial environmental models. The word ‘spatial’ refers to the geographic domain whi

  18. Dynamical models of the Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillan P.J.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available I discuss the importance of dynamical models for exploiting survey data, focusing on the advantages of “torus” models. I summarize a number of applications of these models to the study of the Milky Way, including the determination of the peculiar Solar velocity and investigation of the Hyades moving group.

  19. Estimate Total Number of the Earth Atmospheric Particle with Standard Atmosphere Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chong-Yi

    2001-01-01

    The total number of atmospheric particle (AP) is an important datum for planetary science and geoscience.Estimating entire AP number is also a familiar question in general physics.With standard atmosphere model,considering the number difference of AP caused by rough and uneven in the earth surface below,the sum of dry clean atmosphere particle is 1.06962 × 1044.So the whole number of AP including water vapor is 1.0740 × 1044.The rough estimation for the total number of AP on other planets (or satellites) in condensed state is also discussed on the base of it.

  20. Atmospheric dispersion models help to improve air quality; Los modelos de dispersion atmosferica ayudan a mejorar la calidad del aire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.

    2013-07-01

    One of the main challenges of the atmospheric sciences is to reproduce as well as possible the phenomena and processes of pollutants in the atmosphere. To do it, mathematical models based in this case on fluid dynamics and mass and energy conservation equations, equations that govern the atmospheric chemistry, etc., adapted to the spatial scales to be simulated, are developed. The dispersion models simulate the processes of transport, dispersion, chemical transformation and elimination by deposition that air pollutants undergo once they are emitted. Atmospheric dispersion models with their multiple applications have become essential tools for the air quality management. (Author)

  1. Fluctuations, response, and resonances in a simple atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsun, Andrey; Lucarini, Valerio

    2017-06-01

    We study the response of a simple quasi-geostrophic barotropic model of the atmosphere to various classes of perturbations affecting its forcing and its dissipation using the formalism of the Ruelle response theory. We investigate the geometry of such perturbations by constructing the covariant Lyapunov vectors of the unperturbed system and discover in one specific case-orographic forcing-a substantial projection of the forcing onto the stable directions of the flow. This results into a resonant response shaped as a Rossby-like wave that has no resemblance to the unforced variability in the same range of spatial and temporal scales. Such a climatic surprise corresponds to a violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, in agreement with the basic tenets of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The resonance can be attributed to a specific group of rarely visited unstable periodic orbits of the unperturbed system. Our results reinforce the idea of using basic methods of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics and high-dimensional chaotic dynamical systems to approach the problem of understanding climate dynamics.

  2. Validated dynamic flow model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The purpose with this deliverable 2.5 is to use fresh experimental data for validation and selection of a flow model to be used for control design in WP3-4. Initially the idea was to investigate the models developed in WP2. However, in the project it was agreed to include and focus on a additive...... model turns out not to be useful for prediction of the flow. Moreover, standard Box Jenkins model structures and multiple output auto regressive models proves to be superior as they can give useful predictions of the flow....

  3. SMART - a computer program for modelling stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Aret, Anna; Poolamäe, Raivo; Sapar, Lili

    2013-01-01

    Program SMART (Spectra and Model Atmospheres by Radiative Transfer) has been composed for modelling atmospheres and spectra of hot stars (O, B and A spectral classes) and studying different physical processes in them (Sapar & Poolam\\"ae 2003, Sapar et al. 2007). Line-blanketed models are computed assuming plane-parallel, static and horizontally homogeneous atmosphere in radiative, hydrostatic and local thermodynamic equilibrium. Main advantages of SMART are its shortness, simplicity, user friendliness and flexibility for study of different physical processes. SMART successfully runs on PC both under Windows and Linux.

  4. COLD-SAT dynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Neil S.; Bollenbacher, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the development and underlying mathematics of a rigid-body computer model of a proposed cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage, acquisition, and transfer spacecraft (COLD-SAT). This model, referred to in this report as the COLD-SAT dynamic model, consists of both a trajectory model and an attitudinal model. All disturbance forces and torques expected to be significant for the actual COLD-SAT spacecraft are modeled to the required degree of accuracy. Control and experimental thrusters are modeled, as well as fluid slosh. The model also computes microgravity disturbance accelerations at any specified point in the spacecraft. The model was developed by using the Boeing EASY5 dynamic analysis package and will run on Apollo, Cray, and other computing platforms.

  5. A theoretical model of atmospheric ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midya, S. K.; Jana, P. K.; Lahiri, T.

    1994-01-01

    A critical study on different ozone depletion and formation processes has been made and following important results are obtained: (i) From analysis it is shown that O3 concentration will decrease very minutely with time for normal atmosphere when [O], [O2] and UV-radiation remain constant. (ii) An empirical equation is established theoretically between the variation of ozone concentration and time. (iii) Special ozone depletion processes are responsible for the dramatic decrease of O3-concentration at Antarctica.

  6. Some issues on modeling atmospheric turbulence experienced by helicopter rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Mark; Gaonkar, G. H.; Prasad, J. V. R.; Schrage, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The atmospheric turbulence velocities seen by nonrotating aircraft components and rotating blades can be substantially different. The differences are due to the spatial motion of the rotor blades, which move fore and aft through the gust waves. Body-fixed atmospheric turbulence refers to the actual atmospheric turbulence experienced by a point fixed on a nonrotating aircraft component such as the aircraft's center of gravity or the rotor hub, while blade-fixed atmospheric turbulence refers to the atmospheric turbulence experienced by an element of the rotating rotor blade. An example is presented, which, though overly simplified, shows important differences between blade- and body-fixed rotorcraft atmospheric turbulence models. All of the information necessary to develop the dynamic equations describing the atmospheric turbulence velocity field experienced by an aircraft is contained in the atmospheric turbulence velocity correlation matrix. It is for this reason that a generalized formulation of the correlation matrix describing atmospheric turbulence that a rotating blade encounters is developed. From this correlation matrix, earlier treated cases restricted to a rotor flying straight and level directly into the mean wind can be recovered as special cases.

  7. Review of the Study of Nonlinear Atmospheric Dynamics in China (1999-2002)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刁一娜; 封国林; 刘式达; 刘式适; 罗德海; 黄思训; 陆维松; 丑纪范

    2004-01-01

    Researches on nonlinear atmospheric dynamics in China (1999-2002) are briefly surveyed. This review includes the major achievements in the following branches of nonlinear dynamics: nonlinear stability theory,nonlinear blocking dynamics, 3D spiral structure in the atmosphere, traveling wave solution of the nonlinear evolution equation, numerical predictability in a chaotic system, and global analysis of climate dynamics.Some applications of nonlinear methods such as hierarchy structure of climate and scaling invariance, the spatial-temporal series predictive method, the nonlinear inverse problem, and a new difference scheme with multi-time levels are also introduced.

  8. Memory efficient atmospheric effects modeling for infrared scene generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavak, Çaǧlar; Özsaraç, Seçkin

    2015-05-01

    The infrared (IR) energy radiated from any source passes through the atmosphere before reaching the sensor. As a result, the total signature captured by the IR sensor is significantly modified by the atmospheric effects. The dominant physical quantities that constitute the mentioned atmospheric effects are the atmospheric transmittance and the atmospheric path radiance. The incoming IR radiation is attenuated by the transmittance and path radiance is added on top of the attenuated radiation. In IR scene simulations OpenGL is widely used for rendering purposes. In the literature there are studies, which model the atmospheric effects in an IR band using OpenGLs exponential fog model as suggested by Beers law. In the standard pipeline of OpenGL, the related fog model needs single equivalent OpenGL variables for the transmittance and path radiance, which actually depend on both the distance between the source and the sensor and also on the wavelength of interest. However, in the conditions where the range dependency cannot be modeled as an exponential function, it is not accurate to replace the atmospheric quantities with a single parameter. The introduction of OpenGL Shading Language (GLSL) has enabled the developers to use the GPU more flexible. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for the atmospheric effects modeling using the least squares estimation with polynomial fitting by programmable OpenGL shader programs built with GLSL. In this context, a radiative transfer model code is used to obtain the transmittance and path radiance data. Then, polynomial fits are computed for the range dependency of these variables. Hence, the atmospheric effects model data that will be uploaded in the GPU memory is significantly reduced. Moreover, the error because of fitting is negligible as long as narrow IR bands are used.

  9. Atmospheric monitoring and model applications at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilhauer, Bianca

    2015-03-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory detects high-energy cosmic rays with energies above ˜1017 eV. It is built as a multi-hybrid detector measuring extensive air showers with different techniques. For the reconstruction of extensive air showers, the atmospheric conditions at the site of the Observatory have to be known quite well. This is particularly true for reconstructions based on data obtained by the fluorescence technique. For these data, not only the weather conditions near ground are relevant, most important are altitude-dependent atmospheric profiles. The Pierre Auger Observatory has set up a dedicated atmospheric monitoring programme at the site in the Mendoza province, Argentina. Beyond this, exploratory studies were performed in Colorado, USA, for possible installations in the northern hemisphere. In recent years, the atmospheric monitoring programme at the Pierre Auger Observatory was supplemented by applying data from atmospheric models. Both GDAS and HYSPLIT are developments by the US weather department NOAA and the data are freely available. GDAS is a global model of the atmospheric state parameters on a 1 degree geographical grid, based on real-time measurements and numeric weather predictions, providing a full altitude-dependent data set every 3 hours. HYSPLIT is a powerful tool to track the movement of air masses at various heights, and with it the aerosols. Combining local measurements of the atmospheric state variables and aerosol scattering with the given model data, advanced studies about atmospheric conditions can be performed and high precision air shower reconstructions are achieved.

  10. A non-grey analytical model for irradiated atmospheres. I: Derivation

    CERN Document Server

    Parmentier, Vivien

    2013-01-01

    Context. Semi-grey atmospheric models (with one opacity for the visible and one opacity for the infrared) are useful to understand the global structure of irradiated atmospheres, their dynamics and the interior structure and evolution of planets, brown dwarfs and stars. But when compared to direct numerical radiative transfer calculations for irradiated exoplanets, these models systematically overestimate the temperatures at low optical depth, independently of the opacity parameters. We wish to understand why semi-grey models fail at low optical depths, and provide a more accurate approximation to the atmospheric structure by accounting for the variable opacity in the infrared. Our analytical irradiated non-grey model is found to provide a range of temperatures that is consistent with that obtained by numerical calculations. We find that even for slightly non-grey thermal opacities the temperature structure differs significantly from previous semi-grey models. For small values of beta (expected when lines are...

  11. Outer scales of temperature turbulence and dynamic turbulence from the data of acoustic sounding of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanaeva, L. G.; Krasnenko, N. P.; Kapegesheva, O. F.

    2014-11-01

    The outer scale of turbulence plays an important role in the theory of atmospheric turbulence. It specifies the lowfrequency boundary of the inertial subrange of fluctuation spectra of the atmospheric meteorological parameters, is used to construct models of the atmospheric turbulence and to estimate the excess turbulent attenuation of waves in the atmosphere. Outer scales of the wind velocity, temperature, humidity, and ozone concentration were previously determined, in particular, from direct airborne measurements of the spectral power density of these parameters, and their dependences on the altitude above the underlying surface, its properties, and type of the atmospheric stratification were demonstrated. For optical radiation propagating in the surface layer, the outer scale of temperature turbulence was determined from measurements of the variance of phase fluctuations of optical waves propagating along the near-ground paths. Unlike the optical waves, the acoustic wave propagation in the atmospheric boundary layer is influenced simultaneously by the temperature fluctuations caused by thermal convection and by the velocity fluctuations (dynamic turbulence caused by the wind shear). Their relative contributions depend on the ratio of the outer scales of the dynamic turbulence and temperature turbulence. In the present work, a method of simultaneous acoustic sounding of the outer scales of dynamic turbulence and temperature turbulence is suggested, and combined influence of these parameters on the acoustic wave propagation is estimated. Temporal dynamics of vertical profiles of the outer scales of dynamic turbulence and temperature turbulence is analyzed. The efficiency of the suggested method is confirmed by the results of comparison with the data of laser sensing of these parameters and their theoretical estimates, which demonstrate their good agreement.

  12. Comparison of modelled and empirical atmospheric propagation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, J. R.; Biegel, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The radiometric integrity of TM thermal infrared channel data was evaluated and monitored to develop improved radiometric preprocessing calibration techniques for removal of atmospheric effects. Modelled atmospheric transmittance and path radiance were compared with empirical values derived from aircraft underflight data. Aircraft thermal infrared imagery and calibration data were available on two dates as were corresponding atmospheric radiosonde data. The radiosonde data were used as input to the LOWTRAN 5A code which was modified to output atmospheric path radiance in addition to transmittance. The aircraft data were calibrated and used to generate analogous measurements. These data indicate that there is a tendancy for the LOWTRAN model to underestimate atmospheric path radiance and transmittance as compared to empirical data. A plot of transmittance versus altitude for both LOWTRAN and empirical data is presented.

  13. Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code: a flexible method for solution of the birth-death equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. McGrath

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code (ACDC is presented and explored. This program was created to study the first steps of atmospheric new particle formation by examining the formation of molecular clusters from atmospherically relevant molecules. The program models the cluster kinetics by explicit solution of the birth–death equations, using an efficient computer script for their generation and the MATLAB ode15s routine for their solution. Through the use of evaporation rate coefficients derived from formation free energies calculated by quantum chemical methods for clusters containing dimethylamine or ammonia and sulphuric acid, we have explored the effect of changing various parameters at atmospherically relevant monomer concentrations. We have included in our model clusters with 0–4 base molecules and 0–4 sulfuric acid molecules for which we have commensurable quantum chemical data. The tests demonstrate that large effects can be seen for even small changes in different parameters, due to the non-linearity of the system. In particular, changing the temperature had a significant impact on the steady-state concentrations of all clusters, while the boundary effects (allowing clusters to grow to sizes beyond the largest cluster that the code keeps track of, or forbidding such processes, coagulation sink terms, non-monomer collisions, sticking probabilities and monomer concentrations did not show as large effects under the conditions studied. Removal of coagulation sink terms prevented the system from reaching the steady state when all the initial cluster concentrations were set to the default value of 1 m−3, which is probably an effect caused by studying only relatively small cluster sizes.

  14. Testing substellar models with dynamical mass measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu M.C.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We have been using Keck laser guide star adaptive optics to monitor the orbits of ultracool binaries, providing dynamical masses at lower luminosities and temperatures than previously available and enabling strong tests of theoretical models. We have identified three specific problems with theory: (1 We find that model color–magnitude diagrams cannot be reliably used to infer masses as they do not accurately reproduce the colors of ultracool dwarfs of known mass. (2 Effective temperatures inferred from evolutionary model radii are typically inconsistent with temperatures derived from fitting atmospheric models to observed spectra by 100–300 K. (3 For the only known pair of field brown dwarfs with a precise mass (3% and age determination (≈25%, the measured luminosities are ~2–3× higher than predicted by model cooling rates (i.e., masses inferred from Lbol and age are 20–30% larger than measured. To make progress in understanding the observed discrepancies, more mass measurements spanning a wide range of luminosity, temperature, and age are needed, along with more accurate age determinations (e.g., via asteroseismology for primary stars with brown dwarf binary companions. Also, resolved optical and infrared spectroscopy are needed to measure lithium depletion and to characterize the atmospheres of binary components in order to better assess model deficiencies.

  15. Dynamic Boolean models

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, van den, Aad; Meester, R.; White, Damien

    1997-01-01

    Consider an ordinary Boolean model, that is, a homogeneous Poisson point process in Rd, where the points are all centres of random balls with i.i.d. radii. Now let these points move around according to i.i.d. stochastic processes. It is not hard to show that at each xed time t we again have a Boolean model with the original distribution. Hence if the original model is supercritical then, for any t, the probability of having an unbounded occupied component at time t equals 1. We show that unde...

  16. CHIMERE 2013: a model for regional atmospheric composition modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Menut

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources, stagnant meteorological conditions, kinetics and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative contribution to the pollutants budgets can be quantified with chemistry-transport models. The CHIMERE chemistry-transport model is dedicated to regional atmospheric pollution event studies. Since it has now reached a certain level a maturity, the new stable version, CHIMERE 2013, is described to provide a reference model paper. The successive developments of the model are reviewed on the basis of published investigations that are referenced in order to discuss the scientific choices and to provide an overview of the main results.

  17. Exact results in modeling planetary atmospheres-II. Semi-gray atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutily, B. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Chevallier, L. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Laboratoire LUTH, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France); Pelkowski, J. [Institut fuer Atmosphaere und Umwelt, J.W. Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Campus Riedberg, Altenhaferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany)], E-mail: Pelkowski@meteor.uni-frankfurt.de; Bergeat, J. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France)

    2008-01-15

    We solve the radiative transfer equation for a semi-gray planetary atmosphere in radiative equilibrium, in an attempt to define an entirely analytical non-gray model atmosphere of finite optical thickness. The salient feature of the model is that the incident solar radiation is partitioned between two adjacent spectral domains-the 'visible' and the 'infrared'-in each of which the atmosphere's (effective) opacity is assumed to be independent of frequency (the semi-gray assumption). We envisage a plane-parallel atmosphere illuminated by a beam of parallel radiation and bounded below by a partially reflecting and emitting ground. The former emits infrared radiation, induced by the absorption of radiation both visible and infrared, deriving from the external irradiation as well as from the emission of the planet's surface layer. For an atmosphere with given single-scattering albedos and optical thicknesses in both the visible and infrared domains, we compute the temperature at every depth of the atmosphere, as well as the ground's temperature.

  18. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the islands of Samoa at...

  19. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the island of Guam at...

  20. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: CNMI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the Commonwealth of the Northern...

  1. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Oahu

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 3.5-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the Hawaiian island of Oahu at...

  2. Fast and simple model for atmospheric radiative transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, F.C.; Kokhanovsky, A.A.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Radiative transfer models (RTMs) are of utmost importance for quantitative remote sensing, especially for compensating atmospheric perturbation. A persistent trade-off exists between approaches that prefer accuracy at the cost of computational complexity, versus those favouring simplicity at the

  3. An Updated Coupled Model for Land-Atmosphere Interaction. Part Ⅰ: Simulations of Physical Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Hongling; WANG Zaizhi; JI Jinjun; WU Guoxiong

    2008-01-01

    A new two-way land-atmosphere interaction model (R42_AVIM) is fulfilled by coupling the spectral at- mospheric model (SAMIL_R42L9) developed at the State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmo- spheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sci- ences (LASG/IAP/CAS) with the land surface model, Atmosphere-Vegetation-Interaction-Model (AVIM). In this coupled model, physical and biological components of AVIM are both included. Climate base state and land surface physical fluxes simulated by R42_AVIM are analyzed and compared with the results of R42_SSIB [which is coupled by SAMIL_R42L9 and Simplified Simple Biosphere (SSIB) models]. The results show the performance of the new model is closer to the observations. It can basically guarantee that the land surface energy budget is balanced, and can simulate June-July-August (JJA) and December-January- February (DJF) land surface air temperature, sensible heat flux, latent heat flux, precipitation, sea level pressure and other variables reasonably well. Compared with R42_SSIB, there are obvious improvements in the JJA simulations of surface air temperature and surface fluxes. Thus, this land-atmosphere coupled model will offer a good experiment platform for land-atmosphere interaction research.

  4. Parallel Semi-Implicit Spectral Element Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, A.; Thomas, S.; Loft, R.

    2001-05-01

    The shallow-water equations (SWE) have long been used to test atmospheric-modeling numerical methods. The SWE contain essential wave-propagation and nonlinear effects of more complete models. We present a semi-implicit (SI) improvement of the Spectral Element Atmospheric Model to solve the SWE (SEAM, Taylor et al. 1997, Fournier et al. 2000, Thomas & Loft 2000). SE methods are h-p finite element methods combining the geometric flexibility of size-h finite elements with the accuracy of degree-p spectral methods. Our work suggests that exceptional parallel-computation performance is achievable by a General-Circulation-Model (GCM) dynamical core, even at modest climate-simulation resolutions (>1o). The code derivation involves weak variational formulation of the SWE, Gauss(-Lobatto) quadrature over the collocation points, and Legendre cardinal interpolators. Appropriate weak variation yields a symmetric positive-definite Helmholtz operator. To meet the Ladyzhenskaya-Babuska-Brezzi inf-sup condition and avoid spurious modes, we use a staggered grid. The SI scheme combines leapfrog and Crank-Nicholson schemes for the nonlinear and linear terms respectively. The localization of operations to elements ideally fits the method to cache-based microprocessor computer architectures --derivatives are computed as collections of small (8x8), naturally cache-blocked matrix-vector products. SEAM also has desirable boundary-exchange communication, like finite-difference models. Timings on on the IBM SP and Compaq ES40 supercomputers indicate that the SI code (20-min timestep) requires 1/3 the CPU time of the explicit code (2-min timestep) for T42 resolutions. Both codes scale nearly linearly out to 400 processors. We achieved single-processor performance up to 30% of peak for both codes on the 375-MHz IBM Power-3 processors. Fast computation and linear scaling lead to a useful climate-simulation dycore only if enough model time is computed per unit wall-clock time. An efficient SI

  5. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Blackwell, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Group dynamic movement is a fundamental aspect of many species' movements. The need to adequately model individuals' interactions with other group members has been recognised, particularly in order to differentiate the role of social forces in individual movement from environmental factors. However......, to date, practical statistical methods which can include group dynamics in animal movement models have been lacking. We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level model, describing the movement of the group's centre, and an individual-level model, such that each individual...... makes its movement decisions relative to the group centroid. The basic idea is framed within the flexible class of hidden Markov models, extending previous work on modelling animal movement by means of multi-state random walks. While in simulation experiments parameter estimators exhibit some bias...

  6. Accelerating Atmospheric Modeling Through Emerging Multi-core Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Linford, John Christian

    2010-01-01

    The new generations of multi-core chipset architectures achieve unprecedented levels of computational power while respecting physical and economical constraints. The cost of this power is bewildering program complexity. Atmospheric modeling is a grand-challenge problem that could make good use of these architectures if they were more accessible to the average programmer. To that end, software tools and programming methodologies that greatly simplify the acceleration of atmospheric modeling...

  7. Stochastic modelling and predictability: analysis of a low-order coupled ocean-atmosphere model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2014-06-28

    There is a growing interest in developing stochastic schemes for the description of processes that are poorly represented in atmospheric and climate models, in order to increase their variability and reduce the impact of model errors. The use of such noise could however have adverse effects by modifying in undesired ways a certain number of moments of their probability distributions. In this work, the impact of developing a stochastic scheme (based on stochastic averaging) for the ocean is explored in the context of a low-order coupled (deterministic) ocean-atmosphere system. After briefly analysing its variability, its ability in predicting the oceanic flow generated by the coupled system is investigated. Different phases in the error dynamics are found: for short lead times, an initial overdispersion of the ensemble forecast is present while the ensemble mean follows a dynamics reminiscent of the combined amplification of initial condition and model errors for deterministic systems; for longer lead times, a reliable diffusive ensemble spread is observed. These different phases are also found for ensemble-oriented skill measures like the Brier score and the rank histogram. The implications of these features on building stochastic models are then briefly discussed.

  8. Modeling Cultural Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gabora, Liane

    2008-01-01

    EVOC (for EVOlution of Culture) is a computer model of culture that enables us to investigate how various factors such as barriers to cultural diffusion, the presence and choice of leaders, or changes in the ratio of innovation to imitation affect the diversity and effectiveness of ideas. It consists of neural network based agents that invent ideas for actions, and imitate neighbors' actions. The model is based on a theory of culture according to which what evolves through culture is not memes or artifacts, but the internal models of the world that give rise to them, and they evolve not through a Darwinian process of competitive exclusion but a Lamarckian process involving exchange of innovation protocols. EVOC shows an increase in mean fitness of actions over time, and an increase and then decrease in the diversity of actions. Diversity of actions is positively correlated with population size and density, and with barriers between populations. Slowly eroding borders increase fitness without sacrificing diver...

  9. Swimmers’ Collective Dynamics Modelization

    OpenAIRE

    Ferré Porta, Guillem

    2011-01-01

    English: We describe a new model in order to study the properties of collections of self-propelled particles swimming in a two-dimensional fluid. Our model consist in two types of particles, the first interacting with each other with a soft potential and thus representing the fluid while the second type are self-propelled particles of biological nature capable of changing its orientation following the velocity field of the fluid. The results of the simulations show how a super-diffusive regim...

  10. Evaluation protocol for the WIND system atmospheric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion models have been developed for real-time calculations of the location and concentration of toxic or radioactive materials during a accidental release at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These models are have been incorporated into an automated menu-driven computer based system called the WIND (Weather INformation and Display) system. In an effort to establish more formal quality assurance procedures for the WIND system atmospheric codes, a software evaluation protocol is being developed. An evaluation protocol is necessary to determine how well they may perform in emergency response (real-time) situations. The evaluation of high-impact software must be conducted in accordance with WSRC QA Manual, 1Q, QAP 20-1. This report will describe the method that will be used to evaluate the atmospheric models. The evaluation will determine the effectiveness of the atmospheric models in emergency response situations, which is not necessarily the same procedure used for research purposes. The format of the evaluation plan will provide guidance for the evaluation of atmospheric models that may be added to the WIND system in the future. The evaluation plan is designed to provide the user with information about the WIND system atmospheric models that is necessary for emergency response situations.

  11. Evaluation protocol for the WIND system atmospheric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion models have been developed for real-time calculations of the location and concentration of toxic or radioactive materials during a accidental release at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These models are have been incorporated into an automated menu-driven computer based system called the WIND (Weather INformation and Display) system. In an effort to establish more formal quality assurance procedures for the WIND system atmospheric codes, a software evaluation protocol is being developed. An evaluation protocol is necessary to determine how well they may perform in emergency response (real-time) situations. The evaluation of high-impact software must be conducted in accordance with WSRC QA Manual, 1Q, QAP 20-1. This report will describe the method that will be used to evaluate the atmospheric models. The evaluation will determine the effectiveness of the atmospheric models in emergency response situations, which is not necessarily the same procedure used for research purposes. The format of the evaluation plan will provide guidance for the evaluation of atmospheric models that may be added to the WIND system in the future. The evaluation plan is designed to provide the user with information about the WIND system atmospheric models that is necessary for emergency response situations.

  12. Spatio-temporal statistical models with applications to atmospheric processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikle, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral dissertation is presented as three self-contained papers. An introductory chapter considers traditional spatio-temporal statistical methods used in the atmospheric sciences from a statistical perspective. Although this section is primarily a review, many of the statistical issues considered have not been considered in the context of these methods and several open questions are posed. The first paper attempts to determine a means of characterizing the semiannual oscillation (SAO) spatial variation in the northern hemisphere extratropical height field. It was discovered that the midlatitude SAO in 500hPa geopotential height could be explained almost entirely as a result of spatial and temporal asymmetries in the annual variation of stationary eddies. It was concluded that the mechanism for the SAO in the northern hemisphere is a result of land-sea contrasts. The second paper examines the seasonal variability of mixed Rossby-gravity waves (MRGW) in lower stratospheric over the equatorial Pacific. Advanced cyclostationary time series techniques were used for analysis. It was found that there are significant twice-yearly peaks in MRGW activity. Analyses also suggested a convergence of horizontal momentum flux associated with these waves. In the third paper, a new spatio-temporal statistical model is proposed that attempts to consider the influence of both temporal and spatial variability. This method is mainly concerned with prediction in space and time, and provides a spatially descriptive and temporally dynamic model.

  13. Spatio-temporal statistical models with applications to atmospheric processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikle, Christopher K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This doctoral dissertation is presented as three self-contained papers. An introductory chapter considers traditional spatio-temporal statistical methods used in the atmospheric sciences from a statistical perspective. Although this section is primarily a review, many of the statistical issues considered have not been considered in the context of these methods and several open questions are posed. The first paper attempts to determine a means of characterizing the semiannual oscillation (SAO) spatial variation in the northern hemisphere extratropical height field. It was discovered that the midlatitude SAO in 500hPa geopotential height could be explained almost entirely as a result of spatial and temporal asymmetries in the annual variation of stationary eddies. It was concluded that the mechanism for the SAO in the northern hemisphere is a result of land-sea contrasts. The second paper examines the seasonal variability of mixed Rossby-gravity waves (MRGW) in lower stratospheric over the equatorial Pacific. Advanced cyclostationary time series techniques were used for analysis. It was found that there are significant twice-yearly peaks in MRGW activity. Analyses also suggested a convergence of horizontal momentum flux associated with these waves. In the third paper, a new spatio-temporal statistical model is proposed that attempts to consider the influence of both temporal and spatial variability. This method is mainly concerned with prediction in space and time, and provides a spatially descriptive and temporally dynamic model.

  14. Model of THz Magnetization Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocklage, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Magnetization dynamics can be coherently controlled by THz laser excitation, which can be applied in ultrafast magnetization control and switching. Here, transient magnetization dynamics are calculated for excitation with THz magnetic field pulses. We use the ansatz of Smit and Beljers, to formulate dynamic properties of the magnetization via partial derivatives of the samples free energy density, and extend it to solve the Landau-Lifshitz-equation to obtain the THz transients of the magnetization. The model is used to determine the magnetization response to ultrafast multi- and single-cycle THz pulses. Control of the magnetization trajectory by utilizing the THz pulse shape and polarization is demonstrated. PMID:26956997

  15. Acceleration of the KINETICS Integrated Dynamical/Chemical Computational Model Using MPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Max; Willacy, Karen; Allen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of a planet's atmosphere not only provides a better theoretical understanding of planetary physics and the formation of planets, but also grants useful insight into Earth's own atmosphere. One of the tools used at JPL for the modeling of planetary atmospheres and protostellar disks is KINETICS. KINETICS can simulate years of complex dynamics and chemistry.

  16. Acceleration of the KINETICS Integrated Dynamical/Chemical Computational Model Using MPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Max; Willacy, Karen; Allen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of a planet's atmosphere not only provides a better theoretical understanding of planetary physics and the formation of planets, but also grants useful insight into Earth's own atmosphere. One of the tools used at JPL for the modeling of planetary atmospheres and protostellar disks is KINETICS. KINETICS can simulate years of complex dynamics and chemistry.

  17. Modeling Internet Topology Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haddadi, H.; Uhlig, S.; Moore, A.; Mortier, R.; Rio, M.

    Despite the large number of papers on network topology modeling and inference, there still exists ambiguity about the real nature of the Internet AS and router level topology. While recent findings have illustrated the inaccuracies in maps inferred from BGP peering and traceroute measurements, exist

  18. PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere: determining important driving forces using a global atmospheric transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Friedman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a spatially and temporally resolved global atmospheric PCB model, driven by meteorological data, that is skilled at simulating mean atmospheric PCB concentrations and seasonal cycles in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and mean Arctic concentrations. However, the model does not capture the observed Arctic summer maximum in atmospheric PCBs. We use the model to estimate global budgets for the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 7 PCBs, and demonstrate that congeners that deposit more readily show lower potential for long-range transport, consistent with a recently-described "differential removal hypothesis" regarding the hemispheric transport of PCBs. Using sensitivity simulations to assess processes within, outside, or transport to the Arctic, we examine the influence of climate- and emissions-driven processes on Arctic concentrations and their effect on improving the simulated Arctic seasonal cycle. We find evidence that processes occurring outside the Arctic have a greater influence on Arctic atmospheric PCB levels than processes that occur within the Arctic. Our simulations suggest that re-emissions from sea ice melting or from the Arctic Ocean during summer would have to be unrealistically high in order to capture observed temporal trends of PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere. We conclude that mid-latitude processes are likely to have a greater effect on the Arctic under global change scenarios than re-emissions within the Arctic.

  19. A global hybrid coupled model based on atmosphere-SST feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimatoribus, Andrea A.; Drijfhout, Sybren S. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt (Netherlands); Dijkstra, Henk A. [Utrecht University, Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    A global hybrid coupled model is developed, with the aim of studying the effects of ocean-atmosphere feedbacks on the stability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. The model includes a global ocean general circulation model and a statistical atmosphere model. The statistical atmosphere model is based on linear regressions of data from a fully coupled climate model on sea surface temperature both locally and hemispherically averaged, being the footprint of Atlantic meridional overturning variability. It provides dynamic boundary conditions to the ocean model for heat, freshwater and wind-stress. A basic but consistent representation of ocean-atmosphere feedbacks is captured in the hybrid coupled model and it is more than 10 times faster than the fully coupled climate model. The hybrid coupled model reaches a steady state with a climate close to the one of the fully coupled climate model, and the two models also have a similar response (collapse) of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation to a freshwater hosing applied in the northern North Atlantic. (orig.)

  20. Critical transitions of stratocumulus dynamical systems due to perturbation in free-atmosphere moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jia-Ying; Wu, Chien-Ming

    2016-12-01

    The bi-stable behavior of stratocumulus systems is here investigated in a 3D cloud-resolving model based on vector vorticity equations (VVM). This study demonstrates the response of the stratocumulus system to small perturbations of free atmospheric moisture under specified forcings of warm sea surface temperature (SST) and weak subsidence. A critical transition, indicated by the strong decoupling and large variation of cloud properties, separates fast dynamics from slow dynamics. During the fast process governed by the thermodynamic adjustment, the liquid water path (LWP) decreases with a decreasing cloud-top entrainment rate; on the other hand, during the slow process determined by the cloud-top inversion adjustment, LWP increases. The model exhibits two coexisting (cloudy and non-cloudy) quasi-stationary states through the fast process. A key process for the bifurcation is that the non-cloudy state shows the presence of active cumulus convection that allows the destruction of stratocumulus. The results suggest that the direct entrainment drying is enhanced due to an increased moisture gradient across the inversion layer. This tends to develop more broken clouds, which is an important signal for the stratocumulus to cumulus transition. This conceptual model provides a simple framework for developing a timely switch of regime transition in the cloud parameterization in large-scale models.

  1. Atmospheric Dispersion Model Validation in Low Wind Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Atmospheric plume dispersion models are used for a variety of purposes including emergency planning and response to hazardous material releases, determining force protection actions in the event of a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) attack and for locating sources of pollution. This study provides a review of previous studies that examine the accuracy of atmospheric plume dispersion models for chemical releases. It considers the principles used to derive air dispersion plume models and looks at three specific models currently in use: Aerial Location of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA), Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode) and Second Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF). Results from this study indicate over-prediction bias by the EPIcode and SCIPUFF models and under-prediction bias by the ALOHA model. The experiment parameters were for near field dispersion (less than 100 meters) in low wind speed conditions (less than 2 meters per second).

  2. Atmospheric Dispersion Model Validation in Low Wind Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Atmospheric plume dispersion models are used for a variety of purposes including emergency planning and response to hazardous material releases, determining force protection actions in the event of a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) attack and for locating sources of pollution. This study provides a review of previous studies that examine the accuracy of atmospheric plume dispersion models for chemical releases. It considers the principles used to derive air dispersion plume models and looks at three specific models currently in use: Aerial Location of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA), Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode) and Second Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF). Results from this study indicate over-prediction bias by the EPIcode and SCIPUFF models and under-prediction bias by the ALOHA model. The experiment parameters were for near field dispersion (less than 100 meters) in low wind speed conditions (less than 2 meters per second).

  3. Vehicle dynamics modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, Dieter; Bardini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine in detail the fundamentals and mathematical descriptions of the dynamics of automobiles. In this context different levels of complexity will be presented, starting with basic single-track models up to complex three-dimensional multi-body models. A particular focus is on the process of establishing mathematical models on the basis of real cars and the validation of simulation results. The methods presented are explained in detail by means of selected application scenarios.

  4. Observations, Thermochemical Calculations, and Modeling of Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Blecic, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation as a whole aims to provide means to better understand hot-Jupiter planets through observing, performing thermochemical calculations, and modeling their atmospheres. We used Spitzer multi-wavelength secondary-eclipse observations and targets with high signal-to-noise ratios, as their deep eclipses allow us to detect signatures of spectral features and assess planetary atmospheric structure and composition with greater certainty. Chapter 1 gives a short introduction. Chapter 2 presents the Spitzer secondary-eclipse analysis and atmospheric characterization of WASP-14b. WASP-14b is a highly irradiated, transiting hot Jupiter. By applying a Bayesian approach in the atmospheric analysis, we found an absence of thermal inversion contrary to theoretical predictions. Chapter 3 describes the infrared observations of WASP-43b Spitzer secondary eclipses, data analysis, and atmospheric characterization. WASP-43b is one of the closest-orbiting hot Jupiters, orbiting one of the coolest stars with a hot Ju...

  5. Measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars using model atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suleimanov, V.F. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Kazan Federal University, Kazan (Russian Federation); Poutanen, J. [University of Turku, Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Piikkioe (Finland); KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Nordita, Stockholm (Sweden); Klochkov, D.; Werner, K. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are nowadays widely used to fit the observed thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars. This fitting is the key element in the method of the neutron star radius determination. Here, we present the basic assumptions used for the neutron star atmosphere modeling as well as the main qualitative features of the stellar atmospheres leading to the deviations of the emergent model spectrum from blackbody. We describe the properties of two of our model atmosphere grids: i) pure carbon atmospheres for relatively cool neutron stars (1-4MK) and ii) hot atmospheres with Compton scattering taken into account. The results obtained by applying these grids to model the X-ray spectra of the central compact object in supernova remnant HESS 1731-347, and two X-ray bursting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1724-307 and 4U 1608-52, are presented. Possible systematic uncertainties associated with the obtained neutron star radii are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars using model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V F; Klochkov, D; Werner, K

    2015-01-01

    Model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are nowadays widely used to fit the observed thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars. This fitting is the key element in the method of the neutronstar radius determination. Here, we present the basic assumptions used for the neutron star atmosphere modeling as well as the main qualitative features of the stellar atmospheres leading to the deviations of the emergent model spectrum from blackbody. We describe the properties of two of our model atmosphere grids: (i) pure carbon atmospheres for relatively cool neutron stars (1--4 MK) and (ii) hot atmospheres with Compton scattering taken into account. The results obtained by applying these grids to model the X-ray spectra of the central compact object in supernova remnant HESS 1731-347, and two X-ray bursting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1724-307 and 4U 1608-52, are presented. Possible systematic uncertainties associated with the obtained neutron star radii are discussed.

  7. South African seasonal rainfall prediction performance by a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is presented that coupled ocean-atmosphere models can already outscore computationally less expensive atmospheric models. However, if the atmospheric models are forced with highly skillful SST predictions, they may still be a very strong...

  8. Some results regarding the comparison of the Earth's atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šegan S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine air densities derived from our realization of aeronomic atmosphere models based on accelerometer measurements from satellites in a low Earth's orbit (LEO. Using the adapted algorithms we derive comparison parameters. The first results concerning the adjustment of the aeronomic models to the total-density model are given.

  9. Information Flow in an Atmospheric Model and Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-noh

    2011-01-01

    Weather forecasting consists of two processes, model integration and analysis (data assimilation). During the model integration, the state estimate produced by the analysis evolves to the next cycle time according to the atmospheric model to become the background estimate. The analysis then produces a new state estimate by combining the background…

  10. Forests, Water, and the Atmosphere in Northern California: Insights from Sap-Flow Data Analysis and Numerical Atmospheric Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Percy Anne

    Evapotranspiration cools the land surface by consuming a large fraction of the net radiative energy at the surface. In forested regions, trees actively control the rate of transpiration by modulating stomatal conductance in response to environmental conditions, and species with different stomatal dynamics can affect the atmosphere in distinct ways. Using principal component analysis (PCA) and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) parameter estimation with direct, tree-level measurements of water use, we show that Douglas-firs ( Pseudotsuga menziesii), a common evergreen needleleaf tree species in the Northern California Coast Range, decrease their transpiration sharply in the summer dry season in response to a dry root zone; and in contrast, broadleaf evergreen tree species, especially Pacific madrones (Arbutus menziesii), transpire maximally in the summer dry season because their transpiration is much less sensitive to a dry root zone and increases continually in response to increasing atmospheric evaporative demand. We scale up these tree-level observations to construct a bottom-up estimate of regional transpiration, and we use these regional estimates along with atmospheric models, one simple and one comprehensive, to quantify the potential impact of species transpiration differences on regional summertime climate. The atmospheric models suggest that these species differences in transpiration could affect the well-mixed atmospheric boundary layer temperature and humidity by 1-1.5 degrees C and 1 g/kg, respectively, and near-surface temperature and humidity by 1.5-2.5 degrees C and 2-3 g/kg, respectively. We further investigate the sensitivity of California climate to evapotranspiration by estimating the sensitivity of wind energy forecasts at a California wind farm to regional-scale perturbations in soil moisture using a regional atmospheric model. These tests show that forecasts at this particular farm are most sensitive to soil moisture in the Central Valley, and

  11. Dynamic Characteristics and Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Vibration levels of flooring-systems are generally difficult to predict. Nevertheless an estimate may be needed for flooring-systems that are prone to vibrate to actions of humans in motion (e.g. grandstands, footbridges or long-span office floors). One reason for the difficulties...... and the paper therefore looks into this mechanism which is done by carrying out controlled modal identification tests on a test floor. The paper describes the experimental investigations and the basic principles adopted for modal identification. Since there is an interest in being able to model the scenario...

  12. Regional atmospheric budgets of reduced nitrogen over the British isles assessed using a multi-layer atmospheric transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fournier, N.; Tang, Y.S.; Dragosits, U.; Kluizenaar, Y.de; Sutton, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric budgets of reduced nitrogen for the major political regions of the British Isles are investigated with a multi-layer atmospheric transport model. The model is validated against measurements of NH3 concentration and is developed to provide atmospheric budgets for defined subdomains of the

  13. Statistical predictability in the atmosphere and other dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeman, Richard

    2007-06-01

    Ensemble predictions are an integral part of routine weather and climate prediction because of the sensitivity of such projections to the specification of the initial state. In many discussions it is tacitly assumed that ensembles are equivalent to probability distribution functions (p.d.f.s) of the random variables of interest. In general for vector valued random variables this is not the case (not even approximately) since practical ensembles do not adequately sample the high dimensional state spaces of dynamical systems of practical relevance. In this contribution we place these ideas on a rigorous footing using concepts derived from Bayesian analysis and information theory. In particular we show that ensembles must imply a coarse graining of state space and that this coarse graining implies loss of information relative to the converged p.d.f. To cope with the needed coarse graining in the context of practical applications, we introduce a hierarchy of entropic functionals. These measure the information content of multivariate marginal distributions of increasing order. For fully converged distributions (i.e. p.d.f.s) these functionals form a strictly ordered hierarchy. As one proceeds up the hierarchy with ensembles instead however, increasingly coarser partitions are required by the functionals which implies that the strict ordering of the p.d.f. based functionals breaks down. This breakdown is symptomatic of the necessarily limited sampling by practical ensembles of high dimensional state spaces and is unavoidable for most practical applications. In the second part of the paper the theoretical machinery developed above is applied to the practical problem of mid-latitude weather prediction. We show that the functionals derived in the first part all decline essentially linearly with time and there appears in fact to be a fairly well defined cut off time (roughly 45 days for the model analyzed) beyond which initial condition information is unimportant to

  14. Influence of a Carrington-like event on the atmospheric chemistry, temperature and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Calisto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We have modeled the atmospheric impact of a major solar energetic particle event similar in intensity to what is thought of the Carrington Event of 1–2 September 1859. Ionization rates for the August 1972 solar proton event, which had an energy spectrum comparable to the Carrington Event, were scaled up in proportion to the fluence estimated for both events. We have assumed such an event to take place in the year 2020 in order to investigate the impact on the modern, near future atmosphere. Effects on atmospheric chemistry, temperature and dynamics were investigated using the 3-D Chemistry Climate Model SOCOL v2.0. We find significant responses of NOx, HOx, ozone, temperature and zonal wind. Ozone and NOx have in common an unusually strong and long-lived response to this solar proton event. The model suggests a 3-fold increase of NOx generated in the upper stratosphere lasting until the end of November, and an up to 10-fold increase in upper mesospheric HOx. Due to the NOx and HOx enhancements, ozone reduces by up to 60–80% in the mesosphere during the days after the event, and by up to 20–40% in the middle stratosphere lasting for several months after the event. Total ozone is reduced by up to 20 DU in the Northern Hemisphere and up to 10 DU in the Southern Hemisphere. Free tropospheric and surface air temperatures show a significant cooling of more than 3 K and zonal winds change significantly by 3–5 m s−1 in the UTLS region. In conclusion, a solar proton event, if it took place in the near future with an intensity similar to that ascribed to of the Carrington Event of 1859, must be expected to have a major impact on atmospheric composition throughout the middle atmosphere, resulting in significant and persistent decrease in total ozone.

  15. Influence of a Carrington-like event on the atmospheric chemistry, temperature and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Calisto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have modeled the atmospheric impact of a major solar energetic particle event similar in intensity to what is thought of the Carrington Event of 1–2 September 1859. Ionization rates for the August 1972 solar proton event, which had an energy spectrum comparable to the Carrington Event, were scaled up in proportion to the fluence estimated for both events. We have assumed such an event to take place in the year 2020 in order to investigate the impact on the modern, near future atmosphere. Effects on atmospheric chemistry, temperature and dynamics were investigated using the 3-D Chemistry Climate Model SOCOL v2.0. We find significant responses of NOx, HOx, ozone, temperature and zonal wind. Ozone and NOx have in common an unusually strong and long-lived response to this solar proton event. The model suggests a 3-fold increase of NOx generated in the upper stratosphere lasting until the end of November, and an up to 10-fold increase in upper mesospheric HOx. Due to the NOx and HOx enhancements, ozone reduces by up to 60–80% in the mesosphere during the days after the event, and by up to 20–40% in the middle stratosphere lasting for several months after the event. Total ozone is reduced by up to 20 DU in the Northern Hemisphere and up to 10 DU in the Southern Hemisphere. Free tropospheric and surface air temperatures show a significant cooling of more than 3 K and zonal winds change significantly by 3–5 m s−1 in the UTLS region. In conclusion, a solar proton event, if it took place in the near future with an intensity similar to that ascribed to of the Carrington Event of 1859, must be expected to have a major impact on atmospheric composition throughout the middle atmosphere, resulting in significant and persistent decrease in total ozone.

  16. Coupled atmospheric, land surface, and subsurface modeling: Exploring water and energy feedbacks in three-dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Jason H.; Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Sudicky, Edward A.; Lin, John C.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities amplified by climate change pose a significant threat to the sustainability of water resources. Coupled climate-hydrologic simulations commonly predict these threats by combining shallow 1-D land surface models (LSMs) with traditional 2-D and 3-D hydrology models. However, these coupled models limit the moisture and energy-feedback dynamics to the shallow near-surface. This paper presents a novel analysis by applying an integrated variably-saturated subsurface/surface hydrology and heat transport model, HydroGeoSphere (HGS), as a land surface model (LSM). Furthermore, this article demonstrates the coupling of HGS to a simple 0-D atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model. We then applied our coupled HGS-ABL model to three separate test cases and reproduced the strong correlation between the atmospheric energy balance to the depth of the groundwater table. From our simulations, we found that conventional LSMs may overestimate surface temperatures for extended drought periods because they underestimate the heat storage in the groundwater zone. Our final test case of the atmospheric response to drought conditions illustrated that deeper roots buffered the atmosphere better than shallow roots by maintaining higher latent heat fluxes, lower sensible heat fluxes, and lower surface and atmospheric temperatures.

  17. Multiple Equilibria in a Single-Column Model of the Tropical Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sobel, Adam H; Bacmeister, Julio T

    2007-01-01

    A single-column model run under the weak temperature gradient approximation, a parameterization of large-scale dynamics appropriate for the tropical atmosphere, is shown to have multiple stable equilibria. Under conditions permitting persistent deep convection, the model has a statistically steady state in which such convection occurs, as well as an extremely dry state in which convection does not occur. Which state is reached depends on the initial moisture profile.

  18. Progress in the study of nonlinear atmospheric dynamics and predictability of weather and climate in China (2007-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feifan; Ding, Ruiqiang; Feng, Guolin; Fu, Zuntao; Duan, Wansuo

    2012-09-01

    Recent progress in the study of nonlinear atmospheric dynamics and related predictability of weather and climate in China (2007-2011) are briefly introduced in this article. Major achievements in the study of nonlinear atmospheric dynamics have been classified into two types: (1) progress based on the analysis of solutions of simplified control equations, such as the dynamics of NAO, the optimal precursors for blocking onset, and the behavior of nonlinear waves, and (2) progress based on data analyses, such as the nonlinear analyses of fluctuations and recording-breaking temperature events, the long-range correlation of extreme events, and new methods of detecting abrupt dynamical change. Major achievements in the study of predictability include the following: (1) the application of nonlinear local Lyapunov exponents (NLLE) to weather and climate predictability; (2) the application of condition nonlinear optimal perturbation (CNOP) to the studies of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) predictions, ensemble forecasting, targeted observation, and sensitivity analysis of the ecosystem; and (3) new strategies proposed for predictability studies. The results of these studies have provided greater understanding of the dynamics and nonlinear mechanisms of atmospheric motion, and they represent new ideas for developing numerical models and improving the forecast skill of weather and climate events.

  19. Progress in the Study of Nonlinear Atmospheric Dynamics and Predictability of Weather and Climate in China (2007-2011)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Feifan; DING Ruiqiang; FENG Guolin; FU Zuntao; DUAN Wansuo

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in the study of nonlinear atmospheric dynamics and related predictability of weather and climate in China (2007-2011) are briefly introduced in this article.Major achievements in the study of nonlinear atmospheric dynamics have been classified into two types:(1) progress based on the analysis of solutions of simplified control equations,such as the dynamics of NAO,the optimal precursors for blocking onset,and the behavior of nonlinear waves,and (2) progress based on data analyses,such as the nonlinear analyses of fluctuations and recording-breaking temperature events,the long-range correlation of extreme events,and new methods of detecting abrupt dynamical change.Major achievements in the study of predictability include the following:(1) the application of nonlinear local Lyapunov exponents (NLLE) to weather and climate predictability; (2) the application of condition nonlinear optimal perturbation (CNOP) to the studies of El Ni(n)o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) predictions,ensemble forecasting,targeted observation,and sensitivity analysis of the ecosystem; and (3) new strategies proposed for predictability studies.The results of these studies have provided greater understanding of the dynamics and nonlinear mechanisms of atmospheric motion,and they represent new ideas for developing numerical models and improving the forecast skill of weather and climate events.

  20. MAGRITTE: an instrument suite for the solar atmospheric imaging assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Rochus, Pierre; Defise, Jean-Marc; Halain, Jean-Philippe; Jamar, Claude; Mazy, Emmanuel; Rossi, Laurence; Thibert, Tanguy; Clette, Frederic; Cugnon, Pierre; Berghmans, David; Hochedez, Jean-Francois E; Delaboudiniere, Jean-Pierre; Auchere, Frederic; Mercier, Raymond; Ravet, Marie-Francoise

    2004-01-01

    The Solar Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory will characterize the dynamical evolution of the solar plasma from the chromosphere to the corona, and will follow the connection of plasma dynamics with magnetic activity throughout the solar atmosphere. The AIA consists of 7 high-resolution imaging telescopes in the following spectral bandpasses: 1215Å. Ly-a, 304 Å He II, 629 Å OV, 465 Å Ne VII, 195 Å Fe XII (includes Fe XXIV), 284 Å Fe XV, and 335 Å Fe XVI. ...

  1. High Resolution Global Modeling of the Atmospheric Circulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An informal review is presented of recent developments in numerical simulation of the global atmospheric circulation with very fine numerical resolution models. The focus is on results obtained recently with versions of the GFDL SKYHI model and the Atmospheric Model for the Earth Simulator (AFES) global atmospheric models. These models have been run with effective horizontal grid resolution of ~10-40 km and fine vertical resolution. The results presented demonstrate the utility of such models for the study of a diverse range of phenomena. Specifically the models are shown to simulate the development of tropical cyclones with peak winds and minimum central pressures comparable to those of the most intense hurricanes actually observed. More fundamentally, the spectrum of energy content in the mesoscale in the flow can be reproduced by these models down to near the smallest explicitly-resolved horizontal scales. In the middle atmosphere it is shown that increasing horizontal resolution can lead to significantly improved overall simulation of the global-scale circulation. The application of the models to two specific problems requiring very fine resolution global will be discussed. The spatial and temporal variability of the vertical eddy flux of zonal momentum associated with gravity waves near the tropopause is evaluated in the very fine resolution AFES model. This is a subject of great importance for understanding and modelling the flow in the middle atmosphere. Then the simulation of the small scale variations of the semidiurnal surface pressure oscillation is analyzed, and the signature of significant topographic modulation of the semidiurnal atmospheric tide is identified.

  2. Constructing an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael; Podolak, Ester; Mckay, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Scientific model building can be an intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large and complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be easily distributed and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complex, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We believe that advanced software techniques can facilitate both the model building and model sharing process. In this paper, we describe a prototype for a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing and using models. This tool includes an interactive intelligent graphical interface, a high level domain specific modeling language, a library of physics equations and experimental datasets, and a suite of data display facilities. Our prototype has been developed in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling, and is being used to construct models of Titan's atmosphere.

  3. Atmosphere-magma ocean modeling of GJ 1132 b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Laura; Wordsworth, Robin; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Sasselov, Dimitar

    2017-01-01

    GJ 1132 b is a nearby Earth-sized exoplanet transiting an M dwarf, and is amongst the most highly characterizable small exoplanets currently known. Using a coupled atmosphere-magma ocean model, we determine that GJ 1132 b must have begun with more than 5 wt% initial water in order to still retain a water-based atmosphere. We also determine the amount of O2 that can build up in the atmosphere as a result of hydrogen dissociation and loss. We find that the magma ocean absorbs at most ~ 10% of the O2 produced, whereas more than 90% is lost to space through hydrodynamic drag. The results of the model depend strongly on the initial water abundance and the XUV model. The most common outcome for GJ 1132 b from our simulations is a tenuous atmosphere dominated by O2, although for very large initial water abundances, atmospheres with several thousands of bars of O2 are possible. A substantial steam envelope would indicate either the existence of an earlier H2 envelope or low XUV flux over the system's lifetime. A steam atmosphere would also imply the continued existence of a magma ocean on GJ 1132 b. Preliminary modeling with the addition of CO2 gas will be presented.

  4. Simulating organic species with the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: a comparison of model results with observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozzer, A.; Jöckel, P.; Tost, H.; Sander, R.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Kerkweg, A.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-01-01

    The atmospheric-chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1 is evaluated with observations of different organic ozone precursors. This study continues a prior analysis which focused primarily on the representation of atmospheric dynamics and ozone. We use the results of the same reference simu

  5. Global/Local Dynamic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeffer, A; Das, S; Lawless, D; Ng, B

    2006-10-10

    Many dynamic systems involve a number of entities that are largely independent of each other but interact with each other via a subset of state variables. We present global/local dynamic models (GLDMs) to capture these kinds of systems. In a GLDM, the state of an entity is decomposed into a globally influenced state that depends on other entities, and a locally influenced state that depends only on the entity itself. We present an inference algorithm for GLDMs called global/local particle filtering, that introduces the principle of reasoning globally about global dynamics and locally about local dynamics. We have applied GLDMs to an asymmetric urban warfare environment, in which enemy units form teams to attack important targets, and the task is to detect such teams as they form. Experimental results for this application show that global/local particle filtering outperforms ordinary particle filtering and factored particle filtering.

  6. Examining Tatooine: Atmospheric Models of Neptune-Like Circumbinary Planets

    CERN Document Server

    May, E M

    2016-01-01

    Circumbinary planets experience a time varying irradiation pattern as they orbit their two host stars. In this work, we present the first detailed study of the atmospheric effects of this irradiation pattern on known and hypothetical gaseous circumbinary planets. Using both a one-dimensional Energy Balance Model and a three-dimensional General Circulation Model, we look at the temperature differences between circumbinary planets and their equivalent single-star cases in order to determine the nature of the atmospheres of these planets. We find that for circumbinary planets on stable orbits around their host stars, temperature differences are on average no more than 1.0% in the most extreme cases. Based on detailed modeling with the General Circulation Model, we find that these temperature differences are not large enough to excite circulation differences between the two cases. We conclude that gaseous circumbinary planets can be treated as their equivalent single-star case in future atmospheric modeling effor...

  7. The physical theory and propagation model of THz atmospheric propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R; Yao, J Q; Xu, D G; Wang, J L; Wang, P, E-mail: wangran19861014@163.com [College of Precision Instrument and Opto-electronics Engineering, Institute of Laser and Opto-electronics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is extensively applied in diverse fields, such as space communication, Earth environment observation, atmosphere science, remote sensing and so on. And the research on propagation features of THz wave in the atmosphere becomes more and more important. This paper firstly illuminates the advantages and outlook of THz in space technology. Then it introduces the theoretical framework of THz atmospheric propagation, including some fundamental physical concepts and processes. The attenuation effect (especially the absorption of water vapor), the scattering of aerosol particles and the effect of turbulent flow mainly influence THz atmosphere propagation. Fundamental physical laws are illuminated as well, such as Lamber-beer law, Mie scattering theory and radiative transfer equation. The last part comprises the demonstration and comparison of THz atmosphere propagation models like Moliere(V5), SARTre and AMATERASU. The essential problems are the deep analysis of physical mechanism of this process, the construction of atmospheric propagation model and databases of every kind of material in the atmosphere, and the standardization of measurement procedures.

  8. The physical theory and propagation model of THz atmospheric propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Yao, J. Q.; Xu, D. G.; Wang, J. L.; Wang, P.

    2011-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is extensively applied in diverse fields, such as space communication, Earth environment observation, atmosphere science, remote sensing and so on. And the research on propagation features of THz wave in the atmosphere becomes more and more important. This paper firstly illuminates the advantages and outlook of THz in space technology. Then it introduces the theoretical framework of THz atmospheric propagation, including some fundamental physical concepts and processes. The attenuation effect (especially the absorption of water vapor), the scattering of aerosol particles and the effect of turbulent flow mainly influence THz atmosphere propagation. Fundamental physical laws are illuminated as well, such as Lamber-beer law, Mie scattering theory and radiative transfer equation. The last part comprises the demonstration and comparison of THz atmosphere propagation models like Moliere(V5), SARTre and AMATERASU. The essential problems are the deep analysis of physical mechanism of this process, the construction of atmospheric propagation model and databases of every kind of material in the atmosphere, and the standardization of measurement procedures.

  9. A dynamical model of terrorism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdaus Udwadia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a dynamical model of terrorism. We consider the population in a given region as being made up of three primary components: terrorists, those susceptible to both terrorist and pacifist propaganda, and nonsusceptibles, or pacifists. The dynamical behavior of these three populations is studied using a model that incorporates the effects of both direct military/police intervention to reduce the terrorist population, and nonviolent, persuasive intervention to influence the susceptibles to become pacifists. The paper proposes a new paradigm for studying terrorism, and looks at the long-term dynamical evolution in time of these three population components when such interventions are carried out. Many important features—some intuitive, others not nearly so—of the nature of terrorism emerge from the dynamical model proposed, and they lead to several important policy implications for the management of terrorism. The different circumstances in which nonviolent intervention and/or military/police intervention may be beneficial, and the specific conditions under which each mode of intervention, or a combination of both, may be useful, are obtained. The novelty of the model presented herein is that it deals with the time evolution of terrorist activity. It appears to be one of the few models that can be tested, evaluated, and improved upon, through the use of actual field data.

  10. A brief introduction to the Nonlinear Atmospheric Dynamics Research Group in the State Key Laboratory of LASG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@Nonlinear atmospheric dynamics is an interdisciplinary branch of atmospheric sciences,geophysical fluid dynamics and nonlinear sciences.As a basis for numerical weather prediction and short-term climate predication,it is a frontier of rapidly developing atmospheric sciences in recent years.

  11. Laboratory facility to create reference radon + thoron atmosphere under dynamic exposure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressyanov, D; Mitev, K; Georgiev, S; Dimitrova, I; Kolev, J

    2017-01-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) and thoron ((220)Rn) levels in the environment are typically subject to significant random and systematic variations. Creation in the laboratory of reproducible and controlled exposure conditions close to that in the real environment can be useful for testing (222)Rn and (220)Rn detectors and for research. In this report the design and performance of a novel laboratory facility with such functionality is presented. The facility allows the exposure of detectors under controlled dynamic as well as static activity concentrations of (222)Rn and (220)Rn (pure and mixed) and temperature. The temperature is measured and regulated within -15 °C ÷ +60 °C by a dedicated programmable thermostat. Different reference activity concentrations in the exposure vessel are made by regulating the flow-rate of the air that flushes (222)Rn/(220)Rn activity from the sources towards the exposure vessel. Reference atmospheres that contain (222)Rn, (220)Rn or a specified ratio of the two can be created. Pilot experiments that demonstrate the feasibility of the approach are presented. They include follow-up of a pre-defined temperature profile (in the range -5 °C ÷ +35 °C), test of the correspondence between planned and measured (222)Rn and (220)Rn activity concentrations, follow-up of a pre-defined dynamic profile of (220)Rn concentrations and test of the possibility to create mixed (220)Rn/(222)Rn atmospheres (experimentally checked for ratio of the activity concentrations from 0.27 to 4.5). The results from the experimental tests are in agreement with the values obtained by the developed theoretical model. The proposed approach can be used to plan and create stationary and dynamic reference exposure conditions that are close to the real exposure regimes in the environment.

  12. Middle atmosphere water vapour and dynamical features in aircraft measurements and ECMWF analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Feist

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF provides global analyses of atmospheric humidity from the ground to the lower mesosphere. Unlike in the troposphere, in the stratosphere no humidity observations are assimilated. Humidity analyses here are essentially the results of a free-running model constrained by the ECMWF's analysed wind fields. So far only the broad-scale features of the resulting stratospheric water vapour distribution have been validated. This study provides the first in-depth comparison of stratospheric humidity from ECMWF with observations from an airborne microwave radiometer that has measured the distribution of stratospheric water vapour over an altitude range of roughly 15–60 km on several flight campaigns since 1998. The aircraft measurements provide a horizontal resolution that cannot be achieved by current satellite instruments. This study examines dynamical features in the moisture fields such as filamentation and the vortex edge, finding that features in the ERA-40 humidity analyses often do correspond to real atmospheric events that are seen in the aircraft measurements. However, the comparisons also show that in general the ECMWF model produces an unrealistically moist mesosphere. As a result it cannot replicate the descent of relatively dry mesospheric air into the polar vortex in winter and spring.

  13. Middle atmosphere water vapour and dynamical features in aircraft measurements and ECMWF analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Feist

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF provides global analyses of atmospheric humidity from the ground to the lower mesosphere. Unlike in the troposphere, in the stratopshere no humidity observations are assimilated. Humidity analyses here are essentially the results of a free-running model constrained by the ECMWF's well-analysed wind fields. So far only the broad-scale features of the resulting stratospheric water vapour distribution have been validated. This study provides the first in-depth comparison of stratospheric humidity from ECMWF with observations from an airborne microwave radiometer that has measured the distribution of stratospheric water vapour over an altitude range of roughly 15–60 km on several flight campaigns since 1998. The aircraft measurements provide a horizontal resolution that cannot be achieved by current satellite instruments. This study examines dynamical features in the moisture fields such as filamentation and the vortex edge, finding that features in the ERA-40 humidity analyses often do correspond to real atmospheric events that are seen in the aircraft measurements. However, the comparisons also show that in general the ECMWF model produces an unrealistically moist mesosphere. As a result it cannot replicate the descent of relatively dry mesospheric air into the polar vortex in winter and spring.

  14. Exact results in modeling planetary atmospheres-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelkowski, J. [Institut fuer Atmosphaere und Umwelt, J.W. Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Campus Riedberg, Altenhoferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany)], E-mail: Pelkowski@meteor.uni-frankfurt.de; Chevallier, L. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Laboratoire LUTH, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France); Rutily, B. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Titaud, O. [Centro de Modelamiento Matematico, UMI 2807 CNRS-UChile, Blanco Encalada 2120 - 7 Piso, Casilla 170 - Correo 3, Santiago (Chile)

    2008-01-15

    We apply the semi-gray model of our previous paper to the particular case of the Earth's atmosphere, in order to illustrate quantitatively the inverse problem associated with the direct problem we dealt with before. From given climatological values of the atmosphere's spherical albedo and transmittance for visible radiation, the single-scattering albedo and the optical thickness in the visible are inferred, while the infrared optical thickness is deduced for given global average surface temperature. Eventually, temperature distributions in terms of the infrared optical depth will be shown for a terrestrial atmosphere assumed to be semi-gray and, locally, in radiative and thermodynamic equilibrium.

  15. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Fourth year report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The scope of the report is to present the results of the fourth year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  16. Air pollution forecasting by coupled atmosphere-fire model WRF and SFIRE with WRF-Chem

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanski, Adam K; Mandel, Jan; Clements, Craig B

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution regulations have emerged as a dominant obstacle to prescribed burns. Thus, forecasting the pollution caused by wildland fires has acquired high importance. WRF and SFIRE model wildland fire spread in a two-way interaction with the atmosphere. The surface heat flux from the fire causes strong updrafts, which in turn change the winds and affect the fire spread. Fire emissions, estimated from the burning organic matter, are inserted in every time step into WRF-Chem tracers at the lowest atmospheric layer. The buoyancy caused by the fire then naturally simulates plume dynamics, and the chemical transport in WRF-Chem provides a forecast of the pollution spread. We discuss the choice of wood burning models and compatible chemical transport models in WRF-Chem, and demonstrate the results on case studies.

  17. Complex source rate estimation for atmospheric transport and dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, L.L.

    1993-09-13

    The accuracy associated with assessing the environmental consequences of an accidental atmospheric release of radioactivity is highly dependent on our knowledge of the source release rate which is generally poorly known. This paper reports on a technique that integrates the radiological measurements with atmospheric dispersion modeling for more accurate source term estimation. We construct a minimum least squares methodology for solving the inverse problem with no a priori information about the source rate.

  18. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aerospace Vehicles: Fractional Order Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An improved model for simulating atmospheric disturbances is disclosed. A scale Kolmogorov spectral may be scaled to convert the Kolmogorov spectral into a finite energy von Karman spectral and a fractional order pole-zero transfer function (TF) may be derived from the von Karman spectral. Fractional order atmospheric turbulence may be approximated with an integer order pole-zero TF fit, and the approximation may be stored in memory.

  19. Finite-difference numerical modelling of gravitoacoustic wave propagation in a windy and attenuating atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Martin, Roland; Garcia, Raphaël F.; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena such as tectonic events or explosions or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modelled in a 3-D attenuating and windy atmosphere extending from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale, we introduce a finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a background flow (wind). One significant benefit of such a method is its versatility because it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation, which enables one to observe interactions between them. Simulations can be performed for 2-D or 3-D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere or gravity-wave generation by atmospheric explosions. We validate the computations by comparing them to analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases: an atmospheric explosion, and a ground displacement forcing.

  20. Finite Difference Numerical Modeling of Gravito-Acoustic Wave Propagation in a Windy and Attenuating Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic and gravity waves propagating in the planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena (tectonic events, explosions) or as contributors to the atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physic behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modeled in an attenuating and windy 3D atmosphere from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, In order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or the global scale a high order finite difference time domain (FDTD) approach is proposed that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations (Landau 1959) with non constant physical parameters (density, viscosities and speed of sound) and background velocities (wind). One significant benefit from this code is its versatility. Indeed, it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation that enables one to observe correlations between the two. Simulations will also be performed on 2D/3D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere and gravity-wave generation through atmospheric explosions. Computations are validated by comparison to well-known analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases (atmospheric explosion and bottom displacement forcing).

  1. Flexible global ocean-atmosphere-land system model. A modeling tool for the climate change research community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Tianjun; Yu, Yongqiang; Liu, Yimin; Wang, Bin (eds.) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, (China). Inst. of Atmospheric Physics

    2014-04-01

    First book available on systematic evaluations of the performance of the global climate model FGOALS. Covers the whole field, ranging from the development to the applications of this climate system model. Provide an outlook for the future development of the FGOALS model system. Offers brief introduction about how to run FGOALS. Coupled climate system models are of central importance for climate studies. A new model known as FGOALS (the Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System model), has been developed by the State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (LASG/IAP, CAS), a first-tier national geophysical laboratory. It serves as a powerful tool, both for deepening our understanding of fundamental mechanisms of the climate system and for making decadal prediction and scenario projections of future climate change. ''Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System Model: A Modeling Tool for the Climate Change Research Community'' is the first book to offer systematic evaluations of this model's performance. It is comprehensive in scope, covering both developmental and application-oriented aspects of this climate system model. It also provides an outlook of future development of FGOALS and offers an overview of how to employ the model. It represents a valuable reference work for researchers and professionals working within the related areas of climate variability and change.

  2. Modeling of dynamic effects of a low power laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, George N.; Scholl, Marija S.; Khatib, AL

    1988-01-01

    Methods of modeling some of the dynamic effects involved in laser beam propagation through the atmosphere are addressed with emphasis on the development of simple but accurate models which are readily implemented in a physical optics code. A space relay system with a ground based laser facility is considered as an example. The modeling of such characteristic phenomena as laser output distribution, flat and curved mirrors, diffraction propagation, atmospheric effects (aberration and wind shear), adaptive mirrors, jitter, and time integration of power on target, is discussed.

  3. Brown Dwarf Model Atmospheres Based on Multi-Dimensional Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, France; Freytag, Bernd

    2010-11-01

    The atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs (BDs) are the site of molecular opacities and cloud formation, and control their cooling rate, radius and brightness evolution. Brown dwarfs evolve from stellar-like properties (magnetic activity, spots, flares, mass loss) to planet-like properties (electron degeneracy of the interior, cloud formation, dynamical molecular transport) while retaining, due to their fully convective interior, larger rotational velocities (≤ 30 km/s i.e. P objects. While the pure gas-phase based NextGen model atmospheres (Allard et al. 1997, Hauschildt et al. 1999) have allowed the understanding of the several populations of Very Low Mass Stars (VLMs), the AMES-Dusty models (Allard et al. 2001) based on equilibrium chemistry have reproduced some near-IR photometric properties of M and L-type brown dwarfs, and played a key role in the determination of the mass of brown dwarfs and Planetary Mass Objects (PMOs) in the eld and in young stellar clusters. In this paper, we present a new model atmosphere grid for VLMs, BDs, PMOs named BT-Settl, which includes a cloud model and dynamical molecular transport based on mixing information from 2D Radiation Hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations (Freytag et al. 2009). We also present the status of our 3D RHD simulations including rotation (Coriolis forces) of a cube on the surface of a brown dwarf. The BT-Settl model atmosphere grid will be available shortly via the Phoenix web simulator (http://phoenix.ens-lyon.fr/simulator/).

  4. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten Haack

    2006-01-01

    An engineering course, Simulation and Experimental Modeling, has been developed that is based on a method for direct estimation of physical parameters in dynamic systems. Compared with classical system identification, the method appears to be easier to understand, apply, and combine with physical...

  5. Medicanes in an ocean–atmosphere coupled regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Akhtar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available So-called medicanes (Mediterranean hurricanes are meso-scale, marine, and warm-core Mediterranean cyclones that exhibit some similarities to tropical cyclones. The strong cyclonic winds associated with medicanes threaten the highly populated coastal areas around the Mediterranean basin. To reduce the risk of casualties and overall negative impacts, it is important to improve the understanding of medicanes with the use of numerical models. In this study, we employ an atmospheric limited-area model (COSMO-CLM coupled with a one-dimensional ocean model (1-D NEMO-MED12 to simulate medicanes. The aim of this study is to assess the robustness of the coupled model in simulating these extreme events. For this purpose, 11 historical medicane events are simulated using the atmosphere-only model, COSMO-CLM, and coupled model, with different setups (horizontal atmospheric grid-spacings of 0.44°, 0.22°, and 0.08°; with/without spectral nudging, and an ocean grid-spacing of 1/12°. The results show that at high-resolution, the coupled model is able to not only simulate most of medicane events but also improve the track length, core temperature, and wind speed of simulated medicanes compared to the atmosphere-only simulations. The results suggest that the coupled model is more proficient for systemic and detailed studies of historical medicane events, and that this model can be an effective tool for future projections.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamic Model Explains The Solar Dynamic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuman, Maria

    Nonlinear mathematical model in torus representation describes the solar dynamic. Its graphic presentation shows that without perturbing force the orbits of the planets would be circles; only perturbing force could elongate the circular orbits into ellipses. Since the Hubble telescope found that the planetary orbits of other stars in the Milky Way are also ellipses, powerful perturbing force must be present in our galaxy. Such perturbing force is the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy with its heavy Black Hole and leftover stars, which we see orbiting around the center of our galaxy. Since observations of NASA's SDO found that magnetic fields rule the solar activity, we can expect when the planets align and their magnetic moments sum up, the already perturbed stars to reverse their magnetic parity (represented graphically as periodic looping through the hole of the torus). We predict that planets aligned on both sides of the Sun, when their magnetic moments sum-up, would induce more flares in the turbulent equatorial zone, which would bulge. When planets align only on one side of the Sun, the strong magnetic gradient of their asymmetric pull would flip the magnetic poles of the Sun. The Sun would elongate pole-to-pole, emit some energy through the poles, and the solar activity would cease. Similar reshaping and emission was observed in stars called magnetars and experimentally observed in super-liquid fast-spinning Helium nanodroplets. We are certain that NASA's SDO will confirm our predictions.

  7. Solar dynamics and magnetism from the interior to the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kosovichev, Alexander; Komm, Rudolf; Longcope, Dana

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission has provided a large amount of new data on solar dynamics and magnetic activities during the rising phase of the current and highly unusual solar cycle. These data are complemented by the continuing SOHO mission, and by ground-based observatories that include the GONG helioseismology network and the New Solar Telescope. Also, the observations are supported by realistic numerical simulations on supercomputers. This unprecedented amount of data provides a unique opportunity for multi-instrument investigations that address fundamental problems of the origin of solar magnetic activity at various spatial and temporal scales. This book demonstrates that the synergy of high-resolution multi-wavelength observations and simulations is a key to uncovering the long-standing puzzles of solar magnetism and dynamics. This volume is aimed at researchers and graduate students active in solar physics and space science. Previously published in Solar Physics journal, Vol. 287/1-2,...

  8. A new atmospheric aerosol phase equilibrium model (UHAERO: organic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Amundson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In atmospheric aerosols, water and volatile inorganic and organic species are distributed between the gas and aerosol phases in accordance with thermodynamic equilibrium. Within an atmospheric particle, liquid and solid phases can exist at equilibrium. Models exist for computation of phase equilibria for inorganic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols; when organic species are present, the phase equilibrium problem is complicated by organic/water interactions as well as the potentially large number of organic species. We present here an extension of the UHAERO inorganic thermodynamic model (Amundson et al., 2006c to organic/water systems. Phase diagrams for a number of model organic/water systems characteristic of both primary and secondary organic aerosols are computed. Also calculated are inorganic/organic/water phase diagrams that show the effect of organics on inorganic deliquescence behavior. The effect of the choice of activity coefficient model for organics on the computed phase equilibria is explored.

  9. A new atmospheric aerosol phase equilibrium model (UHAERO: organic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Amundson

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In atmospheric aerosols, water and volatile inorganic and organic species are distributed between the gas and aerosol phases in accordance with thermodynamic equilibrium. Within an atmospheric particle, liquid and solid phases can exist at equilibrium. Models exist for computation of phase equilibria for inorganic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols; when organic species are present, the phase equilibrium problem is complicated by organic/water interactions as well as the potentially large number of organic species. We present here an extension of the UHAERO inorganic thermodynamic model (Amundson et al., 2006c to organic/water systems. Phase diagrams for a number of model organic/water systems characteristic of both primary and secondary organic aerosols are computed. Also calculated are inorganic/organic/water phase diagrams that show the effect of organics on inorganic deliquescence behavior. The effect of the choice of activity coefficient model for organics on the computed phase equilibria is explored.

  10. Critical review of wind tunnel modeling of atmospheric heat dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1977-05-01

    There is increasing concern by scientists that future proposed energy or power parks may significantly affect the environment by releasing large quantities of heat and water vapor to the atmosphere. A critical review is presented of the potential application of physical modeling (wind tunnels) to assess possible atmospheric effects from heat dissipation systems such as cooling towers. A short inventory of low-speed wind tunnel facilities is included in the review. The useful roles of wind tunnels are assessed and the state-of-the-art of physical modeling is briefly reviewed. Similarity criteria are summarized and present limitations in satisfying these criteria are considered. Current physical models are defined and limitations are discussed. Three experimental problems are discussed in which physical modeling may be able to provide data. These are: defining the critical atmospheric heat load; topographic and local circulation effects on thermal plumes; and plume rise and downstream effects.

  11. Coupled conduit and atmospheric dispersal dynamics of the AD 79 Plinian eruption of Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Augusto; Papale, Paolo; Del Seppia, Dario; Santacroce, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The AD 79 eruption of Vesuvius is certainly one of the most investigated explosive eruptions in the world. This makes it particularly suitable for the application of numerical models since we can be quite confident about input data, and the model predictions can be compared with field-based reconstruction of the eruption dynamics. Magma ascent along the volcanic conduit and the dispersal of pyroclasts in the atmosphere were simulated. The conduit and atmospheric domain were coupled through the flow conditions computed at the conduit exit. We simulated two different peak phases of the eruption which correspond to the emplacement of the white and gray magma types that produced Plinian fallout deposits with interlayered pyroclastic flow units during the gray phase. The input data, independently constrained and representative of each of the two eruptive phases, consist of liquid magma composition, crystal and water content, mass flow rate, and pressure-temperature-depth of the magma at the conduit entrance. A parametric study was performed on the less constrained variables such as microlite content of magma, pressure at the conduit entrance, and particle size representative of the eruptive mixture. Numerical results are substantially consistent with the reconstructed eruptive dynamics. In particular, the white eruption phase is found to lead to a fully buoyant eruption plume in all cases investigated, whereas the gray phase shows a more transitional character, i.e. the simultaneous production of a buoyant convective plume and pyroclastic surges, with a significant influence of the microlite content of magma in determining the partition of pyroclast mass between convective plumes and pyroclastic flows.

  12. An Otto Engine Dynamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Ion Tiberiu Petrescu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Otto engine dynamics are similar in almost all common internal combustion engines. We can speak so about dynamics of engines: Lenoir, Otto, and Diesel. The dynamic presented model is simple and original. The first thing necessary in the calculation of Otto engine dynamics, is to determine the inertial mass reduced at the piston. One uses then the Lagrange equation. Kinetic energy conservation shows angular speed variation (from the shaft with inertial masses. One uses and elastic constant of the crank shaft, k. Calculations should be made for an engine with a single cylinder. Finally it makes a dynamic analysis of the mechanism with discussion and conclusions. The ratio between the crank length r and the length of the connecting-rod l is noted with landa. When landa increases the mechanism dynamics is deteriorating. For a proper operation is necessary the reduction of the ratio landa, especially if we want to increase the engine speed. We can reduce the acceleration values by reducing the dimensions r and l.

  13. Internal atmospheric noise characteristics in twentieth century coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colfescu, Ioana; Schneider, Edwin K.

    2017-09-01

    The statistical characteristics of the atmospheric internal variability (hereafter internal atmospheric noise) for surface pressure (PS) in twentieth century simulations of a coupled general circulation model are documented. The atmospheric noise is determined from daily post-industrial (1871-1998) Community Climate System Model 3 simulations by removing the SST and externally forced responses from the total fields. The forced responses are found from atmosphere-only simulations forced by the SST and external forcing of the coupled runs. However, we do not address the influence of the SST variability on the synoptic scale high frequency weather noise.The spatial patterns of the main seasonal modes of atmospheric noise variability are found for boreal winter and summer from empirical orthogonal function analyses performed globally and for various regions, including the North Atlantic, the North Pacific, and the equatorial Pacific. The temporal characteristics of the modes are illustrated by power spectra and probability density functions (PDF) of the principal components (PC). Our findings show that, for two different realizations of noise, the variability is dominated by large scale spatial structures of the atmospheric noise that resemble observed patterns, and that their relative amplitudes in the CGCM and AGCM simulations are very similar. The regional expression of the dominant global mode, a seasonally dependent AO-like or AAO-like pattern is also found in the regional analyses, with similar time dependence. The PCs in the CGCM and the corresponding SST forced AGCM simulations are uncorrelated, but the spectra and PDFs of the CGCM and AGCM PCs are similar.The temporal structures of the noise PCs are white at timescales larger than few months, so that these modes can be thought of as stochastic forcings (in time) for the climate system. The PDFs of the noise PCs are not statistically distinguishable from Gaussian distributions with the same standard deviation

  14. Atmospheric monitoring and model applications at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keilhauer Bianca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pierre Auger Observatory detects high-energy cosmic rays with energies above ∼1017 eV. It is built as a multi-hybrid detector measuring extensive air showers with different techniques. For the reconstruction of extensive air showers, the atmospheric conditions at the site of the Observatory have to be known quite well. This is particularly true for reconstructions based on data obtained by the fluorescence technique. For these data, not only the weather conditions near ground are relevant, most important are altitude-dependent atmospheric profiles. The Pierre Auger Observatory has set up a dedicated atmospheric monitoring programme at the site in the Mendoza province, Argentina. Beyond this, exploratory studies were performed in Colorado, USA, for possible installations in the northern hemisphere. In recent years, the atmospheric monitoring programme at the Pierre Auger Observatory was supplemented by applying data from atmospheric models. Both GDAS and HYSPLIT are developments by the US weather department NOAA and the data are freely available. GDAS is a global model of the atmospheric state parameters on a 1 degree geographical grid, based on real-time measurements and numeric weather predictions, providing a full altitude-dependent data set every 3 hours. HYSPLIT is a powerful tool to track the movement of air masses at various heights, and with it the aerosols. Combining local measurements of the atmospheric state variables and aerosol scattering with the given model data, advanced studies about atmospheric conditions can be performed and high precision air shower reconstructions are achieved.

  15. Simulating carbon exchange using a regional atmospheric model coupled to an advanced land-surface model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. W. Ter Maat

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a case study to investigate what the main controlling factors are that determine atmospheric carbon dioxide content for a region in the centre of The Netherlands. We use the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS, coupled with a land surface scheme simulating carbon, heat and momentum fluxes (SWAPS-C, and including also submodels for urban and marine fluxes, which in principle should include the dominant mechanisms and should be able to capture the relevant dynamics of the system. To validate the model, observations are used that were taken during an intensive observational campaign in central Netherlands in summer 2002. These include flux-tower observations and aircraft observations of vertical profiles and spatial fluxes of various variables.

    The simulations performed with the coupled regional model (RAMS-SWAPS-C are in good qualitative agreement with the observations. The station validation of the model demonstrates that the incoming shortwave radiation and surface fluxes of water and CO2 are well simulated. The comparison against aircraft data shows that the regional meteorology (i.e. wind, temperature is captured well by the model. Comparing spatially explicitly simulated fluxes with aircraft observed fluxes we conclude that in general latent heat fluxes are underestimated by the model compared to the observations but that the latter exhibit large variability within all flights. Sensitivity experiments demonstrate the relevance of the urban emissions of carbon dioxide for the carbon balance in this particular region. The same tests also show the relation between uncertainties in surface fluxes and those in atmospheric concentrations.

  16. Regional atmospheric composition modeling with CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menut, L.; Bessagnet, B.; Khvorostyanov, D.; Beekmann, M.; Colette, A.; Coll, I.; Curci, G.; Foret, G.; Hodzic, A.; Mailler, S.; Meleux, F.; Monge, J.-L.; Pison, I.; Turquety, S.; Valari, M.; Vautard, R.; Vivanco, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources), stagnant meteorological conditions, velocity and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative importance to the pollutants budgets can be quantified within a chemistry-transport models (CTM). The offline CTM CHIMERE model uses meteorological model fields and emissions fluxes and calculates deterministically their behavior in the troposphere. The calculated three-dimensional fields of chemical concentrations can be compared to measurements to analyze past periods or used to make air quality forecasts and CHIMERE has enabled a fine understanding of pollutants transport during numerous measurements campaigns. It is a part of the PREVAIR french national forecast platform, delivering pollutant concentrations up to three days in advance. The model also allows scenario studies and long term simulations for pollution trends. The modelling of photochemical air pollution has reached a good level of maturity, and the latest projects involving CHIMERE now aim at increasing our understanding of pollution impact on health at the urban scale or at the other end of the spectrum for long term air quality and climate change interlinkage studies, quantifying the emissions and transport of pollen, but also, at a larger scale, analyzing the transport of pollutants plumes emitted by volcanic eruptions and forest fires.

  17. Regional atmospheric composition modeling with CHIMERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Menut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources, stagnant meteorological conditions, velocity and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative importance to the pollutants budgets can be quantified within a chemistry-transport models (CTM. The offline CTM CHIMERE model uses meteorological model fields and emissions fluxes and calculates deterministically their behavior in the troposphere. The calculated three-dimensional fields of chemical concentrations can be compared to measurements to analyze past periods or used to make air quality forecasts and CHIMERE has enabled a fine understanding of pollutants transport during numerous measurements campaigns. It is a part of the PREVAIR french national forecast platform, delivering pollutant concentrations up to three days in advance. The model also allows scenario studies and long term simulations for pollution trends. The modelling of photochemical air pollution has reached a good level of maturity, and the latest projects involving CHIMERE now aim at increasing our understanding of pollution impact on health at the urban scale or at the other end of the spectrum for long term air quality and climate change interlinkage studies, quantifying the emissions and transport of pollen, but also, at a larger scale, analyzing the transport of pollutants plumes emitted by volcanic eruptions and forest fires.

  18. Atmospheric modelling for seasonal prediction at the CSIR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available by observed monthly sea-surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice fields. The AGCM is the conformal-cubic atmospheric model (CCAM) administered by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. Since the model is forced with observed rather than predicted...

  19. Business model dynamics and innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalcante, Sergio Andre; Kesting, Peter; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to discuss the need to dynamize the existing conceptualization of business model, and proposes a new typology to distinguish different types of business model change. Design/methodology/approach – The paper integrates basic insights of innovation, business process...... and routine research into the concept of business model. The main focus of the paper is on strategic and terminological issues. Findings – The paper offers a new, process-based conceptualization of business model, which recognizes and integrates the role of individual agency. Based on this, it distinguishes...... and specifies four different types of business model change: business model creation, extension, revision, and termination. Each type of business model change is associated with specific challenges. Practical implications – The proposed typology can serve as a basis for developing a management tool to evaluate...

  20. DYNAMIC TEACHING RATIO PEDAGOGIC MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jiaying

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines an innovative pedagogic model, Dynamic Teaching Ratio (DTR Pedagogic Model, for learning design and teaching strategy aimed at the postsecondary technical education. The model draws on the theory of differential learning, which is widely recognized as an important tool for engaging students and addressing the individual needs of all students. The DTR model caters to the different abilities, interest or learning needs of students and provides different learning approaches based on a student’s learning ability. The model aims to improve students’ academic performance through increasing the lecturer-to-student ratio in the classroom setting. An experimental case study on the model was conducted and the outcome was favourable. Hence, a large-scale implementation was carried out upon the successful trial run. The paper discusses the methodology of the model and its application through the case study and the large-scale implementation.

  1. Structure and dynamics of decadal anomalies in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiabei; Yang, Xiu-Qun

    2016-09-01

    The structure and dynamics of decadal anomalies in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system are examined in this study, using the NCEP/NCAR atmospheric reanalysis, HadISST SST and Simple Ocean Data Assimilation data for 1960-2010. The midlatitude decadal anomalies associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation are identified, being characterized by an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low (high) pressure over a cold (warm) oceanic surface. Such a unique configuration of decadal anomalies can be maintained by an unstable ocean-atmosphere interaction mechanism in the midlatitudes, which is hypothesized as follows. Associated with a warm PDO phase, an initial midlatitude surface westerly anomaly accompanied with intensified Aleutian low tends to force a negative SST anomaly by increasing upward surface heat fluxes and driving southward Ekman current anomaly. The SST cooling tends to increase the meridional SST gradient, thus enhancing the subtropical oceanic front. As an adjustment of the atmospheric boundary layer to the enhanced oceanic front, the low-level atmospheric meridional temperature gradient and thus the low-level atmospheric baroclinicity tend to be strengthened, inducing more active transient eddy activities that increase transient eddy vorticity forcing. The vorticity forcing that dominates the total atmospheric forcing tends to produce an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low pressure north of the initial westerly anomaly, intensifying the initial anomalies of the midlatitude surface westerly and Aleutian low. Therefore, it is suggested that the midlatitude ocean-atmosphere interaction can provide a positive feedback mechanism for the development of initial anomaly, in which the oceanic front and the atmospheric transient eddy are the indispensable ingredients. Such a positive ocean-atmosphere feedback mechanism is fundamentally responsible for the observed decadal anomalies in the midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere

  2. DYNAMIC MODELING OF METAMORPHIC MECHANISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The concept of metamorphic mechanism is put forward according to the change of configurations from one state to another. Different configurations of metamorphic mechanism are described through the method of Huston lower body arrays. Kinematics analyses for metamorphic mechanism with generalized topological structure, including the velocity, angular velocity, acceleration and angular acceleration, are given. Dynamic equations for an arbitrary configuration, including close-loop constraints, are formed by using Kane's equations. For an arbitrary metamorphic mechanism, the transformation matrix of generalized speeds between configuration (*)and(*)+1 is obtained for the first time. Furthermore, configuration-complete dynamic modeling of metamorphic mechanism including all configurations is completely established.

  3. Stochastic Model of Microtubule Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryniv, Ostap; Martínez Esteban, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    We introduce a continuous time stochastic process on strings made of two types of particle, whose dynamics mimics that of microtubules in a living cell. The long term behaviour of the system is described in terms of the velocity v of the string end. We show that v is an analytic function of its parameters and study its monotonicity properties. We give a complete characterisation of the phase diagram of the model and derive several criteria of the growth (v>0) and the shrinking (v<0) regimes of the dynamics.

  4. Interfacing the Urban Land-Atmosphere System Through Coupled Urban Canopy and Atmospheric Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiyun; Wang, Zhi-Hua

    2015-03-01

    We couple a single column model (SCM) to a cutting-edge single-layer urban canopy model (SLUCM) with realistic representation of urban hydrological processes. The land-surface transport of energy and moisture parametrized by the SLUCM provides lower boundary conditions to the overlying atmosphere. The coupled SLUCM-SCM model is tested against field measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes in the surface layer, as well as vertical profiles of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer under convective conditions. The model is then used to simulate urban land-atmosphere interactions by changing urban geometry, surface albedo, vegetation fraction and aerodynamic roughness. Results show that changes of landscape characteristics have a significant impact on the growth of the boundary layer as well as on the distributions of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer. Overall, the proposed numerical framework provides a useful stand-alone modelling tool, with which the impact of urban land-surface conditions on the local hydrometeorology can be assessed via land-atmosphere interactions.

  5. Onboard Atmospheric Modeling and Prediction for Autonomous Aerobraking Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Robert H.; Prince, Jill L. H.

    2011-01-01

    Aerobraking has proven to be an effective means of increasing the science payload for planetary orbiting missions and/or for enabling the use of less expensive launch vehicles. Though aerobraking has numerous benefits, large operations cost have been required to maintain the aerobraking time line without violating aerodynamic heating or other constraints. Two operations functions have been performed on an orbit by orbit basis to estimate atmospheric properties relevant to aerobraking. The Navigation team typically solves for an atmospheric density scale factor using DSN tracking data and the atmospheric modeling team uses telemetric accelerometer data to recover atmospheric density profiles. After some effort, decisions are made about the need for orbit trim maneuvers to adjust periapsis altitude to stay within the aerobraking corridor. Autonomous aerobraking would reduce the need for many ground based tasks. To be successful, atmospheric modeling must be performed on the vehicle in near real time. This paper discusses the issues associated with estimating the planetary atmosphere onboard and evaluates a number of the options for Mars, Venus and Titan aerobraking missions.

  6. Box models for the evolution of atmospheric oxygen: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    A simple 3-box model of the atmosphere/ocean system is used to describe the various stages in the evolution of atmospheric oxygen. In Stage I, which probably lasted until redbeds began to form about 2.0 Ga ago, the Earth's surface environment was generally devoid of free O2, except possibly in localized regions of high productivity in the surface ocean. In Stage II, which may have lasted for less than 150 Ma, the atmosphere and surface ocean were oxidizing, while the deep ocean remained anoxic. In Stage III, which commenced with the disappearance of banded iron formations around 1.85 Ga ago and has lasted until the present, all three surface reservoirs contained appreciable amounts of free O2. Recent and not-so-recent controversies regarding the abundance of oxygen in the Archean atmosphere are identified and discussed. The rate of O2 increase during the Middle and Late Proterozoic is identified as another outstanding question.

  7. Light self-focusing in the atmosphere: thin window model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseva, Irina A.; Fedoruk, Mikhail P.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high power (exceeding the self-focusing threshold by more than three orders of magnitude) light beams from ground-based laser systems may find applications in space-debris cleaning. The propagation of such powerful laser beams through the atmosphere reveals many novel interesting features compared to traditional light self-focusing. It is demonstrated here that for the relevant laser parameters, when the thickness of the atmosphere is much shorter than the focusing length (that is, of the orbit scale), the beam transit through the atmosphere in lowest order produces phase distortion only. This means that by using adaptive optics it may be possible to eliminate the impact of self-focusing in the atmosphere on the laser beam. The area of applicability of the proposed “thin window” model is broader than the specific physical problem considered here. For instance, it might find applications in femtosecond laser material processing.

  8. Box models for the evolution of atmospheric oxygen: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    A simple 3-box model of the atmosphere/ocean system is used to describe the various stages in the evolution of atmospheric oxygen. In Stage I, which probably lasted until redbeds began to form about 2.0 Ga ago, the Earth's surface environment was generally devoid of free O2, except possibly in localized regions of high productivity in the surface ocean. In Stage II, which may have lasted for less than 150 Ma, the atmosphere and surface ocean were oxidizing, while the deep ocean remained anoxic. In Stage III, which commenced with the disappearance of banded iron formations around 1.85 Ga ago and has lasted until the present, all three surface reservoirs contained appreciable amounts of free O2. Recent and not-so-recent controversies regarding the abundance of oxygen in the Archean atmosphere are identified and discussed. The rate of O2 increase during the Middle and Late Proterozoic is identified as another outstanding question.

  9. Model atmospheres for Mercury based on a lunar analogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Similarities in daytime spectral reflectivities and nighttime infrared emission from Mercury and the moon are shown to imply that the atmosphere of Mercury must be tenuous, like that of the moon. The theory of formation, transport, and loss in the lunar atmosphere is applied to Mercury. Models of the Hermian atmosphere at perihelion and aphelion are presented, based on the solar wind as the dominant source of gases. Only the noncondensable species - hydrogen, helium and neon - are considered. Of these, helium is the most abundant atmospheric gas, with maximum concentration of about 40,000,000 per cu cm at the nighttime surface. The maximum concentration of H2 is 6,000,000 per cu cm, and that of neon is 700,000 per cu cm.

  10. 3D multispecies collisional model of Ganymede's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Francois; Leclercq, Ludivine; Oza, Apurva; Schmidt, Carl; Modolo, Ronan; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Johnson, Robert E.

    2016-10-01

    Ganymede's atmosphere is produced by the interaction of the Sun and of the Jovian magnetosphere with its surface. It is a reflection of Ganymede's surface properties, but also of the complex interaction between the Ganymede and Jupiter magnetospheres. The Exospheric Global Model (EGM) has been developed in order to be able to integrate surface and magnetosphere processes with those in Ganymede's atmosphere. It is a 3D parallelized multi-species collisional model, coupled with LatHys, a hybrid multi-grid 3D multi-species model of Ganymede's magnetosphere (Leclercq et al., Geophys. Res. Let., Submitted, 2016). EGM's description of the species-dependent spatial distribution of Ganymede's atmosphere, its temporal variability during rotation around Jupiter, its connection to the surface, the role of collisions, and respective roles of sublimation and sputtering in producing Ganymede's exosphere, illustrates how modeling combined with in situ and remote sensing of Ganymede's atmosphere can contribute to our understanding of this unique surface-atmosphere-magnetosphere integrated system.

  11. Model Atmospheres for X-ray Bursting Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Medin, Zach; Calder, Alan C; Fontes, Christopher J; Fryer, Chris L; Hungerford, Aimee L

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where X-ray bursts occur. Observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  12. Statistical and dynamical properties of covariant lyapunov vectors in a coupled atmosphere-ocean model—multiscale effects, geometric degeneracy, and error dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane; Lucarini, Valerio

    2016-06-01

    We study a simplified coupled atmosphere-ocean model using the formalism of covariant Lyapunov vectors (CLVs), which link physically-based directions of perturbations to growth/decay rates. The model is obtained via a severe truncation of quasi-geostrophic equations for the two fluids, and includes a simple yet physically meaningful representation of their dynamical/thermodynamical coupling. The model has 36 degrees of freedom, and the parameters are chosen so that a chaotic behaviour is observed. There are two positive Lyapunov exponents (LEs), sixteen negative LEs, and eighteen near-zero LEs. The presence of many near-zero LEs results from the vast time-scale separation between the characteristic time scales of the two fluids, and leads to nontrivial error growth properties in the tangent space spanned by the corresponding CLVs, which are geometrically very degenerate. Such CLVs correspond to two different classes of ocean/atmosphere coupled modes. The tangent space spanned by the CLVs corresponding to the positive and negative LEs has, instead, a non-pathological behaviour, and one can construct robust large deviations laws for the finite time LEs, thus providing a universal model for assessing predictability on long to ultra-long scales along such directions. Interestingly, the tangent space of the unstable manifold has substantial projection on both atmospheric and oceanic components. The results show the difficulties in using hyperbolicity as a conceptual framework for multiscale chaotic dynamical systems, whereas the framework of partial hyperbolicity seems better suited, possibly indicating an alternative definition for the chaotic hypothesis. They also suggest the need for an accurate analysis of error dynamics on different time scales and domains and for a careful set-up of assimilation schemes when looking at coupled atmosphere-ocean models.

  13. Dynamical Modelling of Meteoroid Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David; Wiegert, P. A.

    2012-10-01

    Accurate simulations of meteoroid streams permit the prediction of stream interaction with Earth, and provide a measure of risk to Earth satellites and interplanetary spacecraft. Current cometary ejecta and meteoroid stream models have been somewhat successful in predicting some stream observations, but have required questionable assumptions and significant simplifications. Extending on the approach of Vaubaillon et al. (2005)1, we model dust ejection from the cometary nucleus, and generate sample particles representing bins of distinct dynamical evolution-regulating characteristics (size, density, direction, albedo). Ephemerides of the sample particles are integrated and recorded for later assignment of frequency based on model parameter changes. To assist in model analysis we are developing interactive software to permit the “turning of knobs” of model parameters, allowing for near-real-time 3D visualization of resulting stream structure. With this tool, we will revisit prior assumptions made, and will observe the impact of introducing non-uniform cometary surface attributes and temporal activity. The software uses a single model definition and implementation throughout model verification, sample particle bin generation and integration, and analysis. It supports the adjustment with feedback of both independent and independent model values, with the intent of providing an interface supporting multivariate analysis. Propagations of measurement uncertainties and model parameter precisions are tracked rigorously throughout. We maintain a separation of the model itself from the abstract concepts of model definition, parameter manipulation, and real-time analysis and visualization. Therefore we are able to quickly adapt to fundamental model changes. It is hoped the tool will also be of use in other solar system dynamics problems. 1 Vaubaillon, J.; Colas, F.; Jorda, L. (2005) A new method to predict meteor showers. I. Description of the model. Astronomy and

  14. Dynamic dose assessment by Large Eddy Simulation of the near-range atmospheric dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervecken, Lieven; Camps, Johan; Meyers, Johan

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the simulation of the near-range atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides, computational fluid dynamics is becoming increasingly popular. In the current study, Large-Eddy Simulation is used to examine the time-evolution of the turbulent dispersion of radioactive gases in the atmospheric boundary layer, and it is coupled to a gamma dose rate model that is based on the point-kernel method with buildup factors. In this way, the variability of radiological dose rate from cloud shine due to instantaneous turbulent mixing processes can be evaluated. The steady release in an open field of (41)Ar and (133)Xe for 4 different release heights is studied, thus covering radionuclides that decay with a high-energy gamma and a low-energy gamma, respectively. Based on these simulations, the variability of dose rates at ground level for different averaging times in the dose measurements is analyzed. It is observed that turbulent variability in the wind field can lead to dose estimates that are underestimated by up to a factor of four when conventional long-term measurements are used to estimate the dose from short-term exposures.

  15. Middle atmosphere dynamical sources of the semiannual oscillation in the thermosphere and ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M.; Emmert, J. T.; Drob, D. P.; Siskind, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    The strong global semiannual oscillation (SAO) in thermospheric density has been observed for five decades, but definitive knowledge of its source has been elusive. We use the National Center of Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) to study how middle atmospheric dynamics generate the SAO in the thermosphere-ionosphere (T-I). The "standard" TIME-GCM simulates, from first principles, SAOs in thermospheric mass density and ionospheric total electron content that agree well with observed climatological variations. Diagnosis of the globally averaged continuity equation for atomic oxygen ([O]) shows that the T-I SAO originates in the upper mesosphere, where an SAO in [O] is forced by nonlinear, resolved-scale variations in the advective, net tidal, and diffusive transport of O. Contrary to earlier hypotheses, TIME-GCM simulations demonstrate that intra-annually varying eddy diffusion by breaking gravity waves may not be the primary driver of the T-I SAO: A pronounced SAO is produced without parameterized gravity waves.

  16. Dynamic Model of Mesoscale Eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovikov, Mikhail S.

    2003-04-01

    Oceanic mesoscale eddies which are analogs of well known synoptic eddies (cyclones and anticyclones), are studied on the basis of the turbulence model originated by Dubovikov (Dubovikov, M.S., "Dynamical model of turbulent eddies", Int. J. Mod. Phys.B7, 4631-4645 (1993).) and further developed by Canuto and Dubovikov (Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: I. General formalism", Phys. Fluids8, 571-586 (1996a) (CD96a); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: II. Sheardriven flows", Phys. Fluids8, 587-598 (1996b) (CD96b); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S., Cheng, Y. and Dienstfrey, A., "A dynamical model for turbulence: III. Numerical results", Phys. Fluids8, 599-613 (1996c)(CD96c); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Dienstfrey, A., "A dynamical model for turbulence: IV. Buoyancy-driven flows", Phys. Fluids9, 2118-2131 (1997a) (CD97a); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: V. The effect of rotation", Phys. Fluids9, 2132-2140 (1997b) (CD97b); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Wielaard, D.J., "A dynamical model for turbulence: VI. Two dimensional turbulence", Phys. Fluids9, 2141-2147 (1997c) (CD97c); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "Physical regimes and dimensional structure of rotating turbulence", Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 666-669 (1997d) (CD97d); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Dienstfrey, A., "Turbulent convection in a spectral model", Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 662-665 (1997e) (CD97e); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A new approach to turbulence", Int. J. Mod. Phys.12, 3121-3152 (1997f) (CD97f); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "Two scaling regimes for rotating Raleigh-Benard convection", Phys. Rev. Letters78, 281-284, (1998) (CD98); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: VII. The five invariants for shear driven flows", Phys. Fluids11, 659-664 (1999a) (CD99a); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Yu, G., "A dynamical model for turbulence: VIII. IR and UV

  17. On the atmospheric dynamical responses to land-use change in East Asian monsoon region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huqiang; Gao, Xuejie

    2009-08-01

    This study aims at (1) exploring dominant atmospheric dynamical processes which are responsible for climate model-simulated land-use impacts on Asian monsoon; and (2) assessing uncertainty in such model simulations due to their skills in simulating detailed monsoon circulations in the region. Firstly, results from a series of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC) global model simulations of land-use vegetation changes (LUC) in China are analysed. The model showed consistent signals of changes in atmospheric low-level vertical profile and regional circulations responding to LUC. In northern winter, the model-simulated rainfall reduction and surface cooling are associated with an enhanced southward penetration of dry and cold air mass, which impedes warm and humid air reaching the region for generating cold-front rainfall. In its summer, an enhanced cyclonic circulation responding to LUC further blocks the northeast penetration of southwestly summer monsoon flow into the region and results in rainfall decreases and a surface warming. Secondly, we have explored uncertainties in the proposed mechanism operating in the global model. By comparing its results with a set of high-resolution regional model simulations using the same vegetation datasets, it reveals similar changes in winter rainfall but opposite features in summer rainfall responses. In the global model, there is a cyclonic low-level circulation pattern over the South China Sea and adjacent region, an unsatisfactory feature commonly seen in other global climate models. With the reduction in surface roughness following LUC, such a deficiency becomes more prominent which further results in a weakened south/southwestly summer monsoon flow and rainfall reduction. In contrast, in the regional model, its southwestly summer monsoon flow is further enhanced due to the same process as reduced surface roughness. The enhanced monsoon flow further pushes the East Asian monsoon rainfall belt more

  18. GEOS Atmospheric Model: Challenges at Exascale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, William M.; Suarez, Max J.

    2017-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) model at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) is used to simulate the multi-scale variability of the Earth's weather and climate, and is used primarily to assimilate conventional and satellite-based observations for weather forecasting and reanalysis. In addition, assimilations coupled to an ocean model are used for longer-term forecasting (e.g., El Nino) on seasonal to interannual times-scales. The GMAO's research activities, including system development, focus on numerous time and space scales, as detailed on the GMAO website, where they are tabbed under five major themes: Weather Analysis and Prediction; Seasonal-Decadal Analysis and Prediction; Reanalysis; Global Mesoscale Modeling, and Observing System Science. A brief description of the GEOS systems can also be found at the GMAO website. GEOS executes as a collection of earth system components connected through the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). The ESMF layer is supplemented with the MAPL (Modeling, Analysis, and Prediction Layer) software toolkit developed at the GMAO, which facilitates the organization of the computational components into a hierarchical architecture. GEOS systems run in parallel using a horizontal decomposition of the Earth's sphere into processing elements (PEs). Communication between PEs is primarily through a message passing framework, using the message passing interface (MPI), and through explicit use of node-level shared memory access via the SHMEM (Symmetric Hierarchical Memory access) protocol. Production GEOS weather prediction systems currently run at 12.5-kilometer horizontal resolution with 72 vertical levels decomposed into PEs associated with 5,400 MPI processes. Research GEOS systems run at resolutions as fine as 1.5 kilometers globally using as many as 30,000 MPI processes. Looking forward, these systems can be expected to see a 2 times increase in horizontal resolution every two to three years, as well as

  19. Dynamic queuing transmission model for dynamic network loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raovic, Nevena; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new macroscopic multi-class dynamic network loading model called Dynamic Queuing Transmission Model (DQTM). The model utilizes ‘good’ properties of the Dynamic Queuing Model (DQM) and the Link Transmission Model (LTM) by offering a DQM consistent with the kinematic wave theory...... and allowing for the representation of multiple vehicle classes, queue spillbacks and shock waves. The model assumes that a link is split into a moving part plus a queuing part, and p that traffic dynamics are given by a triangular fundamental diagram. A case-study is investigated and the DQTM is compared...

  20. Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics as a Novel Closure for Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkington, B. E.; Majda, A. J.

    2001-05-01

    For nearly three decades, geophysical fluid dynamicists have used Gibbsian statistical ensembles to represent the equilibrium states of ocean or atmosphere models. Typically, these ensembles have been based on the conservation of energy and potential enstrophy, resulting in a statistical theory with a Gaussian joint distribution and a linear mean-field equation. This energy-enstrophy theory has successfully predicted a number of phenomena, including the organization of quasi-geostrophic turbulence over topography. In this talk we indicate how modern mathematics can be used to formulate, analyze and implement new statistical equilibrium theories that have a much wider range of application to geophysical flows. In these more general theories, the unresolved, small-scale potential vorticity fluctuations have a non-Gaussian distribution, whose parameters are inferred from physical considerations. Large deviation techniques from probability theory are then invoked to deduce the maximum entropy principle that characterizes the large-scale, coherent state, which satisfies a nonlinear mean-field equation. In turn, ideas from constrained optimization theory are exploited to design a robust iterative algorithm for computing branches of solutions, and to construct a Lyapunov functional that ensures the nonlinear stability of these solutions, many of which lie beyond classical stability criteria. We describe two particular applications: (1) a 1+1/2-layer β -plane model of the steady zonal jets and embedded vortices in a Jovian atmosphere; (2) a 2-layer f-plane model of the spreading phase of open-ocean deep convection. In the Jovian model, the predicted coherent states are zonal shear flows containing prograding and retrograding jets, or anti-cyclonic vortices lying between such jets, depending on the total energy, circulation and other physical parameters. In the model of open-ocean convection, the equilibrium state in basin due to a surface cooling consists of a barotropic

  1. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems,

  2. WM-basic: Modeling atmospheres of hot stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauldrach, A. W. A.

    2012-04-01

    WM-basic is an easy-to-use interface to a program package which models the atmospheres of Hot Stars (and also SN and GN). The release comprises all programs required to calculate model atmospheres which especially yield ionizing fluxes and synthetic spectra. WM-basic is a native 32-bit application, conforming to the Multiple Documents Interface (MDI) standards for Windows XP/2000/NT/9x. All components of the program package have been compiled with Digital Visual Fortran V6.6(Pro) and Microsoft Visual C++.

  3. The atmospheric structure and dynamical properties of Neptune derived from ground-based and IUE spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Smith, Wm. Hayden

    1990-01-01

    A wide range of recent full-disk spectral observations is used to constrain the atmospheric structure and dynamical properties of Neptune; analytical determinations are made of the abundances of such spectrally active gas species as the deep-atmosphere CH4 molar fraction and the mean ortho/para hydrogen ratio in the visible atmosphere, as well as stratospheric and tropospheric aerosol properties. Compared to Uranus, the greater abundance and shorter lifetimes of Neptunian particulates in the stratospheric region irradiated by the solar UV flux indicate that such radiation is the darkening agent of stratospheric aerosols on both planets.

  4. Performance of a reconfigured atmospheric general circulation model at low resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xinyu; Zhou, Tianjun; Wang, Shaowu; Wang, Bin; Wan, Hui; Li, Jian

    2007-07-01

    Paleoclimate simulations usually require model runs over a very long time. The fast integration version of a state-of-the-art general circulation model (GCM), which shares the same physical and dynamical processes but with reduced horizontal resolution and increased time step, is usually developed. In this study, we configure a fast version of an atmospheric GCM (AGCM), the Grid Atmospheric Model of IAP/LASG (Institute of Atmospheric Physics/State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics), at low resolution (GAMIL-L, hereafter), and compare the simulation results with the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and other data to examine its performance. GAMIL-L, which is derived from the original GAMIL, is a finite difference AGCM with 72×40 grids in longitude and latitude and 26 vertical levels. To validate the simulated climatology and variability, two runs were achieved. One was a 60-year control run with fixed climatological monthly sea surface temperature (SST) forcing, and the other was a 50-yr (1950 2000) integration with observational time-varying monthly SST forcing. Comparisons between these two cases and the reanalysis, including intra-seasonal and inter-annual variability are also presented. In addition, the differences between GAMIL-L and the original version of GAMIL are also investigated. The results show that GAMIL-L can capture most of the large-scale dynamical features of the atmosphere, especially in the tropics and mid latitudes, although a few deficiencies exist, such as the underestimated Hadley cell and thereby the weak strength of the Asia summer monsoon. However, the simulated mean states over high latitudes, especially over the polar regions, are not acceptable. Apart from dynamics, the thermodynamic features mainly depend upon the physical parameterization schemes. Since the physical package of GAMIL-L is exactly the same as the original high-resolution version of GAMIL, in which the NCAR Community

  5. Performance of a Reconfigured Atmospheric General Circulation Model at Low Resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Xinyu; ZHOU Tianjun; WANG Shaowu; WANG Bin; WAN Hui; LI Jian

    2007-01-01

    Paleoclimate simulations usually require model runs over a very long time. The fast integration version of a state-of-the-art general circulation model (GCM), which shares the same physical and dynamical processes but with reduced horizontal resolution and increased time step, is usually developed. In this study, we configure a fast version of an atmospheric GCM (AGCM), the Grid Atmospheric Model of IAP/LASG(Institute of Atmospheric Physics/State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics), at low resolution (GAMIL-L, hereafter), and compare the simulation results with the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and other data to examine its performance. GAMIL-L, which is derived from the original GAMIL, is a finite difference AGCM with 72×40 grids in longitude and latitude and 26 vertical levels. To validate the simulated climatology and variability, two runs were achieved. One was a 60-year control run with fixed climatological monthly sea surface temperature (SST) forcing, and the other was a 50-yr (1950-2000) integration with observational time-varying monthly SST forcing. Comparisons between these two cases and the reanalysis, including intra- seasonal and inter-annual variability are also presented. In addition, the differences between GAMIL-L and the original version of GAMIL are also investigated.The results show that GAMIL-L can capture most of the large-scale dynamical features of the atmosphere,especially in the tropics and mid latitudes, although a few deficiencies exist, such as the underestimated Hadley cell and thereby the weak strength of the Asia summer monsoon. However, the simulated mean states over high latitudes, especially over the polar regions, are not acceptable. Apart from dynamics, the thermodynamic features mainly depend upon the physical parameterization schemes. Since the physical package of GAMIL-L is exactly the same as the original high-resolution version of GAMIL, in which the NCAR Community

  6. Model Atmospheres From Very Low Mass Stars to Brown Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Allard, F; Freytag, B

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery of brown dwarfs in 1994, and the discovery of dust cloud formation in the latest Very Low Mass Stars (VLMs) and Brown Dwarfs (BDs) in 1996, the most important challenge in modeling their atmospheres as become the understanding of cloud formation and advective mixing. For this purpose, we have developed radiation hydrodynamic 2D model atmosphere simulations to study the formation of forsterite dust in presence of advection, condensation, and sedimentation across the M-L-T VLMs to BDs sequence (Teff = 2800 K to 900 K, Freytag et al. 2010). We discovered the formation of gravity waves as a driving mechanism for the formation of clouds in these atmospheres, and derived a rule for the velocity field versus atmospheric depth and Teff , which is relatively insensitive to gravity. This rule has been used in the construction of the new model atmosphere grid, BT-Settl, to determine the microturbulence velocity, the diffusion coefficient, and the advective mixing of molecules as a function of depth. ...

  7. Vesper - Venus Chemistry and Dynamics Orbiter - A NASA Discovery Mission Proposal: Submillimeter Investigation of Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Vesper conducts a focused investigation of the chemistry and dynamics of the middle atmosphere of our sister planet- from the base of the global cloud cover to the lower thermosphere. The middle atmosphere controls the stability of the Venus climate system. Vesper determines what processes maintain the atmospheric chemical stability, cause observed variability of chemical composition, control the escape of water, and drive the extreme super-rotation. The Vesper science investigation provides a unique perspective on the Earth environment due to the similarities in the middle atmosphere processes of both Venus and the Earth. Understanding key distinctions and similarities between Venus and Earth will increase our knowledge of how terrestrial planets evolve along different paths from nearly identical initial conditions.

  8. Model Atmospheres and Transit Spectra for Hot Rocky Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, Roxana

    We propose to build a versatile set of self-consistent atmospheric models for hot rocky exoplanets and use them to predict their transit and eclipse spectra. Hot rocky exoplanets will form the majority of small planets in close-in orbits to be discovered by the TESS and Kepler K2 missions, and offer the best opportunity for characterization with current and future instruments. We will use fully non-grey radiative-convective atmospheric structure codes with cloud formation and vertical mixing, combined with a self-consistent treatment of gas chemistry above the magma ocean. Being in equilibrium with the surface, the vaporized rock material can be a good tracer of the bulk composition of the planet. We will derive the atmospheric structure and escape rates considering both volatile-free and volatile bearing compositions, which reflect the diversity of hot rocky planet atmospheres. Our models will inform follow- up observations with JWST and ground-based instruments, aid the interpretation of transit and eclipse spectra, and provide a better understanding of volatile loss in these atmospheres. Such results will help refine our picture of rocky planet formation and evolution. Planets in ultra-short period (USP) orbits are a special class of hot rocky exoplanets. As shown by Kepler, these planets are generally smaller than 2 Earth radii, suggesting that they are likely to be rocky and could have lost their volatiles through photo-evaporation. Being close to their host stars, these planets are ultra-hot, with estimated temperatures of 1000-3000 K. A number of USP planets have been already discovered (e.g. Kepler-78 b, CoRoT-7 b, Kepler-10 b), and this number is expected to grow by confirming additional planet candidates. The characterization of planets on ultra-short orbits is advantageous due to the larger number of observable transits, and the larger transit signal in the case of an evaporating atmosphere. Much advance has been made in understanding and characterizing

  9. Radiative and Dynamical Feedbacks Over the Equatorial Cold-Tongue: Results from Seven Atmospheric GCMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, D; Zhang, T; Covey, C; Klein, S; Collins, W; Kiehl, J; Meehl, J; Held, I; Suarez, M

    2005-01-04

    The equatorial Pacific is a region with strong negative feedbacks. Yet coupled GCMs have exhibited a propensity to develop a significant SST bias in that region, suggesting an unrealistic sensitivity in the coupled models to small energy flux errors that inevitably occur in the individual model components. Could this 'hypersensitivity' exhibited in a coupled model be due to an underestimate of the strength of the negative feedbacks in this region? With this suspicion, the feedbacks in the equatorial Pacific in seven atmospheric GCMs (AGCMs) have been quantified using the interannual variations in that region and compared with the corresponding calculations from the observations. The seven AGCMs are: the NCAR CAM1, the NCAR CAM2,the NCAR CAM3, the NASA/NSIPP Atmospheric Model, the Hadley Center Model, the GFDL AM2p10, and the GFDL AM2p12. All the corresponding coupled runs of these seven AGCMs have an excessive cold-tongue in the equatorial Pacific. The net atmospheric feedback over the equatorial Pacific in the two GFDL models is found to be comparable to the observed value. All other models are found to have a weaker negative net feedback from the atmosphere--a weaker regulating effect on the underlying SST than the real atmosphere. A weaker negative feedback from the cloud albedo and a weaker negative feedback from the atmospheric transport are the two leading contributors to the weaker regulating effect from the model atmosphere. All models overestimate somewhat the positive feedback from water vapor. These results confirm the suspicion that an underestimate of negative feedbacks from the atmosphere over the equatorial Pacific region is a prevalent problem. The results also suggest, however, that a weaker regulatory effect from the atmosphere is unlikely solely responsible for the 'hypersensitivity' in all models. The need to validate the feedbacks from the ocean transport is therefore highlighted.

  10. Extending radiative transfer models by use of Bayes rule. [in atmospheric science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, C.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure that extends some existing radiative transfer modeling techniques to problems in atmospheric science where curvature and layering of the medium and dynamic range and angular resolution of the signal are important. Example problems include twilight and limb scan simulations. Techniques that are extended include successive orders of scattering, matrix operator, doubling, Gauss-Seidel iteration, discrete ordinates and spherical harmonics. The procedure for extending them is based on Bayes' rule from probability theory.

  11. Evaluation of atmospheric density models and preliminary functional specifications for the Langley Atmospheric Information Retrieval System (LAIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.; Boland, D. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This document presents the results of an extensive survey and comparative evaluation of current atmosphere and wind models for inclusion in the Langley Atmospheric Information Retrieval System (LAIRS). It includes recommended models for use in LAIRS, estimated accuracies for the recommended models, and functional specifications for the development of LAIRS.

  12. Atomistic modeling of carbon Cottrell atmospheres in bcc iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, R. G. A.; Perez, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2013-01-01

    Atomistic simulations with an EAM interatomic potential were used to evaluate carbon-dislocation binding energies in bcc iron. These binding energies were then used to calculate the occupation probability of interstitial sites in the vicinity of an edge and a screw dislocation. The saturation concentration due to carbon-carbon interactions was also estimated by atomistic simulations in the dislocation core and taken as an upper limit for carbon concentration in a Cottrell atmosphere. We obtained a maximum concentration of 10 ± 1 at.% C at T = 0 K within a radius of 1 nm from the dislocation lines. The spatial carbon distributions around the line defects revealed that the Cottrell atmosphere associated with an edge dislocation is denser than that around a screw dislocation, in contrast with the predictions of the classical model of Cochardt and colleagues. Moreover, the present Cottrell atmosphere model is in reasonable quantitative accord with the three-dimensional atom probe data available in the literature.

  13. Atmospheric dispersion modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Gayle [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pobanz, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vogt, Phil [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Aluzzi, Fernando [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homann, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    In this research, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident including: daily Japanese weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions to inform planning for field monitoring operations and to provide U.S. government agencies with ongoing situational awareness of meteorological conditions; estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases to support protective action planning for U.S. citizens; predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations; and source estimation and plume model refinement based on atmospheric dispersion modeling and available monitoring data.

  14. Advances in parallel computer technology for desktop atmospheric dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, X.; Ionescu-Niscov, S.; Fast, J.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Allwine, K.J. [Allwine Enviornmental Serv., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Desktop models are those models used by analysts with varied backgrounds, for performing, for example, air quality assessment and emergency response activities. These models must be robust, well documented, have minimal and well controlled user inputs, and have clear outputs. Existing coarse-grained parallel computers can provide significant increases in computation speed in desktop atmospheric dispersion modeling without considerable increases in hardware cost. This increased speed will allow for significant improvements to be made in the scientific foundations of these applied models, in the form of more advanced diffusion schemes and better representation of the wind and turbulence fields. This is especially attractive for emergency response applications where speed and accuracy are of utmost importance. This paper describes one particular application of coarse-grained parallel computer technology to a desktop complex terrain atmospheric dispersion modeling system. By comparing performance characteristics of the coarse-grained parallel version of the model with the single-processor version, we will demonstrate that applying coarse-grained parallel computer technology to desktop atmospheric dispersion modeling systems will allow us to address critical issues facing future requirements of this class of dispersion models.

  15. Dynamics of apokamp-type atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnin, Eduard A.; Panarin, Victor A.; Skakun, Victor S.; Baksht, Evgeny Kh.; Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes a new discharge source of atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) in air with no gas supply through the discharge region. In this discharge mode, plasma jets develop from the bending point of a bright current channel between two electrodes and are therefore termed an apokamp (from Greek `off' and `bend'). The apokamp can represent single plasma jets of length up 6 cm or several jets, and the temperature of such jets can range from more than 1000 °C at their base to 100-250 °C at their tip. Apokamps are formed at maximum applied voltage of positive polarity, provided that the second electrode is capacitively decoupled with ground. According to high-speed photography with time resolution from several nanoseconds to several tens of nanoseconds, the apokamp consists of a set of plasma bullets moving with a velocity of 100-220 km/s, which excludes the convective mechanism of plasma decay. Estimates on a 100-ns scale show that the near-electrode zones and the zones from which apokamps develop are close in temperature.

  16. Dynamics Modeling of Heavy Special Driving Simulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the dynamical characteristic parameters of the real vehicle, the modeling approach and procedure of dynamics of vehicles are expatiated. The layout of vehicle dynamics is proposed, and the sub-models of the diesel engine, drivetrain system and vehicle multi-body dynamics are introduced. Finally, the running characteristic data of the virtual and real vehicles are compared, which shows that the dynamics model is similar closely to the real vehicle system.

  17. Multicomponent aerosol dynamics model UHMA: model development and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korhonen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A size-segregated aerosol dynamics model UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol model was developed for studies of multicomponent tropospheric aerosol particles. The model includes major aerosol microphysical processes in the atmosphere with a focus on new particle formation and growth; thus it incorporates particle coagulation and multicomponent condensation, applying a revised treatment of condensation flux onto free molecular regime particles and the activation of nanosized clusters by organic vapours (Nano-Köhler theory, as well as recent parameterizations for binary H2SO4-H2O and ternary H2SO4-NH3-H2O homogeneous nucleation and dry deposition. The representation of particle size distribution can be chosen from three sectional methods: the hybrid method, the moving center method, and the retracking method in which moving sections are retracked to a fixed grid after a certain time interval. All these methods can treat particle emissions and atmospheric transport consistently, and are therefore suitable for use in large scale atmospheric models. In a test simulation against an accurate high resolution solution, all the methods showed reasonable treatment of new particle formation with 20 size sections although the hybrid and the retracking methods suffered from artificial widening of the distribution. The moving center approach, on the other hand, showed extra dents in the particle size distribution and failed to predict the onset of detectable particle formation. In a separate test simulation of an observed nucleation event, the model captured the key qualitative behaviour of the system well. Furthermore, its prediction of the organic volume fraction in newly formed particles, suggesting values as high as 0.5 for 3–4 nm particles and approximately 0.8 for 10 nm particles, agrees with recent indirect composition measurements.

  18. Multicomponent aerosol dynamics model UHMA: model development and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.

    2004-05-01

    A size-segregated aerosol dynamics model UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol model) was developed for studies of multicomponent tropospheric aerosol particles. The model includes major aerosol microphysical processes in the atmosphere with a focus on new particle formation and growth; thus it incorporates particle coagulation and multicomponent condensation, applying a revised treatment of condensation flux onto free molecular regime particles and the activation of nanosized clusters by organic vapours (Nano-Köhler theory), as well as recent parameterizations for binary H2SO4-H2O and ternary H2SO4-NH3-H2O homogeneous nucleation and dry deposition. The representation of particle size distribution can be chosen from three sectional methods: the hybrid method, the moving center method, and the retracking method in which moving sections are retracked to a fixed grid after a certain time interval. All these methods can treat particle emissions and atmospheric transport consistently, and are therefore suitable for use in large scale atmospheric models. In a test simulation against an accurate high resolution solution, all the methods showed reasonable treatment of new particle formation with 20 size sections although the hybrid and the retracking methods suffered from artificial widening of the distribution. The moving center approach, on the other hand, showed extra dents in the particle size distribution and failed to predict the onset of detectable particle formation. In a separate test simulation of an observed nucleation event, the model captured the key qualitative behaviour of the system well. Furthermore, its prediction of the organic volume fraction in newly formed particles, suggesting values as high as 0.5 for 3-4 nm particles and approximately 0.8 for 10 nm particles, agrees with recent indirect composition measurements.

  19. Atmospheric distribution of methane on Mars: A model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscardy, Sébastien; Daerden, Frank; Neary, Lori

    2016-10-01

    In the past decade, the detection of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars has been reported several times. These observations have strongly drawn the attention of the scientific community and triggered a renewed interest in Mars as their implications for the geochemical or biological activities are remarkable. However, given that methane is expected to have a photochemical lifetime of several centuries, the relatively fast loss rates of methane estimated from Earth-based measurements remain unexplained. Although this gave rise to objections against the validity of those observations, recent in situ measurements confirmed that methane is being occasionally released into the atmosphere from an unknown source (possibly from the ground). Additionally, ExoMars/TGO was launched to Mars in March 2016. NOMAD, one of the instruments onboard TGO, will provide the first global detailed observations of methane on Mars. It is in this context that we present a model study of the behavior of methane plumes.A general circulation model for the atmosphere of Mars is applied to simulate surface emission of methane and to investigate its vertical distribution during the first weeks after the release. Such surface emissions were suggested to explain observations of methane. Previous GCM simulations focused on the horizontal evolution of the methane, but the present study focuses on the three-dimensional dispersion of methane throughout the atmosphere after the surface release. It is found that a highly nonuniform vertical distribution, including distinct vertical layers, can appear throughout the atmosphere during the first weeks after the emission. This is explained by the global circulation patterns in the atmosphere at the time of the emission. Large Hadley cells transport the methane rapidly to other locations over the planet, and methane will be stretched out in layers along the general circulation streamlines at heights corresponding to strong zonal jets.This result changes

  20. An Overview of Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Quality Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew S.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will include my personal research experience and an overview of atmospheric chemistry and air quality modeling to the participants of the NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP 2017). The presentation will also provide examples on ways to apply airborne observations for chemical transport (CTM) and air quality (AQ) model evaluation. CTM and AQ models are important tools in understanding tropospheric-stratospheric composition, atmospheric chemistry processes, meteorology, and air quality. This presentation will focus on how NASA scientist currently apply CTM and AQ models to better understand these topics. Finally, the importance of airborne observation in evaluating these topics and how in situ and remote sensing observations can be used to evaluate and improve CTM and AQ model predictions will be highlighted.

  1. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the 'most likely' dispersion scenario...... of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological obser-vations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observa-tional data, an ensemble of meteorological forecasts is produced....... However, recent developments in numerical weather prediction (NWP) include probabilistic forecasting techniques, which can be utilised also for atmospheric dispersion models. The ensemble statistical methods developed and applied to NWP models aim at describing the inherent uncertainties...

  2. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as possibilities for optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the ‘most likely...... uncertainties of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological observations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing e.g. the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observational data, an ensemble......’ dispersion scenario. However, recent developments in numerical weather prediction (NWP) include probabilistic forecasting techniques, which can be utilised also for long-range atmospheric dispersion models. The ensemble statistical methods developed and applied to NWP models aim at describing the inherent...

  3. New Model Atmospheres: Testing the Solar Spectrum in the UV

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Merino, L H; Bertone, E; Chavez, M; Buzzoni, A

    2007-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the calculation of synthetic spectra obtained with the stellar model atmospheres developed by Cardona, Crivellari, and Simonneau. These new models have been used as input within the SYNTHE series of codes developed by Kurucz. As a first step we have tested if SYNTHE is able to handle these models which go down to log tau(Ross)= -13. We have successfully calculated a synthetic solar spectrum in the wavelength region 2000--4500 A at high resolution (R=522,000). Within this initial test we have found that layers at optical depths with log tau(Ross) < -7 significantly affect the mid-UV properties of a synthetic spectrum computed from a solar model. We anticipate that these new extended models will be a valuable tool for the analysis of UV stellar light arising from the outermost layers of the atmospheres.

  4. New Model Atmospheres: Testing the Solar Spectrum in the UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Merino, L. H.; Cardona, O.; Bertone, E.; Chávez, M.; Buzzoni, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present preliminary results on the calculation of synthetic spectra obtained with the stellar model atmospheres developed by Cardona, Crivellari, and Simonneau. These new models have been used as input within the Synthe series of codes developed by Kurucz. As a first step we have tested if Synthe is able to handle these models which go down to log{τ_{Ross}}= -13. We have successfully calculated a synthetic solar spectrum in the wavelength region 2000-4500 Å at high resolution (R=522 000). Within this initial test we have found that layers at optical depths with log{τ_{Ross}} < -7 significantly affect the mid-UV properties of a synthetic spectrum computed from a solar model. We anticipate that these new extended models will be a valuable tool for the analysis of UV stellar light arising from the outermost layers of the atmospheres.

  5. Models of ungulate population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Eberhardt

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available A useful theory for analyzing ungulate population dynamics is available in the form of equations based on the work of A. J. Lotka. Because the Leslie matrix model yields identical results and is widely known, it is convenient to label the resulting equations as the "Lotka-Leslie" model. The approach is useful for assessing population trends and attempting to predict the outcomes of various management actions. A broad list of applications to large mammals, and two examples specific to caribou are presented with a simple spreadsheet approach to calculations.

  6. Surface conductivity dependent dynamic behaviour of an ultrafine atmospheric pressure plasma jet for microscale surface processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzairi, Tomy; Okada, Mitsuru; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-12-01

    An experimental study on the dynamic behaviour of microcapillary atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) with 5 μm tip size for surfaces of different conductivity is reported. Electrical and spatio-temporal characteristics of the APPJs are monitored using high voltage probe, current monitor and high speed intensified charge couple device camera. From these experimental results, we presented a simple model to understand the electrical discharge characteristics of the capillary APPJs with double electrodes, and estimated the velocity of the ionization fronts in the jet and the electron density to be 3.5-4.2 km/s and 2-7 × 1017 m-3. By analyzing the dynamics of the microcapillary APPJs for different substrate materials, it was found that the surface irradiation area strongly depended on the substrate conductivity and permittivity, especially in the case of polymer-like substrate, surface irradiation area was significantly broadened probably due to the repelling behaviour of the plasma jets from the accumulated electrical charges on the polymer surface. The effect of applying a substrate bias in the range from -900 V to +900 V on the plasma irradiation onto the substrates was also investigated. From the knowledge of the present results, it is helpful for choosing the substrate materials for microscale surface modification.

  7. Dynamical model of brushite precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cristina; Georgieva, Petia; Rocha, Fernando; Ferreira, António; Feyo de Azevedo, Sebastião

    2007-07-01

    The objectives of this work are twofold. From academic point of view the aim is to build a dynamical macro model to fit the material balance and explain the main kinetic mechanisms that govern the transformation of the hydroxyapatite (HAP) into brushite and the growth of brushite, based on laboratory experiments and collected database. From practical point of view, the aim is to design a reliable process simulator that can be easily imbedded in industrial software for model driven monitoring, optimization and control purposes. Based upon a databank of laboratory measurements of the calcium concentration in solution (on-line) and the particle size distribution (off-line) a reliable dynamical model of the dual nature of brushite particle formation for a range of initial concentrations of the reagents was derived as a system of ordinary differential equations of time. The performance of the model is tested with respect to the predicted evolution of mass of calcium in solution and the average (in mass) particle size along time. Results obtained demonstrate a good agreement between the model time trajectories and the available experimental data for a number of different initial concentrations of reagents.

  8. Aeolian dunes as ground truth for atmospheric modeling on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R.K.; Titus, T.N.; Michaels, T.I.; Fenton, L.K.; Colaprete, A.; Christensen, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Martian aeolian dunes preserve a record of atmosphere/surface interaction on a variety of scales, serving as ground truth for both Global Climate Models (GCMs) and mesoscale climate models, such as the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS). We hypothesize that the location of dune fields, expressed globally by geographic distribution and locally by dune centroid azimuth (DCA), may record the long-term integration of atmospheric activity across a broad area, preserving GCM-scale atmospheric trends. In contrast, individual dune morphology, as expressed in slipface orientation (SF), may be more sensitive to localized variations in circulation, preserving topographically controlled mesoscale trends. We test this hypothesis by comparing the geographic distribution, DCA, and SF of dunes with output from the Ames Mars GCM and, at a local study site, with output from MRAMS. When compared to the GCM: 1) dunes generally lie adjacent to areas with strongest winds, 2) DCA agrees fairly well with GCM modeled wind directions in smooth-floored craters, and 3) SF does not agree well with GCM modeled wind directions. When compared to MRAMS modeled winds at our study site: 1) DCA generally coincides with the part of the crater where modeled mean winds are weak, and 2) SFs are consistent with some weak, topographically influenced modeled winds. We conclude that: 1) geographic distribution may be valuable as ground truth for GCMs, 2) DCA may be useful as ground truth for both GCM and mesoscale models, and 3) SF may be useful as ground truth for mesoscale models. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Ab initio investigations of the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of atmospherically relevant strong acids

    OpenAIRE

    Partanen, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Sulfuric and hydrochloric acids participate in several important chemical processes occurring in the atmosphere. Due to its tendency to react with water molecules, sulfuric acid is an important factor in cloud formation and related phenomena. Hydrochloric acid is heavily implicated in stratospheric ozone depletion because of its role as a temporary reservoir for chlorine radicals. In this thesis, the thermodynamics and dynamics of these two acids are investigated. The dynamic part focuse...

  10. Optimization of a prognostic biosphere model for terrestrial biomass and atmospheric CO2 variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saito

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the capacity of a prognostic biosphere model to simulate global variability in atmospheric CO2 concentrations and vegetation carbon dynamics under current environmental conditions. Global data sets of atmospheric CO2 concentrations, above-ground biomass (AGB, and net primary productivity (NPP in terrestrial vegetation were assimilated into the biosphere model using an inverse modeling method combined with an atmospheric transport model. In this process, the optimal physiological parameters of the biosphere model were estimated by minimizing the misfit between observed and modeled values, and parameters were generated to characterize various biome types. Results obtained using the model with the optimized parameters correspond to the observed seasonal variations in CO2 concentration and their annual amplitudes in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In simulating the mean annual AGB and NPP, the model shows improvements in estimating the mean magnitudes and probability distributions for each biome, as compared with results obtained using prior simulation parameters. However, the model is less efficient in its simulation of AGB for forest type biomes. This misfit suggests that more accurate values of input parameters, specifically, grid mean AGB values and seasonal variabilities in physiological parameters, are required to improve the performance of the simulation model.

  11. LES model intercomparisons for the stable atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moene, A.F.; Baas, P.; Bosveld, F.C.; Basu, S.

    2011-01-01

    Model intercomparisons are one possible method to gain confidence in Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) as a viable tool to study turbulence in the atmospheric boundary-layer. This paper discusses the setup and some results of two intercomparison cases focussing on the stably stratified nocturnal boundary-

  12. Modelling atmospheric OH-reactivity in a boreal forest ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, D.; Smolander, S.; Sogachev, Andrey;

    2011-01-01

    We have modelled the total atmospheric OH-reactivity in a boreal forest and investigated the individual contributions from gas phase inorganic species, isoprene, monoterpenes, and methane along with other important VOCs. Daily and seasonal variation in OH-reactivity for the year 2008 was examined...

  13. Assessment of atmospheric models for tele-infrasonic propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Mihan; Hayek, Sylvia

    2005-04-01

    Iron mines in Minnesota are ideally located to assess the accuracy of available atmospheric profiles used in infrasound modeling. These mines are located approximately 400 km away to the southeast (142) of the Lac-Du-Bonnet infrasound station, IS-10. Infrasound data from June 1999 to March 2004 was analyzed to assess the effects of explosion size and atmospheric conditions on observations. IS-10 recorded a suite of events from this time period resulting in well constrained ground truth. This ground truth allows for the comparison of ray trace and PE (Parabolic Equation) modeling to the observed arrivals. The tele-infrasonic distance (greater than 250 km) produces ray paths that turn in the upper atmosphere, the thermosphere, at approximately 120 km to 140 km. Modeling based upon MSIS/HWM (Mass Spectrometer Incoherent Scatter/Horizontal Wind Model) and the NOGAPS (Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System) and NRL-GS2 (Naval Research Laboratory Ground to Space) augmented profiles are used to interpret the observed arrivals.

  14. Sixth International Workshop on the Mars Atmosphere: Modelling and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, F.; Millour, M.

    2017-01-01

    The scope of this workshop is to bring together experts in observations and modelling of the present and past Mars climate systems and discuss the nature of the atmospheric circulation and the photochemistry (up to the thermosphere), the dust cycle, the water cycle (vapor, clouds and frost) and the carbon dioxide cycle (polar caps).

  15. Fast and simple model for atmospheric radiative transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, F.C.; Kokhanovsky, A.A.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Radiative transfer models (RTMs) are of utmost importance for quantitative remote sensing, especially for compensating atmospheric perturbation. A persistent trade-off exists between approaches that prefer accuracy at the cost of computational complexity, versus those favouring simplicity at the cos

  16. A tropical cyclone dynamic initialization technique using high temporal and spatial density atmospheric motion vectors and airborne field campaign data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, E. A.; Bell, M. M.; Elsberry, R. L.; Velden, C.

    2016-12-01

    A new tropical cyclone dynamic initialization technique is described and tested. The technique uses the triple-nested Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System-Tropical Cyclones (COAMPS-TC) (with horizontal grid spacings of 45-,15-, and 5-km, respectively) in conjunction with the Spline Analysis at Mesoscale Utilizing Radar and Aircraft Instrumentation (SAMURAI). A proof-of-concept demonstration of this technique is given for Hurricane Joaquin from the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Tropical Cyclone Intensity (TCI) field program conducted in 2015. High spatial and temporal resolution atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs), dropwindsondes from the Yankee Environmental Systems High Definition Sounding System (HDSS), and surface wind speed retrievals from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) are ingested into SAMURAI to produce increments, which are then used by the COAMPS-TC dynamic initialization scheme to produce consistent dynamic and thermodynamically balanced fields. This high temporal resolution (order of 10-15 minutes) incremental dynamic initialization procedure has advantages over conventional methods in that a bogus vortex is not used, and existing asymmetries (including convective heating and upper and low level wind asymmetries) that exist in the TC are retained. The use of dynamic initialization also ensures improved vortex and environment balance, and consistency with the model physics. A preliminary verification of this new TC initialization scheme will be presented for the initialization and forecast of Hurricane Joaquin (2015).

  17. Dynamic pricing models for electronic business

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y Narahari; C V L Raju; K Ravikumar; Sourabh Shah

    2005-04-01

    Dynamic pricing is the dynamic adjustment of prices to consumers depending upon the value these customers attribute to a product or service. Today’s digital economy is ready for dynamic pricing; however recent research has shown that the prices will have to be adjusted in fairly sophisticated ways, based on sound mathematical models, to derive the benefits of dynamic pricing. This article attempts to survey different models that have been used in dynamic pricing. We first motivate dynamic pricing and present underlying concepts, with several examples, and explain conditions under which dynamic pricing is likely to succeed. We then bring out the role of models in computing dynamic prices. The models surveyed include inventory-based models, data-driven models, auctions, and machine learning. We present a detailed example of an e-business market to show the use of reinforcement learning in dynamic pricing.

  18. High Resolution Transmission Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Jovian Exoplanet Atmospheres: Constraints from Theoretical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Kempton, Eliza M -R; Heng, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    We present high resolution transmission spectra of giant planet atmospheres from a coupled 3-D atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model that includes Doppler shifts which arise from winds and planetary motion. We model jovian planets covering more than two orders of magnitude in incident flux, corresponding to planets with 0.9 to 55 day orbital periods around solar-type stars. The results of our 3-D dynamical models reveal certain aspects of high resolution transmission spectra that are not present in simple 1-D models. We find that the hottest planets experience strong substellar to anti-stellar (SSAS) winds, resulting in transmission spectra with net blue shifts of up to 3 km s$^{-1}$, whereas less irradiated planets show almost no net Doppler shifts. Compared to 1-D models, peak line strengths are significantly reduced for the hottest atmospheres owing to Doppler broadening from a combination of rotation (which is faster for close-in planets under the assumption of tidal locking) and atmospheri...

  19. A Massive Parallel Variational Multiscale FEM Scheme Applied to Nonhydrostatic Atmospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Mariano; Marras, Simone; Moragues, Margarida; Jorba, Oriol; Houzeaux, Guillaume; Aubry, Romain

    2010-05-01

    The solution of the fully compressible Euler equations of stratified flows is approached from the point of view of Computational Fluid Dynamics techniques. Specifically, the main aim of this contribution is the introduction of a Variational Multiscale Finite Element (CVMS-FE) approach to solve dry atmospheric dynamics effectively on massive parallel architectures with more than 1000 processors. The conservation form of the equations of motion is discretized in all directions with a Galerkin scheme with stabilization given by the compressible counterpart of the variational multiscale technique of Hughes [1] and Houzeaux et al. [2]. The justification of this effort is twofold: the search of optimal parallelization characteristics and linear scalability trends on petascale machines is one. The development of a numerical algorithm whose local nature helps maintaining minimal the communication among the processors implies, in fact, a large leap towards efficient parallel computing. Second, the rising trend to global models and models of higher spatial resolution naturally suggests the use of adaptive grids to only resolve zones of larger gradients while keeping the computational mesh properly coarse elsewhere (thus keeping the computational cost low). With these two hypotheses in mind, the finite element scheme presented here is an open option to the development of the next generation Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) codes. This methodology is as new in Computational Fluid Dynamics for compressible flows at low Mach number as it is in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). We however mean to show its ability to maintain stability in the solution of thermal, gravity-driven flows in a stratified environment in the specific context of dry atmospheric dynamics. Standard two dimensional benchmarks are implemented and compared against the reference literature. In the context of thermal and gravity-driven flows in a neutral atmosphere, we present: (1) the density current

  20. Nonhydrostatic adaptive mesh dynamics for multiscale climate models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, W.; Johansen, H.; McCorquodale, P.; Colella, P.; Ullrich, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Many of the atmospheric phenomena with the greatest potential impact in future warmer climates are inherently multiscale. Such meteorological systems include hurricanes and tropical cyclones, atmospheric rivers, and other types of hydrometeorological extremes. These phenomena are challenging to simulate in conventional climate models due to the relatively coarse uniform model resolutions relative to the native nonhydrostatic scales of the phenomonological dynamics. To enable studies of these systems with sufficient local resolution for the multiscale dynamics yet with sufficient speed for climate-change studies, we have adapted existing adaptive mesh dynamics for the DOE-NSF Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). In this talk, we present an adaptive, conservative finite volume approach for moist non-hydrostatic atmospheric dynamics. The approach is based on the compressible Euler equations on 3D thin spherical shells, where the radial direction is treated implicitly (using a fourth-order Runga-Kutta IMEX scheme) to eliminate time step constraints from vertical acoustic waves. Refinement is performed only in the horizontal directions. The spatial discretization is the equiangular cubed-sphere mapping, with a fourth-order accurate discretization to compute flux averages on faces. By using both space-and time-adaptive mesh refinement, the solver allocates computational effort only where greater accuracy is needed. The resulting method is demonstrated to be fourth-order accurate for model problems, and robust at solution discontinuities and stable for large aspect ratios. We present comparisons using a simplified physics package for dycore comparisons of moist physics. Hadley cell lifting an advected tracer into upper atmosphere, with horizontal adaptivity

  1. The Mg II index for upper atmosphere modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thuillier

    Full Text Available The solar radio flux at 10.7 cm has been used in upper atmosphere density modelling because of its correlation with EUV radiation and its long and complete observational record. A proxy, the Mg II index, for the solar chromospheric activity has been derived by Heath and Schlesinger (1986 from Nimbus-7 data. This index allows one to describe the changes occurring in solar-activity in the UV Sun spectral irradiance. The use of this new proxy in upper atmosphere density modelling will be considered. First, this is supported by the 99.9% correlation between the solar radio flux (F10.7 and the Mg II index over a period of 19 years with, however, large differences on time scales of days to months. Secondly, correlation between EUV emissions and the Mg II index has been shown recently, suggesting that this last index may also be used to describe the EUV variations. Using the same density dataset, a model was first run with the F10.7 index as a solar forcing function and second, with the Mg II index. Comparison of their respective predictions to partial density data showed a 3–8% higher precision when the modelling uses the Mg II index rather than F10.7. An external validation, by means of orbit computation, resulted in a 20–40% smaller RMS of the tracking residuals. A density dataset spanning an entire solar cycle, together with Mg II data, is required to construct an accurate, unbiased as possible density model.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere – composition and chemistry; thermosphere – composition and chemistry – History of geophysics (atmospheric sciences

  2. Simulation-Based Analysis of Reentry Dynamics for the Sharp Atmospheric Entry Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillier, Clemens Emmanuel

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes the analysis of the reentry dynamics of a high-performance lifting atmospheric entry vehicle through numerical simulation tools. The vehicle, named SHARP, is currently being developed by the Thermal Protection Materials and Systems branch of NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. The goal of this project is to provide insight into trajectory tradeoffs and vehicle dynamics using simulation tools that are powerful, flexible, user-friendly and inexpensive. Implemented Using MATLAB and SIMULINK, these tools are developed with an eye towards further use in the conceptual design of the SHARP vehicle's trajectory and flight control systems. A trajectory simulator is used to quantify the entry capabilities of the vehicle subject to various operational constraints. Using an aerodynamic database computed by NASA and a model of the earth, the simulator generates the vehicle trajectory in three-dimensional space based on aerodynamic angle inputs. Requirements for entry along the SHARP aerothermal performance constraint are evaluated for different control strategies. Effect of vehicle mass on entry parameters is investigated, and the cross range capability of the vehicle is evaluated. Trajectory results are presented and interpreted. A six degree of freedom simulator builds on the trajectory simulator and provides attitude simulation for future entry controls development. A Newtonian aerodynamic model including control surfaces and a mass model are developed. A visualization tool for interpreting simulation results is described. Control surfaces are roughly sized. A simple controller is developed to fly the vehicle along its aerothermal performance constraint using aerodynamic flaps for control. This end-to-end demonstration proves the suitability of the 6-DOF simulator for future flight control system development. Finally, issues surrounding real-time simulation with hardware in the loop are discussed.

  3. Geochemical and planetary dynamical views on the origin of Earth's atmosphere and oceans

    CERN Document Server

    Dauphas, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Earth's volatile elements (H, C, and N) are essential to maintaining habitable conditions for metazoans and simpler life forms. However, identifying the sources (comets, meteorites, and trapped nebular gas) that supplied volatiles to Earth is not straightforward because secondary processes like mantle degassing, crustal recycling, and escape to space modified the composition of the atmosphere. Here, we review two complementary approaches to investigate the origin of Earth's atmosphere and oceans. The geochemical approach uses volatile element abundances and isotopic compositions to identify the possible contributors to the atmosphere and to disentangle the processes that shaped it. In that respect, noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe), elements that are chemically inert and possess several isotopes produced by radioactivity, play a critical role. The dynamical approach uses our knowledge of planetary dynamics to track volatile delivery to the Earth, starting with dust transport in the disk to planet-building ...

  4. Small-scale topology of solar atmosphere dynamics : II : granulation, K2v grains and waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, N.M.; Rutten, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    We continue studying the small-scale topology of dynamical phenomena in the quiet-sun internetwork atmosphere throug statistical estimation of the co-location probability of different fine-structure elements and wave modes.In this paper we chart spatial alignments between the granular brig tness st

  5. Small-scale topology of solar atmosphere dynamics I: wave sources and wave diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, N.M.; Rutten, R.J.; Brandt, P.N.; Shine, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    We study the small-scale topology of dynamical phenomena in the quiet-sun internet w ork atmosphere,using short-duration Fourier analysis of high-resolution filtergram sequences to obtain statistical estimates for the co-location probability of different fine-structure elements and wave modes. In th

  6. Small-scale topology of solar atmosphere dynamics I: wave sources and wave diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, N.M.; Rutten, R.J.; Brandt, P.N.; Shine, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    We study the small-scale topology of dynamical phenomena in the quiet-sun internet w ork atmosphere,using short-duration Fourier analysis of high-resolution filtergram sequences to obtain statistical estimates for the co-location probability of different fine-structure elements and wave modes. In th

  7. Small-scale topology of solar atmosphere dynamics : II : granulation, K2v grains and waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, N.M.; Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    We continue studying the small-scale topology of dynamical phenomena in the quiet-sun internetwork atmosphere throug statistical estimation of the co-location probability of different fine-structure elements and wave modes.In this paper we chart spatial alignments between the granular brig tness st

  8. Tactical Atmospheric Modeling System-Real Time (TAMS-RT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30...mesoscale model analysis and forecast fields as inputs. OBJECTIVES Support the NRL Tactical Atmospheric Modeling System-Real Time (TAMS-RT) installed in...installation at NCMOC, the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR), who has configuration management oversight for TEDS, has changed the TEDS

  9. Modeling atmospheric effects of the September 1859 Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, B; Melott, A; Thomas, Brian; Jackman, Charles; Melott, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    We have modeled atmospheric effects, especially ozone depletion, due to a solar proton event which probably accompanied the extreme magnetic storm of 1-2 September 1859. We use an inferred proton fluence for this event as estimated from nitrate levels in Greenland ice cores. We present results showing production of odd nitrogen compounds and their impact on ozone. We also compute rainout of nitrate in our model and compare to values from ice core data.

  10. Modeling of Atmospheric Flow Around a Coastal Cape: Lee Side Story

    CERN Document Server

    Perlin, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    The current research focuses on mesoscale dynamics of the atmospheric circulation around an idealized coastal cape representing typical summertime circulation along the northwest coast of the U.S., studied using a mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere modeling system. The orographic wind maximum features a strong NW flow extending a few hundred kilometers downstream and seaward of the cape, which closely follows mesoscale orographic low pressure developed in the lee of the cape. Both wind maximum and the lee trough experience a pronounced diurnal cycle, marked by maximum northwest flow and minimum pressure in the local evening hours (its opposite phase during morning hours), and confirmed by observations from limited buoy and coastal stations. Vertical structure of the atmospheric boundary layer over the coastal ocean on the lee side of the cape indicated the downward propagation of potential temperature and wind features during the course of the day, as opposed to the traditional surface-driven development of t...

  11. Atmospheric Climate Model Experiments Performed at Multiple Horizontal Resolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, T; Bala, G; Gleckler, P; Lobell, D; Mirin, A; Maxwell, R; Rotman, D

    2007-12-21

    This report documents salient features of version 3.3 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3.3) and of three climate simulations in which the resolution of its latitude-longitude grid was systematically increased. For all these simulations of global atmospheric climate during the period 1980-1999, observed monthly ocean surface temperatures and sea ice extents were prescribed according to standard Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) values. These CAM3.3 resolution experiments served as control runs for subsequent simulations of the climatic effects of agricultural irrigation, the focus of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. The CAM3.3 model was able to replicate basic features of the historical climate, although biases in a number of atmospheric variables were evident. Increasing horizontal resolution also generally failed to ameliorate the large-scale errors in most of the climate variables that could be compared with observations. A notable exception was the simulation of precipitation, which incrementally improved with increasing resolution, especially in regions where orography plays a central role in determining the local hydroclimate.

  12. Atmospheric Modeling and Retrieval of Cool Y Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalesky, Joseph; Line, Michael R.; Schneider, Adam

    2017-06-01

    Brown dwarfs' near-infrared spectra contain a wealth of information which can reveal the physical and chemical processes that occur in their atmospheres. Using a recently developed atmospheric retrieval model, we are able to constrain various molecular abundances, along with photometric radius, gravity, cloud optical depths, and temperature profiles for a set of ultral-cool (T8-Y1) dwarfs observed with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. From these spectra, we are able to constrain the abundances of water, methane, ammonia, CO, CO_2, H_2S, and Na+K. Using the retrieved abundances of water and methane, we are able to determine the atmospheric carbon-to-oxygen ratio and metallicity for these objects. We also identify a continuing trend of alkali metal depletion towards cooler effective temperatures likely due to the formation of optically thin Na2S and KCl clouds.

  13. Improving 1D Stellar Models with 3D Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Mosumgaard, Jakob Rørsted; Weiss, Achim; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Trampedach, Regner

    2016-01-01

    Stellar evolution codes play a major role in present-day astrophysics, yet they share common issues. In this work we seek to remedy some of those by the use of results from realistic and highly detailed 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar atmospheres. We have implemented a new temperature stratification extracted directly from the 3D simulations into the Garching Stellar Evolution Code to replace the simplified atmosphere normally used. Secondly, we have implemented the use of a variable mixing-length parameter, which changes as a function of the stellar surface gravity and temperature -- also derived from the 3D simulations. Furthermore, to make our models consistent, we have calculated new opacity tables to match the atmospheric simulations. Here, we present the modified code and initial results on stellar evolution using it.

  14. Modelling of the Manifold Filling Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert; Chevalier, Alain Marie Roger; Jensen, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Mean Value Engine Models (MVEMs) are dynamic models which describe dynamic engine variable (or state) responses on time scales slightly longer than an engine event. This paper describes a new model of the intake manifold filling dynamics which is simple and easy to calibrate for use in engine con...

  15. Working model of the atmosphere and near planetary space of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, V. I. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Basic physical characteristics of Jupiter, its gravitational field, atmosphere, electromagnetic radiation, magnetosphere, meteorite situation and satellites are presented in tables, graphs and figures. Means of observation of the atmosphere and three models of the atmosphere are presented and analyzed.

  16. A stochastic atmospheric model for remote sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    There are many factors which reduce the accuracy of classification of objects in the satellite remote sensing of Earth's surface. One important factor is the variability in the scattering and absorptive properties of the atmospheric components such as particulates and the variable gases. For multispectral remote sensing of the Earth's surface in the visible and infrared parts of the spectrum the atmospheric particulates are a major source of variability in the received signal. It is difficult to design a sensor which will determine the unknown atmospheric components by remote sensing methods, at least to the accuracy needed for multispectral classification. The problem of spatial and temporal variations in the atmospheric quantities which can affect the measured radiances are examined. A method based upon the stochastic nature of the atmospheric components was developed, and, using actual data the statistical parameters needed for inclusion into a radiometric model was generated. Methods are then described for an improved correction of radiances. These algorithms will then result in a more accurate and consistent classification procedure.

  17. Characteristics-Based Methods for Efficient Parallel Integration of the Atmospheric Dynamical Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Matthew Ross

    The social need for realistic atmospheric simulation in weather prediction, climate change attribution, seasonal forecasting, and climate projection is great. To obtain realistic simulations, we need more physical processes included in the model with greater fidelity and finer spatial resolution. Spatial resolution primarily drives the need for computational resources because reducing the model grid spacing by a factor f requires f 4 times more computation (assuming 3-D refinement). This compute power comes from large parallel machines with 10,000s of separate nodes and accelerators such as graphics processing units (GPUs) making efficiency a complicated problem. Efficiency parallel integration algorithms need low internode communication, minimal synchronization, large time steps, and clustered computation. To this end, we propose new characteristics-based methods for the atmospheric dynamical equations with these properties in mind. These schemes are capable of simulating at a large CFL time step in only one stage of computations, needing only one copy of the state variables. They are implemented in a 2-D non-hydrostatic compressible equation set in an x-z (horizontal-vertical) Cartesian plane to simulate buoyancy-driven flows such as rising thermals and internal gravity waves. The schemes are implemented to run on CPU and multi-GPU architectures using Nvidia's CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) language to test relative efficiency. Even with- out memory tuning, the GPU code showed roughly 2.5x (5x) better performance per Watt. With optimization, this could increase by an order of magnitude. The methods can use any spatial interpolant, so two major formulations are proposed and tested. One uses WENO interpolants which are pre-computed, and the other uses standard polynomials and computes them on-the-fly. The advantage of on-the-fly calculations is a significant reduction in the volume of data communicated to and from the GPU's slow global memory. In some

  18. Multiscale modeling of pedestrian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cristiani, Emiliano; Tosin, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This book presents mathematical models and numerical simulations of crowd dynamics. The core topic is the development of a new multiscale paradigm, which bridges the microscopic and macroscopic scales taking the most from each of them for capturing the relevant clues of complexity of crowds. The background idea is indeed that most of the complex trends exhibited by crowds are due to an intrinsic interplay between individual and collective behaviors. The modeling approach promoted in this book pursues actively this intuition and profits from it for designing general mathematical structures susceptible of application also in fields different from the inspiring original one. The book considers also the two most traditional points of view: the microscopic one, in which pedestrians are tracked individually, and the macroscopic one, in which pedestrians are assimilated to a continuum. Selected existing models are critically analyzed. The work is addressed to researchers and graduate students.

  19. DYNAMICAL MODEL OF ELECTROMAGNETIC DRIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the dynamic model of the rocket motor electromagnetic type, consisting of a source of electromagnetic waves of radio frequency band and a conical cavity in which electromagnetic waves are excited. The processes of excitation of electromagnetic oscillations in a cavity with conducting walls, as well as the waves of the YangMills field have been investigated. Multi-dimensional transient numerical model describing the processes of establishment of electromagnetic oscillations in a cavity with the conducting wall was created Separately, the case of standing waves in the cavity with conducting walls been tested. It is shown that the oscillation mode in the conducting resonator different from that in an ideal resonator, both in the steady and unsteady processes. The mechanism of formation of traction for the changes in the space-time metric, the contribution of particle currents, the Yang-Mills and electromagnetic field proposed. It is shown that the effect of the Yang-Mills field calls change the dielectric properties of vacuum, which leads to a change in capacitance of the resonator. Developed a dynamic model, which enables optimal traction on a significant number of parameters. It was found that the thrust increases in the Yang-Mills field parameters near the main resonance frequency. In the presence of thermal fluctuations and the Yang-Mills field as well the traction force changes sign, indicating the presence of various oscillation modes

  20. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric boundary layer with application to wind farm dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggy, Scott B.

    With the recent push for renewable energy sources, wind energy has emerged as a candidate to replace some of the power produced by traditional fossil fuels. Recent studies, however, have indicated that wind farms may have a direct effect on local meteorology by transporting water vapor away from the Earth's surface. Such turbulent transport could result in an increased drying of soil, and, in turn, negatively affect the productivity of land in the wind farm's immediate vicinity. This numerical study will analyze four scenarios with the goal of understanding turbulence transport in the wake of a turbine: the neutrally-stratified boundary layer with system rotation, the unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer, and wind turbine simulations of these previous two cases. For this work, the Ekman layer is used as an approximation of the atmospheric boundary layer and the governing equations are solved using a fully-parallelized direct numerical simulation (DNS). The in-depth studies of the neutrally and unstably-stratified boundary layers without introducing wind farm effects will act to provide a concrete background for the final study concerning turbulent transport due to turbine wakes. Although neutral stratification rarely occurs in the atmospheric boundary layer, it is useful to study the turbulent Ekman layer under such conditions as it provides a limiting case when unstable or stable stratification are weak. In this work, a thorough analysis was completed including turbulent statistics, velocity and pressure autocorrelations, and a calculation of the full turbulent energy budget. The unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer was studied under two levels of heating: moderate and vigorous. Under moderate stratification, both buoyancy and shearing contribute significantly to the turbulent dynamics. As the level of stratification increases, the role of shearing is shown to diminish and is confined to the near-wall region only. A recent, multi

  1. Monitoring middle-atmospheric dynamics using independent ground-based wind and temperature measurements at Reunion Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pichon, Alexis; Hauchecorne, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Khaykin, Sergey; Camas, Jean Pierre; Payen, Guillaume; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Rüfenacht, Rolf; Ceranna, Lars

    2016-04-01

    There are very few multi-instrumented sites in the tropics and particularly in the Southern Hemisphere. In these regions, developing atmospheric sounding methods in the middle and high-atmosphere provides valuable means to improve the physical representation of deep convection in atmospheric models (breaking of gravity waves, coupling between layers) and to better characterize large-scale atmospheric perturbations (cyclones, storms, tropical convection). The Maïdo observatory at Reunion Island (21°S, 55°E) offers trans-national access to host experiments or measurement campaigns for high resolution measurements of dynamic atmospheric processes in a wide range of altitude such as Rayleigh lidar, Doppler lidar, Modem radiosonde, or microwave Doppler spectro-radiometer (WIRA, operated by Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern). Collocated to the existing instruments, a small aperture infrasound array (CEA) has been operating continuously since 2014. In the 0.1-1 Hz band, the coherent energy is dominated by microbarom signals resulting from the non-linear interaction of large swells systems which circulate along the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). The seasonal transition in the bearings along with the stratospheric general circulation between summer and winter is clearly noted. Interestingly, the semiannual oscillation (SAO) of the zonal stratospheric wind is well captured by infrasound measurements. It manifests by opposite ducts between 30 and 60 km that persist for several weeks during the equinox period. For the ARISE project (http://arise-project.eu/), this multi-technology site opens new perspectives to study the climatology of SAO as well as poorly resolved atmospheric disturbances of the tropical middle atmosphere where data coverage is sparse.

  2. Modelling atmospheric OH-reactivity in a boreal forest ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, D.; Smolander, S.; Sogachev, Andrey;

    2011-01-01

    We have modelled the total atmospheric OH-reactivity in a boreal forest and investigated the individual contributions from gas phase inorganic species, isoprene, monoterpenes, and methane along with other important VOCs. Daily and seasonal variation in OH-reactivity for the year 2008 was examined...... as well as the vertical OH-reactivity profile. We have used SOSA; a one dimensional vertical chemistry-transport model (Boy et al., 2011a) together with measurements from Hyytiala, SMEAR II station, Southern Finland, conducted in August 2008. Model simulations only account for similar to 30......-50% of the total measured OH sink, and in our opinion, the reason for missing OH-reactivity is due to unmeasured unknown BVOCs, and limitations in our knowledge of atmospheric chemistry including uncertainties in rate constants. Furthermore, we found that the OH-reactivity correlates with both organic...

  3. Eigenvalue dynamics for multimatrix models

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Koch, Robert; Gossman, David; Nkumane, Lwazi; Tribelhorn, Laila

    2017-07-01

    By performing explicit computations of correlation functions, we find evidence that there is a sector of the two matrix model defined by the S U (2 ) sector of N =4 super Yang-Mills theory that can be reduced to eigenvalue dynamics. There is an interesting generalization of the usual Van der Monde determinant that plays a role. The observables we study are the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield operators of the S U (2 ) sector and include traces of products of both matrices, which are genuine multimatrix observables. These operators are associated with supergravity solutions of string theory.

  4. Eigenvalue Dynamics for Multimatrix Models

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Robert de Mello; Nkumane, Lwazi; Tribelhorn, Laila

    2016-01-01

    By performing explicit computations of correlation functions, we find evidence that there is a sector of the two matrix model defined by the $SU(2)$ sector of ${\\cal N}=4$ super Yang-Mills theory, that can be reduced to eigenvalue dynamics. There is an interesting generalization of the usual Van der Monde determinant that plays a role. The observables we study are the BPS operators of the $SU(2)$ sector and include traces of products of both matrices, which are genuine multi matrix observables. These operators are associated to supergravity solutions of string theory.

  5. Modeling of flight dynamics and analyzing of simulation for airdrop in atmospheric disturbance%大气扰动下运输机空投过程建模与仿真分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘日; 孙秀霞; 董文瀚; 李大东

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of transport airdrop with cargo moving inside under three dimensional (3-D) wind field is studied. The six degrees of freedom (6-DOF) equations of airdrop in wind field are inferred based on vector method and the algorithm for calculating wind parameters is presented. The additional aerodynamics induced by the non-uniform distribution of the wind velocity across the body and wing span is considered and a general method is proposed for modifying aerodynamic parameters. Simulation results show that hard disturbance wind would exert enormous effects on the loader damping and stability characteristics. Either raising the gain of damping loop or adopting flow angle feedback can improve the performance of loader in atmospheric disturbance.%研究了三维空间风场下运输机空投货物舱内移动过程中的建模问题.基于矢量法,推导了扰动风影响下空投货物舱内移动飞行过程中六自由度动力学方程,给出了扰动风参数的计算方法.考虑风速沿机身和翼展方向非均匀分布引起的附加气动力作用,提出扰动风场中飞机气动参数修正的一般方法.仿真验证表明,强扰动风将对空投载机阻尼特性、稳定性产生较大影响.增大阻尼回路增益,接通气流角反馈能够改善复杂大气扰动下空投载机的响应特性.

  6. The dependence of the beta coefficient of REA system with dynamic deadband on atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönholm, Tiia; Haapanala, Sami; Launiainen, Samuli; Rinne, Janne; Vesala, Timo; Rannik, Ullar

    2008-04-01

    We simulated the REA system with dynamic deadband to study numerical value and the effect of atmospheric conditions on the empirical constant beta which relates vertical flux to concentration difference between updrafts and downdrafts. We found that the value of beta depends only weakly on the friction velocity and atmospheric stability. In agreement with previous studies, the median value obtained for a system with dynamic deadband proportional to 0.5 times the running mean of the standard deviation of vertical wind speed was beta=0.42+/-0.03. For a single half-hour measurement one has to consider the large uncertainty of +/-0.2. According to our study, the dynamic deadband enables the use of a constant value of beta in flux calculation.

  7. Advances on the Responses of Root Dynamics to Increased Atmospheric CO2 and Global Climate Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Plant roots dynamics responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, increased temperature and changed precipitation can be a key link between plant growth and long-term changes in soil organic matter and ecosystem carbon balance. This paper reviews some experiments and hypotheses developed in this area, which mainly include plant fine roots growth, root turnover, root respiration and other root dynamics responses to elevated CO2 and global climate change. Some recent new methods of studying root systems were also discussed and summarized. It holds herein that the assemblage of information about root turnover patterns, root respiration and other dynamic responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 and global climatic change can help to better understand and explore some new research areas. In this paper, some research challenges in the plant root responses to the elevated CO2 and other environmental factors during global climate change were also demonstrated.

  8. Bayesian Estimation of Categorical Dynamic Factor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Nesselroade, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic factor models have been used to analyze continuous time series behavioral data. We extend 2 main dynamic factor model variations--the direct autoregressive factor score (DAFS) model and the white noise factor score (WNFS) model--to categorical DAFS and WNFS models in the framework of the underlying variable method and illustrate them with…

  9. Dynamical models of NGC 3115

    CERN Document Server

    Emsellem, E; Bacon, R; Emsellem, Eric; Dejonghe, Herwig; Bacon, Roland

    1998-01-01

    We present new dynamical models of the S0 galaxy N3115, making use of the available published photometry and kinematics as well as of two-dimensional TIGER spectrography. We first examined the kinematics in the central 40 arcsec in the light of two integral f(E,J) models. Jeans equations were used to constrain the mass to light ratio, and the central dark mass whose existence was suggested by previous studies. The even part of the distribution function was then retrieved via the Hunter & Qian formalism. We thus confirmed that the velocity and dispersion profiles in the central region could be well fit with a two-integral model, given the presence of a central dark mass of ~10^9 Msun. However, no two integral model could fit the h_3 profile around a radius of 25 arcsec where the outer disc dominates the surface brightness distribution. Three integral analytical models were therefore built using a Quadratic Programming technique. These models showed that three integral components do indeed provide a reasona...

  10. Sensitivity model study of regional mercury dispersion in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencarelli, Christian N.; Bieser, Johannes; Carbone, Francesco; De Simone, Francesco; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Matthias, Volker; Travnikov, Oleg; Yang, Xin; Pirrone, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is the most important pathway by which Hg reaches marine ecosystems, where it can be methylated and enter the base of food chain. The deposition, transport and chemical interactions of atmospheric Hg have been simulated over Europe for the year 2013 in the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project, performing 14 different model sensitivity tests using two high-resolution three-dimensional chemical transport models (CTMs), varying the anthropogenic emission datasets, atmospheric Br input fields, Hg oxidation schemes and modelling domain boundary condition input. Sensitivity simulation results were compared with observations from 28 monitoring sites in Europe to assess model performance and particularly to analyse the influence of anthropogenic emission speciation and the Hg0(g) atmospheric oxidation mechanism. The contribution of anthropogenic Hg emissions, their speciation and vertical distribution are crucial to the simulated concentration and deposition fields, as is also the choice of Hg0(g) oxidation pathway. The areas most sensitive to changes in Hg emission speciation and the emission vertical distribution are those near major sources, but also the Aegean and the Black seas, the English Channel, the Skagerrak Strait and the northern German coast. Considerable influence was found also evident over the Mediterranean, the North Sea and Baltic Sea and some influence is seen over continental Europe, while this difference is least over the north-western part of the modelling domain, which includes the Norwegian Sea and Iceland. The Br oxidation pathway produces more HgII(g) in the lower model levels, but overall wet deposition is lower in comparison to the simulations which employ an O3 / OH oxidation mechanism. The necessity to perform continuous measurements of speciated Hg and to investigate the local impacts of Hg emissions and deposition, as well as interactions dependent on land use and vegetation, forests, peat

  11. Modeling Atmospheric CO2 Processes to Constrain the Missing Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. R.; Denning, A. S.; Erickson, D. J.; Collatz, J. C.; Pawson, S.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a NASA supported modeling effort to reduce uncertainty in carbon cycle processes that create the so-called missing sink of atmospheric CO2. Our overall objective is to improve characterization of CO2 source/sink processes globally with improved formulations for atmospheric transport, terrestrial uptake and release, biomass and fossil fuel burning, and observational data analysis. The motivation for this study follows from the perspective that progress in determining CO2 sources and sinks beyond the current state of the art will rely on utilization of more extensive and intensive CO2 and related observations including those from satellite remote sensing. The major components of this effort are: 1) Continued development of the chemistry and transport model using analyzed meteorological fields from the Goddard Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, with comparison to real time data in both forward and inverse modes; 2) An advanced biosphere model, constrained by remote sensing data, coupled to the global transport model to produce distributions of CO2 fluxes and concentrations that are consistent with actual meteorological variability; 3) Improved remote sensing estimates for biomass burning emission fluxes to better characterize interannual variability in the atmospheric CO2 budget and to better constrain the land use change source; 4) Evaluating the impact of temporally resolved fossil fuel emission distributions on atmospheric CO2 gradients and variability. 5) Testing the impact of existing and planned remote sensing data sources (e.g., AIRS, MODIS, OCO) on inference of CO2 sources and sinks, and use the model to help establish measurement requirements for future remote sensing instruments. The results will help to prepare for the use of OCO and other satellite data in a multi-disciplinary carbon data assimilation system for analysis and prediction of carbon cycle changes and carbodclimate interactions.

  12. Evapotranspiration and runoff from large land areas: Land surface hydrology for atmospheric general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    A land surface hydrology parameterization for use in atmospheric GCM's is presented. The parameterization incorporates subgrid scale variability in topography, soils, soil moisture and precipitation. The framework of the model is the statistical distribution of a topography-soils index, which controls the local water balance fluxes, and is therefore taken to represent the large land area. Spatially variable water balance fluxes are integrated with respect to the topography-soils index to yield our large topography-soils distribution, and interval responses are weighted by the probability of occurrence of the interval. Grid square averaged land surface fluxes result. The model functions independently as a macroscale water balance model. Runoff ratio and evapotranspiration efficiency parameterizations are derived and are shown to depend on the spatial variability of the above mentioned properties and processes, as well as the dynamics of land surface-atmosphere interactions.

  13. New Approaches to Quantifying Transport Model Error in Atmospheric CO2 Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, L.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Nielsen, J. E.; Collatz, G. J.; Gregg, W. W.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made in observing CO2 distributions from space. However, the