WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamic microtubules coordinately

  1. Daple Coordinates Planar Polarized Microtubule Dynamics in Ependymal Cells and Contributes to Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki Takagishi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Motile cilia in ependymal cells, which line the cerebral ventricles, exhibit a coordinated beating motion that drives directional cerebrospinal fluid (CSF flow and guides neuroblast migration. At the apical cortex of these multi-ciliated cells, asymmetric localization of planar cell polarity (PCP proteins is required for the planar polarization of microtubule dynamics, which coordinates cilia orientation. Daple is a disheveled-associating protein that controls the non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway and cell motility. Here, we show that Daple-deficient mice present hydrocephalus and their ependymal cilia lack coordinated orientation. Daple regulates microtubule dynamics at the anterior side of ependymal cells, which in turn orients the cilial basal bodies required for the directional cerebrospinal fluid flow. These results demonstrate an important role for Daple in planar polarity in motile cilia and provide a framework for understanding the mechanisms and functions of planar polarization in the ependymal cells.

  2. Microtubules as key coordinators of nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum dynamics during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaitz, Anne-Lore

    2014-07-01

    During mitosis, cells comprehensively restructure their interior to promote the faithful inheritance of DNA and cytoplasmic contents. In metazoans, this restructuring entails disassembly of the nuclear envelope, redistribution of its components into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and eventually nuclear envelope reassembly around the segregated chromosomes. The microtubule cytoskeleton has recently emerged as a critical regulator of mitotic nuclear envelope and ER dynamics. Microtubules and associated molecular motors tear open the nuclear envelope in prophase and remove nuclear envelope remnants from chromatin. Additionally, two distinct mechanisms of microtubule-based regulation of ER dynamics operate later in mitosis. First, association of the ER with microtubules is reduced, preventing invasion of ER into the spindle area, and second, organelle membrane is actively cleared from metaphase chromosomes. However, we are only beginning to understand the role of microtubules in shaping and distributing ER and other organelles during mitosis. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Dynamics of Microtubule Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Antal, T; Redner, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of an idealized model of microtubule growth that evolves by: (i) attachment of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) at rate lambda, (ii) conversion of GTP to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) at rate 1, and (iii) detachment of GDP at rate mu. As a function of these rates, a microtubule can grow steadily or its length can fluctuate wildly. For mu=0, we find the exact tubule and GTP cap length distributions, and power-law length distributions of GTP and GDP islands. For mu=infinity, we argue that the time between catastrophes, where the microtubule shrinks to zero length, scales as exp(lambda). We also find the phase boundary between a growing and shrinking microtubule.

  4. Coordination of microtubule and microfilament dynamics by Drosophila Rho1, Spire and Cappuccino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Nieves, Alicia E; Johndrow, James E; Keller, Lani C; Magie, Craig R; Pinto-Santini, Delia M; Parkhurst, Susan M

    2006-04-01

    The actin-nucleation factors Spire and Cappuccino (Capu) regulate the onset of ooplasmic streaming in Drosophila melanogaster. Although this streaming event is microtubule-based, actin assembly is required for its timing. It is not understood how the interaction of microtubules and microfilaments is mediated in this context. Here, we demonstrate that Capu and Spire have microtubule and microfilament crosslinking activity. The spire locus encodes several distinct protein isoforms (SpireA, SpireC and SpireD). SpireD was recently shown to nucleate actin, but the activity of the other isoforms has not been addressed. We find that SpireD does not have crosslinking activity, whereas SpireC is a potent crosslinker. We show that SpireD binds to Capu and inhibits F-actin/microtubule crosslinking, and activated Rho1 abolishes this inhibition, establishing a mechanistic basis for the regulation of Capu and Spire activity. We propose that Rho1, cappuccino and spire are elements of a conserved developmental cassette that is capable of directly mediating crosstalk between microtubules and microfilaments.

  5. Aging of dynamically stabilized microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Ebbinghaus, M

    2009-01-01

    The microtubule network, an important part of the cytoskeleton, is constantly remodeled by alternating phases of growth and shrinkage of individual filaments. Plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) interact with the microtubule and in many cases alter its dynamics. While it is established that the prototypal CLIP-170 enhances microtubule stability by increasing rescues, the plus-end tracking mechanism is still under debate. We present a model for microtubule dynamics in which a rescue factor is dynamically added to the filament while growing. As a consequence, the filament shows aging behavior which should be experimentally accessible and thus allow one to exclude some hypothesized models of the inclusion of rescue factors at the microtubule plus end. Additionally, we show the strong influence of the cell geometry on the quantitative results.

  6. Stochastic Model of Microtubule Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryniv, Ostap; Martínez Esteban, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    We introduce a continuous time stochastic process on strings made of two types of particle, whose dynamics mimics that of microtubules in a living cell. The long term behaviour of the system is described in terms of the velocity v of the string end. We show that v is an analytic function of its parameters and study its monotonicity properties. We give a complete characterisation of the phase diagram of the model and derive several criteria of the growth (v>0) and the shrinking (v<0) regimes of the dynamics.

  7. Microtubule dynamics: Caps, catastrophes, and coupled hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Holy, T.E.; Leibler, S.

    1996-01-01

    individual tubulin dimers, an ignored. In this cap model, GTP hydrolysis is assumed to be stochastic and uncoupled to microtubule growth. Different rates of hydrolysis are assumed for GTP in the cap's interior and for GTP at its boundary with hydrolyzed parts of the microtubule. Expectation values...... and probability distributions relating to available experimental data are derived. Caps are found to be short and the total rate of hydrolysis at a microtubule end is found to be dynamically coupled to growth. The so-called catastrophe rate is a simple function of the microtubule growth rare and fits experimental...... of microtubule growth before dilution. The GTP content of microtubules is found and its rare of hydrolysis is determined under the circumstances created in an experiment designed to measure this GTP content. It is concluded that this experiment's failure to register any GTP content is consistent with the model...

  8. Expression of Nucleolin Affects Microtubule Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Gaume

    Full Text Available Nucleolin is present in diverse cellular compartments and is involved in a variety of cellular processes from nucleolar structure and function to intracellular trafficking, cell adhesion and migration. Recently, nucleolin has been localized at the mature centriole where it is involved in microtubule nucleation and anchoring. Although this new function of nucleolin linked to microtubule regulation has been identified, the global effects of nucleolin on microtubule dynamics have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we analyzed the roles of nucleolin protein levels on global microtubule dynamics by tracking the EB3 microtubule plus end binding protein in live cells. We have found that during microtubule growth phases, nucleolin affects both the speed and life time of polymerization and by analyzing catastrophe events, we showed that nucleolin reduces catastrophe frequency. This new property of nucleolin was then confirmed in a cold induced microtubule depolymerization experiment in which we have found that cold resistant microtubules were totally destabilized in nucleolin depleted cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate a new function of nucleolin on microtubule stabilization, thus bringing novel insights into understanding the multifunctional properties of nucleolin in healthy and cancer cells.

  9. Visualization of microtubule growth in living platelets reveals a dynamic marginal band with multiple microtubules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Patel-Hett (Sunita); J.L. Richardson (Jennifer); H. Schulze (Harald); K. Drabek (Ksenija); N.A. Isaac (Natasha); K. Hoffmeister (Karin); R.A. Shivdasani (Ramesh); J.C. Bulinski (J. Chloë); N.J. Galjart (Niels); J.H. Hartwig (John); J. Italiano (Joseph)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe marginal band of microtubules maintains the discoid shape of resting blood platelets. Although studies of platelet microtubule coil structure conclude that it is composed of a single microtubule, no investigations of its dynamics exist. In contrast to previous studies, permeabilized

  10. Dynamics and regulation of plant interphase microtubules: a comparative view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takashi

    2003-12-01

    Microtubule and actin cytoskeletons are fundamental to a variety of cellular activities within eukaryotic organisms. Extensive information on the dynamics and functions of microtubules, as well as on their regulatory proteins, have been revealed in fungi and animals, and corresponding pictures are now slowly emerging in plants. During interphase, plant cells contain highly dynamic cortical microtubules that organize into ordered arrays, which are apparently regulated by distinct groups of microtubule regulators. Comparison with fungal and animal microtubules highlights both conserved and unique mechanisms for the regulation of the microtubule cytoskeleton in plants.

  11. Mmb1p binds mitochondria to dynamic microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chuanhai; Jain, Deeptee; Costa, Judite; Velve-Casquillas, Guilhem; Tran, Phong T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Mitochondria form a dynamics tubular network within the cell. Proper mitochondria movement and distribution are critical for their localized function in cell metabolism, growth, and survival. In mammalian cells, mechanisms of mitochondria positioning appear dependent on the microtubule cytoskeleton, with kinesin or dynein motors carrying mitochondria as cargos and distributing them throughout the microtubule network. Interestingly, the timescale of microtubule dynamics occurs in seconds, and the timescale of mitochondria distribution occurs in minutes. How does the cell couple these two time constants? Results Fission yeast also relies on microtubules for mitochondria distribution. We report here a new microtubule-dependent but motor-independent mechanism for proper mitochondria positioning in fission yeast. We identify the protein mmb1p, which binds to mitochondria and microtubules. Mmb1p attaches the tubular mitochondria to the microtubule lattice at multiple discrete interaction sites. Mmb1 deletion causes mitochondria to aggregate, with the long-term consequence of defective mitochondria distribution and cell death. Mmb1p decreases microtubule dynamicity. Conclusion Mmb1p is a new microtubule-mitochondria binding protein. We propose that mmb1p act to couple long-term mitochondria distribution to short-term microtubule dynamics by attenuating microtubule dynamics, thus enhancing the mitochondria-microtubule interaction time. PMID:21856157

  12. Integrin-linked kinase regulates interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Lim

    Full Text Available Integrin-linked kinase (ILK localizes to both focal adhesions and centrosomes in distinct multiprotein complexes. Its dual function as a kinase and scaffolding protein has been well characterized at focal adhesions, where it regulates integrin-mediated cell adhesion, spreading, migration and signaling. At the centrosomes, ILK regulates mitotic spindle organization and centrosome clustering. Our previous study showed various spindle defects after ILK knockdown or inhibition that suggested alteration in microtubule dynamics. Since ILK expression is frequently elevated in many cancer types, we investigated the effects of ILK overexpression on microtubule dynamics. We show here that overexpressing ILK in HeLa cells was associated with a shorter duration of mitosis and decreased sensitivity to paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent that suppresses microtubule dynamics. Measurement of interphase microtubule dynamics revealed that ILK overexpression favored microtubule depolymerization, suggesting that microtubule destabilization could be the mechanism behind the decreased sensitivity to paclitaxel, which is known to stabilize microtubules. Conversely, the use of a small molecule inhibitor selective against ILK, QLT-0267, resulted in suppressed microtubule dynamics, demonstrating a new mechanism of action for this compound. We further show that treatment of HeLa cells with QLT-0267 resulted in higher inter-centromere tension in aligned chromosomes during mitosis, slower microtubule regrowth after cold depolymerization and the presence of a more stable population of spindle microtubules. These results demonstrate that ILK regulates microtubule dynamics in both interphase and mitotic cells.

  13. Microtubules: dynamically unstable stochastic phase-switching polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, P. N.; Arzhanik, V. K.; Ulyanov, E. V.; Gudimchuk, N. B.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.

    2016-08-01

    One of the simplest molecular motors, a biological microtubule, is reviewed as an example of a highly nonequilibrium molecular machine capable of stochastic transitions between slow growth and rapid disassembly phases. Basic properties of microtubules are described, and various approaches to simulating their dynamics, from statistical chemical kinetics models to molecular dynamics models using the Metropolis Monte Carlo and Brownian dynamics methods, are outlined.

  14. Microtubules Modulate F-actin Dynamics during Neuronal Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Meka, Durga Praveen; Scharrenberg, Robin; König, Theresa; Schwanke, Birgit; Kobler, Oliver; Windhorst, Sabine; Kreutz, Michael R; Mikhaylova, Marina; Calderon de Anda, Froylan

    2017-08-29

    Neuronal polarization is reflected by different dynamics of microtubule and filamentous actin (F-actin). Axonal microtubules are more stable than those in the remaining neurites, while dynamics of F-actin in axonal growth cones clearly exceed those in their dendritic counterparts. However, whether a functional interplay exists between the microtubule network and F-actin dynamics in growing axons and whether this interplay is instrumental for breaking cellular symmetry is currently unknown. Here, we show that an increment on microtubule stability or number of microtubules is associated with increased F-actin dynamics. Moreover, we show that Drebrin E, an F-actin and microtubule plus-end binding protein, mediates this cross talk. Drebrin E segregates preferentially to growth cones with a higher F-actin treadmilling rate, where more microtubule plus-ends are found. Interruption of the interaction of Drebrin E with microtubules decreases F-actin dynamics and arrests neuronal polarization. Collectively the data show that microtubules modulate F-actin dynamics for initial axon extension during neuronal development.

  15. Deceivingly dynamic: Learning-dependent changes in stathmin and microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Shusaku; Shumyatsky, Gleb P

    2015-10-01

    Microtubules, one of the major cytoskeletal structures, were previously considered stable and only indirectly involved in synaptic structure and function in mature neurons. However, recent evidence demonstrates that microtubules are dynamic and have an important role in synaptic structure, synaptic plasticity, and memory. In particular, learning induces changes in microtubule turnover and stability, and pharmacological manipulation of microtubule dynamics alters synaptic plasticity and long-term memory. These learning-induced changes in microtubules are controlled by the phosphoprotein stathmin, whose only known cellular activity is to negatively regulate microtubule formation. During the first eight hours following learning, changes in the phosphorylation of stathmin go through two phases causing biphasic shifts in microtubules stability/instability. These shifts, in turn, regulate memory formation by controlling in the second phase synaptic transport of the GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors. Improper regulation of stathmin and microtubule dynamics has been observed in aged animals and in patients with Alzheimer's disease and depression. Thus, recent work on stathmin and microtubules has identified new molecular players in the early stages of memory encoding.

  16. Team coordination dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jamie C; Amazeen, Polemnia G; Cooke, Nancy J

    2010-07-01

    Team coordination consists of both the dynamics of team member interaction and the environmental dynamics to which a team is subjected. Focusing on dynamics, an approach is developed that contrasts with traditional aggregate-static concepts of team coordination as characterized by the shared mental model approach. A team coordination order parameter was developed to capture momentary fluctuations in coordination. Team coordination was observed in three-person uninhabited air vehicle teams across two experimental sessions. The dynamics of the order parameter were observed under changes of a team familiarity control parameter. Team members returned for the second session to either the same (Intact) or different (Mixed) team. 'Roadblock' perturbations, or novel changes in the task environment, were introduced in order to probe the stability of team coordination. Nonlinear dynamic methods revealed differences that a traditional approach did not: Intact and Mixed team coordination dynamics looked very different; Mixed teams were more stable than Intact teams and explored the space of solutions without the need for correction. Stability was positively correlated with the number of roadblock perturbations that were overcome successfully. The novel and non-intuitive contribution of a dynamical analysis was that Mixed teams, who did not have a long history working together, were more adaptive. Team coordination dynamics carries new implications for traditional problems such as training adaptive teams.

  17. ErbB2-dependent chemotaxis requires microtubule capture and stabilization coordinated by distinct signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khedidja Benseddik

    Full Text Available Activation of the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase stimulates breast cancer cell migration. Cell migration is a complex process that requires the synchronized reorganization of numerous subcellular structures including cell-to-matrix adhesions, the actin cytoskeleton and microtubules. How the multiple signaling pathways triggered by ErbB2 coordinate, in time and space, the various processes involved in cell motility, is poorly defined. We investigated the mechanism whereby ErbB2 controls microtubules and chemotaxis. We report that activation of ErbB2 increased both cell velocity and directed migration. Impairment of the Cdc42 and RhoA GTPases, but not of Rac1, prevented the chemotactic response. RhoA is a key component of the Memo/ACF7 pathway whereby ErbB2 controls microtubule capture at the leading edge. Upon Memo or ACF7 depletion, microtubules failed to reach the leading edge and cells lost their ability to follow the chemotactic gradient. Constitutive ACF7 targeting to the membrane in Memo-depleted cells reestablished directed migration. ErbB2-mediated activation of phospholipase C gamma (PLCγ also contributed to cell guidance. We further showed that PLCγ signaling, via classical protein kinases C, and Memo signaling converged towards a single pathway controlling the microtubule capture complex. Finally, inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway did not affect microtubule capture, but disturbed microtubule stability, which also resulted in defective chemotaxis. PI3K/Akt-dependent stabilization of microtubules involved repression of GSK3 activity on the one hand and inhibition of the microtubule destabilizing protein, Stathmin, on the other hand. Thus, ErbB2 triggers distinct and complementary pathways that tightly coordinate microtubule capture and microtubule stability to control chemotaxis.

  18. The Role of Molecular Microtubule Motors and the Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Stress Granule Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Bartoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are cytoplasmic foci that appear in cells exposed to stress-induced translational inhibition. SGs function as a triage center, where mRNAs are sorted for storage, degradation, and translation reinitiation. The underlying mechanisms of SGs dynamics are still being characterized, although many key players have been identified. The main components of SGs are stalled 48S preinitiation complexes. To date, many other proteins have also been found to localize in SGs and are hypothesized to function in SG dynamics. Most recently, the microtubule cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins have been demonstrated to function in SG dynamics. In this paper, we will discuss current literature examining the function of microtubules and the molecular microtubule motors in SG assembly, coalescence, movement, composition, organization, and disassembly.

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of C-terminal tails in cellular microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulic, Dalibor L.; Sataric, Bogdan M.; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Bugay, Aleksandr N.; Sataric, Miljko V.

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano-electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C-terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C-terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink-waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process.

  20. Nonlinear dynamics of C–terminal tails in cellular microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekulic, Dalibor L., E-mail: dalsek@uns.ac.rs; Sataric, Bogdan M.; Sataric, Miljko V. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Zdravkovic, Slobodan [University of Belgrade, Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Serbia); Bugay, Aleksandr N. [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano–electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C–terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C–terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule–associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink–waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process.

  1. Modeling the Effects of Drug Binding on the Dynamic Instability of Microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Hinow, Peter; Lopus, Manu; Jordan, Mary Ann; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2010-01-01

    We propose a stochastic model that accounts for the growth, catastrophe and rescue processes of steady state microtubules assembled from MAP-free tubulin. Both experimentally and theoretically we study the perturbation of microtubule dynamic instability by S-methyl-D-DM1, a synthetic derivative of the microtubule-targeted agent maytansine and a potential anticancer agent. We find that to be an effective suppressor of microtubule dynamics a drug must primarily suppress the loss of GDP tubulin from the microtubule tip.

  2. Nonlinear Dynamics of Dipoles in Microtubules: Pseudo-Spin Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Berman, Gennady P; Mavromatos, Nick E

    2016-01-01

    We perform a theoretical study of the dynamics of the electric field excitations in a microtubule by taking into consideration the realistic cylindrical geometry, dipole-dipole interactions of the tubulin-based protein heterodimers, the radial electric field produced by the solvent, and a possible degeneracy of energy states of individual heterodimers. The consideration is done in the frames of the classical pseudo-spin model. We derive the system of nonlinear dynamical ordinary differential equations of motion for interacting dipoles, and the continuum version of these equations. We obtain the solutions of these equations in the form of snoidal waves, solitons, kinks, and localized spikes. Our results will help to a better understanding of the functional properties of microtubules including the motor protein dynamics and the information transfer processes. Our considerations are based on classical dynamics. Some speculations on the role of possible quantum effects are also made.

  3. Nonlinear dynamics of dipoles in microtubules: Pseudospin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Ramírez, Mónica F; Berman, Gennady P; Mavromatos, Nick E

    2016-06-01

    We perform a theoretical study of the dynamics of the electric field excitations in a microtubule by taking into consideration the realistic cylindrical geometry, dipole-dipole interactions of the tubulin-based protein heterodimers, the radial electric field produced by the solvent, and a possible degeneracy of energy states of individual heterodimers. The consideration is done in the frame of the classical pseudospin model. We derive the system of nonlinear dynamical partial differential equations of motion for interacting dipoles and the continuum version of these equations. We obtain the solutions of these equations in the form of snoidal waves, solitons, kinks, and localized spikes. Our results will help to achieve a better understanding of the functional properties of microtubules including the motor protein dynamics and the information transfer processes. Our considerations are based on classical dynamics. Some speculations on the role of possible quantum effects are also made.

  4. EWSR1 regulates mitosis by dynamically influencing microtubule acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Long; Chen, Hui; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Yin, Rong-Hua; Li, Chang-Yan; Ge, Chang-Hui; Yu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-08-17

    EWSR1, participating in transcription and splicing, has been identified as a translocation partner for various transcription factors, resulting in translocation, which in turn plays crucial roles in tumorigenesis. Recent studies have investigated the role of EWSR1 in mitosis. However, the effect of EWSR1 on mitosis is poorly understood. Here, we observed that depletion of EWSR1 resulted in cell cycle arrest in the mitotic phase, mainly due to an increase in the time from nuclear envelope breakdown to metaphase, resulting in a high percentage of unaligned chromosomes and multipolar spindles. We also demonstrated that EWSR1 is a spindle-associated protein that interacts with α-tubulin during mitosis. EWSR1 depletion increased the cold-sensitivity of spindle microtubules, and decreased the rate of spindle assembly. EWSR1 regulated the level of microtubule acetylation in the mitotic spindle; microtubule acetylation was rescued in EWSR1-depleted mitotic cells following suppression of HDAC6 activity by its specific inhibitor or siRNA treatment. In summary, these results suggest that EWSR1 regulates the acetylation of microtubules in a cell cycle-dependent manner through its dynamic location on spindle MTs, and may be a novel regulator for mitosis progress independent of its translocation.

  5. Cep70 promotes microtubule assembly in vitro by increasing microtubule elongation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingjuan Shi; Jun Wang; Yunfan Yang; Yuan Ren; Jun Zhou; Dengwen Li

    2012-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic cytoskeletal polymers present in all eukaryotic cells,In animal cells,they are organized by the centrosome,the major microtubule-organizing center.Many centrosomal proteins act coordinately to modulate microtubule assembly and organization.Our previous work has shown that Cep70,a novel centrosomal protein regulates microtubule assembly and organization in mammalian cells.However,the molecular details remain to be investigated,in this study,we investigated the molecular mechanism of how Cep70 regulates microtubule assembly using purified proteins.Our data showed that Cep70 increased the microtubule length without affecting the microtubule number in the purified system.These results demonstrate that Cep70 could directly regulate microtubule assembly by promoting microtubule elongation instead of microtubule nucleation.

  6. TOG Proteins Are Spatially Regulated by Rac-GSK3β to Control Interphase Microtubule Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn P Trogden

    Full Text Available Microtubules are regulated by a diverse set of proteins that localize to microtubule plus ends (+TIPs where they regulate dynamic instability and mediate interactions with the cell cortex, actin filaments, and organelles. Although individual +TIPs have been studied in depth and we understand their basic contributions to microtubule dynamics, there is a growing body of evidence that these proteins exhibit cross-talk and likely function to collectively integrate microtubule behavior and upstream signaling pathways. In this study, we have identified a novel protein-protein interaction between the XMAP215 homologue in Drosophila, Mini spindles (Msps, and the CLASP homologue, Orbit. These proteins have been shown to promote and suppress microtubule dynamics, respectively. We show that microtubule dynamics are regionally controlled in cells by Rac acting to suppress GSK3β in the peripheral lamellae/lamellipodium. Phosphorylation of Orbit by GSK3β triggers a relocalization of Msps from the microtubule plus end to the lattice. Mutation of the Msps-Orbit binding site revealed that this interaction is required for regulating microtubule dynamic instability in the cell periphery. Based on our findings, we propose that Msps is a novel Rac effector that acts, in partnership with Orbit, to regionally regulate microtubule dynamics.

  7. Taxol differentially modulates the dynamics of microtubules assembled from unfractionated and purified beta-tubulin isotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, W B; Wilson, L; Khan, I A; Luduena, R F; Jordan, M A

    1997-03-25

    Substoichiometric binding of taxol to tubulin in microtubules potently suppresses microtubule dynamics, which appears to be the most sensitive antiproliferative mechanism of taxol. To determine whether the beta-tubulin isotype composition of a microtubule can modulate sensitivity to taxol, we measured the effects of substoichiometric ratios of taxol bound to tubulin in microtubules on the dynamics of microtubules composed of purified alphabeta(II)-, alphabeta(III)-, or alphabeta(IV)-tubulin isotypes and compared the results with the effects of taxol on microtubules assembled from unfractionated tubulin. Substoichiometric ratios of bound taxol in microtubules assembled from purified beta-tubulin isotypes or unfractionated tubulin potently suppressed the shortening rates and the lengths shortened per shortening event. Correlation of the suppression of the shortening rate with the stoichiometry of bound taxol revealed that microtubules composed of purified alphabeta(II)-, alphabeta(III)-, and alphabeta(IV)-tubulin were, respectively, 1.6-, 7.4-, and 7.2-fold less sensitive to the effects of bound taxol than microtubules assembled from unfractionated tubulin. These results indicate that taxol differentially modulates microtubule dynamics depending upon the beta-tubulin isotype composition. The results are consistent with recent studies correlating taxol resistance in tumor cells with increased levels of beta(III0- and beta(IV)-tubulin expression and suggest that altered cellular expression of beta-tubulin isotypes can be an important mechanism by which tumor cells develop resistance to taxol.

  8. Contributions of microtubule dynamic instability and rotational diffusion to kinetochore capture

    CERN Document Server

    Blackwell, Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Gergely, Zachary R; Flynn, Patrick J; Montes, Salvador; Crapo, Ammon; Doostan, Alireza; McIntosh, J Richard; Glaser, Matthew A; Betterton, Meredith D

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule dynamic instability allows search and capture of kinetochores during spindle formation, an important process for accurate chromosome segregation during cell division. Recent work has found that microtubule rotational diffusion about minus-end attachment points contributes to kinetochore capture in fission yeast, but the relative contributions of dynamic instability and rotational diffusion are not well understood. We have developed a biophysical model of kinetochore capture in small fission-yeast nuclei using hybrid Brownian dynamics/kinetic Monte Carlo simulation techniques. With this model, we have studied the importance of dynamic instability and microtubule rotational diffusion for kinetochore capture, both to the lateral surface of a microtubule and at or near its end. Over a range of biologically relevant parameters, microtubule rotational diffusion decreased capture time, but made a relatively small contribution compared to dynamic instability. At most, rotational diffusion reduced capture ...

  9. Stathmin regulates microtubule dynamics and microtubule organizing center polarization in activated T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbert, Erin L; Le Borgne, Marie; Lin, Joseph; Heuser, John E; Shaw, Andrey S

    2012-06-01

    Polarization of T cells involves reorientation of the microtubule organizing center (MTOC). Because activated ERK is localized at the immunological synapse, we investigated its role by showing that ERK activation is important for MTOC polarization. Suspecting that ERK phosphorylates a regulator of microtubules, we next focused on stathmin, a known ERK substrate. Our work indicates that during T cell activation, ERK is recruited to the synapse, allowing it to phosphorylate stathmin molecules near the immunological synapse. Supporting an important role of stathmin phosphorylation in T cell activation, we showed that T cell activation results in increased microtubule growth rate dependent on the presence of stathmin. The significance of this finding was demonstrated by results showing that CTLs from stathmin(-/-) mice displayed defective MTOC polarization and defective target cell cytolysis. These data implicate stathmin as a regulator of the microtubule network during T cell activation.

  10. A plus-end raft to control microtubule dynamics and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galjart, Niels; Perez, Franck

    2003-02-01

    Cells require a properly oriented and organised microtubule array to transmit positional information. Recent data have revealed a heterogeneous population of microtubule-binding proteins that accumulates mainly at distal ends of polymerising microtubules. Two mechanisms may account for this concentration: transient immobilisation, which involves association of proteins with growing ends, followed by release more proximally; and deposition at ends via a molecular motor. As with lipid rafts, protein concentration at distal ends may allow a cascade of interactions in the restricted area of a microtubule plus end. This may, in turn, control the dynamic behaviour of this cytoskeletal network and its anchoring to other structures.

  11. Coordination Games on Dynamical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enea Pestelacci

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a model in which agents of a population interacting according to a network of contacts play games of coordination with each other and can also dynamically break and redirect links to neighbors if they are unsatisfied. As a result, there is co-evolution of strategies in the population and of the graph that represents the network of contacts. We apply the model to the class of pure and general coordination games. For pure coordination games, the networks co-evolve towards the polarization of different strategies. In the case of general coordination games our results show that the possibility of refusing neighbors and choosing different partners increases the success rate of the Pareto-dominant equilibrium.

  12. Microtubule dynamics control HGF-induced lung endothelial barrier enhancement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyong Tian

    Full Text Available Microtubules (MT play a vital role in many cellular functions, but their role in peripheral actin cytoskeletal dynamics which is essential for control of endothelial barrier and monolayer integrity is less understood. We have previously described the enhancement of lung endothelial cell (EC barrier by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF which was associated with Rac1-mediated remodeling of actin cytoskeleton. This study investigated involvement of MT-dependent mechanisms in the HGF-induced enhancement of EC barrier. HGF-induced Rac1 activation was accompanied by phosphorylation of stathmin, a regulator of MT dynamics. HGF also stimulated MT peripheral growth monitored by time lapse imaging and tracking analysis of EB-1-decorated MT growing tips, and increased the pool of acetylated tubulin. These effects were abolished by EC pretreatment with HGF receptor inhibitor, downregulation of Rac1 pathway, or by expression of a stathmin-S63A phosphorylation deficient mutant. Expression of stathmin-S63A abolished the HGF protective effects against thrombin-induced activation of RhoA cascade, permeability increase, and EC barrier dysfunction. These results demonstrate a novel MT-dependent mechanism of HGF-induced EC barrier regulation via Rac1/PAK1/stathmin-dependent control of MT dynamics.

  13. Dynamic microtubules regulate dendritic spine morphology and synaptic plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaworski, J.; Kapitein, L.C.; Montenegro Gouveia, S.; Dortland, B.R.; Wulf, P.S.; Grigoriev, I.; Camera, P.; Spangler, S.A.; Di Stefano, P.; Demmers, J.; Krugers, H.; Defilippi, P.; Akhmanova, A.; Hoogenraad, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the major sites of excitatory synaptic input, and their morphological changes have been linked to learning and memory processes. Here, we report that growing microtubule plus ends decorated by the microtubule tip-tracking protein EB3 enter spines and can modulate spine morpholog

  14. Microtubule-based nanomaterials: Exploiting nature's dynamic biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachand, George D; Spoerke, Erik D; Stevens, Mark J

    2015-06-01

    For more than a decade now, biomolecular systems have served as an inspiration for the development of synthetic nanomaterials and systems that are capable of reproducing many of unique and emergent behaviors of living systems. One intriguing element of such systems may be found in a specialized class of proteins known as biomolecular motors that are capable of performing useful work across multiple length scales through the efficient conversion of chemical energy. Microtubule (MT) filaments may be considered within this context as their dynamic assembly and disassembly dissipate energy, and perform work within the cell. MTs are one of three cytoskeletal filaments in eukaryotic cells, and play critical roles in a range of cellular processes including mitosis and vesicular trafficking. Based on their function, physical attributes, and unique dynamics, MTs also serve as a powerful archetype of a supramolecular filament that underlies and drives multiscale emergent behaviors. In this review, we briefly summarize recent efforts to generate hybrid and composite nanomaterials using MTs as biomolecular scaffolds, as well as computational and synthetic approaches to develop synthetic one-dimensional nanostructures that display the enviable attributes of the natural filaments.

  15. Microtubule Dynamics and Oscillating State for Mitotic Spindle

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid-Shomali, Safura

    2010-01-01

    We present a physical mechanism that can cause the mitotic spindle to oscillate. The driving force for this mechanism emerges from the polymerization of astral microtubules interacting with the cell cortex. We show that Brownian ratchet model for growing microtubules reaching the cell cortex, mediate an effective mass to the spindle body and therefore force it to oscillate. We compare the predictions of this mechanism with the previous mechanisms which were based on the effects of motor proteins. Finally we combine the effects of microtubules polymerization and motor proteins, and present the detailed phase diagram for possible oscillating states.

  16. Dietary flavonoid fisetin binds to β-tubulin and disrupts microtubule dynamics in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Eiman; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Sechi, Mario; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2015-10-28

    Microtubule targeting based therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment; however, resistance and side effects remain a major limitation. Therefore, novel strategies that can overcome these limitations are urgently needed. We made a novel discovery that fisetin, a hydroxyflavone, is a microtubule stabilizing agent. Fisetin binds to tubulin and stabilizes microtubules with binding characteristics far superior than paclitaxel. Surface plasmon resonance and computational docking studies suggested that fisetin binds to β-tubulin with superior affinity compared to paclitaxel. Fisetin treatment of human prostate cancer cells resulted in robust up-regulation of microtubule associated proteins (MAP)-2 and -4. In addition, fisetin treated cells were enriched in α-tubulin acetylation, an indication of stabilization of microtubules. Fisetin significantly inhibited PCa cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Nudc, a protein associated with microtubule motor dynein/dynactin complex that regulates microtubule dynamics, was inhibited with fisetin treatment. Further, fisetin treatment of a P-glycoprotein overexpressing multidrug-resistant cancer cell line NCI/ADR-RES inhibited the viability and colony formation. Our results offer in vitro proof-of-concept for fisetin as a microtubule targeting agent. We suggest that fisetin could be developed as an adjuvant for treatment of prostate and other cancer types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Integrated modeling methodology for microtubule dynamics and Taxol kinetics with experimentally identifiable parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, He; Sokhansanj, Bahrad A

    2007-10-01

    Microtubule dynamics play a critical role in cell function and stress response, modulating mitosis, morphology, signaling, and transport. Drugs such as paclitaxel (Taxol) can impact tubulin polymerization and affect microtubule dynamics. While theoretical methods have been previously proposed to simulate microtubule dynamics, we develop a methodology here that can be used to compare model predictions with experimental data. Our model is a hybrid of (1) a simple two-state stochastic formulation of tubulin polymerization kinetics and (2) an equilibrium approximation for the chemical kinetics of Taxol drug binding to microtubule ends. Model parameters are biologically realistic, with values taken directly from experimental measurements. Model validation is conducted against published experimental data comparing optical measurements of microtubule dynamics in cultured cells under normal and Taxol-treated conditions. To compare model predictions with experimental data requires applying a "windowing" strategy on the spatiotemporal resolution of the simulation. From a biological perspective, this is consistent with interpreting the microtubule "pause" phenomenon as at least partially an artifact of spatiotemporal resolution limits on experimental measurement.

  18. The molecular dynamics of crawling migration in microtubule-disrupted keratocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hitomi; Okimura, Chika; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Cell-crawling migration plays an essential role in complex biological phenomena. It is now generally believed that many processes essential to such migration are regulated by microtubules in many cells, including fibroblasts and neurons. However, keratocytes treated with nocodazole, which is an inhibitor of microtubule polymerization - and even keratocyte fragments that contain no microtubules - migrate at the same velocity and with the same directionality as normal keratocytes. In this study, we discovered that not only these migration properties, but also the molecular dynamics that regulate such properties, such as the retrograde flow rate of actin filaments, distributions of vinculin and myosin II, and traction forces, are also the same in nocodazole-treated keratocytes as those in untreated keratocytes. These results suggest that microtubules are not in fact required for crawling migration of keratocytes, either in terms of migrating properties or of intracellular molecular dynamics.

  19. Kinetochore microtubule dynamics and the metaphase-anaphase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Y; Kronebusch, P J; Borisy, G G

    1995-11-01

    We have quantitatively studied the dynamic behavior of kinetochore fiber microtubules (kMTs); both turnover and poleward transport (flux) in metaphase and anaphase mammalian cells by fluorescence photoactivation. Tubulin derivatized with photoactivatable fluorescein was microinjected into prometaphase LLC-PK and PtK1 cells and allowed to incorporate to steady-state. A fluorescent bar was generated across the MTs in a half-spindle of the mitotic cells using laser irradiation and the kinetics of fluorescence redistribution were determined in terms of a double exponential decay process. The movement of the activated zone was also measured along with chromosome movement and spindle elongation. To investigate the possible regulation of MT transport at the metaphase-anaphase transition, we performed double photoactivation analyses on the same spindles as the cell advanced from metaphase to anaphase. We determined values for the turnover of kMTs (t1/2 = 7.1 +/- 2.4 min at 30 degrees C) and demonstrated that the turnover of kMTs in metaphase is approximately an order of magnitude slower than that for non-kMTs. In anaphase, kMTs become dramatically more stable as evidenced by a fivefold increase in the fluorescence redistribution half-time (t1/2 = 37.5 +/- 8.5 min at 30 degrees C). Our results also indicate that MT transport slows abruptly at anaphase onset to one-half the metaphase value. In early anaphase, MT depolymerization at the kinetochore accounted, on average, for 84% of the rate of chromosome movement toward the pole whereas the relative contribution of MT transport and depolymerization at the pole contributed 16%. These properties reflect a dramatic shift in the dynamic behavior of kMTs at the metaphase-anaphase transition. A release-capture model is presented in which the stability of kMTs is increased at the onset of anaphase through a reduction in the probability of MT release from the kinetochore. The reduction in MT transport at the metaphase

  20. Aurora B suppresses microtubule dynamics and limits central spindle size by locally activating KIF4A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes Bastos, Ricardo; Gandhi, Sapan R.; Baron, Ryan D.; Gruneberg, Ulrike; Nigg, Erich A.

    2013-01-01

    Anaphase central spindle formation is controlled by the microtubule-stabilizing factor PRC1 and the kinesin KIF4A. We show that an MKlp2-dependent pool of Aurora B at the central spindle, rather than global Aurora B activity, regulates KIF4A accumulation at the central spindle. KIF4A phosphorylation by Aurora B stimulates the maximal microtubule-dependent ATPase activity of KIF4A and promotes its interaction with PRC1. In the presence of phosphorylated KIF4A, microtubules grew more slowly and showed long pauses in growth, resulting in the generation of shorter PRC1-stabilized microtubule overlaps in vitro. Cells expressing only mutant forms of KIF4A lacking the Aurora B phosphorylation site overextended the anaphase central spindle, demonstrating that this regulation is crucial for microtubule length control in vivo. Aurora B therefore ensures that suppression of microtubule dynamic instability by KIF4A is restricted to a specific subset of microtubules and thereby contributes to central spindle size control in anaphase. PMID:23940115

  1. Dynamics of microtubule asters in microfabricated chambers: The role of catastrophes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Dogterom, Marileen

    2002-01-01

    Recent in vivo as well as in vitro experiments have indicated that microtubule pushing alone is sufficient to position a microtubule-organizing center within a cell. Here, we investigate the effect of catastrophes on the dynamics of microtubule asters within microfabricated chambers that mimic the confining geometry of living cells. The use of a glass bead as the microtubule-organizing center allows us to manipulate the aster by using optical tweezers. In the case in which microtubules preexist, we show that because of microtubule buckling, repositioning almost never occurs after relocation with the optical tweezers, although initial microtubule growth always leads the aster to the geometrical center of the chamber. When a catastrophe promoter is added, we find instead that the aster is able to efficiently explore the chamber geometry even after being relocated with the optical tweezers. As predicted by theoretical calculations, the results of our in vitro experiments clearly demonstrate the need for catastrophes for proper positioning in a confining geometry. These findings correlate with recent observations of nuclear positioning in fission yeast cells. PMID:12486218

  2. Microtubule dynamics in the peripheral nervous system: A matter of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Souza, Leonardo; Timmerman, Vincent; Janssens, Sophie

    2011-11-01

    The special architecture of neurons in the peripheral nervous system, with axons extending for long distances, represents a major challenge for the intracellular transport system. Two recent studies show that mutations in the small heat shock protein HSPB1, which cause an axonal type of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, affect microtubule dynamics and impede axonal transport. Intriguingly, while at presymptomatic age the neurons in the mutant HSPB1 mouse show a hyperstable microtubule network, at postsymptomatic age, the microtubule network completely lost its stability as reflected by a marked decrease in tubulin acetylation levels. We here propose a model explaining the role of microtubule stabilization and tubulin acetylation in the pathogenesis of HSPB1 mutations.

  3. Push or Pull? -- Cryo-Electron Microscopy of Microtubule's Dynamic Instability and Its Roles in the Kinetochore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Wei

    2009-03-01

    Microtubule is a biopolymer made up of alpha-beta-tubulin heterodimers. The tubulin dimers assemble head-to-tail as protofilaments and about 13 protofilaments interact laterally to form a hollow cylindrical structure which is the microtubule. As the major cytoskeleton in all eukaryotic cells, microtubules have the intrinsic property to switch stochastically between growth and shrinkage phases, a phenomenon termed as their dynamic instability. Microtubule's dynamic instability is closely related to the types of nucleotide (GTP or GDP) that binds to the beta-tubulin. We have biochemically trapped two types of assembly states of tubulin with GTP or GDP bound representing the polymerizing and depolymerizing ends of microtubules respectively. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we have elucidated the structures of these intermediate assemblies, showing that tubulin protofilaments demonstrate various curvatures and form different types of lateral interactions depending on the nucleotide states of tubulin and the temperature. Our work indicates that during the microtubule's dynamic cycle, tubulin undergoes various assembly states. These states, different from the straight microtubule, lend the highly dynamic and complicated behavior of microtubules. Our study of microtubule's interaction with certain kinetochore complexes suggests that the intermediate assemblies are responsible for specific mechanical forces that are required during the mitosis or meiosis. Our discoveries strongly suggest that a microtubule is a molecular machine rather than a simple cellular scaffold.

  4. Polo-like kinase-1 regulates kinetochore–microtubule dynamics and spindle checkpoint silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Davydenko, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1) is a highly conserved kinase with multiple mitotic functions. Plk1 localizes to prometaphase kinetochores and is reduced at metaphase kinetochores, similar to many checkpoint signaling proteins, but Plk1 is not required for spindle checkpoint function. Plk1 is also implicated in stabilizing kinetochore–microtubule attachments, but these attachments are most stable when kinetochore Plk1 levels are low at metaphase. Therefore, it is unclear how Plk1 function at kinetochores can be understood in the context of its dynamic localization. In this paper, we show that Plk1 activity suppresses kinetochore–microtubule dynamics to stabilize initial attachments in prometaphase, and Plk1 removal from kinetochores is necessary to maintain dynamic microtubules in metaphase. Constitutively targeting Plk1 to kinetochores maintained high activity at metaphase, leading to reduced interkinetochore tension and intrakinetochore stretch, a checkpoint-dependent mitotic arrest, and accumulation of microtubule attachment errors. Together, our data show that Plk1 dynamics at kinetochores control two critical mitotic processes: initially establishing correct kinetochore–microtubule attachments and subsequently silencing the spindle checkpoint. PMID:22908307

  5. Calcium-independent disruption of microtubule dynamics by nanosecond pulsed electric fields in U87 human glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lynn; Bardet, Sylvia M.; Burke, Ryan C.; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O’Connor, Rodney P.

    2017-01-01

    High powered, nanosecond duration, pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause cell death by a mechanism that is not fully understood and have been proposed as a targeted cancer therapy. Numerous chemotherapeutics work by disrupting microtubules. As microtubules are affected by electrical fields, this study looks at the possibility of disrupting them electrically with nsPEF. Human glioblastoma cells (U87-MG) treated with 100, 10 ns, 44 kV/cm pulses at a frequency of 10 Hz showed a breakdown of their interphase microtubule network that was accompanied by a reduction in the number of growing microtubules. This effect is temporally linked to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and independent of cellular swelling and calcium influx, two factors that disrupt microtubule growth dynamics. Super-resolution microscopy revealed microtubule buckling and breaking as a result of nsPEF application, suggesting that nsPEF may act directly on microtubules. PMID:28117459

  6. Calcium-independent disruption of microtubule dynamics by nanosecond pulsed electric fields in U87 human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lynn; Bardet, Sylvia M; Burke, Ryan C; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2017-01-24

    High powered, nanosecond duration, pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause cell death by a mechanism that is not fully understood and have been proposed as a targeted cancer therapy. Numerous chemotherapeutics work by disrupting microtubules. As microtubules are affected by electrical fields, this study looks at the possibility of disrupting them electrically with nsPEF. Human glioblastoma cells (U87-MG) treated with 100, 10 ns, 44 kV/cm pulses at a frequency of 10 Hz showed a breakdown of their interphase microtubule network that was accompanied by a reduction in the number of growing microtubules. This effect is temporally linked to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and independent of cellular swelling and calcium influx, two factors that disrupt microtubule growth dynamics. Super-resolution microscopy revealed microtubule buckling and breaking as a result of nsPEF application, suggesting that nsPEF may act directly on microtubules.

  7. Autoinhibition of TBCB regulates EB1-mediated microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Gerardo; Castaño, Raquel; Fanarraga, Mónica L; Villegas, Juan Carlos; Gonçalves, João; Soares, Helena; Avila, Jesus; Marenchino, Marco; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Montoya, Guillermo; Zabala, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin cofactors (TBCs) participate in the folding, dimerization, and dissociation pathways of the tubulin dimer. Among them, TBCB and TBCE are two CAP-Gly domain-containing proteins that together efficiently interact with and dissociate the tubulin dimer. In the study reported here we showed that TBCB localizes at spindle and midzone microtubules during mitosis. Furthermore, the motif DEI/M-COO(-) present in TBCB, which is similar to the EEY/F-COO(-) element characteristic of EB proteins, CLIP-170, and α-tubulin, is required for TBCE-TBCB heterodimer formation and thus for tubulin dimer dissociation. This motif is responsible for TBCB autoinhibition, and our analysis suggests that TBCB is a monomer in solution. Mutants of TBCB lacking this motif are derepressed and induce microtubule depolymerization through an interaction with EB1 associated with microtubule tips. TBCB is also able to bind to the chaperonin complex CCT containing α-tubulin, suggesting that it could escort tubulin to facilitate its folding and dimerization, recycling or degradation.

  8. The coordination of centromere replication, spindle formation, and kinetochore-microtubule interaction in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The kinetochore is a protein complex that assembles on centromeric DNA to mediate chromosome-microtubule interaction. Most eukaryotic cells form the spindle and establish kinetochore-microtubule interaction during mitosis, but budding yeast cells finish these processes in S-phase. It has long been noticed that the S-phase spindle in budding yeast is shorter than that in metaphase, but the biological significance of this short S-phase spindle structure remains unclear. We addressed this issue by using ask1-3, a temperature-sensitive kinetochore mutant that exhibits partially elongated spindles at permissive temperature in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU, a DNA synthesis inhibitor. After exposure to and removal of HU, ask1-3 cells show a delayed anaphase entry. This delay depends on the spindle checkpoint, which monitors kinetochore-microtubule interaction defects. Overproduction of microtubule-associated protein Ase1 or Cin8 also induces spindle elongation in HU-arrested cells. The spindle checkpoint-dependent anaphase entry delay is also observed after ASE1 or CIN8 overexpression in HU-arrested cells. Therefore, the shorter spindle in S-phase cells is likely to facilitate proper chromosome-microtubule interaction.

  9. A polarised population of dynamic microtubules mediates homeostatic length control in animal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remigio Picone

    Full Text Available Because physical form and function are intimately linked, mechanisms that maintain cell shape and size within strict limits are likely to be important for a wide variety of biological processes. However, while intrinsic controls have been found to contribute to the relatively well-defined shape of bacteria and yeast cells, the extent to which individual cells from a multicellular animal control their plastic form remains unclear. Here, using micropatterned lines to limit cell extension to one dimension, we show that cells spread to a characteristic steady-state length that is independent of cell size, pattern width, and cortical actin. Instead, homeostatic length control on lines depends on a population of dynamic microtubules that lead during cell extension, and that are aligned along the long cell axis as the result of interactions of microtubule plus ends with the lateral cell cortex. Similarly, during the development of the zebrafish neural tube, elongated neuroepithelial cells maintain a relatively well-defined length that is independent of cell size but dependent upon oriented microtubules. A simple, quantitative model of cellular extension driven by microtubules recapitulates cell elongation on lines, the steady-state distribution of microtubules, and cell length homeostasis, and predicts the effects of microtubule inhibitors on cell length. Together this experimental and theoretical analysis suggests that microtubule dynamics impose unexpected limits on cell geometry that enable cells to regulate their length. Since cells are the building blocks and architects of tissue morphogenesis, such intrinsically defined limits may be important for development and homeostasis in multicellular organisms.

  10. Thymoquinone disrupts the microtubule dynamics in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusrat Masood

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mad2 deletion strain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe was found to be sensitive to thymoquinone, a signature molecule present in Nigella sativa in a dose-dependent manner. Mad2 protein is an indispensable part of mitotic spindle checkpoint complex and is required for the cell cycle arrest in response to the spindle defects. Although the expression of α tubulin was not affected in thymoquinone treated cells, but the expression of β-tubulin was reduced. Further, the absence of microtubule in thymoquinone treated cells suggests its involvement in tubulin polymerization. Molecular docking studies revealed that thymoquinone specifically binds to β-tubulin near the Taxotere binding site of Tub1 (Tubulin α-β dimer. These studies additionally showed that thymoquinone interacts with the residues present in chain B, which is an inherent part of Mad2 protein of mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC. We concluded that the thymoquinone disrupts the microtubule polymerization that leads to the requirement of spindle checkpoint protein for the cell survival.

  11. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein influences microtubule dynamics at the cell periphery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, M.P.; Mehra, N.; Jorna, A.S.; Beest, M. van; Giles, R.H.; Voest, E.E.

    2004-01-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein protects microtubules (MTs) from destabilization by nocodazole treatment. Based on this fixed-cell assay with static end points, VHL has been reported to directly stabilize the MT cytoskeleton. To investigate the dynamic changes in MTs induced by VHL in living cel

  12. Alterations in ovarian cancer cell adhesion drive taxol resistance by increasing microtubule dynamics in a FAK-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Daniel J; Khambhati, Niti N; Qi, Mark X; Patel, Krishan S; Ravikumar, Nithin; Brandenburg, Chandler P; Dawson, Michelle R

    2015-04-17

    Chemorefractory ovarian cancer patients show extremely poor prognosis. Microtubule-stabilizing Taxol (paclitaxel) is a first-line treatment against ovarian cancer. Despite the close interplay between microtubules and cell adhesion, it remains unknown if chemoresistance alters the way cells adhere to their extracellular environment, a process critical for cancer metastasis. To investigate this, we isolated Taxol-resistant populations of OVCAR3 and SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell lines. Though Taxol-resistant cells neither effluxed more drug nor gained resistance to other chemotherapeutics, they did display increased microtubule dynamics. These changes in microtubule dynamics coincided with faster attachment rates and decreased adhesion strength, which correlated with increased surface β1-integrin expression and decreased focal adhesion formation, respectively. Adhesion strength correlated best with Taxol-sensitivity, and was found to be independent of microtubule polymerization but dependent on focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which was up-regulated in Taxol-resistant cells. FAK inhibition also decreased microtubule dynamics to equal levels in both populations, indicating alterations in adhesive signaling are up-stream of microtubule dynamics. Taken together, this work demonstrates that Taxol-resistance dramatically alters how ovarian cancer cells adhere to their extracellular environment causing down-stream increases in microtubule dynamics, providing a therapeutic target that may improve prognosis by not only recovering drug sensitivity, but also decreasing metastasis.

  13. Label-Free Imaging of Single Microtubule Dynamics Using Spatial Light Interference Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Mikhail E; Teng, Kai Wen; Selvin, Paul R; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-01-24

    Due to their diameter, of only 24 nm, single microtubules are extremely challenging to image without the use of extrinsic contrast agents. As a result, fluorescence tagging is the common method to visualize their motility. However, such investigation is limited by photobleaching and phototoxicity. We experimentally demonstrate the capability of combining label-free spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) with numerical processing for imaging single microtubules in a gliding assay. SLIM combines four different intensity images to obtain the optical path length map associated with the sample. Because of the use of broadband fields, the sensitivity to path length is better than 1 nm without (temporal) averaging and better than 0.1 nm upon averaging. Our results indicate that SLIM can image the dynamics of microtubules in a full field of view, of 200 × 200 μm(2), over many hours. Modeling the microtubule transport via the diffusion-advection equation, we found that the dispersion relation yields the standard deviation of the velocity distribution, without the need for tracking individual tubes. Interestingly, during a 2 h window, the microtubules begin to decelerate, at 100 pm/s(2) over a 20 min period. Thus, SLIM is likely to serve as a useful tool for understanding molecular motor activity, especially over large time scales, where fluorescence methods are of limited utility.

  14. Tank binding kinase 1 is a centrosome-associated kinase necessary for microtubule dynamics and mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Smitha; Nguyen, Jonathan; Johnson, Joseph; Haura, Eric; Coppola, Domenico; Chellappan, Srikumar

    2015-12-10

    TANK Binding Kinase 1 (TBK1) is a non-canonical IκB kinase that contributes to KRAS-driven lung cancer. Here we report that TBK1 plays essential roles in mammalian cell division. Specifically, levels of active phospho-TBK1 increase during mitosis and localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and midbody, and selective inhibition or silencing of TBK1 triggers defects in spindle assembly and prevents mitotic progression. TBK1 binds to the centrosomal protein CEP170 and to the mitotic apparatus protein NuMA, and both CEP170 and NuMA are TBK1 substrates. Further, TBK1 is necessary for CEP170 centrosomal localization and binding to the microtubule depolymerase Kif2b, and for NuMA binding to dynein. Finally, selective disruption of the TBK1-CEP170 complex augments microtubule stability and triggers defects in mitosis, suggesting that TBK1 functions as a mitotic kinase necessary for microtubule dynamics and mitosis.

  15. Dynein and mast/orbit/CLASP have antagonistic roles in regulating kinetochore-microtubule plus-end dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Rita; Feijão, Tália; Gouveia, Susana; Pereira, António J; Matos, Irina; Sampaio, Paula; Maiato, Helder; Sunkel, Claudio E

    2009-07-15

    Establishment and maintenance of the mitotic spindle requires the balanced activity of microtubule-associated proteins and motors. In this study we have addressed how the microtubule plus-end tracking protein mast/orbit/CLASP and cytoplasmic dynein regulate this process in Drosophila melanogaster embryos and S2 cells. We show that mast accumulates at kinetochores early in mitosis, which is followed by a poleward streaming upon microtubule attachment. This leads to a reduction of mast levels at kinetochores during metaphase and anaphase that depends largely on the microtubule minus end-directed motor cytoplasmic dynein. Surprisingly, we also found that co-depletion of dynein rescues spindle bipolarity in mast-depleted cells, while restoring normal microtubule poleward flux. Our results suggest that mast and dynein have antagonistic roles in the local regulation of microtubule plus-end dynamics at kinetochores, which are important for the maintenance of spindle bipolarity and normal spindle length.

  16. KATNAL1 regulation of sertoli cell microtubule dynamics is essential for spermiogenesis and male fertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee B Smith

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is a complex process reliant upon interactions between germ cells (GC and supporting somatic cells. Testicular Sertoli cells (SC support GCs during maturation through physical attachment, the provision of nutrients, and protection from immunological attack. This role is facilitated by an active cytoskeleton of parallel microtubule arrays that permit transport of nutrients to GCs, as well as translocation of spermatids through the seminiferous epithelium during maturation. It is well established that chemical perturbation of SC microtubule remodelling leads to premature GC exfoliation demonstrating that microtubule remodelling is an essential component of male fertility, yet the genes responsible for this process remain unknown. Using a random ENU mutagenesis approach, we have identified a novel mouse line displaying male-specific infertility, due to a point mutation in the highly conserved ATPase domain of the novel KATANIN p60-related microtubule severing protein Katanin p60 subunit A-like1 (KATNAL1. We demonstrate that Katnal1 is expressed in testicular Sertoli cells (SC from 15.5 days post-coitum (dpc and that, consistent with chemical disruption models, loss of function of KATNAL1 leads to male-specific infertility through disruption of SC microtubule dynamics and premature exfoliation of spermatids from the seminiferous epithelium. The identification of KATNAL1 as an essential regulator of male fertility provides a significant novel entry point into advancing our understanding of how SC microtubule dynamics promotes male fertility. Such information will have resonance both for future treatment of male fertility and the development of non-hormonal male contraceptives.

  17. Synergistic suppression of microtubule dynamics by discodermolide and paclitaxel in non-small cell lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honore, Stéphane; Kamath, Kathy; Braguer, Diane; Horwitz, Susan Band; Wilson, Leslie; Briand, Claudette; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2004-07-15

    Discodermolide is a new microtubule-targeted antimitotic drug in Phase I clinical trials that, like paclitaxel, stabilizes microtubule dynamics and enhances microtubule polymer mass in vitro and in cells. Despite their apparently similar binding sites on microtubules, discodermolide acts synergistically with paclitaxel to inhibit proliferation of A549 human lung cancer cells (L. Martello et al., Clin. Cancer Res., 6: 1978-1987, 2000). To understand their synergy, we examined the effects of the two drugs singly and in combination in A549 cells and found that, surprisingly, their antiproliferative synergy is related to their ability to synergistically inhibit microtubule dynamic instability and mitosis. The combination of discodermolide and paclitaxel at their antiproliferative IC(50)s (7 nm for discodermolide and 2 nm for paclitaxel) altered all of the parameters of dynamic instability synergistically except the time-based rescue frequency. For example, together the drugs inhibited overall microtubule dynamicity by 71%, but each drug individually inhibited dynamicity by only 24%, giving a combination index (CI) of 0.23. Discodermolide and paclitaxel also synergistically blocked cell cycle progression at G(2)-M (41, 9.6, and 16% for both drugs together, for discodermolide alone, and for paclitaxel alone, respectively; CI = 0.59), and they synergistically enhanced apoptosis (CI = 0.85). Microtubules are unique receptors for drugs. The results suggest that ligands that bind to large numbers of binding sites on an individual microtubule can interact in a poorly understood manner to synergistically suppress microtubule dynamic instability and inhibit both mitosis and cell proliferation, with important consequences for combination clinical therapy with microtubule-targeted drugs.

  18. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles alter cellular morphology via disturbing the microtubule dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhilei; Xu, Bo; Ji, Xiaoli; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Xuemei; Chen, Minjian; Han, Xiumei; Tang, Qiusha; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2015-04-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in our daily lives, for example, in the areas of sunscreens, cosmetics, toothpastes, food products, and nanomedical reagents. Recently, increasing concern has been raised about their neurotoxicity, but the mechanisms underlying such toxic effects are still unknown. In this work, we employed a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) to study the effects of TiO2 NPs on neurological systems. Our results showed that TiO2 NPs did not affect cell viability but induced noticeable morphological changes until 100 μg ml-1. Immunofluorescence detection showed disorder, disruption, retraction, and decreased intensity of the microtubules after TiO2 NPs treatment. Both α and β tubule expressions did not change in the TiO2 NP-treated group, but the percentage of soluble tubules was increased. A microtubule dynamic study in living cells indicated that TiO2 NPs caused a lower growth rate and a higher shortening rate of microtubules as well as shortened lifetimes of de novo microtubules. TiO2 NPs did not cause changes in the expression and phosphorylation state of tau proteins, but a tau-TiO2 NP interaction was observed. TiO2 NPs could interact with tubule heterodimers, microtubules and tau proteins, which led to the instability of microtubules, thus contributing to the neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs.Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in our daily lives, for example, in the areas of sunscreens, cosmetics, toothpastes, food products, and nanomedical reagents. Recently, increasing concern has been raised about their neurotoxicity, but the mechanisms underlying such toxic effects are still unknown. In this work, we employed a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) to study the effects of TiO2 NPs on neurological systems. Our results showed that TiO2 NPs did not affect cell viability but induced noticeable morphological changes until 100 μg ml-1. Immunofluorescence detection showed disorder

  19. Microtubule Dynamicity Is More Important than Stability in Memory Formation: an In Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atarod, Deyhim; Eskandari-Sedighi, Ghazaleh; Pazhoohi, Farid; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Khajeloo, Mojtaba; Riazi, Gholam Hossein

    2015-06-01

    It has been shown that microtubule (MT) activity and dynamics can have huge impacts on synaptic plasticity and memory formation. This is mainly due to various functions of MTs in neurons; MTs are involved in dendritic spine formation, axonal transportation, neuronal polarity, and receptor trafficking. Recent studies from our group and other labs have suggested the possible role of brain MT dynamicity and activity in memory; however, there is a need for more detailed studies regarding this aspect. In this study, we have tried to evaluate the importance of microtubule dynamicity rather than stability in memory formation in vivo. In order to investigate the role of MT stability in memory formation, we treated mice with paclitaxel-a classic microtubule-stabilizing agent. We then studied the behavior of treated animals using Morris water maze (MWM) test. To measure the effect of injected paclitaxel on MT polymerization kinetics, we conducted polymerization assays on brain extracts of the same paclitaxel-treated animals. Our results show that paclitaxel treatment affects animals' memory in a negative way and treated animals behave poorly in MWM compared to control group. In addition, our kinetics studies show that MT stability is significantly increased in brain extracts from paclitaxel-treated mice, but MT dynamics is reduced. Thus, we suggest that dynamicity is a very important feature of MT protein structures, and regarding memory formation, dynamicity is more important than stability and high activity.

  20. LARG and mDia1 link Galpha12/13 to cell polarity and microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulimari, Polyxeni; Knieling, Helga; Engel, Ulrike; Grosse, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of cell polarity is a process observed in all cells. During directed migration, cells orientate their microtubule cytoskeleton and the microtubule-organizing-center (MTOC), which involves integrins and downstream Cdc42 and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta activity. However, the contribution of G protein-coupled receptor signal transduction for MTOC polarity is less well understood. Here, we report that the heterotrimeric Galpha(12) and Galpha(13) proteins are necessary for MTOC polarity and microtubule dynamics based on studies using Galpha(12/13)-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cell polarization involves the Galpha(12/13)-interacting leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG) and the actin-nucleating diaphanous formin mDia1. Interestingly, LARG associates with pericentrin and localizes to the MTOC and along microtubule tracks. We propose that Galpha(12/13) proteins exert essential functions linking extracellular signals to microtubule dynamics and cell polarity via RhoGEF and formin activity.

  1. Erucin, the major isothiocyanate in arugula (Eruca sativa, inhibits proliferation of MCF7 tumor cells by suppressing microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Azarenko

    Full Text Available Consumption of cruciferous vegetables is associated with reduced risk of various types of cancer. Isothiocyanates including sulforaphane and erucin are believed to be responsible for this activity. Erucin [1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylthiobutane], which is metabolically and structurally related to sulforaphane, is present in large quantities in arugula (Eruca sativa, Mill., kohlrabi and Chinese cabbage. However, its cancer preventive mechanisms remain poorly understood. We found that erucin inhibits proliferation of MCF7 breast cancer cells (IC50 = 28 µM in parallel with cell cycle arrest at mitosis (IC50 = 13 µM and apoptosis, by a mechanism consistent with impairment of microtubule dynamics. Concentrations of 5-15 µM erucin suppressed the dynamic instability of microtubules during interphase in the cells. Most dynamic instability parameters were inhibited, including the rates and extents of growing and shortening, the switching frequencies between growing and shortening, and the overall dynamicity. Much higher erucin concentrations were required to reduce the microtubule polymer mass. In addition, erucin suppressed dynamic instability of microtubules reassembled from purified tubulin in similar fashion. The effects of erucin on microtubule dynamics, like those of sulforaphane, are similar qualitatively to those of much more powerful clinically-used microtubule-targeting anticancer drugs, including taxanes and the vinca alkaloids. The results suggest that suppression of microtubule dynamics by erucin and the resulting impairment of critically important microtubule-dependent cell functions such as mitosis, cell migration and microtubule-based transport may be important in its cancer preventive activities.

  2. Erucin, the major isothiocyanate in arugula (Eruca sativa), inhibits proliferation of MCF7 tumor cells by suppressing microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarenko, Olga; Jordan, Mary Ann; Wilson, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of cruciferous vegetables is associated with reduced risk of various types of cancer. Isothiocyanates including sulforaphane and erucin are believed to be responsible for this activity. Erucin [1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylthio)butane], which is metabolically and structurally related to sulforaphane, is present in large quantities in arugula (Eruca sativa, Mill.), kohlrabi and Chinese cabbage. However, its cancer preventive mechanisms remain poorly understood. We found that erucin inhibits proliferation of MCF7 breast cancer cells (IC50 = 28 µM) in parallel with cell cycle arrest at mitosis (IC50 = 13 µM) and apoptosis, by a mechanism consistent with impairment of microtubule dynamics. Concentrations of 5-15 µM erucin suppressed the dynamic instability of microtubules during interphase in the cells. Most dynamic instability parameters were inhibited, including the rates and extents of growing and shortening, the switching frequencies between growing and shortening, and the overall dynamicity. Much higher erucin concentrations were required to reduce the microtubule polymer mass. In addition, erucin suppressed dynamic instability of microtubules reassembled from purified tubulin in similar fashion. The effects of erucin on microtubule dynamics, like those of sulforaphane, are similar qualitatively to those of much more powerful clinically-used microtubule-targeting anticancer drugs, including taxanes and the vinca alkaloids. The results suggest that suppression of microtubule dynamics by erucin and the resulting impairment of critically important microtubule-dependent cell functions such as mitosis, cell migration and microtubule-based transport may be important in its cancer preventive activities.

  3. Physical Basis of Large Microtubule Aster Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Ishihara, Keisuke; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule asters - radial arrays of microtubules organized by centrosomes - play a fundamental role in the spatial coordination of animal cells. The standard model of aster growth assumes a fixed number of microtubules originating from the centrosomes. However, aster morphology in this model does not scale with cell size, and we recently found evidence for non-centrosomal microtubule nucleation. Here, we combine autocatalytic nucleation and polymerization dynamics to develop a biophysical model of aster growth. Our model predicts that asters expand as traveling waves and recapitulates all major aspects of aster growth. As the nucleation rate increases, the model predicts an explosive transition from stationary to growing asters with a discontinuous jump of the growth velocity to a nonzero value. Experiments in frog egg extract confirm the main theoretical predictions. Our results suggest that asters observed in large frog and amphibian eggs are a meshwork of short, unstable microtubules maintained by autoca...

  4. AKAP9, a Regulator of Microtubule Dynamics, Contributes to Blood-Testis Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Deepak; Mruk, Dolores; Herter, Jan M; Cullere, Xavier; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Cheng, C Yan; Mayadas, Tanya N

    2016-02-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB), formed between adjacent Sertoli cells, undergoes extensive remodeling to facilitate the transport of preleptotene spermatocytes across the barrier from the basal to apical compartments of the seminiferous tubules for further development and maturation into spermatozoa. The actin cytoskeleton serves unique structural and supporting roles in this process, but little is known about the role of microtubules and their regulators during BTB restructuring. The large isoform of the cAMP-responsive scaffold protein AKAP9 regulates microtubule dynamics and nucleation at the Golgi. We found that conditional deletion of Akap9 in mice after the initial formation of the BTB at puberty leads to infertility. Akap9 deletion results in marked alterations in the organization of microtubules in Sertoli cells and a loss of barrier integrity despite a relatively intact, albeit more apically localized F-actin and BTB tight junctional proteins. These changes are accompanied by a loss of haploid spermatids due to impeded meiosis. The barrier, however, progressively reseals in older Akap9 null mice, which correlates with a reduction in germ cell apoptosis and a greater incidence of meiosis. However, spermiogenesis remains defective, suggesting additional roles for AKAP9 in this process. Together, our data suggest that AKAP9 and, by inference, the regulation of the microtubule network are critical for BTB function and subsequent germ cell development during spermatogenesis.

  5. Tobacco mutants with reduced microtubule dynamics are less susceptible to TMV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouko, Maurice O; Sambade, Adrian; Brandner, Katrin; Niehl, Annette; Peña, Eduardo; Ahad, Abdul; Heinlein, Manfred; Nick, Peter

    2010-06-01

    A panel of seven SR1 tobacco mutants (ATER1 to ATER7) derived via T-DNA activation tagging and screening for resistance to a microtubule assembly inhibitor, ethyl phenyl carbamate, were used to study the role of microtubules during infection and spread of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). In one of these lines, ATER2, alpha-tubulin is shifted from the tyrosinylated into the detyrosinated form, and the microtubule plus-end marker GFP-EB1 moves significantly slower when expressed in the background of the ATER2 mutant as compared with the SR1 wild type. The efficiency of cell-to-cell movement of TMV encoding GFP-tagged movement protein (MP-GFP) is reduced in ATER2 accompanied by a reduced association of MP-GFP with plasmodesmata. This mutant is also more tolerant to viral infection as compared with the SR1 wild type, implying that reduced microtubule dynamics confer a comparative advantage in face of TMV infection.

  6. PAR-1/MARK: a kinase essential for maintaining the dynamic state of microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kenji; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ohno, Shigeo

    2012-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase, PAR-1, is an essential component of the evolutionary-conserved polarity-regulating system, PAR-aPKC system, which plays indispensable roles in establishing asymmetric protein distributions and cell polarity in various biological contexts (Suzuki, A. and Ohno, S. (2006). J. Cell Sci., 119: 979-987; Matenia, D. and Mandelkow, E.M. (2009). Trends Biochem. Sci., 34: 332-342). PAR-1 is also known as MARK, which phosphorylates classical microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and detaches MAPs from microtubules (Matenia, D. and Mandelkow, E.M. (2009). Trends Biochem. Sci., 34: 332-342). This MARK activity of PAR-1 suggests its role in microtubule (MT) dynamics, but surprisingly, only few studies have been carried out to address this issue. Here, we summarize our recent study on live imaging analysis of MT dynamics in PAR-1b-depleted cells, which clearly demonstrated the positive role of PAR-1b in maintaining MT dynamics (Hayashi, K., Suzuki, A., Hirai, S., Kurihara, Y., Hoogenraad, C.C., and Ohno, S. (2011). J. Neurosci., 31: 12094-12103). Importantly, our results further revealed the novel physiological function of PAR-1b in maintaining dendritic spine morphology in mature neurons.

  7. SAS-4 is recruited to a dynamic structure in newly forming centrioles that is stabilized by the gamma-tubulin-mediated addition of centriolar microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammermann, Alexander; Maddox, Paul S; Desai, Arshad; Oegema, Karen

    2008-02-25

    Centrioles are surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM), which is proposed to promote new centriole assembly by concentrating gamma-tubulin. Here, we quantitatively monitor new centriole assembly in living Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, focusing on the conserved components SAS-4 and SAS-6. We show that SAS-4 and SAS-6 are coordinately recruited to the site of new centriole assembly and reach their maximum levels during S phase. Centriolar SAS-6 is subsequently reduced by a mechanism intrinsic to the early assembly pathway that does not require progression into mitosis. Centriolar SAS-4 remains in dynamic equilibrium with the cytoplasmic pool until late prophase, when it is stably incorporated in a step that requires gamma-tubulin and microtubule assembly. These results indicate that gamma-tubulin in the PCM stabilizes the nascent daughter centriole by promoting microtubule addition to its outer wall. Such a mechanism may help restrict new centriole assembly to the vicinity of preexisting parent centrioles that recruit PCM.

  8. Enhanced dynamic instability of microtubules in a ROS free inert environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Sirajul; Kabir, Arif Md Rashedul; Inoue, Daisuke; Sada, Kazuki; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the regulators in various biological processes, have recently been suspected to modulate microtubule (MT) dynamics in cells. However due to complicated cellular environment and unavailability of any in vitro investigation, no detail is understood yet. Here, by performing simple in vitro investigations, we have unveiled the effect of ROS on MT dynamics. By studying dynamic instability of MTs in a ROS free environment and comparing with that in the presence of ROS, we disclosed that MTs showed enhanced dynamics in the ROS free environment. All the parameters that define dynamic instability of MTs e.g., growth and shrinkage rates, rescue and catastrophe frequencies were significantly affected by the presence of ROS. This work clearly reveals the role of ROS in modulating MT dynamics in vitro, and would be a great help in understanding the role of ROS in regulation of MT dynamics in cells.

  9. Regulation of Kif15 localization and motility by the C-terminus of TPX2 and microtubule dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Barbara J.; Balchand, Sai K.; Wadsworth, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Mitotic motor proteins generate force to establish and maintain spindle bipolarity, but how they are temporally and spatially regulated in vivo is unclear. Prior work demonstrated that a microtubule-associated protein, TPX2, targets kinesin-5 and kinesin-12 motors to spindle microtubules. The C-terminal domain of TPX2 contributes to the localization and motility of the kinesin-5, Eg5, but it is not known whether this domain regulates kinesin-12, Kif15. We found that the C-terminal domain of TPX2 contributes to the localization of Kif15 to spindle microtubules in cells and suppresses motor walking in vitro. Kif15 and Eg5 are partially redundant motors, and overexpressed Kif15 can drive spindle formation in the absence of Eg5 activity. Kif15-dependent bipolar spindle formation in vivo requires the C-terminal domain of TPX2. In the spindle, fluorescent puncta of GFP-Kif15 move toward the equatorial region at a rate equivalent to microtubule growth. Reduction of microtubule growth with paclitaxel suppresses GFP-Kif15 motility, demonstrating that dynamic microtubules contribute to Kif15 behavior. Our results show that the C-terminal region of TPX2 regulates Kif15 in vitro, contributes to motor localization in cells, and is required for Kif15 force generation in vivo and further reveal that dynamic microtubules contribute to Kif15 behavior in vivo. PMID:27852894

  10. Mathematical modeling of the intracellular protein dynamics: the importance of active transport along microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Zuzanna; Parisot, Martin; Lachowicz, Mirosław

    2014-12-21

    In this paper we propose a mathematical model of protein and mRNA transport inside a cell. The spatio-temporal model takes into account the active transport along microtubules in the cytoplasm as well as diffusion and is able to reproduce the oscillatory changes in protein concentration observed in many experimental data. In the model the protein and the mRNA interact with each other that allows us to classify the model as a simple gene regulatory network. The proposed model is generic and may be adapted to specific signaling pathways. On the basis of numerical simulations, we formulate a new hypothesis that the oscillatory dynamics is allowed by the mRNA active transport along microtubules from the nucleus to distant locations.

  11. Mechanism of dynamic reorientation of cortical microtubules due to mechanical stress

    CERN Document Server

    Muratov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Directional growth caused by gravitropism and corresponding bending of plant cells has been explored since 19th century, however, many aspects of mechanisms underlying the perception of gravity at the molecular level are still not well known. Perception of gravity in root and shoot gravitropisms is usually attributed to gravisensitive cells, called statocytes, which exploit sedimentation of macroscopic and heavy organelles, amyloplasts, to sense the direction of gravity. Gravity stimulus is then transduced into distal elongation zone, which is several mm far from statocytes, where it causes stretching. It is suggested that gravity stimulus is conveyed by gradients in auxin flux. We propose a theoretical model that may explain how concentration gradients and/or stretching may indirectly affect the global orientation of cortical microtubules, attached to the cell membrane and induce their dynamic reorientation perpendicular to the gradients. In turn, oriented microtubules arrays direct the growth and orientatio...

  12. The Salmonella effector SseJ disrupts microtubule dynamics when ectopically expressed in normal rat kidney cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Sally A.; Hodgkinson, Michael R.; Dowle, Adam A.

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella effector protein SseJ is secreted by Salmonella into the host cell cytoplasm where it can then modify host cell processes. Whilst host cell small GTPase RhoA has previously been shown to activate the acyl-transferase activity of SseJ we show here an un-described effect of SseJ protein production upon microtubule dynamism. SseJ prevents microtubule collapse and this is independent of SseJ’s acyl-transferase activity. We speculate that the effects of SseJ on microtubules would be mediated via its known interactions with the small GTPases of the Rho family. PMID:28235057

  13. Dynamical modelling of coordinated multiple robot systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Samad

    1987-01-01

    The state of the art in the modeling of the dynamics of coordinated multiple robot manipulators is summarized and various problems related to this subject are discussed. It is recognized that dynamics modeling is a component used in the design of controllers for multiple cooperating robots. As such, the discussion addresses some problems related to the control of multiple robots. The techniques used to date in the modeling of closed kinematic chains are summarized. Various efforts made to date for the control of coordinated multiple manipulators is summarized.

  14. Microtubule doublets are double-track railways for intraflagellar transport trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanek, Ludek; Pigino, Gaia

    2016-05-06

    The cilium is a large macromolecular machine that is vital for motility, signaling, and sensing in most eukaryotic cells. Its conserved core structure, the axoneme, contains nine microtubule doublets, each comprising a full A-microtubule and an incomplete B-microtubule. However, thus far, the function of this doublet geometry has not been understood. We developed a time-resolved correlative fluorescence and three-dimensional electron microscopy approach to investigate the dynamics of intraflagellar transport (IFT) trains, which carry ciliary building blocks along microtubules during the assembly and disassembly of the cilium. Using this method, we showed that each microtubule doublet is used as a bidirectional double-track railway: Anterograde IFT trains move along B-microtubules, and retrograde trains move along A-microtubules. Thus, the microtubule doublet geometry provides direction-specific rails to coordinate bidirectional transport of ciliary components.

  15. ATX-2, the C. elegans Ortholog of Human Ataxin-2, Regulates Centrosome Size and Microtubule Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Stubenvoll

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes are critical sites for orchestrating microtubule dynamics, and exhibit dynamic changes in size during the cell cycle. As cells progress to mitosis, centrosomes recruit more microtubules (MT to form mitotic bipolar spindles that ensure proper chromosome segregation. We report a new role for ATX-2, a C. elegans ortholog of Human Ataxin-2, in regulating centrosome size and MT dynamics. ATX-2, an RNA-binding protein, forms a complex with SZY-20 in an RNA-independent fashion. Depleting ATX-2 results in embryonic lethality and cytokinesis failure, and restores centrosome duplication to zyg-1 mutants. In this pathway, SZY-20 promotes ATX-2 abundance, which inversely correlates with centrosome size. Centrosomes depleted of ATX-2 exhibit elevated levels of centrosome factors (ZYG-1, SPD-5, γ-Tubulin, increasing MT nucleating activity but impeding MT growth. We show that ATX-2 influences MT behavior through γ-Tubulin at the centrosome. Our data suggest that RNA-binding proteins play an active role in controlling MT dynamics and provide insight into the control of proper centrosome size and MT dynamics.

  16. A model for the regulatory network controlling the dynamics of kinetochore microtubule plus-ends and poleward flux in metaphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Nicolas; Chang, Qiang; Buster, Daniel W; Sharp, David J; Ma, Ao

    2009-05-12

    Tight regulation of kinetochore microtubule dynamics is required to generate the appropriate position and movement of chromosomes on the mitotic spindle. A widely studied but mysterious aspect of this regulation occurs during metaphase when polymerization of kinetochore microtubule plus-ends is balanced by depolymerization at their minus-ends. Thus, kinetochore microtubules maintain a constant net length, allowing chromosomes to persist at the spindle equator, but consist of tubulin subunits that continually flux toward spindle poles. Here, we construct a feasible network of regulatory proteins for controlling kinetochore microtubule plus-end dynamics, which was combined with a Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate metaphase tubulin flux. We also test the network model by combining it with a force-balancing model explicitly taking force generators into account. Our data reveal how relatively simple interrelationships among proteins that stimulate microtubule plus-end polymerization, depolymerization, and dynamicity can induce robust flux while accurately predicting apparently contradictory results of knockdown experiments. The model also provides a simple and robust physical mechanism through which the regulatory networks at kinetochore microtubule plus- and minus-ends could communicate.

  17. Dynamic network structure of interhemispheric coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doron, Karl W; Bassett, Danielle S; Gazzaniga, Michael S

    2012-11-13

    Fifty years ago Gazzaniga and coworkers published a seminal article that discussed the separate roles of the cerebral hemispheres in humans. Today, the study of interhemispheric communication is facilitated by a battery of novel data analysis techniques drawn from across disciplinary boundaries, including dynamic systems theory and network theory. These techniques enable the characterization of dynamic changes in the brain's functional connectivity, thereby providing an unprecedented means of decoding interhemispheric communication. Here, we illustrate the use of these techniques to examine interhemispheric coordination in healthy human participants performing a split visual field experiment in which they process lexical stimuli. We find that interhemispheric coordination is greater when lexical information is introduced to the right hemisphere and must subsequently be transferred to the left hemisphere for language processing than when it is directly introduced to the language-dominant (left) hemisphere. Further, we find that putative functional modules defined by coherent interhemispheric coordination come online in a transient manner, highlighting the underlying dynamic nature of brain communication. Our work illustrates that recently developed dynamic, network-based analysis techniques can provide novel and previously unapproachable insights into the role of interhemispheric coordination in cognition.

  18. Coordination dynamics in horse-rider dyads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolframm, I.A.; Bosga, J.; Meulenbroek, R.G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The sport of equestrianism is defined through close horse-rider interaction. However, no consistent baseline parameters currently exist describing the coordination dynamics of horse-rider movement across different equine gaits. The study aims to employ accelerometers to investigate and describe

  19. Visualization and analysis of microtubule dynamics using dual color-coded display of plus-end labels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy K Garrison

    Full Text Available Investigating spatial and temporal control of microtubule dynamics in live cells is critical to understanding cell morphogenesis in development and disease. Tracking fluorescently labeled plus-end-tracking proteins over time has become a widely used method to study microtubule assembly. Here, we report a complementary approach that uses only two images of these labels to visualize and analyze microtubule dynamics at any given time. Using a simple color-coding scheme, labeled plus-ends from two sequential images are pseudocolored with different colors and then merged to display color-coded ends. Based on object recognition algorithms, these colored ends can be identified and segregated into dynamic groups corresponding to four events, including growth, rescue, catastrophe, and pause. Further analysis yields not only their spatial distribution throughout the cell but also provides measurements such as growth rate and direction for each labeled end. We have validated the method by comparing our results with ground-truth data derived from manual analysis as well as with data obtained using the tracking method. In addition, we have confirmed color-coded representation of different dynamic events by analyzing their history and fate. Finally, we have demonstrated the use of the method to investigate microtubule assembly in cells and provided guidance in selecting optimal image acquisition conditions. Thus, this simple computer vision method offers a unique and quantitative approach to study spatial regulation of microtubule dynamics in cells.

  20. Supramolecular Chirality in Dynamic Coordination Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Miyake

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Labile metal complexes have a useful coordination bond; which is weaker than a covalent C–C bond and is reversibly and dynamically formed and dissociated. Such labile metal complexes also can be used to construct chiral shapes and offer dynamic conversion of chiral molecular shapes in response to external stimuli. This review provides recent examples of chirality induction and describes the dynamic conversion systems produced by chiral metal complexes including labile metal centers, most of which respond to external stimuli by exhibiting sophisticated conversion phenomena.

  1. The coordination dynamics of social neuromarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognoli, Emmanuelle; Kelso, J A Scott

    2015-01-01

    Social behavior is a complex integrative function that entails many aspects of the brain's sensory, cognitive, emotional and movement capacities. Its neural processes are seldom simultaneous but occur according to precise spatiotemporal choreographies, manifested by the coordination of their oscillations within and between brains. Methods with good temporal resolution can help to identify so-called "neuromarkers" of social function and aid in disentangling the dynamical architecture of social brains. In our ongoing research, we have used dual-electroencephalography (EEG) to study neuromarker dynamics during synchronic interactions in which pairs of subjects coordinate behavior spontaneously and intentionally (social coordination) and during diachronic transactions that require subjects to perceive or behave in turn (action observation, delayed imitation). In this paper, after outlining our dynamical approach to the neurophysiological basis of social behavior, we examine commonalities and differences in the neuromarkers that are recruited for both kinds of tasks. We find the neuromarker landscape to be task-specific: synchronic paradigms of social coordination reveal medial mu, alpha and the phi complex as contributing neuromarkers. Diachronic tasks recruit alpha as well, in addition to lateral mu rhythms and the newly discovered nu and kappa rhythms whose functional significance is still unclear. Social coordination, observation, and delayed imitation share commonality of context: in each of our experiments, subjects exchanged information through visual perception and moved in similar ways. Nonetheless, there was little overlap between their neuromarkers, a result that hints strongly of task-specific neural mechanisms for social behavior. The only neuromarker that transcended both synchronic and diachronic social behaviors was the ubiquitous alpha rhythm, which appears to be a key signature of visually-mediated social behaviors. The present paper is both an entry

  2. The coordination dynamics of social neuromarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle eTognoli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Social behavior is a complex integrative function that entails many aspects of the brain's sensory, cognitive, emotional and motor capacities. Its neural processes are seldom simultaneous but occur according to precise spatiotemporal choreographies, manifested by the coordination of their oscillations within and between brains. Methods with good temporal resolution can help to identify so-called neuromarkers of social function and aid in disentangling the dynamical architecture of social brains. In our ongoing research, we have used dual-EEG to study neuromarker dynamics during synchronic interactions in which pairs of subjects coordinate behavior spontaneously and intentionally (social coordination and during diachronic transactions that require subjects to perceive or behave in turn (action observation, delayed imitation. In this paper, after outlining our dynamical approach to the neurophysiological basis of social behavior, we examine commonalities and differences in the neuromarkers that are recruited for both kinds of tasks. We find the neuromarker landscape to be task-specific: synchronic paradigms of social coordination reveal medial mu, alpha and the phi complex as contributing neuromarkers. Diachronic tasks recruit alpha as well, in addition to lateral mu rhythms and the newly discovered nu and kappa rhythms whose functional significance is still unclear. Social coordination, observation, and delayed imitation share commonality of context: in each of our experiments, subjects exchanged information through visual perception and moved in similar ways. Nonetheless, there was little overlap between their neuromarkers, a result that hints strongly of task-specific neural mechanisms for social behavior. The only neuromarker that transcended both synchronic and diachronic social behaviors was the ubiquitous alpha rhythm, which appears to be a key signature of visually-mediated social behaviors. The present paper is both an entry point and a

  3. Coordination: Neural, Behavioral and Social Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Armin

    2008-01-01

    One of the most striking features of Coordination Dynamics is its interdisciplinary character. The problems we are trying to solve in this field range from behavioral phenomena of interlimb coordination and coordination between stimuli and movements (perception-action tasks) through neural activation patterns that can be observed during these tasks to clinical applications and social behavior. It is not surprising that close collaboration among scientists from different fields as psychology, kinesiology, neurology and even physics are imperative to deal with the enormous difficulties we are facing when we try to understand a system as complex as the human brain. The chapters in this volume are not simply write-ups of the lectures given by the experts at the meeting but are written in a way that they give sufficient introductory information to be comprehensible and useful for all interested scientists and students.

  4. Suppression of microtubule dynamics by discodermolide by a novel mechanism is associated with mitotic arrest and inhibition of tumor cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honore, Stéphane; Kamath, Kathy; Braguer, Diane; Wilson, Leslie; Briand, Claudette; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2003-12-01

    Discodermolide is a new microtubule-targeted drug in Phase I clinical trials that inhibits tumor growth and induces G(2)-M cell cycle arrest. It is effective against paclitaxel-resistant cell lines and acts synergistically in combination with paclitaxel. Suppression of microtubule dynamics by microtubule-targeted drugs has been hypothesized to be responsible for their ability to inhibit mitotic progression and cell proliferation. To determine whether discodermolide blocks mitosis by an effect on microtubule dynamics, we analyzed the effects of discodermolide on microtubule dynamics in living A549 human lung cancer cells during interphase at concentrations that block mitosis and inhibit cell proliferation. We found that discodermolide (7-166 nM) significantly suppressed microtubule dynamic instability. At the IC(50) for proliferation (7 nM discodermolide, 72 h), overall dynamicity was reduced by 23%. The principal parameters of dynamic instability suppressed by discodermolide were the microtubule shortening rate and length shortened. In addition, discodermolide markedly increased the frequency of rescued catastrophes. At the discodermolide concentration that resulted in 50% of maximal mitotic block (83 nM, 20 h), most microtubules were completely non-dynamic, no anaphases occurred, and all spindles were abnormal. The dynamicity of the remaining dynamic microtubules was reduced by 62%. The results indicate that a principal mechanism of inhibition of cell proliferation and mitotic block by discodermolide is suppression of microtubule dynamics. Importantly, the results indicate significant additional stabilizing effects of discodermolide on microtubule dynamics as compared with those of paclitaxel that may in turn reflect differences in their binding sites and their effects on tubulin conformation.

  5. A dynamic human motion: coordination analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pchelkin, Stepan; Shiriaev, Anton S; Freidovich, Leonid B; Mettin, Uwe; Gusev, Sergei V; Kwon, Woong; Paramonov, Leonid

    2015-02-01

    This article is concerned with the generic structure of the motion coordination system resulting from the application of the method of virtual holonomic constraints (VHCs) to the problem of the generation and robust execution of a dynamic humanlike motion by a humanoid robot. The motion coordination developed using VHCs is based on a motion generator equation, which is a scalar nonlinear differential equation of second order. It can be considered equivalent in function to a central pattern generator in living organisms. The relative time evolution of the degrees of freedom of a humanoid robot during a typical motion are specified by a set of coordination functions that uniquely define the overall pattern of the motion. This is comparable to a hypothesis on the existence of motion patterns in biomechanics. A robust control is derived based on a transverse linearization along the configuration manifold defined by the coordination functions. It is shown that the derived coordination and control architecture possesses excellent robustness properties. The analysis is performed on an example of a real human motion recorded in test experiments.

  6. Hoxb1b controls oriented cell division, cell shape and microtubule dynamics in neural tube morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Mihaela; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Titus, Tom; Postlethwait, John; Moens, Cecilia B

    2014-02-01

    Hox genes are classically ascribed to function in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of bilaterian animals; however, their role in directing molecular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis at the cellular level remains largely unstudied. We unveil a non-classical role for the zebrafish hoxb1b gene, which shares ancestral functions with mammalian Hoxa1, in controlling progenitor cell shape and oriented cell division during zebrafish anterior hindbrain neural tube morphogenesis. This is likely distinct from its role in cell fate acquisition and segment boundary formation. We show that, without affecting major components of apico-basal or planar cell polarity, Hoxb1b regulates mitotic spindle rotation during the oriented neural keel symmetric mitoses that are required for normal neural tube lumen formation in the zebrafish. This function correlates with a non-cell-autonomous requirement for Hoxb1b in regulating microtubule plus-end dynamics in progenitor cells in interphase. We propose that Hox genes can influence global tissue morphogenesis by control of microtubule dynamics in individual cells in vivo.

  7. The ability to induce microtubule acetylation is a general feature of formin proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan F Thurston

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic microtubules exist as distinct dynamic and stable populations within the cell. Stable microtubules direct and maintain cell polarity and it is thought that their stabilization is dependent on coordinative organization between the microtubule network and the actin cytoskeleton. A growing body of work suggests that some members of the formin family of actin remodeling proteins also regulate microtubule organization and stability. For example, we showed previously that expression of the novel formin INF1 is sufficient to induce microtubule stabilization and tubulin acetylation, but not tubulin detyrosination. An important issue with respect to the relationship between formins and microtubules is the determination of which formin domains mediate microtubule stabilization. INF1 has a distinct microtubule-binding domain at its C-terminus and the endogenous INF1 protein is associated with the microtubule network. Surprisingly, the INF1 microtubule-binding domain is not essential for INF1-induced microtubule acetylation. We show here that expression of the isolated FH1 + FH2 functional unit of INF1 is sufficient to induce microtubule acetylation independent of the INF1 microtubule-binding domain. It is not yet clear whether or not microtubule stabilization is a general property of all mammalian formins; therefore we expressed constitutively active derivatives of thirteen of the fifteen mammalian formin proteins in HeLa and NIH3T3 cells and measured their effects on stress fiber formation, MT organization and MT acetylation. We found that expression of the FH1 + FH2 unit of the majority of mammalian formins is sufficient to induce microtubule acetylation. Our results suggest that the regulation of microtubule acetylation is likely a general formin activity and that the FH2 should be thought of as a dual-function domain capable of regulating both actin and microtubule networks.

  8. Dietary flavonoid fisetin binds to β-tubulin and disrupts microtubule dynamics in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhtar, Eiman; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Sechi, Mario; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule targeting based therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment; however, resistance and side effects remain a major limitation. Therefore, novel strategies that can overcome these limitations are urgently needed. We made a novel discovery that fisetin, a hydroxyflavone, is a microtubule stabilizing agent. Fisetin binds to tubulin and stabilizes microtubules with binding characteristics far superior than paclitaxel. Surface plasmon resonance and computational docking studies sugges...

  9. Dietary flavonoid fisetin binds to β-tubulin and disrupts microtubule dynamics in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhtar, Eiman; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Sechi, Mario; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule targeting based therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment; however, resistance and side effects remain a major limitation. Therefore, novel strategies that can overcome these limitations are urgently needed. We made a novel discovery that fisetin, a hydroxyflavone, is a microtubule stabilizing agent. Fisetin binds to tubulin and stabilizes microtubules with binding characteristics far superior than paclitaxel. Surface plasmon resonance and computational docking studies sugges...

  10. Microtubule-associated protein-4 controls nanovesicle dynamics and T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos-Morán, Eugenio; Blas-Rus, Noelia; Martin-Cófreces, Noa Beatriz; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    The immune synapse (IS) is a specialized structure formed at the contact area between T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that is essential for the adaptive immune response. Proper T cell activation requires its polarization towards the APC, which is highly dependent on the tubulin cytoskeleton. Microtubule-associated protein-4 (MAP4) is a microtubule (MT)-stabilizing protein that controls MTs in physiological processes, such as cell division, migration, vesicular transport or primary cilia formation. In this study, we assessed the role of MAP4 in T cell activation. MAP4 decorates the pericentrosomal area and MTs of the T cell, and it is involved in MT detyrosination and stable assembly in response to T cell activation. In addition, MAP4 prompts the timely translocation of the MT-organizing center (MTOC) towards the IS and the dynamics of signaling nanovesicles that sustains T cell activation. However, MAP4 acts as a negative regulator of other T cell activation-related signals, including diacylglycerol (DAG) production and IL2 secretion. Our data indicate that MAP4 acts as a checkpoint molecule that balances positive and negative hallmarks of T cell activation.

  11. Human TUBB3 mutations perturb microtubule dynamics, kinesin interactions, and axon guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischfield, Max A.; Baris, Hagit N.; Wu, Chen; Rudolph, Guenther; Van Maldergem, Lionel; He, Wei; Chan, Wai-Man; Andrews, Caroline; Demer, Joseph L.; Robertson, Richard L.; Mackey, David A.; Ruddle, Jonathan B.; Bird, Thomas D.; Gottlob, Irene; Pieh, Christina; Traboulsi, Elias I.; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Hunter, David G.; Soul, Janet S.; Newlin, Anna; Sabol, Louise J.; Doherty, Edward J.; de Uzcátegui, Clara E.; de Uzcátegui, Nicolas; Collins, Mary Louise Z.; Sener, Emin C.; Wabbels, Bettina; Hellebrand, Heide; Meitinger, Thomas; de Berardinis, Teresa; Magli, Adriano; Schiavi, Costantino; Pastore-Trossello, Marco; Koc, Feray; Wong, Agnes M.; Levin, Alex V.; Geraghty, Michael T.; Descartes, Maria; Flaherty, Maree; Jamieson, Robyn V.; Møller, H. U.; Meuthen, Ingo; Callen, David F.; Kerwin, Janet; Lindsay, Susan; Meindl, Alfons; Gupta, Mohan L.; Pellman, David; Engle, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    We report that eight heterozygous missense mutations in TUBB3, encoding the neuron-specific β-tubulin isotype III, result in a spectrum of human nervous system disorders we now call the TUBB3 syndromes. Each mutation causes the ocular motility disorder CFEOM3, whereas some also result in intellectual and behavioral impairments, facial paralysis, and/or later-onset axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Neuroimaging reveals a spectrum of abnormalities including hypoplasia of oculomotor nerves, and dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, anterior commissure, and corticospinal tracts. A knock-in disease mouse model reveals axon guidance defects without evidence of cortical cell migration abnormalities. We show the disease-associated mutations can impair tubulin heterodimer formation in vitro, although folded mutant heterodimers can still polymerize into microtubules. Modeling each mutation in yeast tubulin demonstrates that all alter dynamic instability whereas a subset disrupts the interaction of microtubules with kinesin motors. These findings demonstrate normal TUBB3 is required for axon guidance and maintenance in mammals. PMID:20074521

  12. Analysis of dynamic instability of steady-state microtubules in vitro by video-enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy with an appendix by Emin Oroudjev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenjerla, Mythili; Lopus, Manu; Wilson, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Microtubules are major constituents of the cytoskeleton which display dynamic properties. They exhibit dynamic instability which is defined as the stochastic switching between growing and shortening at microtubule ends. Dynamic instability plays an important role in diverse cellular functions including cell migration and mitosis. Many successful antimitotic drugs and microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are known to modulate microtubule dynamics, and it is important to analyze the in vitro dynamic instability of microtubules to study the mechanism of action of microtubule-targeted therapeutics and MAPs. In this chapter, we describe a method to analyze the in vitro dynamic instability of microtubules at steady state using video-enhanced differential contrast (VE-DIC) microscopy in detail. In this method, microtubules are assembled to steady state at 30 degrees C with MAP-free tubulin in a slide chamber in the presence of GTP, using sea urchin axonemes as nucleating seeds. Images of microtubules are enhanced and recorded in real time by a video camera and an image processor connected to a DIC microscope which is maintained at 30 degrees C. We use two software programs to track and analyze the growing and shortening of plus or minus ends of microtubules in the real-time images recorded using VE-DIC. In this chapter, we describe the instructions to use the tracking software Real Time Measurement II (RTM II) program. The instructions to use the analysis software Microtubule Life History Analysis Procedures (MT-LHAP) in Igor Pro software have been described in detail in an appendix (Oroudjev, 2010) following this chapter.

  13. Dynamic assembly of polymer nanotube networks via kinesin powered microtubule filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Walter F.; Bouxsein, Nathan F.; Henderson, Ian M.; Gomez, Andrew; Bachand, George D.

    2015-06-01

    We describe for the first time how biological nanomotors may be used to actively self-assemble mesoscale networks composed of diblock copolymer nanotubes. The collective force generated by multiple kinesin nanomotors acting on a microtubule filament is large enough to overcome the energy barrier required to extract nanotubes from polymer vesicles comprised of poly(ethylene oxide-b-butadiene) in spite of the higher force requirements relative to extracting nanotubes from lipid vesicles. Nevertheless, large-scale polymer networks were dynamically assembled by the motors. These networks displayed enhanced robustness, persisting more than 24 h post-assembly (compared to 4-5 h for corresponding lipid networks). The transport of materials in and on the polymer membranes differs substantially from the transport on analogous lipid networks. Specifically, our data suggest that polymer mobility in nanotubular structures is considerably different from planar or 3D structures, and is stunted by 1D confinement of the polymer subunits. Moreover, quantum dots adsorbed onto polymer nanotubes are completely immobile, which is related to this 1D confinement effect and is in stark contrast to the highly fluid transport observed on lipid tubules.We describe for the first time how biological nanomotors may be used to actively self-assemble mesoscale networks composed of diblock copolymer nanotubes. The collective force generated by multiple kinesin nanomotors acting on a microtubule filament is large enough to overcome the energy barrier required to extract nanotubes from polymer vesicles comprised of poly(ethylene oxide-b-butadiene) in spite of the higher force requirements relative to extracting nanotubes from lipid vesicles. Nevertheless, large-scale polymer networks were dynamically assembled by the motors. These networks displayed enhanced robustness, persisting more than 24 h post-assembly (compared to 4-5 h for corresponding lipid networks). The transport of materials in and on

  14. An antitubulin agent BCFMT inhibits proliferation of cancer cells and induces cell death by inhibiting microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Rai

    Full Text Available Using cell based screening assay, we identified a novel anti-tubulin agent (Z-5-((5-(4-bromo-3-chlorophenylfuran-2-ylmethylene-2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one (BCFMT that inhibited proliferation of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa (IC(50, 7.2 ± 1.8 µM, human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7 (IC(50, 10.0 ± 0.5 µM, highly metastatic breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231 (IC(50, 6.0 ± 1 µM, cisplatin-resistant human ovarian carcinoma (A2780-cis (IC(50, 5.8 ± 0.3 µM and multi-drug resistant mouse mammary tumor (EMT6/AR1 (IC(50, 6.5 ± 1 µM cells. Using several complimentary strategies, BCFMT was found to inhibit cancer cell proliferation at G2/M phase of the cell cycle apparently by targeting microtubules. In addition, BCFMT strongly suppressed the dynamics of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells. At its half maximal proliferation inhibitory concentration (10 µM, BCFMT reduced the rates of growing and shortening phases of microtubules in MCF-7 cells by 37 and 40%, respectively. Further, it increased the time microtubules spent in the pause (neither growing nor shortening detectably state by 135% and reduced the dynamicity (dimer exchange per unit time of microtubules by 70%. In vitro, BCFMT bound to tubulin with a dissociation constant of 8.3 ± 1.8 µM, inhibited tubulin assembly and suppressed GTPase activity of microtubules. BCFMT competitively inhibited the binding of BODIPY FL-vinblastine to tubulin with an inhibitory concentration (K(i of 5.2 ± 1.5 µM suggesting that it binds to tubulin at the vinblastine site. In cultured cells, BCFMT-treatment depolymerized interphase microtubules, perturbed the spindle organization and accumulated checkpoint proteins (BubR1 and Mad2 at the kinetochores. BCFMT-treated MCF-7 cells showed enhanced nuclear accumulation of p53 and its downstream p21, which consequently activated apoptosis in these cells. The results suggested that BCFMT inhibits proliferation of several types of cancer cells including drug

  15. Microtubules are Essential for Mitochondrial Dynamics-Fission, Fusion, and Motility- in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laken C. Woods

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial function is dependent upon mitochondrial structure which is in turn dependent upon mitochondrial dynamics, including fission, fusion, and motility. Here we examined the relationship between mitochondrial dynamics and the cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium discoideum. Using time-lapse analysis, we quantified mitochondrial fission, fusion, and motility in the presence of cytoskeleton disrupting pharmaceuticals and the absence of the potential mitochondria-cytoskeleton linker protein, CluA. Our results indicate that microtubules are essential for mitochondrial movement, as well as fission and fusion; actin plays a less significant role, perhaps selecting the mitochondria for transport. We also suggest that CluA is not a linker protein but plays an unidentified role in mitochondrial fission and fusion. The significance of our work is to gain further insight into the role the cytoskeleton plays in mitochondrial dynamics and function. By better understanding these processes we can better appreciate the underlying mitochondrial contributions to many neurological disorders characterized by altered mitochondrial dynamics, structure, and/or function.

  16. Observable dynamics and coordinate systems for vehicle tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Altendorfer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    We investigate several coordinate systems and dynamical vector fields for target tracking to be used in driver assistance systems. We show how to express the discrete dynamics of maneuvering target vehicles in arbitrary coordinates starting from the target's and the own (ego) vehicle's assumed dynamical model in global coordinates. We clarify the notion of "ego compensation" and show how non-inertial effects are to be included when using a body-fixed coordinate system for target tracking. We finally compare the tracking error of different combinations of target tracking coordinates and dynamical vector fields for simulated data.

  17. Tension-dependent regulation of microtubule dynamics at kinetochores can explain metaphase congression in yeast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Melissa K; Pearson, Chad G; Sprague, Brian L; Zarzar, Ted R; Bloom, Kerry; Salmon, E D; Odde, David J

    2005-01-01

    During metaphase in budding yeast mitosis, sister kinetochores are tethered to opposite poles and separated, stretching their intervening chromatin, by singly attached kinetochore microtubules (kMTs...

  18. FoxO regulates microtubule dynamics and polarity to promote dendrite branching in Drosophila sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, James C; Broihier, Heather T

    2016-10-01

    The size and shape of dendrite arbors are defining features of neurons and critical determinants of neuronal function. The molecular mechanisms establishing arborization patterns during development are not well understood, though properly regulated microtubule (MT) dynamics and polarity are essential. We previously found that FoxO regulates axonal MTs, raising the question of whether it also regulates dendritic MTs and morphology. Here we demonstrate that FoxO promotes dendrite branching in all classes of Drosophila dendritic arborization (da) neurons. FoxO is required both for initiating growth of new branches and for maintaining existing branches. To elucidate FoxO function, we characterized MT organization in both foxO null and overexpressing neurons. We find that FoxO directs MT organization and dynamics in dendrites. Moreover, it is both necessary and sufficient for anterograde MT polymerization, which is known to promote dendrite branching. Lastly, FoxO promotes proper larval nociception, indicating a functional consequence of impaired da neuron morphology in foxO mutants. Together, our results indicate that FoxO regulates dendrite structure and function and suggest that FoxO-mediated pathways control MT dynamics and polarity.

  19. Microtubule dynamics from mating through the first zygotic division in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, P; Chin, E; Mallavarapu, A; Yeh, E; Salmon, E D; Bloom, K

    1999-03-08

    We have used time-lapse digital imaging microscopy to examine cytoplasmic astral microtubules (Mts) and spindle dynamics during the mating pathway in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mating begins when two cells of opposite mating type come into proximity. The cells arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and grow a projection towards one another forming a shmoo projection. Imaging of microtubule dynamics with green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions to dynein or tubulin revealed that the nucleus and spindle pole body (SPB) became oriented and tethered to the shmoo tip by a Mt-dependent search and capture mechanism. Dynamically unstable astral Mts were captured at the shmoo tip forming a bundle of three or four astral Mts. This bundle changed length as the tethered nucleus and SPB oscillated toward and away from the shmoo tip at growth and shortening velocities typical of free plus end astral Mts (approximately 0.5 micrometer/min). Fluorescent fiduciary marks in Mt bundles showed that Mt growth and shortening occurred primarily at the shmoo tip, not the SPB. This indicates that Mt plus end assembly/disassembly was coupled to pushing and pulling of the nucleus. Upon cell fusion, a fluorescent bar of Mts was formed between the two shmoo tip bundles, which slowly shortened (0.23 +/- 0.07 micrometer/min) as the two nuclei and their SPBs came together and fused (karyogamy). Bud emergence occurred adjacent to the fused SPB approximately 30 min after SPB fusion. During the first mitosis, the SPBs separated as the spindle elongated at a constant velocity (0.75 micrometer/min) into the zygotic bud. There was no indication of a temporal delay at the 2-micrometer stage of spindle morphogenesis or a lag in Mt nucleation by replicated SPBs as occurs in vegetative mitosis implying a lack of normal checkpoints. Thus, the shmoo tip appears to be a new model system for studying Mt plus end dynamic attachments and much like higher eukaryotes, the first mitosis after haploid

  20. The Dynamic Pollen Tube Cytoskeleton: Live Cell Studies Using Actin-Binding and Microtubule-Binding Reporter Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alice Y. Cheung; Qiao-hong Duan; Silvia Santos Costa; Barend H.J.de Graaf; Veronica S.Di Stilio; Jose Feijo; Hen-Ming Wu

    2008-01-01

    Pollen tubes elongate within the pistil to transport sperm cells to the embryo sac for fertilization.Growth occurs exclusively at the tube apex,rendering pollen tube elongation a most dramatic polar cell growth process.A hall-mark pollen tube feature is its cytoskeleton,which comprises elaborately organized and dynamic actin microfilaments and microtubules.Pollen tube growth is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton;its organization and regulation have been exalined extensively by various approaches.including fluorescent protein labeled actin-binding proteins in live cell studies.Using the previously described GFP-NtADF1 and GFP-LIADF1, and a new actin reporter protein NtPLIM2b-GFP,we re-affirm that the predominant actin structures in elongating tobacco and lily pollen tubes are long,streaming actin cables along the pollen tube shank,and a subapical structure comprising shorter actin cables.The subapical collection of actin microfilaments undergoes dynamic changes,giving rise to the appearance of structures that range from basket-or funnel-shaped,mesh-like to a subtle ring.NtPLIM2b-GFP is used in combination with a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho GTPases,AtROP-GEF1,to illustrate the use of these actin reporter proteins to explore the linkage between the polar cell growth process and its actin cytoskeleton.Contrary to the actin cytoskeleton,microtubules appear not to play a direct role in supporting the polar cell growth process in angiosperm pollen tubes.Using a microtubule reporter protein based on the microtubule end-binding protein from Arabidopsis AtEB1,GFP-AtEB1,we show that the extensive microtubule network in elongating pollen tubes displays varying degrees of dynamics.These reporter proteins provide versatile tools to explore the functional connection between major structural and signaling components of the polar pollen tube growth process.

  1. Rhythmic coordination dynamics in children with and without a developmental coordination disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volman, Michiel Joannes Maria

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis is to examine the intrinsic dynamics of rhythmic coordinated actions in children with and without DCD by testing the stability of these patterns. Two basically different coordination systems are examined, namely, rhythmic interlimb coordination and rhythmic

  2. Rhythmic coordination dynamics in children with and without a developmental coordination disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volman, Michiel Joannes Maria

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis is to examine the intrinsic dynamics of rhythmic coordinated actions in children with and without DCD by testing the stability of these patterns. Two basically different coordination systems are examined, namely, rhythmic interlimb coordination and rhythmic perception-a

  3. Automated screening of microtubule growth dynamics identifies MARK2 as a regulator of leading edge microtubules downstream of Rac1 in migrating cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukako Nishimura

    Full Text Available Polarized microtubule (MT growth in the leading edge is critical to directed cell migration, and is mediated by Rac1 GTPase. To find downstream targets of Rac1 that affect MT assembly dynamics, we performed an RNAi screen of 23 MT binding and regulatory factors and identified RNAi treatments that suppressed changes in MT dynamics induced by constitutively activated Rac1. By analyzing fluorescent EB3 dynamics with automated tracking, we found that RNAi treatments targeting p150(glued, APC2, spastin, EB1, Op18, or MARK2 blocked Rac1-mediated MT growth in lamellipodia. MARK2 was the only protein whose RNAi targeting additionally suppressed Rac1 effects on MT orientation in lamellipodia, and thus became the focus of further study. We show that GFP-MARK2 rescued effects of MARK2 depletion on MT growth lifetime and orientation, and GFP-MARK2 localized in lamellipodia in a Rac1-activity-dependent manner. In a wound-edge motility assay, MARK2-depleted cells failed to polarize their centrosomes or exhibit oriented MT growth in the leading edge, and displayed defects in directional cell migration. Thus, automated image analysis of MT assembly dynamics identified MARK2 as a target regulated downstream of Rac1 that promotes oriented MT growth in the leading edge to mediate directed cell migration.

  4. TPX2 phosphorylation maintains metaphase spindle length by regulating microtubule flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jingyan; Bian, Minglei; Xin, Guangwei; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Luo, Jia; Guo, Xiao; Chen, Hao; Wang, Yao; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A steady-state metaphase spindle maintains constant length, although the microtubules undergo intensive dynamics. Tubulin dimers are incorporated at plus ends of spindle microtubules while they are removed from the minus ends, resulting in poleward movement. Such microtubule flux is regulated by the microtubule rescue factors CLASPs at kinetochores and depolymerizing protein Kif2a at the poles, along with other regulators of microtubule dynamics. How microtubule polymerization and depolymerization are coordinated remains unclear. Here we show that TPX2, a microtubule-bundling protein and activator of Aurora A, plays an important role. TPX2 was phosphorylated by Aurora A during mitosis. Its phospho-null mutant caused short metaphase spindles coupled with low microtubule flux rate. Interestingly, phosphorylation of TPX2 regulated its interaction with CLASP1 but not Kif2a. The effect of its mutant in shortening the spindle could be rescued by codepletion of CLASP1 and Kif2a that abolished microtubule flux. Together we propose that Aurora A–dependent TPX2 phosphorylation controls mitotic spindle length through regulating microtubule flux. PMID:26240182

  5. plusTipTracker: Quantitative image analysis software for the measurement of microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Kathryn T; Besson, Sebastien; Matov, Alexandre; Bagonis, Maria H; Jaqaman, Khuloud; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2011-11-01

    Here we introduce plusTipTracker, a Matlab-based open source software package that combines automated tracking, data analysis, and visualization tools for movies of fluorescently-labeled microtubule (MT) plus end binding proteins (+TIPs). Although +TIPs mark only phases of MT growth, the plusTipTracker software allows inference of additional MT dynamics, including phases of pause and shrinkage, by linking collinear, sequential growth tracks. The algorithm underlying the reconstruction of full MT trajectories relies on the spatially and temporally global tracking framework described in Jaqaman et al. (2008). Post-processing of track populations yields a wealth of quantitative phenotypic information about MT network architecture that can be explored using several visualization modalities and bioinformatics tools included in plusTipTracker. Graphical user interfaces enable novice Matlab users to track thousands of MTs in minutes. In this paper, we describe the algorithms used by plusTipTracker and show how the package can be used to study regional differences in the relative proportion of MT subpopulations within a single cell. The strategy of grouping +TIP growth tracks for the analysis of MT dynamics has been introduced before (Matov et al., 2010). The numerical methods and analytical functionality incorporated in plusTipTracker substantially advance this previous work in terms of flexibility and robustness. To illustrate the enhanced performance of the new software we thus compare computer-assembled +TIP-marked trajectories to manually-traced MT trajectories from the same movie used in Matov et al. (2010).

  6. Dynamics of centrosome translocation and microtubule organization in neocortical neurons during distinct modes of polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Akira; Sato, Toshiyuki; Ando, Ryota; Noguchi, Namiko; Masaoka, Makoto; Miyata, Takaki

    2014-05-01

    Neuronal migration and process formation require cytoskeletal organization and remodeling. Recent studies suggest that centrosome translocation is involved in initial axon outgrowth, while the role of centrosomal positioning is not clear. Here, we examine relations between centrosomal positioning, axonogenesis, and microtubule (MT) polarization in multipolar and bipolar neocortical neurons. We monitored dynamic movements of centrosomes and MT plus ends in migratory neurons in embryonic mouse cerebral slices. In locomoting bipolar neurons, the centrosome oriented toward the pia-directed leading process. Bipolar neurons displayed dense MT plus end dynamics in leading processes, while trailing processes showed clear bidirectional MTs. In migrating multipolar neurons, new processes emerged irrespective of centrosome localization, followed by centrosome reorientations toward the dominant process. Anterograde movements of MT plus ends occurred in growing processes and retrograde movements were observed after retraction of the distal tip. In multipolar neurons, axon formed by tangential extension of a dominant process and the centrosome oriented toward the growing axon, while in locomoting neurons, an axon formed opposite to the direction of migration and the centrosome localized to the base of the leading process. Our data suggest that MT organization may alter centrosomal localization and that centrosomal positioning does not necessarily direct process formation.

  7. Regulation of a dynamic interaction between two microtubule-binding proteins, EB1 and TIP150, by the mitotic p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) orchestrates kinetochore microtubule plasticity and chromosome stability during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Tarsha; Wang, Ming; Liu, Xing; Wang, Zhikai; Xia, Peng; Chu, Youjun; Wang, Xiwei; Liu, Lifang; Jiang, Kai; Yu, Huijuan; Yan, Maomao; Wang, Jianyu; Hill, Donald L; Huang, Yuejia; Zhu, Tongge; Yao, Xuebiao

    2013-05-31

    The microtubule cytoskeleton network orchestrates cellular dynamics and chromosome stability in mitosis. Although tubulin acetylation is essential for cellular plasticity, it has remained elusive how kinetochore microtubule plus-end dynamics are regulated by p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) acetylation in mitosis. Here, we demonstrate that the plus-end tracking protein, TIP150, regulates dynamic kinetochore-microtubule attachments by promoting the stability of spindle microtubule plus-ends. Suppression of TIP150 by siRNA results in metaphase alignment delays and perturbations in chromosome biorientation. TIP150 is a tetramer that binds an end-binding protein (EB1) dimer through the C-terminal domains, and overexpression of the C-terminal TIP150 or disruption of the TIP150-EB1 interface by a membrane-permeable peptide perturbs chromosome segregation. Acetylation of EB1-PCAF regulates the TIP150 interaction, and persistent acetylation perturbs EB1-TIP150 interaction and accurate metaphase alignment, resulting in spindle checkpoint activation. Suppression of the mitotic checkpoint serine/threonine protein kinase, BubR1, overrides mitotic arrest induced by impaired EB1-TIP150 interaction, but cells exhibit whole chromosome aneuploidy. Thus, the results identify a mechanism by which the TIP150-EB1 interaction governs kinetochore microtubule plus-end plasticity and establish that the temporal control of the TIP150-EB1 interaction by PCAF acetylation ensures chromosome stability in mitosis.

  8. Regulation of a Dynamic Interaction between Two Microtubule-binding Proteins, EB1 and TIP150, by the Mitotic p300/CBP-associated Factor (PCAF) Orchestrates Kinetochore Microtubule Plasticity and Chromosome Stability during Mitosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Tarsha; Wang, Ming; Liu, Xing; Wang, Zhikai; Xia, Peng; Chu, Youjun; Wang, Xiwei; Liu, Lifang; Jiang, Kai; Yu, Huijuan; Yan, Maomao; Wang, Jianyu; Hill, Donald L.; Huang, Yuejia; Zhu, Tongge; Yao, Xuebiao

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton network orchestrates cellular dynamics and chromosome stability in mitosis. Although tubulin acetylation is essential for cellular plasticity, it has remained elusive how kinetochore microtubule plus-end dynamics are regulated by p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) acetylation in mitosis. Here, we demonstrate that the plus-end tracking protein, TIP150, regulates dynamic kinetochore-microtubule attachments by promoting the stability of spindle microtubule plus-ends. Suppression of TIP150 by siRNA results in metaphase alignment delays and perturbations in chromosome biorientation. TIP150 is a tetramer that binds an end-binding protein (EB1) dimer through the C-terminal domains, and overexpression of the C-terminal TIP150 or disruption of the TIP150-EB1 interface by a membrane-permeable peptide perturbs chromosome segregation. Acetylation of EB1-PCAF regulates the TIP150 interaction, and persistent acetylation perturbs EB1-TIP150 interaction and accurate metaphase alignment, resulting in spindle checkpoint activation. Suppression of the mitotic checkpoint serine/threonine protein kinase, BubR1, overrides mitotic arrest induced by impaired EB1-TIP150 interaction, but cells exhibit whole chromosome aneuploidy. Thus, the results identify a mechanism by which the TIP150-EB1 interaction governs kinetochore microtubule plus-end plasticity and establish that the temporal control of the TIP150-EB1 interaction by PCAF acetylation ensures chromosome stability in mitosis. PMID:23595990

  9. Non-critical string theory formulation of microtubule dynamics and quantum aspects of brain function

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nikolaos E

    1995-01-01

    Microtubule (MT) networks, subneural paracrystalline cytosceletal structures, seem to play a fundamental role in the neurons. We cast here the complicated MT dynamics in the form of a 1+1-dimensional non-critical string theory, thus enabling us to provide a consistent quantum treatment of MTs, including enviromental {\\em friction} effects. We suggest, thus, that the MTs are the microsites, in the brain, for the emergence of stable, macroscopic quantum coherent states, identifiable with the {\\em preconscious states}. Quantum space-time effects, as described by non-critical string theory, trigger then an {\\em organized collapse} of the coherent states down to a specific or {\\em conscious state}. The whole process we estimate to take {\\cal O}(1\\,{\\rm sec}), in excellent agreement with a plethora of experimental/observational findings. The {\\em microscopic arrow of time}, endemic in non-critical string theory, and apparent here in the self-collapse process, provides a satisfactory and simple resolution to the age...

  10. Mechanical properties of a complete microtubule revealed through molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, David B; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2010-07-21

    Microtubules (MTs) are the largest type of cellular filament, essential in processes ranging from mitosis and meiosis to flagellar motility. Many of the processes depend critically on the mechanical properties of the MT, but the elastic moduli, notably the Young's modulus, are not directly revealed in experiment, which instead measures either flexural rigidity or response to radial deformation. Molecular dynamics (MD) is a method that allows the mechanical properties of single biomolecules to be investigated through computation. Typically, MD requires an atomic resolution structure of the molecule, which is unavailable for many systems, including MTs. By combining structural information from cryo-electron microscopy and electron crystallography, we have constructed an all-atom model of a complete MT and used MD to determine its mechanical properties. The simulations revealed nonlinear axial stress-strain behavior featuring a pronounced softening under extension, a possible plastic deformation transition under radial compression, and a distinct asymmetry in response to the two senses of twist. This work demonstrates the possibility of combining different levels of structural information to produce all-atom models suitable for quantitative MD simulations, which extends the range of systems amenable to the MD method and should enable exciting advances in our microscopic knowledge of biology. Copyright (c) 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Electric fields generated by synchronized oscillations of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes regulate the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yue

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Super-macromolecular complexes play many important roles in eukaryotic cells. Classical structural biological studies focus on their complicated molecular structures, physical interactions and biochemical modifications. Recent advances concerning intracellular electric fields generated by cell organelles and super-macromolecular complexes shed new light on the mechanisms that govern the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis. In this review we synthesize this knowledge to provide an integrated theoretical model of these cellular events. We suggest that the electric fields generated by synchronized oscillation of microtubules, centrosomes, and chromatin fibers facilitate several events during mitosis and meiosis, including centrosome trafficking, chromosome congression in mitosis and synapsis between homologous chromosomes in meiosis. These intracellular electric fields are generated under energy excitation through the synchronized electric oscillations of the dipolar structures of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes, three of the super-macromolecular complexes within an animal cell.

  12. Electric fields generated by synchronized oscillations of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes regulate the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Zhan, Qimin

    2012-07-02

    Super-macromolecular complexes play many important roles in eukaryotic cells. Classical structural biological studies focus on their complicated molecular structures, physical interactions and biochemical modifications. Recent advances concerning intracellular electric fields generated by cell organelles and super-macromolecular complexes shed new light on the mechanisms that govern the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis. In this review we synthesize this knowledge to provide an integrated theoretical model of these cellular events. We suggest that the electric fields generated by synchronized oscillation of microtubules, centrosomes, and chromatin fibers facilitate several events during mitosis and meiosis, including centrosome trafficking, chromosome congression in mitosis and synapsis between homologous chromosomes in meiosis. These intracellular electric fields are generated under energy excitation through the synchronized electric oscillations of the dipolar structures of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes, three of the super-macromolecular complexes within an animal cell.

  13. Dynamical Structure of the Fields in the Light Cone Coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Kargar, Kianoosh

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that additional constraints emerge in light cone coordinates. We enumerate the number of physical modes in light cone coordinates and compare it with conventional coordinates. We show that the number of Schrodinger modes is divided by two in light cone coordinates. We study the effect of this reduction in the number ladder operators acting on physical states of a system. We analyse the scaler, spinor and vector field theories carefully to see the effect of changes in the dynamical structure of these theories from the view point of the reduction of Schrodinger modes in light-cone coordinates.

  14. Fission yeast mitochondria are distributed by dynamic microtubules in a motor-independent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianpeng; Zheng, Fan; Cheung, Martin; Wang, Fengsong; Fu, Chuanhai

    2015-01-01

    The cytoskeleton plays a critical role in regulating mitochondria distribution. Similar to axonal mitochondria, the fission yeast mitochondria are distributed by the microtubule cytoskeleton, but this is regulated by a motor-independent mechanism depending on the microtubule associated protein mmb1p as the absence of mmb1p causes mitochondria aggregation. In this study, using a series of chimeric proteins to control the subcellular localization and motility of mitochondria, we show that a chimeric molecule containing a microtubule binding domain and the mitochondria outer membrane protein tom22p can restore the normal interconnected mitochondria network in mmb1-deletion (mmb1∆) cells. In contrast, increasing the motility of mitochondria by using a chimeric molecule containing a kinesin motor domain and tom22p cannot rescue mitochondria aggregation defects in mmb1∆ cells. Intriguingly a chimeric molecule carrying an actin binding domain and tom22p results in mitochondria associated with actin filaments at the actomyosin ring during mitosis, leading to cytokinesis defects. These findings suggest that the passive motor-independent microtubule-based mechanism is the major contributor to mitochondria distribution in wild type fission yeast cells. Hence, we establish that attachment to microtubules, but not kinesin-dependent movement and the actin cytoskeleton, is required and crucial for proper mitochondria distribution in fission yeast. PMID:26046468

  15. Ochratoxin A: apoptosis and aberrant exit from mitosis due to perturbation of microtubule dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rached, Eva; Pfeiffer, Erika; Dekant, Wolfgang; Mally, Angela

    2006-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a potent nephrotoxin and causes high incidences of renal tumors in rodents. The molecular events leading to tumor formation by OTA are not well defined. Early pathological changes observed in kidneys of rats treated with OTA in vivo include frequent mitotic and abnormally enlarged cells, detachment of tubule cells, and apoptosis within the S3 segment of the proximal tubule, suggesting that OTA may interfere with molecules involved in the regulation of cell division and apoptosis. In this study, treatment of immortalized human kidney epithelial (IHKE) cells with OTA (0-50 microM) resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in apoptosis and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase. At the same time, OTA blocked metaphase/anaphase transition and led to the formation of aberrant mitotic figures and giant cells with abnormally enlarged and/or multiple nuclei, sometimes still connected by chromatin bridges. Immunostaining of the mitotic apparatus using an alpha-tubulin antibody revealed defects in spindle formation. In addition, OTA inhibited microtubule assembly in a concentration-dependent manner in a cell-free, in vitro assay. Interestingly, treatment with OTA also resulted in activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB), which has recently been shown to promote cell survival during mitotic cell cycle arrest. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that the mechanism by which OTA promotes tumor formation involves interference with microtubuli dynamics and mitotic spindle formation, resulting in apoptosis or-in the presence of survival signals such as stimulation of the NFkappaB pathway-premature exit from mitosis. Aberrant exit from mitosis resulting in blocked or asymmetric cell division may favor the occurrence of cytogenetic abnormalities and may therefore play a critical role in renal tumor formation by OTA.

  16. Escape from Mitotic Arrest: An Unexpected Connection Between Microtubule Dynamics and Epigenetic Regulation of Centromeric Chromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Anuja A; Walworth, Nancy C

    2015-12-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation is necessary to ensure genomic integrity. Segregation depends on the proper functioning of the centromere, kinetochore, and mitotic spindle microtubules and is monitored by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, defects in Dis1, a microtubule-associated protein that influences microtubule dynamics, lead to mitotic arrest as a result of an active SAC and consequent failure to grow at low temperature. In a mutant dis1 background (dis1-288), loss of function of Msc1, a fission yeast homolog of the KDM5 family of proteins, suppresses the growth defect and promotes normal mitosis. Genetic analysis implicates a histone deacetylase (HDAC)-linked pathway in suppression because HDAC mutants clr6-1, clr3∆, and sir2∆, though not hos2∆, also promote normal mitosis in the dis1-288 mutant. Suppression of the dis phenotype through loss of msc1 function requires the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2 and is limited by the presence of the heterochromatin-associated HP1 protein homolog Swi6. We speculate that alterations in histone acetylation promote a centromeric chromatin environment that compensates for compromised dis1 function by allowing for successful kinetochore-microtubule interactions that can satisfy the SAC. In cells arrested in mitosis by mutation of dis1, loss of function of epigenetic determinants such as Msc1 or specific HDACs can promote cell survival. Because the KDM5 family of proteins has been implicated in human cancers, an appreciation of the potential role of this family of proteins in chromosome segregation is warranted.

  17. Dynamic behavior of GFP-CLIP-170 reveals fast protein turnover on microtubule plus ends.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A. Drägestein (Katharina Asja); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); J.A.J. van Haren (Jeffrey); G.D. Tsibidis (George); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); N.J. Galjart (Niels)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMicrotubule (MT) plus end – tracking proteins (+TIPs) specifi cally recognize the ends of growing MTs. +TIPs are involved in diverse cellular processes such as cell division, cell migration, and cell polarity. Although +TIP tracking is important for these processes, the mechanisms underl

  18. In vitro reconstitution of dynamic microtubules interacting with actin filament networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preciado Lopez, M.; Huber, F.; Grigoriev, Ilya; Steinmetz, M.O.; Akhmanova, Anna; Dogterom, M.; Koenderink, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between microtubules and actin filaments (F-actin) are essential for eukaryotic cell migration, polarization, growth, and division. Although the importance of these interactions has been long recognized, the inherent complexity of the cell interior hampers a detailed mechanistic study o

  19. Appendage modal coordinate truncation criteria in hybrid coordinate dynamic analysis. [for spacecraft attitude control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likins, P.; Ohkami, Y.; Wong, C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the validity of the assumption that certain appendage-distributed (modal) coordinates can be truncated from a system model without unacceptable degradation of fidelity in hybrid coordinate dynamic analysis for attitude control of spacecraft with flexible appendages. Alternative truncation criteria are proposed and their interrelationships defined. Particular attention is given to truncation criteria based on eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and controllability and observability. No definitive resolution of the problem is advanced, and exhaustive study is required to obtain ultimate truncation criteria.

  20. PSD-95 alters microtubule dynamics via an association with EB3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Eric S.; Previtera, Michelle L.; Fernández, Jose R.; Charych, Erik I.; Tseng, Chia-Yi; Kwon, Munjin; Starovoytov, Valentin; Zheng, James Q.; Firestein, Bonnie L.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about how the neuronal cytoskeleton is regulated when a dendrite decides whether to branch or not. Previously, we reported that postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) acts as a stop signal for dendrite branching. It is yet to be elucidated how PSD-95 affects the cytoskeleton and how this regulation relates to the dendritic arbor. Here, we show that the SH3 (src homology 3) domain of PSD-95 interacts with a proline-rich region within the microtubule end-binding protein EB3. Overexpression of PSD-95 or mutant EB3 results in a decreased lifetime of EB3 comets in dendrites. In line with these data, transfected rat neurons show that overexpression of PSD-95 results in less organized microtubules at dendritic branch points and decreased dendritogensis. The interaction between PSD-95 and EB3 elucidates a function for a novel region of EB3 and provides a new and important mechanism for the regulation of microtubules in determining dendritic morphology. PMID:21248129

  1. Theory of dynamic force spectroscopy for kinetochore-microtubule attachments: rupture force distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Ghanti, Dipanwita

    2016-01-01

    Application of pulling force, under force-clamp conditions, to kinetochore-microtubule attachments {\\it in-vitro} revealed a catch-bond-like behavior. In an earlier paper ({\\it Sharma et al. Phys. Biol. (2014)} the physical origin of this apparently counter-intuitive phenomenon was traced to the nature of the force-dependence of the (de-)polymerization kinetics of the microtubules. In this brief communication that work is extended to situations where the external forced is ramped up till the attachment gets ruptured. In spite of the fundamental differences in the underlying mechanisms, the trend of variation of the rupture force distribution observed in our model kinetochore-microtubule attachment with the increasing loading rate is qualitatively similar to that displayed by the catch bonds formed in some other ligand-receptor systems. Our theoretical predictions can be tested experimentally by a straightforward modification of the protocol for controlling the force in the optical trap set up that was used in...

  2. Virtual Partner Interaction (VPI: exploring novel behaviors via coordination dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J A Scott Kelso

    Full Text Available Inspired by the dynamic clamp of cellular neuroscience, this paper introduces VPI -- Virtual Partner Interaction -- a coupled dynamical system for studying real time interaction between a human and a machine. In this proof of concept study, human subjects coordinate hand movements with a virtual partner, an avatar of a hand whose movements are driven by a computerized version of the Haken-Kelso-Bunz (HKB equations that have been shown to govern basic forms of human coordination. As a surrogate system for human social coordination, VPI allows one to examine regions of the parameter space not typically explored during live interactions. A number of novel behaviors never previously observed are uncovered and accounted for. Having its basis in an empirically derived theory of human coordination, VPI offers a principled approach to human-machine interaction and opens up new ways to understand how humans interact with human-like machines including identification of underlying neural mechanisms.

  3. Microtubule binding by the formin Cappuccino and its implications for Drosophila oogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roth-Johnson, Elizabeth Anne

    2014-01-01

    Coordination of actin and microtubule cytoskeletal networks is required for a number of fundamental cellular processes. Formin family actin nucleators are emerging coordinators of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, as they can both nucleate actin filaments and bind microtubules in vitro. To gain a more detailed mechanistic understanding of formin-microtubule interactions and formin-mediated actin-microtubule crosstalk, we studied microtubule binding by Cappuccino (Capu), a formin involv...

  4. The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyano enone), TBE-31, targets microtubule dynamics and cell polarity in migrating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eddie; Saito, Akira; Honda, Tadashi; Di Guglielmo, Gianni M

    2016-04-01

    Cell migration is dependent on the microtubule network for structural support as well as for the proper delivery and positioning of polarity proteins at the leading edge of migrating cells. Identification of drugs that target cytoskeletal-dependent cell migration and protein transport in polarized migrating cells is important in understanding the cell biology of normal and tumor cells and can lead to new therapeutic targets in disease processes. Here, we show that the tricyclic compound TBE-31 directly binds to tubulin and interferes with microtubule dynamics, as assessed by end binding 1 (EB1) live cell imaging. Interestingly, this interference is independent of in vitro tubulin polymerization. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we also observed that TBE-31 interferes with the polarity of migratory cells. The polarity proteins Rac1, IQGAP and Tiam1 were localized at the leading edge of DMSO-treated migrating cell, but were observed to be in multiple protrusions around the cell periphery of TBE-31-treated cells. Finally, we observed that TBE-31 inhibits the migration of Rat2 fibroblasts with an IC50 of 0.75 μM. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibition of cell migration by TBE-31 may result from the improper maintenance of cell polarity of migrating cells.

  5. Distributed Coordination of Fractional Dynamical Systems with Exogenous Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyong Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed coordination of fractional multiagent systems with external disturbances is studied. The state observer of fractional dynamical system is presented, and an adaptive pinning controller is designed for a little part of agents in multiagent systems without disturbances. This adaptive pinning controller with the state observer can ensure multiple agents' states reaching an expected reference tracking. Based on disturbance observers, the controllers are composited with the pinning controller and the state observer. By applying the stability theory of fractional order dynamical systems, the distributed coordination of fractional multiagent systems with external disturbances can be reached asymptotically.

  6. A new formalism for molecular dynamics in internal coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Palmo, Kim; Krimm, Samuel

    2001-03-01

    Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) has been used in the past in simulations for large molecules as an alternative way of increasing step size with a reduced operational dimension that is not achievable by MD in Cartesian coordinates. A new ICMD formalism for flexible molecular systems is presented, which is based on the spectroscopic B-matrix rather than the A-matrix of previous methods. The proposed formalism does not require an inversion of a large matrix as in the recursive formulations based on robot dynamics, and takes advantage of the sparsity of the B-matrix, ensuring computational efficiency for flexible molecules. Each molecule's external rotations about an arbitrary atom center, which may differ from its center of mass, are parameterized by the SU(2) Euler representation, giving singularity free parameterization. Although the formalism is based on the use of nonredundant generalized (internal and external) coordinates, an MD simulation in linearly dependent coordinates can be done by finding a transformation to a new set of independent coordinates. Based on the clear separability in the generalized coordinates between fast varying degrees of freedom and slowly varying ones, a multiple time step algorithm is introduced that avoids the previous nontrivial interaction distance classification. Also presented is a recursive method for computing nonzero A-matrix elements that is much easier to apply to a general molecular structure than the previous method.

  7. Large-deformation modal coordinates for nonrigid vehicle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likins, P. W.; Fleischer, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    The derivation of minimum-dimension sets of discrete-coordinate and hybrid-coordinate equations of motion of a system consisting of an arbitrary number of hinge-connected rigid bodies assembled in tree topology is presented. These equations are useful for the simulation of dynamical systems that can be idealized as tree-like arrangements of substructures, with each substructure consisting of either a rigid body or a collection of elastically interconnected rigid bodies restricted to small relative rotations at each connection. Thus, some of the substructures represent elastic bodies subjected to small strains or local deformations, but possibly large gross deformations, in the hybrid formulation, distributed coordinates referred to herein as large-deformation modal coordinates, are used for the deformations of these substructures. The equations are in a form suitable for incorporation into one or more computer programs to be used as multipurpose tools in the simulation of spacecraft and other complex electromechanical systems.

  8. Coordination and geometric optimization via distributed dynamical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Cortes, Jorge; Bullo, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses dynamical systems for disk-covering and sphere-packing problems. We present facility location functions from geometric optimization and characterize their differentiable properties. We design and analyze a collection of distributed control laws that are related to nonsmooth gradient systems. The resulting dynamical systems promise to be of use in coordination problems for networked robots; in this setting the distributed control laws correspond to local interactions betwe...

  9. The Teaching of Polar Coordinates with Dynamic Mathematics Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Yilmaz; Tatar, Enver

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of dynamic mathematics software on the achievement of pre-service mathematics teachers in the topic of polar coordinates and to solicit their opinions about computer-assisted instruction. The study was conducted for 11 weeks with 33 pre-service teachers in the Department of Mathematics…

  10. Coupling Dynamics Interlip Coordination in Lower Lip Load Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lieshout, Pascal; Neufeld, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of lower lip loading on lower and upper lip movements and their coordination to test predictions on coupling dynamics derived from studies in limb control. Method: Movement data were acquired using electromagnetic midsagittal articulography under 4 conditions: (a) without restrictions, serving as a baseline; (b) with…

  11. Going Green : Framing Effects in a Dynamic Coordination Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerlagh, Reyer; van der Heijden, Eline

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study decision-making in a novel dynamic coordination game. The game captures features of a transition between externality networks. Groups consisting of three subjects start in a stable benchmark equilibrium with network externality. Over seven rounds, they can transit to an alter

  12. ASSESSING THE DYNAMIC ERRORS OF COORDINATE MEASURING MACHINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The main factors affecting the dynamic errors of coordinate measuring machines are analyzed. It is pointed out that there are two main contributors to the dynamic errors: One is the rotation of the elements around the joints connected with air bearings and the other is the bending of the elements caused by the dynamic inertial forces. A method for obtaining the displacement errors at the probe position from dynamic rotational errors is presented. The dynamic rotational errors are measured with inductive position sensors and a laser interferometer. The theoretical and experimental results both show that during the process of fast probing, due to the dynamic inertial forces, there are not only large rotation of the elements around the joints connected with air bearings but also large bending of the weak elements themselves.

  13. Multistability and metastability: understanding dynamic coordination in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, J A Scott

    2012-04-05

    Multistable coordination dynamics exists at many levels, from multifunctional neural circuits in vertebrates and invertebrates to large-scale neural circuitry in humans. Moreover, multistability spans (at least) the domains of action and perception, and has been found to place constraints upon, even dictating the nature of, intentional change and the skill-learning process. This paper reviews some of the key evidence for multistability in the aforementioned areas, and illustrates how it has been measured, modelled and theoretically understood. It then suggests how multistability--when combined with essential aspects of coordination dynamics such as instability, transitions and (especially) metastability--provides a platform for understanding coupling and the creative dynamics of complex goal-directed systems, including the brain and the brain-behaviour relation.

  14. Dynamics of coupled field solitons: A collective coordinate approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Danial Saadatmand; Aliakbar Moradi Marjaneh; Mahdi Heidari

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we consider a class of systems of two coupled real scalar fields in bidimensional space-time, with the main motivation of studying classical stability of soliton solutions using collective coordinate approach. First, we present the class of systems of the collective coordinate equations which are derived using the presented method. After that, we follow the dynamics of the coupled fields with local inhomogeneity like a delta function potential wall as well as a delta function potential well. The results of the investigation of the two coupled fields are compared to each other and the differences are discussed. The method can predict most of the characters of the interaction.

  15. A Rational Approach to Ring Flexibility in Internal Coordinate Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mazur, A K

    1998-01-01

    Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) is an efficient method for studying biopolymers, but it is readily applicable only to molecules with tree topologies, that is with no internal flexible rings. Common examples violating this condition are prolines and loops closed by S-S bridges in proteins. The most important such case, however, is nucleic acids because the flexibility of the furanose rings always plays an essential role in conformational transitions both in DNA and RNA. There are a few long-known theoretical approaches to this problem, but, in practice, rings with fixed bond lengths are closed by adding appropriate harmonic distance restraints, which is not always acceptable especially in dynamics. This paper tries to overcome this handicap of ICMD and proposes a rational strategy which results in practical numerical algorithms. It gives a unified analytical treatment which shows that this problem is very close to the difficulties encountered by the method of constraints in Cartesian coordinate d...

  16. Hydrothermal scheduling via extended differential dynamic programming and mixed coordination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J. [Alfred Univ., NY (United States). Div. of Electrical Engineering; Luh, P.B. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Systems Engineering

    1995-11-01

    This paper addresses short-term scheduling of hydrothermal systems by using extended differential dynamic programming and mixed coordination. The problem is first decomposed into a thermal subproblem and a hydro subproblem by relaxing the supply-demand constraints. The thermal subproblem is solved analytically. The hydro subproblem is further decomposed into a set of smaller problems that can be solved in parallel. Extended differential dynamic programming and mixed coordination are used to solve the hydro subproblem. Two problems are tested and the results show that the new approach performs well under a simulated parallel processing environment, and high speedup is obtained. The method is then extended to handle unpredictable changes in natural inflow by utilizing the variational feedback nature of the control strategy. A quick estimate on the impact of an unpredictable change on total cost is also obtained. Numerical results show that estimates are accurate, and unpredictable change in natural inflow can be quickly and effectively handled.

  17. Multistability and metastability: understanding dynamic coordination in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Kelso, J.A. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Multistable coordination dynamics exists at many levels, from multifunctional neural circuits in vertebrates and invertebrates to large-scale neural circuitry in humans. Moreover, multistability spans (at least) the domains of action and perception, and has been found to place constraints upon, even dictating the nature of, intentional change and the skill-learning process. This paper reviews some of the key evidence for multistability in the aforementioned areas, and illustrates how it has b...

  18. Cell cycle-dependent microtubule-based dynamic transport of cytoplasmic dynein in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytoplasmic dynein complex is a large multi-subunit microtubule (MT-associated molecular motor involved in various cellular functions including organelle positioning, vesicle transport and cell division. However, regulatory mechanism of the cell-cycle dependent distribution of dynein has not fully been understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report live-cell imaging of cytoplasmic dynein in HeLa cells, by expressing multifunctional green fluorescent protein (mfGFP-tagged 74-kDa intermediate chain (IC74. IC74-mfGFP was successfully incorporated into functional dynein complex. In interphase, dynein moved bi-directionally along with MTs, which might carry cargos such as transport vesicles. A substantial fraction of dynein moved toward cell periphery together with EB1, a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs, suggesting +TIPs-mediated transport of dynein. In late-interphase and prophase, dynein was localized at the centrosomes and the radial MT array. In prometaphase and metaphase, dynein was localized at spindle MTs where it frequently moved from spindle poles toward chromosomes or cell cortex. +TIPs may be involved in the transport of spindle dyneins. Possible kinetochore and cortical dyneins were also observed. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that cytoplasmic dynein is transported to the site of action in preparation for the following cellular events, primarily by the MT-based transport. The MT-based transport may have greater advantage than simple diffusion of soluble dynein in rapid and efficient transport of the limited concentration of the protein.

  19. Optomechanical proposal for monitoring microtubule mechanical vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzanjeh, Sh.; Salari, V.; Tuszynski, J. A.; Cifra, M.; Simon, C.

    2017-07-01

    Microtubules provide the mechanical force required for chromosome separation during mitosis. However, little is known about the dynamic (high-frequency) mechanical properties of microtubules. Here, we theoretically propose to control the vibrations of a doubly clamped microtubule by tip electrodes and to detect its motion via the optomechanical coupling between the vibrational modes of the microtubule and an optical cavity. In the presence of a red-detuned strong pump laser, this coupling leads to optomechanical-induced transparency of an optical probe field, which can be detected with state-of-the art technology. The center frequency and line width of the transparency peak give the resonance frequency and damping rate of the microtubule, respectively, while the height of the peak reveals information about the microtubule-cavity field coupling. Our method opens the new possibilities to gain information about the physical properties of microtubules, which will enhance our capability to design physical cancer treatment protocols as alternatives to chemotherapeutic drugs.

  20. Models for microtubule cargo transport coupling the Langevin equation to stochastic stepping motor dynamics: Caring about fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzat, Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional models coupling a Langevin equation for the cargo position to stochastic stepping dynamics for the motors constitute a relevant framework for analyzing multiple-motor microtubule transport. In this work we explore the consistence of these models focusing on the effects of the thermal noise. We study how to define consistent stepping and detachment rates for the motors as functions of the local forces acting on them in such a way that the cargo velocity and run-time match previously specified functions of the external load, which are set on the base of experimental results. We show that due to the influence of the thermal fluctuations this is not a trivial problem, even for the single-motor case. As a solution, we propose a motor stepping dynamics which considers memory on the motor force. This model leads to better results for single-motor transport than the approaches previously considered in the literature. Moreover, it gives a much better prediction for the stall force of the two-motor case, highly compatible with the experimental findings. We also analyze the fast fluctuations of the cargo position and the influence of the viscosity, comparing the proposed model to the standard one, and we show how the differences on the single-motor dynamics propagate to the multiple motor situations. Finally, we find that the one-dimensional character of the models impede an appropriate description of the fast fluctuations of the cargo position at small loads. We show how this problem can be solved by considering two-dimensional models.

  1. MVL-PLA2, a snake venom phospholipase A2, inhibits angiogenesis through an increase in microtubule dynamics and disorganization of focal adhesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Bazaa

    Full Text Available Integrins are essential protagonists of the complex multi-step process of angiogenesis that has now become a major target for the development of anticancer therapies. We recently reported and characterized that MVL-PLA2, a novel phospholipase A2 from Macrovipera lebetina venom, exhibited anti-integrin activity. In this study, we show that MVL-PLA2 also displays potent anti-angiogenic properties. This phospholipase A2 inhibited adhesion and migration of human microvascular-endothelial cells (HMEC-1 in a dose-dependent manner without being cytotoxic. Using Matrigel and chick chorioallantoic membrane assays, we demonstrated that MVL-PLA2, as well as its catalytically inactivated form, significantly inhibited angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We have also found that the actin cytoskeleton and the distribution of alphav beta3 integrin, a critical regulator of angiogenesis and a major component of focal adhesions, were disturbed after MVL-PLA2 treatment. In order to further investigate the mechanism of action of this protein on endothelial cells, we analyzed the dynamic instability behavior of microtubules in living endothelial cells. Interestingly, we showed that MVL-PLA2 significantly increased microtubule dynamicity in HMEC-1 cells by 40%. We propose that the enhancement of microtubule dynamics may explain the alterations in the formation of focal adhesions, leading to inhibition of cell adhesion and migration.

  2. Mammalian diaphanous-related formin 1 regulates GSK3β-dependent microtubule dynamics required for T cell migratory polarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoxia Dong

    Full Text Available The mammalian diaphanous-related formin (mDia1, a Rho-regulated cytoskeletal modulator, has been shown to promote T lymphocyte chemotaxis and interaction with antigen presenting cells, but the mechanisms underpinning mDia1 roles in these processes have not been defined. Here we show that mDia1(-/- T cells exhibit impaired lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1-mediated T cell adhesion, migration and in vivo trafficking. These defects are associated with impaired microtubule (MT polarization and stabilization, altered MT dynamics and reduced peripheral clustering of the MT plus-end-protein, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC in migrating T cells following LFA-1-engagement. Loss of mDia1 also leads to impaired inducible inactivation of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK 3β as well as hyperphosphorylation and reduced levels of APC in migrating T cells. These findings identify essential roles for the mDia1 formin in modulating GSK3β-dependent MT contributions to induction of T-cell polarity, adhesion and motility.

  3. Mammalian diaphanous-related formin 1 regulates GSK3β-dependent microtubule dynamics required for T cell migratory polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Baoxia; Zhang, Steven S; Gao, Wen; Su, Haichun; Chen, Jun; Jin, Fuzi; Bhargava, Ajay; Chen, Xiequn; Jorgensen, Lars; Alberts, Arthur S; Zhang, Jinyi; Siminovitch, Katherine A

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian diaphanous-related formin (mDia1), a Rho-regulated cytoskeletal modulator, has been shown to promote T lymphocyte chemotaxis and interaction with antigen presenting cells, but the mechanisms underpinning mDia1 roles in these processes have not been defined. Here we show that mDia1(-/-) T cells exhibit impaired lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1)-mediated T cell adhesion, migration and in vivo trafficking. These defects are associated with impaired microtubule (MT) polarization and stabilization, altered MT dynamics and reduced peripheral clustering of the MT plus-end-protein, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in migrating T cells following LFA-1-engagement. Loss of mDia1 also leads to impaired inducible inactivation of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3β as well as hyperphosphorylation and reduced levels of APC in migrating T cells. These findings identify essential roles for the mDia1 formin in modulating GSK3β-dependent MT contributions to induction of T-cell polarity, adhesion and motility.

  4. Game-theoretic interference coordination approaches for dynamic spectrum access

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Written by experts in the field, this book is based on recent research findings in dynamic spectrum access for cognitive radio networks. It establishes a game-theoretic framework and presents cutting-edge technologies for distributed interference coordination. With game-theoretic formulation and the designed distributed learning algorithms, it provides insights into the interactions between multiple decision-makers and the converging stable states. Researchers, scientists and engineers in the field of cognitive radio networks will benefit from the book, which provides valuable information, useful methods and practical algorithms for use in emerging 5G wireless communication.

  5. Recruitment of EB1, a master regulator of microtubule dynamics, to the surface of the Theileria annulata schizont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry L Woods

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan parasite Theileria annulata transforms infected host cells, inducing uncontrolled proliferation and clonal expansion of the parasitized cell population. Shortly after sporozoite entry into the target cell, the surrounding host cell membrane is dissolved and an array of host cell microtubules (MTs surrounds the parasite, which develops into the transforming schizont. The latter does not egress to invade and transform other cells. Instead, it remains tethered to host cell MTs and, during mitosis and cytokinesis, engages the cell's astral and central spindle MTs to secure its distribution between the two daughter cells. The molecular mechanism by which the schizont recruits and stabilizes host cell MTs is not known. MT minus ends are mostly anchored in the MT organizing center, while the plus ends explore the cellular space, switching constantly between phases of growth and shrinkage (called dynamic instability. Assuming the plus ends of growing MTs provide the first point of contact with the parasite, we focused on the complex protein machinery associated with these structures. We now report how the schizont recruits end-binding protein 1 (EB1, a central component of the MT plus end protein interaction network and key regulator of host cell MT dynamics. Using a range of in vitro experiments, we demonstrate that T. annulata p104, a polymorphic antigen expressed on the schizont surface, functions as a genuine EB1-binding protein and can recruit EB1 in the absence of any other parasite proteins. Binding strictly depends on a consensus SxIP motif located in a highly disordered C-terminal region of p104. We further show that parasite interaction with host cell EB1 is cell cycle regulated. This is the first description of a pathogen-encoded protein to interact with EB1 via a bona-fide SxIP motif. Our findings provide important new insight into the mode of interaction between Theileria and the host cell cytoskeleton.

  6. Recruitment of EB1, a Master Regulator of Microtubule Dynamics, to the Surface of the Theileria annulata Schizont

    KAUST Repository

    Woods, Kerry L.

    2013-05-09

    The apicomplexan parasite Theileria annulata transforms infected host cells, inducing uncontrolled proliferation and clonal expansion of the parasitized cell population. Shortly after sporozoite entry into the target cell, the surrounding host cell membrane is dissolved and an array of host cell microtubules (MTs) surrounds the parasite, which develops into the transforming schizont. The latter does not egress to invade and transform other cells. Instead, it remains tethered to host cell MTs and, during mitosis and cytokinesis, engages the cell\\'s astral and central spindle MTs to secure its distribution between the two daughter cells. The molecular mechanism by which the schizont recruits and stabilizes host cell MTs is not known. MT minus ends are mostly anchored in the MT organizing center, while the plus ends explore the cellular space, switching constantly between phases of growth and shrinkage (called dynamic instability). Assuming the plus ends of growing MTs provide the first point of contact with the parasite, we focused on the complex protein machinery associated with these structures. We now report how the schizont recruits end-binding protein 1 (EB1), a central component of the MT plus end protein interaction network and key regulator of host cell MT dynamics. Using a range of in vitro experiments, we demonstrate that T. annulata p104, a polymorphic antigen expressed on the schizont surface, functions as a genuine EB1-binding protein and can recruit EB1 in the absence of any other parasite proteins. Binding strictly depends on a consensus SxIP motif located in a highly disordered C-terminal region of p104. We further show that parasite interaction with host cell EB1 is cell cycle regulated. This is the first description of a pathogen-encoded protein to interact with EB1 via a bona-fide SxIP motif. Our findings provide important new insight into the mode of interaction between Theileria and the host cell cytoskeleton. 2013 Woods et al.

  7. External electric field effects on the mechanical properties of the αβ-tubulin dimer of microtubules: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, H R; Lohrasebi, A; Mahnam, K

    2014-08-01

    The mechanical properties of the αβ-tubulin dimer of microtubules was modeled by using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The effect on the mechanical properties of the dimer of the existence and nonexistence of an applied electric field, either constant or periodic, was studied. Since there are charged or polar groups in the dimer structure, the electric field can interact with the dimer. The elastic constant and Young's modulus of the dimer were decreased when the dimer was exposed to a constant electric field of 0.03 V/nm. Furthermore, applying an oscillating electric field in the 1 GHz range to the dimer increased the elastic constant and Young's modulus of the dimer. These parameters were related to dimer rigidity and, consequently, in this frequency range, the application of electric fields may affect the function of microtubules.

  8. Structural investigations into the binding mode of novel neolignans Cmp10 and Cmp19 microtubule stabilizers by in silico molecular docking, molecular dynamics, and binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shubhandra; Kumar, Akhil; Kumar, B Sathish; Negi, Arvind S; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-06-01

    Microtubule stabilizers provide an important mode of treatment via mitotic cell arrest of cancer cells. Recently, we reported two novel neolignans derivatives Cmp10 and Cmp19 showing anticancer activity and working as microtubule stabilizers at micromolar concentrations. In this study, we have explored the binding site, mode of binding, and stabilization by two novel microtubule stabilizers Cmp10 and Cmp19 using in silico molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, and binding free energy calculations. Molecular docking studies were performed to explore the β-tubulin binding site of Cmp10 and Cmp19. Further, MD simulations were used to probe the β-tubulin stabilization mechanism by Cmp10 and Cmp19. Binding affinity was also compared for Cmp10 and Cmp19 using binding free energy calculations. Our docking results revealed that both the compounds bind at Ptxl binding site in β-tubulin. MD simulation studies showed that Cmp10 and Cmp19 binding stabilizes M-loop (Phe272-Val288) residues of β-tubulin and prevent its dynamics, leading to a better packing between α and β subunits from adjacent tubulin dimers. In addition, His229, Ser280 and Gln281, and Arg278, Thr276, and Ser232 were found to be the key amino acid residues forming H-bonds with Cmp10 and Cmp19, respectively. Consequently, binding free energy calculations indicated that Cmp10 (-113.655 kJ/mol) had better binding compared to Cmp19 (-95.216 kJ/mol). This study provides useful insight for better understanding of the binding mechanism of Cmp10 and Cmp19 and will be helpful in designing novel microtubule stabilizers.

  9. Persistence Length of Stable Microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Taviare; Mirigian, Matthew; Yasar, M. Selcuk; Ross, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Microtubules are a vital component of the cytoskeleton. As the most rigid of the cytoskeleton filaments, they give shape and support to the cell. They are also essential for intracellular traffic by providing the roadways onto which organelles are transported, and they are required to reorganize during cellular division. To perform its function in the cell, the microtubule must be rigid yet dynamic. We are interested in how the mechanical properties of stable microtubules change over time. Some ``stable'' microtubules of the cell are recycled after days, such as in the axons of neurons or the cilia and flagella. We measured the persistence length of freely fluctuating taxol-stabilized microtubules over the span of a week and analyzed them via Fourier decomposition. As measured on a daily basis, the persistence length is independent of the contour length. Although measured over the span of the week, the accuracy of the measurement and the persistence length varies. We also studied how fluorescently-labeling the microtubule affects the persistence length and observed that a higher labeling ratio corresponded to greater flexibility. National Science Foundation Grant No: 0928540 to JLR.

  10. Bimanual coordination and musical experience : The role of intrinsic dynamics and behavioral information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, M.H.G.; Geuze, RH

    Rhythmic interlimb coordination arises from the interaction of intrinsic dynamics and behavioral information, that is, intention, memory, or external information specifying the required coordination pattern. This study investigates the influence of the content of memorized behavioral information on

  11. Mechanical stress induced mechanism of microtubule catastrophes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunyadi, Viktória; Chrétien, Denis; Jánosi, Imre M

    2005-05-13

    Microtubules assembled in vitro from pure tubulin can switch occasionally from growing to shrinking states or resume assembly, an unusual behavior termed "dynamic instability of microtubule growth". Its origin remains unclear and several models have been proposed, including occasional switching of the microtubules into energetically unfavorable configurations during assembly. In this study, we have asked whether the excess energy accumulated in these configurations would be of sufficient magnitude to destabilize the capping region that must exist at the end of growing microtubules. For this purpose, we have analyzed the frequency distribution of microtubules assembled in vitro from pure tubulin, and modeled the different mechanical constraints accumulated in their wall. We find that the maximal excess energy that the microtubule lattice can store is in the order of 11 kBT per dimer. Configurations that require distortions up to approximately 20 kBT are allowed at the expense of a slight conformational change, and larger distortions are not observed. Modeling of the different elastic deformations suggests that the excess energy is essentially induced by protofilament skewing, microtubule radial curvature change and inter-subunit shearing, distortions that must destabilize further the tubulin subunits interactions. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that unfavorable closure events may trigger the catastrophes observed at low tubulin concentration in vitro. In addition, we propose a novel type of representation that describes the stability of microtubule assembly systems, and which might be of considerable interest to study the effects of stabilizing and destabilizing factors on microtubule structure and dynamics.

  12. Symmetry Breaking in an Edgeless Epithelium by Fat2-Regulated Microtubule Polarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Yuan Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity (PCP information is a critical determinant of organ morphogenesis. While PCP in bounded epithelial sheets is increasingly well understood, how PCP is organized in tubular and acinar tissues is not. Drosophila egg chambers (follicles are an acinus-like “edgeless epithelium” and exhibit a continuous, circumferential PCP that does not depend on pathways active in bounded epithelia; this follicle PCP directs formation of an ellipsoid rather than a spherical egg. Here, we apply an imaging algorithm to “unroll” the entire 3D tissue surface and comprehensively analyze PCP onset. This approach traces chiral symmetry breaking to plus-end polarity of microtubules in the germarium, well before follicles form and rotate. PCP germarial microtubules provide chiral information that predicts the direction of whole-tissue rotation as soon as independent follicles form. Concordant microtubule polarity, but not microtubule alignment, requires the atypical cadherin Fat2, which acts at an early stage to translate plus-end bias into coordinated actin-mediated collective cell migration. Because microtubules are not required for PCP or migration after follicle rotation initiates, while dynamic actin and extracellular matrix are, polarized microtubules lie at the beginning of a handoff mechanism that passes early chiral PCP of the cytoskeleton to a supracellular planar polarized extracellular matrix and elongates the organ.

  13. Mitochondria: the cellular hub of the dynamic coordinated network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2015-04-20

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the eukaryotic cell. After billions of years of evolution, mitochondria have adaptively integrated into the symbiont. Such integration is not only evidenced by the consolidation of genetic information, that is, the transfer of most mitochondrial genes into the nucleus, but also manifested by the functional recombination by which mitochondria participate seamlessly in various cellular processes. In the past decade, the field of mitochondria biology has been focused on the dynamic and interactive features of these semiautonomous organelles. Aspects of a complex multilayer quality control system coordinating mitochondrial function and environmental changes are being uncovered and refined. This Forum summarizes the recent progress of these critical topics, with a focus on the dynamic quality control of mitochondrial reticulum, including their biogenesis, dynamic remodeling, and degradation, as well as the homeostasis of the mitochondrial proteome. These diverse but interconnected mechanisms are found to be critical in the maintenance of a functional, efficient, and responsive mitochondrial population and could therefore become therapeutic targets in numerous mitochondrion-implicated disorders.

  14. NMR with generalized dynamics of spin and spatial coordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Jae

    1987-11-01

    This work is concerned with theoretical and experimental aspects of the generalized dynamics of nuclear spin and spatial coordinates under magnetic-field pulses and mechanical motions. The main text begins with an introduction to the concept of ''fictitious'' interactions. A systematic method for constructing fictitious spin-1/2 operators is given. The interaction of spins with a quantized-field is described. The concept of the fictitious interactions under the irradiation of multiple pulses is utilized to design sequences for selectively averaging linear and bilinear operators. Relations between the low-field sequences and high-field iterative schemes are clarified. These relations and the transformation properties of the spin operators are exploited to develop schemes for heteronuclear decoupling of multi-level systems. The resulting schemes are evaluated for heteronuclear decoupling of a dilute spin-1/2 from a spin-1 in liquid crystal samples and from a homonuclear spin-1/2 pair in liquids. A relation between the spin and the spatial variables is discussed. The transformation properties of the spin operators are applied to spatial coordinates and utilized to develop methods for removing the orientational dependence responsible for line broadening in a powder sample. Elimination of the second order quadrupole effects, as well as the first order anisotropies is discussed. It is shown that various sources of line broadening can effectively be eliminated by spinning and/or hopping the sample about judiciously chosen axes along with appropriate radio-frequency pulse sequences.

  15. Coordinated scheduling for dynamic real-time systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Swaminathan; Zhao, Wei

    1994-01-01

    In this project, we addressed issues in coordinated scheduling for dynamic real-time systems. In particular, we concentrated on design and implementation of a new distributed real-time system called R-Shell. The design objective of R-Shell is to provide computing support for space programs that have large, complex, fault-tolerant distributed real-time applications. In R-shell, the approach is based on the concept of scheduling agents, which reside in the application run-time environment, and are customized to provide just those resource management functions which are needed by the specific application. With this approach, we avoid the need for a sophisticated OS which provides a variety of generalized functionality, while still not burdening application programmers with heavy responsibility for resource management. In this report, we discuss the R-Shell approach, summarize the achievement of the project, and describe a preliminary prototype of R-Shell system.

  16. Modeling microtubule oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jobs, E.; Wolf, D.E.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    1997-01-01

    Synchronization of molecular reactions in a macroscopic volume may cause the volume's physical properties to change dynamically and thus reveal much about the reactions. As an example, experimental time series for so-called microtubule oscillations are analyzed in terms of a minimal model...... for this complex polymerization-depolymerization cycle. The model reproduces well the qualitatively different time series that result from different experimental conditions, and illuminates the role and importance of individual processes in the cycle. Simple experiments are suggested that can further test...... and define the model and the polymer's reaction cycle....

  17. Kinesin-12 motors cooperate to suppress microtubule catastrophes and drive the formation of parallel microtubule bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, Hauke; McAinsh, Andrew D

    2016-03-22

    Human Kinesin-12 (hKif15) plays a crucial role in assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. These functions of hKif15 are partially redundant with Kinesin-5 (Eg5), which can cross-link and drive the extensile sliding of antiparallel microtubules. Although both motors are known to be tetramers, the functional properties of hKif15 are less well understood. Here we reveal how single or multiple Kif15 motors can cross-link, transport, and focus the plus-ends of intersecting microtubules. During transport, Kif15 motors step simultaneously along both microtubules with relative microtubule transport driven by a velocity differential between motor domain pairs. Remarkably, this differential is affected by the underlying intersection geometry: the differential is low on parallel and extreme on antiparallel microtubules where one motor domain pair becomes immobile. As a result, when intersecting microtubules are antiparallel, canonical transport of one microtubule along the other is allowed because one motor is firmly attached to one microtubule while it is stepping on the other. When intersecting microtubules are parallel, however, Kif15 motors can drive (biased) parallel sliding because the motor simultaneously steps on both microtubules that it cross-links. These microtubule rearrangements will focus microtubule plus-ends and finally lead to the formation of parallel bundles. At the same time, Kif15 motors cooperate to suppress catastrophe events at polymerizing microtubule plus-ends, raising the possibility that Kif15 motors may synchronize the dynamics of bundles that they have assembled. Thus, Kif15 is adapted to operate on parallel microtubule substrates, a property that clearly distinguishes it from the other tetrameric spindle motor, Eg5.

  18. The use of compressive sensing and peak detection in the reconstruction of microtubules length time series in the process of dynamic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrooghy, Majid; Yarahmadian, Shantia; Menon, Vineetha; Rezania, Vahid; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2015-10-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are intra-cellular cylindrical protein filaments. They exhibit a unique phenomenon of stochastic growth and shrinkage, called dynamic instability. In this paper, we introduce a theoretical framework for applying Compressive Sensing (CS) to the sampled data of the microtubule length in the process of dynamic instability. To reduce data density and reconstruct the original signal with relatively low sampling rates, we have applied CS to experimental MT lament length time series modeled as a Dichotomous Markov Noise (DMN). The results show that using CS along with the wavelet transform significantly reduces the recovery errors comparing in the absence of wavelet transform, especially in the low and the medium sampling rates. In a sampling rate ranging from 0.2 to 0.5, the Root-Mean-Squared Error (RMSE) decreases by approximately 3 times and between 0.5 and 1, RMSE is small. We also apply a peak detection technique to the wavelet coefficients to detect and closely approximate the growth and shrinkage of MTs for computing the essential dynamic instability parameters, i.e., transition frequencies and specially growth and shrinkage rates. The results show that using compressed sensing along with the peak detection technique and wavelet transform in sampling rates reduces the recovery errors for the parameters.

  19. Hematopoietic differentiation: a coordinated dynamical process towards attractor stable states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Simona

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differentiation process, proceeding from stem cells towards the different committed cell types, can be considered as a trajectory towards an attractor of a dynamical process. This view, taking into consideration the transcriptome and miRNome dynamics considered as a whole, instead of looking at few 'master genes' driving the system, offers a novel perspective on this phenomenon. We investigated the 'differentiation trajectories' of the hematopoietic system considering a genome-wide scenario. Results We developed serum-free liquid suspension unilineage cultures of cord blood (CB CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells through erythroid (E, megakaryocytic (MK, granulocytic (G and monocytic (Mo pathways. These cultures recapitulate physiological hematopoiesis, allowing the analysis of almost pure unilineage precursors starting from initial differentiation of HPCs until terminal maturation. By analyzing the expression profile of protein coding genes and microRNAs in unilineage CB E, MK, G and Mo cultures, at sequential stages of differentiation and maturation, we observed a coordinated, fully interconnected and scalable character of cell population behaviour in both transcriptome and miRNome spaces reminiscent of an attractor-like dynamics. MiRNome and transcriptome space differed for a still not terminally committed behaviour of microRNAs. Conclusions Consistent with their roles, the transcriptome system can be considered as the state space of a cell population, while the continuously evolving miRNA space corresponds to the tuning system necessary to reach the attractor. The behaviour of miRNA machinery could be of great relevance not only for the promise of reversing the differentiated state but even for tumor biology.

  20. Catechol-o-methyltransferase expression and 2-methoxyestradiol affect microtubule dynamics and modify steroid receptor signaling in leiomyoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salama A Salama

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Development of optimal medicinal treatments of uterine leiomyomas represents a significant challenge. 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME is an endogenous estrogen metabolite formed by sequential action of CYP450s and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT. Our previous study demonstrated that 2ME is a potent antiproliferative, proapoptotic, antiangiogenic, and collagen synthesis inhibitor in human leiomyomas cells (huLM. OBJECTIVES: Our objectives were to investigate whether COMT expression, by the virtue of 2ME formation, affects the growth of huLM, and to explore the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby COMT expression or treatment with 2ME affect these cells. RESULTS: Our data demonstrated that E(2-induced proliferation was less pronounced in cells over-expressing COMT or treated with 2ME (500 nM. This effect on cell proliferation was associated with microtubules stabilization and diminution of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha and progesterone receptor (PR transcriptional activities, due to shifts in their subcellular localization and sequestration in the cytoplasm. In addition, COMT over expression or treatment with 2ME reduced the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor -1alpha (HIF-1 alpha and the basal level as well as TNF-alpha-induced aromatase (CYP19 expression. CONCLUSIONS: COMT over expression or treatment with 2ME stabilize microtubules, ameliorates E(2-induced proliferation, inhibits ERalpha and PR signaling, and reduces HIF-1 alpha and CYP19 expression in human uterine leiomyoma cells. Thus, microtubules are a candidate target for treatment of uterine leiomyomas. In addition, the naturally occurring microtubule-targeting agent 2ME represents a potential new therapeutic for uterine leiomyomas.

  1. Eye-hand coordination during dynamic visuomotor rotations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Masia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: for many technology-driven visuomotor tasks such as tele-surgery, human operators face situations in which the frames of reference for vision and action are misaligned and need to be compensated in order to perform the tasks with the necessary precision. The cognitive mechanisms for the selection of appropriate frames of reference are still not fully understood. This study investigated the effect of changing visual and kinesthetic frames of reference during wrist pointing, simulating activities typical for tele-operations. METHODS: using a robotic manipulandum, subjects had to perform center-out pointing movements to visual targets presented on a computer screen, by coordinating wrist flexion/extension with abduction/adduction. We compared movements in which the frames of reference were aligned (unperturbed condition with movements performed under different combinations of visual/kinesthetic dynamic perturbations. The visual frame of reference was centered to the computer screen, while the kinesthetic frame was centered around the wrist joint. Both frames changed their orientation dynamically (angular velocity = 36 degrees /s with respect to the head-centered frame of reference (the eyes. Perturbations were either unimodal (visual or kinesthetic, or bimodal (visual+kinesthetic. As expected, pointing performance was best in the unperturbed condition. The spatial pointing error dramatically worsened during both unimodal and most bimodal conditions. However, in the bimodal condition, in which both disturbances were in phase, adaptation was very fast and kinematic performance indicators approached the values of the unperturbed condition. CONCLUSIONS: this result suggests that subjects learned to exploit an "affordance" made available by the invariant phase relation between the visual and kinesthetic frames. It seems that after detecting such invariance, subjects used the kinesthetic input as an informative signal rather than a

  2. GDP-tubulin incorporation into growing microtubules modulates polymer stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiron, Odile; Arnal, Isabelle; Caudron, Nicolas; Job, Didier

    2010-06-04

    Microtubule growth proceeds through the endwise addition of nucleotide-bound tubulin dimers. The microtubule wall is composed of GDP-tubulin subunits, which are thought to come exclusively from the incorporation of GTP-tubulin complexes at microtubule ends followed by GTP hydrolysis within the polymer. The possibility of a direct GDP-tubulin incorporation into growing polymers is regarded as hardly compatible with recent structural data. Here, we have examined GTP-tubulin and GDP-tubulin incorporation into polymerizing microtubules using a minimal assembly system comprised of nucleotide-bound tubulin dimers, in the absence of free nucleotide. We find that GDP-tubulin complexes can efficiently co-polymerize with GTP-tubulin complexes during microtubule assembly. GDP-tubulin incorporation into microtubules occurs with similar efficiency during bulk microtubule assembly as during microtubule growth from seeds or centrosomes. Microtubules formed from GTP-tubulin/GDP-tubulin mixtures display altered microtubule dynamics, in particular a decreased shrinkage rate, apparently due to intrinsic modifications of the polymer disassembly properties. Thus, although microtubules polymerized from GTP-tubulin/GDP-tubulin mixtures or from homogeneous GTP-tubulin solutions are both composed of GDP-tubulin subunits, they have different dynamic properties, and this may reveal a novel form of microtubule "structural plasticity."

  3. GDP-Tubulin Incorporation into Growing Microtubules Modulates Polymer Stability*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiron, Odile; Arnal, Isabelle; Caudron, Nicolas; Job, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Microtubule growth proceeds through the endwise addition of nucleotide-bound tubulin dimers. The microtubule wall is composed of GDP-tubulin subunits, which are thought to come exclusively from the incorporation of GTP-tubulin complexes at microtubule ends followed by GTP hydrolysis within the polymer. The possibility of a direct GDP-tubulin incorporation into growing polymers is regarded as hardly compatible with recent structural data. Here, we have examined GTP-tubulin and GDP-tubulin incorporation into polymerizing microtubules using a minimal assembly system comprised of nucleotide-bound tubulin dimers, in the absence of free nucleotide. We find that GDP-tubulin complexes can efficiently co-polymerize with GTP-tubulin complexes during microtubule assembly. GDP-tubulin incorporation into microtubules occurs with similar efficiency during bulk microtubule assembly as during microtubule growth from seeds or centrosomes. Microtubules formed from GTP-tubulin/GDP-tubulin mixtures display altered microtubule dynamics, in particular a decreased shrinkage rate, apparently due to intrinsic modifications of the polymer disassembly properties. Thus, although microtubules polymerized from GTP-tubulin/GDP-tubulin mixtures or from homogeneous GTP-tubulin solutions are both composed of GDP-tubulin subunits, they have different dynamic properties, and this may reveal a novel form of microtubule “structural plasticity.” PMID:20371874

  4. A heart for interaction: Shared physiological dynamics and behavioral coordination in a collective, creative construction task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Bjørndahl, Johanne S; Roepstorff, Andreas; Tylén, Kristian

    2016-09-01

    Interpersonally shared physiological dynamics are increasingly argued to underlie rapport, empathy, and even team performance. Inspired by the model of interpersonal synergy, we critically investigate the presence, temporal development, possible mechanisms and impact of shared interpersonal heart rate (HR) dynamics during individual and collective creative LEGO® construction tasks. In Study 1 we show how shared HR dynamics are driven by a plurality of sources, including task constraints and behavioral coordination. Generally, shared HR dynamics are more prevalent in individual trials (involving participants doing the same things) than in collective ones (involving participants taking turns and performing complementary actions). However, when contrasted against virtual pairs, collective trials display more stable shared HR dynamics suggesting that online social interaction plays an important role. Furthermore, in contrast to individual trials, shared HR dynamics are found to increase across collective trials. Study 2 investigates which aspects of social interaction might drive these effects. We show that shared HR dynamics are statistically predicted by interpersonal speech and building coordination. In Study 3, we explore the relation between HR dynamics, behavioral coordination, and self-reported measures of rapport and group competence. Although behavioral coordination predicts rapport and group competence, shared HR dynamics do not. Although shared physiological dynamics were reliably observed in our study, our results warrant not to consider HR dynamics a general driving mechanism of social coordination. Behavioral coordination-on the other hand-seems to be more informative of both shared physiological dynamics and collective experience. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. The actin-microtubule cross-linking activity of Drosophila Short stop is regulated by intramolecular inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applewhite, Derek A; Grode, Kyle D; Duncan, Mara C; Rogers, Stephen L

    2013-09-01

    Actin and microtubule dynamics must be precisely coordinated during cell migration, mitosis, and morphogenesis--much of this coordination is mediated by proteins that physically bridge the two cytoskeletal networks. We have investigated the regulation of the Drosophila actin-microtubule cross-linker Short stop (Shot), a member of the spectraplakin family. Our data suggest that Shot's cytoskeletal cross-linking activity is regulated by an intramolecular inhibitory mechanism. In its inactive conformation, Shot adopts a "closed" conformation through interactions between its NH(2)-terminal actin-binding domain and COOH-terminal EF-hand-GAS2 domain. This inactive conformation is targeted to the growing microtubule plus end by EB1. On activation, Shot binds along the microtubule through its COOH-terminal GAS2 domain and binds to actin with its NH(2)-terminal tandem CH domains. We propose that this mechanism allows Shot to rapidly cross-link dynamic microtubules in response to localized activating signals at the cell cortex.

  6. Microtubule heterogeneity of Ornithogalum umbellatum ovary epidermal cells: non-stable cortical microtubules and stable lipotubuloid microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kwiatkowska

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Lipotubuloids, structures containing lipid bodies and microtubules, are described in ovary epidermalcells of Ornithogalum umbellatum. Microtubules of lipotubuloids can be fixed in electron microscope fixativecontaining only buffered OsO4 or in glutaraldehyde with OsO4 post-fixation, or in a mixture of OsO4 and glutaraldehyde[1]. None of these substances fixes cortical microtubules of ovary epidermis of this plant which ischaracterized by dynamic longitudinal growth. However, cortical microtubules can be fixed with cold methanolaccording immunocytological methods with the use of b-tubulin antibodies and fluorescein. The existence ofcortical microtubules has also been evidenced by EM observations solely after the use of taxol, microtubulestabilizer, and fixation in a glutaraldehyde/OsO4 mixture. These microtubules mostly lie transversely, sometimesobliquely, and rarely parallel to the cell axis. Staining, using Ruthenium Red and silver hexamine, has revealedthat lipotubuloid microtubules surface is covered with polysaccharides. The presumption has been made thatthe presence of a polysaccharide layer enhances the stability of lipotubuloid microtubules.

  7. Dynamic Resource Coordination and Interference Management for Femtocell Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Yan; Yang, Chunliang

    2010-01-01

    Femtocell is emerging as a key technology to secure the coverage and capacity in indoor environments. However the deployment of a new femtocell layer may originate undesired interference to the whole system. This paper investigates spectrum resource coordination and interference management for the femtocell networks. A resource coordination scheme based on broadcasting resource coordination request messages by the femto mobile is proposed to reduce the system interference.

  8. The formin DIAPH1 (mDia1) regulates megakaryocyte proplatelet formation by remodeling the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jiajia; Lordier, Larissa; Meyran, Deborah; Rameau, Philippe; Lecluse, Yann; Kitchen-Goosen, Susan; Badirou, Idinath; Mokrani, Hayat; Narumiya, Shuh; Alberts, Arthur S; Vainchenker, William; Chang, Yunhua

    2014-12-18

    Megakaryocytes are highly specialized precursor cells that produce platelets via cytoplasmic extensions called proplatelets. Proplatelet formation (PPF) requires profound changes in microtubule and actin organization. In this work, we demonstrated that DIAPH1 (mDia1), a mammalian homolog of Drosophila diaphanous that works as an effector of the small GTPase Rho, negatively regulates PPF by controlling the dynamics of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. Moreover, we showed that inhibition of both DIAPH1 and the Rho-associated protein kinase (Rock)/myosin pathway increased PPF via coordination of both cytoskeletons. We provide evidence that 2 major effectors of the Rho GTPase pathway (DIAPH1 and Rock/myosin II) are involved not only in Rho-mediated stress fibers assembly, but also in the regulation of microtubule stability and dynamics during PPF.

  9. Potent antiproliferative cembrenoids accumulate in tobacco upon infection with Rhodococcus fascians and trigger unusual microtubule dynamics in human glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminata P Nacoulma

    Full Text Available AIMS: Though plant metabolic changes are known to occur during interactions with bacteria, these were rarely challenged for pharmacologically active compounds suitable for further drug development. Here, the occurrence of specific chemicals with antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines was evidenced in hyperplasia (leafy galls induced when plants interact with particular phytopathogens, such as the Actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians. METHODS: We examined leafy galls fraction F3.1.1 on cell proliferation, cell division and cytoskeletal disorganization of human cancer cell lines using time-lapse videomicroscopy imaging, combined with flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analysis. We determined the F3.1.1-fraction composition by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The leafy galls induced on tobacco by R. fascians yielded fraction F3.1.1 which inhibited proliferation of glioblastoma U373 cells with an IC50 of 4.5 µg/mL, F.3.1.1 was shown to increase cell division duration, cause nuclear morphological deformations and cell enlargement, and, at higher concentrations, karyokinesis defects leading to polyploidization and apoptosis. F3.1.1 consisted of a mixture of isomers belonging to the cembrenoids. The cellular defects induced by F3.1.1 were caused by a peculiar cytoskeletal disorganization, with the occurrence of fragmented tubulin and strongly organized microtubule aggregates within the same cell. Colchicine, paclitaxel, and cembrene also affected U373 cell proliferation and karyokinesis, but the induced microtubule rearrangement was very different from that provoked by F3.1.1. Altogether our data indicate that the cembrenoid isomers in F3.1.1 have a unique mode of action and are able to simultaneously modulate microtubule polymerization and stability.

  10. Effect of microtubule-associated protein tau in dynamics of single-headed motor proteins KIF1A

    CERN Document Server

    Sparacino, J; Lamberti, P W

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular transport based on molecular motors and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of cells. Filamentary tracks of the cells are abundantly decorated with non-motile microtubule-associated proteins, such as tau. Motivated by experiments on kinesin-tau interactions [Dixit et al. Science 319, 1086 (2008)] we developed a stochastic model of interacting single-headed motor proteins KIF1A that also takes into account the interactions between motor proteins and tau molecules. Our model reproduce experimental observations and predicts significant effects of tau on bound time and run length which suggest an important role of tau in regulation of kinesin-based transport.

  11. beta-Dystroglycan modulates the interplay between actin and microtubules in human-adhered platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Suárez-Sánchez, Rocío; Hernández-González, Enrique; Galván, Iván

    2008-05-01

    To maintain the continuity of an injured blood vessel, platelets change shape, secrete granule contents, adhere, aggregate, and retract in a haemostatic plug. Ordered arrays of microtubules, microfilaments, and associated proteins are responsible for these platelet responses. In full-spread platelets, microfilament bundles in association with other cytoskeleton proteins are anchored in focal contacts. Recent studies in migrating cells suggest that co-ordination and direct physical interaction of microtubules and actin network modulate adhesion development. In platelets, we have proposed a feasible association between these two cytoskeletal systems, as well as the participation of the dystrophin-associated protein complex, as part of the focal adhesion complex. The present study analysed the participation of microtubules and actin during the platelet adhesion process. Confocal microscopy, fluorescence resonance transfer energy and immunoprecipitation assays were used to provide evidence of a cross-talk between these two cytoskeletal systems. Interestingly, beta-dystroglycan was found to act as an interplay protein between actin and microtubules and an additional communication between these two cytoskeleton networks was maintained through proteins of focal adhesion complex. Altogether our data are indicative of a dynamic co-participation of actin filaments and microtubules in modulating focal contacts to achieve platelet function.

  12. Microtubule-driven nuclear movements and linear elements as meiosis-specific characteristics of the fission yeasts Schizosaccharomyces versatilis and Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, A; Bähler, J; Kohli, J

    1995-11-01

    Meiotic prophase in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is characterized by striking nuclear movements and the formation of linear elements along chromosomes instead of tripartite synaptonemal complexes. We analysed the organization of nuclei and microtubules in cells of fission yeasts undergoing sexual differentiation. S. japonicus var. versatilis and S. pombe cells were studied in parallel, taking advantage of the better cytology in S. versatilis. During conjugation, microtubules were directed towards the mating projection. These microtubules seem to lead the haploid nuclei together in the zygote by interaction with the spindle pole bodies at the nuclear periphery. After karyogamy, arrays of microtubules emanating from the spindle pole body of the diploid nucleus extended to both cell poles. The same differentiated microtubule configuration was elaborated upon induction of azygotic meiosis in S. pombe. The cyclic movements of the elongated nuclei between the cell poles is reflected by a dynamic and coordinated shortening and lengthening of the two microtubule arrays. When the nucleus was at a cell end, one array was short while the other bridged the whole cell length. Experiments with inhibitors showed that microtubules are required for karyogamy and for the elongated shape and movement of nuclei during meiotic prophase. In both fission yeasts the SPBs and nucleoli are at the leading ends of the moving nuclei. Astral and cytoplasmic microtubules were also prominent during meiotic divisions and sporulation. We further show that in S. versatilis the linear elements formed during meiotic prophase are similar to those in S. pombe. Tripartite synaptonemal complexes were never detected. Taken together, these findings suggest that S. pombe and S. versatilis share basic characteristics in the organization of microtubules and the structure and behaviour of nuclei during their meiotic cell cycle. The prominent differentiations of microtubules and nuclei may be involved in the

  13. CLASP1, astrin and Kif2b form a molecular switch that regulates kinetochore-microtubule dynamics to promote mitotic progression and fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Amity L; Bakhoum, Samuel F; Maffini, Stefano; Correia-Melo, Clara; Maiato, Helder; Compton, Duane A

    2010-10-20

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis requires precise coordination of various processes, such as chromosome alignment, maturation of proper kinetochore-microtubule (kMT) attachments, correction of erroneous attachments, and silencing of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). How these fundamental aspects of mitosis are coordinately and temporally regulated is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the temporal regulation of kMT attachments by CLASP1, astrin and Kif2b is central to mitotic progression and chromosome segregation fidelity. In early mitosis, a Kif2b-CLASP1 complex is recruited to kinetochores to promote chromosome movement, kMT turnover, correction of attachment errors, and maintenance of SAC signalling. However, during metaphase, this complex is replaced by an astrin-CLASP1 complex, which promotes kMT stability, chromosome alignment, and silencing of the SAC. We show that these two complexes are differentially recruited to kinetochores and are mutually exclusive. We also show that other kinetochore proteins, such as Kif18a, affect kMT attachments and chromosome movement through these proteins. Thus, CLASP1-astrin-Kif2b complex act as a central switch at kinetochores that defines mitotic progression and promotes fidelity by temporally regulating kMT attachments.

  14. Pharmacologic reductions of total tau levels; implications for the role of microtubule dynamics in regulating tau expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickey Chad A

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT is a pathological component of several neurodegenerative diseases and clinical dementias. Here, we have investigated the effects of a series of commercially available FDA-approved compounds and natural products on total tau protein levels using a cell-based approach that allows for the rapid and efficient measurement of changes in protein expression. Results The compounds that reduced tau largely fell within 3 functional categories with the largest percentage being microtubule regulators. Several of these candidates were validated in both a human neuroglioma and a human neuroblastoma cell line. While these drugs lead to a rapid reduction in tau protein levels, a selective decrease in MAPT mRNA expression was also observed. Conclusion These findings suggest that the identified compounds that reduce tau levels may act either through direct effects on the MAPT promoter itself or by altering a feedback transcriptional mechanism regulating MAPT transcription. This is particularly interesting in light of recent evidence suggesting that MAPT 5' UTR mutations in late-onset PD and PSP cases alter the expression of tau mRNA. In fact, one of the compounds we identified, rotenone, has been used extensively to model PD in rodents. These observations may provide key insights into the mechanism of tau turnover within the neuron while also providing the first evidence that selectively reducing tau protein levels may be possible using compounds that are FDA-approved for other uses.

  15. Reaction coordinates, one-dimensional Smoluchowski equations, and a test for dynamical self-consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Baron; Bolhuis, Peter G; Mullen, Ryan G; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2013-02-01

    We propose a method for identifying accurate reaction coordinates among a set of trial coordinates. The method applies to special cases where motion along the reaction coordinate follows a one-dimensional Smoluchowski equation. In these cases the reaction coordinate can predict its own short-time dynamical evolution, i.e., the dynamics projected from multiple dimensions onto the reaction coordinate depend only on the reaction coordinate itself. To test whether this property holds, we project an ensemble of short trajectory swarms onto trial coordinates and compare projections of individual swarms to projections of the ensemble of swarms. The comparison, quantified by the Kullback-Leibler divergence, is numerically performed for each isosurface of each trial coordinate. The ensemble of short dynamical trajectories is generated only once by sampling along an initial order parameter. The initial order parameter should separate the reactants and products with a free energy barrier, and distributions on isosurfaces of the initial parameter should be unimodal. The method is illustrated for three model free energy landscapes with anisotropic diffusion. Where exact coordinates can be obtained from Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, results from the new method agree with the exact results. We also examine characteristics of systems where the proposed method fails. We show how dynamical self-consistency is related (through the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation) to the earlier isocommittor criterion, which is based on longer paths.

  16. A Dynamic Job Shop Scheduling Method Based on Ant Colony Coordination System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Qiong; WU Li-hui; ZHANG Jie

    2009-01-01

    Due to the stubborn nature of dynamic job shop scheduling problem, a novel ant colony coordination mechanism is proposed in this paper to search for an optimal schedule in dynamic environment. In ant colony coordination mechanism, the dynamic .job shop is composed of several autonomous ants. These ants coordinate with each other by simulating the ant foraging behavior of spreading pheromone on the trails, by which they can make information available globally, and further more guide ants make optimal decisions. The proposed mechanism is tested by several instances and the results confirm the validity of it.

  17. Wave->Diffusion Transition in Microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the heat transport in microtubules (MT) is investigated. When the dimension of the structure is of the order of the de Broglie wave length the transport phenomena must be analyzed within quantum mechanics. In this paper we developed the Dirac type thermal equation for MT .The solution of the equation-the temperature fields for electrons can be wave type or diffusion type depending on the dynamics of the scattering. Key words: Microtubules ultrashort laser pulses, Dirac thermal e...

  18. Cognition in Action: the Interplay of Attention and Bimanual Coordination Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temprado, Jean-Jacques

    Studies on motor coordination and on attentional load have developed into separate fields of investigation, bringing out findings, methods, and theories in almost perfect isolation. Sitting at their intersection, this chapter addresses the issue of behavioral flexibility by investigating how intention modifies the stability of existing patterns of coordination between moving limbs. Moreover, it addresses the issue, largely ignored until now, of the attentional cost incurred by the Central Nervous System (CNS) in maintaining a coordination pattern at a given level of stability, in particular under different attentional priority requirements. The experimental paradigm adopted in this study provides an original mix of a classical measure of attentional load, namely, Reaction Time (RT), and of a dynamic approach to coordination, most suitable for characterizing the dynamic properties of coordinated behavior and behavioral change. This paradigm may constitute a first attempt to bridge the gap between a conceptualization of coordination in terms of information processing and another, more recent framework rooted in self-organization theories and dynamical systems models. The present studies establish that central cost and pattern stability covary, suggesting that bimanual coordination and the coupling activity ensured by the CNS to maintain such coordination bear on the same underlying dynamics.

  19. Intersegmental dynamics shape joint coordination during catching in typically developing children but not in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, Michael J; Przysucha, Eryk P; Dounskaia, Natalia

    2014-04-01

    Factors shaping joint coordination during multijoint movements were studied using a one-handed ball-catching task. Typically developing (TD) boys between 9 and 12 yr of age, at which catching becomes consistently successful, and boys with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) of the same age participated in the study. The arm was initially stretched down. Catching was performed by flexing the shoulder and elbow and extending the wrist in the parasagittal plane. Catching success rate was substantially lower in children with DCD. Amplitudes and directions of joint motions were similar in both groups. Group differences were found in shoulder and elbow coordination patterns. TD children performed the movement predominantly by actively accelerating into flexion, one joint at a time-first the elbow and then the shoulder-and allowing passive interaction torque (IT) to accelerate the other joint into extension. Children with DCD tended to accelerate both joints into flexion simultaneously, suppressing IT. The results suggest that the TD joint coordination was shaped by the tendency to minimize active control of IT despite the complexity of the emergent joint kinematics. The inefficient control of IT in children with DCD points to deficiency of the internal model of intersegmental dynamics. Together, the findings advocate that joint coordination throughout a multijoint movement is a by-product of the control strategy that benefits from movement dynamics by actively accelerating a single joint and using IT for rotation of the other joint. Reduction of control-dependent noise is discussed as a possible advantage of this control strategy.

  20. Efficient molecular quantum dynamics in coordinate and phase space using pruned bases

    CERN Document Server

    Larsson, Henrik R; Tannor, David J

    2016-01-01

    We present an efficient implementation of dynamically pruned quantum dynamics, both in coordinate space and in phase space. We combine the ideas behind the biorthogonal von Neumann basis (PvB) with the orthogonalized momentum-symmetrized Gaussians (Weylets) to create a new basis, projected Weylets, that takes the best from both methods. We benchmark pruned dynamics using phase-space-localized PvB, projected Weylets, and coordinate-space-localized DVR bases, with real-world examples in up to six dimensions. We show that coordinate-space localization is most important for efficient pruning and that pruned dynamics is much faster compared to unpruned, exact dynamics. Phase-space localization is useful for more demanding dynamics where many basis functions are required. There, projected Weylets offer a more compact representation than pruned DVR bases.

  1. Efficient molecular quantum dynamics in coordinate and phase space using pruned bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, H. R.; Hartke, B.; Tannor, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    We present an efficient implementation of dynamically pruned quantum dynamics, both in coordinate space and in phase space. We combine the ideas behind the biorthogonal von Neumann basis (PvB) with the orthogonalized momentum-symmetrized Gaussians (Weylets) to create a new basis, projected Weylets, that takes the best from both methods. We benchmark pruned time-dependent dynamics using phase-space-localized PvB, projected Weylets, and coordinate-space-localized DVR bases, with real-world examples in up to six dimensions. For the examples studied, coordinate-space localization is the most important factor for efficient pruning and the pruned dynamics is much faster than the unpruned, exact dynamics. Phase-space localization is useful for more demanding dynamics where many basis functions are required. There, projected Weylets offer a more compact representation than pruned DVR bases.

  2. How visual information influences coordination dynamics when following the leader

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerhoff, L. A.; De Poel, Harjo J.; Button, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Coordinating one's movements with others is an important aspect of human interactions. Regulating the distance to other moving agents is often necessary to achieve specific task goals such as in invasion sports. This study aimed to examine how distance regulation is mediated by different sources of

  3. Rowing Crew Coordination Dynamics at Increasing Stroke Rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, Laura S.; Zaal, Frank T. J. M.; de Poel, Harjo J.

    2015-01-01

    In rowing, perfect synchronisation is important for optimal performance of a crew. Remarkably, a recent study on ergometers demonstrated that antiphase crew coordination might be mechanically more efficient by reducing the power lost to within-cycle velocity fluctuations of the boat. However, couple

  4. Chemistry of stannylene-based Lewis pairs: dynamic tin coordination switching between donor and acceptor character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Kilian M; Freitag, Sarah; Schubert, Hartmut; Gerke, Birgit; Pöttgen, Rainer; Wesemann, Lars

    2015-03-16

    The coordination chemistry of cyclic stannylene-based intramolecular Lewis pairs is presented. The P→Sn adducts were treated with [Ni(COD)2] and [Pd(PCy3)2] (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene, PCy3 = tricyclohexylphosphine). In the isolated coordination compounds the stannylene moiety acts either as an acceptor or a donor ligand. Examples of a dynamic switch between these two coordination modes of the P-Sn ligand are illustrated and the structures in the solid state together with heteronuclear NMR spectroscopic findings are discussed. In the case of a Ni(0) complex, (119)Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy of the uncoordinated and coordinated phosphastannirane ligand is presented.

  5. Dynamical Methods for Evaluating the Time-Dependent Unfolding of Social Coordination in Children with Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula eFitzpatrick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD suffer from numerous impairments in social interaction that affect both their mental and bodily coordination with others. We explored here whether interpersonal motor coordination may be an important key for understanding the profound social problems of children with ASD. We employed a set of experimental techniques to evaluate not only traditional cognitive measures of social competence but also the dynamical structure of social coordination by using dynamical measures of social motor coordination and analyzing the time series records of behavior. Preliminary findings suggest that children with ASD were equivalent to typically developing children on many social performance outcome measures. However, significant relationships were found between cognitive social measures (e.g., intentionality and dynamical social motor measures. In addition, we found that more perceptually-based measures of social coordination were not associated with social motor coordination. These findings suggest that social coordination may not be a unitary construct and point to the promise of this multi-method and process-oriented approach to analyzing social coordination as an important pathway for understanding ASD-specific social deficits.

  6. Microtubules, Tubulins and Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raxworthy, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews much of what is known about microtubules, which are biopolymers consisting predominantly of subunits of the globular protein, tubulin. Describes the functions of microtubules, their structure and assembly, microtube associated proteins, and microtubule-disrupting agents. (TW)

  7. Microtubule stabilization reduces scarring and causes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Hellal (Farida); A. Hurtado (Andres); J. Ruschel (Jörg); K.C. Flynn (Kevin); C.J. Laskowski (Claudia); M. Umlauf (Martina); L.C. Kapitein (Lukas); D. Strikis (Dinara); V. Lemmon (Vance); J. Bixby (John); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper); F. Bradke (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHypertrophic scarring and poor intrinsic axon growth capacity constitute major obstacles for spinal cord repair. These processes are tightly regulated by microtubule dynamics. Here, moderate microtubule stabilization decreased scar formation after spinal cord injury in rodents through va

  8. Effects of silver ions (Ag+) on contractile ring function and microtubule dynamics during first cleavage in Ilyanassa obsoleta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, A. H.; Stephens, A. P.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Schwarting, S. S.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The terminal phase of cell division involves tight constriction of the cleavage furrow contractile ring, stabilization/elongation of the intercellular bridge, and final separation of the daughter cells. At first cleavage, the fertilized eggs of the mollusk, Ilyanassa obsoleta, form two contractile rings at right angles to each other in the same cytoplasm that constrict to tight necks and partition the egg into a trefoil shape. The cleavage furrow contractile ring (CF) normally constricts around many midbody microtubules (MTs) and results in cleavage; the polar lobe constriction contractile ring (PLC) normally constricts around very few MTs and subsequently relaxes without cleavage. In the presence of Ag+ ions, the PLC 1) begins MT-dependent rapid constriction sooner than controls, 2) encircles more MTs than control egg PLCs, 3) elongates much more than control PLCs, and 4) remains tightly constricted and effectively cleaves the polar lobe from the egg. If Ag(+)-incubated eggs are returned to normal seawater at trefoil, tubulin fluorescence disappears from the PLC neck and the neck relaxes. If nocodazole, a drug that depolymerizes MTs, is added to Ag(+)-incubated eggs during early PLC constriction, the PLC is not stabilized and eventually relaxes. However, if nocodazole is added to Ag(+)-incubated eggs at trefoil, tubulin fluorescence disappears from the PLC neck but the neck remains constricted. These results suggest that Ag+ accelerates and gradually stabilizes the PLC constriction by a mechanism that is initially MT-dependent, but that progressively becomes MT-independent.

  9. Stochastic evolutionary dynamics in minimum-effort coordination games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wang, Long

    2016-08-01

    The minimum-effort coordination game draws recently more attention for the fact that human behavior in this social dilemma is often inconsistent with the predictions of classical game theory. Here, we combine evolutionary game theory and coalescence theory to investigate this game in finite populations. Both analytic results and individual-based simulations show that effort costs play a key role in the evolution of contribution levels, which is in good agreement with those observed experimentally. Besides well-mixed populations, set structured populations have also been taken into consideration. Therein we find that large number of sets and moderate migration rate greatly promote effort levels, especially for high effort costs.

  10. Dynamic Enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination for Realistic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Klaus I.; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret; Barcos, Sonia;

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination (eICIC) is a key ingredient to boost the performance of co-channel Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets). eICIC encompasses two main techniques: Almost Blank Subframes (ABS), during which the macro cell remains silent to reduce the interference, and biased...... and an opportunistic approach exploiting the varying cell conditions. Moreover, an autonomous fast distributed muting algorithm is presented, which is simple, robust, and well suited for irregular network deployments. Performance results for realistic network deployments show that the traditional semi-static e...

  11. Third post-Newtonian constrained canonical dynamics for binary point masses in harmonic coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmesheimer, Raoul-Martin; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2005-02-01

    The conservative dynamics of two point masses given in harmonic coordinates up to the third post-Newtonian order is treated within the framework of constrained canonical dynamics. A representation of the approximate Poincaré algebra is constructed with the aid of Dirac brackets. Uniqueness of the generators of the Poincaré group or the integrals of motion is achieved by imposing their action on the point mass coordinates to be identical with that of the usual infinitesimal Poincaré transformations. The second post-Coulombian approximation to the dynamics of two point charges as predicted by Feynman-Wheeler electrodynamics in Lorentz gauge is treated similarly.

  12. Measurement of Binding Force between Microtubule-Associated Protein and Microtubule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chun-Hua; GUO Hong-Lian; QU E; LI Zhao-Lin; YUAN Ming; CHENG Bing-Ying; ZHANG Dao-Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are important proteins in cells. They can regulate the organization,dynamics and function of microtubules. We measure the binding force between microtubule and a new plant MAP, i.e. AtMAP65-1, by dual-optical tweezers. The force is obtained to be 14.6±3.5 pN from the data statistics and analysis. This force measurement is helpful to understand the function and mechanism of MAPs from the mechanical point of view and lays the groundwork for future measurements of the mechanical properties of other biological macro-molecules.

  13. Fission yeast mtr1p regulates interphase microtubule cortical dwell-time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédérique Carlier-Grynkorn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The microtubule cytoskeleton plays important roles in cell polarity, motility and division. Microtubules inherently undergo dynamic instability, stochastically switching between phases of growth and shrinkage. In cells, some microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs and molecular motors can further modulate microtubule dynamics. We present here the fission yeast mtr1+, a new regulator of microtubule dynamics that appears to be not a MAP or a motor. mtr1-deletion (mtr1Δ primarily results in longer microtubule dwell-time at the cell tip cortex, suggesting that mtr1p acts directly or indirectly as a destabilizer of microtubules. mtr1p is antagonistic to mal3p, the ortholog of mammalian EB1, which stabilizes microtubules. mal3Δ results in short microtubules, but can be partially rescued by mtr1Δ, as the double mutant mal3Δ mtr1Δ exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant. By sequence homology, mtr1p is predicted to be a component of the ribosomal quality control complex. Intriguingly, deletion of a predicted ribosomal gene, rps1801, also resulted in longer microtubule dwell-time similar to mtr1Δ. The double-mutant mal3Δ rps1801Δ also exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant alone. Our study suggests a possible involvement of mtr1p and the ribosome complex in modulating microtubule dynamics.

  14. Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry with Diselenides, Disulfides, Imines and Metal Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne

    The design and preparation of strong and selective artificial receptors, especially biomi-metic receptors that function in aqueous solution, has proved truly challenging. In this thesis it will be described how the strengths of dynamic combinatorial chemistry can be used to great advantage...... in this field. The aim of this project has therefore been to develop new ways of using dynamic combinatorial libraries for molecular recognition in aqueous media. The focus has been on using what has been learned from the well-established di-sulfide exchange chemistry to incorporate a new reaction into dynamic...... combinatorial chemistry, namely the reversible diselenide exchange reaction. The first part of the thesis describes the development of a thermally induced OAr → SeAr migration reaction. Here, it was proven possible to rearrange a variety of substituted O-aryl selenocarbamates into the corresponding Se...

  15. Stochastic evolutionary dynamics of minimum-effort coordination games

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Kun; Wang, Long

    2016-01-01

    The minimum-effort coordination game, having potentially important implications in both evolutionary biology and sociology, draws recently more attention for the fact that human behavior in this social dilemma is often inconsistent with the predictions of classic game theory. In the framework of classic game theory, any common effort level is a strict and trembling hand perfect Nash equilibrium, so that no desideratum is provided for selecting among them. Behavior experiments, however, show that the effort levels employed by subjects are inversely related to the effort costs. Here, we combine coalescence theory and evolutionary game theory to investigate this game in finite populations. Both analytic results and individual-based simulations show that effort costs play a key role in the evolution of contribution levels, which is in good agreement with those observed experimentally. Besides well-mixed populations, set structured populations, where the population structure itself is a consequence of the evolutio...

  16. A Dynamic Pricing Model for Coordinated Sales and Operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Fleischmann (Moritz); J.M. Hall (Joseph); D.F. Pyke (David)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractRecent years have seen advances in research and management practice in the area of pricing, and particularly in dynamic pricing and revenue management. At the same time, researchers and managers have made dramatic improvements in operations and supply chain management. The interactions b

  17. Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry with Diselenides, Disulfides, Imines and Metal Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne

    experimentally and theoretically and found to be unique in organoselenium chemistry by proceeding through a four-membered cyclic transition state following first-order kinetics. Subsequently, this thesis illustrates how an aliphatic diselenide could be used to catalyse the formation of a disulfide based dynamic...

  18. Dynamic Coordination Of A Two-Arm Robotic Manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sukhan; Kim, Sungbok

    1994-01-01

    Report presents study of dynamical and kinematical considerations guiding selection of configuration of self-reconfigurable, two-arm robotic manipulator. Two multiple-link arms cooperate in manipulating single object, reconfiguring their mutual, cooperative structure according to changing task requirements.

  19. General theory for the mechanics of confined microtubule asters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Laan, Liedewij; Dogterom, Marileen; Pavin, Nenad; Jülicher, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In cells, dynamic microtubules organize into asters or spindles to assist positioning of organelles. Two types of forces are suggested to contribute to the positioning process: (i) microtubule-growth based pushing forces; and (ii) motor protein mediated pulling forces. In this paper, we present a general theory to account for aster positioning in a confinement of arbitrary shape. The theory takes account of microtubule nucleation, growth, catastrophe, slipping, as well as interaction with cortical force generators. We calculate microtubule distributions and forces acting on microtubule organizing centers in a sphere and in an ellipsoid. Positioning mechanisms based on both pushing forces and pulling forces can be distinguished in our theory for different parameter regimes or in different geometries. In addition, we investigate positioning of microtubule asters in the case of asymmetric distribution of motors. This analysis enables us to characterize situations relevant for Caenorrhabditis elegans embryos.

  20. In vitro assembly of plant tubulin in the absence of microtubule-stabilizing reagents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The assembly of microtubules is essential for physiological functions of microtubules. Addition of microtubule-stabilizing reagents or microtubule "seeds" is usually necessary for plant tubulin assembly in vitro, which hinders the investigation of plant microtubule dynamics. In the present note, highly purified plant tubulins have been obtained from lily pollen, a non-microtubule-stabilizing reagent or microtubule "seed" system for plant tubulin assembly has been established and the analysis of plant tubulin assembly performed. Experiment results showed that purified tubulin polymerized in vitro, and a typical microtubule structure was observed with electron microscopy. The kinetics curve of tubulin assembly exhibited typical "parabola". The presence of taxol significantly altered the character of plant tubulin assembly, including that abnormal microtubules were assembled and the critical concentration for plant tubulin assembly was decreased exceedingly from 3 mg/mL in the absence of taxol to 0.043 mg/mL in the presence of taxol.

  1. The dual specificity phosphatase Cdc14B bundles and stabilizes microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumley, Hyekyung [ORNL; Liu, Yie [ORNL; Gomez, Marla V [ORNL; Wang, Yisong [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    The Cdc14 dual-specificity phosphatases regulate key events in the eukaryotic cell cycle. However, little is known about the function of mammalian CDC14B family members. Here, we demonstrate that subcellular localization of CDC14B protein is cell cycle regulated. CDC14B can bind, bundle, and stabilize microtubules in vitro independently of its catalytic activity. Basic amino acid residues within the nucleolar targeting domain are important for both retaining CDC14B in the nucleolus and preventing microtubule bundling. Overexpression of CDC14B resulted in the formation of cytoplasmic CDC14B and microtubule bundles in interphase cells. These microtubule bundles were resistant to microtubule depolymerization reagents and enriched in acetylated -tubulin. Expression of cytoplasmic forms of CDC14B impaired microtubule nucleation from the microtubule organization center. CDC14B is thus a novel microtubule-bundling and -stabilizing protein, whose regulated subcellular localization may help modulate spindle and microtubule dynamics in mitosis.

  2. CLIP-170 facilitates the formation of kinetochore-microtubule attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Galjart, Niels; van Vugt, Marcel A T M; Medema, René H

    2006-01-11

    CLIP-170 is a microtubule 'plus end tracking' protein involved in several microtubule-dependent processes in interphase. At the onset of mitosis, CLIP-170 localizes to kinetochores, but at metaphase, it is no longer detectable at kinetochores. Although RNA interference (RNAi) experiments have suggested an essential role for CLIP-170 during mitosis, the molecular function of CLIP-170 in mitosis has not yet been revealed. Here, we used a combination of high-resolution microscopy and RNAi-mediated depletion to study the function of CLIP-170 in mitosis. We found that CLIP-170 dynamically localizes to the outer most part of unattached kinetochores and to the ends of growing microtubules. In addition, we provide evidence that a pool of CLIP-170 is transported along kinetochore-microtubules by the dynein/dynactin complex. Interference with CLIP-170 expression results in defective chromosome congression and diminished kinetochore-microtubule attachments, but does not detectibly affect microtubule dynamics or kinetochore-microtubule stability. Taken together, our results indicate that CLIP-170 facilitates the formation of kinetochore-microtubule attachments, possibly through direct capture of microtubules at the kinetochore.

  3. Microtubules: A network for solitary waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravković Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we deal with nonlinear dynamics of microtubules. The structure and role of microtubules in cells are explained as well as one of models explaining their dynamics. Solutions of the crucial nonlinear differential equation depend on used mathematical methods. Two commonly used procedures, continuum and semi-discrete approximations, are explained. These solutions are solitary waves usually called as kink solitons, breathers and bell-type solitons. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III45010

  4. Interaction between microtubules and the Drosophila formin Cappuccino and its effect on actin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth-Johnson, Elizabeth A; Vizcarra, Christina L; Bois, Justin S; Quinlan, Margot E

    2014-02-14

    Formin family actin nucleators are potential coordinators of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, as they can both nucleate actin filaments and bind microtubules in vitro. To gain a more detailed mechanistic understanding of formin-microtubule interactions and formin-mediated actin-microtubule cross-talk, we studied microtubule binding by Cappuccino (Capu), a formin involved in regulating actin and microtubule organization during Drosophila oogenesis. We found that two distinct domains within Capu, FH2 and tail, work together to promote high-affinity microtubule binding. The tail domain appears to bind microtubules through nonspecific charge-based interactions. In contrast, distinct residues within the FH2 domain are important for microtubule binding. We also report the first visualization of a formin polymerizing actin filaments in the presence of microtubules. Interestingly, microtubules are potent inhibitors of the actin nucleation activity of Capu but appear to have little effect on Capu once it is bound to the barbed end of an elongating filament. Because Capu does not simultaneously bind microtubules and assemble actin filaments in vitro, its actin assembly and microtubule binding activities likely require spatial and/or temporal regulation within the Drosophila oocyte.

  5. Interaction between Microtubules and the Drosophila Formin Cappuccino and Its Effect on Actin Assembly*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth-Johnson, Elizabeth A.; Vizcarra, Christina L.; Bois, Justin S.; Quinlan, Margot E.

    2014-01-01

    Formin family actin nucleators are potential coordinators of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, as they can both nucleate actin filaments and bind microtubules in vitro. To gain a more detailed mechanistic understanding of formin-microtubule interactions and formin-mediated actin-microtubule cross-talk, we studied microtubule binding by Cappuccino (Capu), a formin involved in regulating actin and microtubule organization during Drosophila oogenesis. We found that two distinct domains within Capu, FH2 and tail, work together to promote high-affinity microtubule binding. The tail domain appears to bind microtubules through nonspecific charge-based interactions. In contrast, distinct residues within the FH2 domain are important for microtubule binding. We also report the first visualization of a formin polymerizing actin filaments in the presence of microtubules. Interestingly, microtubules are potent inhibitors of the actin nucleation activity of Capu but appear to have little effect on Capu once it is bound to the barbed end of an elongating filament. Because Capu does not simultaneously bind microtubules and assemble actin filaments in vitro, its actin assembly and microtubule binding activities likely require spatial and/or temporal regulation within the Drosophila oocyte. PMID:24362037

  6. Deployment dynamics of a simplified spinning IKAROS solar sail via absolute coordinate based method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Zhao; Qiang Tian; Hai-Yan Hu

    2013-01-01

    The spinning solar sail of large scale has been well developed in recent years.Such a solar sail can be considered as a rigid-flexible multibody system mainly composed of a spinning central rigid hub,a number of flexible thin tethers,sail membranes,and tip masses.A simplified interplanetary kite-craft accelerated by radiation of the Sun (IKAROS) model is established in this study by using the absolute-coordinate-based (ACB) method that combines the natural coordinate formulation (NCF) describing the central rigid hub and the absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) describing flexible parts.The initial configuration of the system in the second-stage deployment is determined through both dynamic and static analyses.The huge set of stiff equations of system dynamics is solved by using the generalized-alpha method,and thus the deployment dynamics of the system can be well understood.

  7. Dynamic Fluctuation of U(3+) Coordination Structure in the Molten LiCl-KCl Eutectic via First Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuejiao; Song, Jia; Shi, Shuping; Yan, Liuming; Zhang, Zhaochun; Jiang, Tao; Peng, Shuming

    2017-01-26

    The dynamic fluctuation of the U(3+) coordination structure in a molten LiCl-KCl mixture was studied using first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. The radial distribution function, probability distribution of coordination numbers, fluctuation of coordination number and cage volume, self-diffusion coefficient and solvodynamic mean radius of U(3+), dynamics of the nearest U-Cl distances, and van Hove function were evaluated. It was revealed that fast exchange of Cl(-) occurred between the first and second coordination shells of U(3+) accompanied with fast fluctuation of coordination number and rearrangement of coordination structure. It was concluded that 6-fold coordination structure dominated the coordination structure of U(3+) in the molten LiCl-KCl-UCl3 mixture and a high temperature was conducive to the formation of low coordinated structure.

  8. Coordination dynamics in a socially situated nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coey, Charles A; Varlet, Manuel; Richardson, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Traditional theories of cognitive science have typically accounted for the organization of human behavior by detailing requisite computational/representational functions and identifying neurological mechanisms that might perform these functions. Put simply, such approaches hold that neural activity causes behavior. This same general framework has been extended to accounts of human social behavior via concepts such as "common-coding" and "co-representation" and much recent neurological research has been devoted to brain structures that might execute these social-cognitive functions. Although these neural processes are unquestionably involved in the organization and control of human social interactions, there is good reason to question whether they should be accorded explanatory primacy. Alternatively, we propose that a full appreciation of the role of neural processes in social interactions requires appropriately situating them in their context of embodied-embedded constraints. To this end, we introduce concepts from dynamical systems theory and review research demonstrating that the organization of human behavior, including social behavior, can be accounted for in terms of self-organizing processes and lawful dynamics of animal-environment systems. Ultimately, we hope that these alternative concepts can complement the recent advances in cognitive neuroscience and thereby provide opportunities to develop a complete and coherent account of human social interaction.

  9. Microtubules Are Essential for Guard-Cell Function in Vicia and Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William Eisinger; David Ehrhardt; Winslow Briggs

    2012-01-01

    Radially arranged cortical microtubules are a prominent feature of guard cells.Guard cells expressing GFPtubulin showed consistent changes in the appearance of microtubules when stomata opened or closed.Guard cells showed fewer microtubule structures as stomata closed,whether induced by transfer to darkness,ABA,hydrogen peroxide,or sodium hydrogen carbonate.Guard cells kept in the dark (closed stomata) showed increases in microtubule structures and stomatal aperture on light treatment.GFP-EB1,marking microtubule growing plus ends,showed no change in number of plus ends or velocity of assembly on stomatal closure.Since the number of growing plus ends and the rate of plus-end growth did not change when microtubule structure numbers declined,microtubule instability and/or rearrangement must be responsible for the apparent loss of microtubules.Guard cells with closed stomata showed more cytosolic GFP-fluorescence than those with open stomata as cortical microtubules became disassembled,although with a large net loss in total fluorescence.Microtubule-targeted drugs blocked guard-cell function in Vicia and Arabidopsis.Oryzalin disrupted guard-cell microtubules and prevented stomatal opening and taxol stabilized guard-cell microtubules and delayed stomatal closure.Gas exchange measurements indicated that the transgenes for fluorescent-labeled proteins did not disrupt normal stomatal function.These dynamic changes in guard-cell microtubules combined with our inhibitor studies provide evidence for an active role of microtubules in guard-cell function.

  10. Microtubule stability and MAPI B upregulation control neuritogenesis in CAD cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen LI; Jin-tang XIA; Yue FENG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study the role of microtubule dynamics and microtubule associated protein 1B (MAP1B) in regulation of the neurite extension in CAD catecholaminergic neuronal cell line. Methods: The neuritogenesis of the CAD cells was abolished by inhibiting microtubule polymerization with nocodazole and by blocking microtubule depolymerization with taxol. MAP1B and tubulin protein expression was detected by Western blot. Immunofluorescent staining of tubulins was observed by fluorescent and confocal microscopy. Results: Microtubule dynamics was essential for CAD neurite extension. Dosage analysis revealed that neurite extension was much more sensitive to nocodazole than to taxol, suggesting a functional requirement for highly active microtubule assembly. A remarkable upregulation of MAP1B protein was detected during neurite extension accompanied with increased microtubule stability. Conclusion: Upregulation of MAP1B leads to the stabilization of newly formed microtubules in the developing neurites, which in turn promotes neurite extension.

  11. Alignment of Microtubule Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Feiyang; Oerlemans, Ard; Bakker, Erwin M.

    2011-01-01

    This work discusses preliminary work aimed at simulating and visualizing the growth process of a tiny structure inside the cell---the microtubule. Difficulty of recording the process lies in the fact that the tissue preparation method for electronic microscopes is highly destructive to live cells. Here in this paper, our approach is to take pictures of microtubules at different time slots and then appropriately combine these images into a coherent video. Experimental results are given on real...

  12. Alignment of Microtubule Imagery

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Feiyang; Bakker, Erwin M

    2011-01-01

    This work discusses preliminary work aimed at simulating and visualizing the growth process of a tiny structure inside the cell---the microtubule. Difficulty of recording the process lies in the fact that the tissue preparation method for electronic microscopes is highly destructive to live cells. Here in this paper, our approach is to take pictures of microtubules at different time slots and then appropriately combine these images into a coherent video. Experimental results are given on real data.

  13. Milking the spherical cow: on aspherical dynamics in spherical coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Pontzen, Andrew; Teyssier, Romain; Governato, Fabio; Gualandris, Alessia; Roth, Nina; Devriendt, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Galaxies and the dark matter halos that host them are not spherically symmetric, yet spherical symmetry is a helpful simplifying approximation for idealised calculations and analysis of observational data. The assumption leads to an exact conservation of angular momentum for every particle, making the dynamics unrealistic. But how much does that inaccuracy matter in practice for analyses of stellar distribution functions, collisionless relaxation, or dark matter core-creation? We provide a general answer to this question for a wide class of aspherical systems; specifically, we consider distribution functions that are "maximally stable", i.e. that do not evolve at first order when external potentials (which arise from baryons, large scale tidal fields or infalling substructure) are applied. We show that a spherically-symmetric analysis of such systems gives rise to the false conclusion that the density of particles in phase space is ergodic (a function of energy alone). Using this idea we are able to demonstra...

  14. Perceptuo-motor compatibility governs multisensory integration in bimanual coordination dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelic, Gregory; Mottet, Denis; Lagarde, Julien

    2016-02-01

    The brain has the remarkable ability to bind together inputs from different sensory origin into a coherent percept. Behavioral benefits can result from such ability, e.g., a person typically responds faster and more accurately to cross-modal stimuli than to unimodal stimuli. To date, it is, however, largely unknown whether such multisensory benefits, shown for discrete reactive behaviors, generalize to the continuous coordination of movements. The present study addressed multisensory integration from the perspective of bimanual coordination dynamics, where the perceptual activity no longer triggers a single response but continuously guides the motor action. The task consisted in coordinating anti-symmetrically the continuous flexion-extension of the index fingers, while synchronizing with an external pacer. Three different configurations of metronome were tested, for which we examined whether a cross-modal pacing (audio-tactile beats) improved the stability of the coordination in comparison with unimodal pacing condition (auditory or tactile beats). We found a more stable bimanual coordination for cross-modal pacing, but only when the metronome configuration directly matched the anti-symmetric coordination pattern. We conclude that multisensory integration can benefit the continuous coordination of movements; however, this is constrained by whether the perceptual and motor activities match in space and time.

  15. KIF7 Controls the Proliferation of Cells of the Respiratory Airway through Distinct Microtubule Dependent Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry L Coles

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The cell cycle must be tightly coordinated for proper control of embryonic development and for the long-term maintenance of organs such as the lung. There is emerging evidence that Kinesin family member 7 (Kif7 promotes Hedgehog (Hh signaling during embryonic development, and its misregulation contributes to diseases such as ciliopathies and cancer. Kif7 encodes a microtubule interacting protein that controls Hh signaling through regulation of microtubule dynamics within the primary cilium. However, whether Kif7 has a function in nonciliated cells remains largely unknown. The role Kif7 plays in basic cell biological processes like cell proliferation or cell cycle progression also remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that Kif7 is required for coordination of the cell cycle, and inactivation of this gene leads to increased cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Immunostaining and transmission electron microscopy experiments show that Kif7dda/dda mutant lungs are hyperproliferative and exhibit reduced alveolar epithelial cell differentiation. KIF7 depleted C3H10T1/2 fibroblasts and Kif7dda/dda mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts have increased growth rates at high cellular densities, suggesting that Kif7 may function as a general regulator of cellular proliferation. We ascertained that in G1, Kif7 and microtubule dynamics regulate the expression and activity of several components of the cell cycle machinery known to control entry into S phase. Our data suggest that Kif7 may function to regulate the maintenance of the respiratory airway architecture by controlling cellular density, cell proliferation, and cycle exit through its role as a microtubule associated protein.

  16. COORDINATION OF THE MOTION PARAMETERS WITHIN STEP-BY-STEP INTEGRATION FOR DYNAMIC EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuangQingfeng; WangQuanfeng; HuYunchang

    2004-01-01

    A method is presented that coordinates the calculation of the displacement, velocity and acceleration of structures within the time-steps of different types of step-by-step integration.The dynamic equation is solved using an energy equation and the calculating data of the original method. The method presented is better than the original method in terms of calculating postulations and is in better conformity with the system's movement. Take the Wilson-θ method as an example. By using the coordination process, the calculation precision has been greatly improved (reducing the errors by approximately 90% ), and the greater part of overshooting of the calculation result has been eliminated. The study suggests that the mal-coordination of the motion parameters within the time-step is the major factor that contributes to the result errors of step-by-step integration for the dynamic equation.

  17. Dynamical framework with blocking topography coordinates for atmospheric GCM and its validation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhaohui; ZHANG Ming; LIANG Danqing; WANG Aihui; ZHANG Dongling; ZENG Qingcun

    2003-01-01

    The dynamical framework with Blocking Topography Coordinates (hereafter, BTC), which is suited to handle the steep topography for the atmospheric general circulation models, is presented in this paper, together with its validation results. The integral properties of both the differential and finite-difference equations for the BTC dynamical core are: gross mass conservation, quadratic conservation for advection terms, Coriolis force does not change the kinetic energy, conservation of total available energy. The improved nonlinear iteration scheme is utilized for the time-integration. The energy conservation for BTC dynamical core is validated by using the integration results from 9-layer and 21-layer version respectively. Comparison results show that, the changes of the kinetic energy and total available potential energy during the integration are quite close for both the BTC dynamical framework and the dynamical framework of IAP 9-level and IAP 21-level AGCM, and this may suggest that the BTC dynamical core can be used for long-term integration with good computational stability. Furthermore, the BTC dynamical core has the advantage over the terrain following (sigma) coordinates in its better representation of the influence of the large-scale topography on the atmospheric general circulation. Finally, the correctness and reasonableness of the BTC dynamical core has been further proved by the numerical simulation of the topography influence on the quasi-stationary planetary wave with 21-layer version of BTC dynamical framework.

  18. Uplink Performance of Dynamic Interference Coordination under Fractional Power Control for LTE-Advanced Femtocells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Luis Guilherme Uzeda; Pedersen, Klaus; Mogensen, Preben

    2010-01-01

    It has been identified in numerous contributions that dynamic interference coordination is very appealing in case of dense and uncoordinated deployments of home eNBs (eNBs), also known as femtocells. One of the proposed schemes for LTE-Advanced is known as Autonomous Component Carrier Selection (...

  19. Changes in dynamic balance control over time in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelsma, L.D.; Smits-Engelsman, B. C. M.; Krijnen, W. P.; Geuze, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in underlying adaptations of dynamic balance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) during a Wii Fit game and to measure changes over time and after intervention. Twenty-eight children with DCD and 21 typically developi

  20. Changes in dynamic balance control over time in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelsma, L.D.; Smits-Engelsman, B. C. M.; Krijnen, W. P.; Geuze, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in underlying adaptations of dynamic balance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) during a Wii Fit game and to measure changes over time and after intervention. Twenty-eight children with DCD and 21 typically

  1. Overreaching in coordination dynamics therapy in an athlete with a spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalow, G; Vaher, I; Jaigma, P

    2008-03-01

    A motocross athlete suffered a clinically complete spinal cord injury (SCI) during competition. Although MRIs (magnetic resonance imaging) showed a complete spinal cord injury at the Thoracic 11/12 levels, surface EMG recordings indicated the survival of few tract fibres across the injury site. Six weeks after the accident the subject began intensive Coordination Dynamics Therapy (CDT) at an up-to-date therapy centre. The subject trained at his physical limits to induce structural and functional repair. Exercising at variable loads between 20 and 200N (on a special CDT and recording device) generated periods of overreaching and super-compensation. By plotting coordination dynamics values (kinesiology), including high-load exertion (200N) and hysteresis curves, periods of overreaching and super-compensation were made graphically visible. It was found that symmetrical improvements of central nervous system (CNS) functioning occurred during overreaching. Improvements in spinal cord functioning were achieved throughout one year of CDT in this chronically injured subject with an almost anatomically complete SCI. It is discussed that the measuring of CNS functions by means of recording coordination dynamics is a powerful and non-invasive tool ideal for exact quantitative and qualitative measurements of improvement (or change) in CNS functioning. Such diagnostics may be of particular importance in sport during training and before competition. Also, coordination dynamics might be used to measure the effects of prolonged exposure to reduced gravitational conditions on CNS functions, such as faced by astronauts.

  2. Changes in dynamic balance control over time in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelsma, L.D.; Smits-Engelsman, B. C. M.; Krijnen, W. P.; Geuze, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in underlying adaptations of dynamic balance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) during a Wii Fit game and to measure changes over time and after intervention. Twenty-eight children with DCD and 21 typically developi

  3. Short-term motor learning of dynamic balance control in children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelsma, Dorothee; Ferguson, Gilian D.; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C.M.; Geuze, Reint H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the differences in learning a dynamic balance task between children with and without probable Developmental Coordination Disorder (p-DCD) from different cultural backgrounds. Participants: Twenty-eight Dutch children with DCD (p-DCD-NL), a similar group of 17 South African childr

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of the traveler's dilemma and minimum-effort coordination games on complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Swami; Killingback, Timothy

    2014-10-01

    The traveler's dilemma game and the minimum-effort coordination game are social dilemmas that have received significant attention resulting from the fact that the predictions of classical game theory are inconsistent with the results found when the games are studied experimentally. Moreover, both the traveler's dilemma and the minimum-effort coordination games have potentially important applications in evolutionary biology. Interestingly, standard deterministic evolutionary game theory, as represented by the replicator dynamics in a well-mixed population, is also inadequate to account for the behavior observed in these games. Here we study the evolutionary dynamics of both these games in populations with interaction patterns described by a variety of complex network topologies. We investigate the evolutionary dynamics of these games through agent-based simulations on both model and empirical networks. In particular, we study the effects of network clustering and assortativity on the evolutionary dynamics of both games. In general, we show that the evolutionary behavior of the traveler's dilemma and minimum-effort coordination games on complex networks is in good agreement with that observed experimentally. Thus, formulating the traveler's dilemma and the minimum-effort coordination games on complex networks neatly resolves the paradoxical aspects of these games.

  5. S. pombe kinesins-8 promote both nucleation and catastrophe of microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Erent

    Full Text Available The kinesins-8 were originally thought to be microtubule depolymerases, but are now emerging as more versatile catalysts of microtubule dynamics. We show here that S. pombe Klp5-436 and Klp6-440 are non-processive plus-end-directed motors whose in vitro velocities on S. pombe microtubules at 7 and 23 nm s(-1 are too slow to keep pace with the growing tips of dynamic interphase microtubules in living S. pombe. In vitro, Klp5 and 6 dimers exhibit a hitherto-undescribed combination of strong enhancement of microtubule nucleation with no effect on growth rate or catastrophe frequency. By contrast in vivo, both Klp5 and Klp6 promote microtubule catastrophe at cell ends whilst Klp6 also increases the number of interphase microtubule arrays (IMAs. Our data support a model in which Klp5/6 bind tightly to free tubulin heterodimers, strongly promoting the nucleation of new microtubules, and then continue to land as a tubulin-motor complex on the tips of growing microtubules, with the motors then dissociating after a few seconds residence on the lattice. In vivo, we predict that only at cell ends, when growing microtubule tips become lodged and their growth slows down, will Klp5/6 motor activity succeed in tracking growing microtubule tips. This mechanism would allow Klp5/6 to detect the arrival of microtubule tips at cells ends and to amplify the intrinsic tendency for microtubules to catastrophise in compression at cell ends. Our evidence identifies Klp5 and 6 as spatial regulators of microtubule dynamics that enhance both microtubule nucleation at the cell centre and microtubule catastrophe at the cell ends.

  6. EB1 targets to kinetochores with attached, polymerizing microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirnauer, Jennifer S; Canman, Julie C; Salmon, E D; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2002-12-01

    Microtubule polymerization dynamics at kinetochores is coupled to chromosome movements, but its regulation there is poorly understood. The plus end tracking protein EB1 is required both for regulating microtubule dynamics and for maintaining a euploid genome. To address the role of EB1 in aneuploidy, we visualized its targeting in mitotic PtK1 cells. Fluorescent EB1, which localized to polymerizing ends of astral and spindle microtubules, was used to track their polymerization. EB1 also associated with a subset of attached kinetochores in late prometaphase and metaphase, and rarely in anaphase. Localization occurred in a narrow crescent, concave toward the centromere, consistent with targeting to the microtubule plus end-kinetochore interface. EB1 did not localize to kinetochores lacking attached kinetochore microtubules in prophase or early prometaphase, or upon nocodazole treatment. By time lapse, EB1 specifically targeted to kinetochores moving antipoleward, coupled to microtubule plus end polymerization, and not during plus end depolymerization. It localized independently of spindle bipolarity, the spindle checkpoint, and dynein/dynactin function. EB1 is the first protein whose targeting reflects kinetochore directionality, unlike other plus end tracking proteins that show enhanced kinetochore binding in the absence of microtubules. Our results suggest EB1 may modulate kinetochore microtubule polymerization and/or attachment.

  7. Taxol crystals can masquerade as stabilized microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Foss

    Full Text Available Taxol is a potent anti-mitotic drug used in chemotherapy, angioplastic stents, and cell biology research. By binding and stabilizing microtubules, Taxol inhibits their dynamics, crucial for cell division, motility, and survival. The drug has also been reported to induce formation of asters and bundles composed of stabilized microtubules. Surprisingly, at commonly used concentrations, Taxol forms crystals that rapidly bind fluorescent tubulin subunits, generating structures with an uncanny resemblance to microtubule asters and bundles. Kinetic and topological considerations suggest that tubulin subunits, rather than microtubules, bind the crystals. This sequestration of tubulin from the subunit pool would be expected to shift the equilibrium of free to polymerized tubulin to disfavor assembly. Our results imply that some previously reported Taxol-induced asters or bundles could include or be composed of tubulin-decorated Taxol crystals. Thus, reevaluation of certain morphological, chemical, and physical properties of Taxol-treated microtubules may be necessary. Moreover, our findings suggest a novel mechanism for chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity in non-dividing cells, with far-reaching medical implications.

  8. A novel p21-activated kinase binds the actin and microtubule networks and induces microtubule stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, Julien; Faure, Sandrine; Comps, Michel; Delsert, Claude; Morin, Nathalie

    2001-01-01

    Coordination of the different cytoskeleton networks in the cell is of central importance for morphogenesis, organelle transport, and motility. The Rho family proteins are well characterized for their effects on the actin cytoskeleton, but increasing evidence indicates that they may also control microtubule (MT) dynamics. Here, we demonstrate that a novel Cdc42/Rac effector, X-p21-activated kinase (PAK)5, colocalizes and binds to both the actin and MT networks and that its subcellular localization is regulated during cell cycle progression. In transfected cells, X-PAK5 promotes the formation of stabilized MTs that are associated in bundles and interferes with MTs dynamics, slowing both the elongation and shrinkage rates and inducing long paused periods. X-PAK5 subcellular localization is regulated tightly, since coexpression with active Rac or Cdc42 induces its shuttling to actin-rich structures. Thus, X-PAK5 is a novel MT-associated protein that may communicate between the actin and MT networks during cellular responses to environmental conditions. PMID:11733543

  9. Symplectic integration of closed chain rigid body dynamics with internal coordinate equations of motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Alexey K.

    1999-07-01

    Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) is a recent efficient method for modeling polymer molecules which treats them as chains of rigid bodies rather than ensembles of point particles as in Cartesian MD. Unfortunately, it is readily applicable only to linear or tree topologies without closed flexible loops. Important examples violating this condition are sugar rings of nucleic acids, proline residues in proteins, and also disulfide bridges. This paper presents the first complete numerical solution of the chain closure problem within the context of ICMD. The method combines natural implicit fixation of bond lengths and bond angles by the choice of internal coordinates with explicit constraints similar to Cartesian dynamics used to maintain the chain closure. It is affordable for large molecules and makes possible 3-5 times faster dynamics simulations of molecular systems with flexible rings, including important biological objects like nucleic acids and disulfide-bonded proteins.

  10. Third post-Newtonian constrained canonical dynamics for binary point masses in harmonic coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Memmesheimer, R M; Memmesheimer, Raoul-Martin; Sch\\"afer, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    The conservative dynamics of two point masses given in harmonic coordinates up to the third post-Newtonian (3pN) order is treated within the framework of constrained canonical dynamics. A representation of the approximate Poincar\\'e algebra is constructed with the aid of Dirac brackets. Uniqueness of the generators of the Poincar\\'e group resp. the integrals of motion is achieved by imposing their action on the point mass coordinates to be identical with that of the usual infinitesimal Poincar\\'e transformations. The second post-Coulombian approximation to the dynamics of two point charges as predicted by Feynman-Wheeler electrodynamics in Lorentz gauge is treated similarly.

  11. Do prokaryotes contain microtubules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudes, D.; Hinkle, G.; Margulis, L.

    1994-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, microtubules are 24-nm-diameter tubular structures composed of a class of conserved proteins called tubulin. They are involved in numerous cell functions including ciliary motility, nerve cell elongation, pigment migration, centrosome formation, and chromosome movement. Although cytoplasmic tubules and fibers have been observed in bacteria, some with diameters similar to those of eukaryotes, no homologies to eukaryotic microtubules have been established. Certain groups of bacteria including azotobacters, cyanobacteria, enteric bacteria, and spirochetes have been frequently observed to possess microtubule-like structures, and others, including archaebacteria, have been shown to be sensitive to drugs that inhibit the polymerization of microtubules. Although little biochemical or molecular biological information is available, the differences observed among these prokaryotic structures suggest that their composition generally differs among themselves as well as from that of eukaryotes. We review the distribution of cytoplasmic tubules in prokaryotes, even though, in all cases, their functions remain unknown. At least some tend to occur in cells that are large, elongate, and motile, suggesting that they may be involved in cytoskeletal functions, intracellular motility, or transport activities comparable to those performed by eukaryotic microtubules. In Escherichia coli, the FtsZ protein is associated with the formation of a ring in the division zone between the newly forming offspring cells. Like tubulin, FtsZ is a GTPase and shares with tubulin a 7-amino-acid motif, making it a promising candidate in which to seek the origin of tubulins.

  12. Kinetochore-Dependent Microtubule Rescue Ensures Their Efficient and Sustained Interactions in Early Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Sapan R.; Gierliński, Marek; Mino, Akihisa; Tanaka, Kozo; Kitamura, Etsushi; Clayton, Lesley; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U.

    2011-01-01

    Summary How kinetochores regulate microtubule dynamics to ensure proper kinetochore-microtubule interactions is unknown. Here, we studied this during early mitosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When a microtubule shrinks and its plus end reaches a kinetochore bound to its lateral surface, the microtubule end attempts to tether the kinetochore. This process often fails and, responding to this failure, microtubule rescue (conversion from shrinkage to growth) occurs, preventing kinetochore detachment from the microtubule end. This rescue is promoted by Stu2 transfer (ortholog of vertebrate XMAP215/ch-TOG) from the kinetochore to the microtubule end. Meanwhile, microtubule rescue distal to the kinetochore is also promoted by Stu2, which is transported by a kinesin-8 motor Kip3 along the microtubule from the kinetochore. Microtubule extension following rescue facilitates interaction with other widely scattered kinetochores, diminishing long delays in collecting the complete set of kinetochores by microtubules. Thus, kinetochore-dependent microtubule rescue ensures efficient and sustained kinetochore-microtubule interactions in early mitosis. PMID:22075150

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin Y-mediated tau hyperphosphorylation impairs microtubule assembly in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Balczon

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses a type III secretion system to introduce the adenylyl and guanylyl cyclase exotoxin Y (ExoY into the cytoplasm of endothelial cells. ExoY induces Tau hyperphosphorylation and insolubility, microtubule breakdown, barrier disruption and edema, although the mechanism(s responsible for microtubule breakdown remain poorly understood. Here we investigated both microtubule behavior and centrosome activity to test the hypothesis that ExoY disrupts microtubule dynamics. Fluorescence microscopy determined that infected pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells contained fewer microtubules than control cells, and further studies demonstrated that the microtubule-associated protein Tau was hyperphosphorylated following infection and dissociated from microtubules. Disassembly/reassembly studies determined that microtubule assembly was disrupted in infected cells, with no detectable effects on either microtubule disassembly or microtubule nucleation by centrosomes. This effect of ExoY on microtubules was abolished when the cAMP-dependent kinase phosphorylation site (Ser-214 on Tau was mutated to a non-phosphorylatable form. These studies identify Tau in microvascular endothelial cells as the target of ExoY in control of microtubule architecture following pulmonary infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and demonstrate that phosphorylation of tau following infection decreases microtubule assembly.

  14. CYLD Regulates Noscapine Activity in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia via a Microtubule-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfan; Ran, Jie; Sun, Lei; Sun, Xiaodong; Luo, Youguang; Yan, Bing; Tala; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen; Zhang, Lei; Bao, Gang; Zhou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an orally administrable drug used worldwide for cough suppression and has recently been demonstrated to disrupt microtubule dynamics and possess anticancer activity. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating noscapine activity remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that cylindromatosis (CYLD), a microtubule-associated tumor suppressor protein, modulates the activity of noscapine both in cell lines and in primary cells of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy reveal that CYLD increases the ability of noscapine to induce mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Examination of cellular microtubules as well as in vitro assembled microtubules shows that CYLD enhances the effect of noscapine on microtubule polymerization. Microtubule cosedimentation and fluorescence titration assays further reveal that CYLD interacts with microtubule outer surface and promotes noscapine binding to microtubules. These findings thus demonstrate CYLD as a critical regulator of noscapine activity and have important implications for ALL treatment.

  15. Patterns of horse-rider coordination during endurance race: a dynamical system approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viry, Sylvain; Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Frances, Jean-Philippe; Berton, Eric; Laurent, Michel; Nicol, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    In riding, most biomechanical studies have focused on the description of the horse locomotion in unridden condition. In this study, we draw the prospect of how the basic principles established in inter-personal coordination by the theory of Coordination Dynamics may provide a conceptual and methodological framework for understanding the horse-rider coupling. The recent development of mobile technologies allows combined horse and rider recordings during long lasting natural events such as endurance races. Six international horse-rider dyads were thus recorded during a 120 km race by using two tri-axial accelerometers placed on the horses and riders, respectively. The analysis concentrated on their combined vertical displacements. The obtained shapes and angles of Lissajous plots together with values of relative phase between horse and rider displacements at lower reversal point allowed us to characterize four coordination patterns, reflecting the use of two riding techniques per horse's gait (trot and canter). The present study shows that the concepts, methods and tools of self-organizing dynamic system approach offer new directions for understanding horse-rider coordination. The identification of the horse-rider coupling patterns constitutes a firm basis to further study the coalition of multiple constraints that determine their emergence and their dynamics in endurance race.

  16. Patterns of horse-rider coordination during endurance race: a dynamical system approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Viry

    Full Text Available In riding, most biomechanical studies have focused on the description of the horse locomotion in unridden condition. In this study, we draw the prospect of how the basic principles established in inter-personal coordination by the theory of Coordination Dynamics may provide a conceptual and methodological framework for understanding the horse-rider coupling. The recent development of mobile technologies allows combined horse and rider recordings during long lasting natural events such as endurance races. Six international horse-rider dyads were thus recorded during a 120 km race by using two tri-axial accelerometers placed on the horses and riders, respectively. The analysis concentrated on their combined vertical displacements. The obtained shapes and angles of Lissajous plots together with values of relative phase between horse and rider displacements at lower reversal point allowed us to characterize four coordination patterns, reflecting the use of two riding techniques per horse's gait (trot and canter. The present study shows that the concepts, methods and tools of self-organizing dynamic system approach offer new directions for understanding horse-rider coordination. The identification of the horse-rider coupling patterns constitutes a firm basis to further study the coalition of multiple constraints that determine their emergence and their dynamics in endurance race.

  17. Multiscale Polar Theory of Microtubule and Motor-Protein Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins are building blocks of self-organized subcellular biological structures such as the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. These same ingredients can form new “bioactive” liquid-crystalline fluids that are intrinsically out of equilibrium and which display complex flows and defect dynamics. It is not yet well understood how microscopic activity, which involves polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, yields such larger-scale dynamical structures. In our multiscale theory, Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubule ensembles driven by cross-linking motors allow us to study microscopic organization and stresses. Polarity sorting and cross-link relaxation emerge as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. On larger length scales, our continuum Doi-Onsager theory captures the hydrodynamic flows generated by polarity-dependent active stresses. The results connect local polar structure to flow structures and defect dynamics. PMID:25679909

  18. Path planning in multi-scale ocean flows: Coordination and dynamic obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolla, T.; Haley, P. J., Jr.; Lermusiaux, P. F. J.

    2015-10-01

    As the concurrent use of multiple autonomous vehicles in ocean missions grows, systematic control for their coordinated operation is becoming a necessity. Many ocean vehicles, especially those used in longer-range missions, possess limited operating speeds and are thus sensitive to ocean currents. Yet, the effect of currents on their trajectories is ignored by many coordination techniques. To address this issue, we first derive a rigorous level-set methodology for distance-based coordination of vehicles operating in minimum time within strong and dynamic ocean currents. The new methodology integrates ocean modeling, time-optimal level-sets and optimization schemes to predict the ocean currents, the short-term reachability sets, and the optimal headings for the desired coordination. Schemes are developed for dynamic formation control, where multiple vehicles achieve and maintain a given geometric pattern as they carry out their missions. To do so, a new score function that is suitable for regular polygon formations is obtained. Secondly, we obtain an efficient, non-intrusive technique for level-set-based time-optimal path planning in the presence of moving obstacles. The results are time-optimal path forecasts that rigorously avoid moving obstacles and sustain the desired coordination. They are exemplified and investigated for a variety of simulated ocean flows. A wind-driven double-gyre flow is used to study time-optimal dynamic formation control. Currents exiting an idealized strait or estuary are employed to explore dynamic obstacle avoidance. Finally, results are analyzed for the complex geometry and multi-scale ocean flows of the Philippine Archipelago.

  19. ISS method for coordination control of nonlinear dynamical agents under directed topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangke; Qin, Jiahu; Yu, Changbin

    2014-10-01

    The problems of coordination of multiagent systems with second-order locally Lipschitz continuous nonlinear dynamics under directed interaction topology are investigated in this paper. A completely nonlinear input-to-state stability (ISS)-based framework, drawing on ISS methods, with the aid of results from graph theory, matrix theory, and the ISS cyclic-small-gain theorem, is proposed for the coordination problem under directed topology, which can effectively tackle the technical challenges caused by locally Lipschitz continuous dynamics. Two coordination problems, i.e., flocking with a virtual leader and containment control, are considered. For both problems, it is assumed that only a portion of the agents can obtain the information from the leader(s). For the first problem, the proposed strategy is shown effective in driving a group of nonlinear dynamical agents reach the prespecified geometric pattern under the condition that at least one agent in each strongly connected component of the information-interconnection digraph with zero in-degree has access to the state information of the virtual leader; and the strategy proposed for the second problem can guarantee the nonlinear dynamical agents moving to the convex hull spanned by the positions of multiple leaders under the condition that for each agent there exists at least one leader that has a directed path to this agent.

  20. Highly dynamic coordination behavior of Pn ligand complexes towards "naked" Cu(+) cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Martin; Welsch, Stefan; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Virovets, Alexander V; Scheer, Manfred

    2015-10-01

    Reactions of Cu(+) containing the weakly coordinating anion [Al{OC(CF3 )3 }4 ](-) with the polyphosphorus complexes [{CpMo(CO)2 }2 (μ,η(2) :η(2) -P2 )] (A), [CpM(CO)2 (η(3) -P3 )] (M=Cr(B1), Mo (B2)), and [Cp*Fe(η(5) -P5 )] (C) are presented. The X-ray structures of the products revealed mononuclear (4) and dinuclear (1, 2, 3) Cu(I) complexes, as well as the one-dimensional coordination polymer (5 a) containing an unprecedented [Cu2 (C)3 ](2+) paddle-wheel building block. All products are readily soluble in CH2 Cl2 and exhibit fast dynamic coordination behavior in solution indicated by variable temperature (31) P{(1) H} NMR spectroscopy.

  1. Coordination mode of nitrate in uranyl(VI) complexes: a first-principles molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühl, Michael; Diss, Romain; Wipff, Georges

    2007-06-25

    According to Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations for [UO(2)(NO(3))(3)](-), [UO(2)(NO(3))(4)](2-), and [UO(2)(OH(2))(4-)(NO(3))](+) complexes in the gas phase and in aqueous solution, the nitrate coordination mode to uranyl depends on the interplay between ligand-metal attractions, interligand repulsions, and solvation. In the trinitrate, the eta(2)-coordination is clearly favored in water and in the gas phase, leading to a coordination number (CN) of 6. According to pointwise thermodynamic integration involving constrained molecular dynamics simulations, a change in free energy of +6 kcal/mol is predicted for eta(2)- to eta(1)-transition of one of the three nitrate ligands in the gas phase. In the gas phase, the mononitrate-hydrate complex also prefers a eta(2)-binding mode but with a CN of 5, one H(2)O molecule being in the second shell. This contrasts with the aqueous solution where the nitrate binds in a eta(1)-fashion and uranyl coordinates to four H2O ligands. A driving force of ca. -3 kcal/mol is predicted for the eta(2)- to eta(1)- transition in water. This structural preference is interpreted in terms of steric arguments and differential solvation of terminal vs uranyl-coordinated O atoms of the nitrate ligands. The [UO(2)(NO(3))(4)](2-) complex with two eta(2)- and two eta(1)- coordinated nitrates, observed in the solid state, is stable for 1-2 ps in the gas phase and in solution. In the studied series, the modulation of uranyl-ligand distances upon immersion of the complex in water is found to depend on the nature of the ligand and the composition of the complex.

  2. Roles for microtubule and microfilament cytoskeletons in animal cell cytokinesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhongcai; CAI Shang; JIANG Qing; ZHANG Chuanmao; TANG Xiaowei

    2005-01-01

    Microtubule and microfilament cytoskeletons play key roles in the whole process of cytokinesis. Although a number of hypotheses have been proposed to elucidate the mechanism of cytokinesis by microtubule and actin filament cytoskeletons, many reports are conflicting. In our study, combining the cytoskeletons drug treatments with the time-lapse video technology, we retested the key roles of microtubule and actin filament in cytokinesis. The results showed that depolymerization of microtubules by Nocodazole after the initiation of furrowing would not inhibit the furrow ingression, but obviously decrease the stiffness of daughter cells. Depolymerizing actin filaments by Cytochalasin B before metaphase would inhibit the initiation of furrowing but not chromosome segregation, resulting in the formation of binucleate cells; however, depolymerizing actin filaments during anaphase would prevent furrowing and lead to the regress of established furrow, also resulting in the formation of binucleate cells. Further, depolymerizing microtubules and actin filaments simultaneously after metaphase would cause the quick regress of the furrow and the formation of binucleate cells. From these results we propose that a successful cytokinesis requires functions and coordination of both the microtubule and actin filament cytoskeletons. Microtubule cytoskeleton may function in the positioning and initiation of cleavage furrow, and the actin filament cytoskeleton may play key roles in the initiation and ingression of the furrow.

  3. A novel role for aquaporin-5 in enhancing microtubule organization and stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataramana K Sidhaye

    Full Text Available Aquaporin-5 (AQP5 is a water-specific channel located on the apical surface of airway epithelial cells. In addition to regulating transcellular water permeability, AQP5 can regulate paracellular permeability, though the mechanisms by which this occurs have not been determined. Microtubules also regulate paracellular permeability. Here, we report that AQP5 promotes microtubule assembly and helps maintain the assembled microtubule steady state levels with slower turnover dynamics in cells. Specifically, reduced levels of AQP5 correlated with lower levels of assembled microtubules and decreased paracellular permeability. In contrast, overexpression of AQP5 increased assembly of microtubules, with evidence of increased MT stability, and promoted the formation of long straight microtubules in the apical domain of the epithelial cells. These findings indicate that AQP5-mediated regulation of microtubule dynamics modulates airway epithelial barrier properties and epithelial function.

  4. Depolymerizing kinesins Kip3 and MCAK shape cellular microtubule architecture by differential control of catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Melissa K; Zanic, Marija; Gell, Christopher; Bormuth, Volker; Howard, Jonathon

    2011-11-23

    Microtubules are dynamic filaments whose ends alternate between periods of slow growth and rapid shortening as they explore intracellular space and move organelles. A key question is how regulatory proteins modulate catastrophe, the conversion from growth to shortening. To study this process, we reconstituted microtubule dynamics in the absence and presence of the kinesin-8 Kip3 and the kinesin-13 MCAK. Surprisingly, we found that, even in the absence of the kinesins, the microtubule catastrophe frequency depends on the age of the microtubule, indicating that catastrophe is a multistep process. Kip3 slowed microtubule growth in a length-dependent manner and increased the rate of aging. In contrast, MCAK eliminated the aging process. Thus, both kinesins are catastrophe factors; Kip3 mediates fine control of microtubule length by narrowing the distribution of maximum lengths prior to catastrophe, whereas MCAK promotes rapid restructuring of the microtubule cytoskeleton by making catastrophe a first-order random process.

  5. PACSIN1, a Tau-interacting protein, regulates axonal elongation and branching by facilitating microtubule instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Lv, Kaosheng; Li, Zenglong; Yu, Albert C H; Chen, Jianguo; Teng, Junlin

    2012-11-16

    Tau is a major member of the neuronal microtubule-associated proteins. It promotes tubulin assembly and stabilizes axonal microtubules. Previous studies have demonstrated that Tau forms cross-bridges between microtubules, with some particles located on cross-bridges, suggesting that some proteins interact with Tau and might be involved in regulating Tau-related microtubule dynamics. This study reports that PACSIN1 interacts with Tau in axon. PACSIN1 blockade results in impaired axonal elongation and a higher number of primary axonal branches in mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons, which is induced by increasing the binding ability of Tau to microtubules. In PACSIN1-blocked dorsal root ganglia neurons, a greater amount of Tau is inclined to accumulate in the central domain of growth cones, and it promotes the stability of the microtubule network. Taken together, these results suggest that PACSIN1 is an important Tau binding partner in regulating microtubule dynamics and forming axonal plasticity.

  6. Control of hierarchical polymer mechanics with bioinspired metal-coordination dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Grindy, Scott C.; Learsch, Robert; Mozhdehi, Davoud; Cheng, Jing; Barrett, Devin G.; Guan, Zhibin; Messersmith, Phillip B.; Holten-Andersen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    In conventional polymer materials, mechanical performance is traditionally engineered via material structure, using motifs such as polymer molecular weight, polymer branching, or copolymer-block design 1 . Here, by means of a model system of 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels crosslinked with multiple, kinetically distinct dynamic metal-ligand coordinate complexes, we show that polymer materials with decoupled spatial structure and mechanical performance can be designed. By tuning the rela...

  7. Microtubule's conformational cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chretien, D.; Janosi, I.; Taveau, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that allow elongation of the unstable microtubule lattice remain unclear. It is usually thought that the GDP-liganded tubulin lattice is capped by a small layer of GTP- or GDP-P(i)-liganded molecules, the so called "GTP-cap". Here, we point-out that the elastic properties...

  8. Two New Methods To Generate Internal Coordinates for Molecular Wave Packet Dynamics in Reduced Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauleck, Julius P P; Thallmair, Sebastian; Loipersberger, Matthias; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-12-13

    The curse of dimensionality still remains as the central challenge of molecular quantum dynamical calculations. Either compromises on the accuracy of the potential landscape have to be made or methods must be used that reduce the dimensionality of the configuration space of molecular systems to a low dimensional one. For dynamic approaches such as grid-based wave packet dynamics that are confined to a small number of degrees of freedom this dimensionality reduction can become a major part of the overall problem. A common strategy to reduce the configuration space is by selection of a set of internal coordinates using chemical intuition. We devised two methods that increase the degree of automation of the dimensionality reduction as well as replace chemical intuition by more quantifiable criteria. Both methods reduce the dimensionality linearly and use the intrinsic reaction coordinate as guidance. The first one solely relies on the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC), whereas the second one uses semiclassical trajectories to identify the important degrees of freedom.

  9. Decision-making ability of Physarum polycephalum enhanced by its coordinated spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwayama, Koji; Zhu, Liping; Hirata, Yoshito; Aono, Masashi; Hara, Masahiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-04-12

    An amoeboid unicellular organism, a plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum, exhibits complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics and sophisticated information processing capabilities while deforming its amorphous body. We previously devised an 'amoeba-based computer (ABC),' that implemented optical feedback control to lead this amoeboid organism to search for a solution to the traveling salesman problem (TSP). In the ABC, the shortest TSP route (the optimal solution) is represented by the shape of the organism in which the body area (nutrient absorption) is maximized while the risk of being exposed to aversive light stimuli is minimized. The shortness of the TSP route found by ABC, therefore, serves as a quantitative measure of the optimality of the decision made by the organism. However, it remains unclear how the decision-making ability of the organism originates from the oscillatory dynamics of the organism. We investigated the number of coexisting traveling waves in the spatiotemporal patterns of the oscillatory dynamics of the organism. We show that a shorter TSP route can be found when the organism exhibits a lower number of traveling waves. The results imply that the oscillatory dynamics are highly coordinated throughout the global body. Based on the results, we discuss the fact that the decision-making ability of the organism can be enhanced not by uncorrelated random fluctuations, but by its highly coordinated oscillatory dynamics.

  10. The Microtubule Regulatory Protein Stathmin Is Required to Maintain the Integrity of Axonal Microtubules in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E Duncan

    Full Text Available Axonal transport, a form of long-distance, bi-directional intracellular transport that occurs between the cell body and synaptic terminal, is critical in maintaining the function and viability of neurons. We have identified a requirement for the stathmin (stai gene in the maintenance of axonal microtubules and regulation of axonal transport in Drosophila. The stai gene encodes a cytosolic phosphoprotein that regulates microtubule dynamics by partitioning tubulin dimers between pools of soluble tubulin and polymerized microtubules, and by directly binding to microtubules and promoting depolymerization. Analysis of stai function in Drosophila, which has a single stai gene, circumvents potential complications with studies performed in vertebrate systems in which mutant phenotypes may be compensated by genetic redundancy of other members of the stai gene family. This has allowed us to identify an essential function for stai in the maintenance of the integrity of axonal microtubules. In addition to the severe disruption in the abundance and architecture of microtubules in the axons of stai mutant Drosophila, we also observe additional neurological phenotypes associated with loss of stai function including a posterior paralysis and tail-flip phenotype in third instar larvae, aberrant accumulation of transported membranous organelles in stai deficient axons, a progressive bang-sensitive response to mechanical stimulation reminiscent of the class of Drosophila mutants used to model human epileptic seizures, and a reduced adult lifespan. Reductions in the levels of Kinesin-1, the primary anterograde motor in axonal transport, enhance these phenotypes. Collectively, our results indicate that stai has an important role in neuronal function, likely through the maintenance of microtubule integrity in the axons of nerves of the peripheral nervous system necessary to support and sustain long-distance axonal transport.

  11. Acentrosomal Microtubule Assembly in Mitosis: The Where, When, and How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Sylvain; Vernos, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    In mitosis the cell assembles the bipolar spindle, a microtubule (MT)-based apparatus that segregates the duplicated chromosomes into two daughter cells. Most animal cells enter mitosis with duplicated centrosomes that provide an active source of dynamic MTs. However, it is now established that spindle assembly relies on the nucleation of acentrosomal MTs occurring around the chromosomes after nuclear envelope breakdown, and on pre-existing microtubules. Where chromosome-dependent MT nucleation occurs, when MT amplification takes place and how the two pathways function are still key questions that generate some controversies. We reconcile the data and present an integrated model accounting for acentrosomal microtubule assembly in the dividing cell.

  12. Studying neuronal microtubule organization and microtubule-associated proteins using single molecule localization microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chazeau, Anaël; Katrukha, Eugene A; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2016-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of highly polarized neurons critically depends on the proper organization of the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton. In axons, MTs are uniformly oriented with their plus-end pointing outward whereas in mature dendrites MTs have mixed orientations. MT organization and dynamic

  13. Contact dynamics of elasto-plastic thin beams simulated via absolute nodal coordinate formulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Tao Wang; Qiang Tian; Hai-Yan Hu

    2016-01-01

    Under the frame of multibody dynamics, the contact dynamics of elasto-plastic spatial thin beams is numerically studied by using the spatial thin beam elements of absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF). The inter-nal force of the elasto-plastic spatial thin beam element is derived under the assumption that the plastic strain of the beam element depends only on its longitudinal deformation. A new body-fixed local coordinate system is introduced into the spatial thin beam element of ANCF for efficient con-tact detection in the contact dynamics simulation. The linear isotropic hardening constitutive law is used to describe the elasto-plastic deformation of beam material, and the classical return mapping algorithm is adopted to evaluate the plastic strains. A multi-zone contact approach of thin beams previ-ously proposed by the authors is also introduced to detect the multiple contact zones of beams accurately, and the penalty method is used to compute the normal contact force of thin beams in contact. Four numerical examples are given to demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of the pro-posed elasto-plastic spatial thin beam element of ANCF for flexible multibody system dynamics.

  14. Shared knowledge or shared affordances? Insights from an ecological dynamics approach to team coordination in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pedro; Garganta, Júlio; Araújo, Duarte; Davids, Keith; Aguiar, Paulo

    2013-09-01

    Previous research has proposed that team coordination is based on shared knowledge of the performance context, responsible for linking teammates' mental representations for collective, internalized action solutions. However, this representational approach raises many questions including: how do individual schemata of team members become reformulated together? How much time does it take for this collective cognitive process to occur? How do different cues perceived by different individuals sustain a general shared mental representation? This representational approach is challenged by an ecological dynamics perspective of shared knowledge in team coordination. We argue that the traditional shared knowledge assumption is predicated on 'knowledge about' the environment, which can be used to share knowledge and influence intentions of others prior to competition. Rather, during competitive performance, the control of action by perceiving surrounding informational constraints is expressed in 'knowledge of' the environment. This crucial distinction emphasizes perception of shared affordances (for others and of others) as the main communication channel between team members during team coordination tasks. From this perspective, the emergence of coordinated behaviours in sports teams is based on the formation of interpersonal synergies between players resulting from collective actions predicated on shared affordances.

  15. Effects of Agent-Environment Symmetry on the Coordination Dynamics of Triadic Jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijima, Akifumi; Shima, Hiroyuki; Okumura, Motoki; Yamamoto, Yuji; Richardson, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether the patterns of coordination that emerged during a three-participant (triadic) jumping task were defined by the symmetries of the (multi) agent-environment task space. Triads were instructed to jump around different geometrical arrangements of hoops. The symmetry of the hoop geometry was manipulated to create two symmetrical and two asymmetrical participant-hoop configurations. Video and motion tracking recordings were employed to determine the frequencies of coordination misses (collisions or failed jumps) and during 20 successful jump sequences, the jump direction chosen (clockwise vs. counterclockwise) and the patterning of between participant temporal movement lags within and across jump events. The results revealed that the (a)symmetry of the joint action workspace significantly influenced the (a)symmetry of the jump direction dynamics and, more importantly, the (a)symmetry of the between participant coordination lags. The symmetrical participant-hoop configurations resulted in smaller overall movement lags and a more spontaneous, interchangeable leader/follower relationship between participants, whereas the asymmetrical participant-hoop configurations resulted in slightly larger overall movements lags and a more explicit, persistent asymmetry in the leader/follower relationship of participants. The degree to which the patterns of behavioral coordination that emerged were consistent with the theory of symmetry groups and spontaneous and explicit symmetry-breaking are discussed. PMID:28210231

  16. Artificial coordinating field and its application to motion planning of robots in uncertain dynamic environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING; Xingjian; WANG; Yuechao; TAN; Dalong

    2004-01-01

    Artificial coordinating fields (ACF) are proposed to deal with the motion planning problems of mobile robots in uncertain dynamic environments. An ACF around an obstacle can generate two orthogonal force vectors to a robot: one is called the coordinating force vector which is purposively designed in this paper, and the other is the repulsive force vector which is the same as that in a conventional artificial potential field.The ACF is designed according to the updated motion purpose and the relative states of the robot with respect to its local environment, and it also satisfies the robot's dynamic constraints. The direction of the coordinating force can be determined on line according to an optimal evaluation function. The ACF can effectively remove the local minima, and reduce the oscillation of the planned trajectory between multiple obstacles. Only local knowledge of the environments is needed in the ACF-based motion planning. The properties of the ACF such as controllability, adaptability, safety and reachability are studied and discussed in detail in this paper. Theoretical analysis and simulations are given to illustrate our main results.

  17. Team dynamics, clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between primary care providers: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hummy; Ryan, Molly; Tendulkar, Shalini; Fisher, Josephine; Martin, Julia; Peters, Antoinette S; Frolkis, Joseph P; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Chien, Alyna T; Singer, Sara J

    Team-based care is essential for delivering high-quality, comprehensive, and coordinated care. Despite considerable research about the effects of team-based care on patient outcomes, few studies have examined how team dynamics relate to provider outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine relationships among team dynamics, primary care provider (PCP) clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between PCPs in 18 Harvard-affiliated primary care practices participating in Harvard's Academic Innovations Collaborative. First, we administered a cross-sectional survey to all 548 PCPs (267 attending clinicians, 281 resident physicians) working at participating practices; 65% responded. We assessed the relationship of team dynamics with PCPs' clinical work satisfaction and perception of patient care coordination between PCPs, respectively, and the potential mediating effect of patient care coordination on the relationship between team dynamics and work satisfaction. In addition, we embedded a qualitative evaluation within the quantitative evaluation to achieve a convergent mixed methods design to help us better understand our findings and illuminate relationships among key variables. Better team dynamics were positively associated with clinical work satisfaction and quality of patient care coordination between PCPs. Coordination partially mediated the relationship between team dynamics and satisfaction for attending clinicians, suggesting that higher satisfaction depends, in part, on better teamwork, yielding more coordinated patient care. We found no mediating effects for resident physicians. Qualitative results suggest that sources of satisfaction from positive team dynamics for PCPs may be most relevant to attending clinicians. Improving primary care team dynamics could improve clinical work satisfaction among PCPs and patient care coordination between PCPs. In addition to improving outcomes that directly concern health care providers, efforts to

  18. The microtubule plus-end-tracking protein CLIP-170 associates with the spermatid manchette and is essential for spermatogenesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Akhmanova (Anna); A.L. Mausset-Bonnefont (Anne-Laure); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); N. Keijzer (Nanda); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper); T. Stepanova (Tatiana); K. Drabek (Ksenija); J. van der Wees (Jacqueline); M. Mommaas (Mieke); J. Onderwater (Jos); H. van der Meulen (Hans); M.E. Tanenbaum (Marvin); R.H. Medema (Rene); J.W. Hoogerbrugge (Jos); J.T.M. Vreeburg (Jan); E.J. Uringa; J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); N.J. Galjart (Niels)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractCLIP-170 is a microtubule "plus-end-tracking protein" implicated in the control of microtubule dynamics, dynactin localization, and the linking of endosomes to microtubules. To investigate the function of mouse CLIP-170, we generated CLIP-170 knockout and GFP-CLIP-170 knock-in alleles. R

  19. The microtubule plus-end-tracking protein CLIP-170 associates with the spermatid manchette and is essential for spermatogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akhmanova, A.S.; Mausset-Bonnefont, A.-L.; Cappellen, W. van; Keijzer, N.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Stepanova, T.; Drabek, K.; Wees, J. van der; Mommaas, M.; Onderwater, J.; Meulen, H. van der; Tanenbaum, M.E.; Medema, R.H.; Hoogerbrugge, J.; Vreeburg, J.; Uringa, E.-J.; Grootegoed, J.A.; Grosveld, F.; Galjart, N.

    2005-01-01

    CLIP-170 is a microtubule "plus-end-tracking protein" implicated in the control of microtubule dynamics, dynactin localization, and the linking of endosomes to microtubules. To investigate the function of mouse CLIP-170, we generated CLIP-170 knockout and GFP-CLIP-170 knock-in alleles. Residual CLIP

  20. Electrostatically biased binding of kinesin to microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Grant

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The minimum motor domain of kinesin-1 is a single head. Recent evidence suggests that such minimal motor domains generate force by a biased binding mechanism, in which they preferentially select binding sites on the microtubule that lie ahead in the progress direction of the motor. A specific molecular mechanism for biased binding has, however, so far been lacking. Here we use atomistic Brownian dynamics simulations combined with experimental mutagenesis to show that incoming kinesin heads undergo electrostatically guided diffusion-to-capture by microtubules, and that this produces directionally biased binding. Kinesin-1 heads are initially rotated by the electrostatic field so that their tubulin-binding sites face inwards, and then steered towards a plus-endwards binding site. In tethered kinesin dimers, this bias is amplified. A 3-residue sequence (RAK in kinesin helix alpha-6 is predicted to be important for electrostatic guidance. Real-world mutagenesis of this sequence powerfully influences kinesin-driven microtubule sliding, with one mutant producing a 5-fold acceleration over wild type. We conclude that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the kinesin stepping mechanism, by biasing the diffusional association of kinesin with microtubules.

  1. Coordination, Organisation and Model-driven Approaches for Dynamic, Flexible, Robust Software and Services Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Juan Carlos; Padget, Julian; Vasconcelos, Wamberto; Staikopoulos, Athanasios; Cliffe, Owen; Dignum, Frank; Vázquez-Salceda, Javier; Clarke, Siobhán; Reed, Chris

    Enterprise systems are increasingly composed of (and even functioning as) components in a dynamic, digital ecosystem. On the one hand, this new situation requires flexible, spontaneous and opportunistic collaboration activities to be identified and established among (electronic) business parties. On the other, it demands engineering methods that are able to integrate new functionalities and behaviours into running systems composed by active, distributed, interdependent processes. Here we present a multi-level architecture that combines organisational and coordination theories with model driven development, for the implementation, deployment and management of dynamic, flexible and robust service-oriented business applications, combined with a service layer that accommodates semantic service description, fine-grained semantic service discovery and the dynamic adaptation of services to meet changing circumstances.

  2. Tubulin bond energies and microtubule biomechanics determined from nanoindentation in silico

    CERN Document Server

    Kononova, Olga; Theisen, Kelly E; Marx, Kenneth A; Dima, Ruxandra I; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Barsegov, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules, the primary components of the chromosome segregation machinery, are stabilized by longitudinal and lateral non-covalent bonds between the tubulin subunits. However, the thermodynamics of these bonds and the microtubule physico-chemical properties are poorly understood. Here, we explore the biomechanics of microtubule polymers using multiscale computational modeling and nanoindentations in silico of a contiguous microtubule fragment. A close match between the simulated and experimental force-deformation spectra enabled us to correlate the microtubule biomechanics with dynamic structural transitions at the nanoscale. Our mechanical testing revealed that the compressed MT behaves as a system of rigid elements interconnected through a network of lateral and longitudinal elastic bonds. The initial regime of continuous elastic deformation of the microtubule is followed by the transition regime, during which the microtubule lattice undergoes discrete structural changes, which include first the reversib...

  3. Globally visualizing the microtubule-dependent transport behaviors of influenza virus in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Lin; Zhang, Li-Juan; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Wu, Qiu-Mei; Sun, En-Ze; Shi, Yun-Bo; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-04-15

    Understanding the microtubule-dependent behaviors of viruses in live cells is very meaningful for revealing the mechanisms of virus infection and endocytosis. Herein, we used a quantum dots-based single-particle tracking technique to dynamically and globally visualize the microtubule-dependent transport behaviors of influenza virus in live cells. We found that the intersection configuration of microtubules can interfere with the transport behaviors of the virus in live cells, which lead to the changing and long-time pausing of the transport behavior of viruses. Our results revealed that most of the viruses moved along straight microtubules rapidly and unidirectionally from the cell periphery to the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) near the bottom of the cell, and the viruses were confined in the grid of microtubules near the top of the cell and at the MTOC near the bottom of the cell. These results provided deep insights into the influence of entire microtubule geometry on the virus infection.

  4. A Chimeric Cetuximab-Functionalized Corona as a Potent Delivery System for Microtubule-Destabilizing Nanocomplexes to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells: A Focus on EGFR and Tubulin Intracellular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojari, Radhika; Kini, Sudarshan; Srivastava, Rohit; Panda, Dulal

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we have developed microtubule destabilizing agents combretastatin A4 (CA4) or 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) encapsulated poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) nanocomplexes for targeted delivery to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to be overexpressed in HCC cells. Therefore, the targeting moiety cetuximab (Cet), an anti-EGFR chimeric monoclonal antibody, is functionalized on the surface of these diblock copolymeric coronas. Cetuximab is associated with the extracellular domain of the EGFR; therefore, the uptake of the cetuximab conjugated nanocomplexes occurred efficiently in EGFR overexpressing HCC cells indicating potent internalization of the complex. The cetuximab targeted-PLGA-b-PEG nanocomplexes encapsulating CA4 or 2ME strongly inhibited phospho-EGFR expression, depolymerized microtubules, produced spindle abnormalities, stalled mitosis, and induced apoptosis in Huh7 cells compared to the free drugs, CA4 or 2ME. Further, the combinatorial strategy of targeted nanocomplexes, Cet-PLGA-b-PEG-CA4 NP and Cet-PLGA-b-PEG-2ME NP, significantly reduced the migration of Huh7 cells, and markedly enhanced the anticancer effects of the microtubule-targeted drugs in Huh7 cells compared to the free drugs, CA4 or 2ME. The results indicated that EGFR receptor-mediated internalization via cetuximab facilitated enhanced uptake of the nanocomplexes leading to potent anticancer efficacy in Huh7 cells. Cetuximab-functionalized PLGA-b-PEG nanocomplexes possess a strong potential for the targeted delivery of CA4 or 2ME in EGFR overexpressed HCC cells, and the strategy may be useful for selectively targeting microtubules in these cells.

  5. Molecular dynamic simulations of the lithium coordination environment in phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALAM,TODD M.; LIANG,JIANJIE; CYGAN,RANDALL T.

    2000-06-07

    A molecular dynamics (MD) study of the lithium ultraphosphate glass series, xLi{sub 2}O{center_dot}(1{minus}x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (0 {le} x < 0.5) was used to investigate the changes in the Li environment with increasing modifier concentration. The results from the MD simulations indicate that no major structural variations in the Li coordination environment are observed. Changes in the type of oxygen coordinated to the modifier are observed and correlate with the T{sub g} minimum. Additionally, changes in the number of shared phosphorus vertices are observed with increasing modifier concentration, in support of recent models involving the role of the modifier in the extended range structure of phosphate glasses. Empirical calculations of the {sup 6}Li NMR chemical shifts directly from the MD simulation structures is also reported and compared to recent experimental solid-state NMR results.

  6. Traffic Management Coordinator Evaluation of the Dynamic Weather Routes Concept and System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chester

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic Weather Routes (DWR) is a weather-avoidance system for airline dispatchers and FAA traffic managers that continually searches for and advises the user of more efficient routes around convective weather. NASA and American Airlines (AA) have been conducting an operational trial of DWR since July 17, 2012. The objective of this evaluation is to assess DWR from a traffic management coordinator (TMC) perspective, using recently retired TMCs and actual DWR reroutes advisories that were rated acceptable by AA during the operational trial. Results from the evaluation showed that the primary reasons for a TMC to modify or reject airline reroute requests were related to airspace configuration. Approximately 80 percent of the reroutes evaluated required some coordination before implementation. Analysis showed TMCs approved 62 percent of the requested DWR reroutes, resulting in 57 percent of the total requested DWR time savings.

  7. Linking cortical microtubule attachment and exocytosis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivar Noordstra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Exocytosis is a fundamental cellular process whereby secreted molecules are packaged into vesicles that move along cytoskeletal filaments and fuse with the plasma membrane. To function optimally, cells are strongly dependent on precisely controlled delivery of exocytotic cargo. In mammalian cells, microtubules serve as major tracks for vesicle transport by motor proteins, and thus microtubule organization is important for targeted delivery of secretory carriers. Over the years, multiple microtubule-associated and cortical proteins have been discovered that facilitate the interaction between the microtubule plus ends and the cell cortex. In this review, we focus on mammalian protein complexes that have been shown to participate in both cortical microtubule capture and exocytosis, thereby regulating the spatial organization of secretion. These complexes include microtubule plus-end tracking proteins, scaffolding factors, actin-binding proteins, and components of vesicle docking machinery, which together allow efficient coordination of cargo transport and release.

  8. Cell Biology: Microtubule Collisions to the Rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Melissa K

    2016-12-19

    The proper regulation of microtubule lengths is fundamental to their cellular function. New work now reports that the collision of a growing microtubule end with another object, such as a microtubule, can contribute to the regulation of microtubule lengths by leaving behind damage that ultimately acts to stabilize the microtubule network. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutual and asynchronous anticipation and action in sports as globally competitive and locally coordinative dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Isaka, Tadao; Kouzaki, Motoki; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    Humans interact by changing their actions, perceiving other’s actions and executing solutions in conflicting situations. Using oscillator models, nonlinear dynamics have been considered for describing these complex human movements as an emergence of self-organisation. However, these frameworks cannot explain the hierarchical structures of complex behaviours between conflicting inter-agent and adapting intra-agent systems, especially in sport competitions wherein mutually quick decision making and execution are required. Here we adopt a hybrid multiscale approach to model an attack-and-defend game during which both players predict the opponent’s movement and move with a delay. From both simulated and measured data, one synchronous outcome between two-agent (i.e. successful defence) can be described as one attractor. In contrast, the other coordination-breaking outcome (i.e. successful attack) cannot be explained using gradient dynamics because the asymmetric interaction cannot always assume a conserved physical quantity. Instead, we provide the asymmetric and asynchronous hierarchical dynamical models to discuss two-agent competition. Our framework suggests that possessing information about an opponent and oneself in local-coordinative and global-competitive scale enables us to gain a deeper understanding of sports competitions. We anticipate developments in the scientific fields of complex movement adapting to such uncontrolled environments.

  10. Perspective: Insight into reaction coordinates and dynamics from the potential energy landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, D. J.

    2015-04-01

    This perspective focuses on conceptual and computational aspects of the potential energy landscape framework. It has two objectives: first to summarise some key developments of the approach and second to illustrate how such techniques can be applied using a specific example that exploits knowledge of pathways. Recent developments in theory and simulation within the landscape framework are first outlined, including methods for structure prediction, analysis of global thermodynamic properties, and treatment of rare event dynamics. We then develop a connection between the kinetic transition network treatment of dynamics and a potential of mean force defined by a reaction coordinate. The effect of projection from the full configuration space to low dimensionality is illustrated for an atomic cluster. In this example, where a relatively successful structural order parameter is available, the principal change in cluster morphology is reproduced, but some details are not faithfully represented. In contrast, a profile based on configurations that correspond to the discrete path defined geometrically retains all the barriers and minima. This comparison provides insight into the physical origins of "friction" effects in low-dimensionality descriptions of dynamics based upon a reaction coordinate.

  11. A thermodynamic model of microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard M A G Piette

    Full Text Available Microtubules are self-assembling polymers whose dynamics are essential for the normal function of cellular processes including chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Therefore understanding what factors effect microtubule growth is fundamental to our understanding of the control of microtubule based processes. An important factor that determines the status of a microtubule, whether it is growing or shrinking, is the length of the GTP tubulin microtubule cap. Here, we derive a Monte Carlo model of the assembly and disassembly of microtubules. We use thermodynamic laws to reduce the number of parameters of our model and, in particular, we take into account the contribution of water to the entropy of the system. We fit all parameters of the model from published experimental data using the GTP tubulin dimer attachment rate and the lateral and longitudinal binding energies of GTP and GDP tubulin dimers at both ends. Also we calculate and incorporate the GTP hydrolysis rate. We have applied our model and can mimic published experimental data, which formerly suggested a single layer GTP tubulin dimer microtubule cap, to show that these data demonstrate that the GTP cap can fluctuate and can be several microns long.

  12. A thermodynamic model of microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, Bernard M A G; Liu, Junli; Peeters, Kasper; Smertenko, Andrei; Hawkins, Timothy; Deeks, Michael; Quinlan, Roy; Zakrzewski, Wojciech J; Hussey, Patrick J

    2009-08-11

    Microtubules are self-assembling polymers whose dynamics are essential for the normal function of cellular processes including chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Therefore understanding what factors effect microtubule growth is fundamental to our understanding of the control of microtubule based processes. An important factor that determines the status of a microtubule, whether it is growing or shrinking, is the length of the GTP tubulin microtubule cap. Here, we derive a Monte Carlo model of the assembly and disassembly of microtubules. We use thermodynamic laws to reduce the number of parameters of our model and, in particular, we take into account the contribution of water to the entropy of the system. We fit all parameters of the model from published experimental data using the GTP tubulin dimer attachment rate and the lateral and longitudinal binding energies of GTP and GDP tubulin dimers at both ends. Also we calculate and incorporate the GTP hydrolysis rate. We have applied our model and can mimic published experimental data, which formerly suggested a single layer GTP tubulin dimer microtubule cap, to show that these data demonstrate that the GTP cap can fluctuate and can be several microns long.

  13. Stem cell therapy and coordination dynamics therapy to improve spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalow, G

    2008-01-01

    During competition a motocross athlete suffered a clinically complete spinal cord injury (SCI) at the Thoracic 11/12 levels according to MRIs (magnetic resonance imaging). Six weeks after the accident the subject began intensive Coordination Dynamics Therapy (CDT) at an up-to-date therapy centre. After 6 months of therapy, when further improvements were only marginal, the patient opted for haematopoietic stem cell therapy in addition to ongoing CDT. During two years of stem cell therapy, including 4 sessions of stem cell application, and ongoing coordination dynamics therapy, improvement remained marginal--no more than what would have been achieved with continuing only CDT. It is concluded that this haematopoietic stem cell therapy did not have any beneficial effect on the repair of the spinal cord in this patient. Differences in the regeneration capacity between commonly used laboratory animals and human are addressed. On the basis of a frog model for regeneration, cell communication, and neural control, it is discussed why complete SCI in human are difficult to improve and why for stem cell therapies more proper human knowledge is needed to induce structural repair and direct it to the injured sites of the neuronal networks. Further research is needed to improve and justify the clinical application of stem cell therapy. A thoughtful combination of stem cell therapy and CDT may have a chance of structural repair even in complete SCI. However, objective measures are needed to quantify improvement in MRI (anatomic measure), EMG (measuring of motor programs by sEMG, electrophysiologic measure), and measurements of coordination dynamics (kinesiologic measure).

  14. Sites of glucose transporter-4 vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane correlate spatially with microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennine M Dawicki-McKenna

    Full Text Available In adipocytes, vesicles containing glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4 redistribute from intracellular stores to the cell periphery in response to insulin stimulation. Vesicles then fuse with the plasma membrane, facilitating glucose transport into the cell. To gain insight into the details of microtubule involvement, we examined the spatial organization and dynamics of microtubules in relation to GLUT4 vesicle trafficking in living 3T3-L1 adipocytes using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy. Insulin stimulated an increase in microtubule density and curvature within the TIRF-illuminated region of the cell. The high degree of curvature and abrupt displacements of microtubules indicate that substantial forces act on microtubules. The time course of the microtubule density increase precedes that of the increase in intensity of fluorescently-tagged GLUT4 in this same region of the cell. In addition, portions of the microtubules are highly curved and are pulled closer to the cell cortex, as confirmed by Parallax microscopy. Microtubule disruption delayed and modestly reduced GLUT4 accumulation at the plasma membrane. Quantitative analysis revealed that fusions of GLUT4-containing vesicles with the plasma membrane, detected using insulin-regulated aminopeptidase with a pH-sensitive GFP tag (pHluorin, preferentially occur near microtubules. Interestingly, long-distance vesicle movement along microtubules visible at the cell surface prior to fusion does not appear to account for this proximity. We conclude that microtubules may be important in providing spatial information for GLUT4 vesicle fusion.

  15. Selective Adsorption of CO2 from Light Gas Mixtures Using a Structurally Dynamic Porous Coordination Polymer**

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristi L. Kauffman, Jeffrey T. Culp, Andrew J. Allen, Laura Espinal, Winnie Wong-Ng, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    The selective adsorption of CO{sub 2} from mixtures with N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O in a dynamic porous coordination polymer (see monomer structure) was evaluated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, GC, and SANS. All three techniques indicate highly selective adsorption of CO{sub 2} from CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures at 30 C, with no selectivity observed for the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O system.

  16. Hamiltonian Analysis of 3-Dimensional Connection Dynamics in Bondi-like Coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chao-Guang

    2016-01-01

    The Hamiltonian analysis for a 3-dimensional $SO(1,1)\\times T_+$-connection dynamics is conducted in a Bondi-like coordinate system.A null coframe with 5 independent variables and 9 connection coefficients are treated as basic configuration variables.All constraints and their consistency conditions, as well as the equations of motion,for the system are presented.There is no physical degree of freedom in the system as expected.The Ba\\~nados-Teitelboim-Zanelli spacetime as an example is used to check the analysis.

  17. Tortoise Coordinates and Hawking Radiation in a Dynamical Spherically Symmetric Spacetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jian; ZHAO Zheng; TIAN Gui-Hua; LIU Wen-Biao

    2009-01-01

    Hawking effect from dynamical spherical Vaidya black hole,Vaidya-Bonner black hole,and Vaidya-de Sitter black hole is investigated using the improved Damour-Ruffini method.After the new tortoise coordinate transformation in which the position τ of event horizon is an undetermined function and the temperature parameter κ is an undetermined constant,the Klein-Gordon equation can be written as the standard form at the event horizon,and both τ and κ can be determined automatically.Then extending the outgoing wave from outside to inside of the horizon analytically,the Hawking temperature can also be obtained automatically.

  18. Mechanism of supply chain coordination cased on dynamic capability framework-the mediating role of manufacturing capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Gao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A critical issue has been absent from the conversation on supply chain coordination: how supply chain coordination influence the enterprise performance. This research proposes a new vision to research the performance mechanism of supply chain coordination capability as a dynamic capability. Manufacturing capabilities are existed as mediating role. Design/methodology/approach: Data from International Manufacturing Strategy Survey in 2009 is used to verify the mediating model by hierarchical regression analysis. Findings: The results show that supply chain coordination impacts the enterprise performance positively and indirect impacts the enterprise performance through quality, cost, flexibility. Research implications: This study presents an overview of the impact of supply chain coordination and manufacturing capabilities on enterprise performance, giving grasp for further research of the relationships that exist between them. Originality/value: This finding integrates insights from previous research in dynamic capability framework and supply chain management into a generalization and extension of the performance mechanism in manufacturing enterprises.

  19. A dynamic signal coordination control method for urban arterial roads and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-jiang SHEN; Yong-yao YANG

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel dynamic traffic signal coordination method that takes account of the special traffic flow char-acteristics of urban arterial roads. The core of this method includes a control area division module and a signal coordination control module. Firstly, we analyze and model the influences of segment distance, traffic flow density, and signal cycle time on the cor-relation degree between two neighboring intersections. Then, we propose a fuzzy computing method to estimate the correlation degree based on a hierarchical structure and a method to divide the control area of urban arterial roads into subareas based on correlation degrees. Subarea coordination control arithmetic is used to calculate the public cycle time of the control subarea, up-run offset and down-run offset of the section, and the split of each intersection. An application of the method in Shaoxing City, Zhejiang Province, China shows that the method can reduce the average travel time and the average stop rate effectively.

  20. Capture of microtubule plus-ends at the actin cortex promotes axophilic neuronal migration by enhancing microtubule tension in the leading process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, B Ian; Wray, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules are a critical part of neuronal polarity and leading process extension, thus microtubule movement plays an important role in neuronal migration. However, the dynamics of microtubules during the forward movement of the nucleus into the leading process (nucleokinesis) is unclear and may be dependent on the cell type and mode of migration used. In particular, little is known about cytoskeletal changes during axophilic migration, commonly used in anteroposterior neuronal migration. We recently showed that leading process actin flow in migrating GnRH neurons is controlled by a signaling cascade involving IP3 receptors, CaMKK, AMPK, and RhoA. In the present study, microtubule dynamics were examined in GnRH neurons. Failure of the migration of these cells leads to the neuroendocrine disorder Kallmann Syndrome. Microtubules translocated forward along the leading process shaft during migration, but reversed direction and moved toward the nucleus when migration stalled. Blocking calcium release through IP3 receptors halted migration and induced the same reversal of microtubule translocation, while blocking cortical actin flow prevented microtubules from translocating toward the distal leading process. Super-resolution imaging revealed that microtubule plus-end tips are captured at the actin cortex through calcium-dependent mechanisms. This work shows that cortical actin flow draws the microtubule network forward through calcium-dependent capture in order to promote nucleokinesis, revealing a novel mechanism engaged by migrating neurons to facilitate movement.

  1. Bio-Inspired Composite Interfaces: Controlling Hydrogel Mechanics via Polymer-Nanoparticle Coordination Bond Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holten-Andersen, Niels

    2015-03-01

    In soft nanocomposite materials, the effective interaction between polymer molecules and inorganic nanoparticle surfaces plays a critical role in bulk mechanical properties. However, controlling these interfacial interactions remains a challenge. Inspired by the adhesive chemistry in mussel threads, we present a novel approach to control composite mechanics via polymer-particle interfacial dynamics; by incorporating iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) into a catechol-modified polymer network the resulting hydrogels are crosslinked via reversible coordination bonds at Fe3O4 NP surfaces thereby providing a dynamic gel network with robust self-healing properties. By studying the thermally activated composite network relaxation processes we have found that the polymer-NP binding energy can be controlled by engineering both the organic and inorganic side of the interface.

  2. Chronophin coordinates cell leading edge dynamics by controlling active cofilin levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme-Walker, Violaine; Seo, Ji-Yeon; Gohla, Antje; Fowler, Bruce; Bohl, Ben; DerMardirossian, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Cofilin, a critical player of actin dynamics, is spatially and temporally regulated to control the direction and force of membrane extension required for cell locomotion. In carcinoma cells, although the signaling pathways regulating cofilin activity to control cell direction have been established, the molecular machinery required to generate the force of the protrusion remains unclear. We show that the cofilin phosphatase chronophin (CIN) spatiotemporally regulates cofilin activity at the cell edge to generate persistent membrane extension. We show that CIN translocates to the leading edge in a PI3-kinase–, Rac1-, and cofilin-dependent manner after EGF stimulation to activate cofilin, promotes actin free barbed end formation, accelerates actin turnover, and enhances membrane protrusion. In addition, we establish that CIN is crucial for the balance of protrusion/retraction events during cell migration. Thus, CIN coordinates the leading edge dynamics by controlling active cofilin levels to promote MTLn3 cell protrusion. PMID:26324884

  3. Dynamics of the Coordination of Economy-Society and Resource-Environment in Shandong Peninsula, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Rongqing; Zhao Minghua

    2012-01-01

    Shandong Peninsula, as a more developed region in Shandong Province even the east coast of China, is facing challenges from resources and environment pressures. This paper tried to track and assess the coordination status and the dynamic between resource-environment and economy-society systems in Shandong Peninsula during 2001-2008 in order to provide deci- sion support for regional sustainability. An appraisal index system was built including five aspects of harmony degree (A), sustain- ability degree (B), opening degree (C), stability degree (D) and controllability degree (E). The results showed that: 1) The coor- dination level of resource-environment and economy-society in Shandong Peninsula has continuously grown, and it has undergone three stages: no coordinated degree (2001-2002), weak coordi- nated degree (2003-2006) and basically coordinated degree (2007- 2008). 2) Five indexes of criterion hierarchy also increased overall, but each index showed different trends. Harmony degree, sustain- ability degree and opening degree rose all the time, while stability degree and controllability degree alternately rose and fell. The improvement of controllability degree was the slowest. 3) The ag- gravating trend of environmental pollution was slowing down. The economic growth was driven by industrial growth and urbanization typically and investment was still the main force to pull the regional economic growth. At the same time, technology and education were becoming more and more important for economic growth. The level of foreign capital utility declined and the geographical advantage of Shandong Peninsula was exerted. Meanwhile some characteristics of knowledge economy were presenting. Water re- sources become the main constraint factor of fast development in Shandong Peninsula. It is necessary to further strengthen the coordination ability of government on regional sustainable development.

  4. Dynamic reaction coordinate in thermally fluctuating environment in the framework of the multidimensional generalized Langevin equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2010-12-21

    A framework recently developed for the extraction of a dynamic reaction coordinate to mediate reactions buried in a multidimensional Langevin equation is extended to the generalized Langevin equations without a priori assumption of the forms of the potential (in general, nonlinearly coupled systems) and the friction kernel. The equation of motion with memory effect can be transformed into an equation without memory at the cost of an increase in the dimensionality of the system, and hence the theoretical framework developed for the (nonlinear) Langevin formulation can be generalized to the non-Markovian process with colored noise. It is found that the increased dimension can be physically interpreted as effective modes of the fluctuating environment. As an illustrative example, we apply this theory to a multidimensional generalized Langevin equation for motion on the Müller-Brown potential surface with an exponential friction kernel. Numerical simulations find a boundary between the highly reactive region and the less reactive region in the space of initial conditions. The location of the boundary is found to depend significantly on both the memory kernel and the nonlinear couplings. The theory extracts a reaction coordinate whose sign determines the fate of the reaction taking into account thermally fluctuating environments, memory effect, and nonlinearities. It is found that the location of the boundary of reactivity is satisfactorily reproduced as the zero of the statistical average of the new reaction coordinate, which is an analytical functional of both the original position coordinates and velocities of the system, and of the properties of the environment.

  5. Analysis of Soybean Microtubule Persistence Length; New Evidence on the Correlation between Structural Composition and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra; Winton, Carly; Barrientos, Jimmy

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies on microtubules composed of different β tubulin isotypes indicate their different functionality in terms of their dynamical behavior or the mechanism of their interaction with chemotherapeutic drugs. Along these lines, the result of our recent study measuring the rigidity of neural and non-neural samples of microtubules with different β tubulin isotype compositions suggests that the distinguished mechanical properties of microtubules, such as rigidity, may also be associated with the different distribution of their β tubulin isotypes. In our current study, we have reported the persistence length of a single soybean microtubule. This plant microtubule has a structural composition different from that of mammalian microtubules. Under the same experimental methods of measurement, the soybean microtubules showed a different persistence length as compared to the value of the persistence length that we estimated in the study of both single Bovine Brain and MCF7 microtubules.

  6. Insights from an erroneous kinetochore-microtubule attachment state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, Stuart; McGilvray, Philip T; Maresca, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Faithful distribution of the genome requires that sister kinetochores, which assemble on each chromatid during cell division, interact with dynamic microtubules from opposite spindle poles in a configuration called chromosome biorientation. Biorientation produces tension that increases the affinity of kinetochores for microtubules via ill-defined mechanisms. Non-bioriented kinetochore-microtubule (kt-MT) interactions are prevalent but short-lived due to an error correction pathway that reduces the affinity of kinetochores for microtubules. Interestingly, incorrect kt-MT interactions can be stabilized by experimentally applying force to misoriented chromosomes. Here, a live-cell force assay is utilized to characterize the molecular composition of a common type of improper kt-MT attachment. Our force-related studies are also discussed in the context of current models for tension-dependent stabilization of kt-MT interactions.

  7. Mechanical Models of Microtubule Bundle Collapse in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendek, Austin; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid-beta aggregates initiate Alzheimer's disease, and downstream trigger degradation of tau proteins that act as microtubule bundle stabilizers and mechanical spacers. Currently it is unclear which of tau cutting by proteases, tau phosphorylation, or tau aggregation are responsible for cytoskeleton degradation., We construct a percolation simulation of the microtubule bundle using a molecular spring model for the taus and including depletion force attraction between microtubules and membrane/actin cytoskeletal surface tension. The simulation uses a fictive molecular dynamics to model the motion of the individual microtubules within the bundle as a result of random tau removal, and calculates the elastic modulus of the bundle as the tau concentration falls. We link the tau removal steps to kinetic tau steps in various models of tau degradation. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624

  8. Dynamic Shift Coordinated Control Based on Motor Active Speed Synchronization with the New Hybrid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the inherent disadvantages that severely affect driving comfortability during the shift process in HEVs, a dynamic shift coordinated control based on motor active speed synchronization is proposed to improve shift quality by reduction of shift vibration. The whole control scheme is comprised of three phases, preparatory phase, speed regulation phase, and synchronization phase, which are implemented consecutively in order. The key to inhibiting impact and jerk depends on the speed regulation phase, where motor active speed synchronization is utilized to reach the minimum speed difference between the two ends of synchronizer. A new hybrid system with superior performances is applied to present the validity of the adopted control algorithm during upshift or downshift, which can represent planetary gear system and conventional AMT shift procedure, respectively. Bench test, simulation, and road test results show that, compared with other methods, the proposed dynamic coordinated control can achieve shifting control in real time to effectively improve gear-shift comfort and shorten power interruption transients, with robustness in both conventional AMT and planetary gear train.

  9. Overcoming potential energy distortions in constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Saugat; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Larsen, Adrien B; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2016-01-28

    The Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics (ICMD) method is an attractive molecular dynamics (MD) method for studying the dynamics of bonded systems such as proteins and polymers. It offers a simple venue for coarsening the dynamics model of a system at multiple hierarchical levels. For example, large scale protein dynamics can be studied using torsional dynamics, where large domains or helical structures can be treated as rigid bodies and the loops connecting them as flexible torsions. ICMD with such a dynamic model of the protein, combined with enhanced conformational sampling method such as temperature replica exchange, allows the sampling of large scale domain motion involving high energy barrier transitions. Once these large scale conformational transitions are sampled, all-torsion, or even all-atom, MD simulations can be carried out for the low energy conformations sampled via coarse grained ICMD to calculate the energetics of distinct conformations. Such hierarchical MD simulations can be carried out with standard all-atom forcefields without the need for compromising on the accuracy of the forces. Using constraints to treat bond lengths and bond angles as rigid can, however, distort the potential energy landscape of the system and reduce the number of dihedral transitions as well as conformational sampling. We present here a two-part solution to overcome such distortions of the potential energy landscape with ICMD models. To alleviate the intrinsic distortion that stems from the reduced phase space in torsional MD, we use the Fixman compensating potential. To additionally alleviate the extrinsic distortion that arises from the coupling between the dihedral angles and bond angles within a force field, we propose a hybrid ICMD method that allows the selective relaxing of bond angles. This hybrid ICMD method bridges the gap between all-atom MD and torsional MD. We demonstrate with examples that these methods together offer a solution to eliminate the potential

  10. Overcoming potential energy distortions in constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandel, Saugat; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Larsen, Adrien B.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan, E-mail: nvaidehi@coh.org [Division of Immunology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, California 91010 (United States); Jain, Abhinandan, E-mail: Abhi.Jain@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    The Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics (ICMD) method is an attractive molecular dynamics (MD) method for studying the dynamics of bonded systems such as proteins and polymers. It offers a simple venue for coarsening the dynamics model of a system at multiple hierarchical levels. For example, large scale protein dynamics can be studied using torsional dynamics, where large domains or helical structures can be treated as rigid bodies and the loops connecting them as flexible torsions. ICMD with such a dynamic model of the protein, combined with enhanced conformational sampling method such as temperature replica exchange, allows the sampling of large scale domain motion involving high energy barrier transitions. Once these large scale conformational transitions are sampled, all-torsion, or even all-atom, MD simulations can be carried out for the low energy conformations sampled via coarse grained ICMD to calculate the energetics of distinct conformations. Such hierarchical MD simulations can be carried out with standard all-atom forcefields without the need for compromising on the accuracy of the forces. Using constraints to treat bond lengths and bond angles as rigid can, however, distort the potential energy landscape of the system and reduce the number of dihedral transitions as well as conformational sampling. We present here a two-part solution to overcome such distortions of the potential energy landscape with ICMD models. To alleviate the intrinsic distortion that stems from the reduced phase space in torsional MD, we use the Fixman compensating potential. To additionally alleviate the extrinsic distortion that arises from the coupling between the dihedral angles and bond angles within a force field, we propose a hybrid ICMD method that allows the selective relaxing of bond angles. This hybrid ICMD method bridges the gap between all-atom MD and torsional MD. We demonstrate with examples that these methods together offer a solution to eliminate the potential

  11. Folding of the Tau Protein on Microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadavath, Harindranath; Jaremko, Mariusz; Jaremko, Łukasz; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2015-08-24

    Microtubules are regulated by microtubule-associated proteins. However, little is known about the structure of microtubule-associated proteins in complex with microtubules. Herein we show that the microtubule-associated protein Tau, which is intrinsically disordered in solution, locally folds into a stable structure upon binding to microtubules. While Tau is highly flexible in solution and adopts a β-sheet structure in amyloid fibrils, in complex with microtubules the conserved hexapeptides at the beginning of the Tau repeats two and three convert into a hairpin conformation. Thus, binding to microtubules stabilizes a unique conformation in Tau. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Dynamics between cancer cell subpopulations reveals a model coordinating with both hierarchical and stochastic concepts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weikang Wang

    Full Text Available Tumors are often heterogeneous in which tumor cells of different phenotypes have distinct properties. For scientific and clinical interests, it is of fundamental importance to understand their properties and the dynamic variations among different phenotypes, specifically under radio- and/or chemo-therapy. Currently there are two controversial models describing tumor heterogeneity, the cancer stem cell (CSC model and the stochastic model. To clarify the controversy, we measured probabilities of different division types and transitions of cells via in situ immunofluorescence. Based on the experiment data, we constructed a model that combines the CSC with the stochastic concepts, showing the existence of both distinctive CSC subpopulations and the stochastic transitions from NSCCs to CSCs. The results showed that the dynamic variations between CSCs and non-stem cancer cells (NSCCs can be simulated with the model. Further studies also showed that the model can be used to describe the dynamics of the two subpopulations after radiation treatment. More importantly, analysis demonstrated that the experimental detectable equilibrium CSC proportion can be achieved only when the stochastic transitions from NSCCs to CSCs occur, indicating that tumor heterogeneity may exist in a model coordinating with both the CSC and the stochastic concepts. The mathematic model based on experimental parameters may contribute to a better understanding of the tumor heterogeneity, and provide references on the dynamics of CSC subpopulation during radiotherapy.

  13. Mechanical modulation of cardiac microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ed

    2011-07-01

    Microtubules are a major component of the cardiac myocyte cytoskeleton. Interventions that alter it may influence cardiac mechanical and electrical activity by disrupting the trafficking of proteins to and from the surface membrane by molecular motors such as dynein, which use microtubules as tracks to step along. Free tubulin dimers may transfer GTP to the α-subunits of G-proteins, thus an increase in free tubulin could increase the activity of G-proteins; evidence for and against such a role exists. There is more general agreement that microtubules act as compression-resisting structures within myocytes, influencing visco-elasticity of myocytes and increasing resistance to shortening when proliferated and resisting deformation from longitudinal shear stress. In response to pressure overload, there can be post-translational modifications resulting in more stable microtubules and an increase in microtubule density. This is accompanied by contractile dysfunction of myocytes which can be reversed by microtubule disruption. There are reports of mechanically induced changes in electrical activity that are dependent upon microtubules, but at present, a consensus is lacking on whether disruption or proliferation would be beneficial in the prevention of arrhythmias. Microtubules certainly play a role in the response of cardiac myocytes to mechanical stimulation, the exact nature and significance of this role is still to be fully determined.

  14. Stabilizing versus destabilizing the microtubules: a double-edge sword for an effective cancer treatment option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanale, Daniele; Bronte, Giuseppe; Passiglia, Francesco; Calò, Valentina; Castiglia, Marta; Di Piazza, Florinda; Barraco, Nadia; Cangemi, Antonina; Catarella, Maria Teresa; Insalaco, Lavinia; Listì, Angela; Maragliano, Rossella; Massihnia, Daniela; Perez, Alessandro; Toia, Francesca; Cicero, Giuseppe; Bazan, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic and structural cellular components involved in several cell functions, including cell shape, motility, and intracellular trafficking. In proliferating cells, they are essential components in the division process through the formation of the mitotic spindle. As a result of these functions, tubulin and microtubules are targets for anticancer agents. Microtubule-targeting agents can be divided into two groups: microtubule-stabilizing, and microtubule-destabilizing agents. The former bind to the tubulin polymer and stabilize microtubules, while the latter bind to the tubulin dimers and destabilize microtubules. Alteration of tubulin-microtubule equilibrium determines the disruption of the mitotic spindle, halting the cell cycle at the metaphase-anaphase transition and, eventually, resulting in cell death. Clinical application of earlier microtubule inhibitors, however, unfortunately showed several limits, such as neurological and bone marrow toxicity and the emergence of drug-resistant tumor cells. Here we review several natural and synthetic microtubule-targeting agents, which showed antitumor activity and increased efficacy in comparison to traditional drugs in various preclinical and clinical studies. Cryptophycins, combretastatins, ombrabulin, soblidotin, D-24851, epothilones and discodermolide were used in clinical trials. Some of them showed antiangiogenic and antivascular activity and others showed the ability to overcome multidrug resistance, supporting their possible use in chemotherapy.

  15. Stabilizing versus Destabilizing the Microtubules: A Double-Edge Sword for an Effective Cancer Treatment Option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanale, Daniele; Bronte, Giuseppe; Passiglia, Francesco; Calò, Valentina; Castiglia, Marta; Di Piazza, Florinda; Barraco, Nadia; Cangemi, Antonina; Catarella, Maria Teresa; Insalaco, Lavinia; Listì, Angela; Maragliano, Rossella; Massihnia, Daniela; Perez, Alessandro; Toia, Francesca; Cicero, Giuseppe; Bazan, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic and structural cellular components involved in several cell functions, including cell shape, motility, and intracellular trafficking. In proliferating cells, they are essential components in the division process through the formation of the mitotic spindle. As a result of these functions, tubulin and microtubules are targets for anticancer agents. Microtubule-targeting agents can be divided into two groups: microtubule-stabilizing, and microtubule-destabilizing agents. The former bind to the tubulin polymer and stabilize microtubules, while the latter bind to the tubulin dimers and destabilize microtubules. Alteration of tubulin-microtubule equilibrium determines the disruption of the mitotic spindle, halting the cell cycle at the metaphase-anaphase transition and, eventually, resulting in cell death. Clinical application of earlier microtubule inhibitors, however, unfortunately showed several limits, such as neurological and bone marrow toxicity and the emergence of drug-resistant tumor cells. Here we review several natural and synthetic microtubule-targeting agents, which showed antitumor activity and increased efficacy in comparison to traditional drugs in various preclinical and clinical studies. Cryptophycins, combretastatins, ombrabulin, soblidotin, D-24851, epothilones and discodermolide were used in clinical trials. Some of them showed antiangiogenic and antivascular activity and others showed the ability to overcome multidrug resistance, supporting their possible use in chemotherapy. PMID:26484003

  16. Push-me-pull-you: how microtubules organize the cell interior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva M

    2008-09-01

    Dynamic organization of the cell interior, which is crucial for cell function, largely depends on the microtubule cytoskeleton. Microtubules move and position organelles by pushing, pulling, or sliding. Pushing forces can be generated by microtubule polymerization, whereas pulling typically involves microtubule depolymerization or molecular motors, or both. Sliding between a microtubule and another microtubule, an organelle, or the cell cortex is also powered by molecular motors. Although numerous examples of microtubule-based pushing and pulling in living cells have been observed, it is not clear why different cell types and processes employ different mechanisms. This review introduces a classification of microtubule-based positioning strategies and discusses the efficacy of pushing and pulling. The positioning mechanisms based on microtubule pushing are efficient for movements over small distances, and for centering of organelles in symmetric geometries. Mechanisms based on pulling, on the other hand, are typically more elaborate, but are necessary when the distances to be covered by the organelles are large, and when the geometry is asymmetric and complex. Thus, taking into account cell geometry and the length scale of the movements helps to identify general principles of the intracellular layout based on microtubule forces.

  17. Push-me-pull-you: how microtubules organize the cell interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic organization of the cell interior, which is crucial for cell function, largely depends on the microtubule cytoskeleton. Microtubules move and position organelles by pushing, pulling, or sliding. Pushing forces can be generated by microtubule polymerization, whereas pulling typically involves microtubule depolymerization or molecular motors, or both. Sliding between a microtubule and another microtubule, an organelle, or the cell cortex is also powered by molecular motors. Although numerous examples of microtubule-based pushing and pulling in living cells have been observed, it is not clear why different cell types and processes employ different mechanisms. This review introduces a classification of microtubule-based positioning strategies and discusses the efficacy of pushing and pulling. The positioning mechanisms based on microtubule pushing are efficient for movements over small distances, and for centering of organelles in symmetric geometries. Mechanisms based on pulling, on the other hand, are typically more elaborate, but are necessary when the distances to be covered by the organelles are large, and when the geometry is asymmetric and complex. Thus, taking into account cell geometry and the length scale of the movements helps to identify general principles of the intracellular layout based on microtubule forces. PMID:18404264

  18. Stabilizing versus Destabilizing the Microtubules: A Double-Edge Sword for an Effective Cancer Treatment Option?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Fanale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are dynamic and structural cellular components involved in several cell functions, including cell shape, motility, and intracellular trafficking. In proliferating cells, they are essential components in the division process through the formation of the mitotic spindle. As a result of these functions, tubulin and microtubules are targets for anticancer agents. Microtubule-targeting agents can be divided into two groups: microtubule-stabilizing, and microtubule-destabilizing agents. The former bind to the tubulin polymer and stabilize microtubules, while the latter bind to the tubulin dimers and destabilize microtubules. Alteration of tubulin-microtubule equilibrium determines the disruption of the mitotic spindle, halting the cell cycle at the metaphase-anaphase transition and, eventually, resulting in cell death. Clinical application of earlier microtubule inhibitors, however, unfortunately showed several limits, such as neurological and bone marrow toxicity and the emergence of drug-resistant tumor cells. Here we review several natural and synthetic microtubule-targeting agents, which showed antitumor activity and increased efficacy in comparison to traditional drugs in various preclinical and clinical studies. Cryptophycins, combretastatins, ombrabulin, soblidotin, D-24851, epothilones and discodermolide were used in clinical trials. Some of them showed antiangiogenic and antivascular activity and others showed the ability to overcome multidrug resistance, supporting their possible use in chemotherapy.

  19. Structural insights into microtubule doublet interactions inaxonemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Sui, Haixin

    2007-06-06

    Coordinated sliding of microtubule doublets, driven by dynein motors, produces periodic beating of the axoneme. Recent structural studies of the axoneme have used cryo-electron tomography to reveal new details of the interactions among some of the multitude of proteins that form the axoneme and regulate its movement. Connections among the several sets of dyneins, in particular, suggest ways in which their actions may be coordinated. Study of the molecular architecture of isolated doublets has provided a structural basis for understanding the doublet's mechanical properties that are related to the bending of the axoneme, and has also offered insight into its potential role in the mechanism of dynein activity regulation.

  20. Computing the Free Energy along a Reaction Coordinate Using Rigid Body Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Peng; Sodt, Alexander J; Shao, Yihan; König, Gerhard; Brooks, Bernard R

    2014-10-14

    The calculations of potential of mean force along complex chemical reactions or rare events pathways are of great interest because of their importance for many areas in chemistry, molecular biology, and material science. The major difficulty for free energy calculations comes from the great computational cost for adequate sampling of the system in high-energy regions, especially close to the reaction transition state. Here, we present a method, called FEG-RBD, in which the free energy gradients were obtained from rigid body dynamics simulations. Then the free energy gradients were integrated along a reference reaction pathway to calculate free energy profiles. In a given system, the reaction coordinates defining a subset of atoms (e.g., a solute, or the quantum mechanics (QM) region of a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation) are selected to form a rigid body during the simulation. The first-order derivatives (gradients) of the free energy with respect to the reaction coordinates are obtained through the integration of constraint forces within the rigid body. Each structure along the reference reaction path is separately subjected to such a rigid body simulation. The individual free energy gradients are integrated along the reference pathway to obtain the free energy profile. Test cases provided demonstrate both the strengths and weaknesses of the FEG-RBD method. The most significant benefit of this method comes from the fast convergence rate of the free energy gradient using rigid-body constraints instead of restraints. A correction to the free energy due to approximate relaxation of the rigid-body constraint is estimated and discussed. A comparison with umbrella sampling using a simple test case revealed the improved sampling efficiency of FEG-RBD by a factor of 4 on average. The enhanced efficiency makes this method effective for calculating the free energy of complex chemical reactions when the reaction coordinate can be unambiguously defined by a

  1. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-Chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y.-S.; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-07-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ3, but not in those by integrin α5β1. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  2. Coordinating two-period ordering and advertising policies in a dynamic market with stochastic demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junping; Wang, Shengdong; Min, Jie

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we study the optimal two-stage advertising and ordering policies and the channel coordination issues in a supply chain composed of one manufacturer and one retailer. The manufacturer sells a short-life-cycle product through the retailer facing stochastic demand in dynamic markets characterised by price declines and product obsolescence. Following a two-period newsvendor framework, we develop two members' optimal ordering and advertising models under both the centralised and decentralised settings, and present the closed-form solutions to the developed models as well. Moreover, we design a two-period revenue-sharing contract, and develop sufficient conditions such that the channel coordination can be achieved and a win-win outcome can be guaranteed. Our analysis suggests that the centralised decision creates an incentive for the retailer to increase the advertising investments in two periods and put the purchase forward, but the decentralised decision mechanism forces the retailer to decrease the advertising investments in two periods and postpone/reduce its purchase in the first period. This phenomenon becomes more evident when demand variability is high.

  3. A dynamical model of hierarchical selection and coordination in speech planning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Tilsen

    Full Text Available studies of the control of complex sequential movements have dissociated two aspects of movement planning: control over the sequential selection of movement plans, and control over the precise timing of movement execution. This distinction is particularly relevant in the production of speech: utterances contain sequentially ordered words and syllables, but articulatory movements are often executed in a non-sequential, overlapping manner with precisely coordinated relative timing. This study presents a hybrid dynamical model in which competitive activation controls selection of movement plans and coupled oscillatory systems govern coordination. The model departs from previous approaches by ascribing an important role to competitive selection of articulatory plans within a syllable. Numerical simulations show that the model reproduces a variety of speech production phenomena, such as effects of preparation and utterance composition on reaction time, and asymmetries in patterns of articulatory timing associated with onsets and codas. The model furthermore provides a unified understanding of a diverse group of phonetic and phonological phenomena which have not previously been related.

  4. A dynamical model of hierarchical selection and coordination in speech planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilsen, Sam

    2013-01-01

    studies of the control of complex sequential movements have dissociated two aspects of movement planning: control over the sequential selection of movement plans, and control over the precise timing of movement execution. This distinction is particularly relevant in the production of speech: utterances contain sequentially ordered words and syllables, but articulatory movements are often executed in a non-sequential, overlapping manner with precisely coordinated relative timing. This study presents a hybrid dynamical model in which competitive activation controls selection of movement plans and coupled oscillatory systems govern coordination. The model departs from previous approaches by ascribing an important role to competitive selection of articulatory plans within a syllable. Numerical simulations show that the model reproduces a variety of speech production phenomena, such as effects of preparation and utterance composition on reaction time, and asymmetries in patterns of articulatory timing associated with onsets and codas. The model furthermore provides a unified understanding of a diverse group of phonetic and phonological phenomena which have not previously been related.

  5. Approximating high-dimensional dynamics by barycentric coordinates with linear programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Yoshito, E-mail: yoshito@sat.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Department of Mathematical Informatics, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); CREST, JST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Shiro, Masanori [Department of Mathematical Informatics, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Mathematical Neuroinformatics Group, Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takahashi, Nozomu; Mas, Paloma [Center for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG), Consorci CSIC-IRTA-UAB-UB, Barcelona 08193 (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    The increasing development of novel methods and techniques facilitates the measurement of high-dimensional time series but challenges our ability for accurate modeling and predictions. The use of a general mathematical model requires the inclusion of many parameters, which are difficult to be fitted for relatively short high-dimensional time series observed. Here, we propose a novel method to accurately model a high-dimensional time series. Our method extends the barycentric coordinates to high-dimensional phase space by employing linear programming, and allowing the approximation errors explicitly. The extension helps to produce free-running time-series predictions that preserve typical topological, dynamical, and/or geometric characteristics of the underlying attractors more accurately than the radial basis function model that is widely used. The method can be broadly applied, from helping to improve weather forecasting, to creating electronic instruments that sound more natural, and to comprehensively understanding complex biological data.

  6. Event heap: a coordination infrastructure for dynamic heterogeneous application interactions in ubiquitous computing environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Bradley E.; Fox, Armando; Winograd, Terry A.; Hanrahan, Patrick M.

    2010-04-20

    An efficient and adaptive middleware infrastructure called the Event Heap system dynamically coordinates application interactions and communications in a ubiquitous computing environment, e.g., an interactive workspace, having heterogeneous software applications running on various machines and devices across different platforms. Applications exchange events via the Event Heap. Each event is characterized by a set of unordered, named fields. Events are routed by matching certain attributes in the fields. The source and target versions of each field are automatically set when an event is posted or used as a template. The Event Heap system implements a unique combination of features, both intrinsic to tuplespaces and specific to the Event Heap, including content based addressing, support for routing patterns, standard routing fields, limited data persistence, query persistence/registration, transparent communication, self-description, flexible typing, logical/physical centralization, portable client API, at most once per source first-in-first-out ordering, and modular restartability.

  7. Approximating high-dimensional dynamics by barycentric coordinates with linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yoshito; Shiro, Masanori; Takahashi, Nozomu; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Mas, Paloma

    2015-01-01

    The increasing development of novel methods and techniques facilitates the measurement of high-dimensional time series but challenges our ability for accurate modeling and predictions. The use of a general mathematical model requires the inclusion of many parameters, which are difficult to be fitted for relatively short high-dimensional time series observed. Here, we propose a novel method to accurately model a high-dimensional time series. Our method extends the barycentric coordinates to high-dimensional phase space by employing linear programming, and allowing the approximation errors explicitly. The extension helps to produce free-running time-series predictions that preserve typical topological, dynamical, and/or geometric characteristics of the underlying attractors more accurately than the radial basis function model that is widely used. The method can be broadly applied, from helping to improve weather forecasting, to creating electronic instruments that sound more natural, and to comprehensively understanding complex biological data.

  8. Xenopus oocyte wound healing as a model system for analysis of microtubule-actin interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Mandato, Craig A

    2007-01-01

    Microtubule-actin interactions are fundamental to many cellular processes such as cytokinesis and cellular locomotion. Investigating the mechanism of microtubule-actin interactions is the key to understand the cellular morphogenesis and related pathological processes. The abundance and highly dynamic nature of microtubules and F-actin raise a serious challenge when trying to distinguish between the real and fortuitous interactions within a cell. Xenopus oocyte wound model represents an ideal system to study microtubule-actin interactions as well as microtubule-dependent control of the actin polymerization. Here, we describe a series of cytoskeleton specific treatments in Xenopus oocyte wound healing experiments and use confocal fluorescence microscopy to analyze fixed oocytes to examine microtubule-actin interactions.

  9. Polyamine sharing between tubulin dimers favours microtubule nucleation and elongation via facilitated diffusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Mechulam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We suggest for the first time that the action of multivalent cations on microtubule dynamics can result from facilitated diffusion of GTP-tubulin to the microtubule ends. Facilitated diffusion can promote microtubule assembly, because, upon encountering a growing nucleus or the microtubule wall, random GTP-tubulin sliding on their surfaces will increase the probability of association to the target sites (nucleation sites or MT ends. This is an original explanation for understanding the apparent discrepancy between the high rate of microtubule elongation and the low rate of tubulin association at the microtubule ends in the viscous cytoplasm. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion requires an attraction force between two tubulins, which can result from the sharing of multivalent counterions. Natural polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine are present in all living cells and are potent agents to trigger tubulin self-attraction. By using an analytical model, we analyze the implication of facilitated diffusion mediated by polyamines on nucleation and elongation of microtubules. In vitro experiments using pure tubulin indicate that the promotion of microtubule assembly by polyamines is typical of facilitated diffusion. The results presented here show that polyamines can be of particular importance for the regulation of the microtubule network in vivo and provide the basis for further investigations into the effects of facilitated diffusion on cytoskeleton dynamics.

  10. Termination of Protofilament Elongation by Eribulin Induces Lattice Defects that Promote Microtubule Catastrophes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doodhi, Harinath; Prota, Andrea E; Rodríguez-García, Ruddi; Xiao, Hui; Custar, Daniel W; Bargsten, Katja; Katrukha, Eugene A; Hilbert, Manuel; Hua, Shasha; Jiang, Kai; Grigoriev, Ilya; Yang, Chia-Ping H; Cox, David; Horwitz, Susan Band; Kapitein, Lukas C; Akhmanova, Anna; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers built of tubulin dimers that attach in a head-to-tail fashion to form protofilaments, which further associate laterally to form a tube. Asynchronous elongation of individual protofilaments can potentially lead to an altered microtubule-end structure that promotes su

  11. Exact dynamics of stochastic linear delayed systems: Application to spatiotemporal coordination of comoving agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKetterick, Thomas John; Giuggioli, Luca

    2014-10-01

    Delayed dynamics result from finite transmission speeds of a signal in the form of energy, mass, or information. In stochastic systems the resulting lagged dynamics challenge our understanding due to the rich behavioral repertoire encompassing monotonic, oscillatory, and unstable evolution. Despite the vast literature, quantifying this rich behavior is limited by a lack of explicit analytic studies of high-dimensional stochastic delay systems. Here we fill this gap for systems governed by a linear Langevin equation of any number of delays and spatial dimensions with additive Gaussian noise. By exploiting Laplace transforms we are able to derive an exact time-dependent analytic solution of the Langevin equation. By using characteristic functionals we are able to construct the full time dependence of the multivariate probability distribution of the stochastic process as a function of the delayed and nondelayed random variables. As an application we consider interactions in animal collective movement that go beyond the traditional assumption of instantaneous alignment. We propose models for coordinated maneuvers of comoving agents applicable to recent empirical findings in pigeons and bats whereby individuals copy the heading of their neighbors with some delay. We highlight possible strategies that individual pairs may adopt to reduce the variance in their velocity difference and/or in their spatial separation. We also show that a minimum in the variance of the spatial separation at long times can be achieved with certain ratios of measurement to reaction delay.

  12. Global Analysis of miRNA Gene Clusters and Gene Families Reveals Dynamic and Coordinated Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To further understand the potential expression relationships of miRNAs in miRNA gene clusters and gene families, a global analysis was performed in 4 paired tumor (breast cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples using deep sequencing datasets. The compositions of miRNA gene clusters and families are not random, and clustered and homologous miRNAs may have close relationships with overlapped miRNA species. Members in the miRNA group always had various expression levels, and even some showed larger expression divergence. Despite the dynamic expression as well as individual difference, these miRNAs always indicated consistent or similar deregulation patterns. The consistent deregulation expression may contribute to dynamic and coordinated interaction between different miRNAs in regulatory network. Further, we found that those clustered or homologous miRNAs that were also identified as sense and antisense miRNAs showed larger expression divergence. miRNA gene clusters and families indicated important biological roles, and the specific distribution and expression further enrich and ensure the flexible and robust regulatory network.

  13. Changes in dynamic balance control over time in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsma, L D; Smits-Engelsman, B C M; Krijnen, W P; Geuze, R H

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in underlying adaptations of dynamic balance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) during a Wii Fit game and to measure changes over time and after intervention. Twenty-eight children with DCD and 21 typically developing (TD) children participated in the study. Analyses of force plate variables showed that the TD group initially used a longer path length for the ski slope descent and tended toward more variation in Center of Pressure (CoP) displacement in lateral direction than the children with DCD. In contrast, the TD group showed a trend of fewer reversals per cm in both AP and lateral direction. After the nonintervention period, the TD group improved performance by decreasing the path length, while the DCD group improved by increasing the path length and by decreasing the number of reversals. After intervention, no changes were found in sway characteristics. Individual analyses within the DCD group showed that the path length per run fell more often within the 95% confidence Interval of the faultless runs. In conclusion both TD and DCD children modify the underlying kinetics of dynamic balance control, but in different ways and both lead to better performance.

  14. Predictive-model-based dynamic coordination control strategy for power-split hybrid electric bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaohua; Yang, Nannan; Wang, Junnian; Song, Dafeng; Zhang, Nong; Shang, Mingli; Liu, Jianxin

    2015-08-01

    Parameter-matching methods and optimal control strategies of the top-selling hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), namely, power-split HEV, are widely studied. In particular, extant research on control strategy focuses on the steady-state energy management strategy to obtain better fuel economy. However, given that multi-power sources are highly coupled in power-split HEVs and influence one another during mode shifting, conducting research on dynamic coordination control strategy (DCCS) to achieve riding comfort is also important. This paper proposes a predictive-model-based DCCS. First, the dynamic model of the objective power-split HEV is built and the mode shifting process is analyzed based on the developed model to determine the reason for the system shock generated. Engine torque estimation algorithm is then designed according to the principle of the nonlinear observer, and the prediction model of the degree of shock is established based on the theory of model predictive control. Finally, the DCCS with adaptation for a complex driving cycle is realized by combining the feedback control and the predictive model. The presented DCCS is validated on the co-simulation platform of AMESim and Simulink. Results show that the shock during mode shifting is well controlled, thereby improving riding comfort.

  15. Estimation and Dynamic Judgment of Urban-rural Coordinated Development:A Case Study of Chongqing City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Using AHP(Analytic Hierarchy Process)and GCA(Grey Comprehensive Analysis),this article measures the degree of urban-rural coordinated development of Chongqing City,and establishes GARCH model to analyze its dynamic feature.The results show that urban-rural coordination degree of Chongqing City tended to decline year by year in the period 1985-2010 on the whole;after it became a municipality directly under the Central Government,the average annual rate of decline reached 1.78%.Further,from GARCH modeling analysis,there is no"clustering"in urban-rural coordination degree of Chongqing City,and the impact of fluctuation state in the past on the future will gradually intensify.There is no "leverage effect"in urban-rural coordination degree of Chongqing City,and if the government does not exert"external force",urban-rural coordination degree will decline year by year.But in the long run,urban-rural coordination degree will gradually converge to the equilibrium level.Based on this,we propose to strengthen institutional innovation and help propel coordinated urban and rural development,in terms of employment,social security,finance,land management and use.

  16. Biological oscillations for learning walking coordination: dynamic recurrent neural network functionally models physiological central pattern generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoellinger, Thomas; Petieau, Mathieu; Duvinage, Matthieu; Castermans, Thierry; Seetharaman, Karthik; Cebolla, Ana-Maria; Bengoetxea, Ana; Ivanenko, Yuri; Dan, Bernard; Cheron, Guy

    2013-01-01

    The existence of dedicated neuronal modules such as those organized in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, or spinal cord raises the question of how these functional modules are coordinated for appropriate motor behavior. Study of human locomotion offers an interesting field for addressing this central question. The coordination of the elevation of the 3 leg segments under a planar covariation rule (Borghese et al., 1996) was recently modeled (Barliya et al., 2009) by phase-adjusted simple oscillators shedding new light on the understanding of the central pattern generator (CPG) processing relevant oscillation signals. We describe the use of a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) mimicking the natural oscillatory behavior of human locomotion for reproducing the planar covariation rule in both legs at different walking speeds. Neural network learning was based on sinusoid signals integrating frequency and amplitude features of the first three harmonics of the sagittal elevation angles of the thigh, shank, and foot of each lower limb. We verified the biological plausibility of the neural networks. Best results were obtained with oscillations extracted from the first three harmonics in comparison to oscillations outside the harmonic frequency peaks. Physiological replication steadily increased with the number of neuronal units from 1 to 80, where similarity index reached 0.99. Analysis of synaptic weighting showed that the proportion of inhibitory connections consistently increased with the number of neuronal units in the DRNN. This emerging property in the artificial neural networks resonates with recent advances in neurophysiology of inhibitory neurons that are involved in central nervous system oscillatory activities. The main message of this study is that this type of DRNN may offer a useful model of physiological central pattern generator for gaining insights in basic research and developing clinical applications.

  17. Biological oscillations for learning walking coordination: dynamic recurrent neural network functionally models physiological central pattern generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eHoellinger

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The existence of dedicated neuronal modules such as those organized in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum or spinal cord raises the question of how these functional modules are coordinated for appropriate motor behavior. Study of human locomotion offers an interesting field for addressing this central question. The coordination of the elevation of the 3 leg segments under a planar covariation rule (Borghese et al., 1996 was recently modeled (Barliya et al., 2009 by phase-adjusted simple oscillators shedding new light on the understanding of the central pattern generator processing relevant oscillation signals. We describe the use of a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN mimicking the natural oscillatory behavior of human locomotion for reproducing the planar covariation rule in both legs at different walking speeds. Neural network learning was based on sinusoid signals integrating frequency and amplitude features of the first three harmonics of the sagittal elevation angles of the thigh, shank and foot of each lower limb. We verified the biological plausibility of the neural networks. Best results were obtained with oscillations extracted from the first three harmonics in comparison to oscillations outside the harmonic frequency peaks. Physiological replication steadily increased with the number of neuronal units from 1 to 80, where similarity index reached 0.99. Analysis of synaptic weighting showed that the proportion of inhibitory connections consistently increased with the number of neuronal units in the DRNN. This emerging property in the artificial neural networks resonates with recent advances in neurophysiology of inhibitory neurons that are involved in central nervous system oscillatory activities. The main message of this study is that this type of DRNN may offer a useful model of physiological central pattern generator for gaining insights in basic research and developing clinical applications.

  18. The octarepeat region of hamster PrP (PrP51-91) enhances the formation of microtubule and antagonize Cu~(2+)-induced microtubule-disrupting activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoli Li; Chenfang Dong; Song Shi; Guirong Wang; Yuan Li; Xin Wang; Qi Shi; Chan Tian; Ruimin Zhou; Chen Gao; Xiaoping Dong

    2009-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is considered to associate with microtubule and its major component, tubulin. In the present study, octarepeat region of PrP (PrP51-91) was expressed in prokaryotic-expressing system. Using GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation, the mol-ecular interaction between PrP51-91 and tubulin was observed. Our data also demonstrated that PrP51-91 could efficiently stimulate microtubule assembly in vitro, indicating a potential effect of PrP on microtu-bule dynamics. Moreover, PrP51-91 was confirmed to be able to antagonize Cu~(2+)-induced microtubule-disrupt-ing activity in vivo, partially protecting against Cu~(2+) intoxication to culture cells and stabilize cellular micro-tubule structure. The association of the octarepeat region of PrP with tubulin may further provide insight into the biological function of PrP in the neurons.

  19. Crowding of molecular motors determines microtubule depolymerization

    CERN Document Server

    Reese, Louis; Frey, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    Assembly and disassembly dynamics of microtubules (MTs) is tightly controlled by MT associated proteins. Here, we investigate how plus-end-directed depolymerases of the kinesin-8 family regulate MT depolymerization dynamics. Employing an individual-based model, we reproduce experimental findings. Moreover, crowding is identified as the key regulatory mechanism of depolymerization dynamics. Our analysis gives two qualitatively distinct regimes. For motor densities above a particular threshold, a macroscopic traffic jam emerges at the plus-end and the MT dynamics become independent of the motor concentration. Below this threshold, microscopic traffic jams at the tip arise which cancel out the effect of the depolymerization kinetics such that the depolymerization speed is solely determined by the motor density. Because this density changes over the MT length, length-dependent regulation is possible. Remarkably, motor cooperativity does not affect the depolymerization speed but only the end-residence time of depo...

  20. Partially implicit finite difference scheme for calculating dynamic pressure in a terrain-following coordinate non-hydrostatic ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Lin, Lei; Xie, Lian; Gao, Huiwang

    2016-10-01

    To improve the efficiency of the terrain-following σ-coordinate non-hydrostatic ocean model, a partially implicit finite difference (PIFD) scheme is proposed. By using explicit terms instead of implicit terms to discretize the parts of the vertical dynamic pressure gradient derived from the σ-coordinate transformation, the coefficient matrix of the discrete Poisson equation that the dynamic pressure satisfies can be simplified from 15 diagonals to 7 diagonals. The PIFD scheme is shown to run stably when it is applied to simulate five benchmark cases, namely, a standing wave in a basin, a surface solitary wave, a lock-exchange problem, a periodic wave over a bar and a tidally induced internal wave. Compared with the conventional fully implicit finite difference (FIFD) scheme, the PIFD scheme produces simulation results of equivalent accuracy at only 40-60% of the computational cost. The PIFD scheme demonstrates strong applicability and can be easily implemented in σ-coordinate ocean models.

  1. Coordination Chemistry and Structural Dynamics of a Long and Flexible Piperazine-Derived Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Chris S; Hamilton, Sophie E; Hicks, Jamie; Knowles, Gregory P; Chaffee, Alan L; Turner, David R; Batten, Stuart R

    2016-07-05

    A long and highly flexible internally functionalized dipyridyl ligand α,α'-p-xylylenebis(1-(4-pyridylmethylene)-piper-4-azine), L, has been employed in the synthesis of a series of coordination polymer materials with Co(II), Cd(II), and Ag(I) ions. In poly-[Cd(L)(TPA)] 1 and poly-[Co(L)(IPA)], 2, (TPA = terephthalate, IPA = isophthalate) the ligand adopts a similar linear conformation to that seen in the structure of the unbound molecule and provides a long (2.6 nm) metal-metal bridging distance. Due to the mismatch of edge lengths with that provided by the carboxylate coligands, geometric distortions from the regular dia and (4,4) network geometries for 1 and 2, respectively, are observed. In poly-[Ag2(CF3SO3)2(L)], 3, the ligand coordinates through both pyridine groups and two of the four piperazine nitrogen donors, forming a high-connectivity 2-dimensional network. The compound poly-[Ag2(L)](BF4)2·2MeCN, 4, a porous 3-dimensional cds network, undergoes a fascinating and rapid single-crystal-to-single-crystal rearrangement on exchange of the acetonitrile guests for water in ambient air, forming a nonporous hydrated network poly-[Ag2(L)](BF4)2·2H2O, 5, in which the well-ordered guest water molecules mediate the rearrangement of the tetrafluoroborate anions and the framework itself through hydrogen bonding. The dynamics of the system are examined in greater detail through the preparation of a kinetic product, the dioxane-solvated species poly-[Ag2(L)](BF4)2·2C4H8O2, 6, which undergoes a slow conversion to 5 over the course of approximately 16 h, a transition which can be monitored in real time. The reverse transformation can also be observed on immersing the hydrate 5 in dioxane. The structural features and physical properties of each of the materials can be rationalized based on the flexible and multifunctional nature of the ligand molecule, as well as the coordination behavior of the chosen metal ions.

  2. Motility and microtubule depolymerization mechanisms of the Kinesin-8 motor, KIF19A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Doudou; Nitta, Ryo; Morikawa, Manatsu; Yajima, Hiroaki; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Shigematsu, Hideki; Kikkawa, Masahide; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2016-01-01

    The kinesin-8 motor, KIF19A, accumulates at cilia tips and controls cilium length. Defective KIF19A leads to hydrocephalus and female infertility because of abnormally elongated cilia. Uniquely among kinesins, KIF19A possesses the dual functions of motility along ciliary microtubules and depolymerization of microtubules. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these functions we solved the crystal structure of its motor domain and determined its cryo-electron microscopy structure complexed with a microtubule. The features of KIF19A that enable its dual function are clustered on its microtubule-binding side. Unexpectedly, a destabilized switch II coordinates with a destabilized L8 to enable KIF19A to adjust to both straight and curved microtubule protofilaments. The basic clusters of L2 and L12 tether the microtubule. The long L2 with a characteristic acidic-hydrophobic-basic sequence effectively stabilizes the curved conformation of microtubule ends. Hence, KIF19A utilizes multiple strategies to accomplish the dual functions of motility and microtubule depolymerization by ATP hydrolysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18101.001 PMID:27690357

  3. A Simple and Efficient Numerical Method for Computing the Dynamics of Rotating Bose--Einstein Condensates via Rotating Lagrangian Coordinates

    KAUST Repository

    Bao, Weizhu

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simple, efficient, and accurate numerical method for simulating the dynamics of rotating Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in a rotational frame with or without longrange dipole-dipole interaction (DDI). We begin with the three-dimensional (3D) Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) with an angular momentum rotation term and/or long-range DDI, state the twodimensional (2D) GPE obtained from the 3D GPE via dimension reduction under anisotropic external potential, and review some dynamical laws related to the 2D and 3D GPEs. By introducing a rotating Lagrangian coordinate system, the original GPEs are reformulated to GPEs without the angular momentum rotation, which is replaced by a time-dependent potential in the new coordinate system. We then cast the conserved quantities and dynamical laws in the new rotating Lagrangian coordinates. Based on the new formulation of the GPE for rotating BECs in the rotating Lagrangian coordinates, a time-splitting spectral method is presented for computing the dynamics of rotating BECs. The new numerical method is explicit, simple to implement, unconditionally stable, and very efficient in computation. It is spectral-order accurate in space and second-order accurate in time and conserves the mass on the discrete level. We compare our method with some representative methods in the literature to demonstrate its efficiency and accuracy. In addition, the numerical method is applied to test the dynamical laws of rotating BECs such as the dynamics of condensate width, angular momentum expectation, and center of mass, and to investigate numerically the dynamics and interaction of quantized vortex lattices in rotating BECs without or with the long-range DDI.Copyright © by SIAM.

  4. Monte Carlo Simulation on Coordinated Movement of Kinesin and Dynein Motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong; DOU Shuo-Xing; WANG Peng-Ye

    2008-01-01

    Kinesin and dynein are two important classes of molecular motors which are responsible for active organelle trafficking and cell division.They call work together to carry a cargo,moving along the microtubule in a coordinated way.We use Monte Carlo method to simulate the dynamics of this coordinated movement.Based on four essential assumptions,our simulations reproduce some features of the recent in vivo experiments.The fast moving speed of the cargo js simulated and the speed distribution is presented.

  5. Hamiltonian Analysis of 3-Dimensional Connection Dynamics in Bondi-like Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Guang; Kong, Shi-Bei

    2017-08-01

    The Hamiltonian analysis for a 3-dimensional connection dynamics of {s}{o}(1,2), spanned by {L-+, L-2, L+2 } instead of {L01, L02, L12 }, is first conducted in a Bondi-like coordinate system. The symmetry of the system is clearly presented. A null coframe with 3 independent variables and 9 connection coefficients are treated as basic configuration variables. All constraints and their consistency conditions, the solutions of Lagrange multipliers as well as the equations of motion are presented. There is no physical degree of freedom in the system. The Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) spacetime is discussed as an example to check the analysis. Unlike the ADM formalism, where only non-degenerate geometries on slices are dealt with and the Ashtekar formalism, where non-degenerate geometries on slices are mainly concerned though the degenerate geometries may be studied as well, in the present formalism the geometries on the slices are always degenerate though the geometries for the spacetime are not degenerate. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11275207 and 11690022

  6. Learning robotic eye-arm-hand coordination from human demonstration: a coupled dynamical systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukic, Luka; Santos-Victor, José; Billard, Aude

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the role of obstacle avoidance in visually guided reaching and grasping movements. We report on a human study in which subjects performed prehensile motion with obstacle avoidance where the position of the obstacle was systematically varied across trials. These experiments suggest that reaching with obstacle avoidance is organized in a sequential manner, where the obstacle acts as an intermediary target. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the notion of workspace travelled by the hand is embedded explicitly in a forward planning scheme, which is actively involved in detecting obstacles on the way when performing reaching. We find that the gaze proactively coordinates the pattern of eye-arm motion during obstacle avoidance. This study provides also a quantitative assessment of the coupling between the eye-arm-hand motion. We show that the coupling follows regular phase dependencies and is unaltered during obstacle avoidance. These observations provide a basis for the design of a computational model. Our controller extends the coupled dynamical systems framework and provides fast and synchronous control of the eyes, the arm and the hand within a single and compact framework, mimicking similar control system found in humans. We validate our model for visuomotor control of a humanoid robot.

  7. Evolving dynamics of trading behavior based on coordination game in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yue-tang; Xu, Lu; Li, Jin-sheng

    2016-05-01

    This work concerns the modeling of evolvement of trading behavior in stock markets. Based on the assumption of the investors' limited rationality, the evolution mechanism of trading behavior is modeled according to the investment strategy of coordination game in network, that investors are prone to imitate their neighbors' activity through comprehensive analysis on the risk dominance degree of certain investment behavior, the network topology of their relationship and its heterogeneity. We investigate by mean-field analysis and extensive simulations the evolution of investors' trading behavior in various typical networks under different risk dominance degree of investment behavior. Our results indicate that the evolution of investors' behavior is affected by the network structure of stock market and the effect of risk dominance degree of investment behavior; the stability of equilibrium states of investors' behavior dynamics is directly related with the risk dominance degree of some behavior; connectivity and heterogeneity of the network plays an important role in the evolution of the investment behavior in stock market.

  8. Dynamic strategy based fast decomposed GA coordinated with FACTS devices to enhance the optimal power flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdad, Belkacem, E-mail: bemahdad@yahoo.f [University of Biskra, Department of Electrical Engineering, Biskra 07000 (Algeria); Bouktir, T. [Oum El Bouaghi, Department of Electrical Engineering, Oum El Bouaghi 04000 (Algeria); Srairi, K. [University of Biskra, Department of Electrical Engineering, Biskra 07000 (Algeria); EL Benbouzid, M. [Laboratoire Brestois de Mecanique et des Systemes, University of Brest (France)

    2010-07-15

    Under critical situation the main preoccupation of expert engineers is to assure power system security and to deliver power to the consumer within the desired index power quality. The total generation cost taken as a secondary strategy. This paper presents an efficient decomposed GA to enhance the solution of the optimal power flow (OPF) with non-smooth cost function and under severe loading conditions. At the decomposed stage the length of the original chromosome is reduced successively and adapted to the topology of the new partition. Two sub problems are proposed to coordinate the OPF problem under different loading conditions: the first sub problem related to the active power planning under different loading factor to minimize the total fuel cost, and the second sub problem is a reactive power planning designed based in practical rules to make fine corrections to the voltage deviation and reactive power violation using a specified number of shunt dynamic compensators named Static Var Compensators (SVC). To validate the robustness of the proposed approach, the proposed algorithm tested on IEEE 30-Bus, 26-Bus and IEEE 118-Bus under different loading conditions and compared with global optimization methods (GA, EGA, FGA, PSO, MTS, MDE and ACO) and with two robust simulation packages: PSAT and MATPOWER. The results show that the proposed approach can converge to the near solution and obtain a competitive solution at critical situation and with a reasonable time.

  9. Dynamic and kinematic observers for output coordination control of Euler-Lagrange systems: A comparison and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Kyrkjebø

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares a dynamic and a kinematic observer approach for output coordination control of mechanical systems formulated in the Euler-Lagrange framework. The observers are designed to estimate missing velocity and acceleration information based on position/attitude measurements to provide a full state vector to the coordination control algorithm. The kinematic observer approach utilizes a virtual system designed to mimic the kinematic behaviour of the leader in order to estimate unknown states of the state vector with a minimum of information available. The dynamic observer approach is based on utilizing the full dynamic model of the follower system when estimating the missing states. The two observers are compared in terms of estimation principles and practical performance, and applied to two practical examples; leader-follower robot manipulator synchronization control, and underway replenishment operations for surface ships.

  10. Termination of Protofilament Elongation by Eribulin Induces Lattice Defects that Promote Microtubule Catastrophes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doodhi, Harinath; Prota, Andrea E; Rodríguez-García, Ruddi; Xiao, Hui; Custar, Daniel W; Bargsten, Katja; Katrukha, Eugene A; Hilbert, Manuel; Hua, Shasha; Jiang, Kai; Grigoriev, Ilya; Yang, Chia-Ping H; Cox, David; Horwitz, Susan Band; Kapitein, Lukas C; Akhmanova, Anna; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-07-11

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers built of tubulin dimers that attach in a head-to-tail fashion to form protofilaments, which further associate laterally to form a tube. Asynchronous elongation of individual protofilaments can potentially lead to an altered microtubule-end structure that promotes sudden depolymerization, termed catastrophe [1-4]. However, how the dynamics of individual protofilaments relates to overall growth persistence has remained unclear. Here, we used the microtubule targeting anti-cancer drug Eribulin [5-7] to explore the consequences of stalled protofilament elongation on microtubule growth. Using X-ray crystallography, we first revealed that Eribulin binds to a site on β-tubulin that is required for protofilament plus-end elongation. Based on the structural information, we engineered a fluorescent Eribulin molecule. We demonstrate that single Eribulin molecules specifically interact with microtubule plus ends and are sufficient to either trigger a catastrophe or induce slow and erratic microtubule growth in the presence of EB3. Interestingly, we found that Eribulin increases the frequency of EB3 comet "splitting," transient events where a slow and erratically progressing comet is followed by a faster comet. This observation possibly reflects the "healing" of a microtubule lattice. Because EB3 comet splitting was also observed in control microtubules in the absence of any drugs, we propose that Eribulin amplifies a natural pathway toward catastrophe by promoting the arrest of protofilament elongation.

  11. Kinetochore-microtubule attachment is sufficient to satisfy the human spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kuijt, Timo E F; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-12-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a genome surveillance mechanism that protects against aneuploidization. Despite profound progress on understanding mechanisms of its activation, it remains unknown what aspect of chromosome-spindle interactions is monitored by the SAC: kinetochore-microtubule attachment or the force generated by dynamic microtubules that signals stable biorientation of chromosomes? To answer this, we uncoupled these two processes by expressing a non-phosphorylatable version of the main microtubule-binding protein at kinetochores (HEC1-9A), causing stabilization of incorrect kinetochore-microtubule attachments despite persistent activity of the error-correction machinery. The SAC is fully functional in HEC1-9A-expressing cells, yet cells in which chromosomes cannot biorient but are stably attached to microtubules satisfy the SAC and exit mitosis. SAC satisfaction requires neither intra-kinetochore stretching nor dynamic microtubules. Our findings support the hypothesis that in human cells the end-on interactions of microtubules with kinetochores are sufficient to satisfy the SAC without the need for microtubule-based pulling forces.

  12. Optimal Attitude Estimation and Filtering Without Using Local Coordinates Part I: Uncontrolled and Deterministic Attitude Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Sanyal, Amit K.

    2005-01-01

    There are several attitude estimation algorithms in existence, all of which use local coordinate representations for the group of rigid body orientations. All local coordinate representations of the group of orientations have associated problems. While minimal coordinate representations exhibit kinematic singularities for large rotations, the quaternion representation requires satisfaction of an extra constraint. This paper treats the attitude estimation and filtering problem as an optimizati...

  13. Interactive domains in the molecular chaperone human alphaB crystallin modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy G Ghosh

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113FISREFHR(120 exposed on the surface of alphaB crystallin decreased microtubule assembly by approximately 45%. In contrast, the interactive sequences, (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, corresponding to the beta8 strand and the C-terminal extension respectively, which are involved in complex formation, increased microtubule assembly by approximately 34-45%. The alphaB crystallin peptides, (113FISREFHR(120 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, inhibited microtubule disassembly by approximately 26-36%, and the peptides (113FISREFHR(120 and (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 decreased the thermal aggregation of tubulin by approximately 42-44%. The (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164 peptides were more effective than the widely used anti-cancer drug, Paclitaxel, in modulating tubulinmicrotubule dynamics. Mutagenesis of these interactive sequences in wt human alphaB crystallin confirmed the effects of the alphaB crystallin peptides on microtubule assembly/disassembly and tubulin aggregation. The regulation of microtubule assembly by alphaB crystallin varied over a narrow range of concentrations. The assembly of microtubules was maximal at alphaB crystallin to tubulin molar ratios between 1:4 and 2:1, while molar ratios >2:1 inhibited microtubule assembly.Interactive sequences on the surface of human alphaB crystallin collectively modulate microtubule assembly through a dynamic subunit exchange mechanism that depends on the concentration and ratio of alphaB crystallin to tubulin. These are the first

  14. Microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4: structure, function, and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Farha; Anjum, Farah; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2013-11-01

    MAP/Microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (MARK4) belongs to the family of serine/threonine kinases that phosphorylate the microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) causing their detachment from the microtubules thereby increasing microtubule dynamics and facilitating cell division, cell cycle control, cell polarity determination, cell shape alterations, etc. The MARK4 gene encodes two alternatively spliced isoforms, L and S that differ in their C-terminal region. These isoforms are differentially regulated in human tissues including central nervous system. MARK4L is a 752-residue-long polypeptide that is divided into three distinct domains: (1) protein kinase domain (59-314), (2) ubiquitin-associated domain (322-369), and (3) kinase-associated domain (703-752) plus 54 residues (649-703) involved in the proper folding and function of the enzyme. In addition, residues 65-73 are considered to be the ATP-binding domain and Lys88 is considered as ATP-binding site. Asp181 has been proposed to be the active site of MARK4 that is activated by phosphorylation of Thr214 side chain. The isoform MARK4S is highly expressed in the normal brain and is presumably involved in neuronal differentiation. On the other hand, the isoform MARK4L is upregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells and gliomas suggesting its involvement in cell cycle. Several biological functions are also associated with MARK4 including microtubule bundle formation, nervous system development, and positive regulation of programmed cell death. Therefore, MARK4 is considered as the most suitable target for structure-based rational drug design. Our sequence, structure- and function-based analysis should be helpful for better understanding of mechanisms of regulation of microtubule dynamics and MARK4 associated diseases.

  15. Short-term motor learning of dynamic balance control in children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsma, Dorothee; Ferguson, Gillian D; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M; Geuze, Reint H

    2015-03-01

    To explore the differences in learning a dynamic balance task between children with and without probable Developmental Coordination Disorder (p-DCD) from different cultural backgrounds. Twenty-eight Dutch children with DCD (p-DCD-NL), a similar group of 17 South African children (p-DCD-SA) and 21 Dutch typically developing children (TD-NL) participated in the study. All children performed the Wii Fit protocol. The slope of the learning curve was used to estimate motor learning for each group. The protocol was repeated after six weeks. Level of motor skill was assessed with the Movement ABC-2. No significant difference in motor learning rate was found between p-DCD-NL and p-DCD-SA, but the learning rate of children with p-DCD was slower than the learning rate of TD children. Speed-accuracy trade off, as a way to improve performance by slowing down in the beginning was only seen in the TD children, indicating that TD children and p-DCD children used different strategies. Retention of the level of learned control of the game after six weeks was found in all three groups after six weeks. The learning slope was associated with the level of balance skill for all children. This study provides evidence that children with p-DCD have limitations in motor learning on a complex balance task. In addition, the data do not support the contention that learning in DCD differs depending on cultural background. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. On the Nature and Shape of Tubulin Trails: Implications on Microtubule Self-Organization

    CERN Document Server

    Glade, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Microtubules, major elements of the cell skeleton are, most of the time, well organized in vivo, but they can also show self-organizing behaviors in time and/or space in purified solutions in vitro. Theoretical studies and models based on the concepts of collective dynamics in complex systems, reaction-diffusion processes and emergent phenomena were proposed to explain some of these behaviors. In the particular case of microtubule spatial self-organization, it has been advanced that microtubules could behave like ants, self-organizing by 'talking to each other' by way of hypothetic (because never observed) concentrated chemical trails of tubulin that are expected to be released by their disassembling ends. Deterministic models based on this idea yielded indeed like-looking spatio-temporal self-organizing behaviors. Nevertheless the question remains of whether microscopic tubulin trails produced by individual or bundles of several microtubules are intense enough to allow microtubule self-organization at a macr...

  17. Studying the role of protein dynamics in an SN2 enzyme reaction using free-energy surfaces and solvent coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Meseguer, Rafael; Martí, Sergio; Ruiz-Pernía, J. Javier; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2013-07-01

    Conformational changes are known to be able to drive an enzyme through its catalytic cycle, allowing, for example, substrate binding or product release. However, the influence of protein motions on the chemical step is a controversial issue. One proposal is that the simple equilibrium fluctuations incorporated into transition-state theory are insufficient to account for the catalytic effect of enzymes and that protein motions should be treated dynamically. Here, we propose the use of free-energy surfaces, obtained as a function of both a chemical coordinate and an environmental coordinate, as an efficient way to elucidate the role of protein structure and motions during the reaction. We show that the structure of the protein provides an adequate environment for the progress of the reaction, although a certain degree of flexibility is needed to attain the full catalytic effect. However, these motions do not introduce significant dynamical corrections to the rate constant and can be described as equilibrium fluctuations.

  18. Oxidative stress decreases microtubule growth and stability in ventricular myocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Drum, BML; Yuan, C.; Li, L; Liu, Q.; Wordeman, L; Santana, LF

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.Microtubules (MTs) have many roles in ventricular myocytes, including structural stability, morphological integrity, and protein trafficking. However, despite their functional importance, dynamic MTs had never been visualized in living adult myocytes. Using adeno-associated viral vectors expressing the MT-associated protein plus end binding protein 3 (EB3) tagged with EGFP, we were able to perform live imaging and thus capture and quantify MT dynamics in ventricular myocyt...

  19. The XMAP215-family protein DdCP224 is required for cortical interactions of microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hestermann Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions of peripheral microtubule tips with the cell cortex are of crucial importance for nuclear migration, spindle orientation, centrosome positioning and directional cell movement. Microtubule plus end binding proteins are thought to mediate interactions of microtubule tips with cortical actin and membrane proteins in a dynein-dependent manner. XMAP215-family proteins are main regulators of microtubule plus end dynamics but so far they have not been implicated in the interactions of microtubule tips with the cell cortex. Results Here we show that overexpression of an N-terminal fragment of DdCP224, the Dictyostelium XMAP215 homologue, caused a collapse of the radial microtubule cytoskeleton, whereby microtubules lost contact with the cell cortex and were dragged behind like a comet tail of an unusually motile centrosome. This phenotype was indistinguishable from mutants overexpressing fragments of the dynein heavy chain or intermediate chain. Moreover, it was accompanied by dispersal of the Golgi apparatus and reduced cortical localization of the dynein heavy chain indicating a disrupted dynein/dynactin interaction. The interference of DdCP224 with cortical dynein function is strongly supported by the observations that DdCP224 and its N-terminal fragment colocalize with dynein and coimmunoprecipitate with dynein and dynactin. Conclusions Our data show that XMAP215-like proteins are required for the interaction of microtubule plus ends with the cell cortex in interphase cells and strongly suggest that this function is mediated by dynein.

  20. Microtubule assembly affects bone mass by regulating both osteoblast and osteoclast functions: stathmin deficiency produces an osteopenic phenotype in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongbin; Zhang, Rongrong; Ko, Seon-Yle; Oyajobi, Babatunde O; Papasian, Christopher J; Deng, Hong-Wen; Zhang, Shujun; Zhao, Ming

    2011-09-01

    Cytoskeleton microtubules regulate various cell signaling pathways that are involved in bone cell function. We recently reported that inhibition of microtubule assembly by microtubule-targeting drugs stimulates osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. To further elucidate the role of microtubules in bone homeostasis, we characterized the skeletal phenotype of mice null for stathmin, an endogenous protein that inhibits microtubule assembly. In vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) and histology revealed that stathmin deficiency results in a significant reduction of bone mass in adult mice concurrent with decreased osteoblast and increased osteoclast numbers in bone tissues. Phenotypic analyses of primary calvarial cells and bone marrow cells showed that stathmin deficiency inhibited osteoblast differentiation and induced osteoclast formation. In vitro overexpression studies showed that increased stathmin levels enhanced osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells and mouse bone marrow-derived cells and attenuated osteoclast formation from osteoclast precursor Raw264.7 cells and bone marrow cells. Results of immunofluorescent studies indicated that overexpression of stathmin disrupted radial microtubule filaments, whereas deficiency of stathmin stabilized the microtubule network structure in these bone cells. In addition, microtubule-targeting drugs that inhibit microtubule assembly and induce osteoblast differentiation lost these effects in the absence of stathmin. Collectively, these results suggest that stathmin, which alters microtubule dynamics, plays an essential role in maintenance of postnatal bone mass by regulating both osteoblast and osteoclast functions in bone. \\

  1. The microtubule aster formation and its role in nuclear envelope assembly around the sperm chromatin in Xenopus egg extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ning; CHEN Zhongcai; LU Ping; ZHANG Chuanmao; ZHAI Zhonghe; TANG Xiaowei

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear envelope is a dynamic structure in the cell cycle. At the beginning of mitosis, nuclear envelope breaks down and its components disperse into the cytoplasm. At the end of mitosis, nuclear envelope reassembles using the dispersed components. Searching for the mechanisms of the nuclear disassembly and reassembly has for a long time been one of the key projects for cell biologists. In this report we show that microtubules take a role in the nuclear envelope assembly around the sperm chromatin in Xenopus egg extracts. Microtubule cytoskeleton has been demonstrated to take roles in the transport of intracellular membranes such as Golgi and ER vesicles. We found that the nuclear envelope assembly needs functional microtubules. At the beginning of the nuclear assembly, microtubules nucleated to form a microtubule aster around the centrosome at the base of the sperm head. Using the microtubule drug colchicine to disrupt the microtubule nucleation, nuclear envelope reassembly was seriously inhibited. If the microtubules were stabilized by taxol, another microtubule drug, the nuclear envelope reassembly was also interfered, although a significantly large aster formed around the chromatin. Based on these observations, we propose that microtubules play an important role in the nuclear envelope reassembly maybe by transporting the nuclear envelope precursors to the chromatin surfaces.

  2. A stochastic model for microtubule motors describes the in vivo cytoplasmic transport of human adenovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Gazzola

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic transport of organelles, nucleic acids and proteins on microtubules is usually bidirectional with dynein and kinesin motors mediating the delivery of cargoes in the cytoplasm. Here we combine live cell microscopy, single virus tracking and trajectory segmentation to systematically identify the parameters of a stochastic computational model of cargo transport by molecular motors on microtubules. The model parameters are identified using an evolutionary optimization algorithm to minimize the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the in silico and the in vivo run length and velocity distributions of the viruses on microtubules. The present stochastic model suggests that bidirectional transport of human adenoviruses can be explained without explicit motor coordination. The model enables the prediction of the number of motors active on the viral cargo during microtubule-dependent motions as well as the number of motor binding sites, with the protein hexon as the binding site for the motors.

  3. A stochastic model for microtubule motors describes the in vivo cytoplasmic transport of human adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzola, Mattia; Burckhardt, Christoph J; Bayati, Basil; Engelke, Martin; Greber, Urs F; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2009-12-01

    Cytoplasmic transport of organelles, nucleic acids and proteins on microtubules is usually bidirectional with dynein and kinesin motors mediating the delivery of cargoes in the cytoplasm. Here we combine live cell microscopy, single virus tracking and trajectory segmentation to systematically identify the parameters of a stochastic computational model of cargo transport by molecular motors on microtubules. The model parameters are identified using an evolutionary optimization algorithm to minimize the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the in silico and the in vivo run length and velocity distributions of the viruses on microtubules. The present stochastic model suggests that bidirectional transport of human adenoviruses can be explained without explicit motor coordination. The model enables the prediction of the number of motors active on the viral cargo during microtubule-dependent motions as well as the number of motor binding sites, with the protein hexon as the binding site for the motors.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of antitumor activity of taxanes. I. Interaction of docetaxel with microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Tabaczar

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Docetaxel (Taxotere, a new semisynthetic taxoid, is a mitotic inhibitor, widely used in monotherapy or in combination with other anticancer drugs against many types of cancer. The structure and dynamics of microtubules as the main target for docetaxel activity inside the cell and the taxane-binding site on β-tubulin are discussed. Microtubules are highly dynamic assemblies of α- and β-tubulin. They readily polymerize and depolymerize in cells and these dynamic behaviours are crucial to cell mitosis. Microtubule instability is attributed to their capability to hydrolyze GTP to GDP, which causes their depolymerization. Addition of new α-, β-tubulin heterodimer bound to GTP leads to tubulin polymerization, which increases the length of the microtubule. Docetaxel alters the polymerization dynamics of microtubules, which causes blockage of cell mitosis, and consequently induces apoptotic and non-apoptotic cell death. Docetaxel specifically acts on the S, M and G2 phases of the cell cycle. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge related to the molecular mechanisms of docetaxel action on the cell cycle and microtubule dynamics. In addition, a brief survey of the present state of research on the new generation (2nd and 3rd of taxanes is presented.

  5. Proton dynamics of two-dimensional oxalate-bridged coordination polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatsu, Satoshi; Kofu, Maiko; Nagoe, Atsushi; Yamada, Takeshi; Sadakiyo, Masaaki; Yamada, Teppei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Tyagi, Madhusudan; García Sakai, Victoria; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2014-08-28

    A two-dimensional porous coordination polymer (NH4)2{HOOC(CH2)4COOH}[Zn2(C2O4)3] (abbreviated as (NH4)2(adp)[Zn2(ox)3] (adp = adipic acid, ox = oxalate)), which accommodates water molecules between the [Zn2(ox)3] layers, is highly remarked as a new type of crystalline proton conductor. In order to investigate its phase behavior and the proton conducting mechanism, we have performed adiabatic calorimetry, neutron diffraction, and quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments on a fully hydrated sample (NH4)2(adp)[Zn2(ox)3]·3H2O with the highest proton conductivity (8 × 10(-3) S cm(-1), 25 °C, 98% RH). Its isostructural derivative K2(adp)[Zn2(ox)3]·3H2O was also measured to investigate the role of ammonium ions. (NH4)2(adp)[Zn2(ox)3]·3H2O and K2(adp)[Zn2(ox)3]·3H2O exhibit higher order transitions at 86 K and 138 K, respectively. From the magnitude of the transition entropy, the former is of an order-disorder type while the latter is of a displacive type. (NH4)2(adp)[Zn2(ox)3]·3H2O has four Debye-type relaxations and K2(adp)[Zn2(ox)3]·3H2O has two similar relaxations above each transition temperature. The two relaxations of (NH4)2(adp)[Zn2(ox)3]·3H2O with very small activation energies (ΔEa < 5 kJ mol(-1)) are due to the rotational motions of ammonium ions and play important roles in the proton conduction mechanism. It was also found that the protons in (NH4)2(adp)[Zn2(ox)3]·3H2O are carried through a Grotthuss mechanism. We present a discussion on the proton conducting mechanism based on the present structural and dynamical information.

  6. The kinesin-13 KLP10A motor regulates oocyte spindle length and affects EB1 binding without altering microtubule growth rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin K. Do

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinesin-13 motors are unusual in that they do not walk along microtubules, but instead diffuse to the ends, where they remove tubulin dimers, regulating microtubule dynamics. Here we show that Drosophila kinesin-13 klp10A regulates oocyte meiosis I spindle length and is haplo-insufficient – KLP10A, reduced by RNAi or a loss-of-function P element insertion mutant, results in elongated and mispositioned oocyte spindles, and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates. KLP10A knockdown by RNAi does not significantly affect microtubule growth rates in oocyte spindles, but, unexpectedly, EB1 binding and unbinding are slowed, suggesting a previously unobserved role for kinesin-13 in mediating EB1 binding interactions with microtubules. Kinesin-13 may regulate spindle length both by disassembling subunits from microtubule ends and facilitating EB1 binding to plus ends. We also observe an increased number of paused microtubules in klp10A RNAi knockdown spindles, consistent with a reduced frequency of microtubule catastrophes. Overall, our findings indicate that reduced kinesin-13 decreases microtubule disassembly rates and affects EB1 interactions with microtubules, rather than altering microtubule growth rates, causing spindles to elongate and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates to form.

  7. Manipulation and quantification of microtubule lattice integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor A. Reid

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are structural polymers that participate in a wide range of cellular functions. The addition and loss of tubulin subunits allows the microtubule to grow and shorten, as well as to develop and repair defects and gaps in its cylindrical lattice. These lattice defects act to modulate the interactions of microtubules with molecular motors and other microtubule-associated proteins. Therefore, tools to control and measure microtubule lattice structure will be invaluable for developing a quantitative understanding of how the structural state of the microtubule lattice may regulate its interactions with other proteins. In this work, we manipulated the lattice integrity of in vitro microtubules to create pools of microtubules with common nucleotide states, but with variations in structural states. We then developed a series of novel semi-automated analysis tools for both fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments to quantify the type and severity of alterations in microtubule lattice integrity. These techniques will enable new investigations that explore the role of microtubule lattice structure in interactions with microtubule-associated proteins.

  8. Mechanism for the catastrophe-promoting activity of the microtubule destabilizer Op18/stathmin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kamlesh K; Li, Chunlei; Duan, Aranda; Alberico, Emily O; Kim, Oleg V; Alber, Mark S; Goodson, Holly V

    2013-12-17

    Regulation of microtubule dynamic instability is crucial for cellular processes, ranging from mitosis to membrane transport. Stathmin (also known as oncoprotein 18/Op18) is a prominent microtubule destabilizer that acts preferentially on microtubule minus ends. Stathmin has been studied intensively because of its association with multiple types of cancer, but its mechanism of action remains controversial. Two models have been proposed. One model is that stathmin promotes microtubule catastrophe indirectly, and does so by sequestering tubulin; the other holds that stathmin alters microtubule dynamics by directly destabilizing growing microtubules. Stathmin's sequestration activity is well established, but the mechanism of any direct action is mysterious because stathmin binds to microtubules very weakly. To address these issues, we have studied interactions between stathmin and varied tubulin polymers. We show that stathmin binds tightly to Dolastatin-10 tubulin rings, which mimic curved tubulin protofilaments, and that stathmin depolymerizes stabilized protofilament-rich polymers. These observations lead us to propose that stathmin promotes catastrophe by binding to and acting upon protofilaments exposed at the tips of growing microtubules. Moreover, we suggest that stathmin's minus-end preference results from interactions between stathmin's N terminus and the surface of α-tubulin that is exposed only at the minus end. Using computational modeling of microtubule dynamics, we show that these mechanisms could account for stathmin's observed activities in vitro, but that both the direct and sequestering activities are likely to be relevant in a cellular context. Taken together, our results suggest that stathmin can promote catastrophe by direct action on protofilament structure and interactions.

  9. Microtubule-microtubule sliding by kinesin-1 is essential for normal cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen; Winding, Michael; Lakonishok, Margot; Wildonger, Jill; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2016-08-23

    Cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes is a microtubule-based bulk cytoplasmic movement. Streaming efficiently circulates and localizes mRNAs and proteins deposited by the nurse cells across the oocyte. This movement is driven by kinesin-1, a major microtubule motor. Recently, we have shown that kinesin-1 heavy chain (KHC) can transport one microtubule on another microtubule, thus driving microtubule-microtubule sliding in multiple cell types. To study the role of microtubule sliding in oocyte cytoplasmic streaming, we used a Khc mutant that is deficient in microtubule sliding but able to transport a majority of cargoes. We demonstrated that streaming is reduced by genomic replacement of wild-type Khc with this sliding-deficient mutant. Streaming can be fully rescued by wild-type KHC and partially rescued by a chimeric motor that cannot move organelles but is active in microtubule sliding. Consistent with these data, we identified two populations of microtubules in fast-streaming oocytes: a network of stable microtubules anchored to the actin cortex and free cytoplasmic microtubules that moved in the ooplasm. We further demonstrated that the reduced streaming in sliding-deficient oocytes resulted in posterior determination defects. Together, we propose that kinesin-1 slides free cytoplasmic microtubules against cortically immobilized microtubules, generating forces that contribute to cytoplasmic streaming and are essential for the refinement of posterior determinants.

  10. Atomic-resolution structure of the CAP-Gly domain of dynactin on polymeric microtubules determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Si; Guo, Changmiao; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Lu, Xingyu; Williams, John Charles; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules and their associated proteins perform a broad array of essential physiological functions, including mitosis, polarization and differentiation, cell migration, and vesicle and organelle transport. As such, they have been extensively studied at multiple levels of resolution (e.g., from structural biology to cell biology). Despite these efforts, there remain significant gaps in our knowledge concerning how microtubule-binding proteins bind to microtubules, how dynamics connect different conformational states, and how these interactions and dynamics affect cellular processes. Structures of microtubule-associated proteins assembled on polymeric microtubules are not known at atomic resolution. Here, we report a structure of the cytoskeleton-associated protein glycine-rich (CAP-Gly) domain of dynactin motor on polymeric microtubules, solved by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. We present the intermolecular interface of CAP-Gly with microtubules, derived by recording direct dipolar contacts between CAP-Gly and tubulin using double rotational echo double resonance (dREDOR)-filtered experiments. Our results indicate that the structure adopted by CAP-Gly varies, particularly around its loop regions, permitting its interaction with multiple binding partners and with the microtubules. To our knowledge, this study reports the first atomic-resolution structure of a microtubule-associated protein on polymeric microtubules. Our approach lays the foundation for atomic-resolution structural analysis of other microtubule-associated motors. PMID:26604305

  11. Atomic-resolution structure of the CAP-Gly domain of dynactin on polymeric microtubules determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Si; Guo, Changmiao; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Lu, Xingyu; Williams, John Charles; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-11-24

    Microtubules and their associated proteins perform a broad array of essential physiological functions, including mitosis, polarization and differentiation, cell migration, and vesicle and organelle transport. As such, they have been extensively studied at multiple levels of resolution (e.g., from structural biology to cell biology). Despite these efforts, there remain significant gaps in our knowledge concerning how microtubule-binding proteins bind to microtubules, how dynamics connect different conformational states, and how these interactions and dynamics affect cellular processes. Structures of microtubule-associated proteins assembled on polymeric microtubules are not known at atomic resolution. Here, we report a structure of the cytoskeleton-associated protein glycine-rich (CAP-Gly) domain of dynactin motor on polymeric microtubules, solved by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. We present the intermolecular interface of CAP-Gly with microtubules, derived by recording direct dipolar contacts between CAP-Gly and tubulin using double rotational echo double resonance (dREDOR)-filtered experiments. Our results indicate that the structure adopted by CAP-Gly varies, particularly around its loop regions, permitting its interaction with multiple binding partners and with the microtubules. To our knowledge, this study reports the first atomic-resolution structure of a microtubule-associated protein on polymeric microtubules. Our approach lays the foundation for atomic-resolution structural analysis of other microtubule-associated motors.

  12. Bidirectional coupling between astrocytes and neurons mediates learning and dynamic coordination in the brain: a multiple modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Wade

    Full Text Available In recent years research suggests that astrocyte networks, in addition to nutrient and waste processing functions, regulate both structural and synaptic plasticity. To understand the biological mechanisms that underpin such plasticity requires the development of cell level models that capture the mutual interaction between astrocytes and neurons. This paper presents a detailed model of bidirectional signaling between astrocytes and neurons (the astrocyte-neuron model or AN model which yields new insights into the computational role of astrocyte-neuronal coupling. From a set of modeling studies we demonstrate two significant findings. Firstly, that spatial signaling via astrocytes can relay a "learning signal" to remote synaptic sites. Results show that slow inward currents cause synchronized postsynaptic activity in remote neurons and subsequently allow Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity based learning to occur at the associated synapses. Secondly, that bidirectional communication between neurons and astrocytes underpins dynamic coordination between neuron clusters. Although our composite AN model is presently applied to simplified neural structures and limited to coordination between localized neurons, the principle (which embodies structural, functional and dynamic complexity, and the modeling strategy may be extended to coordination among remote neuron clusters.

  13. A Stochastic Multiscale Model That Explains the Segregation of Axonal Microtubules and Neurofilaments in Neurological Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Xue

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The organization of the axonal cytoskeleton is a key determinant of the normal function of an axon, which is a long thin projection of a neuron. Under normal conditions two axonal cytoskeletal polymers, microtubules and neurofilaments, align longitudinally in axons and are interspersed in axonal cross-sections. However, in many neurotoxic and neurodegenerative disorders, microtubules and neurofilaments segregate apart from each other, with microtubules and membranous organelles clustered centrally and neurofilaments displaced to the periphery. This striking segregation precedes the abnormal and excessive neurofilament accumulation in these diseases, which in turn leads to focal axonal swellings. While neurofilament accumulation suggests an impairment of neurofilament transport along axons, the underlying mechanism of their segregation from microtubules remains poorly understood for over 30 years. To address this question, we developed a stochastic multiscale model for the cross-sectional distribution of microtubules and neurofilaments in axons. The model describes microtubules, neurofilaments and organelles as interacting particles in a 2D cross-section, and is built upon molecular processes that occur on a time scale of seconds or shorter. It incorporates the longitudinal transport of neurofilaments and organelles through this domain by allowing stochastic arrival and departure of these cargoes, and integrates the dynamic interactions of these cargoes with microtubules mediated by molecular motors. Simulations of the model demonstrate that organelles can pull nearby microtubules together, and in the absence of neurofilament transport, this mechanism gradually segregates microtubules from neurofilaments on a time scale of hours, similar to that observed in toxic neuropathies. This suggests that the microtubule-neurofilament segregation can be a consequence of the selective impairment of neurofilament transport. The model generates the

  14. Tau Induces Cooperative Taxol Binding to Microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jennifer; Santangelo, Christian; Victoria, Makrides; Fygenson, Deborah

    2004-03-01

    Taxol and tau are two ligands which stabilize the microtubule (MT) lattice. Taxol is an anti-mitotic drug that binds β tubulin in the MT interior. Tau is a MT-associated protein that binds both α and β tubulin on the MT exterior. Both taxol and tau reduce MT dynamics and promote tubulin polymerization. Tau alone also acts as a buttress to bundle, stiffen, and space MTs. A structural study recently suggested that taxol and tau may interact by binding to the same site. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we find that tau induces taxol to bind MTs cooperatively depending on the tau concentration. We develop a model that correctly fits the data in the absence of tau and yields a measure of taxol cooperativity when tau is present.

  15. Analyzing Group Coordination when Solving Geometry Problems with Dynamic Geometry Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oner, Diler

    2013-01-01

    In CSCL research, collaborative activity is conceptualized along various yet intertwined dimensions. When functioning within these multiple dimensions, participants make use of several resources, which can be social or content-related (and sometimes temporal) in nature. It is the effective coordination of these resources that appears to…

  16. Plk phosphorylation regulates the microtubule-stabilizing protein TCTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarm, Frederic R

    2002-09-01

    The mitotic polo-like kinases have been implicated in the formation and function of bipolar spindles on the basis of their respective localizations and mutant phenotypes. To date, this putative regulation has been limited to a kinesin-like motor protein, a centrosomal structural protein, and two microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). In this study, another spindle-regulating protein, the mammalian non-MAP microtubule-binding and -stabilizing protein, the translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP), was identified as a putative Plk-interacting clone by a two-hybrid screen. Plk phosphorylates TCTP on two serine residues in vitro and cofractionates with the majority of kinase activity toward TCTP in mitotic cell lysates. In addition, these sites were demonstrated to be phosphorylated in vivo. Overexpression of a Plk phosphorylation site-deficient mutant of TCTP induced a dramatic increase in the number of multinucleate cells, rounded cells with condensed ball-like nuclei, and cells undergoing cell death, similar to both the reported anti-Plk antibody microinjection and the low-concentration taxol treatment phenotypes. These results suggest that phosphorylation decreases the microtubule-stabilizing activity of TCTP and promotes the increase in microtubule dynamics that occurs after metaphase.

  17. Regulation of microtubule stability and mitotic progression by survivin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giodini, Alessandra; Kallio, Marko J; Wall, Nathan R; Gorbsky, Gary J; Tognin, Simona; Marchisio, Pier Carlo; Symons, Marc; Altieri, Dario C

    2002-05-01

    Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) gene family, which has been implicated in both preservation of cell viability and regulation of mitosis in cancer cells. Here, we show that HeLa cells microinjected with a polyclonal antibody to survivin exhibited delayed progression in prometaphase (31.5 +/- 6.9 min) and metaphase (126.8 +/- 73.8 min), as compared with control injected cells (prometaphase, 21.5 +/- 3.3 min; metaphase, 18.9 +/- 4.5 min; P mitotic spindles severely depleted of microtubules and occasionally underwent apoptosis without exiting the mitotic block or thereafter. Forced expression of survivin in HeLa cells profoundly influenced microtubule dynamics with reduction of pole-to-pole distance at metaphase (8.57 +/- 0.21 microm versus 10.58 +/- 0.19 microm; P microtubules against nocodazole-induced depolymerization in vivo. These data demonstrate that survivin functions at cell division to control microtubule stability and assembly of a normal mitotic spindle. This pathway may facilitate checkpoint evasion and promote resistance to chemotherapy in cancer.

  18. Detailed Per-residue Energetic Analysis Explains the Driving Force for Microtubule Disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed T Ayoub

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are long filamentous hollow cylinders whose surfaces form lattice structures of αβ-tubulin heterodimers. They perform multiple physiological roles in eukaryotic cells and are targets for therapeutic interventions. In our study, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for arbitrarily long microtubules that have either GDP or GTP molecules in the E-site of β-tubulin. A detailed energy balance of the MM/GBSA inter-dimer interaction energy per residue contributing to the overall lateral and longitudinal structural stability was performed. The obtained results identified the key residues and tubulin domains according to their energetic contributions. They also identified the molecular forces that drive microtubule disassembly. At the tip of the plus end of the microtubule, the uneven distribution of longitudinal interaction energies within a protofilament generates a torque that bends tubulin outwardly with respect to the cylinder's axis causing disassembly. In the presence of GTP, this torque is opposed by lateral interactions that prevent outward curling, thus stabilizing the whole microtubule. Once GTP hydrolysis reaches the tip of the microtubule (lateral cap, lateral interactions become much weaker, allowing tubulin dimers to bend outwards, causing disassembly. The role of magnesium in the process of outward curling has also been demonstrated. This study also showed that the microtubule seam is the most energetically labile inter-dimer interface and could serve as a trigger point for disassembly. Based on a detailed balance of the energetic contributions per amino acid residue in the microtubule, numerous other analyses could be performed to give additional insights into the properties of microtubule dynamic instability.

  19. Microtubule as nanobioelectronic nonlinear circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekulić Dalibor L.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of biological molecules has offered exciting alternatives to conventional synthetic methods. Specific methods use various biological templates to direct the deposition and patterning of inorganic materials. Here we have established a new electrical model of microtubules as a biological nanoscale circuit based on polyelectrolyte features of cylindrical biopolymers. Our working hypothesis is that microtubules play an active role in sub-cellular computation and signaling via electronic and protonic conductivity and can thus be made useful in hybrid materials that offer novel electronic characteristics. We verify these hypotheses both computationally and analytically through a quantitative model based on the atomic resolution structures of the key functional proteins.

  20. Coordination chemistry strategies for dynamic helicates: time-programmable chirality switching with labile and inert metal helicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hiroyuki; Tsukube, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    'Chirality switching' is one of the most important chemical processes controlling many biological systems. DNAs and proteins often work as time-programmed functional helices, in which specific external stimuli alter the helical direction and tune the time scale of subsequent events. Although a variety of organic foldamers and their hybrids with natural helices have been developed, we highlight coordination chemistry strategies for development of structurally and functionally defined metal helicates. These metal helicates have characteristic coordination geometries, redox reactivities and spectroscopic/magnetic properties as well as complex chiralities. Several kinds of inert metal helicates maintain rigid helical structures and their stereoisomers are separable by optical resolution techniques, while labile metal helicates offer dynamic inversion of their helical structures via non-covalent interactions with external chemical signals. The latter particularly have dynamically ordered helical structures, which are controlled by the combinations of metal centres and chiral ligands. They further function as time-programmable switches of chirality-derived dynamic rotations, translations, stretching and shape flipping, which are useful applications in nanoscience and related technology.

  1. Microtubules in Dendritic Spine Development

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    It is generally believed that only the actin cytoskeleton resides in dendritic spines and controls spine morphology and plasticity. Here we report that microtubules (MTs) are present in spines and that shRNA knockdown of the MT-plus end binding protein EB3 significantly reduces spine formation. Furthermore, stabilization and inhibition of MTs by low doses of taxol and nocodazole enhance and impair spine formation elicited by BDNF, respectively. Therefore, MTs play an important role in the con...

  2. CYLD Regulates Noscapine Activity in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia via a Microtubule-Dependent Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yunfan; Ran, Jie; Sun, Lei; Sun, Xiaodong; Luo, Youguang; Yan, Bing; Tala,; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen; Zhang, Lei; Bao, Gang; Zhou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an orally administrable drug used worldwide for cough suppression and has recently been demonstrated to disrupt microtubule dynamics and possess anticancer activity. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating noscapine activity remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that cylindromatosis (CYLD), a microtubule-associated tumor suppressor protein, modulates the activity of noscapine both in cell lines and in primary cells of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Flow cytometry a...

  3. Detailed Per-residue Energetic Analysis Explains the Driving Force for Microtubule Disassembly

    OpenAIRE

    Ayoub, Ahmed T.; Mariusz Klobukowski; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules are long filamentous hollow cylinders whose surfaces form lattice structures of αβ-tubulin heterodimers. They perform multiple physiological roles in eukaryotic cells and are targets for therapeutic interventions. In our study, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for arbitrarily long microtubules that have either GDP or GTP molecules in the E-site of β-tubulin. A detailed energy balance of the MM/GBSA inter-dimer interaction energy per residue contributing to t...

  4. Long astral microtubules and RACK-1 stabilize polarity domains during maintenance phase in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkang Ai

    Full Text Available Cell polarity is a very well conserved process important for cell differentiation, cell migration, and embryonic development. After the establishment of distinct cortical domains, polarity cues have to be stabilized and maintained within a fluid and dynamic membrane to achieve proper cell asymmetry. Microtubules have long been thought to deliver the signals required to polarize a cell. While previous studies suggest that microtubules play a key role in the establishment of polarity, the requirement of microtubules during maintenance phase remains unclear. In this study, we show that depletion of Caenorhabditis elegans RACK-1, which leads to short astral microtubules during prometaphase, specifically affects maintenance of cortical PAR domains and Dynamin localization. We then investigated the consequence of knocking down other factors that also abolish astral microtubule elongation during polarity maintenance phase. We found a correlation between short astral microtubules and the instability of PAR-6 and PAR-2 domains during maintenance phase. Our data support a necessary role for astral microtubules in the maintenance phase of cell polarity.

  5. Structural differences between yeast and mammalian microtubules revealed by cryo-EM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howes, Stuart C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Biophysics Graduate Group; Geyer, Elisabeth A. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biophysics; Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; LaFrance, Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular and Cell Biology Graduate Program; Zhang, Rui [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Kellogg, Elizabeth H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Westermann, Stefan [Univ. of Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany). Dept. of Molecular Genetics, Center for Medical Biotechnology; Rice, Luke M. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biophysics; Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; Nogales, Eva [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst.; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Biology and California Inst. for Quantitative Biosciences; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division

    2017-06-26

    Microtubules are polymers of αβ-tubulin heterodimers essential for all eukaryotes. Despite sequence conservation, there are significant structural differences between microtubules assembled in vitro from mammalian or budding yeast tubulin. Yeast MTs were not observed to undergo compaction at the interdimer interface as seen for mammalian microtubules upon GTP hydrolysis. Lack of compaction might reflect slower GTP hydrolysis or a different degree of allosteric coupling in the lattice. The microtubule plus end–tracking protein Bim1 binds yeast microtubules both between αβ-tubulin heterodimers, as seen for other organisms, and within tubulin dimers, but binds mammalian tubulin only at interdimer contacts. At the concentrations used in cryo-electron microscopy, Bim1 causes the compaction of yeast microtubules and induces their rapid disassembly. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate structural differences between yeast and mammalian microtubules that likely underlie their differing polymerization dynamics. These differences may reflect adaptations to the demands of different cell size or range of physiological growth temperatures.

  6. Laulimalide induces dose-dependent modulation of microtubule behaviour in the C. elegans embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Bajaj

    Full Text Available Laulimalide is a microtubule-binding drug that was originally isolated from marine sponges. High concentrations of laulimalide stabilize microtubules and inhibit cell division similarly to paclitaxel; however, there are important differences with respect to the nature of the specific cellular defects between these two drugs and their binding sites on the microtubule. In this study, we used Caenorhabditis elegans embryos to investigate the acute effects of laulimalide on microtubules in vivo, with a direct comparison to paclitaxel. We observed surprising dose-dependent effects for laulimalide, whereby microtubules were stabilized at concentrations above 100 nM, but destabilized at concentrations between 50 and 100 nM. Despite this behaviour at low concentrations, laulimalide acted synergistically with paclitaxel to stabilize microtubules when both drugs were used at sub-effective concentrations, consistent with observations of synergistic interactions between these two drugs in other systems. Our results indicate that laulimalide induces a concentration-dependent, biphasic change in microtubule polymer dynamics in the C. elegans embryo.

  7. Dynamic Coordination of Uncalibrated Hand/Eye Robotic System Based on Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A nonlinear visual mapping model is presented to replace the image Jacobian relation for uncalibrated hand/eye coordination. A new visual tracking controller based on artificial neural network is designed. Simulation results show that this method can drive the static tracking error to zero quickly and keep good robustness and adaptability at the same time. In addition, the algorithm is very easy to be implemented with low computational complexity.``

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Microtubule Interacting Proteins over the Course of Xylem Tracheary Element Formation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbyshire, Paul; Ménard, Delphine; Green, Porntip; Saalbach, Gerhard; Buschmann, Henrik; Lloyd, Clive W; Pesquet, Edouard

    2015-10-01

    Plant vascular cells, or tracheary elements (TEs), rely on circumferential secondary cell wall thickenings to maintain sap flow. The patterns in which TE thickenings are organized vary according to the underlying microtubule bundles that guide wall deposition. To identify microtubule interacting proteins present at defined stages of TE differentiation, we exploited the synchronous differentiation of TEs in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cultures. Quantitative proteomic analysis of microtubule pull-downs, using ratiometric (14)N/(15)N labeling, revealed 605 proteins exhibiting differential accumulation during TE differentiation. Microtubule interacting proteins associated with membrane trafficking, protein synthesis, DNA/RNA binding, and signal transduction peaked during secondary cell wall formation, while proteins associated with stress peaked when approaching TE cell death. In particular, CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-INTERACTING PROTEIN1, already associated with primary wall synthesis, was enriched during secondary cell wall formation. RNAi knockdown of genes encoding several of the identified proteins showed that secondary wall formation depends on the coordinated presence of microtubule interacting proteins with nonoverlapping functions: cell wall thickness, cell wall homogeneity, and the pattern and cortical location of the wall are dependent on different proteins. Altogether, proteins linking microtubules to a range of metabolic compartments vary specifically during TE differentiation and regulate different aspects of wall patterning.

  9. The Drosophila microtubule-associated protein mars stabilizes mitotic spindles by crosslinking microtubules through its N-terminal region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs.

  10. Anomalous motor mediated cargo transport in microtubule networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandal, Steven; Macveigh-Fierro, Daniel; Shen, Zhiyuan; Lemoi, Kyle; Vidali, Luis; Ross, Jennifer; Tuzel, Erkan

    Cargo transport is an important biological mechanism by which cells locomote, self-organize, and actively transport organelles. This transport is mediated by the cytoskeletal network and molecular motors; however, it is not known how network self-organization and dynamics affect these transport processes. In order to develop a mechanistic understanding of cargo transport, we use a coarse-grained Brownian dynamics model that incorporates the dynamics of these networks, as well as experimentally determined motor properties. We will test these models with two experimental systems: (1) in vitro microtubule networks with kinesin-1 motors, and quantum dot cargos on recreated microtubule networks, and (2) an excellent model organism, the moss Physcomitrella patens, in which chloroplasts are transported via the microtubule network by means of kinesin-like proteins. Phenomenological network characterizations are made, both in vivo and in vitro, and cargo motility is characterized using Mean Squared Displacement (MSD) measurements. Our simulations shed light on the role of network density and motor properties on the observed transport behavior, and improve our understanding of cargo transport in cells.

  11. Dynamic Coordinated Shifting Control of Automated Mechanical Transmissions without a Clutch in a Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinlei Liu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the shifting process of automated mechanical transmissions (AMTs for traditional hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs, and by combining the features of electric machines with fast response speed, the dynamic model of the hybrid electric AMT vehicle powertrain is built up, the dynamic characteristics of each phase of shifting process are analyzed, and a control strategy in which torque and speed of the engine and electric machine are coordinatively controlled to achieve AMT shifting control for a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV without clutch is proposed. In the shifting process, the engine and electric machine are well controlled, and the shift jerk and power interruption and restoration time are reduced. Simulation and real car test results show that the proposed control strategy can more efficiently improve the shift quality for PHEVs equipped with AMTs.

  12. GDP-to-GTP exchange on the microtubule end can contribute to the frequency of catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedra, Felipe-Andrés; Kim, Tae; Garza, Emily S; Geyer, Elisabeth A; Burns, Alexander; Ye, Xuecheng; Rice, Luke M

    2016-11-07

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers of αβ-tubulin that have essential roles in chromosome segregation and organization of the cytoplasm. Catastrophe-the switch from growing to shrinking-occurs when a microtubule loses its stabilizing GTP cap. Recent evidence indicates that the nucleotide on the microtubule end controls how tightly an incoming subunit will be bound (trans-acting GTP), but most current models do not incorporate this information. We implemented trans-acting GTP into a computational model for microtubule dynamics. In simulations, growing microtubules often exposed terminal GDP-bound subunits without undergoing catastrophe. Transient GDP exposure on the growing plus end slowed elongation by reducing the number of favorable binding sites on the microtubule end. Slower elongation led to erosion of the GTP cap and an increase in the frequency of catastrophe. Allowing GDP-to-GTP exchange on terminal subunits in simulations mitigated these effects. Using mutant αβ-tubulin or modified GTP, we showed experimentally that a more readily exchangeable nucleotide led to less frequent catastrophe. Current models for microtubule dynamics do not account for GDP-to-GTP exchange on the growing microtubule end, so our findings provide a new way of thinking about the molecular events that initiate catastrophe. © 2016 Piedra et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Intermediate filament-associated cytolinker plectin 1c destabilizes microtubules in keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Rocio G.; Walko, Gernot; Janda, Lubomir; Novacek, Jirka; Mihailovska, Eva; Reipert, Siegfried; Andrä-Marobela, Kerstin; Wiche, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The transition of microtubules (MTs) from an assembled to a disassembled state plays an essential role in several cellular functions. While MT dynamics are often linked to those of actin filaments, little is known about whether intermediate filaments (IFs) have an influence on MT dynamics. We show here that plectin 1c (P1c), one of the multiple isoforms of the IF-associated cytolinker protein plectin, acts as an MT destabilizer. We found that MTs in P1c-deficient (P1c−/−) keratinocytes are more resistant toward nocodazole-induced disassembly and display increased acetylation. In addition, live imaging of MTs in P1c−/−, as well as in plectin-null, cells revealed decreased MT dynamics. Increased MT stability due to P1c deficiency led to changes in cell shape, increased velocity but loss of directionality of migration, smaller-sized focal adhesions, higher glucose uptake, and mitotic spindle aberrations combined with reduced growth rates of cells. On the basis of ex vivo and in vitro experimental approaches, we suggest a mechanism for MT destabilization in which isoform-specific binding of P1c to MTs antagonizes the MT-stabilizing and assembly-promoting function of MT-associated proteins through an inhibitory function exerted by plectin's SH3 domain. Our results open new perspectives on cytolinker-coordinated IF-MT interaction and its physiological significance. PMID:23363598

  14. Myopic versus Far-Sighted Behaviors in Dynamic Supply Chain Coordination through Advertising with Reference Price Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafei Zu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the different effects of the myopic and far-sighted behaviors on the advertising coordination in dynamic supply chain, this paper takes the reference price effect into consideration and formulates four differential game models for the two-level supply chain composed of a manufacturer and a retailer in the situation of Stackelberg game. In our models, the market demand is assumed to be affected by the goodwill, reference price, and the advertising investment, in which the advertising investment can promote the construction of goodwill and such goodwill can further enhance the reference price. The results show that the participating members in the supply chain should invest more in advertisement to improve the goodwill and the relative reference price reflected in the minds of consumers. A far-sighted manufacturer will invest more in the advertisement and charge a higher wholesale price regardless of the behavior choice of the retailer. However, such kind of ignorance leads to different results on the retail pricing strategies of the retailer. The numerical analyses are given in the end to verify the effectiveness of the conclusions which provide the theoretical support to the dynamic supply chain coordination in practice.

  15. Dissecting the nanoscale distributions and functions of microtubule-end-binding proteins EB1 and ch-TOG in interphase HeLa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Nakamura

    Full Text Available Recently, the EB1 and XMAP215/TOG families of microtubule binding proteins have been demonstrated to bind autonomously to the growing plus ends of microtubules and regulate their behaviour in in vitro systems. However, their functional redundancy or difference in cells remains obscure. Here, we compared the nanoscale distributions of EB1 and ch-TOG along microtubules using high-resolution microscopy techniques, and also their roles in microtubule organisation in interphase HeLa cells. The ch-TOG accumulation sites protruded ∼100 nm from the EB1 comets. Overexpression experiments showed that ch-TOG and EB1 did not interfere with each other's localisation, confirming that they recognise distinct regions at the ends of microtubules. While both EB1 and ch-TOG showed similar effects on microtubule plus end dynamics and additively increased microtubule dynamicity, only EB1 exhibited microtubule-cell cortex attachment activity. These observations indicate that EB1 and ch-TOG regulate microtubule organisation differently via distinct regions in the plus ends of microtubules.

  16. Multi-Objective Coordinated Path Planning for a Team of UAVs in a Dynamic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    fuel. The need to coordinate multiple UAVs temporally and/or spatially while avoiding collisions with static obstacles (e.g., mountainous terrain...geographic location loc (l), UAV requirements sgna l , start time start lt , processing time process lt , and deadline deadline lt . Each UAV...arrive k depart travel arrive ki k ijkt kj ijkt depart arrive ki ki depart arrive a ki ki l t k a t t x t M x k i j t b t t i loc l k c t t i loc

  17. Tracking excited-state charge and spin dynamics in iron coordination complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenkai; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Bergmann, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    to spin state, can elucidate the spin crossover dynamics of [Fe(2,2'-bipyridine)(3)](2+) on photoinduced metal-to-ligand charge transfer excitation. We are able to track the charge and spin dynamics, and establish the critical role of intermediate spin states in the crossover mechanism. We anticipate......Crucial to many light-driven processes in transition metal complexes is the absorption and dissipation of energy by 3d electrons(1-4). But a detailed understanding of such non-equilibrium excited-state dynamics and their interplay with structural changes is challenging: a multitude of excited...... states and possible transitions result in phenomena too complex to unravel when faced with the indirect sensitivity of optical spectroscopy to spin dynamics(5) and the flux limitations of ultrafast X-ray sources(6,7). Such a situation exists for archetypal poly-pyridyl iron complexes, such as [Fe(2...

  18. A Heart for Interaction: Shared Physiological Dynamics and Behavioral Coordination in a Collective, Creative Construction Task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Stege Bjørndahl, Johanne; Roepstorff, Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    participants doing the same things) than in collective ones (involving participants taking turns and performing complementary actions). However, when contrasted against virtual pairs, collective trials display more stable shared HR dynamics suggesting that online social interaction plays an important role...

  19. Improving Supply Chain Coordination by Linking Dynamic Procurement Decision to Multi-Agent System

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yee Ming

    2010-01-01

    The Internet has changed the way business is conducted in many ways. For example, in the field of procurement, the possibility to directly interact with a trading partner has given rise to new mechanisms in the supply chain management. One such interactive dynamic procurement, which lets both buyer and seller software agents bid by potential buyer agents instead of static procurement by vendors. Dynamic procurement decision could provide the buying and selling channel to buyer, to avoid occurring condition that seller could not deliver on the contract promise. Using NYOP(Name Your Own Price) to be the core of dynamic procurement negotiation algorithm sets up multi-agent dynamic supply chain system, to present the DSINs(Dynamic Supply Chain Information Networks) by JADE, and to present the dynamic supply chain logistic simulation by eM-Plant. Finally, evaluating supply chain performance with supply chain performance metrics (such as bullwhip, fill rate), to be the reference of enterprise making deciding in the...

  20. Joined at the hip: kinetochores, microtubules, and spindle assembly checkpoint signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristan, Carlos; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-01-01

    Error-free chromosome segregation relies on stable connections between kinetochores and spindle microtubules. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors such connections and relays their absence to the cell cycle machinery to delay cell division. The molecular network at kinetochores that is responsible for microtubule binding is integrated with the core components of the SAC signaling system. Molecular-mechanistic understanding of how the SAC is coupled to the kinetochore-microtubule interface has advanced significantly in recent years. The latest insights not only provide a striking view of the dynamics and regulation of SAC signaling events at the outer kinetochore but also create a framework for understanding how that signaling may be terminated when kinetochores and microtubules connect.

  1. Novel coordinates for nonlinear multibody motion with applications to spacecraft dynamics and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Hanspeter

    1998-12-01

    Novel sets of attitude coordinates called the Stereographic Parameters (SPs) and configuration quasivelocity coordinates called the Eigenfactor Quasivelocities (EQVs) are discussed. The SPs are generated through stereographic projections of the Euler parameter constraint hypersphere onto hyperplanes. SP sets are non-unique and have distinct alternate sets referred to as shadow sets. They abide by the same differential kinematic equation, but generally display a different singular behavior. Explicit expressions are developed that map the original SP set to the shadow set and thus avoid any singularities. Both symmetric SPs such as the classical and Modified Rodrigues Parameters (MRPs), as well as asymmetric SPs are discussed. A globally asymptotically stable MRP feedback law which tracks any reference trajectory is presented. Both unsaturated and saturated control cases are discussed. Further, an MRP costate switching condition is developed that allows both original and shadow MRPs to be used simultaneously in optimal control problems. The Lagrange equations of motion in terms of the n-dimensional EQV vector are developed. The EQV formulation has an identity mass matrix which results in no matrix inverse being taken in numerical simulations. An explicit expression is presented that incorporates Pfaffian non-holonomic constraints into the EQV formulation without increasing the system order. Unfortunately, the use of EQV in numerical simulations only proved beneficial in selected cases. Generally the computational burden proved too high. However, the EQVs are found to be valuable when used as velocity feedback coordinates. EQV feedback laws have an exponentially decaying kinetic energy, superior performance to traditional state velocity feedback laws and are found to decouple the motion of multi-link robotic systems. The equations of motion and steering laws of spacecraft containing Variable Speed Control Moment Gyroscopes (VSCMGs) are developed. Contrary to classical

  2. [The role of cortical microtubules in moss protonemal cells during dehydration/rehydration cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Ling; Ouyang, Hao-Miao; Liu, Xiang-Lin; Xia, Gui-Xian

    2003-05-01

    Plant cells response to water deficit through a variety of physiological processes. In this work, we studied the function of microtubule cytoskeleton during dehydration/rehydration cycle in moss (Atrichum undulatum) protonemal cells as a model system. The morphological and cytological change of protonemal cells during dehydration and rehydration cycle were first investigated. Under normal conditions, protonemal cells showed bright green colour and appeared wet and fresh. Numerous chloroplasts distributed regularly throughout the cytoplasm in each cell. After dehydration treatment, protonemal cells lost most of their chlorophylls and turned to look yellow and dry. In addition, dehydration caused plasmolysis in these cells. Upon rehydration, the cells could recover completely from the dehydrated state. These results indicated that moss had a remarkable intrinsic ability to survive from the extreme drought stress. Microtubule, an important component of cytoskeleton, is considered to play crucial roles in the responses to some environmental stresses such as cold and light. To see if it is also involved in the drought tolerance, dynamic organization of microtubules in protonemal cells of Atrichum undulatum subjected to drought and rehydration were examined by indirect immunofluorescence combined with confocal lasersharp scanning microscopy. The cortical microtubules were arranged into a fine structure with a predominant orientation parallel to the long axis of the cells in the control cells. After dehydration, the microtubule organization was remarkablly altered and the fine microtubule structure disappeared whereas some thicker cables formed. When the cells were grown under rehydration conditions, the fine microtubule arrays reappeared. These results provided a piece of evidence that microtubules play a role in the cellular responses to drought stress in moss. Furthermore, we analyzed the effects of the microtubule-disrupting agent colchicine on the morphology recovery

  3. Movement of chromosomes with severed kinetochore microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forer, Arthur; Johansen, Kristen M; Johansen, Jørgen

    2015-05-01

    Experiments dating from 1966 and thereafter showed that anaphase chromosomes continued to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed by ultraviolet microbeam irradiation. These observations were initially met with scepticism as they contradicted the prevailing view that kinetochore fibre microtubules pulled chromosomes to the pole. However, recent experiments using visible light laser microbeam irradiations have corroborated these earlier experiments as anaphase chromosomes again were shown to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed. Thus, multiple independent studies using different techniques have shown that chromosomes can indeed move poleward without direct microtubule connections to the pole, with only a kinetochore 'stub' of microtubules. An issue not yet settled is: what propels the disconnected chromosome? There are two not necessarily mutually exclusive proposals in the literature: (1) chromosome movement is propelled by the kinetochore stub interacting with non-kinetochore microtubules and (2) chromosome movement is propelled by a spindle matrix acting on the stub. In this review, we summarise the data indicating that chromosomes can move with severed kinetochore microtubules and we discuss proposed mechanisms for chromosome movement with severed kinetochore microtubules.

  4. Coordinated Observations of X-ray and High-Resolution EUV Active Region Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    The recently-launched High-resolution Coronal imager (Hi-C) sounding rocket provided the highest resolution images of coronal loops and other small-scale structures in the 193 Angstrom passband to date. With just 5 minutes of observations, the instrument recorded a variety of dynamic coronal events -- including even a small B-class flare. We will present our results comparing these extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations with X-ray imaging from Hinode/XRT as well as EUV AIA data to identify sources of hot plasma rooted in the photosphere and track their affect on the overall topology and dynamics of the active region.

  5. Effects of 3-repeat tau on taxol mobility through microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjoo; Fygenson, Deborah; Kim, Mahn Won

    2005-03-01

    Both the anti-cancer drug taxol and the microtubule-associated protein tau suppress dynamics of microtubules (MT). We have observed taxol mobility with full-length 3-repeat tau, one of six tau isoforms, using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) on MTs and compare with earlier results on recombinant full-length adult 4-repeat tau. Taxol mobility becomes highly sensitive to taxol concentration in the presence of 3-repeat tau (up to 1:1 molar ratio) as it does in the presence of 4-repeat tau, but is 2 to 3 times faster at low taxol concentrations. Fitting to a mean-field binding reaction model [J.L. Ross et.al, PNAS 101:12910-5 (2004)] suggests that the presence of 3-repeat tau enhances taxol movement through pores in the MT walls.

  6. Sliding mode coordination control for multiagent systems with underactuated agent dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Masood; Nersesov, Sergey G.; Clayton, Garrett; Ashrafiuon, Hashem

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we develop a new integrated coordinated control and obstacle avoidance approach for a general class of underactuated agents. We use graph-theoretic notions to characterise communication topology in the network of underactuated agents as determined by the information flow directions and captured by the graph Laplacian matrix. Obstacle avoidance is achieved by surrounding the stationary as well as moving obstacles by elliptical or other convex shapes that serve as stable periodic solutions to planar systems of ordinary differential equations and using transient trajectories of those systems to navigate the agents around the obstacles. Decentralised controllers for individual agents are designed using sliding mode control approach and are only based on data communicated from the neighbouring agents. We demonstrate the efficacy of our theoretical approach using an example of a system of wheeled mobile robots that reach and maintain a desired formation. Finally, we validate our results experimentally.

  7. Stable reduced-order models of generalized dynamical systems using coordinate-transformed Arnoldi algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, L.M.; Kamon, M.; Elfadel, I.; White, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Model order reduction based on Krylov subspace iterative methods has recently emerged as a major tool for compressing the number of states in linear models used for simulating very large physical systems (VLSI circuits, electromagnetic interactions). There are currently two main methods for accomplishing such a compression: one is based on the nonsymmetric look-ahead Lanczos algorithm that gives a numerically stable procedure for finding Pade approximations, while the other is based on a less well characterized Arnoldi algorithm. In this paper, we show that for certain classes of generalized state-space systems, the reduced-order models produced by a coordinate-transformed Arnoldi algorithm inherit the stability of the original system. Complete Proofs of our results will be given in the final paper.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation and vibrational spectroscopy of molecules (Ⅰ)——A method of internal coordinate correlation for band assignment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨小震

    1995-01-01

    A method of simulation of vibrational spectra by using the "internal coordinatecorrelation" based on molecular dynamics algorithms and auto-correlation function has been developed.The in-ternal coordinates,such as bond stretching,bond angle bending,out-of-plane bending and torsion,are treatedas the dynamic variables to obtain a density spectrum or the "internal coordinate correlation" spectrum Theadvantages of this method are as follows:i)it is easier to assign vibration modes for the density spectra;ii)itsimply connects the Fourier transformed "internal coordinate correlation" function to the eigenvectors innormal coordinate analysis;iii)it is a basis for simulating IR and Raman active spectra of a large molecularsystem.

  9. Mobility of Taxol in Microtubule Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J.

    2003-06-01

    Mobility of taxol inside microtubules was investigated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) on flow-aligned bundles. Bundles were made of microtubules with either GMPCPP or GTP at the exchangeable site on the tubulin dimer. Recovery times were sensitive to bundle thickness and packing, indicating that taxol molecules are able to move laterally through the bundle. The density of open binding sites along a microtubule was varied by controlling the concentration of taxol in solution for GMPCPP samples. With > 63% sites occupied, recovery times were independent of taxol concentration and, therefore, inversely proportional to the microscopic dissociation rate, k_{off}. It was found that 10*k_{off} (GMPCPP) ~ k_{off} (GTP), consistent with, but not fully accounting for, the difference in equilibrium constants for taxol on GMPCPP and GTP microtubules. With taxol along the microtubule interior is hindered by rebinding events when open sites are within ~7 nm of each other.

  10. Coordinated approaches to quantify long-term ecosystem dynamics in response to global change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Y.; Melillo, J.; Niu, S.

    2011-01-01

    Many serious ecosystem consequences of climate change will take decades or even centuries to emerge. Long-term ecological responses to global change are strongly regulated by slow processes, such as changes in species composition, carbon dynamics in soil and by long-lived plants, and accumulation...

  11. Dynamic Analysis of Offshore Oil Pipe Installation Using the Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmy D; Madsen, Søren B; Hyldahl, Per Christian

    2013-01-01

    of offshore submerged oil pipes using oceangoing vessels. In this investigation such an oil pipe is modeled using ANCF beam elements to simulate the dynamic behavior of the pipe during the installation process. Multiple physical effects such as gravity, buoyancy, seabed contact, and fluid damping...

  12. Coordinated power control of unified power flow controller and its application for enhancing dynamic power system performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wanliang

    This thesis focuses on reporting my research study on a problem area relating to use of Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC) for coordinating load flow in power systems so as to enhance their static and dynamic performance by having more secure and economical operation and higher dynamic stability margin. UPFC is considered as one of the most promising devices for implementing the Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) concept. Although development of UPFC is still on an infant stage, probing into its impact on power system operation is actively pursued and significant effort has been devoted to put it forward as a practical FACTS device and as a challenging academic research object. In order to consider UPFC as a basic power system element, it has to be involved in associated load flow computation essentially for power system control analysis and operational planning. An up front problem for design engineers is therefore pointing to a need to modify existing load flow program so as to accommodate interactions of UPFCs. A lot of research output start coming out but their computational efficiency are not high enough. In this regard, I propose two methods to perform the UPFC embedded load flow calculation to cater for two different types of application. The first one caters for analyzing direct control of load flow on transmission lines with embedded UPFCs. In this type of problem, active and reactive power of the lines, as well as the magnitude of bus voltages are priori given. The load flow solution can then be obtained and enables the UPFC parameters to be determined with a significantly improved computational efficiency. The second one works in contrary to the first one by which parameters of UPFCs are given before hand and the load flow calculation is performed for conforming a feasible operation. It can be regarded as an indirect load flow control calculation which is useful in planning stage for incorporating UPFC into existing system and/or carrying out

  13. Dynamic coordination control technique for trunk road%主干道动态协调控制技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈国江; 钱晓杰

    2013-01-01

    针对主干道信号协调控制问题,提出一种新的动态分段协调控制技术。首先分析路段长度、交通密度以及信号周期时间对关联度的影响,设计了基于分层结构的关联度模糊计算方法和基于关联度的控制子区划分方法;然后提出一种子区协调控制算法,根据一段时间内交通流信息计算子区公共信号周期、上下行相位差和各路口的绿信比。实际应用表明,该控制技术能有效降低主干道交通流平均旅行时间和平均停车率,效果令人满意。%Aiming at the problem of the signal coordination control in trunk road, a novel dynamic subsection coordination control technique is proposed. Firstly, the influences of the intersection distance, the traffic density and the cycle time on the correlation degree between two neighboring intersections are analysed. The fuzzy computing method of correlation degree based on hierarchical structure and the division method of control subarea based on correlation degree are designed. Then the subarea coordination control algorithm is also designed by which the public cycle time of control subarea, up-run offset and down-run offset of section, and split of each intersection are obtained. The actual application shows that the proposed technique can decrease the average travel time and average stop rate effectively, and the application result is very satisfied.

  14. Inner and Outer Coordination Shells of Mg(2+) in CorA Selectivity Filter from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Wapeesittipan, Pattama; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2016-01-28

    Structural data of CorA Mg(2+) channels show that the five Gly-Met-Asn (GMN) motifs at the periplasmic loop of the pentamer structure form a molecular scaffold serving as a selectivity filter. Unfortunately, knowledge about the cation selectivity of Mg(2+) channels remains limited. Since Mg(2+) in aqueous solution has a strong first hydration shell and apparent second hydration sphere, the coordination structure of Mg(2+) in a CorA selectivity filter is expected to be different from that in bulk water. Hence, this study investigated the hydration structure and ligand coordination of Mg(2+) in a selectivity filter of CorA using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The simulations reveal that the inner-shell structure of Mg(2+) in the filter is not significantly different from that in aqueous solution. The major difference is the characteristic structural features of the outer shell. The GMN residues engage indirectly in the interactions with the metal ion as ligands in the second shell of Mg(2+). Loss of hydrogen bonds between inner- and outer-shell waters observed from Mg(2+) in bulk water is mostly compensated by interactions between waters in the first solvation shell and the GMN motif. Some water molecules in the second shell remain in the selectivity filter and become less mobile to support the metal binding. Removal of Mg(2+) from the divalent cation sensor sites of the protein had an impact on the structure and metal binding of the filter. From the results, it can be concluded that the GMN motif enhances the affinity of the metal binding site in the CorA selectivity filter by acting as an outer coordination ligand.

  15. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S; Karakaya, Mahmut; Howell, Danielle; Kerekes, Ryan A; Solecki, David J

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. We show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia are motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. We propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.

  16. The impact of Wii Fit intervention on dynamic balance control in children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder and balance problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsma, Dorothee; Geuze, Reint H; Mombarg, Remo; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in the performance of children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder (p-DCD) and balance problems (BP) and typical developing children (TD) on a Wii Fit task and to measure the effect on balance skills after a Wii Fit intervention. Twenty-eight children with BP and 20 TD-children participated in the study. Motor performance was assessed with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC2), three subtests of the Bruininks Oseretsky Test (BOT2): Bilateral Coordination, Balance and Running Speed & Agility, and a Wii Fit ski slalom test. The TD children and half of the children in the BP group were tested before and after a 6weeks non-intervention period. All children with BP received 6weeks of Wii Fit intervention (with games other than the ski game) and were tested before and afterwards. Children with BP were less proficient than TD children in playing the Wii Fit ski slalom game. Training with the Wii Fit improved their motor performance. The improvement was significantly larger after intervention than after a period of non-intervention. Therefore the change cannot solely be attributed to spontaneous development or test-retest effect. Nearly all children enjoyed participation during the 6weeks of intervention. Our study shows that Wii Fit intervention is effective and is potentially a method to support treatment of (dynamic) balance control problems in children.

  17. The dynamic of information-driven coordination phenomena: a transfer entropy analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Borge-Holthoefer, Javier; Gonçalves, Bruno; González-Bailón, Sandra; Arenas, Alex; Moreno, Yamir; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Data from social media are providing unprecedented opportunities to investigate the processes that rule the dynamics of collective social phenomena. Here, we consider an information theoretical approach to define and measure the temporal and structural signatures typical of collective social events as they arise and gain prominence. We use the symbolic transfer entropy analysis of micro-blogging time series to extract directed networks of influence among geolocalized sub-units in social systems. This methodology captures the emergence of system-level dynamics close to the onset of socially relevant collective phenomena. The framework is validated against a detailed empirical analysis of five case studies. In particular, we identify a change in the characteristic time-scale of the information transfer that flags the onset of information-driven collective phenomena. Furthermore, our approach identifies an order-disorder transition in the directed network of influence between social sub-units. In the absence of ...

  18. CO2 selective dynamic two-dimensional Zn(II) coordination polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Hong; Bae, Jeong Mi; Hwang, Yong-Kyung; Kim, Ha-Yeong; Kim, Cheal; Huh, Seong; Kim, Sung-Jin; Kim, Youngmee

    2013-11-28

    A CO2 selective dynamic two-dimensional (2D) MOF system, [Zn(glu)(μ-bpe)]·2H2O (·2H2O) (glu = glutarate, bpe = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene), is prepared. Based on variable temperature PXRD patterns, I·2H2O exhibits a structural transformation of the framework upon desolvation. Various gas sorption analyses at low temperatures reveal that solvent-free I selectively adsorbs CO2 over N2, H2, and CH4. Stepped CO2 isotherms for solvent-free I with a large hysteresis between adsorption and desorption branches at 196 K indicate that I is a dynamic framework. Moreover, I·2H2O shows efficient heterogeneous catalytic reactivity for transesterification of various esters. The catalyst can be recycled multiple times without losing its original activity.

  19. Dynamics of Vibration Machine with Air Flow Excitation and Restrictions on Phase Coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Vība, J; Beresņevičs, V; Štāls, L; Eiduks, M; Kovals, E.; Kruusmaa, M.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of presented article is to show possibilities of practical use of air or liquid flow in vibration engineering. Dynamics of vibration machine with constant air or liquid flow excitation is considered. In the first part vibration motion of the machine working head under constant air or liquid flow velocity excitation is investigated. The main idea is to find out optimal control law for variation of additional surface area of vibrating object within limits. The criterion of optimiz...

  20. Dynamic Contact between a Wire Rope and a Pulley Using Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichiro Takehara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wire rope and pulley devices are used in various machines. To use these machines more safely, it is necessary to analyze the behavior of the contact between them. In this study, we represent a wire rope by a numerical model of a flexible body. This flexible body is expressed in the absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF, and the model includes the normal contact force and the frictional force between the wire rope and the pulley. The normal contact force is expressed by spring-damper elements, and the frictional force is expressed by the Quinn method. The advantage of the Quinn method is that it reduces the numerical problems associated with the discontinuities in Coulomb friction at zero velocity. By using the numerical model, simulations are performed, and the validity of this model is shown by comparing its results with those of an experiment. Through numerical simulations, we confirm the proposed model for the contact between the wire rope and the pulley. We confirmed that the behavior of the wire rope changes when both the bending elastic modulus of the wire rope and the mass added to each end of the wire rope are changed.

  1. An epigenetic regulator emerges as microtubule minus-end binding and stabilizing factor in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Sylvain; Shvedunova, Maria; Van Nguyen, Nhuong; Avila, Leonor; Vernos, Isabelle; Akhtar, Asifa

    2015-08-05

    The evolutionary conserved NSL complex is a prominent epigenetic regulator controlling expression of thousands of genes. Here we uncover a novel function of the NSL complex members in mitosis. As the cell enters mitosis, KANSL1 and KANSL3 undergo a marked relocalisation from the chromatin to the mitotic spindle. By stabilizing microtubule minus ends in a RanGTP-dependent manner, they are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. Moreover, we identify KANSL3 as a microtubule minus-end-binding protein, revealing a new class of mitosis-specific microtubule minus-end regulators. By adopting distinct functions in interphase and mitosis, KANSL proteins provide a link to coordinate the tasks of faithful expression and inheritance of the genome during different phases of the cell cycle.

  2. Laminin/β1 integrin signal triggers axon formation by promoting microtubule assembly and stabilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Liang Lei; Shi-Ge Xing; Cai-Yun Deng; Xiang-Chun Ju; Xing-Yu Jiang; Zhen-Ge Luo

    2012-01-01

    Axon specification during neuronal polarization is closely associated with increased microtubule stabilization in one of the neurites of unpolarized neuron,but how this increased microtubule stability is achieved is unclear.Here,we show that extracellular matrix (ECM) component laminin promotes neuronal polarization via regulating directional microtubule assembly through β1 integrin (Itgb1).Contact with laminin coated on culture substrate or polystyrene beads was sufficient for axon specification of undifferentiated neurites in cultured hippocampal neurons and cortical slices.Active Itgb1 was found to be concentrated in laminin-contacting neurites.Axon formation was promoted and abolished by enhancing and attenuating Itgbl signaling,respectively.Interestingly,laminin contact promoted plus-end microtubule assembly in a manner that required Itgbl.Moreover,stabilizing microtubules partially prevented polarization defects caused by ltgbl downregulation.Finally,genetic ablation of ltgbl in dorsal telencephalic progenitors caused deficits in axon development of cortical pyramidal neurons.Thus,laminin/Itgb1 signaling plays an instructive role in axon initiation and growth,both in vitro and in vivo,through the regulation of microtubule assembly.This study has established a linkage between an extrinsic factor and intrinsic cytoskeletai dynamics during neuronal polarization.

  3. Cis/trans Coordination in olefin metathesis by static and molecular dynamic DFT calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert

    2014-05-25

    In regard to [(N-heterocyclic carbene)Ru]-based catalysts, it is still a matter of debate if the substrate binding is preferentially cis or trans to the N-heterocyclic carbene ligand. By means of static and molecular dynamic DFT calculations, a simple olefin, like ethylene, is shown to be prone to the trans binding. Bearing in mind the higher reactivity of trans isomers in olefin metathesis, this insight helps to construct small alkene substrates with increased reactivity. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  4. Role of the first coordination shell in determining the equilibrium structure and dynamics of simple liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren; Dyre, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    . Lett. 103, 170601 (2009);10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.170601 J. Chem. Phys. 134, 214503 (2011)10.1063/1.3592709] . We present simulations of the standard Lennard-Jones liquid at several condensed-fluid state points, including a fairly low density state and a very high density state, as well as simulations......The traditional view that the physical properties of a simple liquid are determined primarily by its repulsive forces was recently challenged by Berthier and Tarjus, who showed that in some cases ignoring the attractions leads to large errors in the dynamics [L. Berthier and G. Tarjus, Phys. Rev...

  5. Coordinated Lot-sizing and Dynamic Prizing under a Supplier All-units Quantity Discount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Transchel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider an economic order quantity model where the supplier offers an all-units quantity discount and a price sensitive customer demand. We compare a decentralized decision framework where selling price and replenishment policy are determined independently to simultaneous decision making. Constant and dynamic pricing are distinguished. We derive structural properties and develop algorithms that determine the optimal pricing and replenishment policy and show how quantity discounts not only influence the purchasing strategy but also the pricing policy. A sensitivity analysis indicates the impact of the fixed-holding cost ratio, the discount policy, and the customers' price sensitivity on the optimal decisions.

  6. Identification of a TPX2-like microtubule-associated protein in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gohta Goshima

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis relies on the spindle and the functions of numerous microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs. One of the best-studied spindle MAPs is the highly conserved TPX2, which has been reported to have characteristic intracellular dynamics and molecular activities, such as nuclear localisation in interphase, poleward movement in the metaphase spindle, microtubule nucleation, microtubule stabilisation, microtubule bundling, Aurora A kinase activation, kinesin-5 binding, and kinesin-12 recruitment. This protein has been shown to be essential for spindle formation in every cell type analysed so far. However, as yet, TPX2 homologues have not been found in the Drosophila genome. In this study, I found that the Drosophila protein Ssp1/Mei-38 has significant homology to TPX2. Sequence conservation was limited to the putative spindle microtubule-associated region of TPX2, and intriguingly, D-TPX2 (Ssp1/Mei-38 lacks Aurora A- and kinesin-5-binding domains, which are highly conserved in other animal and plant species, including many insects such as ants and bees. D-TPX2 uniformly localised to kinetochore microtubule-enriched regions of the metaphase spindle in the S2 cell line, and it had microtubule binding and bundling activities in vitro. In comparison with other systems, the contribution of D-TPX2 to cell division seems to be minor; live cell imaging of microtubules and chromosomes after RNAi knockdown identified significant delay in chromosome congression in only 18% of the cells. Thus, while this conserved spindle protein is present in Drosophila, other mechanisms may largely compensate for its spindle assembly and chromosome segregation functions.

  7. Early stages of spindle formation and independence of chromosome and microtubule cycles in Haemanthus endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, E A; Bajer, A S

    1998-01-01

    We analyzed transformation of the interphase microtubular cytoskeleton into the prophase spindle and followed the pattern of spindle axis determination. Microtubules in endosperm of the higher plant Haemanthus (Scadoxus) were stained by the immunogold and immunogold silver-enhanced methods. Basic structural units involved in spindle morphogenesis were "microtubule converging centers." We emphasized the importance of relative independence of chromosomal and microtubular cycles, and the influence of these cycles on the progress of mitosis. Cells with moderately desynchronized cycles were functional, but extreme desynchronization led to aberrant mitosis. There were three distinct phases of spindle development. The first one comprised interphase and early to mid-prophase. During this phase, the interphase microtubule meshwork radiating from the nuclear surface into the cytoplasm rearranged and formed a dense microtubule cage around the nucleus. The second phase comprised mid to late prophase, and resulted in the formation of normal (bipolar) or transitory aberrant (apolar or multipolar) prophase spindles. The third phase comprised late prophase with prometaphase. The onset of prometaphase was accompanied by a rapid association of microtubule converging centers with kinetochores. In this stage aberrant spindles transformed invariably into bipolar ones. Lateral association of a few bipolar kinetochore fibers at early prometaphase established the core of the bipolar spindle and its alignment. We concluded that (1) spindle formation is a largely independent microtubular process modified by the chromosomal/kinetochore cycle; and (2) the initial polarity of the spindle is established by microtubule converging centers, which are a functional substitute of the centrosome/MTOC. We believe that the dynamics of microtubule converging centers is an expression of microtubule self-organization driven by motor proteins as proposed by Mitchison [1992: Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B

  8. The dynamics of information-driven coordination phenomena: A transfer entropy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borge-Holthoefer, Javier; Perra, Nicola; Gonçalves, Bruno; González-Bailón, Sandra; Arenas, Alex; Moreno, Yamir; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Data from social media provide unprecedented opportunities to investigate the processes that govern the dynamics of collective social phenomena. We consider an information theoretical approach to define and measure the temporal and structural signatures typical of collective social events as they arise and gain prominence. We use the symbolic transfer entropy analysis of microblogging time series to extract directed networks of influence among geolocalized subunits in social systems. This methodology captures the emergence of system-level dynamics close to the onset of socially relevant collective phenomena. The framework is validated against a detailed empirical analysis of five case studies. In particular, we identify a change in the characteristic time scale of the information transfer that flags the onset of information-driven collective phenomena. Furthermore, our approach identifies an order-disorder transition in the directed network of influence between social subunits. In the absence of clear exogenous driving, social collective phenomena can be represented as endogenously driven structural transitions of the information transfer network. This study provides results that can help define models and predictive algorithms for the analysis of societal events based on open source data.

  9. Decoherence Time of a Microtubule

    CERN Document Server

    Hiramatsu, T; Sakakibara, K; Hiramatsu, Takashi; Matsui, Tetsuo; Sakakibara, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    We formulate and study a quantum field theory of a microtubule, a basic element of living cells. Following the quantum theory of consciousness by Hameroff and Penrose, we let the system to make self-reductions, and measure the decoherence time $\\tau_N$ (the mean interval between two successive reductions) of a cluster consisting of more than $N$ neighboring cells (tubulins). $\\tau_N$ is interpreted as an instance of the stream of consciousness. For a sufficiently small electron hopping amplitude, $\\tau_N$ obeys an exponential law, $\\tau_N \\sim \\exp(c' N)$, and may take realistic values $\\tau_N $ \\raisebox{-0.5ex} {$\\stackrel{>}{\\sim}$} $ 10^{-2}$ sec for $N \\raisebox{-0.5ex} {$\\stackrel{>}{\\sim}$} 1100$.

  10. Two-state mechanochemical model for microtubule growth

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a two-state mechanochemical model is presented to describe the dynamic properties of microtubule (MT) growth in cells. The MT switches between two states, assembly state and disassembly state. In assembly state, the growth of microtubule includes two processes: GTP-tubulin binding to the tip of protofilament (PF) and conformational change of PF, during which the penultimate GTP is hydrolyzed and the first tubulin unit that curls out the MT surface is rearranged into MT surface using the energy released from GTP hydrolysis. In disassembly state, the shortening of microtubule is also described by two processes, the release of GDP-tibulin from the tip of PF and one new tubulin unit curls out from the MT surface. Switches between these two states, which are usually called rescue and catastrophe, happen stochastically with external force dependent rates. Using this two-state model with parameters obtained by fitting the recent experimental data, detailed properties of MT growth are obtained, we find...

  11. Structural comparison of the Caenorhabditis elegans and human Ndc80 complexes bound to microtubules reveals distinct binding behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M.; Cheeseman, Iain M.; Milligan, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    During cell division, kinetochores must remain tethered to the plus ends of dynamic microtubule polymers. However, the molecular basis for robust kinetochore–microtubule interactions remains poorly understood. The conserved four-subunit Ndc80 complex plays an essential and direct role in generating dynamic kinetochore–microtubule attachments. Here we compare the binding of the Caenorhabditis elegans and human Ndc80 complexes to microtubules at high resolution using cryo–electron microscopy reconstructions. Despite the conserved roles of the Ndc80 complex in diverse organisms, we find that the attachment mode of these complexes for microtubules is distinct. The human Ndc80 complex binds every tubulin monomer along the microtubule protofilament, whereas the C. elegans Ndc80 complex binds more tightly to β-tubulin. In addition, the C. elegans Ndc80 complex tilts more toward the adjacent protofilament. These structural differences in the Ndc80 complex between different species may play significant roles in the nature of kinetochore–microtubule interactions. PMID:26941333

  12. A mechanism for reorientation of cortical microtubule arrays driven by microtubule severing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeboom, Jelmer J; Nakamura, Masayoshi; Hibbel, Anneke; Shundyak, Kostya; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ketelaar, Tijs; Emons, Anne Mie C; Mulder, Bela M; Kirik, Viktor; Ehrhardt, David W

    2013-12-06

    Environmental and hormonal signals cause reorganization of microtubule arrays in higher plants, but the mechanisms driving these transitions have remained elusive. The organization of these arrays is required to direct morphogenesis. We discovered that microtubule severing by the protein katanin plays a crucial and unexpected role in the reorientation of cortical arrays, as triggered by blue light. Imaging and genetic experiments revealed that phototropin photoreceptors stimulate katanin-mediated severing specifically at microtubule intersections, leading to the generation of new microtubules at these locations. We show how this activity serves as the basis for a mechanism that amplifies microtubules orthogonal to the initial array, thereby driving array reorientation. Our observations show how severing is used constructively to build a new microtubule array.

  13. Centriolar CPAP/SAS-4 Imparts Slow Processive Microtubule Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashwani; Aher, Amol; Dynes, Nicola J; Frey, Daniel; Katrukha, Eugene A; Jaussi, Rolf; Grigoriev, Ilya; Croisier, Marie; Kammerer, Richard A; Akhmanova, Anna; Gönczy, Pierre; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-05-23

    Centrioles are fundamental and evolutionarily conserved microtubule-based organelles whose assembly is characterized by microtubule growth rates that are orders of magnitude slower than those of cytoplasmic microtubules. Several centriolar proteins can interact with tubulin or microtubules, but how they ensure the exceptionally slow growth of centriolar microtubules has remained mysterious. Here, we bring together crystallographic, biophysical, and reconstitution assays to demonstrate that the human centriolar protein CPAP (SAS-4 in worms and flies) binds and "caps" microtubule plus ends by associating with a site of β-tubulin engaged in longitudinal tubulin-tubulin interactions. Strikingly, we uncover that CPAP activity dampens microtubule growth and stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting catastrophes and promoting rescues. We further establish that the capping function of CPAP is important to limit growth of centriolar microtubules in cells. Our results suggest that CPAP acts as a molecular lid that ensures slow assembly of centriolar microtubules and, thereby, contributes to organelle length control.

  14. The smallest active fragment of microtubule-associated protein 4 and its interaction with microtubules in phosphate buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashi, Yurika; Nagase, Lisa; Matsushima, Kazuyuki; Kotani, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the interaction between microtubule-associated protein (MAP) 4 and microtubules physicochemically, a MAP4 active site fragment was designed for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) use. The fragment was bacterially expressed and purified to homogeneity. The buffer conditions for NMR were optimized to support microtubule assembly. The fragment was found to bind to microtubules under the optimized buffer conditions.

  15. Cell cycle coordination and regulation of bacterial chromosome segregation dynamics by polarly localized proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Whitman B; Lim, Hoong Chuin; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2010-09-15

    What regulates chromosome segregation dynamics in bacteria is largely unknown. Here, we show in Caulobacter crescentus that the polarity factor TipN regulates the directional motion and overall translocation speed of the parS/ParB partition complex by interacting with ParA at the new pole. In the absence of TipN, ParA structures can regenerate behind the partition complex, leading to stalls and back-and-forth motions of parS/ParB, reminiscent of plasmid behaviour. This extrinsic regulation of the parS/ParB/ParA system directly affects not only division site selection, but also cell growth. Other mechanisms, including the pole-organizing protein PopZ, compensate for the defect in segregation regulation in ΔtipN cells. Accordingly, synthetic lethality of PopZ and TipN is caused by severe chromosome segregation and cell division defects. Our data suggest a mechanistic framework for adapting a self-organizing oscillator to create motion suitable for chromosome segregation.

  16. The human kinesin-14 HSET tracks the tips of growing microtubules in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Marcus; Lansky, Zdenek; Bajer, Seweryn; Fink, Gero; Kasprzak, Andrzej A; Diez, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Tip-tracking of kinesin-14 motor proteins is believed to be crucial for the assembly and maintenance of dynamic microtubule arrays. However, in contrast to other members of the kinesin-14 family, H. sapiens kinesin-14 HSET has so far never been observed to be prominently located at microtubule plus ends. Here, using an in vitro microtubule dynamics reconstitution assay we observe tip-tracking of GFP-HSET in the presence of H. sapiens EB1 (hsEB1). Tip-tracking depended on the SxIP-like motif in HSET as well as on the EB homology domain in hsEB1. D. melanogaster Ncd and S. pombe Klp2 tip-tracking reconstitution assays accompanied by kinesin-14 amino acid sequence comparisons suggest that SxIP-like motif mediated tip-tracking dependent on EB family proteins is conserved in the kinesin-14 family of molecular motors.

  17. Oxidative stress decreases microtubule growth and stability in ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, Benjamin M L; Yuan, Can; Li, Lei; Liu, Qinghang; Wordeman, Linda; Santana, L Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Microtubules (MTs) have many roles in ventricular myocytes, including structural stability, morphological integrity, and protein trafficking. However, despite their functional importance, dynamic MTs had never been visualized in living adult myocytes. Using adeno-associated viral vectors expressing the MT-associated protein plus end binding protein 3 (EB3) tagged with EGFP, we were able to perform live imaging and thus capture and quantify MT dynamics in ventricular myocytes in real time under physiological conditions. Super-resolution nanoscopy revealed that EB1 associated in puncta along the length of MTs in ventricular myocytes. The vast (~80%) majority of MTs grew perpendicular to T-tubules at a rate of 0.06μm∗s(-1) and growth was preferentially (82%) confined to a single sarcomere. Microtubule catastrophe rate was lower near the Z-line than M-line. Hydrogen peroxide increased the rate of catastrophe of MTs ~7-fold, suggesting that oxidative stress destabilizes these structures in ventricular myocytes. We also quantified MT dynamics after myocardial infarction (MI), a pathological condition associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our data indicate that the catastrophe rate of MTs increases following MI. This contributed to decreased transient outward K(+) currents by decreasing the surface expression of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 channels after MI. On the basis of these data, we conclude that, under physiological conditions, MT growth is directionally biased and that increased ROS production during MI disrupts MT dynamics, decreasing K(+) channel trafficking.

  18. One-parameter nonrelativistic supersymmetry for microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Rosu, H C

    2003-01-01

    The simple supersymmetric model of Caticha [PRA 51, 4264 (1995)], as used by Rosu [PRE 55, 2038 (1997)] for microtubules, is generalized to the case of Mielnik's one-parameter nonrelativistic susy [JMP 25, 3387 (1984)

  19. Introducing Variable-Step Topography (VST) coordinates within dynamically constrained Nonhydrostatic Modeling System (NMS). Part 1: VST formulation within NMS host model framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripoli, Gregory J.; Smith, Eric A.

    2014-06-01

    A Variable-Step Topography (VST) surface coordinate system is introduced into a dynamically constrained, scalable, nonhydrostatic atmospheric model for reliable simulations of flows over both smooth and steep terrain without sacrificing dynamical integrity over either type of surface. Backgrounds of both terrain-following and step coordinate model developments are presented before justifying the turn to a VST approach within an appropriately configured host model. In this first part of a two-part sequence of papers, the full formulation of the VST model, prefaced by a description of the framework of its apposite host, i.e., a re-tooled Nonhydrostatic Modeling System (NMS), are presented. [The second part assesses the performance and benefits of the new VST coordinate system in conjunction with seven orthodox obstacle flow problems.] The NMS is a 3-dimensional, nonhydrostatic cloud-mesoscale model, designed for integrations from plume-cloud scales out to regional-global scales. The derivative properties of VST in conjunction with the NMS's newly designed dynamically constrained core are capable of accurately capturing the deformations of flows by any type of terrain variability. Numerical differencing schemes needed to satisfy critical integral constraints, while also effectively enabling the VST lower boundary, are described. The host model constraints include mass, momentum, energy, vorticity and enstrophy conservation. A quasi-compressible closure cast on multiple-nest rotated spherical grids is the underlying framework used to study the advantages of the VST coordinate system. The principle objective behind the VST formulation is to combine the advantages of both terrain-following and step coordinate systems without suffering either of their disadvantages, while at the same time creating a vertical surface coordinate setting suitable for a scalable, nonhydrostatic model, safeguarded with physically realistic dynamical constraints.

  20. 基于协同工作的动态办公信息平台%Information Platform of Dynamic Office Based on Coordination Work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶平

    2013-01-01

    In order to overcome the puzzle of being difficult to satisfy the demand of modern coordination office by conventional platform, the paper explored a sort of dynamic office information platform based on coordination work. In the paper, it analyzed the cause of being difficult to provide overall service information timely and accurately for management decision, discussed the office platform of immediately dynamic coordination supported by computer, designed the related modules such as coordination drive of dynamic workflow, system function, model structure and service drive of coordination message etc, based on XML and JAVA, and implemented the dynamic office information platform based on coordination work. The preliminary test results of implemented prototype system demonstrated that the design would be reasonable. The actual running effect shows that the designed platform of office information owns the feasibility.%为了克服传统平台难以满足现代协同办公要求的难题,探讨了一种基于协同工作的动态办公信息平台.分析了难于为管理决策提供及时、准确、全面服务信息的原因,研究了计算机支持的动态即时协同办公平台,对协同动态工作流驱动、系统功能模块、模型结构与协同消息服务驱动等进行了设计,基于XML和JAVA实现了基于协同工作的动态办公信息平台.原型系统经初步测试显示了设计的合理性.实际运行效果表明:所设计的办公信息平台具有可行性.

  1. Motor function in interpolar microtubules during metaphase

    OpenAIRE

    Deutsch, J. M.; Lewis, Ian P.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze experimental observations of microtubules undergoing small fluctuations about a "balance point" when mixed in solution of two different kinesin motor proteins, KLP61F and Ncd. It has been proposed that the microtubule movement is due to stochastic variations in the densities of the two species of motor proteins. We test this hypothesis here by showing how it maps onto a one-dimensional random walk in a random environment. Our estimate of the amplitude of the fluctuations agrees wit...

  2. TIPsy tour guides: How microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs facilitate axon guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Bearce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The growth cone is a dynamic cytoskeletal vehicle, which drives the end of a developing axon. It serves to interpret and navigate through the complex landscape and guidance cues of the early nervous system. The growth cone’s distinctive cytoskeletal organization offers a fascinating platform to study how extracellular cues can be translated into mechanical outgrowth and turning behaviors. While many studies of cell motility highlight the importance of actin networks in signaling, adhesion, and propulsion, both seminal and emerging works in the field have highlighted a unique and necessary role for microtubules in growth cone navigation. Here, we focus on the role of singular pioneer microtubules, which extend into the growth cone periphery and are regulated by a diverse family of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs. These +TIPs accumulate at the dynamic ends of microtubules, where they are well-positioned to encounter and respond to key signaling events downstream of guidance receptors, catalyzing immediate changes in microtubule stability and actin cross-talk, that facilitate both axonal outgrowth and turning events.

  3. The role of microtubule-associated protein 1B in axonal growth and neuronal migration in the central nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maoguang Yang; Xiaoyu Yang; Minfei Wu; Peng Xia; Chunxin Wang; Peng Yan; Qi Gao; Jian Liu; Haitao Wang; Xingwei Duan

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the role of microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) and its phosphorylation in axonal development and regeneration in the central nervous system. MAP1B exhibits similar functions during axonal development and regeneration. MAP1B and phosphorylated MAP1B in neurons and axons maintain a dynamic balance between cytoskeletal components, and regulate the stability and interaction of microtubules and actin to promote axonal growth, neural connectivity and regeneration in the central nervous system.

  4. Coordinate regulation of G protein signaling via dynamic interactions of receptor and GAP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Turcotte

    Full Text Available Signal output from receptor-G-protein-effector modules is a dynamic function of the nucleotide exchange activity of the receptor, the GTPase-accelerating activity of GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs, and their interactions. GAPs may inhibit steady-state signaling but may also accelerate deactivation upon removal of stimulus without significantly inhibiting output when the receptor is active. Further, some effectors (e.g., phospholipase C-beta are themselves GAPs, and it is unclear how such effectors can be stimulated by G proteins at the same time as they accelerate G protein deactivation. The multiple combinations of protein-protein associations and interacting regulatory effects that allow such complex behaviors in this system do not permit the usual simplifying assumptions of traditional enzyme kinetics and are uniquely subject to systems-level analysis. We developed a kinetic model for G protein signaling that permits analysis of both interactive and independent G protein binding and regulation by receptor and GAP. We evaluated parameters of the model (all forward and reverse rate constants by global least-squares fitting to a diverse set of steady-state GTPase measurements in an m1 muscarinic receptor-G(q-phospholipase C-beta1 module in which GTPase activities were varied by approximately 10(4-fold. We provide multiple tests to validate the fitted parameter set, which is consistent with results from the few previous pre-steady-state kinetic measurements. Results indicate that (1 GAP potentiates the GDP/GTP exchange activity of the receptor, an activity never before reported; (2 exchange activity of the receptor is biased toward replacement of GDP by GTP; (3 receptor and GAP bind G protein with negative cooperativity when G protein is bound to either GTP or GDP, promoting rapid GAP binding and dissociation; (4 GAP indirectly stabilizes the continuous binding of receptor to G protein during steady-state GTPase hydrolysis, thus further

  5. Pseudo-Spin Model for the Cytoskeletal Microtubule Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying; QIU Xi-Jun; LI Ru-Xin

    2004-01-01

    @@ Due to the inherent symmetry structures and the electric properties in the microtubule (MT), we treat the MT as a one-dimensional ferroelectric system and describe the nonlinear dynamics of dimer electric dipoles in one protofilament of the MT by virtue of the double-well potential. Consequently, the physical problem has been mapped onto the pseudo-spin system, and the mean-field approximation has been taken to obtain some physical results, including the expression for the phase transition temperature Tc and the estimated value of Tc (≈ 312 K).

  6. Role of Exchange Protein Activated by cAMP 1 in Regulating Rates of Microtubule Formation in Cystic Fibrosis Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymut, Sharon M; Ivy, Tracy; Corey, Deborah A; Cotton, Calvin U; Burgess, James D; Kelley, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    The regulation of microtubule dynamics in cystic fibrosis (CF) epithelial cells and the consequences of reduced rates of microtubule polymerization on downstream CF cellular events, such as cholesterol accumulation, a marker of impaired intracellular transport, are explored here. It is identified that microtubules in both CF cell models and in primary CF nasal epithelial cells repolymerize at a slower rate compared with respective controls. Previous studies suggest a role for cAMP in modulating organelle transport in CF cells, implicating a role for exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) 1, a regulator of microtubule elongation, as a potential mechanism. EPAC1 activity is reduced in CF cell models and in Cftr(-/-) mouse lung compared with respective non-CF controls. Stimulation of EPAC1 activity with the selective EPAC1 agonist, 8-cpt-2-O-Me-cAMP, stimulates microtubule repolymerization to wild-type rates in CF cells. EPAC1 activation also alleviates cholesterol accumulation in CF cells, suggesting a direct link between microtubule regulation and intracellular transport. To verify the relationship between transport and microtubule regulation, expression of the protein, tubulin polymerization-promoting protein, was knocked down in non-CF human tracheal (9/HTEo(-)) cells to mimic the microtubule dysregulation in CF cells. Transduced cells with short hairpin RNA targeting tubulin polymerization-promoting protein exhibit CF-like perinuclear cholesterol accumulation and other cellular manifestations of CF cells, thus supporting a role for microtubule regulation as a mechanism linking CFTR function to downstream cellular manifestation.

  7. An RKDG finite element method for the one-dimensional inviscid compressible gas dynamics equations in a Lagrangian coordinate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Guo-Zhong; Yu Xi-Jun; Zhang Rong-Pei

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) finite element method is presented to solve the onedimensional inviscid compressible gas dynamic equations in a Lagrangian coordinate.The equations are discretized by the DG method in space and the temporal discretization is accomplished by the total variation diminishing Runge-Kutta method.A limiter based on the characteristic field decomposition is applied to maintain stability and non-oscillatory property of the RKDG method.For multi-medium fluid simulation,the two cells adjacent to the interface are treated differently from other cells.At first,a linear Riemann solver is applied to calculate the numerical flux at the interface.Numerical examples show that there is some oscillation in the vicinity of the interface.Then a nonlinear Riemann solver based on the characteristic formulation of the equation and the discontinuity relations is adopted to calculate the numerical flux at the interface,which suppresses the oscillation successfully.Several single-medium and multi-medium fluid examples are given to demonstrate the reliability and efficiency of the algorithm.

  8. Kriging-Based Parameter Estimation Algorithm for Metabolic Networks Combined with Single-Dimensional Optimization and Dynamic Coordinate Perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Xicheng; Li, Zheng; Li, Keqiu

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic network model allows for an in-depth insight into the molecular mechanism of a particular organism. Because most parameters of the metabolic network cannot be directly measured, they must be estimated by using optimization algorithms. However, three characteristics of the metabolic network model, i.e., high nonlinearity, large amount parameters, and huge variation scopes of parameters, restrict the application of many traditional optimization algorithms. As a result, there is a growing demand to develop efficient optimization approaches to address this complex problem. In this paper, a Kriging-based algorithm aiming at parameter estimation is presented for constructing the metabolic networks. In the algorithm, a new infill sampling criterion, named expected improvement and mutual information (EI&MI), is adopted to improve the modeling accuracy by selecting multiple new sample points at each cycle, and the domain decomposition strategy based on the principal component analysis is introduced to save computing time. Meanwhile, the convergence speed is accelerated by combining a single-dimensional optimization method with the dynamic coordinate perturbation strategy when determining the new sample points. Finally, the algorithm is applied to the arachidonic acid metabolic network to estimate its parameters. The obtained results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in getting precise parameter values under a limited number of iterations.

  9. The density matrix functional approach to electron correlation: Dynamic and nondynamic correlation along the full dissociation coordinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentel, Ł. M.; Meer, R. van; Gritsenko, O. V. [Section Theoretical Chemistry, VU University, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Baerends, E. J. [Section Theoretical Chemistry, VU University, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-06-07

    For chemistry an accurate description of bond weakening and breaking is vital. The great advantage of density matrix functionals, as opposed to density functionals, is their ability to describe such processes since they naturally cover both nondynamical and dynamical correlation. This is obvious in the Löwdin-Shull functional, the exact natural orbital functional for two-electron systems. We present in this paper extensions of this functional for the breaking of a single electron pair bond in N-electron molecules, using LiH, BeH{sup +}, and Li{sub 2} molecules as prototypes. Attention is given to the proper formulation of the functional in terms of not just J and K integrals but also the two-electron L integrals (K integrals with a different distribution of the complex conjugation of the orbitals), which is crucial for the calculation of response functions. Accurate energy curves are obtained with extended Löwdin-Shull functionals along the complete dissociation coordinate using full CI calculations as benchmark.

  10. Spatiotemporal Regulation of Nuclear Transport Machinery and Microtubule Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Okada

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Spindle microtubules capture and segregate chromosomes and, therefore, their assembly is an essential event in mitosis. To carry out their mission, many key players for microtubule formation need to be strictly orchestrated. Particularly, proteins that assemble the spindle need to be translocated at appropriate sites during mitosis. A small GTPase (hydrolase enzyme of guanosine triphosphate, Ran, controls this translocation. Ran plays many roles in many cellular events: nucleocytoplasmic shuttling through the nuclear envelope, assembly of the mitotic spindle, and reorganization of the nuclear envelope at the mitotic exit. Although these events are seemingly distinct, recent studies demonstrate that the mechanisms underlying these phenomena are substantially the same as explained by molecular interplay of the master regulator Ran, the transport factor importin, and its cargo proteins. Our review focuses on how the transport machinery regulates mitotic progression of cells. We summarize translocation mechanisms governed by Ran and its regulatory proteins, and particularly focus on Ran-GTP targets in fission yeast that promote spindle formation. We also discuss the coordination of the spatial and temporal regulation of proteins from the viewpoint of transport machinery. We propose that the transport machinery is an essential key that couples the spatial and temporal events in cells.

  11. Rearrangements of microtubule cytoskeleton in stomatal closure of Arabidopsis induced by nitric oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YongMei; WU ZhongYi; WANG XueChen; YU Rong

    2008-01-01

    NO (nitric oxide), known as a key signal molecule in plant, plays important roles in regulation of stomatal movement. In this study, microtubule dynamics and its possible mechanism in the NO signal pathway were investigated. The results were as follows: (ⅰ) In vivo stomatal aperture assays revealed that both vinblastine (microtubule-disrupting drug) and SNP (exogenous NO donor) prevented stomatal opening in the light, and vinblastine even could enhance the inhibitory effect of SNP, whereas taxol (a microtubule-stabilizing agent) was able to reduce this effect; (ⅱ) microtubules in the opening Arabi-dopsis guard cells expressing GFP:α-tubulin-6 (AtGFP:α-tubulin-6) were organized in parallel, straight and dense bundles, radiating from the ventral side to the dorsal side, and most of them were localized perpendicularly to the ventral wall; (ⅲ) under the same environmental conditions, treated with SNP for 30 min, the radial arrays of microtubules in guard cells began to break down, twisted partially and be-came oblique or exhibited a random pattern; (ⅳ) furthermore, the involvement of cytosolic Ca2+ in this event was tested. Stomatal aperture assays revealed that BAPTA-AM (a chelator of Ca2+) greatly sup-pressed the effect of NO on stomatal closure; however, it did not show the same function on stomatal closure induced by vinblastine. When BAPTA-AM was added to the SNP-pretreated solution, the SNP-induced disordered microtubulue cytoskeleton in guard cells underwent rearrangement in a time-dependent manner. After 30 min of treatment with BAPTA-AM, the cortical microtubules resumed the original radial distribution, almost the same as the control. All this indicates that NO may promote rearrangement of microtubule cytoskeleton via elevation of [Ca2+]cyt (free Ca2+ concentration in the cy-toplasm), finally leading to stomatal closure.

  12. Dynamics of Interorganizational Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    another that it can agree with and trust, 0 which in turn is the product of communications (Schelling, 196f; Scheff, 1967). But, as Berger and Luckmann ...of covariance structures." Psychological Bulletin. 88:588-606. Berger, Peter L. and Thomas Luckmann 1966 The Social Construction of Reality. Garden

  13. SDF1 reduces interneuron leading process branching through dual regulation of actin and microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysko, Daniel E; Putt, Mary; Golden, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-02

    Normal cerebral cortical function requires a highly ordered balance between projection neurons and interneurons. During development these two neuronal populations migrate from distinct progenitor zones to form the cerebral cortex, with interneurons originating in the more distant ganglionic eminences. Moreover, deficits in interneurons have been linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders underscoring the importance of understanding interneuron development and function. We, and others, have identified SDF1 signaling as one important modulator of interneuron migration speed and leading process branching behavior in mice, although how SDF1 signaling impacts these behaviors remains unknown. We previously found SDF1 inhibited leading process branching while increasing the rate of migration. We have now mechanistically linked SDF1 modulation of leading process branching behavior to a dual regulation of both actin and microtubule organization. We find SDF1 consolidates actin at the leading process tip by de-repressing calpain protease and increasing proteolysis of branched-actin-supporting cortactin. Additionally, SDF1 stabilizes the microtubule array in the leading process through activation of the microtubule-associated protein doublecortin (DCX). DCX stabilizes the microtubule array by bundling microtubules within the leading process, reducing branching. These data provide mechanistic insight into the regulation of interneuron leading process dynamics during neuronal migration in mice and provides insight into how cortactin and DCX, a known human neuronal migration disorder gene, participate in this process.

  14. SDF1 Reduces Interneuron Leading Process Branching through Dual Regulation of Actin and Microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysko, Daniel E.; Putt, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Normal cerebral cortical function requires a highly ordered balance between projection neurons and interneurons. During development these two neuronal populations migrate from distinct progenitor zones to form the cerebral cortex, with interneurons originating in the more distant ganglionic eminences. Moreover, deficits in interneurons have been linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders underscoring the importance of understanding interneuron development and function. We, and others, have identified SDF1 signaling as one important modulator of interneuron migration speed and leading process branching behavior in mice, although how SDF1 signaling impacts these behaviors remains unknown. We previously found SDF1 inhibited leading process branching while increasing the rate of migration. We have now mechanistically linked SDF1 modulation of leading process branching behavior to a dual regulation of both actin and microtubule organization. We find SDF1 consolidates actin at the leading process tip by de-repressing calpain protease and increasing proteolysis of branched-actin-supporting cortactin. Additionally, SDF1 stabilizes the microtubule array in the leading process through activation of the microtubule-associated protein doublecortin (DCX). DCX stabilizes the microtubule array by bundling microtubules within the leading process, reducing branching. These data provide mechanistic insight into the regulation of interneuron leading process dynamics during neuronal migration in mice and provides insight into how cortactin and DCX, a known human neuronal migration disorder gene, participate in this process. PMID:24695713

  15. A study of microtubule dipole lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Shubhendu

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal protein polymers orchestrating a host of important cellular functions including, but not limited to, cell support, cell division, cell motility and cell transport. In this thesis, we construct a toy-model of the microtubule lattice composed of vector Ising spins representing tubulin molecules, the building block of microtubules. Nearest-neighbor and next-to-nearest neighbor interactions are considered within an anisotropic dielectric medium. As a consequence of the helical topology, we observe that certain spin orientations render the lattice frustrated with nearest neighbor ferroelectric and next-to-nearest neighbor antiferroelectric bonds. Under these conditions, the lattice displays the remarkable property of stabilizing certain spin patterns that are robust to thermal fluctuations. We model this behavior in the framework of a generalized Ising model known as the J1 - J2 model and theoretically determine the set of stable patterns. Employing Monte-Carlo methods, we demonstrate the stability of such patterns in the microtubule lattice at human physiological temperatures. This suggests a novel biological mechanism for storing information in living organisms, whereby the tubulin spin (dipole moment) states become information bits and information gets stored in microtubules in a way that is robust to thermal fluctuations.

  16. Microtubule remodeling mediates the inhibition of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) during mitosis in COS-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russa, Afadhali Denis; Ishikita, Naoyuki; Masu, Kazuki; Akutsu, Hitomi; Saino, Tomoyuki; Satoh, Yoh-ichi

    2008-12-01

    Regulation of the intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is critical, because calcium signaling controls diverse and vital cellular processes such as secretion, proliferation, division, gene transcription, and apoptosis. Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) is the main mechanism through which non-excitable cells replenish and thus maintain this delicate balance. There is limited evidence which indicates that SOCE may be inhibited during mitosis, and the mechanisms leading to the presumed inhibition has not been elucidated. In the present study, we examined and compared the [Ca(2+)](i) dynamics of COS-7 cells in mitotic and non-mitotic phases with special reference paid to SOCE. Laser scanning confocal microscopy to monitor [Ca(2+)](i) dynamics revealed that SOCE was progressively inhibited in mitosis and became virtually absent during the metaphase. We used various cytoskeletal modifying drugs and immunofluorescence to assess the contribution of microtubule and actin filaments in SOCE signaling. Nocodazole treatment caused microtubule reorganization and retraction from the cell periphery that mimicked the natural mitotic microtubule remodeling that was also accompanied by SOCE inhibition. Short exposure to paclitaxel, a microtubule-stabilizing drug, bolstered SOCE, whereas long exposure resulted in microtubule disruption and SOCE inhibition. Actin-modifying drugs did not affect SOCE. These findings indicate that mitotic microtubule remodeling plays a significant role in the inhibition of SOCE during mitosis.

  17. A geometrically motivated coordinate system for exploring spacetime dynamics in numerical-relativity simulations using a quasi-Kinnersley tetrad

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Fan; Szilágyi, Béla; Lovelace, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the suitability and properties of a quasi-Kinnersley tetrad and a geometrically motivated coordinate system as tools for quantifying both strong-field and wave-zone effects in numerical relativity (NR) simulations. We fix the radial and latitudinal coordinate degrees of freedom of the metric, using the Coulomb potential associated with the quasi-Kinnersley transverse frame. These coordinates are invariants of the spacetime and can be used to unambiguously fix the outstanding spin-boost freedom associated with the quasi-Kinnersley frame (resulting in a preferred quasi-Kinnersley tetrad (QKT)). In the limit of small perturbations about a Kerr spacetime, these coordinates and QKT reduce to Boyer-Lindquist coordinates and the Kinnersley tetrad, irrespective of the simulation gauge choice. We explore the properties of this construction both analytically and numerically, and we gain insights regarding the propagation of radiation described by a super-Poynting vector. We also quantify in detail the pe...

  18. The cortical cytoskeletal network and cell-wall dynamics in the unicellular charophycean green alga Penium margaritaceum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Julie; LaRue, Therese; Tinaz, Berke; Yongue, Camille; Domozych, David S

    2014-10-01

    Penium margaritaceum is a unicellular charophycean green alga with a unique bi-directional polar expansion mechanism that occurs at the central isthmus zone prior to cell division. This entails the focused deposition of cell-wall polymers coordinated by the activities of components of the endomembrane system and cytoskeletal networks. The goal of this study was to elucidate the structural organization of the cortical cytoskeletal network during the cell cycle and identify its specific functional roles during key cell-wall developmental events: pre-division expansion and cell division. Microtubules and actin filaments were labelled during various cell cycle phases with an anti-tubulin antibody and rhodamine phalloidin, respectively. Chemically induced disruption of the cytoskeleton was used to elucidate specific functional roles of microtubules and actin during cell expansion and division. Correlation of cytoskeletal dynamics with cell-wall development included live cell labelling with wall polymer-specific antibodies and electron microscopy. The cortical cytoplasm of Penium is highlighted by a band of microtubules found at the cell isthmus, i.e. the site of pre-division wall expansion. This band, along with an associated, transient band of actin filaments, probably acts to direct the deposition of new wall material and to mark the plane of the future cell division. Two additional bands of microtubules, which we identify as satellite bands, arise from the isthmus microtubular band at the onset of expansion and displace toward the poles during expansion, ultimately marking the isthmus of future daughter cells. Treatment with microtubule and actin perturbation agents reversibly stops cell division. The cortical cytoplasm of Penium contains distinct bands of microtubules and actin filaments that persist through the cell cycle. One of these bands, termed the isthmus microtubule band, or IMB, marks the site of both pre-division wall expansion and the zone where a cross

  19. Understanding social motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, R C; Fitzpatrick, Paula; Caron, Robert; Mergeche, Joanna

    2011-10-01

    Recently there has been much interest in social coordination of motor movements, or as it is referred to by some researchers, joint action. This paper reviews the cognitive perspective's common coding/mirror neuron theory of joint action, describes some of its limitations and then presents the behavioral dynamics perspective as an alternative way of understanding social motor coordination. In particular, behavioral dynamics' ability to explain the temporal coordination of interacting individuals is detailed. Two experiments are then described that demonstrate how dynamical processes of synchronization are apparent in the coordination underlying everyday joint actions such as martial art exercises, hand-clapping games, and conversations. The import of this evidence is that emergent dynamic patterns such as synchronization are the behavioral order that any neural substrate supporting joint action (e.g., mirror systems) would have to sustain.

  20. Chromator is required for proper microtubule spindle formation and mitosis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yun; Yao, Changfu; Lince-Faria, Mariana; Rath, Uttama; Cai, Weili; Maiato, Helder; Girton, Jack; Johansen, Kristen M; Johansen, Jørgen

    2009-10-01

    The chromodomain protein, Chromator, has been shown to have multiple functions that include regulation of chromatin structure as well as coordination of muscle remodeling during metamorphosis depending on the developmental context. In this study we show that mitotic neuroblasts from brain squash preparations from larvae heteroallelic for the two Chromator loss-of-function alleles Chro(71) and Chro(612) have severe microtubule spindle and chromosome segregation defects that were associated with a reduction in brain size. The microtubule spindles formed were incomplete, unfocused, and/or without clear spindle poles and at anaphase chromosomes were lagging and scattered. Time-lapse analysis of mitosis in S2 cells depleted of Chromator by RNAi treatment suggested that the lagging and scattered chromosome phenotypes were caused by incomplete alignment of chromosomes at the metaphase plate, possibly due to a defective spindle-assembly checkpoint, as well as of frayed and unstable microtubule spindles during anaphase. Expression of full-length Chromator transgenes under endogenous promoter control restored both microtubule spindle morphology as well as brain size strongly indicating that the observed mutant defects were directly attributable to lack of Chromator function.

  1. Introducing variable-step topography (VST) coordinates within dynamically constrained nonhydrostatic modeling system (NMS). Part 2: VST performance on orthodox obstacle flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripoli, Gregory J.; Smith, Eric A.

    2014-06-01

    In this second part of a two-part sequence of papers, the performance metrics and quantitative advantages of a new VST surface coordinate system, implemented within a dynamically constrained, nonhydrostatic, cloud mesoscale atmospheric model, are evaluated in conjunction with seven orthodox obstacle flow problems. [The first part presented a full formulation of the VST model, prefaced by a description of the framework of the newly re-tooled nonhydrostatic modeling system (NMS) operating within integral constraints based on the conservation of the foremost quantities of mass, energy and circulation.] The intent behind VST is to create a vertical surface coordinate system boundary underpinning a nonhydrostatic atmosphere capable of reliable simulations of flows over both smooth and steep terrain without sacrificing dynamical integrity over either type of surface. Model simulation results are analyzed for six classical fluid dynamics problems involving flows relative to obstacles with known analytical or laboratory-simulated solutions, as well as for a seventh noteworthy mountain wave breaking problem that has well-studied numerical solutions. For cases when topography becomes excessively severe or poorly resolved numerically, atmospheric models using transform (terrain-following) coordinates produce noteworthy errors rendering a stable integration only if the topography is smoothed. For cases when topography is slowly varying (smooth or subtle), models using discrete-step coordinates also produce noteworthy errors relative to known solutions. Alternatively, the VST model demonstrates that both limitations of the two conventional approaches, for the entire range of slope severities, can be overcome. This means that VST is ideally suited for a scalable, nonhydrostatic atmospheric model, safeguarded with physically realistic dynamical constraints.

  2. Multi-Agent Coordination and Cooperation in a Distributed Dynamic Environment with Limited Resources: Simulated Air Wars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    of agents [Lo, 1988; Parunak, 1987; Smith , 1980; Smith & Davis, 1981]. 2.1.2 Coordination Closely related to cooperation, coordination involves the...even compete with one another. One of the earliest, and perhaps best known, DAI coordination techniques is the contract net [Davis & Smith , 1983; Smith ...Aircraft Resources A/C Combat Factor Maximum Engagements Z=x A-toA A-to-G Enurance SedrA A-toA A-to-G F-01 5 0 3 8 3 0 F-02 10 0 4 8 3 0 F-03 15 0 5 10

  3. Driven evolution of a constitutional dynamic library of molecular helices toward the selective generation of [2 x 2] gridlike arrays under the pressure of metal ion coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseppone, Nicolas; Schmitt, Jean-Louis; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2006-12-27

    Constitutional dynamics, self-assembly, and helical-folding control are brought together in the efficient Sc(OTf)3/microwave-catalyzed transimination of helical oligohydrazone strands, yielding highly diverse dynamic libraries of interconverting constituents through assembly, dissociation, and exchange of components. The transimination-type mechanism of the ScIII-promoted exchange, as well as its regioselectivity, occurring only at the extremities of the helical strands, allow one to perform directional terminal polymerization/depolymerization processes when starting with dissymmetric strands. A particular library is subsequently brought to express quantitatively [2 x 2] gridlike metallosupramolecular arrays in the presence of ZnII ions by component recombination generating the correct ligand from the dynamic set of interconverting strands. This behavior represents a process of driven evolution of a constitutional dynamic chemical system under the pressure (coordination interaction) of an external effector (metal ions).

  4. Biological Activity of 4-Substituted Methoxybenzoyl-Aryl-Thiazole (SMART): An Active Microtubule Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Formation of microtubules is a dynamic process that involves polymerization and depolymerization of αβ-tubulin heterodimers. Drugs that enhance or inhibit tubulin polymerization can destroy this dynamic process, arresting cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Although drugs that target tubulin generally demonstrate cytotoxic potency in the sub-nanomolar range, resistance due to drug efflux is a common phenomenon among the antitubulin agents. We recently reported a class of 4-Substituted ...

  5. Research of dynamically coordinated development of regional system in Liaoning province%辽宁省区域系统动态协调发展研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关伟; 高健

    2014-01-01

    区域系统是由经济、社会、人口、资源、环境等构成的复杂系统,区域系统协调是这一复杂系统在其发展演化过程中,经济、社会、人口、资源、环境等子系统之间不断协同、相互促进,由不协调到协调、由协调到不协调、再到更高程度的协调,循环往复的动态变化及其过程。基于区域系统协调发展的标准,构建了区域经济-社会-人口-资源环境系统协调度评价指标体系,通过线性加权模型和离差系数法得到辽宁省2002-2011年间区域系统协调发展水平得分及其所辖14个市的协调度。通过对辽宁省协调度变化及协调度类型的时空演变分析,得出辽宁省区域系统具有系统协调度类型以基本协调和比较协调为主、协调度区域差异明显、市域系统协调度类型分化显著、总体上呈良性发展趋势等4个结论。%Regional system is a complex system w hich is consists of economic ,social ,population ,resources ,envi-ronment ,etc .In the process of regional system development evolution ,the economic subsystem ,society subsys-tem ,population subsystem ,resource subsystem ,environment subsystem constantly coordinate and promote each other .Regional system coordination is the process that system dynamics change from uncoordinated to coordina-tion to uncoordinated ,finally reach a higher degree of coordination .Based on the principle of coordinated develop-ment of regional system ,this paper chooses 21 indexes of Liaoning province to build the index system of coordi-nated development of regional system .By using the linear weighted model and the coefficient of variation ,the co-ordination degree of Liaoning province and 14 cities of Liaoning province between 2002 and 2011 is obtained . Through analyzing the change of coordination degree and spatial distribution of the type of system coordination degree ,the results show that the type of coordination degree is almost basic

  6. Microtubules guide root hair tip growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieberer, B.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Esseling, J.J.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to establish cell polarity is crucial to form and function of an individual cell. Polarity underlies critical processes during cell development, such as cell growth, cell division, cell differentiation and cell signalling. Interphase cytoplasmic microtubules in tip-growing fission yeast

  7. Microtubules guide root hair tip growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieberer, B.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Esseling, J.J.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to establish cell polarity is crucial to form and function of an individual cell. Polarity underlies critical processes during cell development, such as cell growth, cell division, cell differentiation and cell signalling. Interphase cytoplasmic microtubules in tip-growing fission yeast

  8. Mechanical properties of organelles driven by microtubule-dependent molecular motors in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Bruno

    Full Text Available The organization of the cytoplasm is regulated by molecular motors which transport organelles and other cargoes along cytoskeleton tracks. Melanophores have pigment organelles or melanosomes that move along microtubules toward their minus and plus end by the action of cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-2, respectively. In this work, we used single particle tracking to characterize the mechanical properties of motor-driven organelles during transport along microtubules. We tracked organelles with high temporal and spatial resolutions and characterized their dynamics perpendicular to the cytoskeleton track. The quantitative analysis of these data showed that the dynamics is due to a spring-like interaction between melanosomes and microtubules in a viscoelastic microenvironment. A model based on a generalized Langevin equation explained these observations and predicted that the stiffness measured for the motor complex acting as a linker between organelles and microtubules is ∼ one order smaller than that determined for motor proteins in vitro. This result suggests that other biomolecules involved in the interaction between motors and organelles contribute to the mechanical properties of the motor complex. We hypothesise that the high flexibility observed for the motor linker may be required to improve the efficiency of the transport driven by multiple copies of motor molecules.

  9. TCS1, a Microtubule-Binding Protein, Interacts with KCBP/ZWICHEL to Regulate Trichome Cell Shape in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available How cell shape is controlled is a fundamental question in developmental biology, but the genetic and molecular mechanisms that determine cell shape are largely unknown. Arabidopsis trichomes have been used as a good model system to investigate cell shape at the single-cell level. Here we describe the trichome cell shape 1 (tcs1 mutants with the reduced trichome branch number in Arabidopsis. TCS1 encodes a coiled-coil domain-containing protein. Pharmacological analyses and observations of microtubule dynamics show that TCS1 influences the stability of microtubules. Biochemical analyses and live-cell imaging indicate that TCS1 binds to microtubules and promotes the assembly of microtubules. Further results reveal that TCS1 physically associates with KCBP/ZWICHEL, a microtubule motor involved in the regulation of trichome branch number. Genetic analyses indicate that kcbp/zwi is epistatic to tcs1 with respect to trichome branch number. Thus, our findings define a novel genetic and molecular mechanism by which TCS1 interacts with KCBP to regulate trichome cell shape by influencing the stability of microtubules.

  10. Discodermolide interferes with the binding of tau protein to microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Santwana; Florence, Gordon J; Paterson, Ian; Amos, Linda A

    2003-03-27

    We investigated whether discodermolide, a novel antimitotic agent, affects the binding to microtubules of tau protein repeat motifs. Like taxol, the new drug reduces the proportion of tau that pellets with microtubules. Despite their differing structures, discodermolide, taxol and tau repeats all bind to a site on beta-tubulin that lies within the microtubule lumen and is crucial in controlling microtubule assembly. Low concentrations of tau still bind strongly to the outer surfaces of preformed microtubules when the acidic C-terminal regions of at least six tubulin dimers are available for interaction with each tau molecule; otherwise binding is very weak.

  11. Cell cycle regulation of tubulin RNA level, tubulin protein synthesis, and assembly of microtubules in Physarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedl, T; Burland, T G; Gull, K; Dove, W F

    1984-07-01

    The temporal relationship between tubulin expression and the assembly of the mitotic spindle microtubules has been investigated during the naturally synchronous cell cycle of the Physarum plasmodium. The cell cycle behavior of the tubulin isoforms was examined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins labeled in vivo and by translation of RNA in vitro. alpha 1-, alpha 2-, beta 1-, and beta 2-tubulin synthesis increases coordinately until metaphase, and then falls, with beta 2 falling more rapidly than beta 1. Nucleic acid hybridization demonstrated that alpha- and beta-tubulin RNAs accumulate coordinately during G2, peaking at metaphase. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that alpha-tubulin RNA increases with apparent exponential kinetics, peaking with an increase over the basal level of greater than 40-fold. After metaphase, tubulin RNA levels fall exponentially, with a short half-life (19 min). Electron microscopic analysis of the plasmodium showed that the accumulation of tubulin RNA begins long before the polymerization of mitotic spindle microtubules. By contrast, the decay of tubulin RNA after metaphase coincides with the depolymerization of the spindle microtubules.

  12. Doublecortin Is Excluded from Growing Microtubule Ends and Recognizes the GDP-Microtubule Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Andreas; van Haren, Jeffrey; Ribeiro, Susana A; Wittmann, Torsten

    2016-06-20

    Many microtubule (MT) functions are mediated by a diverse class of proteins (+TIPs) at growing MT plus ends that control intracellular MT interactions and dynamics and depend on end-binding proteins (EBs) [1]. Cryoelectron microscopy has recently identified the EB binding site as the interface of four tubulin dimers that undergoes a conformational change in response to β-tubulin GTP hydrolysis [2, 3]. Doublecortin (DCX), a MT-associated protein (MAP) required for neuronal migration during cortical development [4, 5], binds to the same site as EBs [6], and recent in vitro studies proposed DCX localization to growing MT ends independent of EBs [7]. Because this conflicts with observations in neurons [8, 9] and the molecular function of DCX is not well understood, we revisited intracellular DCX dynamics at low expression levels. Here, we report that DCX is not a +TIP in cells but, on the contrary, is excluded from the EB1 domain. In addition, we find that DCX-MT interactions are highly sensitive to MT geometry. In cells, DCX binding was greatly reduced at MT segments with high local curvature. Remarkably, this geometry-dependent binding to MTs was completely reversed in the presence of taxanes, which reconciles incompatible observations in cells [9] and in vitro [10]. We propose a model explaining DCX specificity for different MT geometries based on structural changes induced by GTP hydrolysis that decreases the spacing between adjacent tubulin dimers [11]. Our data are consistent with a unique mode of MT interaction in which DCX specifically recognizes this compacted GDP-like MT lattice.

  13. Enhanced crosslimb transfer of force-field learning for dynamics that are identical in extrinsic and joint-based coordinates for both limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Timothy J; de Rugy, Aymar; Howard, Ian S; Ingram, James N; Wolpert, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Humans are able to adapt their motor commands to make accurate movements in novel sensorimotor environments, such as when wielding tools that alter limb dynamics. However, it is unclear to what extent sensorimotor representations, obtained through experience with one limb, are available to the opposite, untrained limb and in which form they are available. Here, we compared crosslimb transfer of force-field compensation after participants adapted to a velocity-dependent curl field, oriented either in the sagittal or the transverse plane. Due to the mirror symmetry of the limbs, the force field had identical effects for both limbs in joint and extrinsic coordinates in the sagittal plane but conflicting joint-based effects in the transverse plane. The degree of force-field compensation exhibited by the opposite arm in probe trials immediately after initial learning was significantly greater after sagittal (26 ± 5%) than transverse plane adaptation (9 ± 4%; P coordinates for the two limbs. The data reveal that neural representations of novel dynamics are only partially available to the opposite limb, since transfer is incomplete even when force-field perturbation is spatially compatible for the two limbs, according to both intrinsic and extrinsic coordinates.

  14. The N-terminal domain of DDA3 regulates the spindle-association of the microtubule depolymerase Kif2a and controls the mitotic function of DDA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Chang-Young; Fang, Guowei

    2009-10-01

    DDA3 is a microtubule-associated protein that controls chromosome congression and segregation by regulating the dynamics of the mitotic spindle. Depletion of DDA3 alters spindle structure, generates unaligned chromosomes at metaphase, and delays the mitotic progression. DDA3 interacts with the microtubule depolymerase Kif2a and controls the association of Kif2a to the mitotic spindle and the dynamic turnover of microtubules in the spindle. To understand the function and regulation of DDA3, we analyzed its domain structure and found that the C-terminal domain of DDA3 directly binds to microtubules in vitro and associates with the mitotic spindle in vivo. The N-terminal domain of DDA3 does not interact with microtubules, but acts dominant negatively over the wild-type protein. Ectopic expression of this domain prevents the endogenous DDA3 from association with the spindle and results in a high frequency of unaligned chromosomes in metaphase cells, a phenotype similar to that in metaphase cells depleted of DDA3. Mechanistically, expression of N-terminal DDA3 reduces the amount of spindle-associated Kif2a and increases the spindle microtubule density, pheno-copying those in DDA3-depleted cells. We conclude that DDA3 has a distinct domain structure. The C-terminal domain confers its ability to associate with the mitotic spindle, while the regulatory N-terminal domain controls the microtubule-binding by the C-terminal domain and determines the cellular activity of the DDA3 protein.

  15. Fluid dynamics in the spirit of Cartan: a coordinate-free formulation of fluid dynamics. Part I: Inviscid equations in inertial and non-inertial frames

    CERN Document Server

    Scotti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Using Cartan's exterior calculus, we derive a coordinate-free formulation of the Euler equations. These equations are invariant under Galileian transformations, which constitute a global symmetry. With the introduction of an appropriate generalized Coriolis force, these equations become symmetric under general coordinate transformations. We show how exterior calculus simplifies dramatically the derivation of conservation laws. We also discuss the advantage of an exterior calculus formulation with respect to symmetry-preserving discretizations of the equations.

  16. Fluid dynamics in the spirit of Cartan: A coordinate-free formulation of fluid dynamics for an inviscid fluid in inertial and non-inertial frames

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Using Cartan's exterior calculus, we derive a coordinate-free formulation of the Euler equations. These equations are invariant under Galileian transformations, which constitute a global symmetry. With the introduction of an appropriate generalized Coriolis force, these equations become symmetric under general coordinate transformations. We show how exterior calculus simplifies dramatically the derivation of conservation laws. We also discuss the advantage of an exterior calculus formulation ...

  17. Beyond the blank slate: routes to learning new coordination patterns depend on the intrinsic dynamics of the learner-experimental evidence and theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrubiec, Viviane; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio; Fuchs, Armin; Kelso, J A Scott

    2012-01-01

    Using an approach that combines experimental studies of bimanual movements to visual stimuli and theoretical modeling, the present paper develops a dynamical account of sensorimotor learning, that is, how new skills are acquired and old ones modified. A significant aspect of our approach is the focus on the individual learner as the basic unit of analysis, in particular the quantification of predispositions and capabilities that the individual learner brings to the learning environment. Such predispositions constitute the learner's behavioral repertoire, captured here theoretically as a dynamical landscape ("intrinsic dynamics"). The learning process is demonstrated to not only lead to a relatively permanent improvement of performance in the required task-the usual outcome-but also to alter the individual's entire repertoire. Changes in the dynamical landscape due to learning are shown to result from two basic mechanisms or "routes": bifurcation and shift. Which mechanism is selected depends the initial individual repertoire before new learning begins. Both bifurcation and shift mechanisms are accommodated by a dynamical model, a relatively straightforward development of the well-established HKB model of movement coordination. Model simulations show that although environmental or task demands may be met equally well using either mechanism, the bifurcation route results in greater stabilization of the to-be-learned behavior. Thus, stability not (or not only) error is demonstrated to be the basis of selection, both of a new pattern of behavior and the path (smooth shift versus abrupt qualitative change) that learning takes. In line with these results, recent neurophysiological evidence indicates that stability is a relevant feature around which brain activity is organized while an individual performs a coordination task. Finally, we explore the consequences of the dynamical approach to learning for theories of biological change.

  18. Lattice dynamics and normal coordinate analysis of HTSC Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, S. [Pondicherry Univ. (India). Raman School of Physics; Sonamuthu, K. [J.N.R. Mahavidyalaya, Port Blair, Andaman (India)

    2002-02-01

    The lattice dynamics of the high-temperature superconductor Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8} has been investigated on the basis of the three-body-force shell model (TSM). The various interactions between ions are treated in a general way without making them numerically equal. The phonon frequency at the zone centre of Brillouin zone are presented and the vibrational assignments are discussed. Further, a normal coordinate calculation has also been employed to study the vibrational analysis of this compound. The normal coordinate analysis of the superconductor Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8} has been calculated by using Wilson's F-G matrix method which is useful for the confirmation of our present investigation. The vibrational frequencies and the potential energy distribution (PED) of the optically active phonon modes are also presented. (orig.)

  19. The impact of Wii Fit intervention on dynamic balance control in children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder and balance problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelsma, Dorothee; Geuze, Reint H; Mombarg, Remo; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in the performance of children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder (p-DCD) and balance problems (BP) and typical developing children (TD) on a Wii Fit task and to measure the effect on balance skills after a Wii Fit intervention. Twenty-

  20. The impact of Wii Fit intervention on dynamic balance control in children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder and balance problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelsma, Dorothee; Geuze, Reint H; Mombarg, Remo; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C.M.

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in the performance of children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder (p-DCD) and balance problems (BP) and typical developing children (TD) on a Wii Fit task and to measure the effect on balance skills after a Wii Fit intervention.

  1. Resolving bundled microtubules using anti-tubulin nanobodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylova, Marina; Cloin, Bas M C; Finan, Kieran; van den Berg, Robert; Teeuw, Jalmar; Kijanka, Marta M; Sokolowski, Mikolaj; Katrukha, Eugene A; Maidorn, Manuel; Opazo, Felipe; Moutel, Sandrine; Vantard, Marylin; Perez, Frank; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Ewers, Helge; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2015-08-11

    Microtubules are hollow biopolymers of 25-nm diameter and are key constituents of the cytoskeleton. In neurons, microtubules are organized differently between axons and dendrites, but their precise organization in different compartments is not completely understood. Super-resolution microscopy techniques can detect specific structures at an increased resolution, but the narrow spacing between neuronal microtubules poses challenges because most existing labelling strategies increase the effective microtubule diameter by 20-40 nm and will thereby blend neighbouring microtubules into one structure. Here we develop single-chain antibody fragments (nanobodies) against tubulin to achieve super-resolution imaging of microtubules with a decreased apparent diameter. To test the resolving power of these novel probes, we generate microtubule bundles with a known spacing of 50-70 nm and successfully resolve individual microtubules. Individual bundled microtubules can also be resolved in different mammalian cells, including hippocampal neurons, allowing novel insights into fundamental mechanisms of microtubule organization in cell- and neurobiology.

  2. How do Plants Organize Microtubules Without a Centrosome?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A microtubule nucleates from a γ-tubulin complex, which consists of γ-tubulin, proteins from the SPC97/SPC98 family, and the WD40 motif protein GCP-WD. We analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of the genes encoding these proteins and found that the components of this complex are widely conserved among land plants and other eukaryotes. By contrast,the interphase and mitotic arrays of microtubules in land plants differ from those in other eukaryotes. In the interphase cortical array, the majority of microtubules nucleate on existing microtubules in the absence of conspicuous microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs), such as a centrosome. During mitosis, the spindle also forms in the absence of conspicuous MTOCs. Both poles of the spindle are broad, and branched structures of microtubules called microtubule converging centers form at the poles. In this review, we hypothesize that the microtubule converging centers form via microtubuledependent microtubule nucleation, as in the case of the interphase arrays. The evolutionary insights arising from the molecular basis of the diversity in microtubule organization are discussed.

  3. Beyond the blank slate: routes to learning new coordination patterns depend on the intrinsic dynamics of the learner —experimental evidence and theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane eKostrubiec

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Using an approach that combines experimental studies of bimanual movements to visual stimuli and theoretical modeling, the present paper develops a dynamical account of sensorimotor learning, that is, how new skills are acquired and old ones modified. A significant aspect of our approach is the focus on the individual learner as the basic unit of analysis, in particular the quantification of predispositions and capabilities that the individual learner brings to the learning environment. Such predispositions constitute the learner’s behavioral repertoire, captured here theoretically as a dynamical landscape (‘intrinsic dynamics’. The learning process is demonstrated to not only lead to a relatively permanent improvement of performance in the required task —the usual outcome— but also to alter the individual’s entire repertoire. Changes in the dynamical landscape due to learning are shown to result from two basic mechanisms or routes: bifurcation and shift. Which mechanism is selected depends both on the initial individual repertoire before new learning begins and the task to be learned. Both bifurcation and shift mechanisms are accommodated by a dynamical model, a relatively straightforward development of the well-established HKB model of movement coordination. Model simulations show that although environmental or task demands may be met equally well using either mechanism, the bifurcation route results in greater stabilization of the to-be-learned behavior. Thus stability not (or not only error is demonstrated to be the basis of selection, both of a new pattern of behavior and the path (smooth shift versus abrupt qualitative change that learning takes. In line with these results, recent neurophysiological evidence indicates that stability is a relevant feature around which brain activity is organized while an individual performs a coordination task. Finally, we explore the consequences of the dynamical approach to learning for

  4. Motor protein accumulation on antiparallel microtubule overlaps

    CERN Document Server

    Kuan, Hui-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would na\\"ively expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center ...

  5. CSPP and CSPP-L associate with centrosomes and microtubules and differently affect microtubule organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzke, Sebastian; Stokke, Trond; Aasheim, Hans-Christian

    2006-10-01

    We recently described the identification of a centrosome/spindle pole associated protein, CSPP, involved in cell cycle progression. Here we report a CSPP isoform denoted CSPP-L, with a 294 amino acids longer N-terminus and a 51 amino acids insertion located in the coiled-coil mid-domain. Expression analysis indicates an inverse cell cycle dependent regulation. CSPP mRNA expression is highest in G1 whereas CSPP-L expression is highest in G2/M. Ectopic expression of CSPP-L impairs cell cycle progression weaker in G1 than CSPP. Furthermore, normal mitotic phenotypes were observed in CSPP-L but not in CSPP transfectants. CSPP-L relocates from spindle microtubules and poles in metaphase to the mid-spindle in anaphase and concentrates at the mid-body in telophase/cytokinesis. CSPP-L high-expressing mitotic cells were predominantly characterized by lagging chromosomes or monopolar spindles, in contrast to the predominant multipolar spindles observed with CSPP expression. The different effects of CSPP and CSPP-L on microtubule organization in mitosis depend on the coiled-coil mid-domain insertion. The common C-terminal domain is required to repress that activity until mitosis. Notably, this C-terminal domain alone can associate with centrosomes in a microtubule independent manner. Taken together, CSPP and CSPP-L interact with centrosomes and microtubules and can differently affect microtubule organization. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Microtubule-Targeting Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    Cancer1828 Mol Cancer Ther 2005;4(12). December 2005 22. Sambrook J, Fritsch EF, Maniatis T. Molecular cloning : a laboratory manual. 2nd ed. Cold Spring...Harbor (NY): Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory; 1989. 23. Zhu XX, Kozarsky K, Strahler JR, et al. Molecular cloning of a novel human leukemia-associated...of Cancer Research, Abstract #4940, 2005. 3. Mistry, SJ, Atweh, GF. Microtubule targeting therapy: Anti-stathmin based molecular cancer

  7. Microtubule self-organisation depends upon gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabony, J.; Pochon, N.; Papaseit, C.

    2001-01-01

    The molecular processes by which gravity is transduced into biological systems are poorly, if at all, understood. Under equilibrium conditions, chemical and biochemical structures do not depend upon gravity. It has been proposed that biological systems might show a gravity dependence by way of the bifurcation properties of certain types of non-linear chemical reactions that are far-from-equilibrium. We have found that in-vitro preparations of microtubules, an important element of the cellular cytoskeleton, show this type of behaviour. On earth, the solutions show macroscopic self-ordering, and the morphology of the structures that form depend upon the orientation of the sample with respect to gravity at a critical moment at an early stage in the development of the self-organised state. An experiment carried out in a sounding rocket, showed that as predicted by theories of this type, no self-organisation occurs when the microtubules are assembled under low gravity conditions. This is an experimental demonstration of how a very simple biochemical system, containing only two molecules, can be gravity sensitive. At a molecular level this behaviour results from an interaction of gravity with macroscopic concentration and density fluctuations that arise from the processes of microtubule contraction and elongation.

  8. MICROTUBULE ORGANIZATION 1 regulates structure and function of microtubule arrays during mitosis and cytokinesis in the Arabidopsis root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Eiko; Himmelspach, Regina; Rashbrooke, Madeleine C; Whittington, Angela T; Gale, Kevin R; Collings, David A; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2006-01-01

    MICROTUBULE ORGANIZATION 1 (MOR1) is a plant member of the highly conserved MAP215/Dis1 family of microtubule-associated proteins. Prior studies with the temperature-sensitive mor1 mutants of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which harbor single amino acid substitutions in an N-terminal HEAT repeat, proved that MOR1 regulates cortical microtubule organization and function. Here we demonstrate by use of live cell imaging and immunolabeling that the mor1-1 mutation generates specific defects in the microtubule arrays of dividing vegetative cells. Unlike the universal cortical microtubule disorganization in elongating mor1-1 cells, disruption of mitotic and cytokinetic microtubule arrays was not detected in all dividing cells. Nevertheless, quantitative analysis identified distinct defects in preprophase bands (PPBs), spindles, and phragmoplasts. In nearly one-half of dividing cells at the restrictive temperature of 30 degrees C, PPBs were not detected prior to spindle formation, and those that did form were often disrupted. mor1-1 spindles and phragmoplasts were short and abnormally organized and persisted for longer times than in wild-type cells. The reduced length of these arrays predicts that the component microtubule lengths are also reduced, suggesting that microtubule length is a critical determinant of spindle and phragmoplast structure, orientation, and function. Microtubule organizational defects led to aberrant chromosomal arrangements, misaligned or incomplete cell plates, and multinucleate cells. Antiserum raised against an N-terminal MOR1 sequence labeled the full length of microtubules in interphase arrays, PPBs, spindles, and phragmoplasts. Continued immunolabeling of the disorganized and short microtubules of mor1-1 at the restrictive temperature demonstrated that the mutant mor1-1(L174F) protein loses function without dissociating from microtubules, providing important insight into the mechanism by which MOR1 may regulate microtubule length.

  9. Dynamics of actin cables in polarized growth of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eBergs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Highly polarized growth of filamentous fungi requires a continuous supply of proteins and lipids to the hyphal tip. This transport is managed by vesicle trafficking via the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and their associated motor proteins. Particularly, actin cables originating from the hyphal tip are essential for hyphal growth. Although specific marker proteins to visualize actin cables have been developed in filamentous fungi, the exact organization and dynamics of actin cables has remained elusive. Here we visualized actin cables using tropomyosin (TpmA and Lifeact fused to fluorescent proteins in Aspergillus nidulans and studied the dynamics and regulation. GFP tagged TpmA visualized dynamic actin cables formed from the hyphal tip with cycles of elongation and shrinkage. The elongation and shrinkage rates of actin cables were similar and approximately 0.6 μm/s. Comparison of actin markers revealed that high concentrations of Lifeact reduced actin dynamics. Simultaneous visualization of actin cables and microtubules suggests temporally and spatially coordinated polymerization and depolymerization between the two cytoskeletons. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ordered polarized growth regulated by actin cables and microtubules.

  10. PREFACE: Cooperative dynamics Cooperative dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gov, Nir

    2011-09-01

    , the biological problems that inspire these physical studies cover fundamental processes, from cell division up to the dynamics within axons and neurons. We would like to acknowledge and thank all contributors for their submissions, which made this special issue possible in the first place. Moreover, we would like to thank the staff at IOP Publishing for helping us with the administrative aspects and for co-ordinating the refereeing process. We hope that readers will enjoy this collection of papers and that it will trigger them to further explore the endless open physics questions presented by biological systems. Cooperative dynamics contents How does the antagonism between capping and anti-capping proteins affect actin network dynamics? Longhua Hu and Garegin A Papoian The emergence of sarcomeric, graded-polarity and spindle-like patterns in bundles of short cytoskeletal polymers and two opposite molecular motorsE M Craig, S Dey and A Mogilner Model of myosin node aggregation into a contractile ring: the effect of local alignmentNikola Ojkic, Jian-Qiu Wu and Dimitrios Vavylonis Loop formation of microtubules during gliding at high densityLynn Liu, Erkan Tüzel and Jennifer L Ross Protein-coat dynamics and cluster phases in intracellular traffickingGreg Huber, Hui Wang and Ranjan Mukhopadhyay Conformational changes, diffusion and collective behavior in monomeric kinesin-based motilityKerwyn Casey Huang, Christian Vega and Ajay Gopinathan One-dimensional deterministic transport in neurons measured by dispersion-relation phase spectroscopyRu Wang, Zhuo Wang, Joe Leigh, Nahil Sobh, Larry Millet, Martha U Gillette, Alex J Levine and Gabriel Popescu

  11. 某弹协调臂刚柔耦合动力学仿真%Rigid-Flex Coupling Dynamics Simulation and Analysis of a Missle Coordinating Arm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈俊; 陈龙淼

    2016-01-01

    为了评估某火炮自动装填系统中弹协调臂的性能,在分析某弹协调臂的工作原理的基础上,利用ProE建立了弹协调臂的三维模型,并在ANSyS中对模型中的弹协调臂本体部分完成网格划分和刚性区域的建立,生成弹协调臂本体部分的柔性体模态文件,在ADAMS中对柔性体施加转动约束以及液压缸驱动,对弹协调臂进行了刚柔耦合仿真,得到弹协调臂在摆动过程中的动力学特性以及动态的应力分布,给出了不满足强度要求的应力集中区域,为设计验证和后期改进提供了理论依据。%In order to assess the performance of a missle coordinating arm,it established the 3D model of the coordinator with ProE software on the basis of analyzing the working principle of a missile coordination arm,and established the rigid region and complete model meshing in the ANSyS software and got the flexible body file,and rotational constraints were imposed on the flexible body and the hydraulic cylinder drive in ADAMS,and the missle coordination arm was processed coupled simulation,and we obtained the dynamic characteristics and dynamic stress distribution of the missle coordinating arm and got the stress concentration area of which stress can not meet the strength requirements. It provides a theoretical basis for design verification and improvement later after.

  12. Cellular Samurai: katanin and the severing of microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarmby, L

    2000-08-01

    Recent biochemical studies of the AAA ATPase, katanin, provide a foundation for understanding how microtubules might be severed along their length. These in vitro studies are complemented by a series of recent reports of direct in vivo observation of microtubule breakage, which indicate that the in vitro phenomenon of catalysed microtubule severing is likely to be physiological. There is also new evidence that microtubule severing by katanin is important for the production of non-centrosomal microtubules in cells such as neurons and epithelial cells. Although it has been difficult to establish the role of katanin in mitosis, new genetic evidence indicates that a katanin-like protein, MEI-1, plays an essential role in meiosis in C. elegans. Finally, new proteins involved in the severing of axonemal microtubules have been discovered in the deflagellation system of Chlamydomonas.

  13. Microtubule Associated Proteins in Plants and the Processes They Manage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) are proteins that physically bind to microtubules in eukaryotes. MAPs play important roles in regulating the polymerization and organization of microtubules and in using the ensuing microtubule arrays to carry out a variety of cellular functions. In plants, MAPs manage the construction, repositioning, and dismantling of four distinct microtubule arrays throughout the cell cycle. Three of these arrays, the cortical array, the preprophase band,and the phragmoplast, are prominent to plants and are responsible for facilitating cell wall deposition and modification,transducing signals, demarcating the plane of cell division, and forming the new cell plate during cytokinesis, This review highlights important aspects of how MAPs in plants establish and maintain microtubule arrays as well as regulate cell growth, cell division, and cellular responses to the environment.

  14. Drosophila Stathmin: A Microtubule-destabilizing Factor Involved in Nervous System Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Ozon, Sylvie; Guichet, Antoine; Gavet, Olivier; Roth, Siegfried; Sobel, André

    2002-01-01

    Stathmin is a ubiquitous regulatory phosphoprotein, the generic element of a family of neural phosphoproteins in vertebrates that possess the capacity to bind tubulin and interfere with microtubule dynamics. Although stathmin and the other proteins of the family have been associated with numerous cell regulations, their biological roles remain elusive, as in particular inactivation of the stathmin gene in the mouse resulted in no clear deleterious phenotype. We identified stathmin phosphoprot...

  15. Cortical microtubule arrays are initiated from a nonrandom prepattern driven by atypical microtubule initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeboom, Jelmer J; Lioutas, Antonios; Deinum, Eva E; Tindemans, Simon H; Ehrhardt, David W; Emons, Anne Mie C; Vos, Jan W; Mulder, Bela M

    2013-03-01

    The ordered arrangement of cortical microtubules in growing plant cells is essential for anisotropic cell expansion and, hence, for plant morphogenesis. These arrays are dismantled when the microtubule cytoskeleton is rearranged during mitosis and reassembled following completion of cytokinesis. The reassembly of the cortical array has often been considered as initiating from a state of randomness, from which order arises at least partly through self-organizing mechanisms. However, some studies have shown evidence for ordering at early stages of array assembly. To investigate how cortical arrays are initiated in higher plant cells, we performed live-cell imaging studies of cortical array assembly in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 cells after cytokinesis and drug-induced disassembly. We found that cortical arrays in both cases did not initiate randomly but with a significant overrepresentation of microtubules at diagonal angles with respect to the cell axis, which coincides with the predominant orientation of the microtubules before their disappearance from the cell cortex in preprophase. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root cells, recovery from drug-induced disassembly was also nonrandom and correlated with the organization of the previous array, although no diagonal bias was observed in these cells. Surprisingly, during initiation, only about one-half of the new microtubules were nucleated from locations marked by green fluorescent protein-γ-tubulin complex protein2-tagged γ-nucleation complexes (γ-tubulin ring complex), therefore indicating that a large proportion of early polymers was initiated by a noncanonical mechanism not involving γ-tubulin ring complex. Simulation studies indicate that the high rate of noncanonical initiation of new microtubules has the potential to accelerate the rate of array repopulation.

  16. Calculation of the Electromagnetic Field Around a Microtubule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Havelka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are important structures in the cytoskeleton which organizes the cell. A single microtubule is composed of electrically polar structures, tubulin heterodimers, which have a strong electric dipole moment. Vibrations are expected to be generated in microtubules, thus tubulin heterodimers oscillate as electric dipoles. This gives rise to an electromagnetic field which is detected around the cells. We calculate here the electromagnetic field of microtubules if they are excited at 1 GHz. This paper includes work done for the bachelor thesis of the first author. 

  17. Molecular architecture of axonemal microtubule doublets revealedby cryo-electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Haixin; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2006-05-22

    The axoneme, which forms the core of eukaryotic flagella and cilia, is one of the largest macromolecular machines with a structure that is largely conserved from protists to mammals. Microtubule doublets are structural components of axonemes containing a number of proteins besides tubulin, and are usually found in arrays of nine doublets arranged around two singlet microtubules. Coordinated sliding of adjacent doublets, which involves a host of other proteins in the axoneme, produces periodic beating movements of the axoneme. We have obtained a 3D density map of intact microtubule doublets using cryo-electron tomography and image averaging. Our map, with a resolution of about 3 nm, provides insights into locations of particular proteins within the doublets and the structural features of the doublets that define their mechanical properties. We identify likely candidates for several of these non-tubulin components of the doublets. This work offers novel insight on how tubulin protofilaments and accessory proteins attach together to form the doublets and provides a structural basis for understanding doublet function in axonemes.

  18. Queueing induced by bidirectional motor motion near the end of a microtubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin, Peter; Lin, Congping; Steinberg, Gero

    2010-11-01

    Recent live observations of motors in long-range microtubule (MT) dependent transport in the fungus Ustilago maydis have reported bidirectional motion of dynein and an accumulation of the motors at the polymerization-active (the plus-end) of the microtubule. Quantitative data derived from in vivo observation of dynein has enabled us to develop an accurate, quantitatively-valid asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) model that describes the coordinated motion of anterograde and retrograde motors sharing a single oriented microtubule. We give approximate expressions for the size and distribution of the accumulation, and discuss queueing properties for motors entering this accumulation. We show for this ASEP model, that the mean accumulation can be modeled as an M/M/∞ queue that is Poisson distributed with mean Farr/pd , where Farr is the flux of motors that arrives at the tip and pd is the rate at which individual motors change direction from anterograde to retrograde motion. Deviations from this can in principle be used to gain information about other processes at work in the accumulation. Furthermore, our work is a significant step toward a mathematical description of the complex interactions of motors in cellular long-range transport of organelles.

  19. Inter-domain Cooperation in INCENP Promotes Aurora B Relocation from Centromeres to Microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando van der Horst

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The chromosomal passenger complex is essential for error-free chromosome segregation and proper execution of cytokinesis. To coordinate nuclear division with cytoplasmic division, its enzymatic subunit, Aurora B, relocalizes from centromeres in metaphase to the spindle midzone in anaphase. In budding yeast, this requires dephosphorylation of the microtubule-binding (MTB domain of the INCENP analog Sli15. The mechanistic basis for this relocalization in metazoans is incompletely understood. We demonstrate that the putative coiled-coil domain within INCENP drives midzone localization of Aurora B via a direct, electrostatic interaction with microtubules. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the CPC multimerizes via INCENP’s centromere-targeting domain (CEN box, which increases the MTB affinity of INCENP. In (prometaphase, the MTB affinity of INCENP is outcompeted by the affinity of its CEN box for centromeres, while at anaphase onset—when the histone mark H2AT120 is dephosphorylated—INCENP and Aurora B switch from centromere to microtubule localization.

  20. Human SAS-6 C-Terminus Nucleates and Promotes Microtubule Assembly in Vitro by Binding to Microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Hindol; Badarudeen, Binshad; George, Athira; Thomas, Geethu Emily; Gireesh, K K; Manna, Tapas K

    2015-10-20

    Centrioles are essential components of the animal centrosome and play crucial roles in the formation of cilia and flagella. They are cylindrical structures composed of nine triplet microtubules organized around a central cartwheel. Recent studies have identified spindle assembly abnormal protein SAS-6 as a critical component necessary for formation of the cartwheel. However, the molecular details of how the cartwheel participates in centriolar microtubule assembly have not been clearly understood. In this report, we show that the C-terminal tail (residues 470-657) of human SAS-6, HsSAS-6 C, the region that has been shown to extend toward the centriolar wall where the microtubule triplets are organized, nucleated and induced microtubule polymerization in vitro. The N-terminus (residues 1-166) of HsSAS-6, the domain known to be involved in formation of the central hub of the cartwheel, did not, however, exert any effect on microtubule polymerization. HsSAS-6 C bound to the microtubules and localized along the lengths of the microtubules in vitro. Microtubule pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) experiments with S-phase synchronized HeLa cell lysates showed that the endogenous HsSAS-6 coprecipitated with the microtubules, and it mediated interaction with tubulin. Isothermal calorimetry titration and size exclusion chromatography showed that HsSAS-6 C bound to the αβ-tubulin dimer in vitro. The results demonstrate that HsSAS-6 possesses an intrinsic microtubule assembly promoting activity and further implicate that its outer exposed C-terminal tail may play critical roles in microtubule assembly and stabilizing microtubule attachment with the centriolar cartwheel.

  1. Numerical simulation of four-field extended magnetohydrodynamics in dynamically adaptive curvilinear coordinates via Newton-Krylov-Schwarz

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Xuefei

    2012-07-01

    Numerical simulations of the four-field extended magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations with hyper-resistivity terms present a difficult challenge because of demanding spatial resolution requirements. A time-dependent sequence of . r-refinement adaptive grids obtained from solving a single Monge-Ampère (MA) equation addresses the high-resolution requirements near the . x-point for numerical simulation of the magnetic reconnection problem. The MHD equations are transformed from Cartesian coordinates to solution-defined curvilinear coordinates. After the application of an implicit scheme to the time-dependent problem, the parallel Newton-Krylov-Schwarz (NKS) algorithm is used to solve the system at each time step. Convergence and accuracy studies show that the curvilinear solution requires less computational effort than a pure Cartesian treatment. This is due both to the more optimal placement of the grid points and to the improved convergence of the implicit solver, nonlinearly and linearly. The latter effect, which is significant (more than an order of magnitude in number of inner linear iterations for equivalent accuracy), does not yet seem to be widely appreciated. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  2. Interplay between kinesin-1 and cortical dynein during axonal outgrowth and microtubule organization in Drosophila neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo, Urko; Winding, Michael; Lu, Wen; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2015-12-28

    In this study, we investigated how microtubule motors organize microtubules in Drosophila neurons. We showed that, during the initial stages of axon outgrowth, microtubules display mixed polarity and minus-end-out microtubules push the tip of the axon, consistent with kinesin-1 driving outgrowth by sliding antiparallel microtubules. At later stages, the microtubule orientation in the axon switches from mixed to uniform polarity with plus-end-out. Dynein knockdown prevents this rearrangement and results in microtubules of mixed orientation in axons and accumulation of microtubule minus-ends at axon tips. Microtubule reorganization requires recruitment of dynein to the actin cortex, as actin depolymerization phenocopies dynein depletion, and direct recruitment of dynein to the membrane bypasses the actin requirement. Our results show that cortical dynein slides 'minus-end-out' microtubules from the axon, generating uniform microtubule arrays. We speculate that differences in microtubule orientation between axons and dendrites could be dictated by differential activity of cortical dynein.

  3. Tubers from patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are characterized by changes in microtubule biology through ROCK2 signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Isidre; Mohan, Pooja; Chen, Helen; Castellsague, Joan; Gómez-Baldó, Laia; Carmona, Marga; García, Nadia; Aguilar, Helena; Jiang, Jihong; Skowron, Margaretha; Nellist, Mark; Ampuero, Israel; Russi, Antonio; Lázaro, Conxi; Maxwell, Christopher A; Pujana, Miguel Angel

    2014-07-01

    Most patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) develop cortical tubers that cause severe neurological disabilities. It has been suggested that defects in neuronal differentiation and/or migration underlie the appearance of tubers. However, the precise molecular alterations remain largely unknown. Here, by combining cytological and immunohistochemical analyses of tubers from nine TSC patients (four of them diagnosed with TSC2 germline mutations), we show that alteration of microtubule biology through ROCK2 signalling contributes to TSC neuropathology. All tubers showed a larger number of binucleated neurons than expected relative to control cortex. An excess of normal and altered cytokinetic figures was also commonly observed. Analysis of centrosomal markers suggested increased microtubule nucleation capacity, which was supported by the analysis of an expression dataset from cortical tubers and control cortex, and subsequently linked to under-expression of Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinase 2 (ROCK2). Thus, augmented microtubule nucleation capacity was observed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human fibroblasts deficient in the Tsc2/TSC2 gene product, tuberin. Consistent with ROCK2 under-expression, microtubule acetylation was found to be increased with tuberin deficiency; this alteration was abrogated by rapamycin treatment and mimicked by HDAC6 inhibition. Together, the results of this study support the hypothesis that loss of TSC2 expression can alter microtubule organization and dynamics, which, in turn, deregulate cell division and potentially impair neuronal differentiation.

  4. Arabidopsis phospholipase D alpha 1-derived phosphatidic acid regulates microtubule organization and cell development under microtubule-interacting drugs treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Qu, Yana; Wang, Qing; Song, Ping; Wang, Peipei; Jia, Qianru; Guo, Jinhe

    2017-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) and its product phosphatidic acid (PA) are emerging as essential regulators of cytoskeleton organization in plants. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of PA-mediated microtubule reorganization in plants remain largely unknown. In this study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to analyze the function of Arabidopsis thaliana PLDα1 in the regulation of microtubule organization and cell development in response to microtubule-affecting drugs. Treatment with the microtubule-stabilizing drug paclitaxel resulted in less growth inhibition and decreased rightward slant of roots, longitudinal alignment of microtubules, and enhanced length of hypocotyl epidermal cells in the pldα1 mutant, the phenotype of which was rescued by exogenous application of PA. Moreover, the pldα1 mutant was sensitive to the microtubule-disrupting drugs oryzalin and propyzamide in terms of seedling survival ratio, left-skewing angle of roots and microtubule organization. In addition, both disruption and stabilization of microtubules induced by drugs activated PLDα1 activity. Our findings demonstrate that in A. thaliana, PLDα1/PA might regulate cell development by modulating microtubule organization in an activity-dependent manner.

  5. Highly Transient Molecular Interactions Underlie the Stability of Kinetochore–Microtubule Attachment During Cell Division

    OpenAIRE

    Zaytsev, Anatoly V.; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome segregation during mitosis is mediated by spindle microtubules that attach to chromosomal kinetochores with strong yet labile links. The exact molecular composition of the kinetochore–microtubule interface is not known but microtubules are thought to bind to kinetochores via the specialized microtubule-binding sites, which contain multiple microtubule-binding proteins. During prometaphase the lifetime of microtubule attachments is short but in metaphase it increases 3-fold, presuma...

  6. In vivo FRET imaging revealed a regulatory role of RanGTP in kinetochore-microtubule attachments via Aurora B kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoke-Peng; Wong, Chi-Hang; Chan, Kheng-Sze; Lai, Soak-Kuan; Koh, Cheng-Gee; Li, Hoi-Yeung

    2012-01-01

    Under the fluctuating circumstances provided by the innate dynamics of microtubules and opposing tensions resulted from microtubule-associated motors, it is vital to ensure stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments for accurate segregation. However, a comprehensive understanding of how this regulation is mechanistically achieved remains elusive. Using our newly designed live cell FRET time-lapse imaging, we found that post-metaphase RanGTP is crucial in the maintenance of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments by regulating Aurora B kinase via the NES-bearing Mst1. More importantly, our study demonstrates that by ensuring stable alignment of metaphase chromosomes prior to segregation, RanGTP is indispensible in governing the genomic integrity and the fidelity of cell cycle progression. Our findings suggest an additional role of RanGTP beyond its known function in mitotic spindle assembly during the prometaphase-metaphase transition.

  7. In vivo FRET imaging revealed a regulatory role of RanGTP in kinetochore-microtubule attachments via Aurora B kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoke-Peng Lee

    Full Text Available Under the fluctuating circumstances provided by the innate dynamics of microtubules and opposing tensions resulted from microtubule-associated motors, it is vital to ensure stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments for accurate segregation. However, a comprehensive understanding of how this regulation is mechanistically achieved remains elusive. Using our newly designed live cell FRET time-lapse imaging, we found that post-metaphase RanGTP is crucial in the maintenance of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments by regulating Aurora B kinase via the NES-bearing Mst1. More importantly, our study demonstrates that by ensuring stable alignment of metaphase chromosomes prior to segregation, RanGTP is indispensible in governing the genomic integrity and the fidelity of cell cycle progression. Our findings suggest an additional role of RanGTP beyond its known function in mitotic spindle assembly during the prometaphase-metaphase transition.

  8. Markov stochasticity coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-01-01

    Markov dynamics constitute one of the most fundamental models of random motion between the states of a system of interest. Markov dynamics have diverse applications in many fields of science and engineering, and are particularly applicable in the context of random motion in networks. In this paper we present a two-dimensional gauging method of the randomness of Markov dynamics. The method-termed Markov Stochasticity Coordinates-is established, discussed, and exemplified. Also, the method is tweaked to quantify the stochasticity of the first-passage-times of Markov dynamics, and the socioeconomic equality and mobility in human societies.

  9. Modeling and prototyping of a fiber Bragg grating-based dynamic micro-coordinate measuring machine probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangfang; Chen, Lijuan; Wang, Jingfan; Xia, Haojie; Li, Ruijun; Yu, Liandong; Fei, Yetai

    2016-02-01

    Higher-accuracy measurements of the 3D metrology of nano- and micro-structures are increasingly demanded. This paper details the prototyping of a novel 3D micro-scale coordinate measuring machine probe based on fiber Bragg grating sensors for true 3D measurements at micro- and nanometer scales. A new manufacturing technique for the high-precision cantilever used in the probe is also reported. Simulations are performed during the design and testing to help to test important aspects of the probe and to gain understanding about the influence of the probe geometrical parameters on the sensor sensitivity. The initial performance of the probe has been tested in both the vertical and horizontal directions, and the characterization results are promising. Further experimental results demonstrate that the probe is not affected by surface interaction forces.

  10. Dynamic Associations of Change in Physical Activity and Change in Cognitive Function: Coordinated Analyses of Four Longitudinal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Lindwall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study used a coordinated analyses approach to examine the association of physical activity and cognitive change in four longitudinal studies. A series of multilevel growth models with physical activity included both as a fixed (between-person and time-varying (within-person predictor of four domains of cognitive function (reasoning, memory, fluency, and semantic knowledge was used. Baseline physical activity predicted fluency, reasoning and memory in two studies. However, there was a consistent pattern of positive relationships between time-specific changes in physical activity and time-specific changes in cognition, controlling for expected linear trajectories over time, across all four studies. This pattern was most evident for the domains of reasoning and fluency.

  11. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, Mirko; Ritter, Anett; Rothemund, Sven; Pauling, Björg V; Rottner, Klemens; Gingras, Alexandre R; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2009-05-15

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and there are contradictory models with respect to the determinants of adhesion site localization. Here, we report turnover rates and protein-protein interactions in a range of talin rod domain constructs varying in helix bundle structure. We conclude that several bundles of the C terminus cooperate to regulate targeting and concomitantly tailor high affinity interactions of the talin rod in cell adhesions. Intrinsic control of ligand binding activities is essential for the coordination of adhesion site function of talin.

  12. Optimization of explicit time-stepping algorithms and Stream-Function-Coordinate (SFC) concept for fluid dynamics problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-Yuan

    A new formulation of the stream function based on a stream function coordinate (SFC) concept for inviscid flow field calculations is presented. In addition, a new method is developed not only to accelerate, but also to stabilize the iterative schemes for steady and unsteady, linear and non-linear, scalar and system of coupled, partial differential equations. With this theory, the limitation on the time step size of an explicit scheme for solving unsteady problems and the limitation on the relaxation factors of an iterative scheme for solving steady state problems could be analytically determined. Moreover, this theory allows the determination of the optimal time steps for explicit time-stepping schemes and the optimal values of the acceleration factors for iterative schemes, if the transient behavior is immaterial.

  13. Poisson Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian-Ying; Hu, Shi-Min

    2013-02-01

    Harmonic functions are the critical points of a Dirichlet energy functional, the linear projections of conformal maps. They play an important role in computer graphics, particularly for gradient-domain image processing and shape-preserving geometric computation. We propose Poisson coordinates, a novel transfinite interpolation scheme based on the Poisson integral formula, as a rapid way to estimate a harmonic function on a certain domain with desired boundary values. Poisson coordinates are an extension of the Mean Value coordinates (MVCs) which inherit their linear precision, smoothness, and kernel positivity. We give explicit formulas for Poisson coordinates in both continuous and 2D discrete forms. Superior to MVCs, Poisson coordinates are proved to be pseudoharmonic (i.e., they reproduce harmonic functions on n-dimensional balls). Our experimental results show that Poisson coordinates have lower Dirichlet energies than MVCs on a number of typical 2D domains (particularly convex domains). As well as presenting a formula, our approach provides useful insights for further studies on coordinates-based interpolation and fast estimation of harmonic functions.

  14. The Ndc80 internal loop is required for recruitment of the Ska complex to establish end-on microtubule attachment to kinetochores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Gang; Kelstrup, Christian D; Hu, Xiao-Wen;

    2012-01-01

    the chromosomes and stable kinetochore fibers are absent. Through quantitative mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence we find that the binding of the Ska complex depends on the loop region explaining why end-on attachment is defective. This underscores the importance of the Ndc80 loop region in coordinating......The Ndc80 complex establishes end-on attachment of kinetochores to microtubules essential for chromosome segregation. The Ndc80 subunit is characterized by an N-terminal region, that binds directly to microtubules, and a long coiled-coil region that interacts with Nuf2. A loop region in Ndc80...

  15. Resolving bundled microtubules using anti-tubulin nanobodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikhaylova, Marina; Cloin, Bas M C; Finan, Kieran; van den Berg, Robert; Teeuw, Jalmar; Kijanka, Marta M; Sokolowski, Mikolaj; Katrukha, Eugene A; Maidorn, Manuel; Opazo, Felipe; Moutel, Sandrine; Vantard, Marylin; Perez, Frank; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Ewers, Helge; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules are hollow biopolymers of 25-nm diameter and are key constituents of the cytoskeleton. In neurons, microtubules are organized differently between axons and dendrites, but their precise organization in different compartments is not completely understood. Super-resolution microscopy techn

  16. Molecular Pathway of Microtubule Organization at the Golgi Apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Jingchao; de Heus, Cecilia; Liu, Qingyang; Bouchet, Benjamin P; Noordstra, Ivar; Jiang, Kai; Hua, Shasha; Martin, Maud; Yang, Chao; Grigoriev, Ilya; Katrukha, Eugene A; Altelaar, A F Maarten; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Qi, Robert Z; Klumperman, Judith; Akhmanova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus controls the formation of non-centrosomal microtubule arrays important for Golgi organization, polarized transport, cell motility, and cell differentiation. Here, we show that CAMSAP2 stabilizes and attaches microtubule minus ends to the Golgi through a complex of AKAP450 and myo

  17. CLIP-170 facilitates the formation of kinetochore-microtubule attachments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanenbaum, ME; Galjart, N; van Vugt, MATM; Medema, RH

    2006-01-01

    CLIP-170 is a microtubule 'plus end tracking' protein involved in several microtubule-dependent processes in interphase. At the onset of mitosis, CLIP-170 localizes to kinetochores, but at metaphase, it is no longer detectable at kinetochores. Although RNA interference (RNAi) experiments have

  18. Action-perception coordination dynamics of whole-body rhythmic movement in stance: a comparison study of street dancers and non-dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Akito; Kudo, Kazutoshi; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2013-06-07

    This study investigated whether whole-body, rhythmic action-perception coordination in stance is organized in terms of dynamic principles. We observed whether phase transition and hysteresis occur during the execution of dancing movements. Nine skilled street dancers and 9 novice controls performed 2 types of rhythmic knee-bending movements to a metronome beat in the standing position. Participants performed down-on-the-beat (in which knee flexion coincides with the beat) and up-on-the-beat (in which knee extension coincides with the beat), which are both typical components of street dance. All participants were instructed not to intervene in the pattern change. The auditory stimulus beat rate increased or decreased between 60 and 220 beats per minute (bpm) in steps of 20 bpm. We calculated the phase angle of beat time that is superposed on knee movement trajectory on a phase plane. Under the up-on-the-beat condition, phase transition and hysteresis were observed. The bifurcation frequency at which phase transition occurred significantly differed between groups, indicating that dancers were able to perform up-on-the-beat at higher movement frequencies than non-dancers. This suggests that dynamical properties may differ between Dancers and Non-dancers. The present results provide additional evidence that whole-body action-perception pattern formation is governed by general and common dynamical principles.

  19. HILI destabilizes microtubules by suppressing phosphorylation and Gigaxonin-mediated degradation of TBCB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hao; Liao, Hua; Zhao, Lianfang; Lu, Yilu; Jiang, Siyuan; Tao, Dachang; Liu, Yunqiang; Ma, Yongxin

    2017-01-01

    Human PIWIL2, aka HILI, is a member of PIWI protein family and overexpresses in various tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms of HILI in tumorigenesis remain largely unknown. TBCB has a critical role in regulating microtubule dynamics and is overexpressed in many cancers. Here we report that HILI inhibits Gigaxonin-mediated TBCB ubiquitination and degradation by interacting with TBCB, promoting the binding between HSP90 and TBCB, and suppressing the interaction between Gigaxonin and TBCB. Meanwhile, HILI can also reduce phosphorylation level of TBCB induced by PAK1. Our results showed that HILI suppresses microtubule polymerization and promotes cell proliferation, migration and invasion via TBCB for the first time, revealing a novel mechanism for HILI in tumorigenesis. PMID:28393858

  20. Role of the Number of Microtubules in Chromosome Segregation during Cell Division

    CERN Document Server

    Bertalan, Zsolt; La Porta, Caterina A M; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Faithful segregation of genetic material during cell division requires alignment of chromosomes between two spindle poles and attachment of their kinetochores to each of the poles. Failure of these complex dynamical processes leads to chromosomal instability (CIN), a characteristic feature of several diseases including cancer. While a multitude of biological factors regulating chromosome congression and bi-orientation have been identified, it is still unclear how they are integrated so that coherent chromosome motion emerges from a large collection of random and deterministic processes. Here we address this issue by a three dimensional computational model of motor-driven chromosome congression and bi-orientation during mitosis. Our model reveals that successful cell division requires control of the total number of microtubules: if this number is too small bi-orientation fails, while if it is too large not all the chromosomes are able to congress. The optimal number of microtubules predicted by our model compa...