WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamic live cell

  1. Transcription Dynamics in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenstra, Tineke L; Rodriguez, Joseph; Chen, Huimin; Larson, Daniel R

    2016-07-01

    The transcription cycle can be roughly divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Understanding the molecular events that regulate all these stages requires a dynamic view of the underlying processes. The development of techniques to visualize and quantify transcription in single living cells has been essential in revealing the transcription kinetics. They have revealed that (a) transcription is heterogeneous between cells and (b) transcription can be discontinuous within a cell. In this review, we discuss the progress in our quantitative understanding of transcription dynamics in living cells, focusing on all parts of the transcription cycle. We present the techniques allowing for single-cell transcription measurements, review evidence from different organisms, and discuss how these experiments have broadened our mechanistic understanding of transcription regulation.

  2. Local Nucleosome Dynamics Facilitate Chromatin Accessibility in Living Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saera Hihara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome information, which is three-dimensionally organized within cells as chromatin, is searched and read by various proteins for diverse cell functions. Although how the protein factors find their targets remains unclear, the dynamic and flexible nature of chromatin is likely crucial. Using a combined approach of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, single-nucleosome imaging, and Monte Carlo computer simulations, we demonstrate local chromatin dynamics in living mammalian cells. We show that similar to interphase chromatin, dense mitotic chromosomes also have considerable chromatin accessibility. For both interphase and mitotic chromatin, we observed local fluctuation of individual nucleosomes (∼50 nm movement/30 ms, which is caused by confined Brownian motion. Inhibition of these local dynamics by crosslinking impaired accessibility in the dense chromatin regions. Our findings show that local nucleosome dynamics drive chromatin accessibility. We propose that this local nucleosome fluctuation is the basis for scanning genome information.

  3. Automated live cell imaging systems reveal dynamic cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirieleison, Steven M; Bissell, Taylor A; Scelfo, Christopher C; Anderson, Jordan E; Li, Yong; Koebler, Doug J; Deasy, Bridget M

    2011-07-01

    Automated time-lapsed microscopy provides unique research opportunities to visualize cells and subcellular components in experiments with time-dependent parameters. As accessibility to these systems is increasing, we review here their use in cell science with a focus on stem cell research. Although the use of time-lapsed imaging to answer biological questions dates back nearly 150 years, only recently have the use of an environmentally controlled chamber and robotic stage controllers allowed for high-throughput continuous imaging over long periods at the cell and subcellular levels. Numerous automated imaging systems are now available from both companies that specialize in live cell imaging and from major microscope manufacturers. We discuss the key components of robots used for time-lapsed live microscopic imaging, and the unique data that can be obtained from image analysis. We show how automated features enhance experimentation by providing examples of uniquely quantified proliferation and migration live cell imaging data. In addition to providing an efficient system that drastically reduces man-hours and consumes fewer laboratory resources, this technology greatly enhances cell science by providing a unique dataset of temporal changes in cell activity. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  4. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Ann

    Understanding the structure and functionality of biological systems on a nanometer-resolution and short temporal scales is important for solving complex biological problems, developing innovative treatment, and advancing the design of highly functionalized biomimetic materials. For example, adhesion of cells to an underlying substrate plays a crucial role in physiology and disease development, and has been investigated with great interest for several decades. In the talk, we would like to highlight recent advances in utilizing neutron scattering to study bio-related structures in dynamic conditions (e . g . under the shear flow) including in-situ investigations of the interfacial properties of living cells. The strength of neutron reflectometry is its non-pertubative nature, the ability to probe buried interfaces with nanometer resolution and its sensitivity to light elements like hydrogen and carbon. That allows us to study details of cell - substrate interfaces that are not accessible with any other standard techniques. We studied the adhesion of human brain tumor cells (U251) to quartz substrates and their responses to the external mechanical forces. Such cells are isolated within the central nervous system which makes them difficult to reach with conventional therapies and therefore making them highly invasive. Our results reveal changes in the thickness and composition of the adhesion layer (a layer between the cell lipid membrane and the quartz substrate), largely composed of hyaluronic acid and associated proteoglycans, when the cells were subjected to shear stress. Further studies will allow us to determine more conditions triggering changes in the composition of the bio-material in the adhesion layer. This, in turn, can help to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness, which can have significant medical impact for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  5. Nanoscale live cell optical imaging of the dynamics of intracellular microvesicles in neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sohee; Heo, Chaejeong; Suh, Minah; Lee, Young Hee

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in biotechnology and imaging technology have provided great opportunities to investigate cellular dynamics. Conventional imaging methods such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy are powerful techniques for cellular imaging, even at the nanoscale level. However, these techniques have limitations applications in live cell imaging because of the experimental preparation required, namely cell fixation, and the innately small field of view. In this study, we developed a nanoscale optical imaging (NOI) system that combines a conventional optical microscope with a high resolution dark-field condenser (Cytoviva, Inc.) and halogen illuminator. The NOI system's maximum resolution for live cell imaging is around 100 nm. We utilized NOI to investigate the dynamics of intracellular microvesicles of neural cells without immunocytological analysis. In particular, we studied direct, active random, and moderate random dynamic motions of intracellular microvesicles and visualized lysosomal vesicle changes after treatment of cells with a lysosomal inhibitor (NH4Cl). Our results indicate that the NOI system is a feasible, high-resolution optical imaging system for live small organelles that does not require complicated optics or immunocytological staining processes.

  6. Structure and dynamics of metalloproteins in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jeremy D; Penner-Hahn, James E; Stemmler, Timothy L

    2008-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has emerged as one of the premier tools for investigating the structure and dynamic properties of metals in cells and in metal containing biomolecules. Utilizing the high flux and broad energy range of X-rays supplied by synchrotron light sources, one can selectively excite core electronic transitions in each metal. Spectroscopic signals from these electronic transitions can be used to dissect the chemical architecture of metals in cells, in cellular components, and in biomolecules at varying degrees of structural resolution. With the development of ever-brighter X-ray sources, X-ray methods have grown into applications that can be utilized to provide both a cellular image of the relative distribution of metals throughout the cell as well as a high-resolution picture of the structure of the metal. As these techniques continue to grow in their capabilities and ease of use, so too does the demand for their application by chemists and biochemists interested in studying the structure and dynamics of metals in cells, in cellular organelles, and in metalloproteins.

  7. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana; O'Neill, Hugh; Liberton, Michelle; Urban, Volker S.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ohl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membranes in terms of their flexibility and motion during the photosynthetic process. We present a direct observation of thylakoid membrane undulatory motion in vivo and show a connection between membrane mobility and photosynthetic activity. High-resolution inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 assessed the flexibility of cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane sheets and the dependence of the membranes on illumination conditions. We observed softer thylakoid membranes in the dark that have three-to four fold excess mobility compared to membranes under high light conditions. Our analysis indicates that electron transfer between photosynthetic reaction centers and the associated electrochemical proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane result in a significant driving force for excess membrane dynamics. These observations provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular architecture.

  8. Evolution of the global internal dynamics of a living cell nucleus during interphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suissa, M; Place, C; Goillot, E; Freyssingeas, E

    2009-07-22

    Progress in cellular biology based on fluorescent microscopy techniques, shows that the spatial organization of the nucleus is dynamic. This dynamic is very complex and involves a multitude of phenomena that occur on very different time and size scales. Using an original light scattering experimental device, we investigated the global internal dynamics of the nucleus of a living cell according to the phases of the cell cycle. This dynamic presents two different and independent kinds of relaxation that are well separated in time and specific to the phase of the cell cycle.

  9. Dynamics of dye release from nanocarriers of different types in model cell membranes and living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkacheva T. N.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the dynamics of lipophilic content release from nanocarriers of different types, organic molecular ensembles and inorganic nanoparticles (NPs in vitro experiments. Methods. Two-channel ratiometric fluorescence detection method based on Forster Resonance Energy Transfer, fluorescent spectroscopy and micro-spectroscopy have been used. Results. It has been found that the profiles of lipophilic dyes release from organic nanocarriers (PC liposomes and SDS micelles and inorganic ones (GdYVO4:Eu3+ and CeO2 NPs are well fitted by the first-order reaction kinetics in both model cell membranes and living cells (rat hepatocytes. The dye release constants (K and half-lives (t1/2 were analyzed. Conclusions. GdYVO4:Eu3+ and CeO2 NPs have been shown to provide faster lipophilic content release in model cell membranes as compared to PC liposomes. Negatively charged or lipophilic compounds added into nanocarriers can decrease the rate of lipophilic dyes release. Specific interaction of GdYVO4:Eu3+ NPs with rat hepatocytes has been observed.

  10. Rotation of single live mammalian cells using dynamic holographic optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Cao; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Chan, Samantha; Shetty, Rishabh M.; Smith, Dean; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2017-05-01

    We report on a method for rotating single mammalian cells about an axis perpendicular to the optical system axis through the imaging plane using dynamic holographic optical tweezers (HOTs). Two optical traps are created on the opposite edges of a mammalian cell and are continuously transitioned through the imaging plane along the circumference of the cell in opposite directions, thus providing the torque to rotate the cell in a controlled fashion. The method enables a complete 360° rotation of live single mammalian cells with spherical or near-to spherical shape in 3D space, and represents a useful tool suitable for the single cell analysis field, including tomographic imaging.

  11. Imaging Cellular Dynamics with Spectral Relaxation Imaging Microscopy: Distinct Spectral Dynamics in Golgi Membranes of Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajevardipour, Alireza; Chon, James W. M.; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2016-11-01

    Spectral relaxation from fluorescent probes is a useful technique for determining the dynamics of condensed phases. To this end, we have developed a method based on wide-field spectral fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to extract spectral relaxation correlation times of fluorescent probes in living cells. We show that measurement of the phase and modulation of fluorescence from two wavelengths permit the identification and determination of excited state lifetimes and spectral relaxation correlation times at a single modulation frequency. For NBD fluorescence in glycerol/water mixtures, the spectral relaxation correlation time determined by our approach exhibited good agreement with published dielectric relaxation measurements. We applied this method to determine the spectral relaxation dynamics in membranes of living cells. Measurements of the Golgi-specific C6-NBD-ceramide probe in living HeLa cells revealed sub-nanosecond spectral dynamics in the intracellular Golgi membrane and slower nanosecond spectral dynamics in the extracellular plasma membrane. We interpret the distinct spectral dynamics as a result of structural plasticity of the Golgi membrane relative to more rigid plasma membranes. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute one of the first measurements of Golgi rotational dynamics.

  12. Imaging Cellular Dynamics with Spectral Relaxation Imaging Microscopy: Distinct Spectral Dynamics in Golgi Membranes of Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajevardipour, Alireza; Chon, James W M; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Clayton, Andrew H A

    2016-11-22

    Spectral relaxation from fluorescent probes is a useful technique for determining the dynamics of condensed phases. To this end, we have developed a method based on wide-field spectral fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to extract spectral relaxation correlation times of fluorescent probes in living cells. We show that measurement of the phase and modulation of fluorescence from two wavelengths permit the identification and determination of excited state lifetimes and spectral relaxation correlation times at a single modulation frequency. For NBD fluorescence in glycerol/water mixtures, the spectral relaxation correlation time determined by our approach exhibited good agreement with published dielectric relaxation measurements. We applied this method to determine the spectral relaxation dynamics in membranes of living cells. Measurements of the Golgi-specific C6-NBD-ceramide probe in living HeLa cells revealed sub-nanosecond spectral dynamics in the intracellular Golgi membrane and slower nanosecond spectral dynamics in the extracellular plasma membrane. We interpret the distinct spectral dynamics as a result of structural plasticity of the Golgi membrane relative to more rigid plasma membranes. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute one of the first measurements of Golgi rotational dynamics.

  13. Melanosomal dynamics assessed with a live-cell fluorescent melanosomal marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan M Bruder

    Full Text Available Melanocytes present in skin and other organs synthesize and store melanin pigment within membrane-delimited organelles called melanosomes. Exposure of human skin to ultraviolet radiation (UV stimulates melanin production in melanosomes, followed by transfer of melanosomes from melanocytes to neighboring keratinocytes. Melanosomal function is critical for protecting skin against UV radiation, but the mechanisms underlying melanosomal movement and transfer are not well understood. Here we report a novel fluorescent melanosomal marker, which we used to measure real-time melanosomal dynamics in live human epidermal melanocytes (HEMs and transfer in melanocyte-keratinocyte co-cultures. A fluorescent fusion protein of Ocular Albinism 1 (OA1 localized to melanosomes in both B16-F1 cells and HEMs, and its expression did not significantly alter melanosomal distribution. Live-cell tracking of OA1-GFP-tagged melanosomes revealed a bimodal kinetic profile, with melanosomes exhibiting combinations of slow and fast movement. We also found that exposure to UV radiation increased the fraction of melanosomes exhibiting fast versus slow movement. In addition, using OA1-GFP in live co-cultures, we monitored melanosomal transfer using time-lapse microscopy. These results highlight OA1-GFP as a specific and effective melanosomal marker for live-cell studies, reveal new aspects of melanosomal dynamics and transfer, and are relevant to understanding the skin's physiological response to UV radiation.

  14. Exploring dynamics of molybdate in living animal cells by a genetically encoded FRET nanosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Yoichi; Iida, Syuntaro; Ueoka-Nakanishi, Hanayo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Tomioka, Rie; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is an essential trace element for almost all living organisms including animals. Mo is used as a catalytic center of molybdo-enzymes for oxidation/reduction reactions of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism. Whilst living cells are known to import inorganic molybdate oxyanion from the surrounding environment, the in vivo dynamics of cytosolic molybdate remain poorly understood as no appropriate indicator is available for this trace anion. We here describe a genetically encoded Förester-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET)-based nanosensor composed of CFP, YFP and the bacterial molybdate-sensor protein ModE. The nanosensor MolyProbe containing an optimized peptide-linker responded to nanomolar-range molybdate selectively, and increased YFP:CFP fluorescence intensity ratio by up to 109%. By introduction of the nanosensor, we have been able to successfully demonstrate the real-time dynamics of molybdate in living animal cells. Furthermore, time course analyses of the dynamics suggest that novel oxalate-sensitive- and sulfate-resistant- transporter(s) uptake molybdate in a model culture cell.

  15. Live cell CRISPR-imaging in plants reveals dynamic telomere movements

    KAUST Repository

    Dreissig, Steven

    2017-05-16

    Elucidating the spatio-temporal organization of the genome inside the nucleus is imperative to understand the regulation of genes and non-coding sequences during development and environmental changes. Emerging techniques of chromatin imaging promise to bridge the long-standing gap between sequencing studies which reveal genomic information and imaging studies that provide spatial and temporal information of defined genomic regions. Here, we demonstrate such an imaging technique based on two orthologues of the bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system. By fusing eGFP/mRuby2 to the catalytically inactive version of Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9, we show robust visualization of telomere repeats in live leaf cells of Nicotiana benthamiana. By tracking the dynamics of telomeres visualized by CRISPR-dCas9, we reveal dynamic telomere movements of up to 2 μm within 30 minutes during interphase. Furthermore, we show that CRISPR-dCas9 can be combined with fluorescence-labelled proteins to visualize DNA-protein interactions in vivo. By simultaneously using two dCas9 orthologues, we pave the way for imaging of multiple genomic loci in live plants cells. CRISPR-imaging bears the potential to significantly improve our understanding of the dynamics of chromosomes in live plant cells.

  16. Microenvironments and different nanoparticle dynamics in living cells revealed by a standard nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Chan Gi; Song, Mi Ryoung; Tae, Eunju Lee; Hiroshima, Michio; Byun, Kyung Hee; Kim, Jun Sung; Sako, Yasushi

    2012-11-10

    For quantitative analysis of nanoparticle diffusions and submicro-environments in living cells, use of newly synthesized silica-based fluorescent nanoparticle (Si-FNP) as a standard nanoprobe is successfully demonstrated. The appropriate characteristics of a standard probe were fully analyzed in vitro by single molecule detection, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Using fluorescence correlation analysis in single living cells, we quantitatively compared the diffusional properties of the standard Si-FNP with a diameter of 50 nm, peptide coated Si-FNP, streptavidin coated Qdot, and GFP molecule which have different sizes and surface properties. The result demonstrates that the standard Si-FNP without coat is minimally trapped in the vesicles in the process of cellular endocytosis. Interestingly, a large proportion of Si-FNP introduced into the cells by electroporation diffuses freely in the cells during a cell cycle suggesting free diffusing NPs are hardly trapped in the vesicles. The simple but highly sensitive method will provide insight into strategies to understanding the hydrodynamic process of nanoparticle delivery into living cells as well as the cellular microenvironment in the view of submicro-size.

  17. Real time imaging of mRNA expression dynamics in live cells using protein complementation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Amit

    2009-03-01

    Traditional methods for mRNA quantification in cells, such as northern blots, quantitative PCR or microarrays assays, require cell lysis and therefore do not preserve its dynamics. These methods cannot be used to probe the spatio-temporal localization of mRNA in cells, which provide useful information for a wide range biomolecular process, including RNA metabolizim, expression kinetics and RNA interference. To probe mRNA dynamics in live prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, we develop a method, which exploit the strong affinity of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) to specific RNA aptamers. Two parts of the eIF4A are fused to a split Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP), and are expressed in the cells at high abundance. However, only when the RNA apatmer is also present, the two protein parts complement and become fluorescent. Thus, the fluorescent background remains low, allowing us to directly image the expression of mRNA molecules in live e-coli cells from its early onset, over hours. We find that the expression kinetics can be classified in one out of at least three forms, which also display distinct spatial distributions. I will discuss the possible biological origin for these distributions and their time evolution.

  18. A genetically encoded toolkit for tracking live-cell histidine dynamics in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hanyang; Gu, Yanfang; Xu, Lei; Zou, Yejun; Wang, Aoxue; Tao, Rongkun; Chen, Xianjun; Zhao, Yuzheng; Yang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution spatiotemporal imaging of histidine in single living mammalian cells faces technical challenges. Here, we developed a series of ratiometric, highly responsive, and single fluorescent protein-based histidine sensors of wide dynamic range. We used these sensors to quantify subcellular free-histidine concentrations in glucose-deprived cells and glucose-fed cells. Results showed that cytosolic free-histidine concentration was higher and more sensitive to the environment than free histidine in the mitochondria. Moreover, histidine was readily transported across the plasma membrane and mitochondrial inner membrane, which had almost similar transport rates and transport constants, and histidine transport was not influenced by cellular metabolic state. These sensors are potential tools for tracking histidine dynamics inside subcellular organelles, and they will open an avenue to explore complex histidine signaling. PMID:28252043

  19. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-Chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y.-S.; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-07-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ3, but not in those by integrin α5β1. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  20. Stable morphology, but dynamic internal reorganisation, of interphase human chromosomes in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Müller

    Full Text Available Despite the distinctive structure of mitotic chromosomes, it has not been possible to visualise individual chromosomes in living interphase cells, where chromosomes spend over 90% of their time. Studies of interphase chromosome structure and dynamics use fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH on fixed cells, which potentially damages structure and loses dynamic information. We have developed a new methodology, involving photoactivation of labelled histone H3 at mitosis, to visualise individual and specific human chromosomes in living interphase cells. Our data revealed bulk chromosome volume and morphology are established rapidly after mitosis, changing only incrementally after the first hour of G1. This contrasted with the behaviour of specific loci on labelled chromosomes, which showed more progressive reorganisation, and revealed that "looping out" of chromatin from chromosome territories is a dynamic state. We measured considerable heterogeneity in chromosome decondensation, even between sister chromatids, which may reflect local structural impediments to decondensation and could potentially amplify transcriptional noise. Chromosome structure showed tremendous resistance to inhibitors of transcription, histone deacetylation and chromatin remodelling. Together, these data indicate steric constraints determine structure, rather than innate chromosome architecture or function-driven anchoring, with interphase chromatin organisation governed primarily by opposition between needs for decondensation and the space available for this to happen.

  1. Fluorescence Dynamics in the Endoplasmic Reticulum of a Live Cell: Time-Resolved Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shirsendu; Nandi, Somen; Ghosh, Catherine; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-09-19

    Fluorescence dynamics in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of a live non-cancer lung cell (WI38) and a lung cancer cell (A549) are studied by using time-resolved confocal microscopy. To selectively study the organelle, ER, we have used an ER-Tracker dye. From the emission maximum (λmaxem) of the ER-Tracker dye, polarity (i.e. dielectric constant, ϵ) in the ER region of the cells (≈500 nm in WI38 and ≈510 nm in A549) is estimated to be similar to that of chloroform (λmaxem =506 nm, ϵ≈5). The red shift by 10 nm in λmaxem in the cancer cell (A549) suggests a slightly higher polarity compared to the non-cancer cell (WI38). The fluorescence intensity of the ER-Tracker dye exhibits prolonged intermittent oscillations on a timescale of 2-6 seconds for the cancer cell (A549). For the non-cancer cell (WI38), such fluorescence oscillations are much less prominent. The marked fluorescence intensity oscillations in the cancer cell are attributed to enhanced calcium oscillations. The average solvent relaxation time () of the ER region in the lung cancer cell (A549, 250±50 ps) is about four times faster than that in the non-cancer cell (WI38, 1000±50 ps).

  2. Dynamic Nucleosome Movement Provides Structural Information of Topological Chromatin Domains in Living Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Soya; Nozaki, Tadasu; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian genome is organized into submegabase-sized chromatin domains (CDs) including topologically associating domains, which have been identified using chromosome conformation capture-based methods. Single-nucleosome imaging in living mammalian cells has revealed subdiffusively dynamic nucleosome movement. It is unclear how single nucleosomes within CDs fluctuate and how the CD structure reflects the nucleosome movement. Here, we present a polymer model wherein CDs are characterized by fractal dimensions and the nucleosome fibers fluctuate in a viscoelastic medium with memory. We analytically show that the mean-squared displacement (MSD) of nucleosome fluctuations within CDs is subdiffusive. The diffusion coefficient and the subdiffusive exponent depend on the structural information of CDs. This analytical result enabled us to extract information from the single-nucleosome imaging data for HeLa cells. Our observation that the MSD is lower at the nuclear periphery region than the interior region indicates that CDs in the heterochromatin-rich nuclear periphery region are more compact than those in the euchromatin-rich interior region with respect to the fractal dimensions as well as the size. Finally, we evaluated that the average size of CDs is in the range of 100–500 nm and that the relaxation time of nucleosome movement within CDs is a few seconds. Our results provide physical and dynamic insights into the genome architecture in living cells. PMID:27764097

  3. Multi-color fluorescence imaging of sub-cellular dynamics of cancer cells in live mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M.

    2006-02-01

    We have genetically engineered dual-color fluorescent cells with one color in the nucleus and the other in the cytoplasm that enables real-time nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics to be visualized in living cells in the cytoplasm in vivo as well as in vitro. To obtain the dual-color cells, red fluorescent protein (RFP) was expressed of the cancer cells, and green fluorescent protein (GFP) linked to histone H2B was expressed in the nucleus. Mitotic cells were visualized by whole-body imaging after injection in the mouse ear. Common carotid artery or heart injection of dual-color cells and a reversible skin flap enabled the external visualization of the dual-color cells in microvessels in the mouse where extreme elongation of the cell body as well as the nucleus occurred. The migration velocities of the dual-color cancer cells in the capillaries were measured by capturing individual images of the dual-color fluorescent cells over time. Human HCT-116-GFP-RFP colon cancer and mouse mammary tumor (MMT)-GFP-RFP cells were injected in the portal vein of nude mice. Extensive clasmocytosis (destruction of the cytoplasm) of the HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells occurred within 6 hours. The data suggest rapid death of HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells in the portal vein. In contrast, MMT-GFP-RFP cells injected into the portal vein mostly survived and formed colonies in the liver. However, when the host mice were pretreated with cyclophosphamide, the HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells also survived and formed colonies in the liver after portal vein injection. These results suggest that a cyclophosphamide-sensitive host cellular system attacked the HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells but could not effectively kill the MMT-GFP-RFP cells. With the ability to continuously image cancer cells at the subcellular level in the live animal, our understanding of the complex steps of metastasis will significantly increase. In addition, new drugs can be developed to target these newly visible steps of metastasis.

  4. A Novel Automated High-Content Analysis Workflow Capturing Cell Population Dynamics from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Live Imaging Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerz, Maximilian; Folarin, Amos; Meleckyte, Ruta; Watt, Fiona M.; Dobson, Richard J.; Danovi, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Most image analysis pipelines rely on multiple channels per image with subcellular reference points for cell segmentation. Single-channel phase-contrast images are often problematic, especially for cells with unfavorable morphology, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Live imaging poses a further challenge, because of the introduction of the dimension of time. Evaluations cannot be easily integrated with other biological data sets including analysis of endpoint images. Here, we present a workflow that incorporates a novel CellProfiler-based image analysis pipeline enabling segmentation of single-channel images with a robust R-based software solution to reduce the dimension of time to a single data point. These two packages combined allow robust segmentation of iPSCs solely on phase-contrast single-channel images and enable live imaging data to be easily integrated to endpoint data sets while retaining the dynamics of cellular responses. The described workflow facilitates characterization of the response of live-imaged iPSCs to external stimuli and definition of cell line–specific, phenotypic signatures. We present an efficient tool set for automated high-content analysis suitable for cells with challenging morphology. This approach has potentially widespread applications for human pluripotent stem cells and other cell types. PMID:27256155

  5. CRISPR-Cas9 nuclear dynamics and target recognition in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hanhui; Tu, Li-Chun; Naseri, Ardalan; Huisman, Maximiliaan; Zhang, Shaojie; Grunwald, David; Pederson, Thoru

    2016-08-29

    The bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system has been repurposed for genome engineering, transcription modulation, and chromosome imaging in eukaryotic cells. However, the nuclear dynamics of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein 9 (Cas9) guide RNAs and target interrogation are not well defined in living cells. Here, we deployed a dual-color CRISPR system to directly measure the stability of both Cas9 and guide RNA. We found that Cas9 is essential for guide RNA stability and that the nuclear Cas9-guide RNA complex levels limit the targeting efficiency. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measurements revealed that single mismatches in the guide RNA seed sequence reduce the target residence time from >3 h to as low as CRISPR discriminates between genuine versus mismatched targets for genome editing via radical alterations in residence time.

  6. Dynamic heterogeneity and non-Gaussian statistics for acetylcholine receptors on live cell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W.; Song, H.; Su, Y.; Geng, L.; Ackerson, B. J.; Peng, H. B.; Tong, P.

    2016-05-01

    The Brownian motion of molecules at thermal equilibrium usually has a finite correlation time and will eventually be randomized after a long delay time, so that their displacement follows the Gaussian statistics. This is true even when the molecules have experienced a complex environment with a finite correlation time. Here, we report that the lateral motion of the acetylcholine receptors on live muscle cell membranes does not follow the Gaussian statistics for normal Brownian diffusion. From a careful analysis of a large volume of the protein trajectories obtained over a wide range of sampling rates and long durations, we find that the normalized histogram of the protein displacements shows an exponential tail, which is robust and universal for cells under different conditions. The experiment indicates that the observed non-Gaussian statistics and dynamic heterogeneity are inherently linked to the slow-active remodelling of the underlying cortical actin network.

  7. Self-referencing digital holographic microscope for dynamic imaging of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Arun; Chhaniwal, Vani; Mahajan, Swapnil; Trivedi, Vismay; Singh, Amardeep; Leitgeb, Rainer; Javidi, Bahram

    2014-06-01

    Digital holographic microscope is an ideal tool for quantitative phase contrast imaging of living cells. It yields the thickness distribution of the object under investigation from a single hologram. From a series of holograms the dynamics of the cell under investigation can be obtained. But two-beam digital holographic microscopes has low temporal stability due to uncorrelated phase changes occurring in the reference and object arms. One way to overcome is to use common path techniques, in which, the reference beam is derived from the object beam itself. Both the beams travel along the same path, increasing the temporal stability of the setup. In self-referencing techniques a portion of the object beam is converted into reference beam. It could be achieved by example, using a glass plate to create two laterally sheared versions of the object beam at the sensor, which interfere to produce the holograms/interferograms. This created a common path setup, leading to high temporal stability (~0.6nm). This technique could be used to map cell membrane fluctuations with high temporal stability. Here we provide an overview of our work on the development of temporally stable quantitative phase contrast techniques for dynamic imaging of micro-objects and biological specimen including red blood cells.

  8. Dynamical change of mitochondrial DNA induced in the living cell by perturbing the electrochemical gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppey-Moisan, M; Brunet, A C; Morais, R; Coppey, J

    1996-11-01

    Digital-imaging microscopy was used in conditions that allowed the native state to be preserved and hence fluorescence variations of specific probes to be followed in the real time of living mammalian cells. Ethidium bromide was shown to enter into living cells and to intercalate stably into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), giving rise to high fluorescence. When the membrane potential or the pH gradient across the inner membrane was abolished by specific inhibitors or ionophores, the ethidium fluorescence disappeared from all mtDNA molecules within 2 min. After removal of the inhibitors or ionophores, ethidium fluorescence rapidly reappeared in mitochondria, together with the membrane potential. The fluorescence extinction did not result from an equilibrium shift caused by leakage of free ethidium out of mitochondria when the membrane potential was abolished but was most likely due to a dynamical mtDNA change that exposed intercalated ethidium to quencher, either by weakening the ethidium binding constant or by giving access of a proton acceptor (such as water) to the interior of mtDNA. Double labeling with ethidium and with a minor groove probe (4',6-diamino-2-phenylindole) indicated that mtDNA maintains a double-stranded structure. The two double-stranded DNA states, revealed by the fluorescence of mitochondrial ethidium, enhanced or quenched in the presence of ethidium, seem to coexist in mitochondria of unperturbed fibroblast cells, suggesting a spontaneous dynamical change of mtDNA molecules. Therefore, the ethidium fluorescence variation allows changes of DNA to be followed, a property that has to be taken into consideration when using this intercalator for in vivo as well as in vitro imaging studies.

  9. Diffusion dynamics of the Keap1–Cullin3 interaction in single live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Liam [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom); Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T., E-mail: a.dinkovakostova@dundee.ac.uk [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom); Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► We developed a quantitative FRAP-based system to study the Keap1–Cul3 interaction. ► We show that Keap1–EGFP and mCherry–Cul3 interact in single live cells. ► We used inducers which target distinct cysteine sensors of Keap1 and differ 4000-fold in potency. ► Inducers cause Nrf2 stabilization, nuclear translocation, and target gene expression. ► Inducers of four different types do not dissociate the Keap1–EGFP:mCherry–Cul3 complex. -- Abstract: Transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates the expression of a network of genes encoding drug-detoxification, anti-inflammatory, and metabolic enzymes, as well as proteins involved in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis. Under basal conditions, Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1 (Keap1) targets Nrf2 for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation via association with Cullin3 (Cul3)-based Rbx1 E3 ubiquitin ligase. Various small molecules (inducers) activate Nrf2 leading to upregulation of cytoprotective gene expression. Inducers chemically modify specific cysteine residues of Keap1 which ultimately loses its ability to target Nrf2 for degradation. Dissociation of the Keap1–Cul3 complex by inducers is one possible mechanism, but evidence in single live cells is lacking. To investigate the diffusion dynamics of the Keap1–Cul3 interaction and the effect of inducers, we developed a quantitative fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP)-based system using Keap1–EGFP and mCherry–Cul3 fusion proteins. We show that Keap1–EGFP and mCherry–Cul3 interact in single live cells. Exposure for 1 h to small-molecule inducers of 4 different types, the oleanane triterpenoid CDDO, the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, the sulfoxythiocarbamate STCA, and the oxidant hydrogen peroxide which target distinct cysteine sensors within Keap1 with potencies which differ by nearly 4000-fold, does not dissociate the Keap1–Cul3 complex. As inducers cause conformational changes

  10. Dynamical change of mitochondrial DNA induced in the living cell by perturbing the electrochemical gradient.

    OpenAIRE

    Coppey-Moisan, M; Brunet, A C; Morais, R.; Coppey, J

    1996-01-01

    Digital-imaging microscopy was used in conditions that allowed the native state to be preserved and hence fluorescence variations of specific probes to be followed in the real time of living mammalian cells. Ethidium bromide was shown to enter into living cells and to intercalate stably into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), giving rise to high fluorescence. When the membrane potential or the pH gradient across the inner membrane was abolished by specific inhibitors or ionophores, the ethidium fluor...

  11. VISUALIZATION OF DYNAMIC ORGANIZATION OF CYTOSKELETON GELS IN LIVING CELLS BY HYBRID-SPM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Kawabata; Y.Sado; M.Nagayama; T.Nitta; K.Nemoto; Y.Koyama; H.Haga

    2003-01-01

    We succeeded in performing of hybrid Scanning Probe Microscopy (hybrid-SPM) in which mechanical-SPM and fluorescence microscopy are combined. This technique is able to measure simultaneously mechanical properties and distribution of cytoskeletons of living cells by using green fluorescent protein. We measured evolution of both local elasticity and distributions of actin stress fibers in an identical fibroblast living in physiological conditions. The SPM experiments revealed that stiffer lines develop in living cells, which correspond to actin stress fibers. The elasticity of the actin stress fibers is as high as 100 kPa. We discuss mechanical effects on the development of actin filament networks.

  12. Revealing nonergodic dynamics in living cells from a single particle trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanoiselée, Yann; Grebenkov, Denis S

    2016-05-01

    We propose the improved ergodicity and mixing estimators to identify nonergodic dynamics from a single particle trajectory. The estimators are based on the time-averaged characteristic function of the increments and can thus capture additional information on the process as compared to the conventional time-averaged mean-square displacement. The estimators are first investigated and validated for several models of anomalous diffusion, such as ergodic fractional Brownian motion and diffusion on percolating clusters, and nonergodic continuous-time random walks and scaled Brownian motion. The estimators are then applied to two sets of earlier published trajectories of mRNA molecules inside live Escherichia coli cells and of Kv2.1 potassium channels in the plasma membrane. These statistical tests did not reveal nonergodic features in the former set, while some trajectories of the latter set could be classified as nonergodic. Time averages along such trajectories are thus not representative and may be strongly misleading. Since the estimators do not rely on ensemble averages, the nonergodic features can be revealed separately for each trajectory, providing a more flexible and reliable analysis of single-particle tracking experiments in microbiology.

  13. VISUALIZATION OF DYNAMIC ORGANIZATION OF CYTOSKELETON GELS IN LIVING CELLS BY HYBRID—SPM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Kawabata; Y.Sado; M.Nagayama; T.Nitta; K.Nemoto; Y.Koyama; H.Haga

    2003-01-01

    We succeeded in performing of hybrid Scanning Probe Microscopy(hybrid-SPM) in which mechanical-SPM and fluorescence microscopy are combined.This technique is able to measure simultaneously mechanical properties and distribution of cytoskeletons of lining cells by using green fluorescent protein.We measured evolution of both local elasticity and distributions of actin stress fibers in an identical fibroblast living in physiological conditions.The SPM experiments revealed that stiffer lines develop in living cells,which correspond to actin stress fibers.The elasticity of the actin stress fibers is as high as 100kPa.We discuss mechanical effects on the development of actin filament networks.

  14. A study of the dynamics of PTEN proteins in living cells using in vivo fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhixue; Dong, Chaoqing; Ren, Jicun

    2017-06-01

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) is one of the most important tumor-suppressor proteins, which plays a key role in negative regulation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, and governs many cellular processes including growth, proliferation, survival and migration. The dynamics of PTEN proteins in single living cells is as yet unclear owing to a shortage of suitable in vivo approaches. Here, we report a single-molecule method for in vivo study of the dynamics of PTEN proteins in living cells using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). First, we established a monoclonal H1299 stable cell line expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and PTEN (EGFP-PTEN) fusion proteins; we then developed an in vivo FCS method to study the dynamics of EGFP-PTEN both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We investigated the diffusion behaviors of EGFP and EGFP-PTEN in solution, nucleus and cytosol, and observed that the motion of PTEN in living cells was restricted compared with EGFP. Finally, we investigated the protein dynamics in living cells under oxidative stress stimulation and a cellular ATP depletion treatment. Under oxidative stress stimulation, the EGFP-PTEN concentration increased in the nucleus, but slightly decreased in the cytoplasm. The diffusion coefficient and alpha value of EGFP-PTEN reduced significantly both in the nucleus and cytoplasm; the significantly decreased alpha parameter indicates a more restricted Brownian diffusion behavior. Under the cellular ATP depletion treatment, the concentration of EGFP-PTEN remained unchanged in the nucleus and decreased significantly in cytosol. The diffusion coefficient of EGFP-PTEN decreased significantly in cytosol, but showed no significant change in the nucleus; the alpha value decreased significantly in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. These results suggest that the concentration and mobility of PTEN in the nucleus and cytoplasm can be regulated by stimulation methods. Our approach provides a unique

  15. Dynamics of Chikungunya Virus Cell Entry Unraveled by Single-Virus Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoornweg, Tabitha E; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Ayala Nuñez, Nilda V; Albulescu, Irina C; van Hemert, Martijn J; Smit, Jolanda M

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen causing major outbreaks in Africa, Asia and the Americas. The cell entry pathway hijacked by CHIKV to infect a cell has been studied before using inhibitory compounds. There has been some debate on the mechanism by which C

  16. Dynamics of Chikungunya Virus Cell Entry Unraveled by Single-Virus Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Nunez, Nilda V. Ayala; Albulescu, Irina C.; van Hemert, Martijn J.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen causing major outbreaks in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. The cell entry pathway hijacked by CHIKV to infect a cell has been studied previously using inhibitory compounds. There has been some debate on the mechanism by wh

  17. Dynamics of Chikungunya Virus Cell Entry Unraveled by Single-Virus Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoornweg, Tabitha E; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Ayala Nuñez, Nilda V; Albulescu, Irina C; van Hemert, Martijn J; Smit, Jolanda M

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen causing major outbreaks in Africa, Asia and the Americas. The cell entry pathway hijacked by CHIKV to infect a cell has been studied before using inhibitory compounds. There has been some debate on the mechanism by which C

  18. Single molecule narrowfield microscopy of protein-DNA binding dynamics in glucose signal transduction of live yeast cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wollman, Adam J M

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule narrowfield microscopy is a versatile tool to investigate a diverse range of protein dynamics in live cells and has been extensively used in bacteria. Here, we describe how these methods can be extended to larger eukaryotic, yeast cells, which contain sub-cellular compartments. We describe how to obtain single-molecule microscopy data but also how to analyse these data to track and obtain the stoichiometry of molecular complexes diffusing in the cell. We chose glucose mediated signal transduction of live yeast cells as the system to demonstrate these single-molecule techniques as transcriptional regulation is fundamentally a single molecule problem - a single repressor protein binding a single binding site in the genome can dramatically alter behaviour at the whole cell and population level.

  19. Live Cell Imaging During Germination Reveals Dynamic Tubular Structures Derived from Protein Storage Vacuoles of Barley Aleurone Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Ibl

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The germination of cereal seeds is a rapid developmental process in which the endomembrane system undergoes a series of dynamic morphological changes to mobilize storage compounds. The changing ultrastructure of protein storage vacuoles (PSVs in the cells of the aleurone layer has been investigated in the past, but generally this involved inferences drawn from static pictures representing different developmental stages. We used live cell imaging in transgenic barley plants expressing a TIP3-GFP fusion protein as a fluorescent PSV marker to follow in real time the spatially and temporally regulated remodeling and reshaping of PSVs during germination. During late-stage germination, we observed thin, tubular structures extending from PSVs in an actin-dependent manner. No extensions were detected following the disruption of actin microfilaments, while microtubules did not appear to be involved in the process. The previously-undetected tubular PSV structures were characterized by complex movements, fusion events and a dynamic morphology. Their function during germination remains unknown, but might be related to the transport of solutes and metabolites.

  20. Live Cell Imaging During Germination Reveals Dynamic Tubular Structures Derived from Protein Storage Vacuoles of Barley Aleurone Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibl, Verena; Stoger, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The germination of cereal seeds is a rapid developmental process in which the endomembrane system undergoes a series of dynamic morphological changes to mobilize storage compounds. The changing ultrastructure of protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) in the cells of the aleurone layer has been investigated in the past, but generally this involved inferences drawn from static pictures representing different developmental stages. We used live cell imaging in transgenic barley plants expressing a TIP3-GFP fusion protein as a fluorescent PSV marker to follow in real time the spatially and temporally regulated remodeling and reshaping of PSVs during germination. During late-stage germination, we observed thin, tubular structures extending from PSVs in an actin-dependent manner. No extensions were detected following the disruption of actin microfilaments, while microtubules did not appear to be involved in the process. The previously-undetected tubular PSV structures were characterized by complex movements, fusion events and a dynamic morphology. Their function during germination remains unknown, but might be related to the transport of solutes and metabolites.

  1. Imaging metabolite dynamics in living cells using a Spinach-based riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Mingxu; Litke, Jacob L; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2015-05-26

    Riboswitches are natural ligand-sensing RNAs typically that are found in the 5' UTRs of mRNA. Numerous classes of riboswitches have been discovered, enabling mRNA to be regulated by diverse and physiologically important cellular metabolites and small molecules. Here we describe Spinach riboswitches, a new class of genetically encoded metabolite sensor derived from naturally occurring riboswitches. Drawing upon the structural switching mechanism of natural riboswitches, we show that Spinach can be swapped for the expression platform of various riboswitches, allowing metabolite binding to induce Spinach fluorescence directly. In the case of the thiamine 5'-pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitch from the Escherichia coli thiM gene encoding hydroxyethylthiazole kinase, we show that insertion of Spinach results in an RNA sensor that exhibits fluorescence upon binding TPP. This TPP Spinach riboswitch binds TPP with affinity and selectivity similar to that of the endogenous riboswitch and enables the discovery of agonists and antagonists of the TPP riboswitch using simple fluorescence readouts. Furthermore, expression of the TPP Spinach riboswitch in Escherichia coli enables live imaging of dynamic changes in intracellular TPP concentrations in individual cells. Additionally, we show that other riboswitches that use a structural mechanism similar to that of the TPP riboswitch, including the guanine and adenine riboswitches from the Bacillus subtilis xpt gene encoding xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase, and the S-adenosyl-methionine-I riboswitch from the B. subtilis yitJ gene encoding methionine synthase, can be converted into Spinach riboswitches. Thus, Spinach riboswitches constitute a novel class of RNA-based fluorescent metabolite sensors that exploit the diversity of naturally occurring ligand-binding riboswitches.

  2. A device for real-time live-cell microscopy during dynamic dual-modal mechanostimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, D.; Nikolov, H. N.; Chmiel, T.; Beach, R. J.; Sims, S. M.; Dixon, S. J.; Holdsworth, D. W.

    2017-03-01

    Mechanotransduction - the process by which cells sense and respond to mechanical stimuli - is essential for several physiological processes including skeletal homeostasis. Mammalian cells are thought to be sensitive to different modes of mechanical stimuli, including vibration and fluid shear. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the early stages of mechanotransduction, we describe the development of devices for mechanostimulation (by vibration and fluid shear) of live cells that can be integrated with real-time optical microscopy. The integrated system can deliver up to 3 Pa of fluid shear simultaneous with high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations up to 1 g. Stimuli can be applied simultaneously or independently to cells during real-time microscopic imaging. A custom microfluidic chamber was prepared from polydimethylsiloxane on a glass-bottom cell culture dish. Fluid flow was applied with a syringe pump to induce shear stress. This device is compatible with a custom-designed motion control vibration system. A voice coil actuates the system that is suspended on linear air bushings. Accelerations produced by the system were monitored with an on-board accelerometer. Displacement was validated optically using particle tracking digital high-speed imaging (1200 frames per second). During operation at nominally 45 Hz and 0.3 g, displacements were observed to be within 3.56% of the expected value. MC3T3-E1 osteoblast like cells were seeded into the microfluidic device and loaded with the calcium sensitive fluorescent probe fura-2, then mounted onto the dual-modal mechanostimulation platform. Cells were then imaged and monitored for fluorescence emission. In summary, we have developed a system to deliver physiologically relevant vibrations and fluid shear to live cells during real-time imaging and photometry. Monitoring the behavior of live cells loaded with appropriate fluorescent probes will enable characterization of the signals activated during the initial

  3. Processes on the emergent landscapes of biochemical reaction networks and heterogeneous cell population dynamics: differentiation in living matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangting

    2017-01-01

    The notion of an attractor has been widely employed in thinking about the nonlinear dynamics of organisms and biological phenomena as systems and as processes. The notion of a landscape with valleys and mountains encoding multiple attractors, however, has a rigorous foundation only for closed, thermodynamically non-driven, chemical systems, such as a protein. Recent advances in the theory of nonlinear stochastic dynamical systems and its applications to mesoscopic reaction networks, one reaction at a time, have provided a new basis for a landscape of open, driven biochemical reaction systems under sustained chemostat. The theory is equally applicable not only to intracellular dynamics of biochemical regulatory networks within an individual cell but also to tissue dynamics of heterogeneous interacting cell populations. The landscape for an individual cell, applicable to a population of isogenic non-interacting cells under the same environmental conditions, is defined on the counting space of intracellular chemical compositions x = (x1,x2, … ,xN) in a cell, where xℓ is the concentration of the ℓth biochemical species. Equivalently, for heterogeneous cell population dynamics xℓ is the number density of cells of the ℓth cell type. One of the insights derived from the landscape perspective is that the life history of an individual organism, which occurs on the hillsides of a landscape, is nearly deterministic and ‘programmed’, while population-wise an asynchronous non-equilibrium steady state resides mostly in the lowlands of the landscape. We argue that a dynamic ‘blue-sky’ bifurcation, as a representation of Waddington's landscape, is a more robust mechanism for a cell fate decision and subsequent differentiation than the widely pictured pitch-fork bifurcation. We revisit, in terms of the chemostatic driving forces upon active, living matter, the notions of near-equilibrium thermodynamic branches versus far-from-equilibrium states. The emergent

  4. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Andrade, Débora M.; Clausen, Mathias P.

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below the diff...... embryo fibroblasts results in an unhindered, intra-compartment, diffusion coefficient of ≈0.7-1.0 μm2 s-1, and a compartment size of about 100-150 nm....

  5. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications. PMID:26525841

  6. The availability of filament ends modulates actin stochastic dynamics in live plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiejie; Staiger, Benjamin H.; Henty-Ridilla, Jessica L.; Abu-Abied, Mohamad; Sadot, Einat; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    A network of individual filaments that undergoes incessant remodeling through a process known as stochastic dynamics comprises the cortical actin cytoskeleton in plant epidermal cells. From images at high spatial and temporal resolution, it has been inferred that the regulation of filament barbed ends plays a central role in choreographing actin organization and turnover. How this occurs at a molecular level, whether different populations of ends exist in the array, and how individual filament behavior correlates with the overall architecture of the array are unknown. Here we develop an experimental system to modulate the levels of heterodimeric capping protein (CP) and examine the consequences for actin dynamics, architecture, and cell expansion. Significantly, we find that all phenotypes are the opposite for CP-overexpression (OX) cells compared with a previously characterized cp-knockdown line. Specifically, CP OX lines have fewer filament–filament annealing events, as well as reduced filament lengths and lifetimes. Further, cp-knockdown and OX lines demonstrate the existence of a subpopulation of filament ends sensitive to CP concentration. Finally, CP levels correlate with the biological process of axial cell expansion; for example, epidermal cells from hypocotyls with reduced CP are longer than wild-type cells, whereas CP OX lines have shorter cells. On the basis of these and other genetic studies in this model system, we hypothesize that filament length and lifetime positively correlate with the extent of axial cell expansion in dark-grown hypocotyls. PMID:24523291

  7. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiaofei [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036 (China); Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); Wang, Aiming, E-mail: aiming.wang@agr.gc.ca [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  8. Monitoring Dynamic Protein Expression in Single Living E. Coli. Bacterial Cells by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J W; Winhold, H; Corzett, M H; Ulloa, J M; Cosman, M; Balhorn, R; Huser, T

    2007-01-09

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) is a novel, nondestructive, and label-free method that can be used to quantitatively measure changes in cellular activity in single living cells. Here, we demonstrate its use to monitor changes in a population of E. coli cells that occur during overexpression of a protein, the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(1-120)) Raman spectra were acquired of individual E. coli cells suspended in solution and trapped by a single tightly focused laser beam. Overexpression of MOG(1-120) in transformed E. coli Rosetta-Gami (DE3)pLysS cells was induced by addition of isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Changes in the peak intensities of the Raman spectra from a population of cells were monitored and analyzed over a total duration of three hours. Data was also collected for concentrated purified MOG(1-120) protein in solution, and the spectra compared with that obtained for the MOG(1-120) expressing cells. Raman spectra of individual, living E. coli cells exhibit signatures due to DNA and protein molecular vibrations. Characteristic Raman markers associated with protein vibrations, such as 1257 cm{sup -1}, 1340 cm{sup -1}, 1453 cm{sup -1} and 1660 cm{sup -1}, are shown to increase as a function of time following the addition of IPTG. Comparison of these spectra and the spectra of purified MOG protein indicates that the changes are predominantly due to the induction of MOG protein expression. Protein expression was found to occur mostly within the second hour, with a 470% increase relative to the protein expressed in the first hour. A 230% relative increase between the second and third hour indicates that protein expression begins to level off within the third hour. It is demonstrated that LTRS has sufficient sensitivity for real-time, nondestructive, and quantitative monitoring of biological processes, such as protein expression, in single living cells. Such capabilities, which are not currently available in

  9. Dynamic, large-scale profiling of transcription factor activity from live cells in 3D culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Weiss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular activation of signal transduction pathways and their downstream target transcription factors (TFs are critical regulators of cellular processes and tissue development. The intracellular signaling network is complex, and techniques that quantify the activities of numerous pathways and connect their activities to the resulting phenotype would identify the signals and mechanisms regulating tissue development. The ability to investigate tissue development should capture the dynamic pathway activity and requires an environment that supports cellular organization into structures that mimic in vivo phenotypes. Taken together, our objective was to develop cellular arrays for dynamic, large-scale quantification of TF activity as cells organized into spherical structures within 3D culture. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: TF-specific and normalization reporter constructs were delivered in parallel to a cellular array containing a well-established breast cancer cell line cultured in Matrigel. Bioluminescence imaging provided a rapid, non-invasive, and sensitive method to quantify luciferase levels, and was applied repeatedly on each sample to monitor dynamic activity. Arrays measuring 28 TFs identified up to 19 active, with 13 factors changing significantly over time. Stimulation of cells with β-estradiol or activin A resulted in differential TF activity profiles evolving from initial stimulation of the ligand. Many TFs changed as expected based on previous reports, yet arrays were able to replicate these results in a single experiment. Additionally, arrays identified TFs that had not previously been linked with activin A. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This system provides a method for large-scale, non-invasive, and dynamic quantification of signaling pathway activity as cells organize into structures. The arrays may find utility for investigating mechanisms regulating normal and abnormal tissue growth, biomaterial design, or as a

  10. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Ziv

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosettes--highly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM--a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientation--a phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of actin or non-muscle myosin-II (NMII reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling.

  11. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Omer; Zaritsky, Assaf; Yaffe, Yakey; Mutukula, Naresh; Edri, Reuven; Elkabetz, Yechiel

    2015-10-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture) and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosettes--highly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM)--a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientation--a phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of actin or non-muscle myosin-II (NMII) reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling.

  12. Spatial Organization and Dynamics of Transcription Elongation and Pre-mRNA Processing in Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Sánchez-Álvarez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last 30 years, systematic biochemical and functional studies have significantly expanded our knowledge of the transcriptional molecular components and the pre-mRNA processing machinery of the cell. However, our current understanding of how these functions take place spatiotemporally within the highly compartmentalized eukaryotic nucleus remains limited. Moreover, it is increasingly clear that “the whole is more than the sum of its parts” and that an understanding of the dynamic coregulation of genes is essential for fully characterizing complex biological phenomena and underlying diseases. Recent technological advances in light microscopy in addition to novel cell and molecular biology approaches have led to the development of new tools, which are being used to address these questions and may contribute to achieving an integrated and global understanding of how the genome works at a cellular level. Here, we review major hallmarks and novel insights in RNA polymerase II activity and pre-mRNA processing in the context of nuclear organization, as well as new concepts and challenges arising from our ability to gather extensive dynamic information at the single-cell resolution.

  13. Extracting the stepping dynamics of molecular motors in living cells from trajectories of single particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Augusto; Bruno, Luciana; Levi, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motors are responsible of transporting a wide variety of cargos in the cytoplasm. Current efforts are oriented to characterize the biophysical properties of motors in cells with the aim of elucidating the mechanisms of these nanomachines in the complex cellular environment. In this study, we present an algorithm designed to extract motor step sizes and dwell times between steps from trajectories of motors or cargoes driven by motors in cells. The algorithm is based on finding patterns in the trajectory compatible with the behavior expected for a motor step, i.e., a region of confined motion followed by a jump in the position to another region of confined motion with similar characteristics to the previous one. We show that this algorithm allows the analysis of 2D trajectories even if they present complex motion patterns such as active transport interspersed with diffusion and does not require the assumption of a given step size or dwell period. The confidence on the step detection can be easily obtained and allows the evaluation of the confidence of the dwell and step size distributions. To illustrate the possible applications of this algorithm, we analyzed trajectories of myosin-V driven organelles in living cells.

  14. Live-cell microscopy reveals small molecule inhibitor effects on MAPK pathway dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Anderson

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations in the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway are prevalent in human tumors, making this pathway a target of drug development efforts. Recently, ATP-competitive Raf inhibitors were shown to cause MAPK pathway activation via Raf kinase priming in wild-type BRaf cells and tumors, highlighting the need for a thorough understanding of signaling in the context of small molecule kinase inhibitors. Here, we present critical improvements in cell-line engineering and image analysis coupled with automated image acquisition that allow for the simultaneous identification of cellular localization of multiple MAPK pathway components (KRas, CRaf, Mek1 and Erk2. We use these assays in a systematic study of the effect of small molecule inhibitors across the MAPK cascade either as single agents or in combination. Both Raf inhibitor priming as well as the release from negative feedback induced by Mek and Erk inhibitors cause translocation of CRaf to the plasma membrane via mechanisms that are additive in pathway activation. Analysis of Erk activation and sub-cellular localization upon inhibitor treatments reveals differential inhibition and activation with the Raf inhibitors AZD628 and GDC0879 respectively. Since both single agent and combination studies of Raf and Mek inhibitors are currently in the clinic, our assays provide valuable insight into their effects on MAPK signaling in live cells.

  15. Rational design of reversible fluorescent probes for live-cell imaging and quantification of fast glutathione dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Keitaro; Yoshida, Masafumi; Kamiya, Mako; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Urano, Yasuteru

    2017-03-01

    Alterations in glutathione (GSH) homeostasis are associated with a variety of diseases and cellular functions, and therefore, real-time live-cell imaging and quantification of GSH dynamics are important for understanding pathophysiological processes. However, existing fluorescent probes are unsuitable for these purposes due to their irreversible fluorogenic mechanisms or slow reaction rates. In this work, we have successfully overcome these problems by establishing a design strategy inspired by Mayr's work on nucleophilic reaction kinetics. The synthesized probes exhibit concentration-dependent, reversible and rapid absorption/fluorescence changes (t1/2 = 620 ms at [GSH] = 1 mM), as well as appropriate Kd values (1-10 mM: within the range of intracellular GSH concentrations). We also developed FRET-based ratiometric probes, and demonstrated that they are useful for quantifying GSH concentration in various cell types and also for real-time live-cell imaging of GSH dynamics with temporal resolution of seconds.

  16. Dynamic clustered distribution of hemagglutinin resolved at 40 nm in living cell membranes discriminates between raft theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Samuel T.; Gould, Travis J.; Gudheti, Manasa V.; Maas, Sarah A.; Mills, Kevin D.; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    Organization in biological membranes spans many orders of magnitude in length scale, but limited resolution in far-field light microscopy has impeded distinction between numerous biomembrane models. One canonical example of a heterogeneously distributed membrane protein is hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza virus, which is associated with controversial cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. Using fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy, we are able to image distributions of tens of thousands of HA molecules with subdiffraction resolution (≈40 nm) in live and fixed fibroblasts. HA molecules form irregular clusters on length scales from ≈40 nm up to many micrometers, consistent with results from electron microscopy. In live cells, the dynamics of HA molecules within clusters is observed and quantified to determine an effective diffusion coefficient. The results are interpreted in terms of several established models of biological membranes. PMID:17959773

  17. Cyto•IQ: an adaptive cytometer for extracting the noisy dynamics of molecular interactions in live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, David A.; Moody, Stephen E.; Peccoud, Jean

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a fundamentally new type of cytometer to track the statistics of dynamic molecular interactions in hundreds of individual live cells within a single experiment. This entirely new high-throughput experimental system, which we have named Cyto•IQ, reports statistical, rather than image-based data for a large cellular population. Like a flow cytometer, Cyto•IQ rapidly measures several fluorescent probes in a large population of cells to yield a reduced statistical model that is matched to the experimental goals set by the user. However, Cyto•IQ moves beyond flow cytometry by tracking multiple probes in individual cells over time. Using adaptive learning algorithms, we process data in real time to maximize the convergence of the statistical model parameter estimators. Software controlling Cyto•IQ integrates existing open source applications to interface hardware components, process images, and adapt the data acquisition strategy based on previously acquired data. These innovations allow the study of larger populations of cells, and molecular interactions with more complex dynamics, than is possible with traditional microscope-based approaches. Cyto•IQ supports research to characterize the noisy dynamics of molecular interactions controlling biological processes.

  18. Dynamic Visualization of mTORC1 Activity in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Clister, Terri L.; Lowry, Pamela R.; Seldin, Marcus M.; Wong, G. William; Zhang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) senses diverse signals to regulate cell growth and metabolism. It has become increasingly clear that mTORC1 activity is regulated in time and space inside the cell, but direct interrogation of such spatiotemporal regulation is challenging. Here we describe a genetically encoded mTORC1 activity reporter (TORCAR) that exhibits a change in FRET in response to phosphorylation by mTORC1. Co-imaging mTORC1 activity and calcium dynamics revealed that a growth factor-induced calcium transient contributes to mTORC1 activity. Dynamic activity maps generated using subcellularly targeted TORCAR uncovered mTORC1 activity not only in cytosol and at the lysosome but also in nucleus and at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, a wide distribution of activities was observed upon growth factor stimulation, whereas leucine ester, an amino acid surrogate, induces more compartmentalized activities at the lysosome and in nucleus. Thus, mTORC1 activities are spatiotemporally regulated in a signal-specific manner. PMID:25772363

  19. Dynamic Visualization of mTORC1 Activity in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 senses diverse signals to regulate cell growth and metabolism. It has become increasingly clear that mTORC1 activity is regulated in time and space inside the cell, but direct interrogation of such spatiotemporal regulation is challenging. Here, we describe a genetically encoded mTORC1 activity reporter (TORCAR that exhibits a change in FRET in response to phosphorylation by mTORC1. Co-imaging mTORC1 activity and calcium dynamics revealed that a growth-factor-induced calcium transient contributes to mTORC1 activity. Dynamic activity maps generated with the use of subcellularly targeted TORCAR uncovered mTORC1 activity not only in cytosol and at the lysosome but also in the nucleus and at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, a wide distribution of activities was observed upon growth factor stimulation, whereas leucine ester, an amino acid surrogate, induces more compartmentalized activities at the lysosome and in the nucleus. Thus, mTORC1 activities are spatiotemporally regulated in a signal-specific manner.

  20. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Andrade, Débora M.; Clausen, Mathias P.; Eggeling, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below the diffraction limit of conventional microscopy. However, a major disparity in interpretation of data from SPT and STED-FCS remains, namely the proposed existence of a very fast (unhindered) lateral diffusion coefficient, ⩾5 µm2 s-1, in the plasma membrane of live cells at very short length scales, ≈⩽ 100 nm, and time scales, ≈1-10 ms. This fast diffusion coefficient has been advocated in several high-speed SPT studies, for lipids and membrane proteins alike, but the equivalent has not been detected in STED-FCS measurements. Resolving this ambiguity is important because the assessment of membrane dynamics currently relies heavily on SPT for the determination of heterogeneous diffusion. A possible systematic error in this approach would thus have vast implications in this field. To address this, we have re-visited the analysis procedure for SPT data with an emphasis on the measurement errors and the effect that these errors have on the measurement outputs. We subsequently demonstrate that STED-FCS and SPT data, following careful consideration of the experimental errors of the SPT data, converge to a common interpretation which for the case of a diffusing phospholipid analogue in the plasma membrane of live mouse embryo fibroblasts results in an unhindered, intra-compartment, diffusion coefficient of  ≈0.7-1.0 µm2 s-1, and a compartment size of about 100-150 nm.

  1. The Dynamic Pollen Tube Cytoskeleton: Live Cell Studies Using Actin-Binding and Microtubule-Binding Reporter Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alice Y. Cheung; Qiao-hong Duan; Silvia Santos Costa; Barend H.J.de Graaf; Veronica S.Di Stilio; Jose Feijo; Hen-Ming Wu

    2008-01-01

    Pollen tubes elongate within the pistil to transport sperm cells to the embryo sac for fertilization.Growth occurs exclusively at the tube apex,rendering pollen tube elongation a most dramatic polar cell growth process.A hall-mark pollen tube feature is its cytoskeleton,which comprises elaborately organized and dynamic actin microfilaments and microtubules.Pollen tube growth is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton;its organization and regulation have been exalined extensively by various approaches.including fluorescent protein labeled actin-binding proteins in live cell studies.Using the previously described GFP-NtADF1 and GFP-LIADF1, and a new actin reporter protein NtPLIM2b-GFP,we re-affirm that the predominant actin structures in elongating tobacco and lily pollen tubes are long,streaming actin cables along the pollen tube shank,and a subapical structure comprising shorter actin cables.The subapical collection of actin microfilaments undergoes dynamic changes,giving rise to the appearance of structures that range from basket-or funnel-shaped,mesh-like to a subtle ring.NtPLIM2b-GFP is used in combination with a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho GTPases,AtROP-GEF1,to illustrate the use of these actin reporter proteins to explore the linkage between the polar cell growth process and its actin cytoskeleton.Contrary to the actin cytoskeleton,microtubules appear not to play a direct role in supporting the polar cell growth process in angiosperm pollen tubes.Using a microtubule reporter protein based on the microtubule end-binding protein from Arabidopsis AtEB1,GFP-AtEB1,we show that the extensive microtubule network in elongating pollen tubes displays varying degrees of dynamics.These reporter proteins provide versatile tools to explore the functional connection between major structural and signaling components of the polar pollen tube growth process.

  2. Microencapsulation Of Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Manchium; Kendall, James M.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1989-01-01

    In experimental technique, living cells and other biological materials encapsulated within submillimeter-diameter liquid-filled spheres. Sphere material biocompatible, tough, and compliant. Semipermeable, permitting relatively small molecules to move into and out of sphere core but preventing passage of large molecules. New technique promises to make such spherical capsules at high rates and in uniform, controllable sizes. Capsules injected into patient through ordinary hypodermic needle. Promising application for technique in treatment of diabetes. Also used to encapsulate pituitary cells and thyroid hormone adrenocortical cells for treatment of other hormonal disorders, to encapsulate other secreting cells for transplantation, and to package variety of pharmaceutical products and agricultural chemicals for controlled release.

  3. Real-Time linux dynamic clamp: a fast and flexible way to construct virtual ion channels in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorval, A D; Christini, D J; White, J A

    2001-10-01

    We describe a system for real-time control of biological and other experiments. This device, based around the Real-Time Linux operating system, was tested specifically in the context of dynamic clamping, a demanding real-time task in which a computational system mimics the effects of nonlinear membrane conductances in living cells. The system is fast enough to represent dozens of nonlinear conductances in real time at clock rates well above 10 kHz. Conductances can be represented in deterministic form, or more accurately as discrete collections of stochastically gating ion channels. Tests were performed using a variety of complex models of nonlinear membrane mechanisms in excitable cells, including simulations of spatially extended excitable structures, and multiple interacting cells. Only in extreme cases does the computational load interfere with high-speed "hard" real-time processing (i.e., real-time processing that never falters). Freely available on the worldwide web, this experimental control system combines good performance. immense flexibility, low cost, and reasonable ease of use. It is easily adapted to any task involving real-time control, and excels in particular for applications requiring complex control algorithms that must operate at speeds over 1 kHz.

  4. Living with Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Sickle Cell Disease If you or your child has sickle ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sickle Cell Disease (Nicholas) 09/02/2011 In this video— ...

  5. Live cell imaging of SOS and prophage dynamics in isogenic bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Stefan; Pfeifer, Eugen; Krämer, Christina; Sachs, Christian Carsten; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Nöh, Katharina; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Almost all bacterial genomes contain DNA of viral origin, including functional prophages or degenerated phage elements. A frequent but often unnoted phenomenon is the spontaneous induction of prophage elements (SPI) even in the absence of an external stimulus. In this study, we have analyzed SPI of the large, degenerated prophage CGP3 (187 kbp), which is integrated into the genome of the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of fluorescent reporter strains grown in microfluidic chips revealed the sporadic induction of the SOS response as a prominent trigger of CGP3 SPI but also displayed a considerable fraction (∼30%) of RecA-independent SPI. Whereas approx. 20% of SOS-induced cells recovered from this stress and resumed growth, the spontaneous induction of CGP3 always led to a stop of growth and likely cell death. A carbon source starvation experiment clearly emphasized that SPI only occurs in actively proliferating cells, whereas sporadic SOS induction was still observed in resting cells. These data highlight the impact of sporadic DNA damage on the activity of prophage elements and provide a time-resolved, quantitative description of SPI as general phenomenon of bacterial populations.

  6. Living on three time scales: the dynamics of plasma cell and antibody populations illustrated for hepatitis a virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andraud, Mathieu; Lejeune, Olivier; Musoro, Jammbe Z; Ogunjimi, Benson; Beutels, Philippe; Hens, Niel

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms involved in long-term persistence of humoral immunity after natural infection or vaccination is challenging and crucial for further research in immunology, vaccine development as well as health policy. Long-lived plasma cells, which have recently been shown to reside in survival niches in the bone marrow, are instrumental in the process of immunity induction and persistence. We developed a mathematical model, assuming two antibody-secreting cell subpopulations (short- and long-lived plasma cells), to analyze the antibody kinetics after HAV-vaccination using data from two long-term follow-up studies. Model parameters were estimated through a hierarchical nonlinear mixed-effects model analysis. Long-term individual predictions were derived from the individual empirical parameters and were used to estimate the mean time to immunity waning. We show that three life spans are essential to explain the observed antibody kinetics: that of the antibodies (around one month), the short-lived plasma cells (several months) and the long-lived plasma cells (decades). Although our model is a simplified representation of the actual mechanisms that govern individual immune responses, the level of agreement between long-term individual predictions and observed kinetics is reassuringly close. The quantitative assessment of the time scales over which plasma cells and antibodies live and interact provides a basis for further quantitative research on immunology, with direct consequences for understanding the epidemiology of infectious diseases, and for timing serum sampling in clinical trials of vaccines.

  7. Vaccination with live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus causes dynamic changes in intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsley William

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccination with live attenuated SIV can protect against detectable infection with wild-type virus. We have investigated whether target cell depletion contributes to the protection observed. Following vaccination with live attenuated SIV the frequency of intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells, an early target of wild-type SIV infection and destruction, was determined at days 3, 7, 10, 21 and 125 post inoculation. Results In naive controls, modest frequencies of intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells were predominantly found within the LPL TTrM-1 and IEL TTrM-2 subsets. At day 3, LPL and IEL CD4+CCR5+ TEM cells were dramatically increased whilst less differentiated subsets were greatly reduced, consistent with activation-induced maturation. CCR5 expression remained high at day 7, although there was a shift in subset balance from CD4+CCR5+ TEM to less differentiated TTrM-2 cells. This increase in intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells preceded the peak of SIV RNA plasma loads measured at day 10. Greater than 65.9% depletion of intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells followed at day 10, but overall CD4+ T cell homeostasis was maintained by increased CD4+CCR5- T cells. At days 21 and 125, high numbers of intestinal CD4+CCR5- naive TN cells were detected concurrent with greatly increased CD4+CCR5+ LPL TTrM-2 and IEL TEM cells at day 125, yet SIV RNA plasma loads remained low. Conclusions This increase in intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells, following vaccination with live attenuated SIV, does not correlate with target cell depletion as a mechanism of protection. Instead, increased intestinal CD4+CCR5+ T cells may correlate with or contribute to the protection conferred by vaccination with live attenuated SIV.

  8. Tempo-spatially resolved cellular dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus transacting activator of transcription (Tat) peptide-modified nanocargos in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin; Yang, Qiaoyu; Xiao, Lehui

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of nanocarriers in living cells is of great importance for the rational design of efficient drug delivery cargos as well as the development of robust biomedical diagnostic probes. In present study, with a dual wavelength view darkfield microscope (DWVD), the tempo-spatially resolved dynamics of Tat peptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (TGNPs, with size similar to viruses) in living HeLa cells were extensively explored. It was found that energy-dependent endocytosis (both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated processes were involved) was the prevailing pathway for the cellular uptake of TGNPs. The time-correlated dynamic spatial distribution information revealed that TGNPs could not actively target the cell nuclei, which is contrary to previous observations based on fixed cell results. More importantly, the inheritance of TGNPs to the daughter cells through mitosis was found to be the major route to metabolize TGNPs by HeLa cells. These understandings on the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of nanocargos in living cells would provide deep insight on how to improve and controllably manipulate their translocation efficiency for targeted drug delivery.Understanding the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of nanocarriers in living cells is of great importance for the rational design of efficient drug delivery cargos as well as the development of robust biomedical diagnostic probes. In present study, with a dual wavelength view darkfield microscope (DWVD), the tempo-spatially resolved dynamics of Tat peptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (TGNPs, with size similar to viruses) in living HeLa cells were extensively explored. It was found that energy-dependent endocytosis (both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated processes were involved) was the prevailing pathway for the cellular uptake of TGNPs. The time-correlated dynamic spatial distribution information revealed that TGNPs

  9. Tracking in real time the crawling dynamics of adherent living cells with a high resolution surface plasmon microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streppa, L.; Berguiga, L.; Boyer Provera, E.; Ratti, F.; Goillot, E.; Martinez Torres, C.; Schaeffer, L.; Elezgaray, Juan; Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a high resolution scanning surface plasmon microscope for long term imaging of living adherent mouse myoblast cells. The coupling of a high numerical aperture objective lens with a fibered heterodyne interferometer provides both enhanced sensitivity and long term stability. This microscope takes advantage of the plasmon resonance excitation and the amplification of the electromagnetic field in near-field distance to the gold coated coverslip. This plasmon enhanced evanescent wave microscopy is particularly attractive for the study of cell adhesion and motility since it can be operated without staining of the biological sample. We show that this microscope allows very long-term imaging of living samples, and that it can capture and follow the temporal deformation of C2C12 myoblast cell protusions (lamellipodia), during their migration on a at surface.

  10. Intravital FRAP Imaging using an E-cadherin-GFP Mouse Reveals Disease- and Drug-Dependent Dynamic Regulation of Cell-Cell Junctions in Live Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Erami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions play a prominent role in maintaining the epithelial architecture. The disruption or deregulation of these adhesions in cancer can lead to the collapse of tumor epithelia that precedes invasion and subsequent metastasis. Here we generated an E-cadherin-GFP mouse that enables intravital photobleaching and quantification of E-cadherin mobility in live tissue without affecting normal biology. We demonstrate the broad applications of this mouse by examining E-cadherin regulation in multiple tissues, including mammary, brain, liver, and kidney tissue, while specifically monitoring E-cadherin mobility during disease progression in the pancreas. We assess E-cadherin stability in native pancreatic tissue upon genetic manipulation involving Kras and p53 or in response to anti-invasive drug treatment and gain insights into the dynamic remodeling of E-cadherin during in situ cancer progression. FRAP in the E-cadherin-GFP mouse, therefore, promises to be a valuable tool to fundamentally expand our understanding of E-cadherin-mediated events in native microenvironments.

  11. Intravital FRAP Imaging using an E-cadherin-GFP Mouse Reveals Disease- and Drug-Dependent Dynamic Regulation of Cell-Cell Junctions in Live Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erami, Zahra; Herrmann, David; Warren, Sean C.; Nobis, Max; McGhee, Ewan J.; Lucas, Morghan C.; Leung, Wilfred; Reischmann, Nadine; Mrowinska, Agata; Schwarz, Juliane P.; Kadir, Shereen; Conway, James R.W.; Vennin, Claire; Karim, Saadia A.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Gallego-Ortega, David; Magenau, Astrid; Murphy, Kendelle J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Law, Andrew M.; Walters, Stacey N.; Grey, Shane T.; Croucher, David R.; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Hardeman, Edna C.; Gunning, Peter W.; Ormandy, Christopher J.; Evans, T.R. Jeffry; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen J.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Anderson, Kurt I.; Timpson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions play a prominent role in maintaining the epithelial architecture. The disruption or deregulation of these adhesions in cancer can lead to the collapse of tumor epithelia that precedes invasion and subsequent metastasis. Here we generated an E-cadherin-GFP mouse that enables intravital photobleaching and quantification of E-cadherin mobility in live tissue without affecting normal biology. We demonstrate the broad applications of this mouse by examining E-cadherin regulation in multiple tissues, including mammary, brain, liver, and kidney tissue, while specifically monitoring E-cadherin mobility during disease progression in the pancreas. We assess E-cadherin stability in native pancreatic tissue upon genetic manipulation involving Kras and p53 or in response to anti-invasive drug treatment and gain insights into the dynamic remodeling of E-cadherin during in situ cancer progression. FRAP in the E-cadherin-GFP mouse, therefore, promises to be a valuable tool to fundamentally expand our understanding of E-cadherin-mediated events in native microenvironments. PMID:26725115

  12. Molecular fluctuation in living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐孝威

    1997-01-01

    The concept of molecular fluctuation in living cells is introduced. Many apparently different experi-mental facts in living cells, including the velocity non-uniformity of organelle movement, the saltatory movement of transport vesicles in axoplasmic transport, the chromosome oscillation during metaphase in mitosis and the pauses in the chromosome movement during anaphase are explained using a unified viewpoint. A method of determination of average number of the attached motor protein molecules from the experimental data is also proposed.

  13. Live Cells as Dynamic Laboratories: Time Lapse Raman Spectral Microscopy of Nanoparticles with Both IgE Targeting and pH-Sensing Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Lovato, Kristy L.; Rector, Kirk D.

    2012-01-01

    This review captures the use of live cells as dynamic microlaboratories through implementation of labeled nanoparticles (nanosensors) that have both sensing and targeting functions. The addition of 2,4-ε-dinitrophenol-L-lysine (DNP) as a FcεRI targeting ligand and 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) as a pH-sensing ligand enables spatial and temporal monitoring of FcεRI receptors and their pH environment within the endocytic pathway. To ensure reliability, the sensor is calibrated in vivo using the ionophore nigericin and standard buffer solutions to equilibrate the external [H+] concentration with that of the cell compartments. This review highlights the nanosensors, ability to traffic and respond to pH of receptor-bound nanosensors (1) at physiological temperature (37°C) versus room temperature (25°C), (2) after pharmacological treatment with bafilomycin, an H+ ATPase pump inhibitor, or amiloride, an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchange, and (3) in response to both temperature and pharmacological treatment. Whole-cell, time lapse images are demonstrated to show the ability to transform live cells into dynamic laboratories to monitor temporal and spatial endosomal pH. The versatility of these probes shows promise for future applications relevant to intracellular trafficking and intelligent drug design. PMID:22778738

  14. Electronic Interfacing with Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James T.

    The direct interfacing of living cells with inorganic electronic materials, components or systems has led to the development of two broad categories of devices that can (1) transduce biochemical signals generated by biological components into electrical signals and (2) transduce electronically generated signals into biochemical signals. The first category of devices permits the monitoring of living cells, the second, enables control of cellular processes. This review will survey this exciting area with emphasis on the fundamental issues and obstacles faced by researchers. Devices and applications that use both prokaryotic (microbial) and eukaryotic (mammalian) cells will be covered. Individual devices described include microbial biofuel cells that produce electricity, bioelectrical reactors that enable electronic control of cellular metabolism, living cell biosensors for the detection of chemicals and devices that permit monitoring and control of mammalian physiology.

  15. Single cell dynamic phenotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Katherin Patsch; Chi-Li Chiu; Mark Engeln; Agus, David B.; Parag Mallick; Shannon M. Mumenthaler; Daniel Ruderman

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging has improved our ability to measure phenotypic heterogeneity. However, bottlenecks in imaging and image processing often make it difficult to differentiate interesting biological behavior from technical artifact. Thus there is a need for new methods that improve data quality without sacrificing throughput. Here we present a 3-step workflow to improve dynamic phenotype measurements of heterogeneous cell populations. We provide guidelines for image acquisition, phenotype track...

  16. Collective dynamics of water in the living cell and in bulk liquid. New physical models and biologcial infereneces

    CERN Document Server

    Preoteasa, Eugen A

    2008-01-01

    In the frame of collective dynamics in water, models built on elementary excitations and long-range electromagnetic interactions in the cell and bulk liquid are presented. Making use of the low effective mass of water coherence domains (CDs), we examined the relevance of simple quantum models to cellular characteristics. A hypothesis of CDs Bose-type condensation, and models of CD in spherical wells with impenetrable and semipenetrable walls, and of an isotropic oscillator consisting of two interacting CDs were investigated. Estimated cellular volumes matched to medium-sized bacteria and small prokaryotes, and to some organelles in eukaryotic cells. Also, the cytotoxic effects of heavy water in eukaryotes were explained. In another approach we proposed a plasmon-like model of hydrogen-oxygen ionic plasma in liquid water. In addition to plasmonic oscillations, the model predicted sound-like non-equilibrium elementary excitations that we called densitons (the sound anomaly of water), the vaporization heat and t...

  17. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-07-14

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light.

  18. Dynamic tracking and mobility analysis of single GLUT4 storage vesicle in live 3T3-L1 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Hong LI; Li BAI; Dong Dong LI; Sheng XIA; Tao XU

    2004-01-01

    Glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is responsible for insulin-stimulated glucose transporting into the insulin-sensitive fat and muscle cells. The dynamics of GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs) remains to be explored and it is unclear how GSVs are arranged based on their mobility. We examined this issue in 3T3-L1 cells via investigating the three-dimensional mobility of single GSV labeled with EGFP-fused GLUT4. A thin layer of cytosol right adjacent to the plasma membrane was illuminated and successively imaged at 5 Hz under a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope with a penetration depth of 136 nm. Employing single particle tracking, the three-dimensional subpixel displacement of single GSV was tracked at a spatial precision of 22 nm. Both the mean square displacement and the diffusion coefficient were calculated for each vesicle. Tracking results revealed that vesicles moved as if restricted within a cage that has a mean radius of 160 nm, suggesting the presence of some intracellular tethering matrix. By constructing the histogram of the diffusion coefficients of GSVs, we observed a smooth distribution instead of the existence of distinct groups. The result indicates that GSVs are dynamically retained in a continuous and wide range of mobility rather than into separate classes.

  19. Observing real-time molecular event dynamics of apoptosis in living cancer cells using nuclear-targeted plasmonically enhanced Raman nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bin; Austin, Lauren A; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2014-05-27

    Apoptosis is a biological process that plays important roles in embryogenesis, aging, and various diseases. During the process of apoptosis, cells undergo a series of morphological and molecular events such as blebbing, cell shrinkage, proteolysis, and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Investigating these events on a molecular level is crucial for gaining a more complete understanding of the intricate mechanism of apoptosis; however, the simultaneous direct observation of morphological and molecular events in real-time on a single living cell scale still remains a challenge. Herein, we directly monitored morphological and molecular events during cellular apoptosis in real-time after the treatment of an apoptosis-inducing agent, by utilizing our previously described plasmonically enhanced Rayleigh/Raman spectroscopic technique. Spectroscopic analysis of the DNA/protein composition around the cell nucleus revealed the occurrence and dynamics of three apoptotic molecular events: protein denaturation, proteolysis, and DNA fragmentation. The molecular event dynamics were used to create a temporal profile of apoptotic events in single cells. It is found that the sequence of events occurring in the apoptotic process induced by hydrogen peroxide addition is protein denaturation through disulfide bond breakage as well as DNA fragmentation, followed in time by protein unraveling with hydrophobic amino acid exposure, and finally protein degradation. These results demonstrate the potential of using this time-dependent plasmonically enhanced vibrational imaging technique to study the detailed mechanism of other apoptosis molecular pathways induced by different agents (e.g., anticancer drugs). A note is given in the conclusion discussing the expected large difference between the SERS spectrum of biological molecules in solution and that observed in live cells which are enhanced by the plasmonic field of the aggregated nanoparticles.

  20. Diffusion inside living human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leijnse, N.; Jeon, J. -H.; Loft, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring lipid granules diffuse in the cytoplasm and can be used as tracers to map out the viscoelastic landscape inside living cells. Using optical trapping and single particle tracking we found that lipid granules exhibit anomalous diffusion inside human umbilical vein endothelial...... cells. For these cells the exact diffusional pattern of a particular granule depends on the physiological state of the cell and on the localization of the granule within the cytoplasm. Granules located close to the actin rich periphery of the cell move less than those located towards to the center...... of the cell or within the nucleus. Also, granules in cells which are stressed by intense laser illumination or which have attached to a surface for a long period of time move in a more restricted fashion than those within healthy cells. For granules diffusing in healthy cells, in regions away from the cell...

  1. Quantifying transient 3D dynamical phenomena of single mRNA particles in live yeast cell measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Christopher P; Thompson, Michael A; Casolari, Jason M; Paffenroth, Randy C; Moerner, W E

    2013-12-12

    Single-particle tracking (SPT) has been extensively used to obtain information about diffusion and directed motion in a wide range of biological applications. Recently, new methods have appeared for obtaining precise (10s of nm) spatial information in three dimensions (3D) with high temporal resolution (measurements obtained every 4 ms), which promise to more accurately sense the true dynamical behavior in the natural 3D cellular environment. Despite the quantitative 3D tracking information, the range of mathematical methods for extracting information about the underlying system has been limited mostly to mean-squared displacement analysis and other techniques not accounting for complex 3D kinetic interactions. There is a great need for new analysis tools aiming to more fully extract the biological information content from in vivo SPT measurements. High-resolution SPT experimental data has enormous potential to objectively scrutinize various proposed mechanistic schemes arising from theoretical biophysics and cell biology. At the same time, methods for rigorously checking the statistical consistency of both model assumptions and estimated parameters against observed experimental data (i.e., goodness-of-fit tests) have not received great attention. We demonstrate methods enabling (1) estimation of the parameters of 3D stochastic differential equation (SDE) models of the underlying dynamics given only one trajectory; and (2) construction of hypothesis tests checking the consistency of the fitted model with the observed trajectory so that extracted parameters are not overinterpreted (the tools are applicable to linear or nonlinear SDEs calibrated from nonstationary time series data). The approach is demonstrated on high-resolution 3D trajectories of single ARG3 mRNA particles in yeast cells in order to show the power of the methods in detecting signatures of transient directed transport. The methods presented are generally relevant to a wide variety of 2D and 3D SPT

  2. Living Well with Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Living Well with Sickle Cell Disease Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir People with sickle cell disease can live full lives and enjoy most of ...

  3. Dynamics of glucose-induced membrane recruitment of protein kinase C beta II in living pancreatic islet beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Paolo; Tsuboi, Takashi; Ainscow, Edward K; Pozzan, Tullio; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-10-01

    The mechanisms by which glucose may affect protein kinase C (PKC) activity in the pancreatic islet beta-cell are presently unclear. By developing adenovirally expressed chimeras encoding fusion proteins between green fluorescent protein and conventional (betaII), novel (delta), or atypical (zeta) PKCs, we show that glucose selectively alters the subcellular localization of these enzymes dynamically in primary islet and MIN6 beta-cells. Examined by laser scanning confocal or total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, elevated glucose concentrations induced oscillatory translocations of PKCbetaII to spatially confined regions of the plasma membrane. Suggesting that increases in free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](c)) were primarily responsible, prevention of [Ca(2+)](c) increases with EGTA or diazoxide completely eliminated membrane recruitment, whereas elevation of cytosolic [Ca(2+)](c) with KCl or tolbutamide was highly effective in redistributing PKCbetaII both to the plasma membrane and to the surface of dense core secretory vesicles. By contrast, the distribution of PKCdelta.EGFP, which binds diacylglycerol but not Ca(2+), was unaffected by glucose. Measurement of [Ca(2+)](c) immediately beneath the plasma membrane with a ratiometric "pericam," fused to synaptic vesicle-associated protein-25, revealed that depolarization induced significantly larger increases in [Ca(2+)](c) in this domain. These data demonstrate that nutrient stimulation of beta-cells causes spatially and temporally complex changes in the subcellular localization of PKCbetaII, possibly resulting from the generation of Ca(2+) microdomains. Localized changes in PKCbetaII activity may thus have a role in the spatial control of insulin exocytosis.

  4. Cell Wall Growth and Modulation Dynamics in a Model Unicellular Green Alga—Penium margaritaceum: Live Cell Labeling with Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Domozych

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Penium margaritaceum is a unicellular charophycean green alga that possesses cell wall polymers similar to those of land plants. Several wall macromolecules of this alga are recognized by monoclonal antibodies specific for wall polymer epitopes of land plants. Immunofluorescence protocols using these antibodies may be employed to label specific cell wall constituents of live cells. Fluorescent labeling persists for several days, and this attribute allows for tracing of wall epitopes in both long- and short-term studies of cell development. Quantitative analysis of surface area covered by cell wall polymers is also easily performed. We show that significant cell expansion caused by incubation of cells in low levels of osmotically active agents like mannitol, glucose, or sucrose results from the inability of cells to undergo cytokinesis but does not result in significant changes to the amount of new cell wall. We also demonstrate that cells can be maintained for long periods of time in culture medium supplemented with specific cell wall-degrading enzymes where notable changes to wall infrastructure occur. These results demonstrate the great potential value of Penium in elucidating fundamental events during cell wall synthesis and modulation in plant cells.

  5. NMR Dynamic Studies in Living Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫永彬; 范明杰; 罗雪春; 张日清

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can noninvasively monitor the intracellular concentrations and kinetic properties of numerous inorganic and organic compounds. These characteristics have made NMR a useful tool for dynamic studies of living systems. Applications of NMR to living systems have successfully extended to many areas, including studies of metabolic regulation, ion transport, and intracellular reaction rates in vivo. The major purpose of this review is to summarize the results that can be obtained by modern NMR techniques in living systems. With the advances of new techniques, NMR measurements of various nuclides have been performed for specific physiological purposes. Although some technical problems still remain and there are still discrepancies between NMR and traditional biochemical results, the abundant and unique information obtained from NMR spectra suggests that NMR will be more extensively applied in future studies of living systems. The fast development of these new techniques is providing many new NMR applications in living systems, as well as in structural biology.

  6. Nuclear choreography: interpretations from living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Susan M; Spector, David L

    2003-04-01

    The advent of green fluorescent protein technology, its use in photobleaching experiments and the development of methods to rapidly acquire images and analyze complex datasets have opened the door to unraveling the mechanisms of nuclear functions in living cells. Studies over the past few years have characterized the movement of chromatin, nuclear proteins and nuclear bodies and, in some cases, correlated their dynamics with energy dependence, cell cycle progression, developmental changes, factor targeting and nuclear position. The mechanisms by which nuclear components move or are restrained have important implications for understanding not only the efficacy of nuclear functions but also the regulation of developmental programs and cellular growth.

  7. Detecting and Tracking Nonfluorescent Nanoparticles Probes in Live Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning

    2012-01-17

    Precisely imaging and tracking dynamic biological processes in live cells are crucial for both fundamental research in life sciences and biomedical applications. Nonfluorescent nanoparticles are emerging as important optical probes in live-cell imaging because of their excellent photostability, large optical cross sections, and low cytotoxicity. Here, we provide a review of recent development in optical imaging of nonfluorescent nanoparticle probes and their applications in dynamic tracking and biosensing in live cells. A brief discussion on cytotoxicity of nanoparticle probes is also provided.

  8. Biocomputing system of living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelia Profir

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper1 is to show that the process of gene transcription can be represented as a finite automaton illustrating the processing of input/output signals in living cells at DNA level. It is proved that the expression regulation process of λ-phage genes cI and cro represents a molecular-genetic trigger (MGT which is a self-organizing structure with two stable states. It is shown that MGT can be described as a finite automaton fulfilling logical function NOT AND. A living cell can be represented as DNA-based molecular-genetic machine which has the following characteristics: input, output, transition states, language of computation, predetermined genetic program, memory and energy source. We propose a formal model of biocomputing system (having depth two that consists of three E.coli bacterium cell cultures. This model corresponding to an elementary logical scheme can solve a class of formula in the conjunctive normal form (like formula (1.

  9. ``Backpack'' Functionalized Living Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiston, Albert; Um, Soong Ho; Irvine, Darrell; Cohen, Robert; Rubner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate that functional polymeric ``backpacks'' built from polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) can be attached to a fraction of the surface area of living, individual lymphocytes. Backpacks containing fluorescent polymers, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, and commercially available quantum dots have been attached to B and T-cells, which may be spatially manipulated using a magnetic field. Since the backpack does not occlude the entire cellular surface from the environment, this technique allows functional synthetic payloads to be attached to a cell that is free to perform its native functions, thereby synergistically utilizing both biological and synthetic functionalities. For instance, we have shown that backpack-modified T-cells are able to migrate on surfaces for several hours following backpack attachment. Possible payloads within the PEM backpack include drugs, vaccine antigens, thermally responsive polymers, nanoparticles, and imaging agents. We will discuss how this approach has broad potential for applications in bioimaging, single-cell functionalization, immune system and tissue engineering, and cell-based therapeutics where cell-environment interactions are critical.

  10. Biomimetic silica encapsultation of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroch, David Benjamin

    Living cells perform complex chemical processes on size and time scales that artificial systems cannot match. Cells respond dynamically to their environment, acting as biological sensors, factories, and drug delivery devices. To facilitate the use of living systems in engineered constructs, we have developed several new approaches to create stable protective microenvironments by forming bioinspired cell-membrane-specific silica-based encapsulants. These include vapor phase deposition of silica gels, use of endogenous membrane proteins and polysaccharides as a site for silica nucleation and polycondensation in a saturated environment, and protein templated ordered silica shell formation. We demonstrate silica layer formation at the surface of pluripotent stem-like cells, bacterial biofilms, and primary murine and human pancreatic islets. Materials are characterized by AFM, SEM and EDS. Viability assays confirm cell survival, and metabolite flux measurements demonstrate normal function and no major diffusion limitations. Real time PCR mRNA analysis indicates encapsulated islets express normal levels of genetic markers for β-cells and insulin production. The silica glass encapsulant produces a secondary bone like calcium phosphate mineral layer upon exposure to media. Such bioactive materials can improve device integration with surrounding tissue upon implantation. Given the favorable insulin response, bioactivity, and long-term viability observed in silica-coated islets, we are currently testing the encapsulant's ability to prevent immune system recognition of foreign transplants for the treatment of diabetes. Such hybrid silica-cellular constructs have a wide range of industrial, environmental, and medical applications.

  11. Quantum Process in Living Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Finkel, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Quantum effects have been confirmed in photosynthesis and other biological phenomena. Here we explore the idea of a cooperative quantum process in cells and introduce a model based on coherent waves of established ultrafast energy transfers in water. We compute wave speed, ~156 km/s, and wavelength, ~9.3 nm, and determine that the waves retain local coherence. Diverse numerical applications lend support to the hypothesis that rapid energy transfers in water are characteristic of living cells. Close agreements are found for the dipole moment of water dimers, microwave radiation on yeast, and the Kleiber law of metabolic rates. We find a sphere with diameter ~20 nm is a lower bound for life in this theory. The quantum properties of the model suggest that cellular chemistry favors reactions that support perpetuation of the energy waves

  12. Revealing hidden dynamics within living soft matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Dino; Bendix, Poul M; Oddershede, Lene B

    2013-10-22

    In the study of living soft matter, we often seek to understand the mechanisms underlying the motion of a single molecule, an organelle, or some other tracer. The experimentally observed signature of the tracer is masked by its thermal fluctuations, inherent drift of the system, and instrument noise. In addition, the timing or length scales of the events of interest are often unknown. In the current issue of ACS Nano, Chen et al. present a general method for extracting the underlying dynamics from time series. Here, we provide an easily accessible introduction to the method, put it into perspective with the field, and exemplify how it can be used to answer important out-standing questions within soft matter and living systems.

  13. Nanocapsules: coating for living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Silke; Diaspro, Alberto; Magrassi, Raffaella; Ballario, Paola; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Filetici, Patrizia; Ornaghi, Prisca; Ramoino, Paola; Gliozzi, Alessandra

    2004-03-01

    One of the most promising tools for future applications in science and medicine is the use of nanotechnologies. Especially self-assembly systems, e.g., polyelectrolyte (PE) capsules prepared by means of the layer-by-layer technique with tailored properties, fulfill the requirements for nano-organized systems in a satisfactory manner. The nano-organized shells are suitable as coating for living cells or artificial tissue to prevent immune response. With these shells, material can be delivered to predefined organs. In this paper, some preliminary results are presented, giving a broad overview over the possibilities to use nano-organized capsules. Based on the observations that the cells while duplicating break the capsule a mutant yeast strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which express GFP-tubulin under galactose promotion, was investigated by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy. The measurements reveal an increased surface charge in the region of buds developed prior encapsulation. In order to test the used PE pair for cytotoxicity, germinating conidia of the fungi Neurospora crassa were coated. The investigation with fluorescence microscopy shows a variation in the surface charge for the growing region and the conidium poles. The capsules exhibit interesting properties as valuable tool in science and a promising candidate for application in the field of medicine.

  14. The Use of Living Cancer Cells Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein in the Nucleus and Red Fluorescence Protein in the Cytoplasm for Real-time Confocal Imaging of Chromosome and Cytoplasmic Dynamics During Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Atsushi; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Meng; Yamamoto, Norio; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Saji, Shigetoyo; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-05-01

    A library of dual-color fluorescent cancer cells with green fluorescent protein (GFP), linked to histone H2B, expressed in the nucleus and red fluorescent protein (RFP) expressed in the cytoplasm was previously genetically engineered. The aim of the current study was to use the dual-color cancer cells to visualize chromosome and cytoplasmic dynamics during mitosis. Using an Olympus FV1000 confocal microscope, a library of dual-color cells from the major cancer types was cultured on plastic. The cells were imaged by confocal microscopy to demonstrate chromosome and cytoplasmic dynamics during mitosis. Nuclear GFP expression enabled visualization of chromosomes behavior, whereas simultaneous cytoplasmic RFP expression enabled visualization of cytoplasmic behavior during mitosis. Thus, total cellular dynamics can be visualized at high resolution, including individual chromosomes in some cases, in living dual-color cells in real time. Dual-color cancer cells expressing H2B-GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm provide unique tools for visualizing subcellular nuclear and cytoplasm dynamics, including the behavior of individual chromosomes during mitosis. The dual-color cells can be used to evaluate chromosomal loss or gain in real time during treatment with a variety of agents or as the cells are selected for increased or decreased malignancy in culture or in vivo. The dual color cells will be a useful tool to discover and evaluate novel strategies for killing cancer cells. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Monroy-Contreras; Luis Vaca

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular fu...

  16. Measuring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate level in living cells induced by low-level laser irradiation using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yimei; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies demonstrated that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), an important second messenger, is involved in the mechanism of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) treatment. However, most of these studies obtained the cAMP level in cell culture extracts or supernatant. In this study, the cAMP level in living cells was measured with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The effect of LLLI on cAMP level in living cells with adenosine receptors blocked was explored to identify the role of adenosine receptors in LLLI. The results showed that LLLI increased the cAMP level. Moreover, the rise of cAMP level was light dose dependent but wavelength independent for 658-, 785-, and 830-nm laser light. The results also exhibited that the adenosine receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), modulated the increase of cAMP level induced by LLLI. The cAMP level increased more significantly when the A3 adenosine receptors (A3R) were blocked by A3R antagonist compared with A1 adenosine receptor or A2a adenosine receptor blocked in HEK293T cells after LLLI, which was in good agreement with the adenosine receptors' expressions. All these results suggested that measuring the cAMP level with BRET could be a useful technique to study the role of GPCRs in living cells under LLLI.

  17. Interactions between semiconductor nanowires and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Christelle N

    2015-06-17

    Semiconductor nanowires are increasingly used for biological applications and their small dimensions make them a promising tool for sensing and manipulating cells with minimal perturbation. In order to interface cells with nanowires in a controlled fashion, it is essential to understand the interactions between nanowires and living cells. The present paper reviews current progress in the understanding of these interactions, with knowledge gathered from studies where living cells were interfaced with vertical nanowire arrays. The effect of nanowires on cells is reported in terms of viability, cell-nanowire interface morphology, cell behavior, changes in gene expression as well as cellular stress markers. Unexplored issues and unanswered questions are discussed.

  18. Live imaging of X chromosome reactivation dynamics in early mouse development can discriminate naïve from primed pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shin; Hosoi, Yusuke; Shiura, Hirosuke; Yamagata, Kazuo; Takahashi, Saori; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Kohda, Takashi; Okabe, Masaru; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2016-08-15

    Pluripotent stem cells can be classified into two distinct states, naïve and primed, which show different degrees of potency. One difficulty in stem cell research is the inability to distinguish these states in live cells. Studies on female mice have shown that reactivation of inactive X chromosomes occurs in the naïve state, while one of the X chromosomes is inactivated in the primed state. Therefore, we aimed to distinguish the two states by monitoring X chromosome reactivation. Thus far, X chromosome reactivation has been analysed using fixed cells; here, we inserted different fluorescent reporter gene cassettes (mCherry and eGFP) into each X chromosome. Using these knock-in 'Momiji' mice, we detected X chromosome reactivation accurately in live embryos, and confirmed that the pluripotent states of embryos were stable ex vivo, as represented by embryonic and epiblast stem cells in terms of X chromosome reactivation. Thus, Momiji mice provide a simple and accurate method for identifying stem cell status based on X chromosome reactivation.

  19. Experimental comparison of the high-speed imaging performance of an EM-CCD and sCMOS camera in a dynamic live-cell imaging test case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hope T Beier

    Full Text Available The study of living cells may require advanced imaging techniques to track weak and rapidly changing signals. Fundamental to this need is the recent advancement in camera technology. Two camera types, specifically sCMOS and EM-CCD, promise both high signal-to-noise and high speed (>100 fps, leaving researchers with a critical decision when determining the best technology for their application. In this article, we compare two cameras using a live-cell imaging test case in which small changes in cellular fluorescence must be rapidly detected with high spatial resolution. The EM-CCD maintained an advantage of being able to acquire discernible images with a lower number of photons due to its EM-enhancement. However, if high-resolution images at speeds approaching or exceeding 1000 fps are desired, the flexibility of the full-frame imaging capabilities of sCMOS is superior.

  20. Live cell refractometry using microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Niyom; Popescu, Gabriel; Ikeda, Takahiro; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Badizadegan, Kamran; Feld, Michael S

    2006-09-15

    Using Hilbert phase microscopy for extracting quantitative phase images, we measured the average refractive index associated with live cells in culture. To decouple the contributions to the phase signal from the cell refractive index and thickness, we confined the cells in microchannels. The results are confirmed by comparison with measurements of spherical cells in suspension.

  1. Electron Microscopy of Living Cells During in Situ Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liv, Nalan; van Oosten Slingeland, Daan S B; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Kruit, Pieter; Piston, David W; Hoogenboom, Jacob P

    2016-01-26

    We present an approach toward dynamic nanoimaging: live fluorescence of cells encapsulated in a bionanoreactor is complemented with in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on an integrated microscope. This allows us to take SEM snapshots on-demand, that is, at a specific location in time, at a desired region of interest, guided by the dynamic fluorescence imaging. We show that this approach enables direct visualization, with EM resolution, of the distribution of bioconjugated quantum dots on cellular extensions during uptake and internalization.

  2. Localization and dynamics of small circular DNA in live mammalian nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mearini, Giulia; Nielsen, Peter E; Fackelmayer, Frank O

    2004-01-01

    While genomic DNA, packaged into chromatin, is known to be locally constrained but highly dynamic in the nuclei of living cells, little is known about the localization and dynamics of small circular DNA molecules that invade cells by virus infection, application of gene therapy vectors or experim......While genomic DNA, packaged into chromatin, is known to be locally constrained but highly dynamic in the nuclei of living cells, little is known about the localization and dynamics of small circular DNA molecules that invade cells by virus infection, application of gene therapy vectors...... or experimental transfection. To address this point, we have created traceable model substrates by direct labeling of plasmid DNA with fluorescent peptide nucleic acids, and have investigated their fate after microinjection into living cells. Here, we report that foreign DNA rapidly undergoes interactions...

  3. Immobilizing live Escherichia coli for AFM studies of surface dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonergan, N.E.; Britt, L.D.; Sullivan, C.J., E-mail: sullivcj@evms.edu

    2014-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a probe-based technique that permits high resolution imaging of live bacterial cells. However, stably immobilizing cells to withstand the probe-based lateral forces remains an obstacle in AFM mediated studies, especially those of live, rod shaped bacteria in nutrient media. Consequently, AFM has been under-utilized in the research of bacterial surface dynamics. The aim of the current study was to immobilize a less adherent Escherichia coli strain in a method that both facilitates AFM imaging in nutrient broth and preserves overall cell viability. Immobilization reagents and buffers were systematically evaluated and the cell membrane integrity was monitored in all sample preparations. As expected, the biocompatible gelatin coated surfaces facilitated stable cell attachment in lower ionic strength buffers, yet poorly immobilized cells in higher ionic strength buffers. In comparison, poly-L-lysine surfaces bound cells in both low and high ionic strength buffers. The benefit of the poly-L-lysine binding capacity was offset by the compromised membrane integrity exhibited by cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces. However, the addition of divalent cations and glucose to the immobilization buffer was found to mitigate this unfavorable effect. Ultimately, immobilization of E. coli cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces in a lower ionic strength buffer supplemented with Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} was determined to provide optimal cell attachment without compromising the overall cell viability. Cells immobilized in this method were stably imaged in media through multiple division cycles. Furthermore, permeability assays indicated that E. coli cells recover from the hypoosmotic stress caused by immobilization in low ionic strength buffers. Taken together, this data suggests that stable immobilization of viable cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces can be accomplished in lower ionic strength buffers that are supplemented with divalent cations for membrane

  4. Shadowless-illuminated variable-angle TIRF (siva-TIRF) microscopy for the observation of spatial-temporal dynamics in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Weijian; Huang, Xiaoshuai; Zhang, Chi; Yuan, Tianyi; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Fan, Ming; Chen, Liangyi

    2014-05-01

    Total-internal-reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy provides high optical-sectioning capability and a good signal-contrast ratio for structures near the surfaces of cells. In recent years, several improvements have been developed, such as variable-angle TIRF (VA-TIRF) and spinning TIRF (sp-TIRF), which permit quantitative image analysis and address non-uniform scattering fringes, respectively. Here, we present a dual-color DMD-based shadowless-illuminated variable-angle TIRF (siva-TIRF) system that provides a uniform illumination field. By adjusting the incidence angle of the illuminating laser on the back focal plane (BFP) of the objective, we can rapidly illuminate biological samples in layers of various thicknesses in TIRF or hollow-cone epi-fluorescence mode. Compared with other methods of accomplishing VA-TIRF/sp-TIRF illumination, our system is simple to build and cost-effective, and it provides optimal multi-plane dual-color images. By showing spatiotemporal correlated movement of clathrin-coated structures with microtubule filaments from various layers of live cells, we demonstrate that cortical microtubules are important spatial regulators of clathrin-coated structures. Moreover, our system can be used to prove superb axial information of three-dimensional movement of structures near the plasma membrane within live cells.

  5. Nonlinear microrheology of living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kollmannsberger, Philip; Fabry, Ben

    2009-01-01

    The linear rheology of adherent cells is characterized by a power-law creep or stress relaxation response, and proportionality between stiffness and internal prestress. It is unknown whether these observations hold in the physiologically relevant nonlinear regime. We used magnetic tweezers microrheology to measure the time- and force-dependent nonlinear creep response of adherent cells. Cell deformations in response to a stepwise increasing force applied to cytoskeletally bound magnetic beads were analyzed with a nonlinear superposition approach. The creep response followed a weak power law regardless of force. Stiffness and power law exponent both increased with force, indicating stress stiffening as well as fluidization of the cytoskeleton. Softer cells showed a more pronounced stress stiffening, which is quantitatively explained by their smaller internal prestress. Stiffer and more elastic cells showed a more pronounced force-induced fluidization, consistent with predictions from soft glassy rheology. Thes...

  6. Dynamic Services for Assisted Living Environments

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Software technologies for assisted living systems can be derived from the more mature domain of pervasive computing and the relative emerging ambient intelligence field. We present herein our position about the need for interoperability enablers extending the software service paradigm and for dependability as key elements of assisted living software systems.

  7. Live-cell imaging of mammalian RNAs with Spinach2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, Rita L.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to monitor RNAs of interest in living cells is crucial to understanding the function, dynamics, and regulation of this important class of molecules. In recent years, numerous strategies have been developed with the goal of imaging individual RNAs of interest in living cells, each with their own advantages and limitations. This chapter provides an overview of current methods of live-cell RNA imaging, including a detailed discussion of genetically encoded strategies for labeling RNAs in mammalian cells. This chapter then focuses on the development and use of “RNA mimics of GFP” or Spinach technology for tagging mammalian RNAs, and includes a detailed protocol for imaging 5S and CGG60 RNA with the recently described Spinach2 tag. PMID:25605384

  8. Trapping red blood cells in living animals using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Min-Cheng; Wei, Xun-Bin; Zhou, Jin-Hua; Wang, Zi-Qiang; Li, Yin-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The recent development of non-invasive imaging techniques has enabled the visualization of molecular events underlying cellular processes in live cells. Although microscopic objects can be readily manipulated at the cellular level, additional physiological insight is likely to be gained by manipulation of cells in vivo, which has not been achieved so far. Here we use infrared optical tweezers to trap and manipulate red blood cells within subdermal capillaries in living mice. We realize a non-contact micro-operation that results in the clearing of a blocked microvessel. Furthermore, we estimate the optical trap stiffness in the capillary. Our work expands the application of optical tweezers to the study of live cell dynamics in animals.

  9. Live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster are also used by the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties with regard to keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick, hazy cytoplasm. This article outlines the major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping the cells alive. It describes various imaging and associated techniques best suited to following changes in the distribution of fluorescently labeled molecules in real time in these tissues. Imaging, in general, is a rapidly developing discipline, and recent advances in imaging technology are able to greatly extend what can be achieved with live cell imaging of Drosophila tissues. As far as possible, this article includes the latest technical developments and discusses likely future developments in imaging methods that could have an impact on research using Drosophila.

  10. Immobilizing live Escherichia coli for AFM studies of surface dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonergan, N E; Britt, L D; Sullivan, C J

    2014-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a probe-based technique that permits high resolution imaging of live bacterial cells. However, stably immobilizing cells to withstand the probe-based lateral forces remains an obstacle in AFM mediated studies, especially those of live, rod shaped bacteria in nutrient media. Consequently, AFM has been under-utilized in the research of bacterial surface dynamics. The aim of the current study was to immobilize a less adherent Escherichia coli strain in a method that both facilitates AFM imaging in nutrient broth and preserves overall cell viability. Immobilization reagents and buffers were systematically evaluated and the cell membrane integrity was monitored in all sample preparations. As expected, the biocompatible gelatin coated surfaces facilitated stable cell attachment in lower ionic strength buffers, yet poorly immobilized cells in higher ionic strength buffers. In comparison, poly-l-lysine surfaces bound cells in both low and high ionic strength buffers. The benefit of the poly-l-lysine binding capacity was offset by the compromised membrane integrity exhibited by cells on poly-l-lysine surfaces. However, the addition of divalent cations and glucose to the immobilization buffer was found to mitigate this unfavorable effect. Ultimately, immobilization of E. coli cells on poly-l-lysine surfaces in a lower ionic strength buffer supplemented with Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) was determined to provide optimal cell attachment without compromising the overall cell viability. Cells immobilized in this method were stably imaged in media through multiple division cycles. Furthermore, permeability assays indicated that E. coli cells recover from the hypoosmotic stress caused by immobilization in low ionic strength buffers. Taken together, this data suggests that stable immobilization of viable cells on poly-l-lysine surfaces can be accomplished in lower ionic strength buffers that are supplemented with divalent cations for membrane stabilization

  11. Dynamic self-assembly in living systems as computation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2004-06-01

    Biochemical reactions taking place in living systems that map different inputs to specific outputs are intuitively recognized as performing information processing. Conventional wisdom distinguishes such proteins, whose primary function is to transfer and process information, from proteins that perform the vast majority of the construction, maintenance, and actuation tasks of the cell (assembling and disassembling macromolecular structures, producing movement, and synthesizing and degrading molecules). In this paper, we examine the computing capabilities of biological processes in the context of the formal model of computing known as the random access machine (RAM) [Dewdney AK (1993) The New Turing Omnibus. Computer Science Press, New York], which is equivalent to a Turing machine [Minsky ML (1967) Computation: Finite and Infinite Machines. Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ]. When viewed from the RAM perspective, we observe that many of these dynamic self-assembly processes - synthesis, degradation, assembly, movement - do carry out computational operations. We also show that the same computing model is applicable at other hierarchical levels of biological systems (e.g., cellular or organism networks as well as molecular networks). We present stochastic simulations of idealized protein networks designed explicitly to carry out a numeric calculation. We explore the reliability of such computations and discuss error-correction strategies (algorithms) employed by living systems. Finally, we discuss some real examples of dynamic self-assembly processes that occur in living systems, and describe the RAM computer programs they implement. Thus, by viewing the processes of living systems from the RAM perspective, a far greater fraction of these processes can be understood as computing than has been previously recognized.

  12. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Jonczyk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays.

  13. Dynamics of living phytoplankton: Implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, A B [Centre for Marine and Environmental Research (CIMA), Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)], E-mail: abarbosa@ualg.pt

    2009-01-01

    Phytoplankton is the dominant primary producer in aquatic ecosystems and is considered a gauge of ecological condition and change. Some phytoplankton groups, namely diatoms, dinoflagellates, and coccolithophores, produce morphological or chemical fossils that can be used for paleoenvironmental reconstruction. This study aims to review the processes that regulate dynamics in living phytoplankton and to highlight how this knowledge is used in paleoecological studies. The distribution patterns of phytoplankton in present-day aquatic ecosystems are shaped by the interplay between processes that regulate cell growth and cell death. Cell growth and cell death are regulated by the internal environment of phytoplankton (e.g., specific environmental tolerances, resource uptake properties, cell size, density and morphology, alternative nutritional strategies such as mixotrophy or N{sub 2} uptake, motility, intracellular storage capacities, grazing resistance properties), and by its external environment. The external environment includes variables dependent on the availability of resources (e.g., light intensity, concentration of CO{sub 2} and dissolved inorganic macronutrients and micronutrients, availability of living prey in case of mixotrophs) and variables independent of resources (e.g., temperature, salinity, turbulence, ultraviolet radiation, bioactive compounds, activity of grazers, viruses, and eukaryotic parasites). The importance of recently described loss processes, such as grazing by phagotrophic protists, viral lyses, and programmed cell death, is discussed in the context of its potential impact upon phytoplankton vertical fluxes. Examples of the use of different phytoplankton metrics (e.g. abundance, species composition, species morphology, and elemental composition) to infer contemporaneous as well as past environmental and ecological conditions are critically evaluated.

  14. Quantification of nanowire uptake by live cells

    KAUST Repository

    Margineanu, Michael B.

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructures fabricated by different methods have become increasingly important for various applications at the cellular level. In order to understand how these nanostructures “behave” and for studying their internalization kinetics, several attempts have been made at tagging and investigating their interaction with living cells. In this study, magnetic iron nanowires with an iron oxide layer are coated with (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), and subsequently labeled with a fluorogenic pH-dependent dye pHrodo™ Red, covalently bound to the aminosilane surface. Time-lapse live imaging of human colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells interacting with the labeled iron nanowires is performed for 24 hours. As the pHrodo™ Red conjugated nanowires are non-fluorescent outside the cells but fluoresce brightly inside, internalized nanowires are distinguished from non-internalized ones and their behavior inside the cells can be tracked for the respective time length. A machine learning-based computational framework dedicated to automatic analysis of live cell imaging data, Cell Cognition, is adapted and used to classify cells with internalized and non-internalized nanowires and subsequently determine the uptake percentage by cells at different time points. An uptake of 85 % by HCT 116 cells is observed after 24 hours incubation at NW-to-cell ratios of 200. While the approach of using pHrodo™ Red for internalization studies is not novel in the literature, this study reports for the first time the utilization of a machine-learning based time-resolved automatic analysis pipeline for quantification of nanowire uptake by cells. This pipeline has also been used for comparison studies with nickel nanowires coated with APTES and labeled with pHrodo™ Red, and another cell line derived from the cervix carcinoma, HeLa. It has thus the potential to be used for studying the interaction of different types of nanostructures with potentially any live cell types.

  15. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  16. ROZA-XL, an improved FRET based biosensor with an increased dynamic range for visualizing zeta associated protein 70 kD (ZAP-70) tyrosine kinase activity in live T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadra, Sophie; Gucciardi, Alexia; Valignat, Marie-Pierre; Theodoly, Olivier; Vacaflores, Aldo; Houtman, Jon C D; Lellouch, Annemarie C

    2015-04-10

    Genetically encoded FRET based biosensors allow one to visualize the spatial and temporal evolution of specific enzyme activities in live cells. We have previously reported the creation of a FRET based biosensor specific for Zeta-Associated Protein -70 kD (ZAP-70) (Randriamampita et al., 2008), a Syk family protein tyrosine kinase. ZAP-70 is essential for early T cell receptor (TCR) signaling events, T lymphocyte development and has also been implicated in integrin mediated T lymphocyte migration. In order to facilitate the study of ZAP-70 kinase activity during dynamic phenomena such as immunological synapse formation or cell migration, we have designed and prepared a second generation of ZAP-70 specific biosensors. Here we describe a novel biosensor named ROZA-XL, that displays a 3-4 times greater dynamic range than its predecessor and possesses a robust baseline FRET value when expressed in the Jurkat human T cell line. We demonstrate that the robust behavior of this biosensor allows for rapid analysis of TCR mediated of ZAP-70 kinase activity at a single cell level, as shown in a simple end point assay in which ROZA-XL expressing cells are allowed to interact with stimulatory anti-CD3epsilon coated coverslips.

  17. Design of microdevices for long-term live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaying; Rosengarten, Gary; Li, Musen; Nordon, Robert E.

    2012-06-01

    Advances in fluorescent live cell imaging provide high-content information that relates a cell's life events to its ancestors. An important requirement to track clonal growth and development is the retention of motile cells derived from an ancestor within the same microscopic field of view for days to weeks, while recording fluorescence images and controlling the mechanical and biochemical microenvironments that regulate cell growth and differentiation. The aim of this study was to design a microwell device for long-term, time-lapse imaging of motile cells with the specific requirements of (a) inoculating devices with an average of one cell per well and (b) retaining progeny of cells within a single microscopic field of view for extended growth periods. A two-layer PDMS microwell culture device consisting of a parallel-plate flow cell bonded on top of a microwell array was developed for cell capture and clonal culture. Cell deposition statistics were related to microwell geometry (plate separation and well depth) and the Reynolds number. Computational fluid dynamics was used to simulate flow in the microdevices as well as cell-fluid interactions. Analysis of the forces acting upon a cell was used to predict cell docking zones, which were confirmed by experimental observations. Cell-fluid dynamic interactions are important considerations for design of microdevices for long-term, live cell imaging. The analysis of force and torque balance provides a reasonable approximation for cell displacement forces. It is computationally less intensive compared to simulation of cell trajectories, and can be applied to a wide range of microdevice geometries to predict the cell docking behavior.

  18. Multifunctional Prenylated Peptides for Live Cell Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, James W.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Mullen, Daniel G.; Amundson, Gregg; Geier, Suzanne; Falkum, Stacy; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Barany, George; Distefano, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a common post-translational modification present in eukaryotic cells. Many key proteins involved in signal transduction pathways are prenylated and inhibition of prenylation can be useful as a therapeutic intervention. While significant progress has been made in understanding protein prenylation in vitro, we have been interested in studying this process in living cells, including the question of where prenylated molecules localize. Here, we describe the synthesis and live cell analysis of a series of fluorescently labeled multifunctional peptides, based on the C-terminus of the naturally prenylated protein CDC42. A synthetic route was developed that features a key Acm to Scm protecting group conversion. This strategy was compatible with acid-sensitive isoprenoid moieties, and allowed incorporation of an appropriate fluorophore as well as a cell-penetrating sequence (penetratin). These peptides are able to enter cells through different mechanisms, depending on the presence or absence of the penetratin vehicle and the nature of the prenyl group attached. Interestingly, prenylated peptides lacking penetratin are able to enter cells freely through an energy-independent process, and localize in a perinuclear fashion. This effect extends to a prenylated peptide that includes a full “CAAX box” sequence (specifically, CVLL). Hence, these peptides open the door for studies of protein prenylation in living cells, including enzymatic processing and intracellular peptide trafficking. Moreover, the synthetic strategy developed here should be useful for the assembly of other types of peptides that contain acid sensitive functionalities. PMID:19425596

  19. Bioluminescence imaging in live cells and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Jack K; Berglund, Ken; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Gross, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The use of bioluminescent reporters in neuroscience research continues to grow at a rapid pace as their applications and unique advantages over conventional fluorescent reporters become more appreciated. Here, we describe practical methods and principles for detecting and imaging bioluminescence from live cells and animals. We systematically tested various components of our conventional fluorescence microscope to optimize it for long-term bioluminescence imaging. High-resolution bioluminescence images from live neurons were obtained with our microscope setup, which could be continuously captured for several hours with no signs of phototoxicity. Bioluminescence from the mouse brain was also imaged noninvasively through the intact skull with a conventional luminescence imager. These methods demonstrate how bioluminescence can be routinely detected and measured from live cells and animals in a cost-effective way with common reagents and equipment.

  20. Dynamic measurement of the pH of the Golgi complex in living cells using retrograde transport of the verotoxin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Lingwood, C A; Williams, D B; Furuya, W; Manolson, M F; Grinstein, S

    1996-09-01

    The B subunit of verotoxin (VT1B) from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli is responsible for the attachment of the holotoxin to the cell surface, by binding to the glycolipid, globotriaosyl ceramide. After receptor-mediated endocytosis, the toxin is targeted to the Golgi complex by a process of retrograde transport. We took advantage of this unique property of VT1B to measure the pH of the Golgi complex in intact live cells. Purified recombinant VT1B was labeled with either rhodamine or fluorescein for subcellular localization by confocal microscopy. After 1 h at 37 degrees C, VT1B accumulated in a juxtanuclear structure that colocalized with several Golgi markers, including alpha-mannosidase II, beta-COP, and NBD-ceramide. Moreover, colchicine and brefeldin A induced dispersal of the juxtanuclear staining, consistent with accumulation of VT1B in the Golgi complex. Imaging of the emission of fluorescein-labeled VT1B was used to measure intra-Golgi pH (pHG), which was calibrated in situ with ionophores. In intact Vero cells, pHG averaged 6.45 +/- 0.03 (standard error). The acidity of the Golgi lumen dissipated rapidly upon addition of bafilomycin A1, a blocker of vacuolar-type ATPases, pHG remained constant despite acidification of the cytosol by reversal of the plasmalemmal Na+/H+ antiport. Similarly, pHG was unaffected by acute changes in cytosolic calcium. Furthermore, pHG recovered quickly toward the basal level after departures imposed with weak bases. These findings suggest that pHG is actively regulated, despite the presence of a sizable H+ "leak" pathway. The ability of VT1B to target the Golgi complex should facilitate not only studies of acid-base regulation, but also analysis of other ionic species.

  1. Using Live-Cell Markers in Maize to Analyze Cell Division Orientation and Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Carolyn G

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed live-cell markers provide an opportunity to explore the dynamics and localization of proteins in maize, an important crop and model for monocot development. A step-by-step method is outlined for observing and analyzing the process of division in maize cells. The steps include plant growth conditions, sample preparation, time-lapse setup, and calculation of division rates.

  2. Gas Plasma Effects on Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffels, E.; Sladek, R. E. J.; Kieft, I. E.

    This paper surveys the research activities at the Eindhoven University of Technology (The Netherlands) in the area of biomedical applications of gas discharge plasmas. A non-thermal atmospheric plasma source (the plasma needle) has been developed, and its interactions with living mammalian cells and bacteria are studied. It is concluded that plasma can efficiently kill bacteria without harming the cells, and also influence the cells without causing cell death (necrosis). In future it will lead to applications like skin (wound) and caries treatment.

  3. Synchrotron IR spectromicroscopy: chemistry of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N; Bechtel, Hans A; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C

    2010-11-01

    Advanced analytical capabilities of synchrotron IR spectromicroscopy meet the demands of modern biological research for studying molecular reactions in individual living cells. (To listen to a podcast about this article, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html.).

  4. Tracking of chromosome dynamics in live Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals that transcription promotes chromosome segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome segregation is an essential part of the bacterial cell cycle but is poorly characterized in oval-shaped streptococci. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have tracked the dynamics of chromosome segregation in live cells of the

  5. Spectro-Microscopy of Living Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Klaus Harter; Alfred J. Meixner; Frank Schleifenbaum

    2012-01-01

    Spectro-microscopy,a combination of fluorescence microscopy with spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques,provides new and exciting tools for functional cell biology in living organisms.This review focuses on recent developments in spectro-microscopic applications for the investigation of living plant cells in their native tissue context.The application of spectro-microscopic methods led to the recent discovery of a fast signal response pathway for the brassinosteroide receptor BRI1 in the plasma membrane of living plant cells.Moreover,the competence of different plant cell types to respond to environmental or endogenous stimuli was determined in vivo by correlation analysis of different optical and spectroscopic readouts such as fluorescence lifetime (FLT).Furthermore,a new spectro-microscopic technique,fluorescence intensity decay shape analysis microscopy (FIDSAM),has been developed.FIDSAM is capable of imaging lowexpressed fluorophore-tagged proteins at high spatial resolution and precludes the misinterpretation of autofluorescence artifacts.In addition,FIDSAM provides a very effective and sensitive tool on the basis of F(o)rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) for the qualitative and quantitative determination of protein-protein interaction.Finally,we report on the quantitative analysis of the photosystem Ⅰ and Ⅱ (PSⅠ/PSⅡ) ratio in the chloroplasts of living Arabidopsis plants at room temperature,using high-resolution,spatially resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.With this technique,it was not only possible to measure PSⅠ/PSⅡ ratios,but also to demonstrate the differential competence of wild-type and carbohydrate-deficient plants to adapt the PSⅠ/PSⅡ ratio to different light conditions.In summary,the information content of standard microscopic images is extended by several dimensions by the use of spectro-microscopic approaches.Therefore,novel cell physiological and molecular topics can be addressed and valuable insights into molecular and

  6. Compartmental genomics in living cells revealed by single-cell nanobiopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Paolo; Maalouf, Michelle M; Kim, Hyunsung John; Lohith, Akshar; Vilozny, Boaz; Seger, R Adam; Pourmand, Nader

    2014-01-28

    The ability to study the molecular biology of living single cells in heterogeneous cell populations is essential for next generation analysis of cellular circuitry and function. Here, we developed a single-cell nanobiopsy platform based on scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) for continuous sampling of intracellular content from individual cells. The nanobiopsy platform uses electrowetting within a nanopipette to extract cellular material from living cells with minimal disruption of the cellular milieu. We demonstrate the subcellular resolution of the nanobiopsy platform by isolating small subpopulations of mitochondria from single living cells, and quantify mutant mitochondrial genomes in those single cells with high throughput sequencing technology. These findings may provide the foundation for dynamic subcellular genomic analysis.

  7. Motion as a phenotype: the use of live-cell imaging and machine visual screening to characterize transcription-dependent chromosome dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silver Pamela A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transcriptional activity is well correlated with intra-nuclear position, especially relative to the nuclear periphery, which is a region classically associated with gene silencing. Recently however, actively transcribed genes have also been found localized to the nuclear periphery in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When genes are activated, they become associated with the nuclear pore complex (NPC at the nuclear envelope. Furthermore, chromosomes are not static structures, but exhibit constrained diffusion in real-time, live-cell studies of particular loci. The relationship of chromosome motion with transcriptional activation and active-gene recruitment to the nuclear periphery has not yet been investigated. Results We have generated a yeast strain that enables us to observe the motion of the galactose-inducible GAL gene locus relative to the nuclear periphery in real-time under transcriptionally active and repressed conditions. Using segmented geometric particle tracking, we show that the repressed GAL locus undergoes constrained diffusive movement, and that transcriptional induction with galactose is associated with an enrichment in cells with GAL loci that are both associated with the nuclear periphery and much more constrained in their movement. Furthermore, we report that the mRNA export factor Sac3 is involved in this galactose-induced enrichment of GAL loci at the nuclear periphery. In parallel, using a novel machine visual screening technique, we find that the motion of constrained GAL loci correlates with the motion of the cognate nuclei in galactose-induced cells. Conclusion Transcriptional activation of the GAL genes is associated with their tethering and motion constraint at the nuclear periphery. We describe a model of gene recruitment to the nuclear periphery involving gene diffusion and the mRNA export factor Sac3 that can be used as a framework for further experimentation. In addition, we applied to

  8. Dynamics of cell orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel A.

    2007-09-01

    Many physiological processes depend on the response of biological cells to mechanical forces generated by the contractile activity of the cell or by external stresses. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitivity of cells and the elasticity of the matrix, we predict the dynamics and orientation of cells in both the absence and presence of applied stresses. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the cellular forces in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency.

  9. STED microscopy of living cells--new frontiers in membrane and neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggeling, Christian; Willig, Katrin I; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2013-07-01

    Recent developments in fluorescence far-field microscopy such as STED microscopy have accomplished observation of the living cell with a spatial resolution far below the diffraction limit. Here, we briefly review the current approaches to super-resolution optical microscopy and present the implementation of STED microscopy for novel insights into live cell mechanisms, with a focus on neurobiology and plasma membrane dynamics.

  10. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-01

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies.

  11. Direct Visualization of De novo Lipogenesis in Single Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Increased de novo lipogenesis is being increasingly recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Despite recent advances in fluorescence microscopy, autoradiography and mass spectrometry, direct observation of de novo lipogenesis in living systems remains to be challenging. Here, by coupling stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy with isotope labeled glucose, we were able to trace the dynamic metabolism of glucose in single living cells with high spatial-temporal resolution. As the first direct visualization, we observed that glucose was largely utilized for lipid synthesis in pancreatic cancer cells, which occurs at a much lower rate in immortalized normal pancreatic epithelial cells. By inhibition of glycolysis and fatty acid synthase (FAS), the key enzyme for fatty acid synthesis, we confirmed the deuterium labeled lipids in cancer cells were from de novo lipid synthesis. Interestingly, we also found that prostate cancer cells exhibit relatively lower level of de novo lipogenesis, but higher fatty acid uptake compared to pancreatic cancer cells. Together, our results demonstrate a valuable tool to study dynamic lipid metabolism in cancer and other disorders.

  12. Dynamic self-assembly of 'living' polymeric chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Binghui; Shi, Yunfeng

    2017-01-01

    We report a dynamic self-assembly system of 'living' polymeric chains sustained by chemistry using reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The linear polymeric chains consist of self-assembled nanoparticles connected by metastable linker molecules. As such, the polymeric chains, once assembled, undergo spontaneous dissociation driven by thermodynamics. However, with a continuous supply of linker molecules and the stored chemical energy therein, the polymeric chains can survive and maintain a steady state averaged chain length. These dynamically self-assembled polymeric chains are analogous to biological systems that both are thermodynamically metastable, yet dynamically stable upon continuous influx of matter and energy.

  13. Single-Molecule Imaging of RNA Splicing in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rino, José; Martin, Robert M; Carvalho, Célia; de Jesus, Ana C; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Expression of genetic information in eukaryotes involves a series of interconnected processes that ultimately determine the quality and amount of proteins in the cell. Many individual steps in gene expression are kinetically coupled, but tools are lacking to determine how temporal relationships between chemical reactions contribute to the output of the final gene product. Here, we describe a strategy that permits direct measurements of intron dynamics in single pre-mRNA molecules in live cells. This approach reveals that splicing can occur much faster than previously proposed and opens new avenues for studying how kinetic mechanisms impact on RNA biogenesis.

  14. Live-cell imaging: new avenues to investigate retinal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahne, Manuela; Hyde, David R

    2017-08-01

    Sensing and responding to our environment requires functional neurons that act in concert. Neuronal cell loss resulting from degenerative diseases cannot be replaced in humans, causing a functional impairment to integrate and/or respond to sensory cues. In contrast, zebrafish (Danio rerio) possess an endogenous capacity to regenerate lost neurons. Here, we will focus on the processes that lead to neuronal regeneration in the zebrafish retina. Dying retinal neurons release a damage signal, tumor necrosis factor α, which induces the resident radial glia, the Müller glia, to reprogram and re-enter the cell cycle. The Müller glia divide asymmetrically to produce a Müller glia that exits the cell cycle and a neuronal progenitor cell. The arising neuronal progenitor cells undergo several rounds of cell divisions before they migrate to the site of damage to differentiate into the neuronal cell types that were lost. Molecular and immunohistochemical studies have predominantly provided insight into the mechanisms that regulate retinal regeneration. However, many processes during retinal regeneration are dynamic and require live-cell imaging to fully discern the underlying mechanisms. Recently, a multiphoton imaging approach of adult zebrafish retinal cultures was developed. We will discuss the use of live-cell imaging, the currently available tools and those that need to be developed to advance our knowledge on major open questions in the field of retinal regeneration.

  15. Live-cell imaging: new avenues to investigate retinal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Lahne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensing and responding to our environment requires functional neurons that act in concert. Neuronal cell loss resulting from degenerative diseases cannot be replaced in humans, causing a functional impairment to integrate and/or respond to sensory cues. In contrast, zebrafish (Danio rerio possess an endogenous capacity to regenerate lost neurons. Here, we will focus on the processes that lead to neuronal regeneration in the zebrafish retina. Dying retinal neurons release a damage signal, tumor necrosis factor α, which induces the resident radial glia, the Müller glia, to reprogram and re-enter the cell cycle. The Müller glia divide asymmetrically to produce a Müller glia that exits the cell cycle and a neuronal progenitor cell. The arising neuronal progenitor cells undergo several rounds of cell divisions before they migrate to the site of damage to differentiate into the neuronal cell types that were lost. Molecular and immunohistochemical studies have predominantly provided insight into the mechanisms that regulate retinal regeneration. However, many processes during retinal regeneration are dynamic and require live-cell imaging to fully discern the underlying mechanisms. Recently, a multiphoton imaging approach of adult zebrafish retinal cultures was developed. We will discuss the use of live-cell imaging, the currently available tools and those that need to be developed to advance our knowledge on major open questions in the field of retinal regeneration.

  16. Thermodynamics of protein destabilization in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Jens; Mu, Xin; Lang, Lisa; Wang, Huabing; Binolfi, Andres; Theillet, François-Xavier; Bekei, Beata; Logan, Derek T; Selenko, Philipp; Wennerström, Håkan; Oliveberg, Mikael

    2015-10-06

    Although protein folding and stability have been well explored under simplified conditions in vitro, it is yet unclear how these basic self-organization events are modulated by the crowded interior of live cells. To find out, we use here in-cell NMR to follow at atomic resolution the thermal unfolding of a β-barrel protein inside mammalian and bacterial cells. Challenging the view from in vitro crowding effects, we find that the cells destabilize the protein at 37 °C but with a conspicuous twist: While the melting temperature goes down the cold unfolding moves into the physiological regime, coupled to an augmented heat-capacity change. The effect seems induced by transient, sequence-specific, interactions with the cellular components, acting preferentially on the unfolded ensemble. This points to a model where the in vivo influence on protein behavior is case specific, determined by the individual protein's interplay with the functionally optimized "interaction landscape" of the cellular interior.

  17. Spectroscopic investigation of local mechanical impedance of living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luca; Benseny-Cases, Núria; Mayeaux, Véronique; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of PC12 living cells have been studied at the nanoscale with a Force Feedback Microscope using two experimental approaches. Firstly, the local mechanical impedance of the cell membrane has been mapped simultaneously to the cell morphology at constant force. As the force of the interaction is gradually increased, we observed the appearance of the sub-membrane cytoskeleton. We shall compare the results obtained with this method with the measurement of other existing techniques. Secondly, a spectroscopic investigation has been performed varying the indentation of the tip in the cell membrane and consequently the force applied on it. In contrast with conventional dynamic atomic force microscopy techniques, here the small oscillation amplitude of the tip is not necessarily imposed at the cantilever first eigenmode. This allows the user to arbitrarily choose the excitation frequency in developing spectroscopic AFM techniques. The mechanical response of the PC12 cell membrane is found to be...

  18. Detecting stoichiometry of macromolecular complexes in live cells using FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Yue, Daniel N.; Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    The stoichiometry of macromolecular interactions is fundamental to cellular signalling yet challenging to detect from living cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful phenomenon for characterizing close-range interactions whereby a donor fluorophore transfers energy to a closely juxtaposed acceptor. Recognizing that FRET measured from the acceptor's perspective reports a related but distinct quantity versus the donor, we utilize the ratiometric comparison of the two to obtain the stoichiometry of a complex. Applying this principle to the long-standing controversy of calmodulin binding to ion channels, we find a surprising Ca2+-induced switch in calmodulin stoichiometry with Ca2+ channels—one calmodulin binds at basal cytosolic Ca2+ levels while two calmodulins interact following Ca2+ elevation. This feature is curiously absent for the related Na channels, also potently regulated by calmodulin. Overall, our assay adds to a burgeoning toolkit to pursue quantitative biochemistry of dynamic signalling complexes in living cells. PMID:27922011

  19. mRNA analysis of single living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikai Atsushi

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysis of specific gene expression in single living cells may become an important technique for cell biology. So far, no method has been available to detect mRNA in living cells without killing or destroying them. We have developed here a novel method to examine gene expression of living cells using an atomic force microscope (AFM. AFM tip was inserted into living cells to extract mRNAs. The obtained mRNAs were analyzed with RT-PCR, nested PCR, and quantitative PCR. This method enabled us to examine time-dependent gene expression of single living cells without serious damage to the cells.

  20. Creep Function of a Single Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desprat, Nicolas; Richert, Alain; Simeon, Jacqueline; Asnacios, Atef

    2005-01-01

    We used a novel uniaxial stretching rheometer to measure the creep function J(t) of an isolated living cell. We show, for the first time at the scale of the whole cell, that J(t) behaves as a power-law J(t) = Atα. For N = 43 mice myoblasts (C2-7), we find α = 0.24 ± 0.01 and A = (2.4 ± 0.3) 10−3 Pa−1 s−α. Using Laplace Transforms, we compare A and α to the parameters G0 and β of the complex modulus G*(ω) = G0ωβ measured by other authors using magnetic twisting cytometry and atomic force microscopy. Excellent agreement between A and G0 on the one hand, and between α and β on the other hand, indicated that the power-law is an intrinsic feature of cell mechanics and not the signature of a particular technique. Moreover, the agreement between measurements at very different size scales, going from a few tens of nanometers to the scale of the whole cell, suggests that self-similarity could be a central feature of cell mechanical structure. Finally, we show that the power-law behavior could explain previous results first interpreted as instantaneous elasticity. Thus, we think that the living cell must definitely be thought of as a material with a large and continuous distribution of relaxation time constants which cannot be described by models with a finite number of springs and dash-pots. PMID:15596508

  1. On strain and stress in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Brian N.; Smith, David W.

    2014-11-01

    Recent theoretical simulations of amelogenesis and network formation and new, simple analyses of the basic multicellular unit (BMU) allow estimation of the order of magnitude of the strain energy density in populations of living cells in their natural environment. A similar simple calculation translates recent measurements of the force-displacement relation for contacting cells (cell-cell adhesion energy) into equivalent volume energy densities, which are formed by averaging the changes in contact energy caused by a cell's migration over the cell's volume. The rates of change of these mechanical energy densities (energy density rates) are then compared to the order of magnitude of the metabolic activity of a cell, expressed as a rate of production of metabolic energy per unit volume. The mechanical energy density rates are 4-5 orders of magnitude smaller than the metabolic energy density rate in amelogenesis or bone remodeling in the BMU, which involve modest cell migration velocities, and 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller for innervation of the gut or angiogenesis, where migration rates are among the highest for all cell types. For representative cell-cell adhesion gradients, the mechanical energy density rate is 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the metabolic energy density rate. The results call into question the validity of using simple constitutive laws to represent living cells. They also imply that cells need not migrate as inanimate objects of gradients in an energy field, but are better regarded as self-powered automata that may elect to be guided by such gradients or move otherwise. Thus Ġel=d/dt 1/2 >[(C11+C12)ɛ02+2μγ02]=(C11+C12)ɛ0ɛ˙0+2μγ0γ˙0 or Ġel=ηEɛ0ɛ˙0+η‧Eγ0γ˙0 with 1.4≤η≤3.4 and 0.7≤η‧≤0.8 for Poisson's ratio in the range 0.2≤ν≤0.4 and η=1.95 and η‧=0.75 for ν=0.3. The spatial distribution of shear strains arising within an individual cell as cells slide past one another during amelogenesis is not known

  2. In-cell NMR: an emerging approach for monitoring metal-related events in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2014-01-01

    In-cell NMR, an isotope-assisted multi-dimensional NMR technique, has been proven to be successful in the investigation of protein dynamics, folding, conformational changes induced by binding events, posttranslational modification in the complex native environments, as well as in vivo drug screening, even de novo 3D protein structure determination in living cells. This technique was initially applied to bacterial cells, and subsequently has been extended to various other cells including eukaryotic cells. In this review, we briefly summarize the methodology and application of in-cell NMR with a focus on its application in metallomics and metalloproteomics. This emerging technique is anticipated to be an excellent tool for studying metal-associated events in complex native environments of living cells.

  3. Universal signal generator for dynamic cell stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piehler, Andreas; Ghorashian, Navid; Zhang, Ce; Tay, Savaş

    2017-06-27

    Dynamic cell stimulation is a powerful technique for probing gene networks and for applications in stem cell differentiation, immunomodulation and signaling. We developed a robust and flexible method and associated microfluidic devices to generate a wide-range of precisely formulated dynamic chemical signals to stimulate live cells and measure their dynamic response. This signal generator is capable of digital to analog conversion (DAC) through combinatoric selection of discrete input concentrations, and outperforms existing methods by both achievable resolution, dynamic range and simplicity in design. It requires no calibration, has minimal space requirements and can be easily integrated into microfluidic cell culture devices. The signal generator hardware and software we developed allows to choose the waveform, period and amplitude of chemical input signals and features addition of well-defined chemical noise to study the role of stochasticity in cellular information processing.

  4. Quantification of plant cell coupling with live-cell microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    cell wall interface. Transport through plasmodesmata, the cell wall channels that directly connect plant cells, is regulated not only by a fixed size exclusion limit, but also by physiological and pathological adaptation. The noninvasive approach described here offers the possibility of precisely......Movement of nutrients and signaling compounds from cell to cell is an essential process for plant growth and development. To understand processes such as carbon allocation, cell communication, and reaction to pathogen attack it is important to know a specific molecule’s capacity to pass a specific...... determining the plasmodesmata-mediated cell wall permeability for small molecules in living cells. The method is based on photoactivation of the fluorescent tracer caged fluorescein. Non-fluorescent caged fluorescein is applied to a target tissue, where it is taken up passively into all cells. Imaged...

  5. Cyborg cells: functionalisation of living cells with polymers and nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhrullin, Rawil F; Zamaleeva, Alsu I; Minullina, Renata T; Konnova, Svetlana A; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2012-06-07

    Living cells interfaced with a range of polyelectrolyte coatings, magnetic and noble metal nanoparticles, hard mineral shells and other complex nanomaterials can perform functions often completely different from their original specialisation. Such "cyborg cells" are already finding a range of novel applications in areas like whole cell biosensors, bioelectronics, toxicity microscreening, tissue engineering, cell implant protection and bioanalytical chemistry. In this tutorial review, we describe the development of novel methods for functionalisation of cells with polymers and nanoparticles and comment on future advances in this technology in the light of other literature approaches. We review recent studies on the cell viability and function upon direct deposition of nanoparticles, coating with polyelectrolytes, polymer assisted assembly of nanomaterials and hard shells on the cell surface. The cell toxicity issues are considered for many practical applications in terms of possible adverse effects of the deposited polymers, polyelectrolytes and nanoparticles on the cell surface.

  6. Microencapsulating and Banking Living Cells for Cell-Based Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wujie Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge to the eventual success of the emerging cell-based medicine such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and cell transplantation is the limited availability of the desired cell sources. This challenge can be addressed by cell microencapsulation to overcome the undesired immune response (i.e., to achieve immunoisolation so that non-autologous cells can be used to treat human diseases, and by cell/tissue preservation to bank living cells for wide distribution to end users so that they are readily available when needed in the future. This review summarizes the status quo of research in both cell microencapsulation and banking the microencapsulated cells. It is concluded with a brief outlook of future research directions in this important field.

  7. Synthetic Glycosphingolipids for Live-Cell Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauner, Martin; Batroff, Ellen; Bachmann, Verena; Hauck, Christof R; Wittmann, Valentin

    2016-07-20

    Glycosphingolipids are an important component of cell membranes that are involved in many biological processes. Fluorescently labeled glycosphingolipids are frequently used to gain insight into their localization. However, the attachment of a fluorophore to the glycan part or-more commonly-to the lipid part of glycosphingolipids is known to alter the biophysical properties and can perturb the biological function of the probe. Presented here is the synthesis of novel glycosphingolipid probes with mono- and disaccharide head groups and ceramide moieties containing fatty acids of varying chain length (C4 to C20). These glycosphingolipids bear an azide or an alkyne group as chemical reporter to which a fluorophore can be attached through a bioorthogonal ligation reaction. The fluorescent tag and any linker connected to it can be chosen in a flexible manner. We demonstrate the suitability of the probes by selective visualization of the plasma membrane of living cells by confocal microscopy techniques. Whereas the derivatives with the shorter fatty acids can be directly applied to HEK 293T cells, the hydrophobic glycosphingolipids with longer fatty acids can be delivered to cells using fusogenic liposomes.

  8. Detection of intracellular phosphatidylserine in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Frances; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2008-03-01

    To demonstrate the intracellular phosphatidylserine (PS) distribution in neuronal cells, neuroblastoma cells and hippocampal neurons expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP)-AnnexinV were stimulated with a calcium ionophore and localization of GFP-AnnexinV was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Initially, GFP-AnnexinV distributed evenly in the cytosol and nucleus. Raising the intracellular calcium level with ionomycin-induced translocation of cytoplasmic GFP-AnnexinV to the plasma membrane but not to the nuclear membrane, indicating that PS distributes in the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane. Nuclear GFP-AnnexinV subsequently translocated to the nuclear membrane, indicating PS localization in the nuclear envelope. GFP-AnnexinV also localized in a juxtanuclear organelle that was identified as the recycling endosome. However, minimal fluorescence was detected in any other subcellular organelles including mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, and lysosomes, strongly suggesting that PS distribution in the cytoplasmic face in these organelles is negligible. Similarly, in hippocampal primary neurons PS distributed in the inner leaflet of plasma membranes of cell body and dendrites, and in the nuclear envelope. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of intracellular PS localization in living cells, providing an insight for specific sites of PS interaction with soluble proteins involved in signaling processes.

  9. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy-Contreras, Ricardo; Vaca, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular functions. Molecular beacons (MBs) are stem-loop hairpin-structured oligonucleotides equipped with a fluorescence quencher at one end and a fluorescent dye (also called reporter or fluorophore) at the opposite end. This structure permits that MB in the absence of their target complementary sequence do not fluoresce. Upon binding to targets, MBs emit fluorescence, due to the spatial separation of the quencher and the reporter. Molecular beacons are promising probes for the development of RNA imaging techniques; nevertheless much work remains to be done in order to obtain a robust technology for imaging various RNA molecules together in real time and in living cells. The present work concentrates on the different requirements needed to use successfully MB for cellular studies, summarizing recent advances in this area. PMID:21876785

  10. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Monroy-Contreras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular functions. Molecular beacons (MBs are stem-loop hairpin-structured oligonucleotides equipped with a fluorescence quencher at one end and a fluorescent dye (also called reporter or fluorophore at the opposite end. This structure permits that MB in the absence of their target complementary sequence do not fluoresce. Upon binding to targets, MBs emit fluorescence, due to the spatial separation of the quencher and the reporter. Molecular beacons are promising probes for the development of RNA imaging techniques; nevertheless much work remains to be done in order to obtain a robust technology for imaging various RNA molecules together in real time and in living cells. The present work concentrates on the different requirements needed to use successfully MB for cellular studies, summarizing recent advances in this area.

  11. Epigenetic phenomena, chromatin dynamics, and gene expression. New theoretical approaches in the study of living systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Luciano

    2008-01-01

    This paper is aimed at exploring the genome at the level beyond that of DNA sequence alone. We stress the fact that the level of genes is not the sole "reality" in the living world, for there are different epigenetic processes that profoundly affect change in living systems. Moreover, epigenetics very likely influences the course of evolution and the unfolding of life. We further attempt to investigate how the genome is dynamically organized into the nuclear space within the cell. We mainly focus on analyses of higher order nuclear architecture and the dynamic interactions of chromatin with other nuclear components. We especially want to know how epigenetic phenomena influences genes expression and chromosome functions. The proper understanding of these processes require new concepts and approaches be introduced and developed. In particular, we think that research in biology has to shift from only describing molecular and local features of living systems to studying the regulatory networks of interactions among gene pathways, the folding and dynamics of chromatin structure and how environmental factors affects the behavior of organisms. There are essential components of biological information on living organisms which cannot be portrayed in the DNA sequence alone. In a post-genomic era, the importance of chromatin/epigenetic interface has become increasingly apparent. One of the purposes of current research should be to highlight the enormous impact of chromatin organization and dynamics on epigenetic phenomena, and, conversely, to emphasize the important role that epigenetic phenomena play in gene expression and cell regulation.

  12. Deep Learning Automates the Quantitative Analysis of Individual Cells in Live-Cell Imaging Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Valen, David A; Kudo, Takamasa; Lane, Keara M; Macklin, Derek N; Quach, Nicolas T; DeFelice, Mialy M; Maayan, Inbal; Tanouchi, Yu; Ashley, Euan A; Covert, Markus W

    2016-11-01

    Live-cell imaging has opened an exciting window into the role cellular heterogeneity plays in dynamic, living systems. A major critical challenge for this class of experiments is the problem of image segmentation, or determining which parts of a microscope image correspond to which individual cells. Current approaches require many hours of manual curation and depend on approaches that are difficult to share between labs. They are also unable to robustly segment the cytoplasms of mammalian cells. Here, we show that deep convolutional neural networks, a supervised machine learning method, can solve this challenge for multiple cell types across the domains of life. We demonstrate that this approach can robustly segment fluorescent images of cell nuclei as well as phase images of the cytoplasms of individual bacterial and mammalian cells from phase contrast images without the need for a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker. These networks also enable the simultaneous segmentation and identification of different mammalian cell types grown in co-culture. A quantitative comparison with prior methods demonstrates that convolutional neural networks have improved accuracy and lead to a significant reduction in curation time. We relay our experience in designing and optimizing deep convolutional neural networks for this task and outline several design rules that we found led to robust performance. We conclude that deep convolutional neural networks are an accurate method that require less curation time, are generalizable to a multiplicity of cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, and expand live-cell imaging capabilities to include multi-cell type systems.

  13. Water Dynamics at the Root of Metamorphosis in Living Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rosa Spinetti

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Liquid water has been recognized long ago to be the matrix of many processes, including life and also rock dynamics. Interactions among biomolecules occur very differently in a non-aqueous system and are unable to produce life. This ability to make living processes possible implies a very peculiar structure of liquid water. According to modern Quantum Field Theory (QFT, a complementary principle (in the sense of Niels Bohr holds between the number N of field quanta (including the matter field whose quanta are just the atoms/molecules and the phase Ф. This means that when we focus on the atomic structure of matter it loses its coherence properties and, vice versa, when we examine the phase dynamics of the system its atomic structure becomes undefined. Superfluid liquid Helium is the first example of this peculiar quantum dynamics. In the present paper we show how consideration of the phase dynamics of liquid water makes the understanding of its peculiar role in the onset of self-organization in living organisms and in ecosystems possible.

  14. Following the Dyamics of DNA in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, Joshua; Raghunathan, Krishnan; Chu, Mike; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2012-02-01

    Cells are brimming with molecular activity, but the cellular interior is much more than a test tube for biochemical reactions. The intracellular environment imposes a variety of mechanical constraints and engenders interactions from molecular crowding to a range of motor-driven activity responsible for transcription, replication, cargo transport, cytoskeletal rearrangement, chromosomal remodeling, and so on. We have developed a two-color correlational microscopy technique to follow the dynamics of DNA interacting with the in vivo cellular environment. Substantial differences between live cells and dead, yet structurally intact, cells point to a strong coupling of active, motor-driven fluctuations in the cell. This suggests that the motion of native, cellular DNA may similarly be driven by active processes, instead of relying on purely thermal, passive fluctuations. We also note that the correlations provide a sensitive measure for the effective length of the DNA probe on a length scale around one persistence length (˜ 50 nm). This paves the way for experiments with more complex DNA probes that can bind transcription factors to form protein-mediated DNA loops, the dynamics of which could be observed through this method.

  15. Enlightening intracellular complexity of living cells with quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Torres, C.; Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Boyer Provera, E.; Elezgaray, J.; Nicolini, F. E.; Maguer-Satta, V.; Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.

    2016-03-01

    The internal distribution of refractive indices (RIs) of a living cell is much more complex than usually admitted in multi-shell models. The reconstruction of RI maps from single phase images has rarely been achieved for several reasons: (i) we still have very little knowledge of the impact of internal macromolecular complexes on the local RI and (ii) phase changes produced by light propagation through the sample are mixed with diffraction effects by internal cell bodies. We propose the implementation a 2D wavelet-based contour chain detection method to distinguish internal boundaries thanks to their greatest optical path difference gradients. These contour chains correspond to the highest image phase contrast and follow the local RI inhomogeneities linked to the intracellular structural intricacy. Their statistics and spatial distribution are morphological indicators for distinguishing cells of different origins and to follow their transformation in pathologic situations. We use this method to compare non adherent blood cells from primary and laboratory culture origins, in healthy and pathological situations (chronic myelogenous leukaemia). In a second part of this presentation, we concentrate on the temporal dynamics of the phase contour chains and we discuss the spectral decomposition of their dynamics in both health and disease.

  16. Kinase Activity Studied in Living Cells Using an Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavec, Aljos?a

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates the use of an immunoassay for studying kinase enzyme activity in living cells. The advantage over the classical method, in which students have to isolate the enzyme from cell material and measure its activity in vitro, is that enzyme activity is modulated and measured in living cells, providing a more…

  17. Tracking single mRNA molecules in live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyungseok C.; Lee, Byung Hun; Lim, Kiseong; Son, Jae Seok; Song, Minho S.; Park, Hye Yoon

    2016-06-01

    mRNAs inside cells interact with numerous RNA-binding proteins, microRNAs, and ribosomes that together compose a highly heterogeneous population of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particles. Perhaps one of the best ways to investigate the complex regulation of mRNA is to observe individual molecules. Single molecule imaging allows the collection of quantitative and statistical data on subpopulations and transient states that are otherwise obscured by ensemble averaging. In addition, single particle tracking reveals the sequence of events that occur in the formation and remodeling of mRNPs in real time. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art techniques in tagging, delivery, and imaging to track single mRNAs in live cells. We also discuss how these techniques are applied to extract dynamic information on the transcription, transport, localization, and translation of mRNAs. These studies demonstrate how single molecule tracking is transforming the understanding of mRNA regulation in live cells.

  18. Microbial Cell Dynamics Lab (MCDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microbial Cell Dynamics Laboratory at PNNL enables scientists to study the molecular details of microbes under relevant environmental conditions. The MCDL seeks...

  19. Long-Term Live Cell Imaging of Cell Migration: Effects of Pathogenic Fungi on Human Epithelial Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllert, Torsten; Langford, George M

    2016-01-01

    Long-term live cell imaging was used in this study to determine the responses of human epithelial cells to pathogenic biofilms formed by Candida albicans. Epithelial cells of the skin represent the front line of defense against invasive pathogens such as C. albicans but under certain circumstances, especially when the host's immune system is compromised, the skin barrier is breached. The mechanisms by which the fungal pathogen penetrates the skin and invade the deeper layers are not fully understood. In this study we used keratinocytes grown in culture as an in vitro model system to determine changes in host cell migration and the actin cytoskeleton in response to virulence factors produced by biofilms of pathogenic C. albicans. It is clear that changes in epithelial cell migration are part of the response to virulence factors secreted by biofilms of C. albicans and the actin cytoskeleton is the downstream effector that mediates cell migration. Our goal is to understand the mechanism by which virulence factors hijack the signaling pathways of the actin cytoskeleton to alter cell migration and thereby invade host tissues. To understand the dynamic changes of the actin cytoskeleton during infection, we used long-term live cell imaging to obtain spatial and temporal information of actin filament dynamics and to identify signal transduction pathways that regulate the actin cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Long-term live cell imaging was achieved using a high resolution, multi-mode epifluorescence microscope equipped with specialized light sources, high-speed cameras with high sensitivity detectors, and specific biocompatible fluorescent markers. In addition to the multi-mode epifluorescence microscope, a spinning disk confocal long-term live cell imaging system (Olympus CV1000) equipped with a stage incubator to create a stable in vitro environment for long-term real-time and time-lapse microscopy was used. Detailed descriptions of these two long-term live

  20. How we live and why we die the secret lives of cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wolpert, Lewis

    2009-01-01

    Cells are the basis of all life in the universe. Our bodies are made up of billions of them: an incredibly complex society that governs everything, from movement to memory and imagination. When we age, it is because our cells slow down; when we get ill, it is because our cells mutate or stop working. In "How We Live and Why we Die", Wolpert provides a clear explanation of the science that underpins our lives. He explains how our bodies function and how we derived from a single cell - the embryo. He examines the science behind the topics that are much discussed but rarely understood - stem-cell research, cloning, DNA - and explains how all life evolved from just one cell. Lively and passionate, "How We Live and Why we Die" is an accessible guide to understanding the human body and, essentially, life itself.

  1. Manual for Dynamic Triaxial Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Schmidt; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    This report is a test report that describes the test setup for a dynamic triaxial cell at the Laboratory for Geotechnique at Aalborg University.......This report is a test report that describes the test setup for a dynamic triaxial cell at the Laboratory for Geotechnique at Aalborg University....

  2. Imaging proteolytic activity in live cells and animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Galbán

    Full Text Available In addition to their degradative role in protein turnover, proteases play a key role as positive or negative regulators of signal transduction pathways and therefore their dysregulation contributes to many disease states. Regulatory roles of proteases include their hormone-like role in triggering G protein-coupled signaling (Protease-Activated-Receptors; their role in shedding of ligands such as EGF, Notch and Fas; and their role in signaling events that lead to apoptotic cell death. Dysregulated activation of apoptosis by the caspase family of proteases has been linked to diseases such as cancer, autoimmunity and inflammation. In an effort to better understand the role of proteases in health and disease, a luciferase biosensor is described which can quantitatively report proteolytic activity in live cells and mouse models. The biosensor, hereafter referred to as GloSensor Caspase 3/7 has a robust signal to noise (50-100 fold and dynamic range such that it can be used to screen for pharmacologically active compounds in high throughput campaigns as well as to study cell signaling in rare cell populations such as isolated cancer stem cells. The biosensor can also be used in the context of genetically engineered mouse models of human disease wherein conditional expression using the Cre/loxP technology can be implemented to investigate the role of a specific protease in living subjects. While the regulation of apoptosis by caspase's was used as an example in these studies, biosensors to study additional proteases involved in the regulation of normal and pathological cellular processes can be designed using the concepts presented herein.

  3. Immunolabeling artifacts and the need for live-cell imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnell, Ulrike; Dijk, Freark; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent fusion proteins have revolutionized examination of proteins in living cells. Still, studies using these proteins are met with criticism because proteins are modified and ectopically expressed, in contrast to immunofluorescence studies. However, introducing immunoreagents inside cells can

  4. Dynamized Preparations in Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellanzhiyil Surendran Sunila

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929 and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The effect of dynamized medicines to induce apoptosis was also evaluated and we studied how dynamized medicines affected genes expressed during apoptosis. Mother tinctures as well as some dynamized medicines showed significant cytotoxicity to cells during short and long-term incubation. Potentiated alcohol control did not produce any cytotoxicity at concentrations studied. The dynamized medicines were found to inhibit CHO cell colony formation and thymidine uptake in L929 cells and those of Thuja, Hydrastis and Carcinosinum were found to induce apoptosis in DLA cells. Moreover, dynamized Carcinosinum was found to induce the expression of p53 while dynamized Thuja produced characteristic laddering pattern in agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA. These results indicate that dynamized medicines possess cytotoxic as well as apoptosis-inducing properties.

  5. Globally visualizing the microtubule-dependent transport behaviors of influenza virus in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Lin; Zhang, Li-Juan; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Wu, Qiu-Mei; Sun, En-Ze; Shi, Yun-Bo; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-04-15

    Understanding the microtubule-dependent behaviors of viruses in live cells is very meaningful for revealing the mechanisms of virus infection and endocytosis. Herein, we used a quantum dots-based single-particle tracking technique to dynamically and globally visualize the microtubule-dependent transport behaviors of influenza virus in live cells. We found that the intersection configuration of microtubules can interfere with the transport behaviors of the virus in live cells, which lead to the changing and long-time pausing of the transport behavior of viruses. Our results revealed that most of the viruses moved along straight microtubules rapidly and unidirectionally from the cell periphery to the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) near the bottom of the cell, and the viruses were confined in the grid of microtubules near the top of the cell and at the MTOC near the bottom of the cell. These results provided deep insights into the influence of entire microtubule geometry on the virus infection.

  6. Deep Learning Automates the Quantitative Analysis of Individual Cells in Live-Cell Imaging Experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Van Valen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Live-cell imaging has opened an exciting window into the role cellular heterogeneity plays in dynamic, living systems. A major critical challenge for this class of experiments is the problem of image segmentation, or determining which parts of a microscope image correspond to which individual cells. Current approaches require many hours of manual curation and depend on approaches that are difficult to share between labs. They are also unable to robustly segment the cytoplasms of mammalian cells. Here, we show that deep convolutional neural networks, a supervised machine learning method, can solve this challenge for multiple cell types across the domains of life. We demonstrate that this approach can robustly segment fluorescent images of cell nuclei as well as phase images of the cytoplasms of individual bacterial and mammalian cells from phase contrast images without the need for a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker. These networks also enable the simultaneous segmentation and identification of different mammalian cell types grown in co-culture. A quantitative comparison with prior methods demonstrates that convolutional neural networks have improved accuracy and lead to a significant reduction in curation time. We relay our experience in designing and optimizing deep convolutional neural networks for this task and outline several design rules that we found led to robust performance. We conclude that deep convolutional neural networks are an accurate method that require less curation time, are generalizable to a multiplicity of cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, and expand live-cell imaging capabilities to include multi-cell type systems.

  7. A microfluidic platform for correlative live-cell and super-resolution microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Tam

    Full Text Available Recently, super-resolution microscopy methods such as stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM have enabled visualization of subcellular structures below the optical resolution limit. Due to the poor temporal resolution, however, these methods have mostly been used to image fixed cells or dynamic processes that evolve on slow time-scales. In particular, fast dynamic processes and their relationship to the underlying ultrastructure or nanoscale protein organization cannot be discerned. To overcome this limitation, we have recently developed a correlative and sequential imaging method that combines live-cell and super-resolution microscopy. This approach adds dynamic background to ultrastructural images providing a new dimension to the interpretation of super-resolution data. However, currently, it suffers from the need to carry out tedious steps of sample preparation manually. To alleviate this problem, we implemented a simple and versatile microfluidic platform that streamlines the sample preparation steps in between live-cell and super-resolution imaging. The platform is based on a microfluidic chip with parallel, miniaturized imaging chambers and an automated fluid-injection device, which delivers a precise amount of a specified reagent to the selected imaging chamber at a specific time within the experiment. We demonstrate that this system can be used for live-cell imaging, automated fixation, and immunostaining of adherent mammalian cells in situ followed by STORM imaging. We further demonstrate an application by correlating mitochondrial dynamics, morphology, and nanoscale mitochondrial protein distribution in live and super-resolution images.

  8. A microfluidic platform for correlative live-cell and super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Johnny; Cordier, Guillaume Alan; Bálint, Štefan; Sandoval Álvarez, Ángel; Borbely, Joseph Steven; Lakadamyali, Melike

    2014-01-01

    Recently, super-resolution microscopy methods such as stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) have enabled visualization of subcellular structures below the optical resolution limit. Due to the poor temporal resolution, however, these methods have mostly been used to image fixed cells or dynamic processes that evolve on slow time-scales. In particular, fast dynamic processes and their relationship to the underlying ultrastructure or nanoscale protein organization cannot be discerned. To overcome this limitation, we have recently developed a correlative and sequential imaging method that combines live-cell and super-resolution microscopy. This approach adds dynamic background to ultrastructural images providing a new dimension to the interpretation of super-resolution data. However, currently, it suffers from the need to carry out tedious steps of sample preparation manually. To alleviate this problem, we implemented a simple and versatile microfluidic platform that streamlines the sample preparation steps in between live-cell and super-resolution imaging. The platform is based on a microfluidic chip with parallel, miniaturized imaging chambers and an automated fluid-injection device, which delivers a precise amount of a specified reagent to the selected imaging chamber at a specific time within the experiment. We demonstrate that this system can be used for live-cell imaging, automated fixation, and immunostaining of adherent mammalian cells in situ followed by STORM imaging. We further demonstrate an application by correlating mitochondrial dynamics, morphology, and nanoscale mitochondrial protein distribution in live and super-resolution images.

  9. Biophysical Techniques for Detection of cAMP and cGMP in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav O. Nikolaev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are ubiquitous second messengers which regulate myriads of functions in virtually all eukaryotic cells. Their intracellular effects are often mediated via discrete subcellular signaling microdomains. In this review, we will discuss state-of-the-art techniques to measure cAMP and cGMP in biological samples with a particular focus on live cell imaging approaches, which allow their detection with high temporal and spatial resolution in living cells and tissues. Finally, we will describe how these techniques can be applied to the analysis of second messenger dynamics in subcellular signaling microdomains.

  10. Live Cell Imaging Reveals Structural Associations between the Actin and Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis [W] [OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Lindeboom, Jelmer J.; Debolt, Seth; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ehrhardt, David W.; Ketelaar, Tijs; Persson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks are dynamic structures that organize intracellular processes and facilitate their rapid reorganization. In plant cells, actin filaments (AFs) and MTs are essential for cell growth and morphogenesis. However, dynamic interactions between these two essential components in live cells have not been explored. Here, we use spinning-disc confocal microscopy to dissect interaction and cooperation between cortical AFs and MTs in Arabidopsis thaliana, utilizing fluorescent reporter constructs for both components. Quantitative analyses revealed altered AF dynamics associated with the positions and orientations of cortical MTs. Reorganization and reassembly of the AF array was dependent on the MTs following drug-induced depolymerization, whereby short AFs initially appeared colocalized with MTs, and displayed motility along MTs. We also observed that light-induced reorganization of MTs occurred in concert with changes in AF behavior. Our results indicate dynamic interaction between the cortical actin and MT cytoskeletons in interphase plant cells. PMID:21693695

  11. Live cell in vitro and in vivo imaging applications: accelerating drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isherwood, Beverley; Timpson, Paul; McGhee, Ewan J; Anderson, Kurt I; Canel, Marta; Serrels, Alan; Brunton, Valerie G; Carragher, Neil O

    2011-04-04

    Dynamic regulation of specific molecular processes and cellular phenotypes in live cell systems reveal unique insights into cell fate and drug pharmacology that are not gained from traditional fixed endpoint assays. Recent advances in microscopic imaging platform technology combined with the development of novel optical biosensors and sophisticated image analysis solutions have increased the scope of live cell imaging applications in drug discovery. We highlight recent literature examples where live cell imaging has uncovered novel insight into biological mechanism or drug mode-of-action. We survey distinct types of optical biosensors and associated analytical methods for monitoring molecular dynamics, in vitro and in vivo. We describe the recent expansion of live cell imaging into automated target validation and drug screening activities through the development of dedicated brightfield and fluorescence kinetic imaging platforms. We provide specific examples of how temporal profiling of phenotypic response signatures using such kinetic imaging platforms can increase the value of in vitro high-content screening. Finally, we offer a prospective view of how further application and development of live cell imaging technology and reagents can accelerate preclinical lead optimization cycles and enhance the in vitro to in vivo translation of drug candidates.

  12. Small Molecule-Photoactive Yellow Protein Labeling Technology in Live Cell Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Gao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the chemical environment, movement, trafficking and interactions of proteins in live cells is essential to understanding their functions. Labeling protein with functional molecules is a widely used approach in protein research to elucidate the protein location and functions both in vitro and in live cells or in vivo. A peptide or a protein tag fused to the protein of interest and provides the opportunities for an attachment of small molecule probes or other fluorophore to image the dynamics of protein localization. Here we reviewed the recent development of no-wash small molecular probes for photoactive yellow protein (PYP-tag, by the means of utilizing a quenching mechanism based on the intramolecular interactions, or an environmental-sensitive fluorophore. Several fluorogenic probes have been developed, with fast labeling kinetics and cell permeability. This technology allows quick live-cell imaging of cell-surface and intracellular proteins without a wash-out procedure.

  13. Gold nanoparticles delivery in mammalian live cells: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Lévy

    2010-02-01

    the University of Liverpool as a Post-doctoral Marie Curie Research Fellow. In 2006, he obtained a prestigious David Phillips Fellowship, to develop single particle-based imaging in living cells (photothermal microscopy. His research interests include the design and characterization of nanomaterials and their interactions with living cells. Umbreen Shaheen completed her Master in Zoology and then lectured at the University of Balochistan. She studied biotechnology at the National Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE, Pakistan and is currently doing her PhD at the University of Liverpool, on intracellular delivery of peptide-capped gold nanoparticles. Yann Cesbron is a PhD student at the University of Liverpool, developing photothermal microscopy for biological imaging. He graduated at the University Louis Pasteur (Strasbourg, France with a Master of Science in Condensed Matter Physics and a second Master of Science in Polymer Materials. He moved to Liverpool in 2006 to start his PhD. Violaine Sée is a BBSRC David Phillips Research Fellow at the University of Liverpool. She graduated in Chemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg (France. After a Master in Pharmacology, in 2001 she obtained her PhD in Pharmacology and Neurobiology at the University Louis Pasteur. She was then assistant lecturer and subsequently moved to the University of Liverpool as a Post-doctoral Research Fellow. In 2005, she obtained a prestigious David Phillips Fellowship, to develop her work on intracellular signaling dynamics. She is focusing on the imaging of single living cells in order to understand regulation of gene transcription and cell fate. She has recently been interested in using new techniques for single molecule imaging in live cells based on the use of gold nanoparticles.

  14. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek C. Macallan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy.

  15. Information dynamics in living systems: prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Roy Frieden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Living systems use information and energy to maintain stable entropy while far from thermodynamic equilibrium. The underlying first principles have not been established. FINDINGS: We propose that stable entropy in living systems, in the absence of thermodynamic equilibrium, requires an information extremum (maximum or minimum, which is invariant to first order perturbations. Proliferation and death represent key feedback mechanisms that promote stability even in a non-equilibrium state. A system moves to low or high information depending on its energy status, as the benefit of information in maintaining and increasing order is balanced against its energy cost. Prokaryotes, which lack specialized energy-producing organelles (mitochondria, are energy-limited and constrained to an information minimum. Acquisition of mitochondria is viewed as a critical evolutionary step that, by allowing eukaryotes to achieve a sufficiently high energy state, permitted a phase transition to an information maximum. This state, in contrast to the prokaryote minima, allowed evolution of complex, multicellular organisms. A special case is a malignant cell, which is modeled as a phase transition from a maximum to minimum information state. The minimum leads to a predicted power-law governing the in situ growth that is confirmed by studies measuring growth of small breast cancers. CONCLUSIONS: We find living systems achieve a stable entropic state by maintaining an extreme level of information. The evolutionary divergence of prokaryotes and eukaryotes resulted from acquisition of specialized energy organelles that allowed transition from information minima to maxima, respectively. Carcinogenesis represents a reverse transition: of an information maximum to minimum. The progressive information loss is evident in accumulating mutations, disordered morphology, and functional decline characteristics of human cancers. The findings suggest energy restriction is a

  16. Single Molecule Imaging in Living Cell with Optical Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Significance, difficult, international developing actuality and our completed works for single molecules imaging in living cell with optical method are described respectively. Additionally we give out some suggestions for the technology development further.

  17. Micropatterning tractional forces in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Ostuni, Emanuele; Whitesides, George M.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Here we describe a method for quantifying traction in cells that are physically constrained within micron-sized adhesive islands of defined shape and size on the surface of flexible polyacrylamide gels that contain fluorescent microbeads (0.2-microm diameter). Smooth muscle cells were plated onto square (50 x 50 microm) or circular (25- or 50-microm diameter) adhesive islands that were created on the surface of the gels by applying a collagen coating through microengineered holes in an elastomeric membrane that was later removed. Adherent cells spread to take on the size and shape of the islands and cell tractions were quantitated by mapping displacement fields of the fluorescent microbeads within the gel. Cells on round islands did not exhibit any preferential direction of force application, but they exerted their strongest traction at sites where they formed protrusions. When cells were confined to squares, traction was highest in the corners both in the absence and presence of the contractile agonist, histamine, and cell protrusions were also observed in these regions. Quantitation of the mean traction exerted by cells cultured on the different islands revealed that cell tension increased as cell spreading was promoted. These results provide a mechanical basis for past studies that demonstrated a similar correlation between spreading and growth within various anchorage-dependent cells. This new approach for analyzing the spatial distribution of mechanical forces beneath individual cells that are experimentally constrained to defined sizes and shapes may provide additional insight into the biophysical basis of cell regulation. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Fluorescent labelling of intestinal epithelial cells reveals independent long-lived intestinal stem cells in a crypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horita, Nobukatsu [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro, E-mail: kii.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Diseases, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Hayashi, Ryohei [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Hiroshima University (Japan); Fukushima, Keita; Hibiya, Shuji; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Yui, Shiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Advanced Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Diseases, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Lentivirus mixed with Matrigel enables direct infection of intestinal organoids. • Our original approach allows the marking of a single stem cell in a crypt. • Time-lapse imaging shows the dynamics of a single stem cell. • Our lentivirus transgene system demonstrates plural long-lived stem cells in a crypt. - Abstract: Background and aims: The dynamics of intestinal stem cells are crucial for regulation of intestinal function and maintenance. Although crypt stem cells have been identified in the intestine by genetic marking methods, identification of plural crypt stem cells has not yet been achieved as they are visualised in the same colour. Methods: Intestinal organoids were transferred into Matrigel® mixed with lentivirus encoding mCherry. The dynamics of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using time-lapse imaging, and the localisation of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using 3D immunofluorescence. Results: We established an original method for the introduction of a transgene into an organoid generated from mouse small intestine that resulted in continuous fluorescence of the mCherry protein in a portion of organoid cells. Three-dimensional analysis using confocal microscopy showed a single mCherry-positive cell in an organoid crypt that had been cultured for >1 year, which suggested the presence of long-lived mCherry-positive and -negative stem cells in the same crypt. Moreover, a single mCherry-positive stem cell in a crypt gave rise to both crypt base columnar cells and transit amplifying cells. Each mCherry-positive and -negative cell contributed to the generation of organoids. Conclusions: The use of our original lentiviral transgene system to mark individual organoid crypt stem cells showed that long-lived plural crypt stem cells might independently serve as intestinal epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of a completely functional villus.

  19. Nanoscale bio-platforms for living cell interrogation: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lingqian; Hu, Jiaming; Chen, Feng; Chen, Zhou; Shi, Junfeng; Yang, Zhaogang; Li, Yiwen; Lee, Ly James

    2016-02-14

    The living cell is a complex entity that dynamically responds to both intracellular and extracellular environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the understanding intracellular functions orchestrated with mRNAs and proteins in investigation of the fate of a single-cell, including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, differentiation and mutations. The rapid development of modern cellular analysis techniques (e.g. PCR, western blotting, immunochemistry, etc.) offers new opportunities in quantitative analysis of RNA/protein expression up to a single cell level. The recent entries of nanoscale platforms that include kinds of methodologies with high spatial and temporal resolution have been widely employed to probe the living cells. In this tutorial review paper, we give insight into background introduction and technical innovation of currently reported nanoscale platforms for living cell interrogation. These highlighted technologies are documented in details within four categories, including nano-biosensors for label-free detection of living cells, nanodevices for living cell probing by intracellular marker delivery, high-throughput platforms towards clinical current, and the progress of microscopic imaging platforms for cell/tissue tracking in vitro and in vivo. Perspectives for system improvement were also discussed to solve the limitations remains in current techniques, for the purpose of clinical use in future.

  20. Nanoscale bio-platforms for living cell interrogation: current status and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lingqian; Hu, Jiaming; Chen, Feng; Chen, Zhou; Shi, Junfeng; Yang, Zhaogang; Li, Yiwen; Lee, Ly James

    2016-02-01

    The living cell is a complex entity that dynamically responds to both intracellular and extracellular environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the understanding intracellular functions orchestrated with mRNAs and proteins in investigation of the fate of a single-cell, including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, differentiation and mutations. The rapid development of modern cellular analysis techniques (e.g. PCR, western blotting, immunochemistry, etc.) offers new opportunities in quantitative analysis of RNA/protein expression up to a single cell level. The recent entries of nanoscale platforms that include kinds of methodologies with high spatial and temporal resolution have been widely employed to probe the living cells. In this tutorial review paper, we give insight into background introduction and technical innovation of currently reported nanoscale platforms for living cell interrogation. These highlighted technologies are documented in details within four categories, including nano-biosensors for label-free detection of living cells, nanodevices for living cell probing by intracellular marker delivery, high-throughput platforms towards clinical current, and the progress of microscopic imaging platforms for cell/tissue tracking in vitro and in vivo. Perspectives for system improvement were also discussed to solve the limitations remains in current techniques, for the purpose of clinical use in future.

  1. Influence of the environment and phototoxicity of the live cell imaging system at IMP microbeam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjing; Du, Guanghua; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Wei, Junzhe; Chen, Hao; Li, Yaning; Zhao, Jing; Li, Xiaoyue

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of DNA damage and repair after the ion irradiation, an online live cell imaging system has been established based on the microbeam facility at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP). The system could provide a sterile and physiological environment by making use of heating plate and live cell imaging solution. The phototoxicity was investigated through the evaluation of DNA repair protein XRCC1 foci formed in HT1080-RFP cells during the imaging exposure. The intensity of the foci induced by phototoxicity was much lower compared with that of the foci induced by heavy ion hits. The results showed that although spontaneous foci were formed due to RFP exposure during live cell imaging, they had little impact on the analysis of the recruitment kinetics of XRCC1 in the foci induced by the ion irradiation.

  2. Identification and super-resolution imaging of ligand-activated receptor dimers in live cells

    CERN Document Server

    Winckler, Pascale; Giannone, Gregory; De Giorgi, Francesca; Ichas, François; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Molecular interactions are key to many chemical and biological processes like protein function. In many signaling processes they occur in sub-cellular areas displaying nanoscale organizations and involving molecular assemblies. The nanometric dimensions and the dynamic nature of the interactions make their investigations complex in live cells. While super-resolution fluorescence microscopies offer live-cell molecular imaging with sub-wavelength resolutions, they lack specificity for distinguishing interacting molecule populations. Here we combine super-resolution microscopy and single-molecule F\\"orster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) to identify dimers of receptors induced by ligand binding and provide super-resolved images of their membrane distribution in live cells. By developing a two-color universal-Point-Accumulation-In-the-Nanoscale-Topography (uPAINT) method, dimers of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) activated by EGF are studied at ultra-high densities, revealing preferential cell-edge sub-...

  3. Model system for plant cell biology: GFP imaging in living onion epidermal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A.; Wyatt, S.; Tsou, P. L.; Robertson, D.; Allen, N. S.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to visualize organelle localization and dynamics is very useful in studying cellular physiological events. Until recently, this has been accomplished using a variety of staining methods. However, staining can give inaccurate information due to nonspecific staining, diffusion of the stain or through toxic effects. The ability to target green fluorescent protein (GFP) to various organelles allows for specific labeling of organelles in vivo. The disadvantages of GFP thus far have been the time and money involved in developing stable transformants or maintaining cell cultures for transient expression. In this paper, we present a rapid transient expression system using onion epidermal peels. We have localized GFP to various cellular compartments (including the cell wall) to illustrate the utility of this method and to visualize dynamics of these compartments. The onion epidermis has large, living, transparent cells in a monolayer, making them ideal for visualizing GFP. This method is easy and inexpensive, and it allows for testing of new GFP fusion proteins in a living tissue to determine deleterious effects and the ability to express before stable transformants are attempted.

  4. Model system for plant cell biology: GFP imaging in living onion epidermal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A.; Wyatt, S.; Tsou, P. L.; Robertson, D.; Allen, N. S.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to visualize organelle localization and dynamics is very useful in studying cellular physiological events. Until recently, this has been accomplished using a variety of staining methods. However, staining can give inaccurate information due to nonspecific staining, diffusion of the stain or through toxic effects. The ability to target green fluorescent protein (GFP) to various organelles allows for specific labeling of organelles in vivo. The disadvantages of GFP thus far have been the time and money involved in developing stable transformants or maintaining cell cultures for transient expression. In this paper, we present a rapid transient expression system using onion epidermal peels. We have localized GFP to various cellular compartments (including the cell wall) to illustrate the utility of this method and to visualize dynamics of these compartments. The onion epidermis has large, living, transparent cells in a monolayer, making them ideal for visualizing GFP. This method is easy and inexpensive, and it allows for testing of new GFP fusion proteins in a living tissue to determine deleterious effects and the ability to express before stable transformants are attempted.

  5. Trafficking of α1B-adrenergic receptor mediated by inverse agonist in living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MingXU; Ying-huaGUAN; NingXU; Zhang-yiLIANG; Shu-yiWang; YaoSONG; Chi-deHAN; Xin-shengZHAO; You-yiZHANG

    2005-01-01

    AIM The project is aimed at understanding the action of inverse agonist at single molecule level and capturing the real time picture of molecular behavior of α1B-adrenergic receptor (AR) mediated by inverse agonist in living cells by single molecule detection (SMD). METHODS The location and distribution of α1B-AR was detected by laser confocal and whole cell 3H-prazosin binding assay. Dynamic imaging of BODIPY-FL-labeled prazosin (Praz), specific antagonist of (1-AR, was observed in α1B-AR stably expressed human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) living cells. The detection of real-time dynamic behaviors of AR was achieved by using fluorescence-labeled AR and its ligand combined with SMD techniques. RESULTS α1B-AR was predominantly distributed on the cell surface and 8.2% of the total receptors were located in cytosol.

  6. Micro-photoluminescence of single living diatom cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeDuff, Paul; Roesijadi, Guritno; Rorrer, Gregory L

    2016-11-01

    Diatoms are single-celled microalgae that possess a nanostructured, porous biosilica shell called a frustule. This study characterized the micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) emission of single living cells of the photosynthetic marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana in response to UV laser irradiation at 325 nm using a confocal Raman microscope. The photoluminescence (PL) spectrum had two primary peaks, one centered at 500-510 nm, which was attributed to the frustule biosilica, and a second peak at 680 nm, which was attributed to auto-fluorescence of photosynthetic pigments. The portion of the μ-PL emission spectrum associated with biosilica frustule in the single living diatom cell was similar to that from single biosilica frustules isolated from these diatom cells. The PL emission by the biosilica frustule in the living cell emerged only after cells were cultivated to silicon depletion. The discovery of the discovery of PL emission by the frustule biosilica within a single living diatom itself, not just its isolated frustule, opens up future possibilities for living biosensor applications, where the interaction of diatom cells with other molecules can be probed by μ-PL spectroscopy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The Dynamics and Facilitation of a Living Lab Construct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum, Louise; Nielsen, Louise Møller

    2013-01-01

    and the different actors, processes and methods are therefore interesting to put into perspective as it contains opportunities for staging a well‐functioning Living Lab. This paper contributes to unfolding and discussing some of the main challenges in managing a Living Lab while keeping the different actors engaged...... in the process by drawing upon data from three Living Lab projects....

  8. Live cell imaging of in vitro human trophoblast syncytialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Dang, Yan-Li; Zheng, Ru; Li, Yue; Li, Weiwei; Lu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Li-Juan; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Hai-Yan; Wang, Hongmei

    2014-06-01

    Human trophoblast syncytialization, a process of cell-cell fusion, is one of the most important yet least understood events during placental development. Investigating the fusion process in a placenta in vivo is very challenging given the complexity of this process. Application of primary cultured cytotrophoblast cells isolated from term placentas and BeWo cells derived from human choriocarcinoma formulates a biphasic strategy to achieve the mechanism of trophoblast cell fusion, as the former can spontaneously fuse to form the multinucleated syncytium and the latter is capable of fusing under the treatment of forskolin (FSK). Live-cell imaging is a powerful tool that is widely used to investigate many physiological or pathological processes in various animal models or humans; however, to our knowledge, the mechanism of trophoblast cell fusion has not been reported using a live- cell imaging manner. In this study, a live-cell imaging system was used to delineate the fusion process of primary term cytotrophoblast cells and BeWo cells. By using live staining with Hoechst 33342 or cytoplasmic dyes or by stably transfecting enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and DsRed2-Nuc reporter plasmids, we observed finger-like protrusions on the cell membranes of fusion partners before fusion and the exchange of cytoplasmic contents during fusion. In summary, this study provides the first video recording of the process of trophoblast syncytialization. Furthermore, the various live-cell imaging systems used in this study will help to yield molecular insights into the syncytialization process during placental development. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  9. Preparation of cell lines for single-cell analysis of transcriptional activation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U; Janicki, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Imaging molecularly defined regions of chromatin in single living cells during transcriptional activation has the potential to provide new insight into gene regulatory mechanisms. Here, we describe a method for isolating cell lines with multi-copy arrays of reporter transgenes, which can be used for real-time high-resolution imaging of transcriptional activation dynamics in single cells.

  10. Microtubules in Plant Cells: Strategies and Methods for Immunofluorescence, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Live Cell Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celler, Katherine; Fujita, Miki; Kawamura, Eiko; Ambrose, Chris; Herburger, Klaus; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are required throughout plant development for a wide variety of processes, and different strategies have evolved to visualize and analyze them. This chapter provides specific methods that can be used to analyze microtubule organization and dynamic properties in plant systems and summarizes the advantages and limitations for each technique. We outline basic methods for preparing samples for immunofluorescence labelling, including an enzyme-based permeabilization method, and a freeze-shattering method, which generates microfractures in the cell wall to provide antibodies access to cells in cuticle-laden aerial organs such as leaves. We discuss current options for live cell imaging of MTs with fluorescently tagged proteins (FPs), and provide chemical fixation, high pressure freezing/freeze substitution, and post-fixation staining protocols for preserving MTs for transmission electron microscopy and tomography. PMID:26498784

  11. Continuous-Wave Stimulated Emission Depletion Microscope for Imaging Actin Cytoskeleton in Fixed and Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Neupane

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stimulated emission depletion (STED microscopy provides a new opportunity to study fine sub-cellular structures and highly dynamic cellular processes, which are challenging to observe using conventional optical microscopy. Using actin as an example, we explored the feasibility of using a continuous wave (CW-STED microscope to study the fine structure and dynamics in fixed and live cells. Actin plays an important role in cellular processes, whose functioning involves dynamic formation and reorganization of fine structures of actin filaments. Frequently used confocal fluorescence and STED microscopy dyes were employed to image fixed PC-12 cells (dyed with phalloidin- fluorescein isothiocyante and live rat chondrosarcoma cells (RCS transfected with actin-green fluorescent protein (GFP. Compared to conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, CW-STED microscopy shows improved spatial resolution in both fixed and live cells. We were able to monitor cell morphology changes continuously; however, the number of repetitive analyses were limited primarily by the dyes used in these experiments and could be improved with the use of dyes less susceptible to photobleaching. In conclusion, CW-STED may disclose new information for biological systems with a proper characteristic length scale. The challenges of using CW-STED microscopy to study cell structures are discussed.

  12. Measuring Molecular Forces Using Calibrated Optical Tweezers in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Adam G; Goldman, Yale E

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have been instrumental in uncovering the mechanisms motor proteins use to generate and react to force. While optical traps have primarily been applied to purified, in vitro systems, emerging methods enable measurements in living cells where the actively fluctuating, viscoelastic environment and varying refractive index complicate calibration of the instrument. Here, we describe techniques to calibrate optical traps in living cells using the forced response to sinusoidal oscillations and spontaneous fluctuations, and to measure the forces exerted by endogenous ensembles of kinesin and dynein motor proteins as they transport cargoes in the cell.

  13. Chapter 15: Live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Panorchan, Porntula; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method to measure the kinetics and micromechanical properties of individual receptor-ligand bonds formed between two living cells. Using living cells rather than recombinant proteins ensures that the orientation, surface density, and posttranslational modifications of the probed receptors are physiological and that their regulated attachment to the cytoskeleton can occur. A cell is tethered to a flexible cantilever and brought into contact with cells adherent to a substratum before being pulled at a controlled retraction velocity. Measurements of bond rupture forces and associated bond loading rates over an extended range of retraction velocities allow us to compute precisely the tensile strength, reactive compliance, lifetime, and dissociation rate of individual intercellular receptor-ligand bonds. We also describe tests of specificity and Monte Carlo simulations, which ensure that measurements obtained by this method correspond to a single type of intercellular adhesion bond. We illustrate this live-cell single molecule force spectroscopy assay by characterizing homotypic bonds composed of vascular endothelial -cadherin pairs formed between living endothelial cells. This versatile assay could be used to establish the molecular principles that drive a wide range of important physiological processes involving receptor-mediated intercellular adhesion, such as the immunological synapse between a lymphocyte and an antigen-presenting cell and synaptic interactions between neuron cells, and pathological processes resulting in altered intercellular adhesion.

  14. Detecting RNA viruses in living mammalian cells by fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, Divya; Biswas, Payal; Cella, Lakshmi N; Yates, Marylynn V; Chen, Wilfred

    2011-07-01

    Traditional methods that rely on viral isolation and culture techniques continue to be the gold standards used for detection of infectious viral particles. However, new techniques that rely on visualization of live cells can shed light on understanding virus-host interaction for early stage detection and potential drug discovery. Live-cell imaging techniques that incorporate fluorescent probes into viral components provide opportunities for understanding mRNA expression, interaction, and virus movement and localization. Other viral replication events inside a host cell can be exploited for non-invasive detection, such as single-virus tracking, which does not inhibit viral infectivity or cellular function. This review highlights some of the recent advances made using these novel approaches for visualization of viral entry and replication in live cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Study on the Curcumin dynamics and distribution through living biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Mariana T.; Dovigo, Lívia N.; Rastelli, Alessandra N. S.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2013-03-01

    Human oral cavity is colonized by a wide range of microorganisms, often organized in biofilms. These biofilms are responsible for the pathogenesis of caries and most periodontal diseases. A possible alternative to reduce biofilms is the photodynamic inactivation (PDI). The success of the PDI depends on different factors. The time required by the PS to remain in contact with the target cells prior to illumination is determinant for the technique's efficacy. This study aimed to assess the interaction between the PS and the biofilm prior to the PDI. We used confocal microscopy and FLIM to evaluate the interaction between the PS and the biofilm's microorganism during the pre-irradiation time (PIT). The study of this dynamics can lead to the understanding of why only some PSs are effective and why is necessary a long PIT for some microorganisms. Our results showed that are differences for each PIT. These differences can be the determinate for the efficacy of the PDI. We observed that the microorganism needs time to concentrate and/or transport the PS within the biofilm. We presented preliminary results for biofilms of Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans in the presence of Curcumin and compared it with the literature. We observed that the effectiveness of the PDI might be directly correlated to the position of the PS with the biofilm. Further analyses will be conducted in order to confirm the potential of FLIM to assess the PS dynamics within the biofilms.

  16. Modeling magnetosensitive ion channels in viscoelastic environment of living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Goychuk, Igor

    2015-01-01

    We propose and study a model of hypothetical magnetosensitive ionic channels which are long thought to be a possible candidate to explain the influence of weak magnetic fields on living organisms ranging from magnetotactic bacteria to fishes, birds, rats, bats and other mammals including humans. The core of the model is provided by a short chain of magnetosomes serving as a sensor which is coupled by elastic linkers to the gating elements of ion channels forming a small cluster in the cell membrane. The magnetic sensor is fixed by one end on cytoskeleton elements attached to the membrane and is exposed to viscoelastic cytosol. Its free end can reorient stochastically and subdiffusively in viscoelastic cytosol responding to external magnetic field changes and open the gates of coupled ion channels. The sensor dynamics is generally bistable due to bistability of the gates which can be in two states with probabilities which depend on the sensor orientation. For realistic parameters, it is shown that this model c...

  17. Mechanics of Cellulose Synthase Complexes in Living Plant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehfroosh, Nina; Liu, Derui; Ramos, Kieran P.; Yang, Xiaoli; Goldner, Lori S.; Baskin, Tobias I.

    The polymer cellulose is one of the major components of the world's biomass with unique and fascinating characteristics such as its high tensile strength, renewability, biodegradability, and biocompatibility. Because of these distinctive aspects, cellulose has been the subject of enormous scientific and industrial interest, yet there are still fundamental open questions about cellulose biosynthesis. Cellulose is synthesized by a complex of transmembrane proteins called ``Cellulose Synthase A'' (CESA) in the plasma membrane. Studying the dynamics and kinematics of the CESA complex will help reveal the mechanism of cellulose synthesis and permit the development and validation of models of CESA motility. To understand what drives these complexes through the cell membrane, we used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) and variable angle epi-fluorescence microscopy to track individual, fluorescently-labeled CESA complexes as they move in the hypocotyl and root of living plants. A mean square displacement analysis will be applied to distinguish ballistic, diffusional, and other forms of motion. We report on the results of these tracking experiments. This work was funded by NSF/PHY-1205989.

  18. Dynamic hyperinflation during activities of daily living in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cláudia S; Nogueira, Fabiana R; Porto, Elias F; Gazzotti, Mariana R; Nascimento, Oliver A; Camelier, Aquiles; Jardim, José R

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether some activities of daily living (ADLs) usually related to dyspnea sensation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are associated with dynamic lung hyperinflation (DH) and whether the use of simple energy conservation techniques (ECTs) might reduce this possible hyperinflation. Eighteen patients (mean age: 65.8 ± 9.8 years) with moderate-to-severe COPD performed six ADLs (walking on a treadmill, storing pots, walking 56 meters carrying a 5-kilogram weight, climbing stairs, simulating taking a shower, and putting on shoes) and had their inspiratory capacity (IC) measured before and after each task. The patients were moderately obstructed with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1): 1.4 ± 0.4 L (50% ± 12.4); FEV1/forced vital capacity: 0.4 ± 8.1; residual volume/total lung capacity: 52.7 ± 10.2, and a reduction in IC was seen after all six activities (p < 0.05): (1) going upstairs, 170 mL; (2) walking 56 meters carrying 5 kilogram weight, 150 mL; (3) walking on a treadmill without and with ECT, respectively, 230 mL and 235 mL; (4) storing pots without and with ECT, respectively, 170 mL and 128 mL; (5) taking a shower without and with ECT, respectively, 172 mL and 118 mL; and (6) putting on shoes without and with ECT, respectively, 210 mL and 78 mL). Patients with moderate to severe COPD develop DH after performing common ADLs involving the upper and lower limbs. Simple ECTs may avoid DH in some of these ADLs.

  19. Electromagnetic waves and living cells: A kinetic thermodynamic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2016-11-01

    Cells are complex thermodynamic systems. Their energy transfer, thermo-electro-chemical processes and transports phenomena can occur across the cells membranes, the border of the complex system. Moreover, cells can also actively modify their behaviours in relation to any change of their environment. All the living systems waste heat, which is no more than the result of their internal irreversibility. This heat is dissipated into their environment. But, this wasted heat represents also a sort of information, which outflows from the cell towards its environment, completely accessible to any observer. The analysis of irreversibility related to this wasted heat can represent a new useful approach to the study of the cells behaviour. This approach allows us to consider the living systems as black boxes and analyse only the inflows and outflows and their changes in relation to any environmental change. This analysis allows also the explanation of the effects of electromagnetic fields on the cell behaviour.

  20. Integrated nanoscale tools for interrogating living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgolli, Marsela

    and fabricated a new hybrid chip that combines a front-side nanowire-based interface for neuronal recording with backside complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits for on-chip multiplexing, voltage control for stimulation, signal amplification, and signal processing. Individual chips contain 1024 stimulation/recording sites enabling large-scale interfacing of neuronal networks with single cell resolution. Through electrical and electrochemical characterization of the devices, we demonstrated their enhanced functionality at a massively parallel scale. In our initial cell experiments, we achieved intracellular stimulations and recordings of changes in the membrane potential in a variety of cells including: HEK293T, cardiomyocytes, and rat cortical neurons. This demonstrated the device capability for single-cell-resolution recording/stimulation which when extended to a large number of neurons in a massively parallel fashion will enable the functional mapping of a complex neuronal network.

  1. Semi-automated quantification of living cells with internalized nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Margineanu, Michael B.

    2016-01-15

    Background Nanostructures fabricated by different methods have become increasingly important for various applications in biology and medicine, such as agents for medical imaging or cancer therapy. In order to understand their interaction with living cells and their internalization kinetics, several attempts have been made in tagging them. Although methods have been developed to measure the number of nanostructures internalized by the cells, there are only few approaches aimed to measure the number of cells that internalize the nanostructures, and they are usually limited to fixed-cell studies. Flow cytometry can be used for live-cell assays on large populations of cells, however it is a single time point measurement, and does not include any information about cell morphology. To date many of the observations made on internalization events are limited to few time points and cells. Results In this study, we present a method for quantifying cells with internalized magnetic nanowires (NWs). A machine learning-based computational framework, CellCognition, is adapted and used to classify cells with internalized and no internalized NWs, labeled with the fluorogenic pH-dependent dye pHrodo™ Red, and subsequently to determine the percentage of cells with internalized NWs at different time points. In a “proof-of-concept”, we performed a study on human colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells and human epithelial cervical cancer HeLa cells interacting with iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) NWs. Conclusions This study reports a novel method for the quantification of cells that internalize a specific type of nanostructures. This approach is suitable for high-throughput and real-time data analysis and has the potential to be used to study the interaction of different types of nanostructures in live-cell assays.

  2. A nucleic acid dependent chemical photocatalysis in live human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arian, Dumitru; Cló, Emiliano; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2010-01-01

    Only two nucleic acid directed chemical reactions that are compatible with live cells have been reported to date. Neither of these processes generate toxic species from nontoxic starting materials. Reactions of the latter type could be applied as gene-specific drugs, for example, in the treatment...... of cancer. We report here the first example of a chemical reaction that generates a cytotoxic drug from a nontoxic prodrug in the presence of a specific endogeneous ribonucleic acid in live mammalian cells. In this case, the prodrug is triplet oxygen and the drug is singlet oxygen. The key component...... singlet oxygen per nucleic acid target. This reaction is highly sequence specific. To detect the generation of singlet oxygen in live cells, we prepared a membrane-permeable and water-soluble fluorescent scavenger, a derivative of 2,5-diphenylisobenzofurane. The scavenger decomposes upon reaction...

  3. Visualization of Ins(1,4,5)P3 dynamics in living cells: two distinct pathways for Ins(1,4,5)P3 generation following mechanical stimulation of HSY-EA1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezu, Akihiro; Tanimura, Akihiko; Morita, Takao; Tojyo, Yosuke

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, the contribution of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P(3)] generation on the mechanical-stimulation-induced Ca(2+) response was investigated in HSY-EA1 cells. Mechanical stimulation induced a local increase in the cytosolic concentration of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) ([IP(3)](i)), as indicated by the Ins(1,4,5)P(3) biosensor LIBRAvIII. The area of this increase expanded like an intracellular Ins(1,4,5)P(3) wave as [IP(3)](i) increased in the stimulated region. A small transient [IP(3)](i) increase was subsequently seen in neighboring cells. The phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 abolished these Ins(1,4,5)P(3) responses and resultant Ca(2+) releases. The purinergic receptor blocker suramin completely blocked increases in [IP(3)](1) and the Ca(2+) release in neighboring cells, but failed to attenuate the responses in mechanically stimulated cells. These results indicate that generation of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) in response to mechanical stimulation is primarily independent of extracellular ATP. The speed of the mechanical-stimulation-induced [IP(3)](i) increase was much more rapid than that induced by a supramaximal concentration of ATP (1 mM). The contribution of the Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-induced Ca(2+) release was larger than that of Ca(2+) entry in the Ca(2+) response to mechanical stimulation in HSY-EA1 cells.

  4. [Regulation of cortical cytoskeleton dynamics during migration of free-living amoebae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłopocka, Wanda; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta; Wasik, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Amoeba proteus and smaller by an order of magnitude (and evolutionary younger) Acanthamoeba castellanii have been for many years model cells for studies of amoeboidal (crawling) type of movement, characteristic also for some of metazoan cells such as fibroblasts, granulocytes and macrophages. Amoeboidal migration is indispensable of organization and dynamics of actin-based cytoskeleton. While there is a number of data on molecular mechanisms of motility of A. castellanii, there is very little known about bases of migration of A. proteus. Noteworthy, a large A. proteus (length approximately 600 microm) have been from over a century an object for studies on biology and physiology of cellular migration. This review describes the current knowledge on molecular aspects of force generation required for migration of these two amoebae and attempts to compare the functioning and regulation of actin cytoskeleton in these free-living unicellular species.

  5. Dynamic imaging of cell-free and cell-associated viral capture in mature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Esteban, Olga; Rodriguez-Plata, Maria T; Erkizia, Itziar; Prado, Julia G; Blanco, Julià; García-Parajo, Maria F; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2011-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) capture human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through a non-fusogenic mechanism that enables viral transmission to CD4(+) T cells, contributing to in vivo viral dissemination. Although previous studies have provided important clues to cell-free viral capture by mature DCs (mDCs), dynamic and kinetic insight on this process is still missing. Here, we used three-dimensional video microscopy and single-particle tracking approaches to dynamically dissect both cell-free and cell-associated viral capture by living mDCs. We show that cell-free virus capture by mDCs operates through three sequential phases: virus binding through specific determinants expressed in the viral particle, polarized or directional movements toward concrete regions of the cell membrane and virus accumulation in a sac-like structure where trapped viral particles display a hindered diffusive behavior. Moreover, real-time imaging of cell-associated viral transfer to mDCs showed a similar dynamics to that exhibited by cell-free virus endocytosis leading to viral accumulation in compartments. However, cell-associated HIV type 1 transfer to mDCs was the most effective pathway, boosted throughout enhanced cellular contacts with infected CD4(+) T cells. Our results suggest that in lymphoid tissues, mDC viral uptake could occur either by encountering cell-free or cell-associated virus produced by infected cells generating the perfect scenario to promote HIV pathogenesis and impact disease progression.

  6. Photothermal modification of optical microscope for noninvasive living cell monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapotko, Dmitry; Romanovskaya, Tat'yana; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2001-06-01

    Photothermal method was applied to improve sensing and imaging capabilities of a light microscope in cell studies. We describe the methods, technical details and testing results of cytometric application of Laser Photothermal Phase Microscope (LPPM). The merits of the proposed approach include living single cell monitoring capability, quantitative measurement of cell functional features through the use of cell natural chromophores as the sensors. Such intracellular sensors are activated by the laser pulse and transform an absorbed energy into the heat. The latter causes thermal and mechanical loads to a cell and its components. The second stage of the process includes the reaction of the cell as integral system or of its components to such loads. This reaction is caused by the changes of cell functional and structural state and includes alterations of cell optical properties. Both processes are monitored for a single cell non-invasively with probe laser beam. Pulsed phase contrast dual beam illumination scheme with acquisition of several laser images at different stages of cell-laser interaction was introduced. An acquired cell image is considered as spatially and temporally resolved cell response to non-specific load that is induced in a cell with a pump laser. This method eliminates any cell staining and allows to monitor cell viability and cell reaction to the environmental factors. Also LPPM offers further improvement of spatial and temporal resolution of optical microscope: with pulsed probe laser monitoring we can detect components with the size down to 50 nm and temporal resolution of 10 ns. In our set up the cell is pumped by pulsed laser at 532 nm, 10 ns , 0.01-0.4 mJ. The source of probe beam is a pulsed dye laser (630 nm, 10 nJ, 10 ns) which forms cell phase image. The results obtained with living cells such as drug impact control, single cell dosimetry, immune action of light on a cell demonstrate basic features of LPPM as the tool for the study of the

  7. Characterizing motility dynamics in human RPE cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Furu; Miller, Donald T.

    2017-02-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, however, are often compromised in ageing and ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, but while in vivo biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. Recently we addressed this problem by using organelle motility as a novel contrast agent to enhance the RPE cell in conjunction with 3D resolution of adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) to section the RPE layer. In this study, we expand on the central novelty of our method - organelle motility - by characterizing the dynamics of the motility in individual RPE cells, important because of its direct link to RPE physiology. To do this, AO-OCT videos of the same retinal patch were acquired at approximately 1 min intervals or less, time stamped, and registered in 3D with sub-cellular accuracy. Motility was quantified by an exponential decay time constant, the time for motility to decorrelate the speckle field across an RPE cell. In two normal subjects, we found the decay time constant to be just 3 seconds, thus indicating rapid motility in normal RPE cells.

  8. Tracking of chromosome dynamics in live Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals that transcription promotes chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2014-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is an essential part of the bacterial cell cycle but is poorly characterized in oval-shaped streptococci. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have tracked the dynamics of chromosome segregation in live cells of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Our observations show that the chromosome segregation process last for two-thirds of the total cell cycle; the origin region segregates rapidly in the early stages of the cell cycle while nucleoid segregation finishes just before cell division. Previously we have demonstrated that the DNA-binding protein ParB and the condensin SMC promote efficient chromosome segregation, likely by an active mechanism. We now show that in the absence of SMC, cell division can occur over the unsegregated chromosomes. However, neither smc nor parB are essential in S. pneumoniae, suggesting the importance of additional mechanisms. Here we have identified the process of transcription as one of these mechanisms important for chromosome segregation in S. pneumoniae. Transcription inhibitors rifampicin and streptolydigin as well as mutants affected in transcription elongation cause chromosome segregation defects. Together, our results highlight the importance of passive (or indirect) processes such as transcription for chromosome segregation in oval-shaped bacteria.

  9. Information management for high content live cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Michael RH

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High content live cell imaging experiments are able to track the cellular localisation of labelled proteins in multiple live cells over a time course. Experiments using high content live cell imaging will generate multiple large datasets that are often stored in an ad-hoc manner. This hinders identification of previously gathered data that may be relevant to current analyses. Whilst solutions exist for managing image data, they are primarily concerned with storage and retrieval of the images themselves and not the data derived from the images. There is therefore a requirement for an information management solution that facilitates the indexing of experimental metadata and results of high content live cell imaging experiments. Results We have designed and implemented a data model and information management solution for the data gathered through high content live cell imaging experiments. Many of the experiments to be stored measure the translocation of fluorescently labelled proteins from cytoplasm to nucleus in individual cells. The functionality of this database has been enhanced by the addition of an algorithm that automatically annotates results of these experiments with the timings of translocations and periods of any oscillatory translocations as they are uploaded to the repository. Testing has shown the algorithm to perform well with a variety of previously unseen data. Conclusion Our repository is a fully functional example of how high throughput imaging data may be effectively indexed and managed to address the requirements of end users. By implementing the automated analysis of experimental results, we have provided a clear impetus for individuals to ensure that their data forms part of that which is stored in the repository. Although focused on imaging, the solution provided is sufficiently generic to be applied to other functional proteomics and genomics experiments. The software is available from: fhttp://code.google.com/p/livecellim/

  10. Living with a diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer: patients' lived experiences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Ita

    2012-01-31

    The aim of this study was to explore patients\\' experience of living with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients diagnosed with NSCLC know that their treatment is not with curative intent and can expect distressing symptoms. In this phenomenological study, six adults with a diagnosis of NSCLC were interviewed. Data was analysed guided by van Manen\\'s six-step process. Four main themes were interpreted: \\'Maintaining my life\\'; \\'The enemy within\\'; \\'Staying on the train\\

  11. Optical manipulation of single molecules in the living cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Jauffred, Liselotte; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine;

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers are the only nano-tools capable of manipulating and performing force-measurements on individual molecules and organelles within the living cell without performing destructive penetration through the cell wall and without the need for inserting a non-endogenous probe. Here, we...... describe how optical tweezers are used to manipulate individual molecules and perform accurate force and distance measurements within the complex cytoplasm of the living cell. Optical tweezers can grab individual molecules or organelles, if their optical contrast to the medium is large enough......, as is the case, e. g., for lipid granules or chromosomes. However, often the molecule of interest is specifically attached to a handle manipulated by the optical trap. The most commonly used handles, their insertion into the cytoplasm, and the relevant micro-rheology of the cell are discussed here and we also...

  12. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-09-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential.

  13. Live-cell thermometry with nitrogen vacancy centers in nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Harishankar; Fedder, Helmut; Chen, Andrew; Yang, Liudi; Li, Chenghai; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Wang, Sihong; Meriles, Carlos

    The ability to measure temperature is typically affected by a tradeoff between sensitivity and spatial resolution. Good thermometers tend to be bulky systems and hence are ill-suited for thermal sensing with high spatial localization. Conversely, the signal resulting from nanoscale temperature probes is often impacted by noise to a level where the measurement precision becomes poor. Adding to the microscopist toolbox, the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond has recently emerged as a promising platform for high-sensitivity nanoscale thermometry. Of particular interest are applications in living cells because diamond nanocrystals are biocompatible and can be chemically functionalized to target specific organelles. Here we report progress on the ability to probe and compare temperature within and between living cells using nanodiamond-hosted NV thermometry. We focus our study on cancerous cells, where atypical metabolic pathways arguably lead to changes in the way a cell generates heat, and thus on its temperature profile.

  14. Biosynthesis of a Fully Functional Cyclotide inside Living Bacterial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Kimura, R H; Woo, Y; Cantor, J; Shekhtman, A

    2007-04-05

    The cyclotide MCoTI-II is a powerful trypsin inhibitor recently isolated from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis, a plant member of cucurbitaceae family. We report for the first time the in vivo biosynthesis of natively-folded MCoTI-II inside live E. coli cells. Our biomimetic approach involves the intracellular backbone cyclization of a linear cyclotide-intein fusion precursor mediated by a modified protein splicing domain. The cyclized peptide then spontaneously folds into its native conformation. The use of genetically engineered E. coli cells containing mutations in the glutathione and thioredoxin reductase genes considerably improves the production of folded MCoTI-II in vivo. Biochemical and structural characterization of the recombinant MCoTI-II confirmed its identity. Biosynthetic access to correctly-folded cyclotides allows the possibility of generating cell-based combinatorial libraries that can be screened inside living cells for their ability to modulate or inhibit cellular processes.

  15. Shape regulation generates elastic interaction between living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkov, Roman; Shokef, Yair

    2017-06-01

    The organization of live cells to tissues is associated with the mechanical interaction between cells, which is mediated through their elastic environment. We model cells as spherical active force dipoles surrounded by an infinite elastic matrix, and analytically evaluate the interaction energy for different scenarios of their regulatory behavior. We obtain attraction for homeostatic (set point) forces and repulsion for homeostatic displacements. When the translational motion of the cells is regulated, the interaction energy decays with distance as 1/{d}4, while when it is not regulated the energy decays as 1/{d}6. This arises from the same reasons as the van der Waals interaction between induced electric dipoles.

  16. Structural relaxation of acridine orange dimer in bulk water and inside a single live lung cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Nandi, Somen; Halder, Ritaban; Jana, Biman; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-02-01

    Structural relaxation of the acridine orange (AO) dimer in bulk water and inside a single live lung cell is studied using time resolved confocal microscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The emission maxima ( λem max ˜ 630 nm) of AO in a lung cancer cell (A549) and a non-cancer lung fibroblast cell (WI38) suggest that AO exists as a dimer inside the cell. Time-dependent red shift in emission maximum indicates dynamic relaxation of the AO dimer (in the excited state) with a time constant of 500-600 ps, both in bulk water and inside the cell. We have calculated the equilibrium relaxation dynamics of the AO dimer in the ground state using MD simulations and found a slow component of time scale ˜350 ps. The intra- and inter-molecular components of the total relaxation dynamics of the AO dimer reveal the presence of a slow component of the order of a few hundred picoseconds. Upon restricting intra-molecular dye dynamics by harmonic constraint between AO monomers, the slow component vanishes. Combining the experimental observations and MD simulation results, we ascribe the slow component of the dynamic relaxation of the AO dimer to the structural relaxation, namely, fluctuations in the distance between the two monomers and associated fluctuation in the number of water molecules.

  17. PALM and STORM: unlocking live-cell super-resolution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Henriques, R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Live-cell fluorescence light microscopy has emerged as an important tool in the study of cellular biology. The development of fluorescent markers in parallel with super-resolution imaging systems has pushed light microscopy into the realm...

  18. Micro magnetic tweezers for nanomanipulation inside live cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. de Vries; G.E. Krenn; R. van Driel; J.S. Kanger

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the design, realization, and characterization of a multi-pole magnetic tweezers that enables us to maneuver small magnetic probes inside living cells. So far, magnetic tweezers can be divided into two categories: I), tweezers that allow the exertion of high forces but consist of o

  19. Micro Magnetic Tweezers for Nanomanipulation Inside Live Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Anthony H.B.; Krenn, Bea E.; Driel, van Roel; Kanger, Johannes S.

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the design, realization, and characterization of a multi-pole magnetic tweezers that enables us to maneuver small magnetic probes inside living cells. So far, magnetic tweezers can be divided into two categories: I), tweezers that allow the exertion of high forces but consist of o

  20. Raman microscopy of individual living human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikov, Sergey M.; Beermann, Jonas; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of mapping the distribution of different biomolecules in living human embryonic stem cells grown on glass substrates, without the need for fluorescent markers. In our work we improve the quality of measurements by finding a buffer that gives low fluorescence, growing...

  1. Lives of a Cell: 40 Years Later, A Third Interpretation

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-06-16

    Reginald Tucker reads an abridged version of the article Lives of a Cell: 40 Years Later, A Third Interpretation.  Created: 6/16/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/18/2015.

  2. High force magnetic tweezers for molecular manipulation inside living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A.H.B.

    2004-01-01

    The problem however, is that there are no suitable methods for doing spatially resolved measurements with molecular resolution that are fit to study these molecular interactions directly within a living cell. This thesis takes a first step towards the development of methods and instrumentation to st

  3. Energy, control and DNA structure in the living cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijker, J.E.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Gomes, A. Vaz

    1995-01-01

    Maintenance (let alone growth) of the highly ordered living cell is only possible through the continuous input of free energy. Coupling of energetically downhill processes (such as catabolic reactions) to uphill processes is essential to provide this free energy and is catalyzed by enzymes either...

  4. Imaging Proteolysis by Living Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Sameni

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant progression is accompanied by degradation of extracellular matrix proteins. Here we describe a novel confocal assay in which we can observe proteolysis by living human breast cancer cells (BT20 and BT549 through the use of quenchedfluorescent protein substrates. Degradation thus was imaged, by confocal optical sectioning, as an accumulation of fluorescent products. With the BT20 cells, fluorescence was localized to pericellular focal areas that coincide with pits in the underlying matrix. In contrast, fluorescence was localized to intracellular vesicles in the BT549 cells, vesicles that also label for lysosomal markers. Neither intracellular nor pericellular fluorescence was observed in the BT549 cells in the presence of cytochalasin B, suggesting that degradation occurred intracellularly and was dependent on endocytic uptake of substrate. In the presence of a cathepsin 13-selective cysteine protease inhibitor, intracellular fluorescence was decreased ~90% and pericellular fluorescence decreased 67% to 96%, depending on the protein substrate. Matrix metallo protease inhibitors reduced pericellular fluorescence ~50%, i.e., comparably to a serine and a broad spectrum cysteine protease inhibitor. Our results suggest that: 1 a proteolytic cascade participates in pericellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells, and 2 the cysteine protease cathepsin B participates in both pericellular and intracellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells.

  5. Minimal paths and probabilistic models for origin-destination traffic estimation in live cell imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Pecot, Thierry; Kervrann, Charles; Bouthemy, P.

    2008-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-tagging and time-lapse fluorescence microscopy enable to observe molecular dynamics and interactions in live cells. Original image analysis methods are then required to process challenging 2D or 3D image sequences. To address the tracking problem of several hundreds of objects, we propose an original framework that provides general information about vesicle transport, that is traffic flows between origin and destination regions detected in the image sequence. T...

  6. Internalization of ferromagnetic nanowires by different living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coey John

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability of living cells, either adherent or suspended, to internalize nickel nanowires is demonstrated for MC3T3-E1, UMR106-tumour and Marrow-Stromal cells. Nanowires were produced by electrodeposition, 20 μm long and 200 nm in diameter. Cell separation and manipulation was achieved for the three cell types. Applied magnetic field successfully oriented the internalized nanowires but no clear anisotropy is induced on the adherent cells. Nanowires tend to bind to cytoplasm metalloproteins and trigger lysosome reorganization around the nucleus. This work demonstrates the applications of nanowires in adherent and suspended cells for cell separation and manipulation, and further explore into their role in nanobiotechnology.

  7. Enhanced fluorescence imaging of live cells by effective cytosolic delivery of probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Massignani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microscopic techniques enable real-space imaging of complex biological events and processes. They have become an essential tool to confirm and complement hypotheses made by biomedical scientists and also allow the re-examination of existing models, hence influencing future investigations. Particularly imaging live cells is crucial for an improved understanding of dynamic biological processes, however hitherto live cell imaging has been limited by the necessity to introduce probes within a cell without altering its physiological and structural integrity. We demonstrate herein that this hurdle can be overcome by effective cytosolic delivery. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show the delivery within several types of mammalian cells using nanometre-sized biomimetic polymer vesicles (a.k.a. polymersomes that offer both highly efficient cellular uptake and endolysomal escape capability without any effect on the cellular metabolic activity. Such biocompatible polymersomes can encapsulate various types of probes including cell membrane probes and nucleic acid probes as well as labelled nucleic acids, antibodies and quantum dots. SIGNIFICANCE: We show the delivery of sufficient quantities of probes to the cytosol, allowing sustained functional imaging of live cells over time periods of days to weeks. Finally the combination of such effective staining with three-dimensional imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy allows cell imaging in complex three-dimensional environments under both mono-culture and co-culture conditions. Thus cell migration and proliferation can be studied in models that are much closer to the in vivo situation.

  8. Imaging of mobile long-lived nanoplatforms in the live cell plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brameshuber, Mario; Weghuber, Julian; Ruprecht, Verena; Gombos, Imre; Horváth, Ibolya; Vigh, László; Eckerstorfer, Paul; Kiss, Endre; Stockinger, Hannes; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2010-12-31

    The plasma membrane has been hypothesized to contain nanoscopic lipid platforms, which are discussed in the context of "lipid rafts" or "membrane rafts." Based on biochemical and cell biological studies, rafts are believed to play a crucial role in many signaling processes. However, there is currently not much information on their size, shape, stability, surface density, composition, and heterogeneity. We present here a method that allows for the first time the direct imaging of nanoscopic long-lived platforms with raft-like properties diffusing in the live cell plasma membrane. Our method senses these platforms by their property to assemble a characteristic set of fluorescent marker proteins or lipids on a time scale of seconds. A special photobleaching protocol was used to reduce the surface density of labeled mobile platforms down to the level of well isolated diffraction-limited spots without altering the single spot brightness. The statistical distribution of probe molecules per platform was determined by single molecule brightness analysis. For demonstration, we used the consensus raft marker glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric GFP and the fluorescent lipid analog BODIPY-G(M1), which preferentially partitions into liquid-ordered phases. For both markers, we found cholesterol-dependent homo-association in the plasma membrane of living CHO and Jurkat T cells in the resting state, thereby demonstrating the existence of small, mobile, long-lived platforms containing these probes. We further applied the technology to address structural changes in the plasma membrane during fever-type heat shock: at elevated temperatures, the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric GFP homo-association disappeared, accompanied by an increase in the expression of the small heat shock protein Hsp27.

  9. Incorporating bacteria as a living component in supramolecular self-assembled monolayers through dynamic nanoscale interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan; Kiren, Mustafa Can; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular assemblies, formed through noncovalent interactions, has become particularly attractive to develop dynamic and responsive architectures to address living systems at the nanoscale. Cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]), a pumpkin shaped macrocylic host molecule, has been successfully used to constru

  10. Incorporating bacteria as a living component in supramolecular self-assembled monolayers through dynamic nanoscale interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankaran, S.; Kiren, Mustafa Can; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular assemblies, formed through noncovalent interactions, has become particularly attractive to develop dynamic and responsive architectures to address living systems at the nanoscale. Cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]), a pumpkin shaped macrocylic host molecule, has been successfully used to

  11. Phase reconstruction of living human embryonic kidney 293 cells based on two off-axis holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenjing; Yu, Yingjie; Duan, Yanhong; Asundi, Anand

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we validate experimentally the potential of off-axis digital micro-holography for 3D image reconstruction of a live Human Embryonic Kidney 293(HEK293) cell that is widely used as transfection and expression. A subtraction method of two off-axis holograms to reconstruct the phase of the live microscopic object is discussed. The presented subtraction method can remove some main noise, for example, the quadratic phase aberration introduced by microscope objective (MO), other phase aberration introduced by the liquid in tank and other interference noise introduced by the optical parts. Thus an improvement in the measurement precision of live cells in aqueous solution is observed. The potential of this method is demonstrated by providing the phase reconstruction results of a phase grating and a single HEK293 cell. The results showed good correspondence to the actual character of HEK293 cell prove the capability of digital micro-holography as a tool to monitor the dynamic transfection process of the living HEK 293 cells.

  12. In-vitro analysis of APA microcapsules for oral delivery of live bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Ouyang, W; Jones, M; Haque, T; Lawuyi, B; Prakash, S

    2005-08-01

    Oral administration of microcapsules containing live bacterial cells has potential as an alternative therapy for several diseases. This article evaluates the suitability of the alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate (APA) microcapsules for oral delivery of live bacterial cells, in-vitro, using a dynamic simulated human gastro-intestinal (GI) model. Results showed that the APA microcapsules were morphologically stable in the simulated stomach conditions, but did not retain their structural integrity after a 3-day exposure in simulated human GI media. The microbial populations of the tested bacterial cells and the activities of the tested enzymes in the simulated human GI suspension were not substantially altered by the presence of the APA microcapsules, suggesting that there were no significant adverse effects of oral administration of the APA microcapsules on the flora of the human gastrointestinal tract. When the APA microcapsules containing Lactobacillus plantarum 80 (LP80) were challenged in the simulated gastric medium (pH = 2.0), 80.0% of the encapsulated cells remained viable after a 5-min incubation; however, the viability decreased considerably (8.3%) after 15 min and dropped to 2.6% after 30 min and lower than 0.2% after 60 min, indicating the limitations of the currently obtainable APA membrane for oral delivery of live bacteria. Further in-vivo studies are required before conclusions can be made concerning the inadequacy of APA microcapsules for oral delivery of live bacterial cells.

  13. Glycoarray Technologies: Deciphering Interactions from Proteins to Live Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania M. Puvirajesinghe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technologies inspired the development of carbohydrate arrays. Initially, carbohydrate array technology was hindered by the complex structures of glycans and their structural variability. The first designs of glycoarrays focused on the HTP (high throughput study of protein–glycan binding events, and subsequently more in-depth kinetic analysis of carbohydrate–protein interactions. However, the applications have rapidly expanded and now achieve successful discrimination of selective interactions between carbohydrates and, not only proteins, but also viruses, bacteria and eukaryotic cells, and most recently even live cell responses to immobilized glycans. Combining array technology with other HTP technologies such as mass spectrometry is expected to allow even more accurate and sensitive analysis. This review provides a broad overview of established glycoarray technologies (with a special focus on glycosaminoglycan applications and their emerging applications to the study of complex interactions between glycans and whole living cells.

  14. Local viscoelasticity of living cells measured by rotational magnetic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berret, J-F

    2016-01-05

    When submitted to a magnetic field, micron-size wires with superparamagnetic properties behave as embedded rheometers and represent interesting sensors for microrheology. Here we use rotational magnetic spectroscopy to measure the shear viscosity of the cytoplasm of living cells. We address the question of whether the cytoplasm is a viscoelastic liquid or an elastic gel. The main result of the study is the observation of a rotational instability between a synchronous and an asynchronous regime of rotation, found for murine fibroblasts and human cancer cells. For wires of susceptibility 3.6, the transition occurs in the range 0.01-1 rad s(-1). The determination of the shear viscosity (10-100 Pa s) and elastic modulus (5-20 Pa) confirms the viscoelastic character of the cytoplasm. In contrast to earlier studies, it is concluded that the interior of living cells can be described as a viscoelastic liquid, and not as an elastic gel.

  15. Live-cell imaging of mitosis in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, James A

    2010-06-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a wonderful model system for live imaging studies of mitosis. A huge collection of research tools is readily available to facilitate experimentation. For imaging, C. elegans embryos provide large clear cells, an invariant pattern of cell division, only six chromosomes, a very short cell cycle, and remain healthy and happy at room temperature. Mitosis is a complicated process and the types of research questions being asked about the mechanisms involved are continuously expanding. For each experiment, the details of imaging methods need to be tailored to the question. Specific imaging methods will depend on the microscopy hardware and software available to each researcher. This article presents points to consider when choosing a microscope, designing an imaging experiment, or selecting appropriate worm strains for imaging. A method for mounting C. elegans embryos and guidelines for fluorescence and differential interference contrast imaging of mitosis in live embryos are presented.

  16. A Fluorimetric Sensor for Detection of One Living Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, studies of metabolic pathways and processes in living organisms cannot be easily done at the cellular level. That is why the development of a new analytical methods and approaches is needed, to allow detection of different biologically important species at very low concentrations levels and sample volumes, especially in individual cells. In the present work, we suggested a sensor to detect units of living cells by means determination of plant esterases (PE based on fluorimetric detection of the products of the enzymatic hydrolysis of fluorescein diacetate in plant cell cultures (BY-2 tobacco cells and early somatic embryos of Norway spruce, clone 2/32. We standardized the sensor using a readily available esterase from pig liver. The detection limits were approximately 17 to 50 amol in 2 ml (8.5 to 25 femtomolar concentrations of esterases of the enzyme contained in BY-2 tobacco cells and spruce early somatic embryos, respectively, after re-computation on the amounts of pig liver esterases. We assumed that the optimised sensor for the determination of PE in cell extracts accomplishes all requirements for a sensitive analysis which could be usable for single cell analysis. The detection limit was 1.5 in case of analysing BY-2 tobacco cells and 0.5 in early somatic embryos. Moreover, we were able to detect single protoplasts.

  17. Copper-Catalyzed Click Reaction on/in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siheng; Wang, Lin; Yu, Fei; Zhu, Zhiling; Shobaki, Dema; Chen, Haoqing; Wang, Mu; Wang, Jun; Qin, Guoting; Erasquin, Uriel J; Ren, Li; Wang, Yingjun; Cai, Chengzhi

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrated that copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction could be performed inside live mammalian cells without using a chelating azide. Under optimized conditions, the reaction was performed in human ovary cancer cell line OVCAR5 in which newly synthesized proteins were metabolically modified with homopropargylglycine (HPG). This model system allowed us to estimate the efficiency of the reaction on the cell membranes and in the cytosol using mass spectrometry. We found that the reaction was greatly promoted by a tris(triazolylmethyl)amine Cu(I) ligand tethering a cell-penetrating peptide. Uptake of the ligand, copper, and a biotin-tagged azide in the cells was determined to be 69 ± 2, 163 ± 3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 µM, respectively. After 10 minutes of reaction, the product yields on the membrane and cytosolic proteins were higher than 18% and 0.8%, respectively, while 75% cells remained viable. By reducing the biothiols in the system by scraping or treatment with N-ethylmalemide, the reaction yield on the cytosolic proteins was greatly improved to ~9% and ~14%, respectively, while the yield on the membrane proteins remained unchanged. The results indicate that out of many possibilities, deactivation of the current copper catalysts by biothiols is the major reason for the low yield of CuAAC reaction in the cytosol. Overall, we have improved the efficiency for CuAAC reaction on live cells by 3-fold. Despite the low yielding inside live cells, the products that strongly bind to the intracellular targets can be detected by mass spectrometry. Hence, the in situ CuAAC reaction can be potentially used for screening of cell-specific enzyme inhibitors or biomarkers containing 1,4-substituted 1,2,3-triazoles.

  18. Quantification of plant cell coupling with live-cell microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    cell wall interface. Transport through plasmodesmata, the cell wall channels that directly connect plant cells, is regulated not only by a fixed size exclusion limit, but also by physiological and pathological adaptation. The noninvasive approach described here offers the possibility of precisely......Movement of nutrients and signaling compounds from cell to cell is an essential process for plant growth and development. To understand processes such as carbon allocation, cell communication, and reaction to pathogen attack it is important to know a specific molecule’s capacity to pass a specific...

  19. Raman microscopy of individual living human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikov, Sergey M.; Beermann, Jonas; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.;

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of mapping the distribution of different biomolecules in living human embryonic stem cells grown on glass substrates, without the need for fluorescent markers. In our work we improve the quality of measurements by finding a buffer that gives low fluorescence, growing...... cells on glass substrates (whose Raman signals are relatively weak compared to that of the cells) and having the backside covered with gold to improve the image contrast under direct white light illumination. The experimental setup used for Raman microscopy is the commercially available confocal...

  20. Real-time, noninvasive optical coherence tomography of cross-sectional living cell-sheets in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Mari; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Mizuuchi, Kiminori; Iseki, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Cell sheet technology has a history of application in regenerating various tissues, having successfully completed several clinical trials using autologous cell sheets. Tomographic analysis of living cell sheets is an important tool in the field of cell sheet-based regenerative medicine and tissue engineering to analyze the inner structure of layered living cells. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used in ophthalmology to noninvasively analyze cross-sections of target tissues at high resolution. This study used OCT to conduct real-time, noninvasive analysis of living cell sheet cross sections. OCT showed the internal structure of cell sheets in tomographic images synthesized with backscatter signals from inside the living cell sheet without invasion or damage. OCT observations were used to analyze the static and dynamic behaviors of living cell sheets in vitro and in vivo including (1) the harvesting process of a C2C12 mouse skeletal myoblast sheet from a temperature-responsive culture surface; (2) cell-sheet adhesion onto various surfaces including a culture surface, a synthetic rubber glove, and the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of rats; and (3) the real-time propagation of beating rat cardiac cells within cardiac cell sheets. This study showed that OCT technology is a powerful tool in the field of cell sheet-based regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  1. Planar patch-clamp force microscopy on living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamir, Evren [Center for Nano Science, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Amalienstr 54, 80799 Munich (Germany); George, Michael; Fertig, Niels [Nanion Technologies GmbH, Erzgiessereistr. 4, 80335 Munich (Germany); Benoit, Martin [Center for Nano Science, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Amalienstr 54, 80799 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: martin.benoit@physik.uni-muenchen.de

    2008-05-15

    Here we report a new combination of the patch-clamp technique with the atomic force microscope (AFM). A planar patch-clamp chip microstructured from borosilicate glass was used as a support for mechanical probing of living cells. The setup not only allows for immobilizing even a non-adherent cell for measurements of its mechanical properties, but also for simultaneously measuring the electrophysiological properties of a single cell. As a proof of principle experiment we measured the voltage-induced membrane movement of HEK293 and Jurkat cells in the whole-cell voltage clamp configuration. The results of these measurements are in good agreement with previous studies. By using the planar patch-clamp chip for immobilization, the AFM not only can image non-adhering cells, but also gets easily access to an electrophysiologically controlled cellular probe at low vibrational noise.

  2. Live cell monitoring of glycine betaine by FRET-based genetically encoded nanosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Ameen, Seema; Siddiqi, Tariq Omar; Khan, Parvez; Ahmad, Altaf

    2016-12-15

    Glycine betaine (GB) is one of the key compatible solutes that accumulate in the cell at exceedingly high level under the conditions of high salinity. It plays a crucial role in the maintenance of osmolarity of the cell without affecting the physiological processes. Analysis of stress-induced physiological conditions in living cells, therefore, requires real-time monitoring of cellular GB level. Glycine Betaine Optical Sensor (GBOS), a genetically-encoded FRET-based nanosensor developed in this study, allows the real-time monitoring of GB levels inside living cells. This nanosensor has been developed by sandwiching GB binding protein (ProX) between the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair, the cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Conformational change in ProX, which was used as sensory domain, reported the change in the level of this compatible solute in in vitro and in vivo conditions. Binding of the GB to the sensory domain fetches close to both the fluorescent moieties that result in the form of increased FRET ratio. So, any change in the concentration of GB is correlated with change in FRET ratio. This sensor also reported the GB cellular dynamics in real-time in Escherichia coli cells after the addition of its precursor, choline. The GBOS was also expressed in yeast and mammalian cells to monitor the intracellular GB. Therefore, the GBOS represents a unique FRET-based nanosensor which allows the non-invasive ratiometric analysis of the GB in living cells.

  3. Jet-based methods to print living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringeisen, Bradley R; Othon, Christina M; Barron, Jason A; Young, Daniel; Spargo, Barry J

    2006-09-01

    Cell printing has been popularized over the past few years as a revolutionary advance in tissue engineering has potentially enabled heterogeneous 3-D scaffolds to be built cell-by-cell. This review article summarizes the state-of-the-art cell printing techniques that utilize fluid jetting phenomena to deposit 2- and 3-D patterns of living eukaryotic cells. There are four distinct categories of jetbased approaches to printing cells. Laser guidance direct write (LG DW) was the first reported technique to print viable cells by forming patterns of embryonic-chick spinal-cord cells on a glass slide (1999). Shortly after this, modified laser-induced forward transfer techniques (LIFT) and modified ink jet printers were also used to print viable cells, followed by the most recent demonstration using an electrohydrodynamic jetting (EHDJ) method. The low cost of some of these printing technologies has spurred debate as to whether they could be used on a large scale to manufacture tissue and possibly even whole organs. This review summarizes the published results of these cell printers (cell viability, retained genotype and phenotype), and also includes a physical description of the various jetting processes with a discussion of the stresses and forces that may be encountered by cells during printing. We conclude the review by comparing and contrasting the different jet-based techniques, while providing a map for future experiments that could lead to significant advances in the field of tissue engineering.

  4. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mouse were also investigated.

  5. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, Yongkeun

    2016-09-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated.

  6. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy for rapid screening and live-cell monitoring: application to nanotoxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, S. K.; Sacksteder, Colette A.; Weber, T. J.; Riley, Brian J.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Harrer, Bruce J.; Peterman, John W.

    2013-01-01

    A significant challenge to realize the full potential of nanotechnology for therapeutic and diagnostic applications is to understand and evaluate how live-cells interact with an external stimulus, e.g., a nanosized particle (NSP), and the toxicity and broad risk associated with these stimuli. NSPs are increasingly used in medicine with largely undetermined hazards in complex cell dynamics and environments. It is difficult to capture the complexity and dynamics of these interactions by following an omics-based approach exclusively, which are expensive and time-consuming. Additionally, this approach needs destructive sampling methods. Live-cell attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometry is well suited to provide noninvasive approach to provide rapid screening of cellular responses to potentially toxic NSPs or any stimuli. Herein we review the technical basis of the approach, the instrument configuration and interface with the biological media, and various effects that impact the data, data analysis, and toxicity. Our preliminary results on live-cell monitoring show promise for rapid screening the NSPs.

  7. Complementarity of PALM and SOFI for super-resolution live cell imaging of focal adhesions

    CERN Document Server

    Deschout, Hendrik; Sharipov, Azat; Szlag, Daniel; Feletti, Lely; Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Leutenegger, Marcel; Lasser, Theo; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging of focal adhesions requires a sufficiently high temporal resolution, which remains a challenging task for super-resolution microscopy. We have addressed this important issue by combining photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI). Using simulations and fixed cell focal adhesion images, we investigated the complementarity between PALM and SOFI in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. This PALM-SOFI framework was used to image focal adhesions in living cells, while obtaining a temporal resolution below 10 s. We visualized the dynamics of focal adhesions, and revealed local mean velocities around 190 nm per minute. The complementarity of PALM and SOFI was assessed in detail with a methodology that integrates a quantitative resolution and signal-to-noise metric. This PALM and SOFI concept provides an enlarged quantitative imaging framework, allowing unprecedented functional exploration of focal adhesions through the estimation of m...

  8. Complementarity of PALM and SOFI for super-resolution live-cell imaging of focal adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschout, Hendrik; Lukes, Tomas; Sharipov, Azat; Szlag, Daniel; Feletti, Lely; Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Leutenegger, Marcel; Lasser, Theo; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-12-01

    Live-cell imaging of focal adhesions requires a sufficiently high temporal resolution, which remains a challenge for super-resolution microscopy. Here we address this important issue by combining photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI). Using simulations and fixed-cell focal adhesion images, we investigate the complementarity between PALM and SOFI in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. This PALM-SOFI framework is used to image focal adhesions in living cells, while obtaining a temporal resolution below 10 s. We visualize the dynamics of focal adhesions, and reveal local mean velocities around 190 nm min-1. The complementarity of PALM and SOFI is assessed in detail with a methodology that integrates a resolution and signal-to-noise metric. This PALM and SOFI concept provides an enlarged quantitative imaging framework, allowing unprecedented functional exploration of focal adhesions through the estimation of molecular parameters such as fluorophore densities and photoactivation or photoswitching kinetics.

  9. Measurement of UV absorption of single living cell for cell manipulation using NIR femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung-Hak, E-mail: shcho@kimm.re.kr [Nano Machining Laboratory, KIMM (Korea Institute of Machinery and Material), 171 Jang-dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Materials Research and Education Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Laboratories, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Chang, Won-Seok [Nano Machining Laboratory, KIMM (Korea Institute of Machinery and Material), 171 Jang-dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Ryul [Department of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jong Wook [Materials Research and Education Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Laboratories, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Optical UV absorption of single human living cells ranging from 200 nm to 360 nm was measured in situ for the study of cell manipulation using the near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser. Human breast living cells of MCF-10A, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231 were used in this experiment. The selective photo-disruptions of single living cell and its sub-organelle (nucleus) were also demonstrated using the tightly focused 790 nm wavelength femtosecond laser with pulse duration of 110 fs. It was found that each living cell has its own absorption spectrum in UV wavelength ranges. It was also inferred that intrinsic absorption spectrum is attributed to the amount of DNA and protein of living cell. For the study of photo-disruption of single cell using the multi-photon absorption excited by the NIR femtosecond laser pulse, the origin UV absorption spectrum of targeted living cell is important and fundamental information to understand nonlinear interaction between NIR ultrashort, high-intensity laser light and transparent living cell.

  10. Figurational dynamics and parliamentary discourses of living standards in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Paddy

    2009-12-01

    While the concept of living standards remains central to political debate, it has become marginal in sociological research compared to the burgeoning attention given to the topic of consumer culture in recent decades. However, they both concern how one does and should consume, and, indeed, behave at particular times. I use the theories of Norbert Elias to explain the unplanned but structured (ordered) changes in expected standards of living over time. This figurational approach is compared to other alternative explanations, particularly those advanced by Bourdieu, Veblen and Baudrillard. Though these offer some parallels with Elias's theories, I argue that consumption standards are produced and transformed through the changing dependencies and power relations between social classes. They cannot be reduced to the intentions, interests or ambitions of particular elites, nor to the needs of social systems. Using qualitative data from parliamentary debates in Ireland to trace changing norms and ideals of consumption, as well as historical data to reconstruct shifts in social interdependencies, I further contend that discourses of living standards and luxury are vital aspects of the growing identification and empathy between classes, which in turn encourages greater global integration in the face of emigration and national decline.

  11. Traceless affinity labeling of endogenous proteins for functional analysis in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Hamachi, Itaru

    2012-09-18

    Protein labeling and imaging techniques have provided tremendous opportunities to study the structure, function, dynamics, and localization of individual proteins in the complex environment of living cells. Molecular biology-based approaches, such as GFP-fusion tags and monoclonal antibodies, have served as important tools for the visualization of individual proteins in cells. Although these techniques continue to be valuable for live cell imaging, they have a number of limitations that have only been addressed by recent progress in chemistry-based approaches. These chemical approaches benefit greatly from the smaller probe sizes that should result in fewer perturbations to proteins and to biological systems as a whole. Despite the research in this area, so far none of these labeling techniques permit labeling and imaging of selected endogenous proteins in living cells. Researchers have widely used affinity labeling, in which the protein of interest is labeled by a reactive group attached to a ligand, to identify and characterize proteins. Since the first report of affinity labeling in the early 1960s, efforts to fine-tune the chemical structures of both the reactive group and ligand have led to protein labeling with excellent target selectivity in the whole proteome of living cells. Although the chemical probes used for affinity labeling generally inactivate target proteins, this strategy holds promise as a valuable tool for the labeling and imaging of endogenous proteins in living cells and by extension in living animals. In this Account, we summarize traceless affinity labeling, a technique explored mainly in our laboratory. In our overview of the different labeling techniques, we emphasize the challenge of designing chemical probes that allow for dissociation of the affinity module (often a ligand) after the labeling reaction so that the labeled protein retains its native function. This feature distinguishes the traceless labeling approach from the traditional

  12. Microfluidic Devices for Terahertz Spectroscopy of Live Cells Toward Lab-on-a-Chip Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qi; Liang, Min; Lu, Yi; Wong, Pak Kin; Wilmink, Gerald J; Zhang, Donna; Xin, Hao

    2016-04-04

    THz spectroscopy is an emerging technique for studying the dynamics and interactions of cells and biomolecules, but many practical challenges still remain in experimental studies. We present a prototype of simple and inexpensive cell-trapping microfluidic chip for THz spectroscopic study of live cells. Cells are transported, trapped and concentrated into the THz exposure region by applying an AC bias signal while the chip maintains a steady temperature at 37 °C by resistive heating. We conduct some preliminary experiments on E. coli and T-cell solution and compare the transmission spectra of empty channels, channels filled with aqueous media only, and channels filled with aqueous media with un-concentrated and concentrated cells.

  13. Microfluidic Devices for Terahertz Spectroscopy of Live Cells Toward Lab-on-a-Chip Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Tang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available THz spectroscopy is an emerging technique for studying the dynamics and interactions of cells and biomolecules, but many practical challenges still remain in experimental studies. We present a prototype of simple and inexpensive cell-trapping microfluidic chip for THz spectroscopic study of live cells. Cells are transported, trapped and concentrated into the THz exposure region by applying an AC bias signal while the chip maintains a steady temperature at 37 °C by resistive heating. We conduct some preliminary experiments on E. coli and T-cell solution and compare the transmission spectra of empty channels, channels filled with aqueous media only, and channels filled with aqueous media with un-concentrated and concentrated cells.

  14. Microfluidic Devices for Terahertz Spectroscopy of Live Cells Toward Lab-on-a-Chip Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qi; Liang, Min; Lu, Yi; Wong, Pak Kin; Wilmink, Gerald J.; D. Zhang, Donna; Xin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    THz spectroscopy is an emerging technique for studying the dynamics and interactions of cells and biomolecules, but many practical challenges still remain in experimental studies. We present a prototype of simple and inexpensive cell-trapping microfluidic chip for THz spectroscopic study of live cells. Cells are transported, trapped and concentrated into the THz exposure region by applying an AC bias signal while the chip maintains a steady temperature at 37 °C by resistive heating. We conduct some preliminary experiments on E. coli and T-cell solution and compare the transmission spectra of empty channels, channels filled with aqueous media only, and channels filled with aqueous media with un-concentrated and concentrated cells. PMID:27049392

  15. Live imaging of adult neural stem cells in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe eOrtega

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The generation of cells of the neural lineage within the brain is not restricted to early development. New neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are produced in the adult brain throughout the entire murine life. However, despite the extensive research performed in the field of adult neurogenesis during the past years, fundamental questions regarding the cell biology of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs remain to be uncovered. For instance, it is crucial to elucidate whether a single aNSC is capable of differentiating into all three different macroglial cell types in vivo or these distinct progenies constitute entirely separate lineages. Similarly, the cell cycle length, the time and mode of division (symmetric versus asymmetric that these cells undergo within their lineage progression are interesting questions under current investigation. In this sense, live imaging constitutes a valuable ally in the search of reliable answers to the previous questions. In spite of the current limitations of technology new approaches are being developed and outstanding amount of knowledge is being piled up providing interesting insights in the behavior of aNSCs. Here we will review the state of the art of live imaging as well as the alternative models that currently offer new answers to critical questions

  16. Mapping eGFP oligomer mobility in living cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dross, Nicolas; Spriet, Corentin; Zwerger, Monika; Müller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar; Langowski, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific artifacts encountered in live cell studies as well as strategies to prevent them, in particular those arising from the choice of the fluorophore used for calibration of the focal volume, as well as temperature and acquisition conditions used for fluorescence fluctuation measurements. After defining the best acquisition conditions, we show for various human cell lines that the mobility of GFP varies significantly within the cell nucleus, but does not correlate with chromatin density. The intranuclear diffusional mobility strongly depends on protein size: in a series of GFP-oligomers, used as free inert fluorescent tracers, the diffusion coefficient decreased from the monomer to the tetramer much more than expected for molecules free in aqueous solution. Still, the entire intranuclear chromatin network is freely accessible for small proteins up to the size of eGFP-tetramers, regardless of the chromatin density or cell line. Even the densest chromatin regions do not exclude free eGFP-monomers or multimers.

  17. Mapping eGFP oligomer mobility in living cell nuclei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Dross

    Full Text Available Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific artifacts encountered in live cell studies as well as strategies to prevent them, in particular those arising from the choice of the fluorophore used for calibration of the focal volume, as well as temperature and acquisition conditions used for fluorescence fluctuation measurements. After defining the best acquisition conditions, we show for various human cell lines that the mobility of GFP varies significantly within the cell nucleus, but does not correlate with chromatin density. The intranuclear diffusional mobility strongly depends on protein size: in a series of GFP-oligomers, used as free inert fluorescent tracers, the diffusion coefficient decreased from the monomer to the tetramer much more than expected for molecules free in aqueous solution. Still, the entire intranuclear chromatin network is freely accessible for small proteins up to the size of eGFP-tetramers, regardless of the chromatin density or cell line. Even the densest chromatin regions do not exclude free eGFP-monomers or multimers.

  18. Secondary Metabolite Localization by Autofluorescence in Living Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Talamond

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autofluorescent molecules are abundant in plant cells and spectral images offer means for analyzing their spectra, yielding information on their accumulation and function. Based on their fluorescence characteristics, an imaging approach using multiphoton microscopy was designed to assess localization of the endogenous fluorophores in living plant cells. This method, which requires no previous treatment, provides an effective experimental tool for discriminating between multiple naturally-occurring fluorophores in living-tissues. Combined with advanced Linear Unmixing, the spectral analysis extends the possibilities and enables the simultaneous detection of fluorescent molecules reliably separating overlapping emission spectra. However, as with any technology, the possibility for artifactual results does exist. This methodological article presents an overview of the applications of tissular and intra-cellular localization of these intrinsic fluorophores in leaves and fruits (here for coffee and vanilla. This method will provide new opportunities for studying cellular environments and the behavior of endogenous fluorophores in the intracellular environment.

  19. Mapping nanomechanical properties of live cells using multi-harmonic atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, A.; Trigueros, S.; Cartagena, A.; Stevenson, A. P. Z.; Susilo, M.; Nauman, E.; Contera, S. Antoranz

    2011-12-01

    The nanomechanical properties of living cells, such as their surface elastic response and adhesion, have important roles in cellular processes such as morphogenesis, mechano-transduction, focal adhesion, motility, metastasis and drug delivery. Techniques based on quasi-static atomic force microscopy techniques can map these properties, but they lack the spatial and temporal resolution that is needed to observe many of the relevant details. Here, we present a dynamic atomic force microscopy method to map quantitatively the nanomechanical properties of live cells with a throughput (measured in pixels/minute) that is ~10-1,000 times higher than that achieved with quasi-static atomic force microscopy techniques. The local properties of a cell are derived from the 0th, 1st and 2nd harmonic components of the Fourier spectrum of the AFM cantilevers interacting with the cell surface. Local stiffness, stiffness gradient and the viscoelastic dissipation of live Escherichia coli bacteria, rat fibroblasts and human red blood cells were all mapped in buffer solutions. Our method is compatible with commercial atomic force microscopes and could be used to analyse mechanical changes in tumours, cells and biofilm formation with sub-10 nm detail.

  20. Rapid telomere motions in live human cells analyzed by highly time-resolved microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xueying

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomeres cap chromosome ends and protect the genome. We studied individual telomeres in live human cancer cells. In capturing telomere motions using quantitative imaging to acquire complete high-resolution three-dimensional datasets every second for 200 seconds, telomere dynamics were systematically analyzed. Results The motility of individual telomeres within the same cancer cell nucleus was widely heterogeneous. One class of internal heterochromatic regions of chromosomes analyzed moved more uniformly and showed less motion and heterogeneity than telomeres. The single telomere analyses in cancer cells revealed that shorter telomeres showed more motion, and the more rapid telomere motions were energy dependent. Experimentally increasing bulk telomere length dampened telomere motion. In contrast, telomere uncapping, but not a DNA damaging agent, methyl methanesulfonate, significantly increased telomere motion. Conclusion New methods for seconds-scale, four-dimensional, live cell microscopic imaging and data analysis, allowing systematic tracking of individual telomeres in live cells, have defined a previously undescribed form of telomere behavior in human cells, in which the degree of telomere motion was dependent upon telomere length and functionality.

  1. A drug-compatible and temperature-controlled microfluidic device for live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Gomez-Escoda, Blanca; Munoz-Garcia, Javier; Babic, Julien; Griscom, Laurent; Wu, Pei-Yun Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring cellular responses to changes in growth conditions and perturbation of targeted pathways is integral to the investigation of biological processes. However, manipulating cells and their environment during live-cell-imaging experiments still represents a major challenge. While the coupling of microfluidics with microscopy has emerged as a powerful solution to this problem, this approach remains severely underexploited. Indeed, most microdevices rely on the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which strongly absorbs a variety of molecules commonly used in cell biology. This effect of the microsystems on the cellular environment hampers our capacity to accurately modulate the composition of the medium and the concentration of specific compounds within the microchips, with implications for the reliability of these experiments. To overcome this critical issue, we developed new PDMS-free microdevices dedicated to live-cell imaging that show no interference with small molecules. They also integrate a module for maintaining precise sample temperature both above and below ambient as well as for rapid temperature shifts. Importantly, changes in medium composition and temperature can be efficiently achieved within the chips while recording cell behaviour by microscopy. Compatible with different model systems, our platforms provide a versatile solution for the dynamic regulation of the cellular environment during live-cell imaging. PMID:27512142

  2. Live Imaging of Kv7.2/7.3 Cell Surface Dynamics at the Axon Initial Segment: High Steady-State Stability and Calpain-Dependent Excitotoxic Downregulation Revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Christensen, Rasmus Kordt; Denti, Federico;

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated K(+) channels Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 are located at the axon initial segment (AIS) and exert strong control over action potential generation. Therefore, changes in their localization or cell surface numbers are likely to influence neuronal signaling. However, nothing is known about......7.3. This seven transmembrane chimera, named super ecliptic phluorin (SEP)-TAC-7.3, functions and traffics as a wild-type (WT) channel. We expressed SEP-TAC-7.3 in dissociated rat hippocampal neurons to examine the lateral mobility, surface numbers, and localization of AIS Kv7.2/7.3 heteromers using...... STATEMENT: The voltage-gated K(+) channels Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 exert strong control over action potential generation, but little is known about their cell surface dynamics. Using a novel phluorin-based approach, we here show that these channels are highly stable at steady state and different types of neuronal...

  3. Quantification of plant cell coupling with live-cell microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    by confocal microscopy, loaded tracer is activated by UV illumination in a target cell and its spread to neighboring cells monitored. When combined with high-speed acquisition by resonant scanning or spinning disc confocal microscopy, the high signal-to-noise ratio of photoactivation allows collection...

  4. Live Cell Surface Labeling with Fluorescent Ag Nanocluster Conjugates†

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Junhua; Choi, Sungmoon; Richards, Chris I.; Antoku, Yasuko; Dickson, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    DNA-encapsulated silver clusters are readily conjugated to proteins and serve as alternatives to organic dyes and semiconductor quantum dots. Stable and bright on the bulk and single molecule levels, Ag nanocluster fluorescence is readily observed when staining live cell surfaces. Being significantly brighter and more photostable than organics and much smaller than quantum dots with a single point of attachment, these nanomaterials offer promising new approaches for bulk and single molecule b...

  5. In what time scale proton transfer takes place in a live CHO cell?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojumdar, Supratik Sen; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Mandal, Amit Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2013-06-01

    Excited state proton transfer (ESPT) of pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate, HPTS) in a live Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell is studied by time resolved confocal microscopy. The cytoplasm region of the cell is stained by a photoacid, HPTS (HA). The time constant of initial proton transfer (τPT) in the cell is found to be ˜10 times longer than that in bulk water, while the time constants of recombination (τrec) and dissociation (τdiss) in the cell are ˜3 times and ˜2 times longer, respectively. The slower rate of proton transfer (˜10 times) inside the CHO cell compared to that in bulk water is ascribed to slower solvation dynamics, lower availability of free water molecules, and disruption of hydrogen-bond network inside the cell. Translational and rotational diffusion of HPTS inside a single CHO cell have been investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and picosecond anisotropy measurement, respectively. Both the translational and rotational diffusion slow down inside the live cell. FCS studies indicate that HPTS remains tightly bound to a macromolecule inside the cell.

  6. Cell-permeable nanobodies for targeted immunolabelling and antigen manipulation in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herce, Henry D.; Schumacher, Dominik; Schneider, Anselm F. L.; Ludwig, Anne K.; Mann, Florian A.; Fillies, Marion; Kasper, Marc-André; Reinke, Stefan; Krause, Eberhard; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Hackenberger, Christian P. R.

    2017-08-01

    Functional antibody delivery in living cells would enable the labelling and manipulation of intracellular antigens, which constitutes a long-thought goal in cell biology and medicine. Here we present a modular strategy to create functional cell-permeable nanobodies capable of targeted labelling and manipulation of intracellular antigens in living cells. The cell-permeable nanobodies are formed by the site-specific attachment of intracellularly stable (or cleavable) cyclic arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides to camelid-derived single-chain VHH antibody fragments. We used this strategy for the non-endocytic delivery of two recombinant nanobodies into living cells, which enabled the relocalization of the polymerase clamp PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) and tumour suppressor p53 to the nucleolus, and thereby allowed the detection of protein-protein interactions that involve these two proteins in living cells. Furthermore, cell-permeable nanobodies permitted the co-transport of therapeutically relevant proteins, such as Mecp2, into the cells. This technology constitutes a major step in the labelling, delivery and targeted manipulation of intracellular antigens. Ultimately, this approach opens the door towards immunostaining in living cells and the expansion of immunotherapies to intracellular antigen targets.

  7. Evolution of Cell-Type-Specific RNA Aptamers Via Live Cell-Based SELEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2016-01-01

    Live cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligand EXponential enrichment) is a promising approach for identifying aptamers that can selectively bind to a cell-surface antigen or a particular target cell population. In particular, it offers a facile selection strategy for some special cell-surface proteins that are original glycosylated or heavily post-translationally modified, and are unavailable in their native/active conformation after in vitro expression and purification. In this chapter, we describe evolution of cell-type-specific RNA aptamers targeting the human CCR5 by combining the live cell-based SELEX strategy with high-throughput sequencing (HTS) and bioinformatics analysis.

  8. The Croonian lecture 2006. Structure of the living cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Iain D

    2008-07-27

    The smallest viable unit of life is a single cell. To understand life, we need to visualize the structure of the cell as well as all cellular components and their complexes. This is a formidable task that requires sophisticated tools. These have developed from the rudimentary early microscopes of 350 years ago to a toolbox that includes electron microscopes, synchrotrons, high magnetic fields and vast computing power. This lecture briefly reviews the development of biophysical tools and illustrates how they begin to unravel the 'molecular logic of the living state'.

  9. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy to be dissipated per unit volume. We use the model to understand and contrast growth in bacteria with different shapes such as spherical, ellipsoidal, cylindrical and toroidal morphologies. Coupling growth to cell wall constriction, we predict a discontinuous shape transformation, from partial constriction to cell division, as a function of the chemical potential driving cell-wall synthesis. Our model for cell wall energy and shape dynamics relates growth kinetics with cell geometry, and provides a unified framework to d...

  10. Real-time detection of α1A-AR movement stimulated by phenylephrine in single living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning XU; Zhang-yi LIANG; Ming XU; Ying-hua GUAN; Qi-hua HE; Qi-de HAN; Xin-sheng ZHAO; You-yi ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the movement of α1A-adrenergic receptors(α1A-AR) stimu-lated by agonist, phenylephrine (PE), and the dynamics of receptor movement in real time in single living cells with millisecond resolution.Methods: We labeled α1A-AR using the monoclonal, anti-FLAG (a kind of tag) antibody and Cy3-conju-gated goat anti-mouse IgG and recorded the trajectory of their transport process in living HEK293A cells stimulated by agonist, PE, and then analyzed their dy-namic properties.Results: The specific detection of α1A-AR on the surface of living HEK293A-α1A cells was achieved. α1A-AR internalize under the stimulation of PE. After the cells were stimulated with PE for 20 rain, apparent colocalization was found between α1A-AR and F-actins. After 40 min stimulation of PE, trajecto-ries of approximate linear motion in HEK293A-α1A cells were recorded, and their velocity was calculated. Condusion: The specific labeling method on the living cell surface provides a convenient means of real-time detection of the behavior of surface receptors. By this method we were able to specifically detectα1A-AR and record the behavior of individual particles of receptors with 50 ms exposure time in real time in single living cells.

  11. Detecting Nanodomains in Living Cell Membrane by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hai-Tao; Marguet, Didier

    2011-05-01

    Cell membranes actively participate in numerous cellular functions. Inasmuch as bioactivities of cell membranes are known to depend crucially on their lateral organization, much effort has been focused on deciphering this organization on different length scales. Within this context, the concept of lipid rafts has been intensively discussed over recent years. In line with its ability to measure diffusion parameters with great precision, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measurements have been made in association with innovative experimental strategies to monitor modes of molecular lateral diffusion within the plasma membrane of living cells. These investigations have allowed significant progress in the characterization of the cell membrane lateral organization at the suboptical level and have provided compelling evidence for the in vivo existence of raft nanodomains. We review these FCS-based studies and the characteristic structural features of raft nanodomains. We also discuss the findings in regards to the current view of lipid rafts as a general membrane-organizing principle.

  12. Live cell imaging techniques to study T cell trafficking across the blood-brain barrier in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coisne Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central nervous system (CNS is an immunologically privileged site to which access for circulating immune cells is tightly controlled by the endothelial blood–brain barrier (BBB located in CNS microvessels. Under physiological conditions immune cell migration across the BBB is low. However, in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis, many immune cells can cross the BBB and cause neurological symptoms. Extravasation of circulating immune cells is a multi-step process that is regulated by the sequential interaction of different adhesion and signaling molecules on the immune cells and on the endothelium. The specialized barrier characteristics of the BBB, therefore, imply the existence of unique mechanisms for immune cell migration across the BBB. Methods and design An in vitro mouse BBB model maintaining physiological barrier characteristics in a flow chamber and combined with high magnification live cell imaging, has been established. This model enables the molecular mechanisms involved in the multi-step extravasation of T cells across the in vitro BBB, to be defined with high-throughput analyses. Subsequently these mechanisms have been verified in vivo using a limited number of experimental animals and a spinal cord window surgical technique. The window enables live observation of the dynamic interaction between T cells and spinal cord microvessels under physiological and pathological conditions using real time epifluorescence intravital imaging. These in vitro and in vivo live cell imaging methods have shown that the BBB endothelium possesses unique and specialized mechanisms involved in the multi-step T cell migration across this endothelial barrier under physiological flow. The initial T cell interaction with the endothelium is either mediated by T cell capture or by T cell rolling. Arrest follows, and then T cells polarize and especially CD4+ T cells crawl over long distances against the direction of

  13. Live cell imaging techniques to study T cell trafficking across the blood-brain barrier in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coisne, Caroline; Lyck, Ruth; Engelhardt, Britta

    2013-01-21

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an immunologically privileged site to which access for circulating immune cells is tightly controlled by the endothelial blood-brain barrier (BBB) located in CNS microvessels. Under physiological conditions immune cell migration across the BBB is low. However, in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis, many immune cells can cross the BBB and cause neurological symptoms. Extravasation of circulating immune cells is a multi-step process that is regulated by the sequential interaction of different adhesion and signaling molecules on the immune cells and on the endothelium. The specialized barrier characteristics of the BBB, therefore, imply the existence of unique mechanisms for immune cell migration across the BBB. An in vitro mouse BBB model maintaining physiological barrier characteristics in a flow chamber and combined with high magnification live cell imaging, has been established. This model enables the molecular mechanisms involved in the multi-step extravasation of T cells across the in vitro BBB, to be defined with high-throughput analyses. Subsequently these mechanisms have been verified in vivo using a limited number of experimental animals and a spinal cord window surgical technique. The window enables live observation of the dynamic interaction between T cells and spinal cord microvessels under physiological and pathological conditions using real time epifluorescence intravital imaging. These in vitro and in vivo live cell imaging methods have shown that the BBB endothelium possesses unique and specialized mechanisms involved in the multi-step T cell migration across this endothelial barrier under physiological flow. The initial T cell interaction with the endothelium is either mediated by T cell capture or by T cell rolling. Arrest follows, and then T cells polarize and especially CD4+ T cells crawl over long distances against the direction of flow to find the rare sites permissive for diapedesis through

  14. Protein dynamics in individual human cells: experiment and theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Aharon Cohen

    Full Text Available A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle-dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time per cell is quadratic for proteins with long mRNA life times and approximately linear for a protein with short mRNA lifetime. Both behaviors correspond to a classical model of transcription and translation. A stochastic model, in which genes slowly switch between ON and OFF states, captures measured cell-cell variability. The data suggests, in accordance with the model, that switching to the gene ON state is exponentially distributed and that the cell-cell distribution of protein levels can be approximated by a Gamma distribution throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that relatively simple models may describe protein dynamics in individual human cells.

  15. Using microdispensing to manufacture a customized cell dish for microbeam irradiation of single, living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, E.J.C. [Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)], E-mail: charlotta.nilsson@nuclear.lu.se; Olsson, M.G. [Division of Infection Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, S-22184 Lund (Sweden); Nilsson, J. [Department of Electrical Measurements and Industrial Electrical Engineering and Automation, Lund Institute of Technology, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Pallon, J.; Masternak, A. [Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Paczesny, J. [Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Division of Infection Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, S-22184 Lund (Sweden); Arteaga-Marrero, N.; Elfman, M.; Kristiansson, P.; Nilsson, C. [Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Akerstroem, B. [Division of Infection Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, S-22184 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-04-15

    In this paper is described the preparation of patterned cell dishes to be used in studies of low dose irradiation effects on living cells. Using a droplet microdispenser, an 8 {mu}m thick polypropylene cell substrate, to which cells do not naturally adhere, was coated in a matrix pattern with the cell adhesive mussel protein Cell-Tak. Cells were shown to adhere and grow on the protein-coated spots, but not on the uncoated parts, providing for guided cell growth. Cultivation of isolated cell colonies provides an opportunity to study how low doses of ionizing radiation affect neighbouring un-irradiated cell colonies.

  16. Severe hypertension in pregnancy: Using dynamic checklists to save lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Jack; Ngene, N C

    2016-07-01

    Severe hypertension is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The South African Saving Mothers report (2011 - 2013) indicates that cerebral injury due to severe hypertension is resulting in avoidable maternal deaths. This demands that management of severe hypertension in pregnancy needs to be improved. A rapid-acting antihypertensive is recommended for the initial management of severe hypertension during pregnancy. A single dose of a rapid-acting agent may be ineffective, in which case incremental doses of the same medication or another antihypertensive may be required for adequate blood pressure control. To ensure that appropriate antihypertensives at the correct doses are administered, the use of a guideline in a dynamic checklist format is advocated and discussed in this article. It is envisaged that the use of dynamic checklists will be valuable to all healthcare professionals providing care during pregnancy and the puerperium.

  17. Distinct short-lived and long-lived antibody-producing cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, F; Lortan, J E; MacLennan, I C; Khan, M

    1986-10-01

    This report analyzes the life span of Ig-containing cells (IgCC) in different sites of antibody production. The experimental approach was based upon the observations that most IgCC are derived from proliferating precursors while IgCC themselves are mainly nondividing end cells. Rats were given a continuous infusion of [3H] thymidine via an osmotic pump inserted in the peritoneal cavity. At intervals of 1, 3, 5 or 10 days after starting infusions, tissues were taken and analyzed by a combination of immunohistology and autoradiography to identify the proportions of IgCC which had gone through S phase of the cell cycle during the period of infusion. After 3 days infusion the median and (range) percent-labeled IgCC in the medullary cords of mesenteric and cervical lymph nodes and the red pulp of the spleen were, respectively, 88 (81-90), 75 (66-77) and 88 (82-93). Conversely that for IgCC in bone marrow was only 13 (11-17) and that in the lamina propria of the jejunum 47 (33-68). The rate of increase in labeling of bone marrow IgCC with length of infusion was approximately linear. Extrapolation of this slope suggests that bone marrow IgCC have a life span in excess of 3 weeks. The slopes of increase in IgCC labeled with time for lymph nodes and spleen were clearly biphasic suggesting that while most IgCC in these tissues have a life span of less than 3 days, there is also a minor population of long-lived IgCC. The lamina propria appears to have approximately equal proportions of long and short-lived IgCC. The life span of IgCC, with the exception of IgMCC, appears to be a feature of the site of antibody production rather than the Ig class produced. Almost all IgM-containing cells were found to be short lived.

  18. Two-colour live-cell nanoscale imaging of intracellular targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottanelli, Francesca; Kromann, Emil B.; Allgeyer, Edward S.; Erdmann, Roman S.; Wood Baguley, Stephanie; Sirinakis, George; Schepartz, Alanna; Baddeley, David; Toomre, Derek K.; Rothman, James E.; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy allows observations of subcellular dynamics at the nanoscale. Applications have, however, been severely limited by the lack of a versatile STED-compatible two-colour labelling strategy for intracellular targets in living cells. Here we demonstrate a universal labelling method based on the organic, membrane-permeable dyes SiR and ATTO590 as Halo and SNAP substrates. SiR and ATTO590 constitute the first suitable dye pair for two-colour STED imaging in living cells below 50 nm resolution. We show applications with mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane and Golgi-localized proteins, and demonstrate continuous acquisition for up to 3 min at 2-s time resolution. PMID:26940217

  19. A highly specific gold nanoprobe for live-cell single-molecule imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Leduc, Cecile; Gautier, Jérémie; Soto-Ribeiro, Martinho; Wehrle-Haller, B; Gautreau, Alexis; Giannone, Gregory; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim

    2013-01-01

    Single molecule tracking in live cells is the ultimate tool to study subcellular protein dynamics, but it is often limited by the probe size and photostability. Due to these issues, long-term tracking of proteins in confined and crowded environments, such as intracellular spaces, remains challenging. We have developed a novel optical probe consisting of 5-nm gold nanoparticles functionalized with a small fragment of camelid antibodies that recognize widely used GFPs with a very high affinity, which we call GFP-nanobodies. These small gold nanoparticles can be detected and tracked using photothermal imaging for arbitrarily long periods of time. Surface and intracellular GFP-proteins were effectively labeled even in very crowded environments such as adhesion sites and cytoskeletal structures both in vitro and in live cell cultures. These nanobody-coated gold nanoparticles are probes with unparalleled capabilities; small size, perfect photostability, high specificity, and versatility afforded by combination with...

  20. Application of Live-Cell RNA Imaging Techniques to the Study of Retroviral RNA Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses produce full-length RNA that serves both as a genomic RNA (gRNA, which is encapsidated into virus particles, and as an mRNA, which directs the synthesis of viral structural proteins. However, we are only beginning to understand the cellular and viral factors that influence trafficking of retroviral RNA and the selection of the RNA for encapsidation or translation. Live cell imaging studies of retroviral RNA trafficking have provided important insight into many aspects of the retrovirus life cycle including transcription dynamics, nuclear export of viral RNA, translational regulation, membrane targeting, and condensation of the gRNA during virion assembly. Here, we review cutting-edge techniques to visualize single RNA molecules in live cells and discuss the application of these systems to studying retroviral RNA trafficking.

  1. A cancer cell-specific fluorescent probe for imaging Cu2 + in living cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Dong, Baoli; Kong, Xiuqi; Song, Xuezhen; Zhang, Nan; Lin, Weiying

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring copper level in cancer cells is important for the further understanding of its roles in the cell proliferation, and also could afford novel copper-based strategy for the cancer therapy. Herein, we have developed a novel cancer cell-specific fluorescent probe for the detecting Cu2 + in living cancer cells. The probe employed biotin as the cancer cell-specific group. Before the treatment of Cu2 +, the probe showed nearly no fluorescence. However, the probe can display strong fluorescence at 581 nm in response to Cu2 +. The probe exhibited excellent sensitivity and high selectivity for Cu2 + over the other relative species. Under the guidance of biotin group, could be successfully used for detecting Cu2 + in living cancer cells. We expect that this design strategy could be further applied for detection of the other important biomolecules in living cancer cells.

  2. An integrated on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Weikang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen; Wang, Yugang

    2015-09-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a threat to genome integrity by introducing DNA damages, particularly DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Understanding how cells react to DSB and maintain genome integrity is of major importance, since increasing evidences indicate the links of DSB with genome instability and cancer predispositions. However, tracking the dynamics of DNA damages and repair response to ionizing radiation in individual cell is difficult. Here we describe the development of an on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system based on isotopic sources at Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The system was designed to irradiate cells and in situ observe the cellular responses to ionizing radiation in real time. On-line irradiation was achieved by mounting a metal framework that hold an isotopic γ source above the cell culture dish for γ irradiation; or by integrating an isotopic α source to an objective lens under the specialized cell culture dish for α irradiation. Live cell imaging was performed on a confocal microscope with an environmental chamber installed on the microscope stage. Culture conditions in the environment chamber such as CO2, O2 concentration as well as temperature are adjustable, which further extends the capacity of the system and allows more flexible experimental design. We demonstrate the use of this system by tracking the DSB foci formation and disappearance in individual cells after exposure to irradiation. On-line irradiation together with in situ live cell imaging in adjustable culture conditions, the system overall provides a powerful tool for investigation of cellular and subcellular response to ionizing radiation under different physiological conditions such as hyperthermia or hypoxia.

  3. An integrated on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Weikang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen, E-mail: gen.yang@pku.edu.cn; Wang, Yugang

    2015-09-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a threat to genome integrity by introducing DNA damages, particularly DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Understanding how cells react to DSB and maintain genome integrity is of major importance, since increasing evidences indicate the links of DSB with genome instability and cancer predispositions. However, tracking the dynamics of DNA damages and repair response to ionizing radiation in individual cell is difficult. Here we describe the development of an on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system based on isotopic sources at Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The system was designed to irradiate cells and in situ observe the cellular responses to ionizing radiation in real time. On-line irradiation was achieved by mounting a metal framework that hold an isotopic γ source above the cell culture dish for γ irradiation; or by integrating an isotopic α source to an objective lens under the specialized cell culture dish for α irradiation. Live cell imaging was performed on a confocal microscope with an environmental chamber installed on the microscope stage. Culture conditions in the environment chamber such as CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} concentration as well as temperature are adjustable, which further extends the capacity of the system and allows more flexible experimental design. We demonstrate the use of this system by tracking the DSB foci formation and disappearance in individual cells after exposure to irradiation. On-line irradiation together with in situ live cell imaging in adjustable culture conditions, the system overall provides a powerful tool for investigation of cellular and subcellular response to ionizing radiation under different physiological conditions such as hyperthermia or hypoxia.

  4. Automated three-dimensional single cell phenotyping of spindle dynamics, cell shape, and volume

    CERN Document Server

    Plumb, Kemp; Pelletier, Vincent; Kilfoil, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    We present feature finding and tracking algorithms in 3D in living cells, and demonstrate their utility to measure metrics important in cell biological processes. We developed a computational imaging hybrid approach that combines automated three-dimensional tracking of point-like features with surface determination from which cell (or nuclear) volume, shape, and planes of interest can be extracted. After validation, we applied the technique to real space context-rich dynamics of the mitotic spindle, and cell volume and its relationship to spindle length, in dividing living cells. These methods are additionally useful for automated segregation of pre-anaphase and anaphase spindle populations in budding yeast. We found that genetic deletion of the yeast kinesin-5 mitotic motor cin8 leads to large mother and daughter cells that were indistinguishable based on size, and that in those cells the spindle length becomes uncorrelated with cell size. The technique can be used to visualize and quantify tracked feature c...

  5. Optical Control of Living Cells Electrical Activity by Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Nicola; Bossio, Caterina; Vaquero Morata, Susana; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-28

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications. In particular, conjugated polymers display several optimal properties as substrates for biological systems, such as good biocompatibility, excellent mechanical properties, cheap and easy processing technology, and possibility of deposition on light, thin and flexible substrates. These materials have been employed for cellular interfaces like neural probes, transistors for excitation and recording of neural activity, biosensors and actuators for drug release. Recent experiments have also demonstrated the possibility to use conjugated polymers for all-optical modulation of the electrical activity of cells. Several in-vitro study cases have been reported, including primary neuronal networks, astrocytes and secondary line cells. Moreover, signal photo-transduction mediated by organic polymers has been shown to restore light sensitivity in degenerated retinas, suggesting that these devices may be used for artificial retinal prosthesis in the future. All in all, light sensitive conjugated polymers represent a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work, all the steps required to fabricate a bio-polymer interface for optical excitation of living cells are described. The function of the active interface is to transduce the light stimulus into a modulation of the cell membrane potential. As a study case, useful for in-vitro studies, a polythiophene thin film is used as the functional, light absorbing layer, and Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells are employed as the biological component of the interface. Practical examples of successful control of the cell membrane potential upon stimulation with light pulses of different duration are provided. In particular, it is shown that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing effects on the cell membrane can be achieved depending on the duration of the light stimulus. The reported

  6. Ocean Networks Canada: Live Sensing of a Dynamic Ocean System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heesemann, Martin; Juniper, Kim; Hoeberechts, Maia; Matabos, Marjolaine; Mihaly, Steven; Scherwath, Martin; Dewey, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Ocean Networks Canada operates two advanced cabled networks on the west coast of British Columbia. VENUS, the coastal network consisting of two cabled arrays with four Nodes reaching an isolated fjord (Saanich Inlet) and a busy shipping corridor near Vancouver (the Strait of Georgia) went into operation in February 2006. NEPTUNE Canada is the first operational deep-sea regional cabled ocean observatory worldwide. Since the first data began streaming to the public in 2009, instruments on the five active nodes along the 800 km cable loop have gathered a time-series documenting three years in the northeastern Pacific. Observations cover the northern Juan de Fuca tectonic plate from ridge to trench and the continental shelf and slope off Vancouver Island. The cabled systems provide power and high bandwidth communications to a wide range of oceanographic instrument systems which measure the physical, chemical, geological, and biological conditions of the dynamic earth-ocean system. Over the years significant challenges have been overcome and currently we have more than 100 instruments with hundreds of sensors reporting data in real-time. Salient successes are the first open-ocean seafloor to sea-surface vertical profiling system, three years of operation of Wally—a seafloor crawler that explores a hydrate mound, and a proven resilient cable design that can recover from trawler hits and major equipment meltdown with minimal loss of data. A network wide array of bottom mounted pressure recorders and seismometers recorded the passage of three major tsunamis, numerous earthquakes and frequent whale calls. At the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge high temperature and diffuse vent fluids were monitored and sampled using novel equipment, including high resolution active acoustics instrumentation to study plume dynamics at a massive sulfide hydrothermal vent. Also, four deep sea cabled moorings (300 m high) were placed in the precipitous bathymetry of the 2200 m

  7. Unmasking Chaotic Attributes in Time Series of Living Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Michel; Deschatrette, Jean; Wolfrom, Claire M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Long-range oscillations of the mammalian cell proliferation rate are commonly observed both in vivo and in vitro. Such complicated dynamics are generally the result of a combination of stochastic events and deterministic regulation. Assessing the role, if any, of chaotic regulation is difficult. However, unmasking chaotic dynamics is essential for analysis of cellular processes related to proliferation rate, including metabolic activity, telomere homeostasis, gene expression, and tumor growth. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a simple, original, nonlinear method based on return maps, we previously found a geometrical deterministic structure coordinating such fluctuations in populations of various cell types. However, nonlinearity and determinism are only necessary conditions for chaos; they do not by themselves constitute a proof of chaotic dynamics. Therefore, we used the same analytical method to analyze the oscillations of four well-known, low-dimensional, chaotic oscillators, originally designed in diverse settings and all possibly well-adapted to model the fluctuations of cell populations: the Lorenz, Rössler, Verhulst and Duffing oscillators. All four systems also display this geometrical structure, coordinating the oscillations of one or two variables of the oscillator. No such structure could be observed in periodic or stochastic fluctuations. Conclusion/Significance Theoretical models predict various cell population dynamics, from stable through periodically oscillating to a chaotic regime. Periodic and stochastic fluctuations were first described long ago in various mammalian cells, but by contrast, chaotic regulation had not previously been evidenced. The findings with our nonlinear geometrical approach are entirely consistent with the notion that fluctuations of cell populations can be chaotically controlled. PMID:20179755

  8. Unmasking chaotic attributes in time series of living cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Laurent

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-range oscillations of the mammalian cell proliferation rate are commonly observed both in vivo and in vitro. Such complicated dynamics are generally the result of a combination of stochastic events and deterministic regulation. Assessing the role, if any, of chaotic regulation is difficult. However, unmasking chaotic dynamics is essential for analysis of cellular processes related to proliferation rate, including metabolic activity, telomere homeostasis, gene expression, and tumor growth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a simple, original, nonlinear method based on return maps, we previously found a geometrical deterministic structure coordinating such fluctuations in populations of various cell types. However, nonlinearity and determinism are only necessary conditions for chaos; they do not by themselves constitute a proof of chaotic dynamics. Therefore, we used the same analytical method to analyze the oscillations of four well-known, low-dimensional, chaotic oscillators, originally designed in diverse settings and all possibly well-adapted to model the fluctuations of cell populations: the Lorenz, Rössler, Verhulst and Duffing oscillators. All four systems also display this geometrical structure, coordinating the oscillations of one or two variables of the oscillator. No such structure could be observed in periodic or stochastic fluctuations. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Theoretical models predict various cell population dynamics, from stable through periodically oscillating to a chaotic regime. Periodic and stochastic fluctuations were first described long ago in various mammalian cells, but by contrast, chaotic regulation had not previously been evidenced. The findings with our nonlinear geometrical approach are entirely consistent with the notion that fluctuations of cell populations can be chaotically controlled.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi: single cell live imaging inside infected tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Bianca Lima; Orikaza, Cristina Mary; Cordero, Esteban Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although imaging the live Trypanosoma cruzi parasite is a routine technique in most laboratories, identification of the parasite in infected tissues and organs has been hindered by their intrinsic opaque nature. We describe a simple method for in vivo observation of live single‐cell Trypanosoma cruzi parasites inside mammalian host tissues. BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice infected with DsRed‐CL or GFP‐G trypomastigotes had their organs removed and sectioned with surgical blades. Ex vivo organ sections were observed under confocal microscopy. For the first time, this procedure enabled imaging of individual amastigotes, intermediate forms and motile trypomastigotes within infected tissues of mammalian hosts. PMID:26639617

  10. Raman microscopy of individual living human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, S. M.; Beermann, J.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Harkness, L. M.; Kassem, M.

    2010-04-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of mapping the distribution of different biomolecules in living human embryonic stem cells grown on glass substrates, without the need for fluorescent markers. In our work we improve the quality of measurements by finding a buffer that gives low fluorescence, growing cells on glass substrates (whose Raman signals are relatively weak compared to that of the cells) and having the backside covered with gold to improve the image contrast under direct white light illumination. The experimental setup used for Raman microscopy is the commercially available confocal scanning Raman microscope (Alpha300R) from Witec and sub-μm spatially resolved Raman images were obtained using a 532 nm excitation wavelength.

  11. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking, an

  12. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of Live Versus Dead Bacterial Cells and Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, James N.; LaDuc, Myron T.; Diamond, Rochelle; Verceles, Josh

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a coupled fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescent staining technology for purifying (removing cells from sampling matrices), separating (based on size, density, morphology, and live versus dead), and concentrating cells (spores, prokaryotic, eukaryotic) from an environmental sample.

  13. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking,

  14. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking, an

  15. Long-Lived Dynamical Niches in the Inner Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuk, Matija

    2008-05-01

    Despite recent theoretical advances (Gomes et al. 2005, Chambers 2007) the cause of the Late Heavy Bombardment (a.k.a. Lunar Cataclysm) is still controversial. During the LHB, which ended by 3.8 Gya (with no clear start date; Chapman et al. 2007) multiple large impact basins formed on the Moon, and there is some evidence of bombardment on Earth, Mars and Vesta. While leading theories prefer late depletion of the main asteroid belt, trace element data in lunar soils point to overwhelmingly enstatite chondrite impactors, usually associated with the inner solar system. Bottke et al.(2007) have shown that even high-inclination planet-crossing planetesimals decay too fast to be a viable source of the LHB. However, there exist several stable niches, potentially relevant to the LHB. We show that putative Vulcanoids and Earth-Mars-belt asteroids (Evans and Tabachnik 1999) are not plausible sources of the LHB, and that the apparent complete depletion of those regions is likely due to YORP and Yarkovsky effects, rather than any purely dynamical causes. The region between Mars and the asteroid belt does offer a long-term refuge, the stability of which depends crucially on the long-term behavior of Mars's eccentricity (cf. Chambers 2007). If Mars originally had a more circular orbit (long term e < 0.09), small bodies could survive in this region until chaotic dynamics excites martian eccentricity (Laskar 1989, 2008). This scenario is very similar to the "Planet V" hypothesis (Chambers 2007), only that the planet never formed. The amount of mass required for the LHB is roughly similar to that of the asteroid belt, implying much higher small-body density in the transmartian region. This is still a negligible fraction of the material needed to form the inner planets, and would require that this region was not swept by the nu6 secular resonance, unlike the main belt.

  16. Culture of Adult Transgenic Zebrafish Retinal Explants for Live-cell Imaging by Multiphoton Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahne, Manuela; Gorsuch, Ryne A; Nelson, Craig M; Hyde, David R

    2017-02-24

    An endogenous regeneration program is initiated by Müller glia in the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) retina following neuronal damage and death. The Müller glia re-enter the cell cycle and produce neuronal progenitor cells that undergo subsequent rounds of cell divisions and differentiate into the lost neuronal cell types. Both Müller glia and neuronal progenitor cell nuclei replicate their DNA and undergo mitosis in distinct locations of the retina, i.e. they migrate between the basal Inner Nuclear Layer (INL) and the Outer Nuclear Layer (ONL), respectively, in a process described as Interkinetic Nuclear Migration (INM). INM has predominantly been studied in the developing retina. To examine the dynamics of INM in the adult regenerating zebrafish retina in detail, live-cell imaging of fluorescently-labeled Müller glia/neuronal progenitor cells is required. Here, we provide the conditions to isolate and culture dorsal retinas from Tg[gfap:nGFP](mi2004) zebrafish that were exposed to constant intense light for 35 h. We also show that these retinal cultures are viable to perform live-cell imaging experiments, continuously acquiring z-stack images throughout the thickness of the retinal explant for up to 8 h using multiphoton microscopy to monitor the migratory behavior of gfap:nGFP-positive cells. In addition, we describe the details to perform post-imaging analysis to determine the velocity of apical and basal INM. To summarize, we established conditions to study the dynamics of INM in an adult model of neuronal regeneration. This will advance our understanding of this crucial cellular process and allow us to determine the mechanisms that control INM.

  17. Photoluminescence Lifetime Imaging of Newly Synthesized Proteins in Living Cells with Iridium-alkyne Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinrong; Wang, Jinyu; Xue, Jie; Yan, Zihe; Zhang, Sichun; Qiao, Juan

    2017-09-23

    Designing probes for real-time imaging of dynamic processes in living cells is a continual challenge. Herein, a novel near-infrared photoluminescence probe with long lifetime was exploited for photoluminescence lifetime imaging (PLIM) based on an Iridium-alkyne complex. This probe offers benefits of desirable deep-red to NIR emission, long stokes shift, excellent cell penetration, low cytotoxicity and good resistance to photobleaching. To the best of our knowledge this is the first PLIM probe applicable to click reaction of Cu(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition with remarkable lifetime shifts of 414 ns before and after click reaction. The approach fully eliminates the background interference and well distinguishes the reacted probes from the unreacted probes, thus enabling the wash-free imaging of the newly synthesized proteins in single living cells. Based on the unique properties of the Iridium complexes, it is anticipated to be applied in more important issues in living cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. 78 FR 49528 - Consolidation of Wound Care Products Containing Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Consolidation of Wound Care Products Containing Live Cells...) is transferring oversight responsibilities for certain wound care products containing live cells from... containing live cells are developed such consolidation is necessary for both efficient and consistent Agency...

  19. Aptamer-based single-molecule imaging of insulin receptors in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Minhyeok; Kwon, Mijin; Kim, Sooran; Yunn, Na-Oh; Kim, Daehyung; Ryu, Sung Ho; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2014-05-01

    We present a single-molecule imaging platform that quantitatively explores the spatiotemporal dynamics of individual insulin receptors in living cells. Modified DNA aptamers that specifically recognize insulin receptors (IRs) with a high affinity were selected through the SELEX process. Using quantum dot-labeled aptamers, we successfully imaged and analyzed the diffusive motions of individual IRs in the plasma membranes of a variety of cell lines (HIR, HEK293, HepG2). We further explored the cholesterol-dependent movement of IRs to address whether cholesterol depletion interferes with IRs and found that cholesterol depletion of the plasma membrane by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduces the mobility of IRs. The aptamer-based single-molecule imaging of IRs will provide better understanding of insulin signal transduction through the dynamics study of IRs in the plasma membrane.

  20. Application of living microbial cells entrapped with synthetic resin prepolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, S; Tanaka, A

    1989-12-01

    Living and growing microbial cells were immobilized by entrapping in synthetic resin gels prepared from their prepolymers, and used in the production of various useful substances. The production of the desired metabolites and also both the activity and the stability of the catalytic systems were seriously affected by the physico-chemical properties of the prepolymers, and those of the resin gels subsequently formed, such as gel network, hydrophilicity-hydrophobicity balance and ionic nature, as well as by the type of bioreactors. Hydroxylation of steroids and production of antibiotics, polypeptides and other biologically active substances, and the effects of gel properties on them are discussed as examples.

  1. Highly stable organic fluorescent nanorods for living- cell imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minhuan Lan[1,3; Jinfeng Zhang[1,3; Xiaoyue Zhu[1; Pengfei Wang[2; Xianfeng Chen[1; Chun-Sing Lee[1; Wenjun Zhang[1

    2015-01-01

    Metal-free, organic-dye-based fluorescent nanorods were fabricated through a simple solvent-exchange procedure. The as-prepared nanorods exhibit low toxicity to living cells and excellent photostability. Furthermore, they are stable in solutions of various pHs and high ionic strength and in solutions with interfering metal ions. Compared with the free DPP-Br molecules in THF, these nanorods exhibit larger Stokes shift, broader absorption spectra, and greatly improved photostability. We successfully demonstrated the application of the nanorods, including their aforementioned beneficial characteristics, as a good fluorescence probe for bio-imaging.

  2. Nanomembrane-Based, Thermal-Transport Biosensor for Living Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami T.

    2016-11-23

    Knowledge of materials\\' thermal-transport properties, conductivity and diffusivity, is crucial for several applications within areas of biology, material science and engineering. Specifically, a microsized, flexible, biologically integrated thermal transport sensor is beneficial to a plethora of applications, ranging across plants physiological ecology and thermal imaging and treatment of cancerous cells, to thermal dissipation in flexible semiconductors and thermoelectrics. Living cells pose extra challenges, due to their small volumes and irregular curvilinear shapes. Here a novel approach of simultaneously measuring thermal conductivity and diffusivity of different materials and its applicability to single cells is demonstrated. This technique is based on increasing phonon-boundary-scattering rate in nanomembranes, having extremely low flexural rigidities, to induce a considerable spectral dependence of the bandgap-emission over excitation-laser intensity. It is demonstrated that once in contact with organic or inorganic materials, the nanomembranes\\' emission spectrally shift based on the material\\'s thermal diffusivity and conductivity. This NM-based technique is further applied to differentiate between different types and subtypes of cancer cells, based on their thermal-transport properties. It is anticipated that this novel technique to enable an efficient single-cell thermal targeting, allow better modeling of cellular thermal distribution and enable novel diagnostic techniques based on variations of single-cell thermal-transport properties.

  3. Nanomembrane-Based, Thermal-Transport Biosensor for Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElAfandy, Rami T; AbuElela, Ayman F; Mishra, Pawan; Janjua, Bilal; Oubei, Hassan M; Büttner, Ulrich; Majid, Mohammed A; Ng, Tien Khee; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Ooi, Boon S

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge of materials' thermal-transport properties, conductivity and diffusivity, is crucial for several applications within areas of biology, material science and engineering. Specifically, a microsized, flexible, biologically integrated thermal transport sensor is beneficial to a plethora of applications, ranging across plants physiological ecology and thermal imaging and treatment of cancerous cells, to thermal dissipation in flexible semiconductors and thermoelectrics. Living cells pose extra challenges, due to their small volumes and irregular curvilinear shapes. Here a novel approach of simultaneously measuring thermal conductivity and diffusivity of different materials and its applicability to single cells is demonstrated. This technique is based on increasing phonon-boundary-scattering rate in nanomembranes, having extremely low flexural rigidities, to induce a considerable spectral dependence of the bandgap-emission over excitation-laser intensity. It is demonstrated that once in contact with organic or inorganic materials, the nanomembranes' emission spectrally shift based on the material's thermal diffusivity and conductivity. This NM-based technique is further applied to differentiate between different types and subtypes of cancer cells, based on their thermal-transport properties. It is anticipated that this novel technique to enable an efficient single-cell thermal targeting, allow better modeling of cellular thermal distribution and enable novel diagnostic techniques based on variations of single-cell thermal-transport properties.

  4. Spatiotemporal analysis of endocytosis and membrane distribution of fluorescent sterols in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Faergeman, Nils J

    2008-01-01

    Distribution and dynamics of cholesterol in the plasma membrane as well as internalization pathways for sterol from the cell surface are of great cell biological interest. Here, UV-sensitive wide field microscopy of the intrinsically fluorescent sterols, dehydroergosterol (DHE) and cholestatrienol...... (CTL) combined with advanced image analysis were used to study spatiotemporal sterol distribution in living macrophages, adipocytes and fibroblasts. Sterol endocytosis was directly visualized by time-lapse imaging and noise-robust tracking revealing confined motion of DHE containing vesicles in close...... proximity to the cell membrane. Spatial surface intensity patterns of DHE as well as that of the lipid marker DiIC12 being assessed by statistical image analysis persisted over several minutes in cells having a constant overall curvature. Sites of sterol endocytosis appeared indistinguishable from other...

  5. Raman microspectroscopic study of biomolecular structure inside living adhesive cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李光; 杨红英; 许以明; 张志义

    2002-01-01

    Cells adhesion is very important for many physiological processes. Using advanced Raman microspectroscopic technique, we selected T Leukemia cells (Jurkat) as the materials and obtained simultaneously conformation information of various biomolecules inside the whole living cells. By comparing the Raman microspectroscopic spectra of single and adhesive cancer cells, we found for the first time that when cells adhered, the conformation of the biomolecules (DNA, protein, carbohydrates and lipids) inside the cells had different changes: (i) the backbone of double-stranded DNA maintained orderly B-form or modified B-form conformation, whereas the groups of its deoxyribose and bases were modified; (ii) the conformational changes of the main chain and the side chain in the protein were obviously variant. The lines intensity belonging to α-helix andβ-sheet decreased, while that ofβ-turn increased. Tyrosine and tryptophane residues of the protein changed from "buried state" to "exposed state"; the lines intensity of its sulfhydryl group also increased; the conformation of its disulfide bond changed from two kinds to three kinds. These facts suggest that the cells adhesion causes changes in H-bonds organization of the main chain and environment of the side chain in the protein; (iii) the groups of the carbohydrates were also modified simultaneously; (iv) the conformation of the lipids bilayers of the membranes changed obviously; the order parameter for lateral interaction between chains decreased gradually with the increase of number of the adhesive cells. So cells adhesion resulted in an increase in fluidity of the membrane and ion permeability on the membrane.

  6. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costantini, Lindsey M. [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Irvin, Susan C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Kennedy, Steven C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Guo, Feng [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Snapp, Erik L., E-mail: erik-lee.snapp@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells.

  7. A new live-cell reporter strategy to simultaneously monitor mitochondrial biogenesis and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodneland Nilsson, Linn Iren; Nitschke Pettersen, Ina Katrine; Nikolaisen, Julie; Micklem, David; Avsnes Dale, Hege; Vatne Røsland, Gro; Lorens, James; Tronstad, Karl Johan

    2015-11-24

    Changes in mitochondrial amount and shape are intimately linked to maintenance of cell homeostasis via adaptation of vital functions. Here, we developed a new live-cell reporter strategy to simultaneously monitor mitochondrial biogenesis and morphology. This was achieved by making a genetic reporter construct where a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), controls expression of mitochondria targeted green fluorescent protein (mitoGFP). HeLa cells with the reporter construct demonstrated inducible expression of mitoGFP upon activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) with AICAR. We established stable reporter cells where the mitoGFP reporter activity corresponded with mitochondrial biogenesis both in magnitude and kinetics, as confirmed by biochemical markers and confocal microscopy. Quantitative 3D image analysis confirmed accordant increase in mitochondrial biomass, in addition to filament/network promoting and protecting effects on mitochondrial morphology, after treatment with AICAR. The level of mitoGFP reversed upon removal of AICAR, in parallel with decrease in mtDNA. In summary, we here present a new GFP-based genetic reporter strategy to study mitochondrial regulation and dynamics in living cells. This combinatorial reporter concept can readily be transferred to other cell models and contexts to address specific physiological mechanisms.

  8. Principles of laser-induced separation and transport of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneffer, Verena; Linz, Norbert; Vogel, Alfred

    2007-01-01

    Separation and transport of defined populations of living cells grown on a thin membrane can be achieved by laser microdissection (LMD) of the sample of interest, followed by a laser-induced forward transport process [laser pressure "catapulting" (LPC)] of the dissected cell cluster. We investigate the dynamics of LMD and LPC with focused and defocused UV-A laser pulses by means of time-resolved photography. Catapulting is driven by plasma formation when tightly focused pulses are used, and by confined thermal ablation at the bottom of the sample for defocused catapulting. With both modalities, the initial specimen velocity amounts to about 50 to 60 ms. Time-resolved photography of live cell catapulting reveals that in defocused catapulting, strong shear forces arise when the sample is accelerated out of the culture medium covering the cells. By contrast, pulses focused at the periphery of the specimen cause a fast rotational movement that minimizes the flow of culture medium parallel to the sample surface, and thus the resulting shear stresses. Therefore, the recultivation rate of catapulted cells is much higher when focused pulses are used. Compared to collateral damage by mechanical forces, side effects by heat and UV exposure of the cells play only a minor role.

  9. Long-lived plasma cells in autoimmunity: lessons from B-cell depleting therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahévas, Matthieu; Michel, Marc; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2013-12-27

    A large number of auto-immune diseases are treated with rituximab, an antibody against CD20 that depletes most of the B-cells in the organism. The response to this treatment depends largely on the disease and the type of lymphoid cells involved in the auto-immune process. We recently reported that B-cell depletion in immune thrombocytopenia induced the appearance of pathogenic long-lived plasma cells in the spleen, which were not present before treatment or in non-auto-immune conditions. The spleen of treated patients produced an excess of the cytokine B-cell activating factor, which in in vitro-cultured splenic cells, could increase the longevity of plasma cells. Our results suggested that, paradoxically, the B-cell depletion itself, by altering the splenic milieu, promoted the differentiation of short-lived auto-immune plasma cells into long-lived ones. We describe the cellular and cytokinic components of the splenic plasma cell niche, notably CD4(+) T cells and discuss possible survival factors that could be targeted simultaneously with rituximab-mediated B-cell depletion to interfere with plasma cell persistence.

  10. Penetration of living cell membranes with fortified carbon nanotube tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Brown, Scott C; Higashitani, Ko; Moudgil, Brij M

    2007-10-23

    We have fabricated robust nanosurgical needles suitable for single cell operations by modifying multiwalled carbon nanotube (MCNT)-terminated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips. Extra-long MCNT AFM tips were prepared and fortified with molecular layers of carbon to overcome mechanical instabilities and then coated with an outer shell of gold to promote chemical versatility. The terminal diameters of the final fabricated tips were approximately 30-40 nm, and the MCNT probes were several micrometers in length. We illustrate the capability of these modified MCNT tips to carry nanoparticulate payloads and to penetrate the plasma membrane of living pleural mesothelial cells at the smallest indentation depths (100-200 nm) and lowest penetration forces (100-200 pN) currently reported for these procedures.

  11. Detecting protein-protein interactions in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Marie; Bach, Anders; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2009-01-01

    The PDZ domain mediated interaction between the NMDA receptor and its intracellular scaffolding protein, PSD-95, is a potential target for treatment of ischemic brain diseases. We have recently developed a number of peptide analogues with improved affinity for the PDZ domains of PSD-95 compared......-terminal of the NMDA receptor and PDZ2 of PSD-95 were fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Renilla luciferase (Rluc) and expressed in COS7 cells. A robust and specific BRET signal was obtained by expression of the appropriate partner proteins and subsequently, the assay was used to evaluate a Tat......-conjugated peptide for its ability to disrupt the PSD-95/NMDA receptor interaction in living cells....

  12. About supramolecular systems for dynamically probing cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkmann, J.; Cavatorta, E.; Sankaran, S.; Schmidt, B.; van Weerd, Jasper; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art in the development of strategies for generating supramolecular systems for dynamic cell studies. Dynamic systems are crucial to further our understanding of cell biology and are consequently at the heart of many medical applications. Increasing interest has

  13. Carotenoid distribution in living cells of Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M Collins

    Full Text Available Haematococcus pluvialis is a freshwater unicellular green microalga belonging to the class Chlorophyceae and is of commercial interest for its ability to accumulate massive amounts of the red ketocarotenoid astaxanthin (3,3'-dihydroxy-β,β-carotene-4,4'-dione. Using confocal Raman microscopy and multivariate analysis, we demonstrate the ability to spectrally resolve resonance-enhanced Raman signatures associated with astaxanthin and β-carotene along with chlorophyll fluorescence. By mathematically isolating these spectral signatures, in turn, it is possible to locate these species independent of each other in living cells of H. pluvialis in various stages of the life cycle. Chlorophyll emission was found only in the chloroplast whereas astaxanthin was identified within globular and punctate regions of the cytoplasmic space. Moreover, we found evidence for β-carotene to be co-located with both the chloroplast and astaxanthin in the cytosol. These observations imply that β-carotene is a precursor for astaxanthin and the synthesis of astaxanthin occurs outside the chloroplast. Our work demonstrates the broad utility of confocal Raman microscopy to resolve spectral signatures of highly similar chromophores in living cells.

  14. Carotenoid Distribution in Living Cells of Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Aaron M.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Han, Danxiang; Hu, Qiang; Beechem, Thomas E.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Evens, Terence

    2011-09-06

    Haematococcus pluvialis is a freshwater unicellular green microalga belonging to the class Chlorophyceae and is of commercial interest for its ability to accumulate massive amounts of the red ketocarotenoid astaxanthin (3,3'-dihydroxy-β,β-carotene-4,4'-dione). Using confocal Raman microscopy and multivariate analysis, we demonstrate the ability to spectrally resolve resonance–enhanced Raman signatures associated with astaxanthin and β-carotene along with chlorophyll fluorescence. By mathematically isolating these spectral signatures, in turn, it is possible to locate these species independent of each other in living cells of H. pluvialis in various stages of the life cycle. Chlorophyll emission was found only in the chloroplast whereas astaxanthin was identified within globular and punctate regions of the cytoplasmic space. Moreover, we found evidence for β-carotene to be co-located with both the chloroplast and astaxanthin in the cytosol. These observations imply that β-carotene is a precursor for astaxanthin and the synthesis of astaxanthin occurs outside the chloroplast. Finally, our work demonstrates the broad utility of confocal Raman microscopy to resolve spectral signatures of highly similar chromophores in living cells.

  15. Labeling proteins on live mammalian cells using click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikić, Ivana; Kang, Jun Hee; Girona, Gemma Estrada; Aramburu, Iker Valle; Lemke, Edward A

    2015-05-01

    We describe a protocol for the rapid labeling of cell-surface proteins in living mammalian cells using click chemistry. The labeling method is based on strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) and strain-promoted inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition (SPIEDAC) reactions, in which noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) bearing ring-strained alkynes or alkenes react, respectively, with dyes containing azide or tetrazine groups. To introduce ncAAs site specifically into a protein of interest (POI), we use genetic code expansion technology. The protocol can be described as comprising two steps. In the first step, an Amber stop codon is introduced--by site-directed mutagenesis--at the desired site on the gene encoding the POI. This plasmid is then transfected into mammalian cells, along with another plasmid that encodes an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA (RS/tRNA) pair that is orthogonal to the host's translational machinery. In the presence of the ncAA, the orthogonal RS/tRNA pair specifically suppresses the Amber codon by incorporating the ncAA into the polypeptide chain of the POI. In the second step, the expressed POI is labeled with a suitably reactive dye derivative that is directly supplied to the growth medium. We provide a detailed protocol for using commercially available ncAAs and dyes for labeling the insulin receptor, and we discuss the optimal surface-labeling conditions and the limitations of labeling living mammalian cells. The protocol involves an initial cloning step that can take 4-7 d, followed by the described transfections and labeling reaction steps, which can take 3-4 d.

  16. Real-time study of E-cadherin and membrane dynamics in living animals: implications for disease modeling and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrels, Alan; Timpson, Paul; Canel, Marta; Schwarz, Juliane P; Carragher, Neil O; Frame, Margaret C; Brunton, Valerie G; Anderson, Kurt I

    2009-04-01

    The ability of tumor cells to invade and metastasize requires deregulation of interactions with adjacent cells and the extracellular matrix. A major challenge of cancer biology is to observe the dynamics of the proteins involved in this process in their functional and physiologic context. Here, for the first time, we have used photobleaching and photoactivation to compare the mobility of cell adhesion and plasma membrane probes in vitro and in tumors grown in mice (in vivo). We find differences between in vitro and in vivo recovery dynamics of two key molecules, the tumor suppressor E-cadherin and the membrane-targeting sequence of H-Ras. Our data show that E-cadherin dynamics are significantly faster in vivo compared with cultured cells, that the ratio of E-cadherin stabilized in cell-cell junctions is significantly higher in vivo, and that E-cadherin mobility correlates with cell migration. Moreover, quantitative imaging has allowed us to assess the effects of therapeutic intervention on E-cadherin dynamics using dasatinib, a clinically approved Src inhibitor, and show clear differences in the efficacy of drug treatment in vivo. Our results show for the first time the utility of photobleaching and photoactivation in the analysis of dynamic biomarkers in living animals. Furthermore, this work highlights critical differences in molecular dynamics in vitro and in vivo, which have important implications for the use of cultured disease models as surrogates for living tissue.

  17. Family Dynamics and Mental Status of Japanese Families Who Live in a Northern Prefecture of Japan

    OpenAIRE

    SEKITO, Yoshiko

    2010-01-01

    Abstract :The purpose of this study was to identify characteristics of family dynamics and mental status of Japanese families who live in a northern prefecture of Yamagata, Japan. Data were collected using Family Dynamics Measure II (FDM II) and a questionnaire including questions about socio-demographic characteristics and mental status. Data were collected by convenience sampling from residents of community groups and care personnel. Participation was voluntary. Findings: The majority of pa...

  18. N-way FRET microscopy of multiple protein-protein interactions in live cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Hoppe

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to visualize nanoscale protein-protein interactions while capturing their microscale organization and millisecond dynamics. Recently, FRET microscopy was extended to imaging of multiple donor-acceptor pairs, thereby enabling visualization of multiple biochemical events within a single living cell. These methods require numerous equations that must be defined on a case-by-case basis. Here, we present a universal multispectral microscopy method (N-Way FRET to enable quantitative imaging for any number of interacting and non-interacting FRET pairs. This approach redefines linear unmixing to incorporate the excitation and emission couplings created by FRET, which cannot be accounted for in conventional linear unmixing. Experiments on a three-fluorophore system using blue, yellow and red fluorescent proteins validate the method in living cells. In addition, we propose a simple linear algebra scheme for error propagation from input data to estimate the uncertainty in the computed FRET images. We demonstrate the strength of this approach by monitoring the oligomerization of three FP-tagged HIV Gag proteins whose tight association in the viral capsid is readily observed. Replacement of one FP-Gag molecule with a lipid raft-targeted FP allowed direct observation of Gag oligomerization with no association between FP-Gag and raft-targeted FP. The N-Way FRET method provides a new toolbox for capturing multiple molecular processes with high spatial and temporal resolution in living cells.

  19. Rapid three-dimensional isotropic imaging of living cells using Bessel beam plane illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchon, Thomas A; Gao, Liang; Milkie, Daniel E; Davidson, Michael W; Galbraith, James A; Galbraith, Catherine G; Betzig, Eric

    2012-01-01

    A key challenge when imaging living cells is how to noninvasively extract the most spatiotemporal information possible. Unlike popular wide-field and confocal methods, plane-illumination microscopy limits excitation to the information-rich vicinity of the focal plane, providing effective optical sectioning and high speed while minimizing out-of-focus background and premature photobleaching. Here we used scanned Bessel beams in conjunction with structured illumination and/or two-photon excitation to create thinner light sheets (<0.5 μm) better suited to three-dimensional (3D) subcellular imaging. As demonstrated by imaging the dynamics of mitochondria, filopodia, membrane ruffles, intracellular vesicles and mitotic chromosomes in live cells, the microscope currently offers 3D isotropic resolution down to ~0.3 μm, speeds up to nearly 200 image planes per second and the ability to noninvasively acquire hundreds of 3D data volumes from single living cells encompassing tens of thousands of image frames. PMID:21378978

  20. Molecular dynamics in an optical trap of glutamate receptors labeled with quantum-dots on living neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Tatsunori; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Kudoh, Suguru N.; Taguchi, Takahisa; Hosokawa, Chie

    2017-04-01

    Molecular dynamics of glutamate receptor, which is major neurotransmitter receptor at excitatory synapse located on neuron, is essential for synaptic plasticity in the complex neuronal networks. Here we studied molecular dynamics in an optical trap of AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) labeled with quantum-dot (QD) on living neuronal cells with fluorescence imaging and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). When a 1064-nm laser beam for optical trapping was focused on QD-AMPARs located on neuronal cells, the fluorescence intensity of QD-AMPARs gradually increased at the focal spot. Using single-particle tracking of QD-AMPARs on neurons, the average diffusion coefficient decreased in an optical trap. Moreover, the decay time obtained from FCS analysis increased with the laser power and the initial assembling state of AMPARs depended on culturing day, suggesting that the motion of QD-AMPAR was constrained in an optical trap.

  1. Th17 cells are long lived and retain a stem cell-like molecular signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranski, Pawel; Borman, Zachary A; Kerkar, Sid P; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Ji, Yun; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Reger, Robert N; Yu, Zhiya; Kern, Steven J; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Ferreyra, Gabriela A; Shen, Wei; Durum, Scott K; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Palmer, Douglas C; Antony, Paul A; Chan, Chi-Chao; Laurence, Arian; Danner, Robert L; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2011-12-23

    Th17 cells have been described as short lived, but this view is at odds with their capacity to trigger protracted damage to normal and transformed tissues. We report that Th17 cells, despite displaying low expression of CD27 and other phenotypic markers of terminal differentiation, efficiently eradicated tumors and caused autoimmunity, were long lived, and maintained a core molecular signature resembling early memory CD8(+) cells with stem cell-like properties. In addition, we found that Th17 cells had high expression of Tcf7, a direct target of the Wnt and β-catenin signaling axis, and accumulated β-catenin, a feature observed in stem cells. In vivo, Th17 cells gave rise to Th1-like effector cell progeny and also self-renewed and persisted as IL-17A-secreting cells. Multipotency was required for Th17 cell-mediated tumor eradication because effector cells deficient in IFN-γ or IL-17A had impaired activity. Thus, Th17 cells are not always short lived and are a less-differentiated subset capable of superior persistence and functionality.

  2. Combining PALM and SOFI for quantitative imaging of focal adhesions in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschout, Hendrik; Lukes, Tomas; Sharipov, Azat; Feletti, Lely; Lasser, Theo; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2017-02-01

    Focal adhesions are complicated assemblies of hundreds of proteins that allow cells to sense their extracellular matrix and adhere to it. Although most focal adhesion proteins have been identified, their spatial organization in living cells remains challenging to observe. Photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) is an interesting technique for this purpose, especially since it allows estimation of molecular parameters such as the number of fluorophores. However, focal adhesions are dynamic entities, requiring a temporal resolution below one minute, which is difficult to achieve with PALM. In order to address this problem, we merged PALM with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) by applying both techniques to the same data. Since SOFI tolerates an overlap of single molecule images, it can improve the temporal resolution compared to PALM. Moreover, an adaptation called balanced SOFI (bSOFI) allows estimation of molecular parameters, such as the fluorophore density. We therefore performed simulations in order to assess PALM and SOFI for quantitative imaging of dynamic structures. We demonstrated the potential of our PALM-SOFI concept as a quantitative imaging framework by investigating moving focal adhesions in living cells.

  3. Live cell calcium imaging at the single ion hit facility of GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Guanghua, E-mail: gh_du@impcas.ac.cn [Gesellschaft Fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt D-64291 (Germany); E12, Physics Department, James-Franck-Str. 1, Garching D-85748 (Germany); Institute of Modern Physics, Nanchang Rd. 509, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Fischer, Bernd E.; Voss, Kay-Obbe [Gesellschaft Fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt D-64291 (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    To study the fast intracellular calcium response after ion irradiation in living mammalian cells, a live cell calcium imaging set-up was constructed at the targeted cell irradiation facility at GSI. This work introduces the live cell calcium imaging system, shows its performance, an example of the ratio-metric calcium measurement and its application to on-line study calcium response to targeted ion irradiation in human cells.

  4. Mechanodelivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Nyssa T.; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U.; Yang, Haw

    2014-04-01

    Nanotechnology has opened up the opportunity to probe, sense, and manipulate the chemical environment of biological systems with an unprecedented level of spatiotemporal control. A major obstacle to the full realization of these novel technologies is the lack of a general, robust, and simple method for the delivery of arbitrary nanostructures to the cytoplasm of intact live cells. Here, we identify a new delivery modality, based on mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane, which efficiently mediates the delivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. We use two distinct execution modes, two adherent cell lines, and three sizes of semiconducting nanocrystals, or quantum dots, to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. As the underlying mechanism is purely physical, we anticipate that such ``mechanodelivery'' can be generalized to other modes of execution as well as to the cytoplasmic introduction of a structurally diverse array of functional nanomaterials.Nanotechnology has opened up the opportunity to probe, sense, and manipulate the chemical environment of biological systems with an unprecedented level of spatiotemporal control. A major obstacle to the full realization of these novel technologies is the lack of a general, robust, and simple method for the delivery of arbitrary nanostructures to the cytoplasm of intact live cells. Here, we identify a new delivery modality, based on mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane, which efficiently mediates the delivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. We use two distinct execution modes, two adherent cell lines, and three sizes of semiconducting nanocrystals, or quantum dots, to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. As the underlying mechanism is purely physical, we anticipate that such ``mechanodelivery'' can be generalized to other modes of execution as well as to the cytoplasmic introduction of a structurally diverse array of functional nanomaterials

  5. Direct imaging of APP proteolysis in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, Niccoló; Del Grosso, Ambra; Antoni, Claudia; Cecchini, Marco; Corradetti, Renato; Pavone, Francesco S; Calamai, Martino

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a multifactorial disorder caused by the interaction of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. The formation of cytotoxic oligomers consisting of Aβ peptide is widely accepted as being one of the main key events triggering the development of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ peptide production results from the specific proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Deciphering the factors governing the activity of the secretases responsible for the cleavage of APP is still a critical issue. Kits available commercially measure the enzymatic activity of the secretases from cells lysates, in vitro. By contrast, we have developed a prototypal rapid bioassay that provides visible information on the proteolytic processing of APP directly in living cells. APP was fused to a monomeric variant of the green fluorescent protein and a monomeric variant of the red fluorescent protein at the C-terminal and N-terminal (mChAPPmGFP), respectively. Changes in the proteolytic processing rate in transfected human neuroblastoma and rat neuronal cells were imaged with confocal microscopy as changes in the red/green fluorescence intensity ratio. The significant decrease in the mean red/green ratio observed in cells over-expressing the β-secretase BACE1, or the α-secretase ADAM10, fused to a monomeric blue fluorescent protein confirms that the proteolytic site is still accessible. Specific siRNA was used to evaluate the contribution of endogenous BACE1. Interestingly, we found that the degree of proteolytic processing of APP is not completely homogeneous within the same single cell, and that there is a high degree of variability between cells of the same type. We were also able to follow with a fluorescence spectrometer the changes in the red emission intensity of the extracellular medium when BACE1 was overexpressed. This represents a complementary approach to fluorescence microscopy for rapidly detecting changes in the proteolytic processing of

  6. Enhanced live cell imaging via photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weili; Long, Kenneth D; Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-11-21

    We demonstrate photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) microscopy as a surface-specific fluorescence imaging technique to study the adhesion of live cells by visualizing variations in cell-substrate gap distance. This approach utilizes a photonic crystal surface incorporated into a standard microscope slide as the substrate for cell adhesion, and a microscope integrated with a custom illumination source as the detection instrument. When illuminated with a monochromatic light source, angle-specific optical resonances supported by the photonic crystal enable efficient excitation of surface-confined and amplified electromagnetic fields when excited at an on-resonance condition, while no field enhancement occurs when the same photonic crystal is illuminated in an off-resonance state. By mapping the fluorescence enhancement factor for fluorophore-tagged cellular components between on- and off-resonance states and comparing the results to numerical calculations, the vertical distance of labelled cellular components from the photonic crystal substrate can be estimated, providing critical and quantitative information regarding the spatial distribution of the specific components of cells attaching to a surface. As an initial demonstration of the concept, 3T3 fibroblast cells were grown on fibronectin-coated photonic crystals with fluorophore-labelled plasma membrane or nucleus. We demonstrate that PCEF microscopy is capable of providing information about the spatial distribution of cell-surface interactions at the single-cell level that is not available from other existing forms of microscopy, and that the approach is amenable to large fields of view, without the need for coupling prisms, coupling fluids, or special microscope objectives.

  7. Nonmuscle myosin II isoforms coassemble in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jordan R; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-19

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB, and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique as well as redundant cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear whether NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments or whether filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB, and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms coassemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly spread cells, arguing for the existence of a sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while coassembled with other NM II isoforms.

  8. Colorimetric detection of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yong Jin; Lee, Young Ju; Lee, Jaemyeon; Lee, Doyeon; Park, Hun-Kuk; Lee, Gi-Ja

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has received great attention as a third gaseous signal transmitter, following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. In particular, H2S plays an important role in the regulation of cancer cell biology. Therefore, the detection of endogenous H2S concentrations within biological systems can be helpful to understand the role of gasotransmitters in pathophysiology. Although a simple and inexpensive method for the detection of H2S has been developed, its direct and precise measurement in living cells remains a challenge. In this study, we introduced a simple, facile, and inexpensive colorimetric system for selective H2S detection in living cells using a silver-embedded Nafion/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) membrane. This membrane could be easily applied onto a polystyrene microplate cover. First, we optimized the composition of the coating membrane, such as the PVP/Nafion mixing ratio and AgNO3 concentration, as well as the pH of the Na2S (H2S donor) solution and the reaction time. Next, the in vitro performance of a colorimetric detection assay utilizing the silver/Nafion/PVP membrane was evaluated utilizing a known concentration of Na2S standard solution both at room temperature and at 37 °C in a 5% CO2 incubator. As a result, the sensitivity of the colorimetric assay for H2S at 37 °C in the incubator (0.0056 Abs./μM Na2S, R2 = 0.9948) was similar to that at room temperature (0.0055 Abs./μM Na2S, R2 = 0.9967). Moreover, these assays were less sensitive to interference from compounds such as glutathione, L-cysteine (Cys), and dithiothreitol than to the H2S from Na2S. This assay based on the silver/Nafion/PVP membrane also showed excellent reproducibility (2.8% RSD). Finally, we successfully measured the endogenous H2S concentrations in live C6 glioma cells by s-(5‧-adenosyl)-L-methionine stimulation with and without Cys and L-homocysteine, utilizing the silver/Nafion/PVP membrane. In summary, colorimetric assays using silver

  9. Molecular Theory of the Living Cell Concepts, Molecular Mechanisms, and Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Sungchul

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive molecular theory of the living cell based on over thirty concepts, principles and laws imported from thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, chemical kinetics, informatics, computer science, linguistics, semiotics, and philosophy. The author formulates physically, chemically and enzymologically realistic molecular mechanisms to account for the basic living processes such as ligand-receptor interactions, protein folding, single-molecule enzymic catalysis, force-generating mechanisms in molecular motors, signal transduction, regulation of the genome-wide RNA metabolism, morphogenesis, the micro-macro coupling in coordination dynamics, the origin of life, and the mechanisms of biological evolution itself. Possible solutions to basic and practical problems facing contemporary biology and biomedical sciences have been suggested, including pharmacotheragnostics and personalized medicine.

  10. Dynamics and Afterglow Light Curves of GRB Blast Waves with a Long-lived Reverse Shock

    CERN Document Server

    Uhm, Z Lucas; Hascoet, Romain; Daigne, Frederic; Mochkovitch, Robert; Park, Il H

    2012-01-01

    We perform a detailed study on the dynamics of a relativistic blast wave with the presence of a long-lived reverse shock (RS). Although a short-lived RS has been widely considered, the RS is believed to be long-lived as a consequence of a stratification expected on the ejecta Lorentz factors. The existence of a long-lived RS makes the forward shock (FS) dynamics to deviate from a self-similar Blandford-McKee solution. Employing the "mechanical model" that correctly incorporates the energy conservation for such blast waves with a long-lived RS, we present an accurate solution for both the FS and RS dynamics. We conduct a sophisticated calculation of the afterglow emission. Adopting a Lagrangian description of the blast wave, we keep track of an adiabatic evolution of numerous shells between the FS and RS. An evolution of the electron spectrum is also followed individually for every shell. We then find the FS and RS light curves by integrating over the entire FS and RS shocked regions, respectively. In particul...

  11. MEMS-based dynamic cell-to-cell culture platforms using electrochemical surface modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Yoon, Sang-Hee; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Lin, Liwei

    2011-05-01

    MEMS-based biological platforms with the capability of both spatial placements and time releases of living cells for cell-to-cell culture experiments have been designed and demonstrated utilizing electrochemical surface modification effects. The spatial placement is accomplished by electrochemical surface modification of substrate surfaces to be either adhesive or non-adhesive for living cells. The time control is achieved by the electrical activation of the selective indium tin oxide co-culture electrode to allow the migration of living cells onto the electrode to start the cell-to-cell culture studies. Prototype devices have a three-electrode design with an electrode size of 50 × 50 µm2 and the separation gaps of 2 µm between them. An electrical voltage of -1.5 V has been used to activate the electrodes independently and sequentially to demonstrate the dynamic cell-to-cell culture experiments of NIH 3T3 fibroblast and Madin Darby canine kidney cells. As such, this MEMS platform could be a basic yet versatile tool to characterize transient cell-to-cell interactions.

  12. Incorporating Bacteria as a Living Component in Supramolecular Self-Assembled Monolayers through Dynamic Nanoscale Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan; Kiren, Mustafa Can; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular assemblies, formed through noncovalent interactions, has become particularly attractive to develop dynamic and responsive architectures to address living systems at the nanoscale. Cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]), a pumpkin shaped macrocylic host molecule, has been successfully used to construct various self-assembled architectures for biomedical applications since it can simultaneously bind two aromatic guest molecules within its cavity. Such architectures can also be designed to respond to external stimuli. Integrating living organisms as an active component into such supramolecular architectures would add a new dimension to the capabilities of such systems. To achieve this, we have incorporated supramolecular functionality at the bacterial surface by genetically modifying a transmembrane protein to display a CB[8]-binding motif as part of a cystine-stabilized miniprotein. We were able to confirm that this supramolecular motif on the bacterial surface specifically binds CB[8] and forms multiple intercellular ternary complexes leading to aggregation of the bacterial solution. We performed various aggregation experiments to understand how CB[8] interacts with this bacterial strain and also demonstrate that it can be chemically reversed using a competitor. To confirm that this strain can be incorporated with a CB[8] based architecture, we show that the bacterial cells were able to adhere to CB[8] self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold and still retain considerable motility for several hours, indicating that the system can potentially be used to develop supramolecular bacterial biomotors. The bacterial strain also has the potential to be combined with other CB[8] based architectures like nanoparticles, vesicles and hydrogels.

  13. Thermally Controlling the Polymeric Cytoskeleton in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Leduc, Philip

    2006-03-01

    Cell structure is controlled to a large degree by the cytoskeleton, which is an intracellular polymer network. This cytoskeleton is critical as it strongly influences many cellular functions such as motility, organelle transport, mechanotransduction and mitosis. In our studies, we controlled the thermal environment of living cells and after applying an increase in temperature of only 5 ^oC, we observed a change in the polymer network as the actin filaments depolymerized. Interestingly, when we then lowered the temperature, the actin repolymerized indicating a reversible phase that is controlled by the thermal environment. We characterized the presence of F-actin and G-actin for these phases through analyzing the intensity from immunofluorescent studies for these proteins. The F-actin concentration decreased when increasing the temperature from the initial state and then increased when decreasing the temperature. Although the cell is known to be affected by heat shock responses, this is not a function of just the polymers as they do not exhibit these polymerization characteristics when we probed them as single filaments in vitro. These studies suggest that the cell has distinct phases or patterns while maintaining a reversible equilibrium due to the thermal environment for these networked polymers.

  14. Visualization of Actin Cytoskeletal Dynamics in Fixed and Live Drosophila Egg Chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Christopher M; Tootle, Tina L

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of actin cytoskeletal dynamics is critical for understanding the spatial and temporal regulation of actin remodeling. Drosophila oogenesis provides an excellent model system for visualizing the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we present methods for imaging the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila egg chambers in both fixed samples by phalloidin staining and in live egg chambers using transgenic actin labeling tools.

  15. Nanoscale histone localization in live cells reveals reduced chromatin mobility in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Lelièvre, Sophie A; Irudayaraj, Joseph M K

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear functions including gene expression, DNA replication and genome maintenance intimately rely on dynamic changes in chromatin organization. The movements of chromatin fibers might play important roles in the regulation of these fundamental processes, yet the mechanisms controlling chromatin mobility are poorly understood owing to methodological limitations for the assessment of chromatin movements. Here, we present a facile and quantitative technique that relies on photoactivation of GFP-tagged histones and paired-particle tracking to measure chromatin mobility in live cells. We validate the method by comparing live cells to ATP-depleted cells and show that chromatin movements in mammalian cells are predominantly energy dependent. We also find that chromatin diffusion decreases in response to DNA breaks induced by a genotoxic drug or by the ISceI meganuclease. Timecourse analysis after cell exposure to ionizing radiation indicates that the decrease in chromatin mobility is transient and precedes subsequent increased mobility. Future applications of the method in the DNA repair field and beyond are discussed.

  16. Living biointerfaces based on non-pathogenic bacteria support stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jake J.; Rodrigo-Navarro, Aleixandre; Hassi, Karoliina; Moulisova, Vladimira; Dalby, Matthew J.; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Lactococcus lactis, a non-pathogenic bacteria, has been genetically engineered to express the III7–10 fragment of human fibronectin as a membrane protein. The engineered L. lactis is able to develop biofilms on different surfaces (such as glass and synthetic polymers) and serves as a long-term substrate for mammalian cell culture, specifically human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). This system constitutes a living interface between biomaterials and stem cells. The engineered biofilms remain stable and viable for up to 28 days while the expressed fibronectin fragment induces hMSC adhesion. We have optimised conditions to allow long-term mammalian cell culture, and found that the biofilm is functionally equivalent to a fibronectin-coated surface in terms of osteoblastic differentiation using bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) added to the medium. This living bacteria interface holds promise as a dynamic substrate for stem cell differentiation that can be further engineered to express other biochemical cues to control hMSC differentiation.

  17. Multicolor imaging of hydrogen peroxide level in living and apoptotic cells by a single fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ying; Xue, Fengfeng; Lan, Haichuang; Li, Zhenhua; Xiao, Shuzhang; Yi, Tao

    2017-05-15

    To understand the entangled relationship between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis, there is urgent need for simultaneous dynamic monitoring of these two important biological events. In this study, we have developed a fluorescent probe, pep4-NP1, which can simultaneously detect H2O2 and caspase 3, the respective markers of ROS and apoptosis. The probe contains a H2O2 fluorescence reporter (NP1) and Cy5 fluorescent chromophore connected by a caspase 3 specific recognition peptide. The detecting strategy was realized through a controllable fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process between NP1 and Cy5 of pep4-NP1, after reaction with H2O2, which was verified by molecular calculation and in vitro spectral studies. In the absent of caspase 3, the accumulation of H2O2 induces red fluorescence of pep4-NP1 centered at 663nm in living cells due to the existence of FRET. In contrast, FRET is inhibited in apoptotic cells due to cleavage of the peptide spacer of pep4-NP1 by over-expressed caspase 3. Consequently, green fluorescence (555nm) predominated when labelling production of H2O2 in apoptotic cells. Moreover, Pep4-NP1 shows excellent selectivity towards H2O2 and caspase 3 on their respective reaction sites. Therefore, pep4-NP1 can distinguish endogenously generated H2O2 between living cells and apoptotic cells with different fluorescence wavelengths, providing additional information on the ROS production pathways.

  18. Live-cell super-resolution imaging of intrinsically fast moving flagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogger, M.; Stichler, S.; Subota, I.; Bertlein, S.; Spindler, M.-C.; Teßmar, J.; Groll, J.; Engstler, M.; Fenz, S. F.

    2017-02-01

    Recent developments in super-resolution microscopy make it possible to resolve structures in biological cells at a spatial resolution of a few nm and observe dynamical processes with a temporal resolution of ms to μs. However, the optimal structural resolution requires repeated illumination cycles and is thus limited to chemically fixed cells. For live cell applications substantial improvement over classical Abbe-limited imaging can already be obtained in adherent or slow moving cells. Nonetheless, a large group of cells are fast moving and thus could not yet be addressed with live cell super-resolution microscopy. These include flagellate pathogens like African trypanosomes, the causative agents of sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in livestock. Here, we present an embedding method based on a in situ forming cytocompatible UV-crosslinked hydrogel. The fast cross-linking hydrogel immobilizes trypanosomes efficiently to allow microscopy on the nanoscale. We characterized both the trypanosomes and the hydrogel with respect to their autofluorescence properties and found them suitable for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy (SMFM). As a proof of principle, SMFM was applied to super-resolve a structure inside the living trypanosome. We present an image of a flagellar axoneme component recorded by using the intrinsic blinking behavior of eYFP. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J Phys D. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Susanne Fenz was selected by the Editorial Board of J Phys D as an Emerging Talent/Leader.

  19. Quantitative imaging of glutathione in live cells using a reversible reaction-based ratiometric fluorescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining redox homeostasis inside cells. Currently, there are no methods available to quantitatively assess the GSH concentration in live cells. Live cell fluorescence imaging revolutionized the understanding of cell biology and has become an indispens...

  20. Dynamically remembered present: Virtual memory as a basis for the stories we live

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius W. du Toit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article memory was viewed as a crucial key to the discovery of reality. It is the basis of historical research at all levels, hence it is not confined to a function of human consciousness (brain operations: its physical vestiges are discernible in the universe, in fossils, in the DNA of species. Memory inscribes information in various ways. On a human level it is not recalled computer-wise: imagination, emotion and tacit motives play a role in how we remember. The article investigated the way in which memory underlies the operation of every cell in any living organism. Against this background the role of memory in humans and its decisive influence on every level of human life are examined. Gerald Edelman’s work in this regard was considered. Marcel Proust’s focus on memory is an underlying thread running through his novels, unrivalled in literary history. Some prominent examples were analysed in this article. In light of the foregoing the role of memory in religious experience was then discussed. The virtuality of memory is encapsulated in the statement that we remember the present whilst reliving the past. Memory characterised by virtuality is basic to our autobiographic narratives. The nature of memory determines our life stories, hence our perception of the human self as dynamically variable and open to the future.

  1. Long-lived charge carrier dynamics in polymer/quantum dot blends and organometal halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Hirokazu

    Solution-processable semiconductors offer a potential route to deploy solar panels on a wide scale, based on the possibility of reduced manufacturing costs by using earth-abundant materials and inexpensive production technologies, such as inkjet or roll-to-roll printing. Understanding the fundamental physics underlying device operation is important to realize this goal. This dissertation describes studies of two kinds of solar cells: hybrid polymer/PbS quantum dot solar cells and organometal halide perovskite solar cells. Chapter two discusses details of the experimental techniques. Chapter three and four explore the mechanisms of charge transfer and energy transfer spectroscopically, and find that both processes contribute to the device photocurrent. Chapter four investigates the important question of how the energy level alignment of quantum dot acceptors affects the operation of hybrid polymer/quantum dot solar cells, by making use of the size-tunable energy levels of PbS quantum dots. We observe that long-lived charge transfer yield is diminished at larger dot sizes as the energy level offset at the polymer/quantum dot interface is changed through decreasing quantum confinement using a combination of spectroscopy and device studies. Chapter five discusses the effects of TiO2 surface chemistry on the performance of organometal halide perovskite solar cells. Specifically, chapter five studies the effect of replacing the conventional TiO2 electrode with Zr-doped TiO2 (Zr-TiO2). We aim to explore the correlation between charge carrier dynamics and device studies by incorporating zirconium into TiO2. We find that, compared to Zr-free controls, solar cells employing Zr-TiO2 give rise to an increase in overall power conversion efficiency, and a decrease in hysteresis. We also observe longer carrier lifetimes and higher charge carrier densities in devices on Zr-TiO2 electrodes at microsecond times in transient photovoltage experiments, as well as at longer persistent

  2. Influence of cell growth conditions and medium composition on EGFP photostability in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamontova, Anastasia V; Bogdanov, Alexey M; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2015-05-01

    Photostability is a key characteristic of fluorescent proteins. It was recently demonstrated that green fluorescent protein (GFP) photobleaching in live cells can be suppressed by changes in medium composition. Here we show that Ham's F12 medium provides very high enhanced GFP (EGFP) photostability during fluorescence microscopy of live cells. This property of Ham's F12 medium is associated with decreased concentrations of riboflavin and pyridoxine, and increased concentrations of FeSO4, cyanocobalamine, lipoic acid, hypoxanthine, and thymidine compared with DMEM. We also found that the rate of EGFP photobleaching strongly depends on cell growth conditions such as cell density and the concentration of serum. We conclude that both imaging medium composition and the physiological state of the cells can strongly affect the photostability of fluorescent proteins. Thus, accurate comparison of the photostabilities of fluorescent proteins should be performed only in side-by-side analysis in identical cell growth conditions and media.

  3. Living in Living Cities

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents and overview of current and potential applications of living technology to urban problems. Living technology can be described as technology that exhibits the core features of living systems. These features can be useful to solve dynamic problems. In particular, urban problems concerning mobility, logistics, telecommunications, governance, safety, sustainability, and society and culture are presented, while solutions involving living technology are reviewed. Finally, the usefulness of describing cities as living systems is discussed.

  4. Measuring dynamic membrane fluctuations in cell membrane using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, SangYun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2017-02-01

    There is a strong correlation between the dynamic membrane fluctuations and the biomechanical properties of living cells. The dynamic membrane fluctuation consists of submicron displacements, and can be altered by changing the cells' pathophysiological conditions. These results have significant relevance to the understanding of RBC biophysics and pathology, as follows. RBCs must withstand large mechanical deformations during repeated passages through the microvasculature and the fenestrated walls of the splenic sinusoids. This essential ability is diminished with senescence, resulting in physiological destruction of the aging RBCs. Pathological destruction of the red cells, however, occurs in cells affected by a host of diseases such as spherocytosis, malaria, and Sickle cell disease, as RBCs depart from their normal discoid shape and lose their deformability. Therefore, quantifying the RBC deformability insight into a variety of problems regarding the interplay of cell structure, dynamics, and function. Furthermore, the ability to monitor mechanical properties of RBCs is of vital interest in monitoring disease progression or response to treatment as molecular and pharmaceutical approaches for treatment of chronic diseases. Here, we present the measurements of dynamic membrane fluctuations in live cells using quantitative phase imaging techniques. Measuring both the 3-D refractive index maps and the dynamic phase images of live cells are simultaneously measured, from which dynamic membrane fluctuation and deformability of cells are precisely calculated. We also present its applications to various diseases ranging from sickle cell diseases, babesiosis, and to diabetes.

  5. Lentivirus Live Cell Array for Quantitative Assessment of Gene and Pathway Activation during Myogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janhavi Moharil

    Full Text Available Stem cell differentiation involves multiple cascades of transcriptional regulation that govern the cell fate. To study the real-time dynamics of this complex process, quantitative and high throughput live cell assays are required. Herein, we developed a lentiviral library of promoters and transcription factor binding sites to quantitatively capture the gene expression dynamics over a period of several days during myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs harvested from two different anatomic locations, bone marrow and hair follicle. Our results enabled us to monitor the sequential activation of signaling pathways and myogenic gene promoters at various stages of differentiation. In conjunction with chemical inhibitors, the lentiviral array (LVA results also revealed the relative contribution of key signaling pathways that regulate the myogenic differentiation. Our study demonstrates the potential of LVA to monitor the dynamics of gene and pathway activation during MSC differentiation as well as serve as a platform for discovery of novel molecules, genes and pathways that promote or inhibit complex biological processes.

  6. Synthetic recombinase-based state machines in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquet, Nathaniel; Soleimany, Ava P; Ferris, Alyssa C; Aaronson, Scott; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-07-22

    State machines underlie the sophisticated functionality behind human-made and natural computing systems that perform order-dependent information processing. We developed a recombinase-based framework for building state machines in living cells by leveraging chemically controlled DNA excision and inversion operations to encode states in DNA sequences. This strategy enables convenient readout of states (by sequencing and/or polymerase chain reaction) as well as complex regulation of gene expression. We validated our framework by engineering state machines in Escherichia coli that used one, two, or three chemical inputs to control up to 16 DNA states. These state machines were capable of recording the temporal order of all inputs and performing multi-input, multi-output control of gene expression. We also developed a computational tool for the automated design of gene regulation programs using recombinase-based state machines. Our scalable framework should enable new strategies for recording and studying how combinational and temporal events regulate complex cell functions and for programming sophisticated cell behaviors.

  7. Multicolor Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots for Live Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fengyi; Li, Jianan; Hua, Ye; Zhang, Miaomiao; Zhou, Zhou; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Jun; Peng, Wanxin; Zhang, Li; Xia, Sheng; Wang, Dongqing; Yang, Shiming; Xu, Wenrong; Gong, Aihua; Shao, Qixiang

    2015-05-01

    Doping carbon dots with nitrogen atoms considerably enhances their fluorescence properties. However, the mechanism by which the carbon dots are doped is not fully understood. We developed a facile bottom-up hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process that uses glucose and glycine as precursors for the synthesis of photoluminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped carbon dots were mono-dispersed spherical particles with a diameter of -2.8 nm. The doped nitrogen atoms assumed pyridinic type and pyrrolic type configurations to participate in the nanocrystal structure of the carbon dots. It appeared that the nitrogen doping introduces a new internal structure. The aqueous solution of nitrogen-doped carbon dots showed excitation wavelength-dependent multicolor photoluminescence. Further, these nitrogen-doped carbon dots readily entered the cytoplasm of A549 cancer cells and showed no significant cytotoxicity. The internalized nitrogen-doped carbon dots were localized to the cell membrane and cytoplasm, particularly around the nucleus. Further, the as-prepared, biocompatible, nitrogen-doped carbon dots demonstrated the potential to be used as fluorescent probes for multicolor live cell labeling, tracking, and imaging.

  8. Optogenetics: optical control of a photoactivatable Rac in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in optogenetics have extended optical control of signaling to intracellular proteins, including Rac, a small G protein in the Rho family. A blue light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) domain derived from Avena sativa (oat) phototropin was fused to the N-terminus of a constitutively active mutant of Rac, via an α-helix (Jα) that is conserved among plant phototropins. The fused LOV domain occluded binding of downstream effectors to Rac in the dark. Exposure to blue light caused a conformational change of the LOV domain and unwinding of the Jα helix, relieving steric inhibition. The LOV domain incorporates a flavin as the photon-absorbing cofactor and can be activated by light in a reversible and repeatable fashion. In cultured cells, global illumination with blue light rapidly activated Rac and led to cell spreading and membrane ruffling. Localized and pulsed illumination generated a gradient of Rac activity and induced directional migration. In this chapter, we will describe the techniques in detail and present some examples of applications of using photoactivatable Rac (PA-Rac) in living cells.

  9. Bioluminescence microscopy: application to ATP measurements in single living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brau, Frederic; Helle, Pierre; Bernengo, Jean C.

    1997-12-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy can be used to measure intracellular cofactors and ionic concentrations (Ca2+, K+, ATP, NADH), as an alternative to micro- spectrophotometry and micro-fluorimetry, due to the development of sensitive detectors (cooled photomultipliers tubes and CCD). The main limitation comes from the very small and brief intensity of the emitted light. Our instrumentation based on an inverted microscope, equipped with high aperture immersion lenses is presented. Light intensity measurements are carried out through a photomultiplier sorted for low dark current and cooled at -5 degree(s)C to reduce thermal noise. Our first aim is to quantify ATP on single living cells using the firefly luciferin-luciferase couple. Experimental and kinetic aspects are presented to emphasize the potentialities of the technique.

  10. Nanometer scale quantum thermometry in a living cell

    CERN Document Server

    Kucsko, G; Yao, N Y; Kubo, M; Noh, H J; Lo, P K; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive probing of temperature variations on nanometer scales represents an outstanding challenge in many areas of modern science and technology. In particular, a thermometer capable of sub-degree temperature resolution as well as integration within a living system could provide a powerful new tool for many areas of biological research, including temperature-induced control of gene expression and cell-selective treatment of disease. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to nanoscale thermometry that utilizes coherent manipulation of the electronic spin associated with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond. We show the ability to detect temperature variations down to 1.8 mK (sensitivity of 9 mK/sqrt(Hz)) in an ultra-pure bulk diamond sample. Using NV centers in diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds), we directly measure the local thermal environment at length scales down to 200 nm. Finally, by introducing both nanodiamonds and gold nanoparticles into a single human embryonic fibroblast, we demonstrate te...

  11. Diffusion Controlled Reactions, Fluctuation Dominated Kinetics, and Living Cell Biochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Konkoli, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    In recent years considerable portion of the computer science community has focused its attention on understanding living cell biochemistry and efforts to understand such complication reaction environment have spread over wide front, ranging from systems biology approaches, through network analysis (motif identification) towards developing language and simulators for low level biochemical processes. Apart from simulation work, much of the efforts are directed to using mean field equations (equivalent to the equations of classical chemical kinetics) to address various problems (stability, robustness, sensitivity analysis, etc.). Rarely is the use of mean field equations questioned. This review will provide a brief overview of the situations when mean field equations fail and should not be used. These equations can be derived from the theory of diffusion controlled reactions, and emerge when assumption of perfect mixing is used.

  12. Fluorescent ligand for human progesterone receptor imaging in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstain, Roy; Kanter, Joan; Friedman, Beth; Ellies, Lesley G; Baker, Michael E; Tsien, Roger Y

    2013-05-15

    We employed molecular modeling to design and then synthesize fluorescent ligands for the human progesterone receptor. Boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) or tetramethylrhodamine were conjugated to the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (Mifepristone) through an extended hydrophilic linker. The fluorescent ligands demonstrated comparable bioactivity to the parent antagonist in live cells and triggered nuclear translocation of the receptor in a specific manner. The BODIPY labeled ligand was applied to investigate the dependency of progesterone receptor nuclear translocation on partner proteins and to show that functional heat shock protein 90 but not immunophilin FKBP52 activity is essential. A tissue distribution study indicated that the fluorescent ligand preferentially accumulates in tissues that express high levels of the receptor in vivo. The design and properties of the BODIPY-labeled RU486 make it a potential candidate for in vivo imaging of PR by positron emission tomography through incorporation of (18)F into the BODIPY core.

  13. SpatTrack: an imaging toolbox for analysis of vesicle motility and distribution in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Frederik Wendelboe; Jensen, Marie Louise; Christensen, Tanja;

    2014-01-01

    SpatTrack, an open source, platform-independent program collecting a variety of methods for analysis of vesicle dynamics and distribution in living cells. SpatTrack performs 2D particle tracking, trajectory analysis and fitting of diffusion models to the calculated mean square displacement. It allows......The endocytic pathway is a complex network of highly dynamic organelles, which has been traditionally studied by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The data generated by this method can be overwhelming and its analysis, even for the skilled microscopist, is tedious and error-prone. We developed...... for spatial analysis of detected vesicle patterns including calculation of the radial distribution function and particle-based colocalization. Importantly, all analysis tools are supported by Monte Carlo simulations of synthetic images. This allows the user to assess the reliability of the analysis...

  14. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir; Sanjiv , Pritha; Ray

    2009-04-28

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imageable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  15. Monitoring the cytoskeletal EGF response in live gastric carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Felkl

    Full Text Available Altered cell motility is considered to be a key factor in determining tumor invasion and metastasis. Epidermal growth factor (EGF signaling has been implicated in this process by affecting cytoskeletal organization and dynamics in multiple ways. To sort the temporal and spatial regulation of EGF-dependent cytoskeletal re-organization in relation to a cell's motile behavior time-lapse microscopy was performed on EGF-responsive gastric carcinoma-derived MKN1 cells co-expressing different fluorescently labeled cytoskeletal filaments and focal adhesion components in various combinations. The experiments showed that EGF almost instantaneously induces a considerable increase in membrane ruffling and lamellipodial activity that can be inhibited by Cetuximab EGF receptor antibodies and is not elicited in non-responsive gastric carcinoma Hs746T cells. The transient cell extensions are rich in actin but lack microtubules and keratin intermediate filaments. We show that this EGF-induced increase in membrane motility can be measured by a simple image processing routine. Microtubule plus-ends subsequently invade growing cell extensions, which start to accumulate focal complexes at the lamellipodium-lamellum junction. Such paxillin-positive complexes mature into focal adhesions by tyrosine phosphorylation and recruitment of zyxin. These adhesions then serve as nucleation sites for keratin filaments which are used to enlarge the neighboring peripheral keratin network. Focal adhesions are either disassembled or give rise to stable zyxin-rich fibrillar adhesions which disassemble in the presence of EGF to support formation of new focal adhesion sites in the cell periphery. Taken together the results serve as a basis for modeling the early cytoskeletal EGF response as a tightly coordinated and step-wise process which is relevant for the prediction of the effectiveness of anti-EGF receptor-based tumor therapy.

  16. Simultaneous detection of mRNA and protein stem cell markers in live cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Gang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological studies and medical application of stem cells often require the isolation of stem cells from a mixed cell population, including the detection of cancer stem cells in tumor tissue, and isolation of induced pluripotent stem cells after eliciting the expression of specific genes in adult cells. Here we report the detection of Oct-4 mRNA and SSEA-1 protein in live carcinoma stem cells using respectively molecular beacon and dye-labeled antibody, aiming to establish a new method for stem cells detection and isolation. Results Quantification of Oct-4 mRNA and protein in P19 mouse carcinoma stem cells using respectively RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry confirmed that their levels drastically decreased after differentiation. To visualize Oct-4 mRNA in live stem cells, molecular beacons were designed, synthesized and validated, and the detection specificity was confirmed using control studies. We found that the fluorescence signal from Oct-4-targeting molecular beacons provides a clear discrimination between undifferentiated and retinoic acid-induced differentiated cells. Using deconvolution fluorescence microscopy, Oct-4 mRNAs were found to reside on one side of the cytosol. We demonstrated that, using a combination of Oct-4 mRNA-targeting molecular beacon with SSEA-1 antibody in flow cytometric analysis, undifferentiated stem cells can be clearly distinguished from differentiated cells. We revealed that Oct-4 targeting molecular beacons do not seem to affect stem cell biology. Conclusion Molecular beacons have the potential to provide a powerful tool for highly specific detection and isolation of stem cells, including cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells without disturbing cell physiology. It is advantageous to perform simultaneous detection of intracellular (mRNA and cell-surface (protein stem cell markers in flow cytometric analysis, which may lead to high detection sensitivity and efficiency.

  17. Cellular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress: live cell fluorescence microscopy of pseudorabies virus exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B Hogue

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Egress of newly assembled herpesvirus particles from infected cells is a highly dynamic process involving the host secretory pathway working in concert with viral components. To elucidate the location, dynamics, and molecular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress, we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy method to visualize the final transport and exocytosis of pseudorabies virus (PRV particles in non-polarized epithelial cells. This method is based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy to selectively image fluorescent virus particles near the plasma membrane, and takes advantage of a virus-encoded pH-sensitive probe to visualize the precise moment and location of particle exocytosis. We performed single-particle tracking and mean squared displacement analysis to characterize particle motion, and imaged a panel of cellular proteins to identify those spatially and dynamically associated with viral exocytosis. Based on our data, individual virus particles travel to the plasma membrane inside small, acidified secretory vesicles. Rab GTPases, Rab6a, Rab8a, and Rab11a, key regulators of the plasma membrane-directed secretory pathway, are present on the virus secretory vesicle. These vesicles undergo fast, directional transport directly to the site of exocytosis, which is most frequently near patches of LL5β, part of a complex that anchors microtubules to the plasma membrane. Vesicles are tightly docked at the site of exocytosis for several seconds, and membrane fusion occurs, displacing the virion a small distance across the plasma membrane. After exocytosis, particles remain tightly confined on the outer cell surface. Based on recent reports in the cell biological and alpha herpesvirus literature, combined with our spatial and dynamic data on viral egress, we propose an integrated model that links together the intracellular transport pathways and exocytosis mechanisms that mediate alpha herpesvirus egress.

  18. Cell Division, Differentiation and Dynamic Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, K; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Yomo, Tetsuya

    1993-01-01

    A novel mechanism for cell differentiation is proposed, based on the dynamic clustering in a globally coupled chaotic system. A simple model with metabolic reaction, active transport of chemicals from media, and cell division is found to show three successive stages with the growth of the number of cells; coherent growth, dynamic clustering, and fixed cell differentiation. At the last stage, disparity in activities, germ line segregation, somatic cell differentiation, and homeochaotic stability against external perturbation are found. Our results, in consistency with the experiments of the preceding paper, imply that cell differentiation can occur without a spatial pattern. From dynamical systems viewpoint, the new concept of ``open chaos" is proposed, as a novel and general scenario for systems with growing numbers of elements, also seen in economics and sociology.A

  19. Super-resolution imaging of fluorescently labeled, endogenous RNA Polymerase II in living cells with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Ki; Jayanth, Namrata; Mullen, Susan; Tan, Tzer Han; Jung, Yoon J; Cissé, Ibrahim I

    2016-10-26

    Live cell imaging of mammalian RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has previously relied on random insertions of exogenous, mutant Pol II coupled with the degradation of endogenous Pol II using a toxin, α-amanitin. Therefore, it has been unclear whether over-expression of labeled Pol II under an exogenous promoter may have played a role in reported Pol II dynamics in vivo. Here we label the endogenous Pol II in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system. Using single-molecule based super-resolution imaging in the living cells, we captured endogenous Pol II clusters. Consistent with previous studies, we observed that Pol II clusters were short-lived (cluster lifetime ~8 s) in living cells. Moreover, dynamic responses to serum-stimulation, and drug-mediated transcription inhibition were all in agreement with previous observations in the exogenous Pol II MEF cell line. Our findings suggest that previous exogenously tagged Pol II faithfully recapitulated the endogenous polymerase clustering dynamics in living cells, and our approach may in principle be used to directly label transcription factors for live cell imaging.

  20. Super-resolution imaging of fluorescently labeled, endogenous RNA Polymerase II in living cells with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Ki; Jayanth, Namrata; Mullen, Susan; Tan, Tzer Han; Jung, Yoon J.; Cissé, Ibrahim I.

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging of mammalian RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has previously relied on random insertions of exogenous, mutant Pol II coupled with the degradation of endogenous Pol II using a toxin, α-amanitin. Therefore, it has been unclear whether over-expression of labeled Pol II under an exogenous promoter may have played a role in reported Pol II dynamics in vivo. Here we label the endogenous Pol II in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system. Using single-molecule based super-resolution imaging in the living cells, we captured endogenous Pol II clusters. Consistent with previous studies, we observed that Pol II clusters were short-lived (cluster lifetime ~8 s) in living cells. Moreover, dynamic responses to serum-stimulation, and drug-mediated transcription inhibition were all in agreement with previous observations in the exogenous Pol II MEF cell line. Our findings suggest that previous exogenously tagged Pol II faithfully recapitulated the endogenous polymerase clustering dynamics in living cells, and our approach may in principle be used to directly label transcription factors for live cell imaging. PMID:27782203

  1. Direct metabolomics for plant cells by live single-cell mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takashi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tejedor, Mónica Lorenzo; Esaki, Tsuyoshi; Sakane, Iwao; Mizuno, Hajime; Tsuyama, Naohiro; Masujima, Tsutomu

    2015-09-01

    Live single-cell mass spectrometry (live MS) provides a mass spectrum that shows thousands of metabolite peaks from a single live plant cell within minutes. By using an optical microscope, a cell is chosen for analysis and a metal-coated nanospray microcapillary tip is used to remove the cell's contents. After adding a microliter of ionization solvent to the opposite end of the tip, the trapped contents are directly fed into the mass spectrometer by applying a high voltage between the tip and the inlet port of the spectrometer to induce nanospray ionization. Proteins are not detected because of insufficient sensitivity. Metabolite peaks are identified by exact mass or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis, and isomers can be separated by combining live MS with ion-mobility separation. By using this approach, spectra can be acquired in 10 min. In combination with metabolic maps and/or molecular databases, the data can be annotated into metabolic pathways; the data analysis takes 30 min to 4 h, depending on the MS/MS data availability from databases. This method enables the analysis of a number of metabolites from a single cell with rapid sampling at sub-attomolar-level sensitivity.

  2. Visualizing the endocytosis of phenylephrine in living cells by quantum dot-based tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Wu, Lina; Hou, Zhun; Song, Yao; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    To study the intracellular receptor-drug transportation, a fluorescent probe consisting of phenylephrine-polyethylene glycol-quantum dots conjugate was employed to track endocytosis process of phenylephrine in living cells. This type of movement was studied by continuously filming fluorescent images in the same cell. We also calculated the movement parameters, and divided the endocytosis process into 6 stages. Furthermore, the movement parameters of this probe in different organelles were determined by co-localization of the probe fluorescent images and different cellular organelles. After comparing the parameters in cellular organelles with these in 6 stages, the whole endocytosis pathway was demonstrated. These results verified that this probe successfully tracked the whole intracellular dynamic endocytosis process of phenylephrine. Our method realized the visual tracking the whole receptor-mediated endocytosis, which is a new approach on investigating the molecular mechanisms and kinetic properties of intracellular receptor-drug transportation.

  3. High spatiotemporal resolution imaging of mechanical processes in live cells using T-shaped cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandriota, Nicola; Sahin, Ozgur

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical properties of cells are paramount regulators of a plethora of physiological processes, such as cell adhesion, motility and proliferation. Yet, their knowledge is currently hampered by the lack of techniques with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to monitor the dynamics of such biological processes. We introduce an atomic force microscopy-based imaging platform based on newly-designed cantilevers with increased force sensitivity, while minimizing viscous drag. This allows us to uncover mechanical properties of a wide variety of living cells - including fibroblasts, neurons and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells - with an unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution. Our mechanical maps approach 50nm resolution and monitor cellular features within a minute's timescale. To identify the counterparts of our mechanical maps' features we perform simultaneous fluorescence microscopy and recognize cytoskeletal elements as the main molecular contributors of cellular stiffness at the nanoscale. Furthermore, the enhanced resolution and speed of our method allows the recognition of dynamic changes in the mechanics of fine cellular structures, which occurred independently of changes within optical images of fluorescently-labeled actin.

  4. A phase unwrapping algorithm based on Branch cuts for living cell's interference pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Xia, Wang; Schmidt, Greg; Moore, Duncan T.; McGrath, James L.

    2011-06-01

    Fibroblast is the main part in the loose connective tissue and differentiates from the mesenchymal cell when it is in embryo. It exhibits highly reproducible growth kinetics and reproducible healing dynamics in the scratch-wound assay and the height of it could show this prediction. In order to measure the height of these cells, we construct an interferometer measuration system. As we all know, the interference pattern should be unwrapped first, there are plenty of methods that are under research. In this paper we want to find out a typical methods that could be used in living cell's interference pattern during image processing, and also we can get the conclusion that how to use the method and why it is fit to unwrap the phase of cells. There are mainly three parts in this paper: Firstly, we have designed an Interference system which can be used to get the interference pattern, here we used multiphase interference microscope to measure the cell height. Secondly, a typical method which is based on Goldstein's branch cuts algorithm were used to guide the way that how the phase is unwrapped, this method is the most efficient way to phase unwrapping, and it could induct the unwrapping path through using the branch cut method which could get rid of the residues as much as it could be. As a comparison, we also used some other methods to find different results. Such as the quality-guided path following phase unwrapping; and the Costantini phase unwrapping. Finally, we analyzed the results of the three-dimensional model of the cell surface topography, as a result of the various noises during the experiment, all these unwrapping methods above can't eliminate all the residues and noises, but compared with the other results, the Goldstein's branch cut method has the fittest advantages, it gives the most fluent topography of the living cells.

  5. Synthetic biology of minimal living cells: primitive cell models and semi-synthetic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Pasquale

    2010-09-01

    This article summarizes a contribution presented at the ESF 2009 Synthetic Biology focused on the concept of the minimal requirement for life and on the issue of constructive (synthetic) approaches in biological research. The attempts to define minimal life within the framework of autopoietic theory are firstly described, and a short report on the development of autopoietic chemical systems based on fatty acid vesicles, which are relevant as primitive cell models is given. These studies can be used as a starting point for the construction of more complex systems, firstly being inspired by possible origins of life scenarioes (and therefore by considering primitive functions), then by considering an approach based on modern biomacromolecular-encoded functions. At this aim, semi-synthetic minimal cells are defined as those man-made vesicle-based systems that are composed of the minimal number of genes, proteins, biomolecules and which can be defined as living. Recent achievements on minimal sized semi-synthetic cells are then discussed, and the kind of information obtained is recognized as being distinctively derived by a constructive approach. Synthetic biology is therefore a fundamental tool for gaining basic knowledge about biosystems, and it should not be confined at all to the engineering side.

  6. Prolactin-induced Subcellular Targeting of GLUT1 Glucose Transporter in Living Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh Riskin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studying the biological pathways involved in mammalian milk production during lactation could have many clinical implications. The mammary gland is unique in its requirement for transport of free glucose into the cell for the synthesis of lactose, the primary carbohydrate in milk. Objective: To study GLUT1 trafficking and subcellular targeting in living mammary epithelial cells (MEC in culture. Methods: Immunocytochemistry was used to study GLUT1 hormonally regulated subcellular targeting in human MEC (HMEC. To study GLUT1 targeting and recycling in living mouse MEC (MMEC in culture, we constructed fusion proteins of GLUT1 and green fluorescent protein (GFP and expressed them in CIT3 MMEC. Cells were maintained in growth medium (GM, or exposed to secretion medium (SM, containing prolactin. Results: GLUT1 in HMEC localized primarily to the plasma membrane in GM. After exposure to prolactin for 4 days, GLUT1 was targeted intracellularly and demonstrated a perinuclear distribution, co-localizing with lactose synthetase. The dynamic trafficking of GFP-GLUT1 fusion proteins in CIT3 MMEC suggested a basal constitutive GLUT1 recycling pathway between an intracellular pool and the cell surface that targets most GLUT1 to the plasma membrane in GM. Upon exposure to prolactin in SM, GLUT1 was specifically targeted intracellularly within 90–110 minutes. Conclusions: Our studies suggest intracellular targeting of GLUT1 to the central vesicular transport system upon exposure to prolactin. The existence of a dynamic prolactin-induced sorting machinery for GLUT1 could be important for transport of free glucose into the Golgi for lactose synthesis during lactation.

  7. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, Christine N; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2016-01-29

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies - can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings.

  8. Quantitative imaging of single mRNA splice variants in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyuwan; Cui, Yi; Lee, Luke P.; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Alternative messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing is a fundamental process of gene regulation, and errors in RNA splicing are known to be associated with a variety of different diseases. However, there is currently a lack of quantitative technologies for monitoring mRNA splice variants in cells. Here, we show that a combination of plasmonic dimer probes and hyperspectral imaging can be used to detect and quantify mRNA splice variants in living cells. The probes are made from gold nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides and can hybridize to specific mRNA sequences, forming nanoparticle dimers that exhibit distinct spectral shifts due to plasmonic coupling. With this approach, we show that the spatial and temporal distribution of three selected splice variants of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1, can be monitored at single-copy resolution by measuring the hybridization dynamics of the nanoplasmonic dimers. Our study provides insights into RNA and its transport in living cells, which could improve our understanding of cellular protein complexes, pharmacogenomics, genetic diagnosis and gene therapies.

  9. Long-Lived Plasma Cells in Autoimmunity: Lessons from B-Cell Depleting Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A large number of autoimmune diseases are treated with rituximab, an antibody against CD20 that depletes most of the B cells in the organism. The response to this treatment depends largely on the disease and the type of lymphoid cells involved in the autoimmune process. We recently reported that B-cell depletion in immune thrombocytopenia induced the appearance of pathogenic long-lived plasma cells in the spleen, which were not present before treatment or in non-autoimmune conditions. The spl...

  10. Potential and limitations of microscopy and Raman spectroscopy for live-cell analysis of 3D cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charwat, Verena; Schütze, Karin; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Gangnus, Rainer; Hofbauer, Pablo; Hoffmann, Claudia; Angres, Brigitte; Kasper, Cornelia

    2015-07-10

    Today highly complex 3D cell culture formats that closely mimic the in vivo situation are increasingly available. Despite their wide use, the development of analytical methods and tools that can work within the depth of 3D-tissue constructs lags behind. In order to get the most information from a 3D cell sample, adequate and reliable assays are required. However, the majority of tools and methods used today have been originally designed for 2D cell cultures and translation to a 3D environment is in general not trivial. Ideally, an analytical method should be non-invasive and allow for repeated observation of living cells in order to detect dynamic changes in individual cells within the 3D cell culture. Although well-established laser confocal microscopy can be used for these purposes, this technique has serious limitations including penetration depth and availability. Focusing on two relevant analytical methods for live-cell monitoring, we discuss the current challenges of analyzing living 3D samples: microscopy, which is the most widely used technology to observe and examine cell cultures, has been successfully adapted for 3D samples by recording of so-called "z-stacks". However the required equipment is generally very expensive and therefore access is often limited. Consequently alternative and less advanced approaches are often applied that cannot capture the full structural complexity of a 3D sample. Similarly, image analysis tools for quantification of microscopic images range from highly specialized and costly to simplified and inexpensive. Depending on the actual sample composition and scientific question the best approach needs to be assessed individually. Another more recently introduced technology for non-invasive cell analysis is Raman micro-spectroscopy. It enables label-free identification of cellular metabolic changes with high sensitivity and has already been successful applied to 2D and 3D cell cultures. However, its future significance for cell

  11. Origin of long-lived coherence and excitation dynamics in pigment-protein complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhedong

    2015-01-01

    We uncover the mechanism of long-lived coherence that the discrete vibrational modes effectively weaken the exciton-environment interaction. This subsequently demonstrates the role of vibrational coherence which greatly contributes to long-lived feature of the excitonic coherence that has been observed in femtosecond experiments. To test the validity of our effective theory, we study the pigment-protein complex in details by exploring the energy transfer and coherence dynamics. The ground-state coherence generated by incoherent radiations is demonstrated to be significant to promote the excitation energy transfer. This on the other hand, seems to be natural from the point of view of nonequilibriumness, which funnels the downhill immigration of excitons. Moreover we also confirm that the considerable improvement of energy transfer is always accompanied by the long-lived oscillation of coherence.

  12. Dynamic culture improves cell reprogramming efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sia, Junren; Sun, Raymond; Chu, Julia; Li, Song

    2016-06-01

    Cell reprogramming to pluripotency is an inefficient process and various approaches have been devised to improve the yield of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, the effect of biophysical factors on cell reprogramming is not well understood. Here we showed that, for the first time, dynamic culture with orbital shaking significantly improved the reprogramming efficiency in adherent cells. Manipulating the viscosity of the culture medium suggested that the improved efficiency is mainly attributed to convective mixing rather than hydrodynamic shear stress. Temporal studies demonstrated that the enhancement of reprogramming efficiency required the dynamic culture in the middle but not early phase. In the early phase, fibroblasts had a high proliferation rate, but as the culture became over-confluent in the middle phase, expression of p57 was upregulated to inhibit cell proliferation and consequently, cell reprogramming. Subjecting the over confluent culture to orbital shaking prevented the upregulation of p57, thus improving reprogramming efficiency. Seeding cells at low densities to avoid over-confluency resulted in a lower efficiency, and optimal reprogramming efficiency was attained at a high seeding density with dynamic culture. Our findings provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of how dynamic culture condition regulate cell reprogramming, and will have broad impact on cell engineering for regenerative medicine and disease modeling.

  13. Live cell imaging to understand monocyte, macrophage, and dendritic cell function in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Sara; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Ley, Klaus

    2016-06-27

    Intravital imaging is an invaluable tool for understanding the function of cells in healthy and diseased tissues. It provides a window into dynamic processes that cannot be studied by other techniques. This review will cover the benefits and limitations of various techniques for labeling and imaging myeloid cells, with a special focus on imaging cells in atherosclerotic arteries. Although intravital imaging is a powerful tool for understanding cell function, it alone does not provide a complete picture of the cell. Other techniques, such as flow cytometry and transcriptomics, must be combined with intravital imaging to fully understand a cell's phenotype, lineage, and function.

  14. Epigenetic dynamics across the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kheir, Tony Bou; Lund, Anders H.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of the mammalian cell cycle depends on correct timing and co-ordination of a series of events, which are managed by the cellular transcriptional machinery and epigenetic mechanisms governing genome accessibility. Epigenetic chromatin modifications are dynamic across the cell cycle......, and are shown to influence and be influenced by cell-cycle progression. Chromatin modifiers regulate cell-cycle progression locally by controlling the expression of individual genes and globally by controlling chromatin condensation and chromosome segregation. The cell cycle, on the other hand, ensures...... a correct inheritance of epigenetic chromatin modifications to daughter cells. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge on the dynamics of epigenetic chromatin modifications during progression of the cell cycle....

  15. Low-power, Confocal Imaging of Protein Localization in Living Cells (7214-150) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed technology genetically labels intracellular structures and visualizes protein interactions in living cells using a compact, confocal microscope with...

  16. Live-cell imaging study of mitochondrial morphology in mammalian cells exposed to X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, M; Kanari, Y; Yokoya, A; Narita, A; Fujii, K

    2015-09-01

    Morphological changes in mitochondria induced by X-irradiation in normal murine mammary gland cells were studied with a live-cell microscopic imaging technique. Mitochondria were visualised by staining with a specific fluorescent probe in the cells, which express fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator 2 (Fucci2) probes to visualise cell cycle. In unirradiated cells, the number of cells with fragmented mitochondria was about 20 % of the total cells through observation period (96 h). In irradiated cells, the population with fragmented mitochondria significantly increased depending on the absorbed dose. Particularly, for 8 Gy irradiation, the accumulation of fragmentation persists even in the cells whose cell cycle came to a stand (80 % in G1 (G0-like) phase). The fraction reached to a maximum at 96 h after irradiation. The kinetics of the fraction with fragmented mitochondria was similar to that for cells in S/G2/M phase (20 %) through the observation period (120 h). The evidences show that, in irradiated cells, some signals are continually released from a nucleus or cytoplasm even in the G0-like cells to operate some sort of protein machineries involved in mitochondrial fission. It is inferred that this delayed mitochondrial fragmentation is strongly related to their dysfunction, and hence might modulate radiobiological effects such as mutation or cell death.

  17. Simultaneous live cell imaging using dual FRET sensors with a single excitation light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Niino

    Full Text Available Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between fluorescent proteins is a powerful tool for visualization of signal transduction in living cells, and recently, some strategies for imaging of dual FRET pairs in a single cell have been reported. However, these necessitate alteration of excitation light between two different wavelengths to avoid the spectral overlap, resulting in sequential detection with a lag time. Thus, to follow fast signal dynamics or signal changes in highly motile cells, a single-excitation dual-FRET method should be required. Here we reported this by using four-color imaging with a single excitation light and subsequent linear unmixing to distinguish fluorescent proteins. We constructed new FRET sensors with Sapphire/RFP to combine with CFP/YFP, and accomplished simultaneous imaging of cAMP and cGMP in single cells. We confirmed that signal amplitude of our dual FRET measurement is comparable to of conventional single FRET measurement. Finally, we demonstrated to monitor both intracellular Ca(2+ and cAMP in highly motile cardiac myocytes. To cancel out artifacts caused by the movement of the cell, this method expands the applicability of the combined use of dual FRET sensors for cell samples with high motility.

  18. Direct measurement of cell wall stress-stiffening and turgor pressure in live bacterial cells

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Yi; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of gram-negative bacteria are governed by a rigid peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall and the turgor pressure generated by the large concentration of solutes in the cytoplasm. The elasticity of the PG has been measured in bulk and in isolated sacculi and shown to be compliant compared to the overall stiffness of the cell itself. However, the stiffness of the cell wall in live cells has not been measured. In particular, the effects that pressure-induced stress might have on the stiffness of the mesh-like PG network have not been addressed even though polymeric materials often exhibit large amounts of stress-stiffening. We study bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. We find strong evidence of power-law stress-stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of $1.07 \\pm 0.25$, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in live cells ($E\\sim32\\pm10$ MPa) than in unpres...

  19. The Possible Impact of Teachers and School Nurses on the Lives of Children Living with Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Madden, Jennifer M.; Lewis, Norma; Tyson, Esther; Reid, Marvin E.; MooSang, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    It is well recognized that for people living with a chronic disease, the largest impact on preserved health may come from persons other than medical professionals. This may be especially true for children for whom the actions of parents and school professionals have significant importance. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one such disease. Although…

  20. Selection of Aptamers Against Whole Living Cells: From Cell-SELEX to Identification of Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang, Nam Nguyen; Miodek, Anna; Cibiel, Agnes; Ducongé, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Aptamer selection protocols, named cell-SELEX, have been developed to target trans-membrane proteins using whole living cells as target. This technique presents several advantages. (1) It does not necessitate the use of purified proteins. (2) Aptamers are selected against membrane proteins in their native conformation. (3) Cell-SELEX can be performed to identify aptamers against biomarkers differentially expressed between different cell lines without prior knowledge of the targets. (4) Aptamers identified by cell-SELEX can be further used to purify their targets and to identify new biomarkers. Here, we provide a protocol of cell-SELEX including the preparation of an oligonucleotide library, next-generation sequencing and radioactive binding assays. Furthermore, we also provide a protocol to purify and identify the target of these aptamers. These protocols could be useful for the discovery of lead therapeutic compounds and diagnostic cell-surface biomarkers.

  1. Dynamical Adaptation in Terrorist Cells/Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Ahmed, Zaki

    2010-01-01

    Typical terrorist cells/networks have dynamical structure as they evolve or adapt to changes which may occur due to capturing or killing of a member of the cell/network. Analytical measures in graph theory like degree centrality, betweenness and closeness centralities are very common and have long...

  2. Sorting cells by their dynamical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Ewan; Holm, Stefan H.; Zhang, Zunmin; Beech, Jason P.; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in cell sorting aim at the development of novel methods that are sensitive to various mechanical properties of cells. Microfluidic technologies have a great potential for cell sorting; however, the design of many micro-devices is based on theories developed for rigid spherical particles with size as a separation parameter. Clearly, most bioparticles are non-spherical and deformable and therefore exhibit a much more intricate behavior in fluid flow than rigid spheres. Here, we demonstrate the use of cells’ mechanical and dynamical properties as biomarkers for separation by employing a combination of mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations and microfluidic experiments. The dynamic behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) within deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) devices is investigated for different device geometries and viscosity contrasts between the intra-cellular fluid and suspending medium. We find that the viscosity contrast and associated cell dynamics clearly determine the RBC trajectory through a DLD device. Simulation results compare well to experiments and provide new insights into the physical mechanisms which govern the sorting of non-spherical and deformable cells in DLD devices. Finally, we discuss the implications of cell dynamics for sorting schemes based on properties other than cell size, such as mechanics and morphology.

  3. Simultaneous Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Karolina; Buschmann, Volker; Hille, Carsten

    2015-09-22

    In living cells, there are always a plethora of processes taking place at the same time. Their precise regulation is the basis of cellular functions, since small failures can lead to severe dysfunctions. For a comprehensive understanding of intracellular homeostasis, simultaneous multiparameter detection is a versatile tool for revealing the spatial and temporal interactions of intracellular parameters. Here, a recently developed time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) board was evaluated for simultaneous fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM/PLIM). Therefore, the metabolic activity in insect salivary glands was investigated by recording ns-decaying intrinsic cellular fluorescence, mainly related to oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the μs-decaying phosphorescence of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium-complex Kr341. Due to dopamine stimulation, the metabolic activity of salivary glands increased, causing a higher pericellular oxygen consumption and a resulting increase in Kr341 phosphorescence decay time. Furthermore, FAD fluorescence decay time decreased, presumably due to protein binding, thus inducing a quenching of FAD fluorescence decay time. Through application of the metabolic drugs antimycin and FCCP, the recorded signals could be assigned to a mitochondrial origin. The dopamine-induced changes could be observed in sequential FLIM and PLIM recordings, as well as in simultaneous FLIM/PLIM recordings using an intermediate TCSPC timing resolution.

  4. Nanometre-scale thermometry in a living cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucsko, G; Maurer, P C; Yao, N Y; Kubo, M; Noh, H J; Lo, P K; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2013-08-01

    Sensitive probing of temperature variations on nanometre scales is an outstanding challenge in many areas of modern science and technology. In particular, a thermometer capable of subdegree temperature resolution over a large range of temperatures as well as integration within a living system could provide a powerful new tool in many areas of biological, physical and chemical research. Possibilities range from the temperature-induced control of gene expression and tumour metabolism to the cell-selective treatment of disease and the study of heat dissipation in integrated circuits. By combining local light-induced heat sources with sensitive nanoscale thermometry, it may also be possible to engineer biological processes at the subcellular level. Here we demonstrate a new approach to nanoscale thermometry that uses coherent manipulation of the electronic spin associated with nitrogen-vacancy colour centres in diamond. Our technique makes it possible to detect temperature variations as small as 1.8 mK (a sensitivity of 9 mK Hz(-1/2)) in an ultrapure bulk diamond sample. Using nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds), we directly measure the local thermal environment on length scales as short as 200 nanometres. Finally, by introducing both nanodiamonds and gold nanoparticles into a single human embryonic fibroblast, we demonstrate temperature-gradient control and mapping at the subcellular level, enabling unique potential applications in life sciences.

  5. Nanometre-scale thermometry in a living cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucsko, G.; Maurer, P. C.; Yao, N. Y.; Kubo, M.; Noh, H. J.; Lo, P. K.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2013-08-01

    Sensitive probing of temperature variations on nanometre scales is an outstanding challenge in many areas of modern science and technology. In particular, a thermometer capable of subdegree temperature resolution over a large range of temperatures as well as integration within a living system could provide a powerful new tool in many areas of biological, physical and chemical research. Possibilities range from the temperature-induced control of gene expression and tumour metabolism to the cell-selective treatment of disease and the study of heat dissipation in integrated circuits. By combining local light-induced heat sources with sensitive nanoscale thermometry, it may also be possible to engineer biological processes at the subcellular level. Here we demonstrate a new approach to nanoscale thermometry that uses coherent manipulation of the electronic spin associated with nitrogen-vacancy colour centres in diamond. Our technique makes it possible to detect temperature variations as small as 1.8 mK (a sensitivity of 9 mK Hz-1/2) in an ultrapure bulk diamond sample. Using nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds), we directly measure the local thermal environment on length scales as short as 200 nanometres. Finally, by introducing both nanodiamonds and gold nanoparticles into a single human embryonic fibroblast, we demonstrate temperature-gradient control and mapping at the subcellular level, enabling unique potential applications in life sciences.

  6. Fractal Characterization of Chromatin Decompaction in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ji; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Blaha, Catherine S; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2015-12-01

    Chromatin organization has a fundamental impact on the whole spectrum of genomic functions. Quantitative characterization of the chromatin structure, particularly at submicron length scales where chromatin fractal globules are formed, is critical to understanding this structure-function relationship. Such analysis is currently challenging due to the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. We herein present an optical approach termed inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography to characterize the mass density fractality of chromatin, and we apply the technique to observe chromatin decompaction in live cells. The technique makes it possible for the first time, to our knowledge, to sense intracellular morphology with length-scale sensitivity from ∼30 to 450 nm, thus primarily probing the higher-order chromatin structure, without resolving the actual structures. We used chromatin decompaction due to inhibition of histone deacytelases and measured the subsequent changes in the fractal dimension of the intracellular structure. The results were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  7. Optical scatter imaging: a microscopic modality for the rapid morphological assay of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boustany, Nada N.

    2007-02-01

    Tumors derived from epithelial cells comprise the majority of human tumors and their growth results from the accumulation of multiple mutations affecting cellular processes critical for tissue homeostasis, including cell proliferation and cell death. To understand these processes and address the complexity of cancer cell function, multiple cellular responses to different experimental conditions and specific genetic mutations must be analyzed. Fundamental to this endeavor is the development of rapid cellular assays in genetically defined cells, and in particular, the development of optical imaging methods that allow dynamic observation and real-time monitoring of cellular processes. In this context, we are developing an optical scatter imaging technology that is intended to bridge the gap between light and electron microscopy by rapidly providing morphometric information about the relative size and shape of non-spherical organelles, with sub-wavelength resolution. Our goal is to complement current microscopy techniques used to study cells in-vitro, especially in long-term time-lapse studies of living cells, where exogenous labels can be toxic, and electron microscopy will destroy the sample. The optical measurements are based on Fourier spatial filtering in a standard microscope, and could ultimately be incorporated into existing high-throughput diagnostic platforms for cancer cell research and histopathology of neoplastic tissue arrays. Using an engineered epithelial cell model of tumor formation, we are currently studying how organelle structure and function are altered by defined genetic mutations affecting the propensity for cell death and oncogenic potential, and by environmental conditions promoting tumor growth. This talk will describe our optical scatter imaging technology and present results from our studies on apoptosis, and the function of BCL-2 family proteins.

  8. Continuous depth-sensing nano-mechanical characterization of living, fixed and dehydrated cells attached on a glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yun-Ta; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Chang, Chia-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chou-Ching K [Department of Neurology, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Ju, Ming-Shaung, E-mail: jdliao@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-16

    Continuous depth-sensing nano-indentation on living, fixed and dehydrated fibroblast cells was performed using a dynamic contact module and vertically measured from a pre-contact state to the glass substrate. The nano-indentation tip-on-cell approaches took advantage of finding a contact surface, followed by obtaining a continuous nano-mechanical profile along the nano-indentation depths. In the experiment, serial indentations from the leading edge, i.e., the lamellipodium to nucleus regions of living, fixed and dehydrated fibroblast cells were examined. Nano-indentations on a living cell anchored upon glass substrate were competent in finding the tip-on-cell contact surfaces and cell heights. For the result on the fixed and the dehydrated cells, cellular nano-mechanical properties were clearly characterized by continuous harmonic contact stiffness (HCS) measurements. The relations of HCS versus measured displacement, varied from the initial tip-on-cell contact to the glass substrate, were presumably divided into three stages, respectively induced by cellular intrinsic behavior, the substrate-dominant property, and the substrate property. This manifestation is beneficial to elucidate how the underlying substrate influences the interpretation of the nano-mechanical property of thin soft matter on a hard substrate. These findings, based upon continuous depth-sensing nano-indentations, are presumably valuable as a reference to related work, e.g., accomplished by atomic force microscopy.

  9. Sensitivity Analysis of Centralized Dynamic Cell Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Victor Fernandez; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret; Pedersen, Klaus I.;

    2016-01-01

    mechanism and solutions involving cell switching in general. Simulation results show that such solutions can greatly benefit from the use of receivers with interference suppression capabilities and a larger number of antennas, with a maximum data rate gain of 120%. High performance gains are observed...... with two different traffic models, and it is not necessary to be able to connect to a large number of cells in order to reap most of the benefits of the centralized dynamic cell selection....

  10. Multiple origins of spontaneously arising micronuclei in HeLa cells: Direct evidence from long-term live cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao Xiaotang; Zhang Yingyin; Yi Qiyi; Hou Heli; Xu Bo; Chu Liang; Huang Yun; Zhang Wenrui [Laboratory of Molecular and Cell Genetics, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Fenech, Michael [CSIRO Human Nutrition, PO Box 10041, Adelaide BC, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); Shi Qinghua [Laboratory of Molecular and Cell Genetics, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)], E-mail: qshi@ustc.edu.cn

    2008-11-10

    Although micronuclei (MNi) are extensively used to evaluate genotoxic effects and chromosome instability, the most basic issue regarding their origins has not been completely addressed due to limitations of traditional methods. Recently, long-term live cell imaging was developed to monitor the dynamics of single cell in a real-time and high-throughput manner. In the present study, this state-of-the-art technique was employed to examine spontaneous micronucleus (MN) formation in untreated HeLa cells. We demonstrate that spontaneous MNi are derived from incorrectly aligned chromosomes in metaphase (displaced chromosomes, DCs), lagging chromosomes (LCs) and broken chromosome bridges (CBs) in later mitotic stages, but not nuclear buds in S phase. However, most of bipolar mitoses with DCs (91.29%), LCs (73.11%) and broken CBs (88.93%) did not give rise to MNi. Our data also show directly, for the first time, that MNi could originate spontaneously from (1) MNi already presented in the mother cells; (2) nuclear fragments that appeared during mitosis with CB; and (3) chromosomes being extruded into a minicell which fused with one of the daughter cells later. Quantitatively, most of MNi originated from LCs (63.66%), DCs (10.97%) and broken CBs (9.25%). Taken together, these direct evidences show that there are multiple origins for spontaneously arising MNi in HeLa cells and each mechanism contributes to overall MN formation to different extents.

  11. Catalysis of Protein Folding by Chaperones Accelerates Evolutionary Dynamics in Adapting Cell Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Cetinbaş; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly f...

  12. Rationale for the real-time and dynamic cell death assays using propidium iodide

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hong; Oczos, Jadwiga; Janowski, Pawel; Trembecka, Dominika; Dobrucki, Jurek; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2010-01-01

    We have recently reported an innovative approach to use charged fluorochromes such as propidium iodide (PI) in the real-time, dynamic cell viability assays. The present study was designed to provide a mechanistic rationale for the kinetic assays using cell permeability markers. Uptake of PI by live cells, effect on the cell cycle, long term proliferation capacity, DNA damage response and pharmacologic interactions with anticancer drugs were studied using both laser scanning microscopy and las...

  13. Evaluating the efficacy of subcellular fractionation of blast cells using live cell labeling and 2D DIGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yin Ying; Penno, Megan; Perugini, Michelle; Lewis, Ian; Hoffmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Labeling of exposed cell surface proteins of live cells using CyDye DIGE fluor minimal dyes is an efficient strategy for cell surface proteome profiling and quantifying differentially expressed proteins in diseases. Here we describe a strategy to evaluate a two-step detergent-based protein fractionation method using live cell labeling followed by visualization of the fluorescently labeled cell surface proteins and fractionated proteins within a single 2D gel.

  14. Cell death associated with abnormal mitosis observed by confocal imaging in live cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiel, Asher; Visochek, Leonid; Mittelman, Leonid; Zilberstein, Yael; Dantzer, Francoise; Izraeli, Shai; Cohen-Armon, Malka

    2013-08-21

    Phenanthrene derivatives acting as potent PARP1 inhibitors prevented the bi-focal clustering of supernumerary centrosomes in multi-centrosomal human cancer cells in mitosis. The phenanthridine PJ-34 was the most potent molecule. Declustering of extra-centrosomes causes mitotic failure and cell death in multi-centrosomal cells. Most solid human cancers have high occurrence of extra-centrosomes. The activity of PJ-34 was documented in real-time by confocal imaging of live human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with vectors encoding for fluorescent γ-tubulin, which is highly abundant in the centrosomes and for fluorescent histone H2b present in the chromosomes. Aberrant chromosomes arrangements and de-clustered γ-tubulin foci representing declustered centrosomes were detected in the transfected MDA-MB-231 cells after treatment with PJ-34. Un-clustered extra-centrosomes in the two spindle poles preceded their cell death. These results linked for the first time the recently detected exclusive cytotoxic activity of PJ-34 in human cancer cells with extra-centrosomes de-clustering in mitosis, and mitotic failure leading to cell death. According to previous findings observed by confocal imaging of fixed cells, PJ-34 exclusively eradicated cancer cells with multi-centrosomes without impairing normal cells undergoing mitosis with two centrosomes and bi-focal spindles. This cytotoxic activity of PJ-34 was not shared by other potent PARP1 inhibitors, and was observed in PARP1 deficient MEF harboring extracentrosomes, suggesting its independency of PARP1 inhibition. Live confocal imaging offered a useful tool for identifying new molecules eradicating cells during mitosis.

  15. An improved procedure for subcellular spatial alignment during live-cell CLEM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin S Padman

    Full Text Available Live-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM offers unique insights into the ultrastructure of dynamic cellular processes. A critical and technically challenging part of CLEM is the 3-dimensional relocation of the intracellular region of interest during sample processing. We have developed a simple CLEM procedure that uses toner particles from a laser printer as orientation marks. This facilitates easy tracking of a region of interest even by eye throughout the whole procedure. Combined with subcellular fluorescence markers for the plasma membrane and nucleus, the toner particles allow for precise subcellular spatial alignment of the optical and electron microscopy data sets. The toner-based reference grid is printed and transferred onto a polymer film using a standard office printer and laminator. We have also designed a polymer film holder that is compatible with most inverted microscopes, and have validated our strategy by following the ultrastructure of mitochondria that were selectively photo-irradiated during live-cell microscopy. In summary, our inexpensive and robust CLEM procedure simplifies optical imaging, without limiting the choice of optical microscope.

  16. An integrated environmental perfusion chamber and heating system for long-term, high resolution imaging of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, W A; Poole, C A; Jensen, C G; Watson, M

    2000-08-01

    This communication presents the design and application of an integrated environmental perfusion chamber and stage heating blanket suitable for time-lapse video microscopy of living cells. The system consists of two independently regulated components: a perfusion chamber suitable for the maintenance of cell viability and the variable delivery of environmental factors, and a separate heating blanket to control the temperature of the microscope stage and limit thermal conduction from the perfusion chamber. Two contrasting experiments are presented to demonstrate the versatility of the system. One long-term sequence illustrates the behaviour of cells exposed to ceramic fibres. The other shows the shrinking response of cultured articular cartilage chondrons under dynamic hyper-osmotic conditions designed to simulate joint loading. The chamber is simple in design, economical to produce and permits long-term examination of dynamic cellular behaviour while satisfying the fundamental requirements for the maintenance of environmental factors that influence cell viability.

  17. Live-cell imaging of Marburg virus-infected cells uncovers actin-dependent transport of nucleocapsids over long distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schudt, Gordian; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Dolnik, Olga; Sodeik, Beate; Becker, Stephan

    2013-08-27

    Transport of large viral nucleocapsids from replication centers to assembly sites requires contributions from the host cytoskeleton via cellular adaptor and motor proteins. For the Marburg and Ebola viruses, related viruses that cause severe hemorrhagic fevers, the mechanism of nucleocapsid transport remains poorly understood. Here we developed and used live-cell imaging of fluorescently labeled viral and host proteins to characterize the dynamics and molecular requirements of nucleocapsid transport in Marburg virus-infected cells under biosafety level 4 conditions. The study showed a complex actin-based transport of nucleocapsids over long distances from the viral replication centers to the budding sites. Only after the nucleocapsids had associated with the matrix viral protein VP40 at the plasma membrane were they recruited into filopodia and cotransported with host motor myosin 10 toward the budding sites at the tip or side of the long cellular protrusions. Three different transport modes and velocities were identified: (i) Along actin filaments in the cytosol, nucleocapsids were transported at ∼200 nm/s; (ii) nucleocapsids migrated from one actin filament to another at ∼400 nm/s; and (iii) VP40-associated nucleocapsids moved inside filopodia at 100 nm/s. Unique insights into the spatiotemporal dynamics of nucleocapsids and their interaction with the cytoskeleton and motor proteins can lead to novel classes of antivirals that interfere with the trafficking and subsequent release of the Marburg virus from infected cells.

  18. In Vitro Ovule Cultivation for Live-cell Imaging of Zygote Polarization and Embryo Patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Daisuke; Kimata, Yusuke; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Ueda, Minako

    2017-09-11

    In most flowering plants, the zygote and embryo are hidden deep in the mother tissue, and thus it has long been a mystery of how they develop dynamically; for example, how the zygote polarizes to establish the body axis and how the embryo specifies various cell fates during organ formation. This manuscript describes an in vitro ovule culture method to perform live-cell imaging of developing zygotes and embryos of Arabidopsis thaliana. The optimized cultivation medium allows zygotes or early embryos to grow into fertile plants. By combining it with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) micropillar array device, the ovule is held in the liquid medium in the same position. This fixation is crucial to observe the same ovule under a microscope for several days from the zygotic division to the late embryo stage. The resulting live-cell imaging can be used to monitor the real-time dynamics of zygote polarization, such as nuclear migration and cytoskeleton rearrangement, and also the cell division timing and cell fate specification during embryo patterning. Furthermore, this ovule cultivation system can be combined with inhibitor treatments to analyze the effects of various factors on embryo development, and with optical manipulations such as laser disruption to examine the role of cell-cell communication.

  19. Live-Cell Imaging of Vaccinia Virus Recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Paszkowski

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recombination between co-infecting poxviruses provides an important mechanism for generating the genetic diversity that underpins evolution. However, poxviruses replicate in membrane-bound cytoplasmic structures known as factories or virosomes. These are enclosed structures that could impede DNA mixing between co-infecting viruses, and mixing would seem to be essential for this process. We hypothesize that virosome fusion events would be a prerequisite for recombination between co-infecting poxviruses, and this requirement could delay or limit viral recombination. We have engineered vaccinia virus (VACV to express overlapping portions of mCherry fluorescent protein fused to a cro DNA-binding element. In cells also expressing an EGFP-cro fusion protein, this permits live tracking of virus DNA and genetic recombination using confocal microscopy. Our studies show that different types of recombination events exhibit different timing patterns, depending upon the relative locations of the recombining elements. Recombination between partly duplicated sequences is detected soon after post-replicative genes are expressed, as long as the reporter gene sequences are located in cis within an infecting genome. The same kinetics are also observed when the recombining elements are divided between VACV and transfected DNA. In contrast, recombination is delayed when the recombining sequences are located on different co-infecting viruses, and mature recombinants aren't detected until well after late gene expression is well established. The delay supports the hypothesis that factories impede inter-viral recombination, but even after factories merge there remain further constraints limiting virus DNA mixing and recombinant gene assembly. This delay could be related to the continued presence of ER-derived membranes within the fused virosomes, membranes that may once have wrapped individual factories.

  20. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian

  1. Coexistence and efficiency of normal and anomalous transport by molecular motors in living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Goychuk, Igor; Metzler, R

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments reveal both passive subdiffusion of various nanoparticles and anomalous active transport of such particles by molecular motors in the molecularly crowded environment of living biological cells. Passive and active microrheology reveals that the origin of this anomalous dynamics is due to the viscoelasticity of the intracellular fluid. How do molecular motors perform in such a highly viscous, dissipative environment? Can we explain the observed co-existence of the anomalous transport of relatively large particles of 100 to 500 nm in size by kinesin motors with the normal transport of smaller particles by the same molecular motors? What is the efficiency of molecular motors in the anomalous transport regime? Here we answer these seemingly conflicting questions and consistently explain experimental findings in a generalization of the well-known continuous diffusion model for molecular motors with two conformational states in which viscoelastic effects are included.

  2. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-06-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging.

  3. A sensitive and specific Raman probe based on bisarylbutadiyne for live cell imaging of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Palonpon, Almar; Dodo, Kosuke; Ando, Jun; Kawata, Satoshi; Fujita, Katsumasa; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-02-01

    We previously showed that bisarylbutadiyne (BADY), which has a conjugated diyne structure, exhibits an intense peak in the cellular Raman-silent region. Here, we synthesized a mitochondria-selective Raman probe by linking bisphenylbutadiyne with triphenylphosphonium, a well-known mitochondrial targeting moiety. This probe, named MitoBADY, has a Raman peak 27 times more intense than that of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine. Raman microscopy using submicromolar extracellular probe concentrations successfully visualized mitochondria in living cells. A full Raman spectrum is acquired at each pixel of the scanned sample, and we showed that simultaneous Raman imaging of MitoBADY and endogenous cellular biomolecules can be achieved in a single scan. MitoBADY should be useful for the study of mitochondrial dynamics.

  4. Dissecting the cell entry pathway of dengue virus by single-particle tracking in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde M van der Schaar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking, and fusion behavior of DENV. Simultaneous tracking of DENV particles and various endocytic markers revealed that DENV enters cells exclusively via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The virus particles move along the cell surface in a diffusive manner before being captured by a pre-existing clathrin-coated pit. Upon clathrin-mediated entry, DENV particles are transported to Rab5-positive endosomes, which subsequently mature into late endosomes through acquisition of Rab7 and loss of Rab5. Fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane was primarily detected in late endosomal compartments.

  5. Long-term time-lapse live imaging reveals extensive cell migration during annelid regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zattara, Eduardo E; Turlington, Kate W; Bely, Alexandra E

    2016-03-23

    Time-lapse imaging has proven highly valuable for studying development, yielding data of much finer resolution than traditional "still-shot" studies and allowing direct examination of tissue and cell dynamics. A major challenge for time-lapse imaging of animals is keeping specimens immobile yet healthy for extended periods of time. Although this is often feasible for embryos, the difficulty of immobilizing typically motile juvenile and adult stages remains a persistent obstacle to time-lapse imaging of post-embryonic development. Here we describe a new method for long-duration time-lapse imaging of adults of the small freshwater annelid Pristina leidyi and use this method to investigate its regenerative processes. Specimens are immobilized with tetrodotoxin, resulting in irreversible paralysis yet apparently normal regeneration, and mounted in agarose surrounded by culture water or halocarbon oil, to prevent dehydration but allowing gas exchange. Using this method, worms can be imaged continuously and at high spatial-temporal resolution for up to 5 days, spanning the entire regeneration process. We performed a fine-scale analysis of regeneration growth rate and characterized cell migration dynamics during early regeneration. Our studies reveal the migration of several putative cell types, including one strongly resembling published descriptions of annelid neoblasts, a cell type suggested to be migratory based on "still-shot" studies and long hypothesized to be linked to regenerative success in annelids. Combining neurotoxin-based paralysis, live mounting techniques and a starvation-tolerant study system has allowed us to obtain the most extensive high-resolution longitudinal recordings of full anterior and posterior regeneration in an invertebrate, and to detect and characterize several cell types undergoing extensive migration during this process. We expect the tetrodotoxin paralysis and time-lapse imaging methods presented here to be broadly useful in studying

  6. Live birth potential of good morphology and vitrified blastocysts presenting abnormal cell divisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzarello, Antonino; Høst, Thomas; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2017-01-01

    transferred to each patient showed similar to results. In conclusion, good morphology blastocysts presenting ACDs can result in live birth although lower compared to blastocysts with solely regular cell division. Pre-implantation embryos in vitro may undergo self-selection or correcting processes...... a lower live birth rate (17.0%) than blastocyst with solely regular cell divisions (29.3%). ACDs could occur at more than one cell division in the same good morphology blastocyst. Reported as independent events, we observed ACDs occurring more frequently at the later cell cycles (1st: 1.3%; 2nd: 8.0%; 3rd......: 18.5%; 4th: 18.1%). More blastocysts presented failed cell divisions (no. 95) than multi-cell divisions (no. 14). Live births were achieved from blastocysts showing multi-cell divisions at any cell cycle and failed cell divisions from the 2nd cell cycle. Analyses of the subgroup of first blastocyst...

  7. Confocal fluorescence anisotropy and FRAP imaging of α-synuclein amyloid aggregates in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Julia Roberti

    Full Text Available We assessed the intracellular association states of the Parkinson's disease related protein α-synuclein (AS in living cells by transfection with a functional recombinant mutant protein (AS-C4 bearing a tetracysteine tag binding the fluorogenic biarsenical ligands FlAsH and ReAsH, The aggregation states of AS-C4 were assessed by in situ microscopy of molecular translational mobility with FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and of local molecular density with confocal fluorescence anisotropy (CFA. FRAP recovery was quantitative and rapid in regions of free protein, whereas AS in larger aggregates was>80% immobile. A small 16% recovery characterized by an apparent diffusion constant of 0.03-0.04 µm(2/s was attributed to the dynamics of smaller, associated forms of AS-C4 and the exchange of mobile species with the larger immobile aggregates. By CFA, the larger aggregates exhibited high brightness and very low anisotropy, consistent with homoFRET between closely packed AS, for which a Förster distance (R(o of 5.3 nm was calculated. Other bright regions had high anisotropy values, close to that of monomeric AS, and indicative of membrane-associated protein with both low mobility and low degree of association. The anisotropy-fluorescence intensity correlations also revealed regions of free protein or of small aggregates, undetectable by conventional fluorescence imaging alone. The combined strategy (FRAP+CFA provides a highly sensitive means for elucidating both the dynamics and structural features of protein aggregates and other intracellular complexes in living cells, and can be extended to other amyloid systems and to drug screening protocols.

  8. Localization and function of calmodulin in live-cells of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaochun; Song, Yiju; Cao, Jinling; Wang, Gang; Wei, Hua; Xu, Xushi; Lu, Ling

    2010-03-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a small, eukaryotic protein that reversibly binds Ca(2+). Study of CaM localization in genetically tractable organisms has yielded many insights into CaM function. Here, we described the dynamic localization of Aspergillus nidulans CaM (AnCaM) in live-cells by using recombination strains with homologous, single cross-over insertions at the target gene which placed the GFP fused copy under the inducible alcA promoter and the RFP-CaM integration under the native cam promoter. We found that the localization of CaM fusion was quite dynamic throughout the hypha and was concentrated to the active growing sites during germination, hyphal growth, cytokinesis and conidiation. The depletion of CaM by alcA promoter repression induced the explicit abnormalities of germlings with the swollen germ tubes. In addition, the position of highly concentrated GFP-CaM in the extreme apex seemed to determine the hyphal orientation. These data collectively suggest that CaM is constantly required for new hyphal growth. In contrast to this constant accumulation at the apex, GFP-CaM was only transiently localized at septum sites during cytokinesis. Notably, depletion of CaM caused the defect of septation with a completely blocked septum formation indicating that the transient CaM accumulation at the septum site is essential for septation. Moreover, the normal localization of CaM at a hyphal tip required the presence of the functional actin cytoskeleton and the motor protein KipA, which is indispensable for positioning Spitzenkörper. This is the first report of CaM localization and function in live-cells by the site-specific homologous integration in filamentous fungi.

  9. Principles of laser microdissection and catapulting of histologic specimens and live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alfred; Horneffer, Verena; Lorenz, Kathrin; Linz, Norbert; Hüttmann, Gereon; Gebert, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Rapid contact- and contamination-free procurement of specific samples of histologic material for proteomic and genomic analysis as well as separation and transport of living cells can be achieved by laser microdissection (LMD) of the sample of interest followed by a laser-induced forward transport process [laser pressure "catapulting," (LPC)] of the dissected material. We investigated the dynamics of LMD and LPC with focused and defocused laser pulses by means of time-resolved photography. The working mechanism of microdissection was found to be plasma-mediated ablation. Catapulting is driven by plasma formation, when tightly focused pulses are used, and by ablation at the bottom of the sample for moderate and strong defocusing. Driving pressures of several hundred megapascals accelerate the specimen to initial velocities of 100-300 m/s before it is rapidly slowed down by air friction. With strong defocusing, driving pressure and initial flight velocity decrease considerably. On the basis of a characterization of the thermal and optical properties of the histologic specimens and supporting materials used, we calculated the temporal evolution of the heat distribution in the sample. After laser microdissection and laser pressure catapulting (LMPC), the samples were inspected by scanning electron microscopy. Catapulting with tightly focused or strongly defocused pulses results in very little collateral damage, while slight defocusing involves significant heat and UV exposure of up to about 10% of the specimen volume, especially if samples are catapulted directly from a glass slide. Time-resolved photography of live-cell catapulting revealed that in defocused catapulting strong shear forces originate from the flow of the thin layer of culture medium covering the cells. By contrast, pulses focused at the periphery of the specimen cause a fast rotational movement that makes the specimen wind its way out of the culture medium, thereby undergoing much less shear stresses

  10. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaglione, Christine N.; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan, E-mail: Ramanujanv@csmc.edu

    2016-01-29

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies – can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. - Highlights: • A novel, direct measurement of Catalase enzyme activity via, oxygen sensing method. • Steady-stateprofiles of Catalase activity follow the Michaelis-Menten Kinetics. • Catalase-specific activity demonstrated using genetic and pharmacological tools. • Overcomes limitations of spectroscopic methods and indirect calorimetric approaches. • Clear

  11. Visualization of the Dynamics of Gene Expression in the Living Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Ryan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Reporter genes can monitor the status and activity of recombinant genomes in a diverse array of organisms, from bacteria and yeast to plants and animals. We have combined luciferase reporter genes with a conditional gene expression system based on regulatory elements from the lac Operon of Escherichia coli to visualize the dynamics of gene expression in realtime in the living mouse. Using this technology, we have determined the rate of gene induction and repression, the level of target gene activity in response to different doses of inducer, and the schedule of induction during early embryogenesis of both the endogenous and the experimentally manipulated programs of mammalian gene expression associated with the HD/Hdh locus. The combination of in vivo imaging and lac regulation is a powerful tool for generating conditional transgenic mice that can be screened rapidly for optimal regulation and expression patterns, and for monitoring the induction and repression of regulated genes noninvasively in the living animal.

  12. Origin of long-lived quantum coherence and excitation dynamics in pigment-protein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhedong; Wang, Jin

    2016-11-01

    We explore the mechanism for the long-lived quantum coherence by considering the discrete phonon modes: these vibrational modes effectively weaken the exciton-environment interaction, due to the new composite (polaron) formed by excitons and vibrons. This subsequently demonstrates the role of vibrational coherence which greatly contributes to long-lived feature of the excitonic coherence that has been observed in femtosecond experiments. The estimation of the timescale of coherence elongated by vibrational modes is given in an analytical manner. To test the validity of our theory, we study the pigment-protein complex in detail by exploring the energy transfer and coherence dynamics. The ground-state vibrational coherence generated by incoherent radiations is shown to be long-survived and is demonstrated to be significant in promoting the excitation energy transfer. This is attributed to the nonequilibriumness of the system caused by the detailed-balance-breaking, which funnels the downhill migration of excitons.

  13. SpatTrack: an imaging toolbox for analysis of vesicle motility and distribution in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Frederik W; Jensen, Maria Louise V; Christensen, Tanja; Nielsen, Gitte K; Heegaard, Christian W; Wüstner, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    The endocytic pathway is a complex network of highly dynamic organelles, which has been traditionally studied by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The data generated by this method can be overwhelming and its analysis, even for the skilled microscopist, is tedious and error-prone. We developed SpatTrack, an open source, platform-independent program collecting a variety of methods for analysis of vesicle dynamics and distribution in living cells. SpatTrack performs 2D particle tracking, trajectory analysis and fitting of diffusion models to the calculated mean square displacement. It allows for spatial analysis of detected vesicle patterns including calculation of the radial distribution function and particle-based colocalization. Importantly, all analysis tools are supported by Monte Carlo simulations of synthetic images. This allows the user to assess the reliability of the analysis and to study alternative scenarios. We demonstrate the functionality of SpatTrack by performing a detailed imaging study of internalized fluorescence-tagged Niemann Pick C2 (NPC2) protein in human disease fibroblasts. Using SpatTrack, we show that NPC2 rescued the cholesterol-storage phenotype from a subpopulation of late endosomes/lysosomes (LE/LYSs). This was paralleled by repositioning and active transport of NPC2-containing vesicles to the cell surface. The potential of SpatTrack for other applications in intracellular transport studies will be discussed.

  14. Toward high-content screening of mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, Eligio F; Willems, Peter H G M; Pellegrini, Mina; Beyrath, Julien; Smeitink, Jan A M; Blanchet, Lionel; Koopman, Werner J H

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are double membrane organelles involved in various key cellular processes. Governed by dedicated protein machinery, mitochondria move and continuously fuse and divide. These "mitochondrial dynamics" are bi-directionally linked to mitochondrial and cell functional state in space and time. Due to the action of the electron transport chain (ETC), the mitochondrial inner membrane displays a inside-negative membrane potential (Δψ). The latter is considered a functional readout of mitochondrial "health" and required to sustain normal mitochondrial ATP production and mitochondrial fusion. During the last decade, live-cell microscopy strategies were developed for simultaneous quantification of Δψ and mitochondrial morphology. This revealed that ETC dysfunction, changes in Δψ and aberrations in mitochondrial structure often occur in parallel, suggesting they are linked potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we discuss how combining high-content and high-throughput strategies can be used for analysis of genetic and/or drug-induced effects at the level of individual organelles, cells and cell populations. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  15. Live cell imaging of the nascent inactive X chromosome during the early differentiation process of naive ES cells towards epiblast stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélia Guyochin

    Full Text Available Random X-chromosome inactivation ensures dosage compensation in mammals through the transcriptional silencing of one of the two X chromosomes present in each female cell. Silencing is initiated in the differentiating epiblast of the mouse female embryos through coating of the nascent inactive X chromosome by the non-coding RNA Xist, which subsequently recruits the Polycomb Complex PRC2 leading to histone H3-K27 methylation. Here we examined in mouse ES cells the early steps of the transition from naive ES cells towards epiblast stem cells as a model for inducing X chromosome inactivation in vitro. We show that these conditions efficiently induce random XCI. Importantly, in a transient phase of this differentiation pathway, both X chromosomes are coated with Xist RNA in up to 15% of the XX cells. In an attempt to determine the dynamics of this process, we designed a strategy aimed at visualizing the nascent inactive X-chromosome in live cells. We generated transgenic female XX ES cells expressing the PRC2 component Ezh2 fused to the fluorescent protein Venus. The fluorescent fusion protein was expressed at sub-physiological levels and located in nuclei of ES cells. Upon differentiation of ES cell towards epiblast stem cell fate, Venus-fluorescent territories appearing in interphase nuclei were identified as nascent inactive X chromosomes by their association with Xist RNA. Imaging of Ezh2-Venus for up to 24 hours during the differentiation process showed survival of some cells with two fluorescent domains and a surprising dynamics of the fluorescent territories across cell division and in the course of the differentiation process. Our data reveal a strategy for visualizing the nascent inactive X chromosome and suggests the possibility for a large plasticity of the nascent inactive X chromosome.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of cell orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, S. A.; de, Rumi

    2009-12-01

    The nonlinear dependence of cellular orientation on an external, time-varying stress field determines the distribution of orientations in the presence of noise and the characteristic time, τc , for the cell to reach its steady-state orientation. The short, local cytoskeletal relaxation time distinguishes between high-frequency (nearly perpendicular) and low-frequency (random or parallel) orientations. However, τc is determined by the much longer, orientational relaxation time. This behavior is related to experiments for which we predict the angle and characteristic time as a function of frequency.

  17. Live imaging of companion cells and sieve elements in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud Cayla

    Full Text Available The phloem is a complex tissue composed of highly specialized cells with unique subcellular structures and a compact organization that is challenging to study in vivo at cellular resolution. We used confocal scanning laser microscopy and subcellular fluorescent markers in companion cells and sieve elements, for live imaging of the phloem in Arabidopsis leaves. This approach provided a simple framework for identifying phloem cell types unambiguously. It highlighted the compactness of the meshed network of organelles within companion cells. By contrast, within the sieve elements, unknown bodies were observed in association with the PP2-A1:GFP, GFP:RTM1 and RTM2:GFP markers at the cell periphery. The phloem lectin PP2-A1:GFP marker was found in the parietal ground matrix. Its location differed from that of the P-protein filaments, which were visualized with SEOR1:GFP and SEOR2:GFP. PP2-A1:GFP surrounded two types of bodies, one of which was identified as mitochondria. This location suggested that it was embedded within the sieve element clamps, specific structures that may fix the organelles to each another or to the plasma membrane in the sieve tubes. GFP:RTM1 was associated with a class of larger bodies, potentially corresponding to plastids. PP2-A1:GFP was soluble in the cytosol of immature sieve elements. The changes in its subcellular localization during differentiation provide an in vivo blueprint for monitoring this process. The subcellular features obtained with these companion cell and sieve element markers can be used as landmarks for exploring the organization and dynamics of phloem cells in vivo.

  18. The large-scale digital cell analysis system: an open system for nonperturbing live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul J; Kosmacek, Elizabeth A; Sun, Yuansheng; Ianzini, Fiorenza; Mackey, Michael A

    2007-12-01

    The Large-Scale Digital Cell Analysis System (LSDCAS) was designed to provide a highly extensible open source live cell imaging system. Analysis of cell growth data has demonstrated a lack of perturbation in cells imaged using LSDCAS, through reference to cell growth data from cells growing in CO(2) incubators. LSDCAS consists of data acquisition, data management and data analysis software, and is currently a Core research facility at the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Iowa. Using LSDCAS analysis software, this report and others show that although phase-contrast imaging has no apparent effect on cell growth kinetics and viability, fluorescent image acquisition in the cell lines tested caused a measurable level of growth perturbation using LSDCAS. This report describes the current design of the system, reasons for the implemented design, and details its basic functionality. The LSDCAS software runs on the GNU/Linux operating system, and provides easy to use, graphical programs for data acquisition and quantitative analysis of cells imaged with phase-contrast or fluorescence microscopy (alone or in combination), and complete source code is freely available under the terms of the GNU Public Software License at the project website (http://lsdcas.engineering.uiowa.edu).

  19. Visualization of the Nucleolus in Living Cells with Cell-Penetrating Fluorescent Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robert M; Herce, Henry D; Ludwig, Anne K; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is the hallmark of nuclear compartmentalization and has been shown to exert multiple roles in cellular metabolism besides its main function as the place of ribosomal RNA synthesis and assembly of ribosomes. The nucleolus plays also a major role in nuclear organization as the largest compartment within the nucleus. The prominent structure of the nucleolus can be detected using contrast light microscopy providing an approximate localization of the nucleolus, but this approach does not allow to determine accurately the three-dimensional structure of the nucleolus in cells and tissues. Immunofluorescence staining with antibodies specific to nucleolar proteins albeit very useful is time consuming, normally antibodies recognize their epitopes only within a small range of species and is applicable only in fixed cells. Here, we present a simple method to selectively and accurately label this ubiquitous subnuclear compartment in living cells of a large range of species using a fluorescently labeled cell-penetrating peptide.

  20. Collective dynamics of cell migration and cell rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabla, Alexandre

    Understanding multicellular processes such as embryo development or cancer metastasis requires to decipher the contributions of local cell autonomous behaviours and long range interactions with the tissue environment. A key question in this context concerns the emergence of large scale coordination in cell behaviours, a requirement for collective cell migration or convergent extension. I will present a few examples where physical and mechanical aspects play a significant role in driving tissue scale dynamics. Geometrical confinement is one of the key external factors influencing large scale coordination during collective migration. Using a combination of in vitro experiments and numerical simulations, we show that the velocity correlation length, measured in unconfined conditions, provides a convenient length scale to predict the dynamic response under confinement. The same length scale can also be used to quantify the influence range of directional cues within the cell population. Heterogeneity within motile cell populations is frequently associated with an increase in their invasive capability and appears to play an important role during cancer metastasis. Using in silico experiments, we studied the way cell invasion is influenced by both the degree of cell coordination and the amount of variability in the motile force of the invading cells. Results suggest that mechanical heterogeneity dramatically enhances the invasion rate through an emerging cooperative process between the stronger and weaker cells, accounting for a number of observed invasion phenotypes. Effective convergent extension requires on a consistent orientation of cell intercalation at the tissue scale, most often in relation with planar cell polarity mechanisms to define the primary axes of deformation. Using a novel modelling approach for cells mechanical interactions, we studied the dynamics of substrate free motile cell populations. Ongoing work shows in particular that nematic order emerges

  1. Live imaging provides new insights on dynamic F-actin filopodia and differential endocytosis during myoblast fusion in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralalka, Shruti; Shelton, Claude; Cartwright, Heather N; Guo, Fengli; Trimble, Rhonda; Kumar, Ram P; Abmayr, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    The process of myogenesis includes the recognition, adhesion, and fusion of committed myoblasts into multinucleate syncytia. In the larval body wall muscles of Drosophila, this elaborate process is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs), and cell adhesion molecules Kin-of-IrreC (Kirre) and Sticks-and-stones (Sns) on their respective surfaces. The FCMs appear to provide the driving force for fusion, via the assembly of protrusions associated with branched F-actin and the WASp, SCAR and Arp2/3 pathways. In the present study, we utilize the dorsal pharyngeal musculature that forms in the Drosophila embryo as a model to explore myoblast fusion and visualize the fusion process in live embryos. These muscles rely on the same cell types and genes as the body wall muscles, but are amenable to live imaging since they do not undergo extensive morphogenetic movement during formation. Time-lapse imaging with F-actin and membrane markers revealed dynamic FCM-associated actin-enriched protrusions that rapidly extend and retract into the myotube from different sites within the actin focus. Ultrastructural analysis of this actin-enriched area showed that they have two morphologically distinct structures: wider invasions and/or narrow filopodia that contain long linear filaments. Consistent with this, formin Diaphanous (Dia) and branched actin nucleator, Arp3, are found decorating the filopodia or enriched at the actin focus, respectively, indicating that linear actin is present along with branched actin at sites of fusion in the FCM. Gain-of-function Dia and loss-of-function Arp3 both lead to fusion defects, a decrease of F-actin foci and prominent filopodia from the FCMs. We also observed differential endocytosis of cell surface components at sites of fusion, with actin reorganizing factors, WASp and SCAR, and Kirre remaining on the myotube surface and Sns preferentially taken up with other membrane proteins into early endosomes and lysosomes in the

  2. Live imaging provides new insights on dynamic F-actin filopodia and differential endocytosis during myoblast fusion in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Haralalka

    Full Text Available The process of myogenesis includes the recognition, adhesion, and fusion of committed myoblasts into multinucleate syncytia. In the larval body wall muscles of Drosophila, this elaborate process is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs, and cell adhesion molecules Kin-of-IrreC (Kirre and Sticks-and-stones (Sns on their respective surfaces. The FCMs appear to provide the driving force for fusion, via the assembly of protrusions associated with branched F-actin and the WASp, SCAR and Arp2/3 pathways. In the present study, we utilize the dorsal pharyngeal musculature that forms in the Drosophila embryo as a model to explore myoblast fusion and visualize the fusion process in live embryos. These muscles rely on the same cell types and genes as the body wall muscles, but are amenable to live imaging since they do not undergo extensive morphogenetic movement during formation. Time-lapse imaging with F-actin and membrane markers revealed dynamic FCM-associated actin-enriched protrusions that rapidly extend and retract into the myotube from different sites within the actin focus. Ultrastructural analysis of this actin-enriched area showed that they have two morphologically distinct structures: wider invasions and/or narrow filopodia that contain long linear filaments. Consistent with this, formin Diaphanous (Dia and branched actin nucleator, Arp3, are found decorating the filopodia or enriched at the actin focus, respectively, indicating that linear actin is present along with branched actin at sites of fusion in the FCM. Gain-of-function Dia and loss-of-function Arp3 both lead to fusion defects, a decrease of F-actin foci and prominent filopodia from the FCMs. We also observed differential endocytosis of cell surface components at sites of fusion, with actin reorganizing factors, WASp and SCAR, and Kirre remaining on the myotube surface and Sns preferentially taken up with other membrane proteins into early endosomes and

  3. CD28–B7 Interaction Modulates Short- and Long-Lived Plasma Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of CD28, which is constitutively expressed on T cells, with B7.1/B7.2 expressed on APCs is critical for T cell activation. CD28 is also expressed on murine and human plasma cells but its function on these cells remains unclear. There are two types of plasma cells: short-lived ones that appear in the secondary lymphoid tissue shortly after Ag exposure, and long-lived plasma cells that mainly reside in the bone marrow. We demonstrate that CD28-deficient murine short- and long-li...

  4. A versatile assay for RNA-binding proteins in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strein, Claudia; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Hentze, Matthias W; Castello, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) control RNA fate from synthesis to decay. Since their cellular expression levels frequently do not reflect their in vivo activity, methods are needed to assess the steady state RNA-binding activity of RBPs as well as their responses to stimuli. While electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) have been used for such determinations, their results serve at best as proxies for the RBP activities in living cells. Here, we describe a quantitative dual fluorescence method to analyze protein-mRNA interactions in vivo. Known or candidate RBPs are fused to fluorescent proteins (eGFP, YFP), expressed in cells, cross-linked in vivo to RNA by ultraviolet light irradiation, and immunoprecipitated, after lysis, with a single chain antibody fragment directed against eGFP (GFP-binding protein, GBP). Polyadenylated RNA-binding activity of fusion proteins is assessed by hybridization with an oligo(DT) probe coupled with a red fluorophore. Since UV light is directly applied to living cells, the assay can be used to monitor dynamic changes in RNA-binding activities in response to biological or pharmacological stimuli. Notably, immunoprecipitation and hybridization can also be performed with commercially available GBP-coupled 96-well plates (GFP-multiTrap), allowing highly parallel RNA-binding measurements in a single experiment. Therefore, this method creates the possibility to conduct in vivo high-throughput RNA-binding assays. We believe that this fast and simple radioactivity-free method will find many useful applications in RNA biology.

  5. Functional live cell imaging of the pulmonary neuroepithelial body microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Proost, Ian; Pintelon, Isabel; Brouns, Inge; Kroese, A; Riccardi, Daniela; Kemp, Paul J.; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs) are densely innervated groups of neuroendocrine cells invariably accompanied by Clara-like cells. Together with NEBs, Clara-like cells form the so-called "NEB microenvironment," which recently has been assigned a potential pulmonary stem cell niche. Conclusive

  6. Functional live cell imaging of the pulmonary neuroepithelial body microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Proost, Ian; Pintelon, Isabel; Brouns, Inge; Kroese, A; Riccardi, Daniela; Kemp, Paul J.; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    Pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs) are densely innervated groups of neuroendocrine cells invariably accompanied by Clara-like cells. Together with NEBs, Clara-like cells form the so-called "NEB microenvironment," which recently has been assigned a potential pulmonary stem cell niche. Conclusive

  7. Structure-function relationships in the stem cell's mechanical world A: seeding protocols as a means to control shape and fate of live stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Joshua A; Knothe Tate, Melissa L

    2011-12-01

    Shape and fate are intrinsic manifestations of form and function at the cell scale. Here we hypothesize that seeding density and protocol affect the form and function of live embryonic murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their nuclei. First, the imperative for study of live cells was demonstrated in studies showing changes in cell nucleus shape that were attributable to fixation per se. Hence, we compared live cell and nuclear volume and shape between groups of a model MSC line (C3H10T1/2) seeded at, or proliferated from 5,000 cells/cm2 to one of three target densities to achieve targeted development contexts. Cell volume was shown to be dependent on initial seeding density whereas nucleus shape was shown to depend on developmental context but not seeding density. Both smaller cell volumes and flatter nuclei were found to correlate with increased expression of markers for mesenchymal condensation as well as chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation but a decreased expression of pre-condensation and adipogenic markers. Considering the data presented here, both seeding density and protocol significantly alter the morphology of mesenchymal stem cells even at very early stages of cell culture. Thus, these design parameters may play a critical role in the success of tissue engineering strategies seeking to recreate condensation events. However, a better understanding of how these changes in cell volume and nucleus shape relate to the differentiation of MSCs is important for prescribing precise seeding conditions necessary for the development of the desired tissue type. In a companion study (Part B, following), we address the effect of concomitant volume and shape changing stresses on spatiotemporal distribution of the cytoskeletal proteins actin and tubulin. Taken together, these studies bring us one step closer to our ultimate goal of elucidating the dynamics of nucleus and cell shape change as tissue templates grow (cell proliferation) and specialize (cell

  8. Dynamics of B cells in germinal centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Nilushi S; Klein, Ulf

    2015-03-01

    Humoral immunity depends on the germinal centre (GC) reaction during which somatically mutated high-affinity memory B cells and plasma cells are generated. Recent studies have uncovered crucial cues that are required for the formation and the maintenance of GCs and for the selection of high-affinity antibody mutants. In addition, it is now clear that these events are promoted by the dynamic movements of cells within and between GCs. These findings have resolved the complexities of the GC reaction in greater detail than ever before. This Review focuses on these recent advances and discusses their implications for the establishment of humoral immunity.

  9. Clarification of mural cell coverage of vascular endothelial cells by live imaging of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koji; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Izumi, Nanae; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Hajime; Kelsh, Robert N; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2016-04-15

    Mural cells (MCs) consisting of vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes cover the endothelial cells (ECs) to regulate vascular stability and homeostasis. Here, we clarified the mechanism by which MCs develop and cover ECs by generating transgenic zebrafish lines that allow live imaging of MCs and by lineage tracing in vivo To cover cranial vessels, MCs derived from either neural crest cells or mesoderm emerged around the preformed EC tubes, proliferated and migrated along EC tubes. During their migration, the MCs moved forward by extending their processes along the inter-EC junctions, suggesting a role for inter-EC junctions as a scaffold for MC migration. In the trunk vasculature, MCs derived from mesoderm covered the ventral side of the dorsal aorta (DA), but not the posterior cardinal vein. Furthermore, the MCs migrating from the DA or emerging around intersegmental vessels (ISVs) preferentially covered arterial ISVs rather than venous ISVs, indicating that MCs mostly cover arteries during vascular development. Thus, live imaging and lineage tracing enabled us to clarify precisely how MCs cover the EC tubes and to identify the origins of MCs.

  10. Clarification of mural cell coverage of vascular endothelial cells by live imaging of zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koji; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Izumi, Nanae; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Hajime; Kelsh, Robert N.; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells (MCs) consisting of vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes cover the endothelial cells (ECs) to regulate vascular stability and homeostasis. Here, we clarified the mechanism by which MCs develop and cover ECs by generating transgenic zebrafish lines that allow live imaging of MCs and by lineage tracing in vivo. To cover cranial vessels, MCs derived from either neural crest cells or mesoderm emerged around the preformed EC tubes, proliferated and migrated along EC tubes. During their migration, the MCs moved forward by extending their processes along the inter-EC junctions, suggesting a role for inter-EC junctions as a scaffold for MC migration. In the trunk vasculature, MCs derived from mesoderm covered the ventral side of the dorsal aorta (DA), but not the posterior cardinal vein. Furthermore, the MCs migrating from the DA or emerging around intersegmental vessels (ISVs) preferentially covered arterial ISVs rather than venous ISVs, indicating that MCs mostly cover arteries during vascular development. Thus, live imaging and lineage tracing enabled us to clarify precisely how MCs cover the EC tubes and to identify the origins of MCs. PMID:26952986

  11. Molecular component distribution imaging of living cells by multivariate curve resolution analysis of space-resolved Raman spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masahiro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2014-01-01

    Label-free Raman microspectroscopy combined with a multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis can be a powerful tool for studying a wide range of biomedical molecular systems. The MCR with the alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) technique, which retrieves the pure component spectra from complicatedly overlapped spectra, has been successfully applied to in vivo and molecular-level analysis of living cells. The principles of the MCR-ALS analysis are reviewed with a model system of titanium oxide crystal polymorphs, followed by two examples of in vivo Raman imaging studies of living yeast cells, fission yeast, and budding yeast. Due to the non-negative matrix factorization algorithm used in the MCR-ALS analysis, the spectral information derived from this technique is just ready for physical and/or chemical interpretations. The corresponding concentration profiles provide the molecular component distribution images (MCDIs) that are vitally important for elucidating life at the molecular level, as stated by Schroedinger in his famous book, "What is life?" Without any a priori knowledge about spectral profiles, time- and space-resolved Raman measurements of a dividing fission yeast cell with the MCR-ALS elucidate the dynamic changes of major cellular components (lipids, proteins, and polysaccharides) during the cell cycle. The MCR-ALS technique also resolves broadly overlapped OH stretch Raman bands of water, clearly indicating the existence of organelle-specific water structures in a living budding yeast cell.

  12. Continuous live cell imaging of cellulose attachment by microbes under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions using confocal microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Wu Wang; Seung-Hwan Lee; James G.Elkins; Yongchao Li; Scott Hamilton-Brehm; Jennifer L.Morrell-Falvey

    2013-01-01

    Live cell imaging methods provide important insights into the dynamics of cellular processes that cannot be derived easily from population-averaged datasets.In the bioenergy field,much research is focused on fermentation of cellulosic biomass by thermophilic microbes to produce biofuels; however,little effort is dedicated to the development of imaging tools to monitor this dynamic biological process.This is,in part,due to the experimental challenges of imaging ceils under both anaerobic and thermophilic conditions.Here an imaging system is described that integrates confocal microscopy,a flow cell device,and a lipophilic dye to visualize cells.Solutions to technical obstacles regarding suitable fluorescent markers,photodamage during imaging,and maintenance of environmental conditions during imaging are presented.This system was utilized to observe cellulose colonization by Clostridium thermocellum under anaerobic conditions at 60℃.This method enables live cell imaging of bacterial growth under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions and should be widely applicable to visualizing different cell types or processes in real time.

  13. Live-cell tracking using SIFT features in DIC microscopic videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Richard M; Crookes, Danny; Luo, Nie; Davidson, Michael W

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, a novel motion-tracking scheme using scale-invariant features is proposed for automatic cell motility analysis in gray-scale microscopic videos, particularly for the live-cell tracking in low-contrast differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. In the proposed approach, scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) points around live cells in the microscopic image are detected, and a structure locality preservation (SLP) scheme using Laplacian Eigenmap is proposed to track the SIFT feature points along successive frames of low-contrast DIC videos. Experiments on low-contrast DIC microscopic videos of various live-cell lines shows that in comparison with principal component analysis (PCA) based SIFT tracking, the proposed Laplacian-SIFT can significantly reduce the error rate of SIFT feature tracking. With this enhancement, further experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme is a robust and accurate approach to tackling the challenge of live-cell tracking in DIC microscopy.

  14. Development of a surface plasmon resonance biosensor for real-time detection of osteogenic differentiation in live mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chun Kuo

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR biosensors have been recognized as a useful tool and widely used for real-time dynamic analysis of molecular binding affinity because of its high sensitivity to the change of the refractive index of tested objects. The conventional methods in molecular biology to evaluate cell differentiation require cell lysis or fixation, which make investigation in live cells difficult. In addition, a certain amount of cells are needed in order to obtain adequate protein or messenger ribonucleic acid for various assays. To overcome this limitation, we developed a unique SPR-based biosensing apparatus for real-time detection of cell differentiation in live cells according to the differences of optical properties of the cell surface caused by specific antigen-antibody binding. In this study, we reported the application of this SPR-based system to evaluate the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. OB-cadherin expression, which is up-regulated during osteogenic differentiation, was targeted under our SPR system by conjugating antibodies against OB-cadherin on the surface of the object. A linear relationship between the duration of osteogenic induction and the difference in refractive angle shift with very high correlation coefficient was observed. To sum up, the SPR system and the protocol reported in this study can rapidly and accurately define osteogenic maturation of MSCs in a live cell and label-free manner with no need of cell breakage. This SPR biosensor will facilitate future advances in a vast array of fields in biomedical research and medical diagnosis.

  15. Development of a surface plasmon resonance biosensor for real-time detection of osteogenic differentiation in live mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Chun; Ho, Jennifer H; Yen, Ta-Jen; Chen, How-Foo; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors have been recognized as a useful tool and widely used for real-time dynamic analysis of molecular binding affinity because of its high sensitivity to the change of the refractive index of tested objects. The conventional methods in molecular biology to evaluate cell differentiation require cell lysis or fixation, which make investigation in live cells difficult. In addition, a certain amount of cells are needed in order to obtain adequate protein or messenger ribonucleic acid for various assays. To overcome this limitation, we developed a unique SPR-based biosensing apparatus for real-time detection of cell differentiation in live cells according to the differences of optical properties of the cell surface caused by specific antigen-antibody binding. In this study, we reported the application of this SPR-based system to evaluate the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). OB-cadherin expression, which is up-regulated during osteogenic differentiation, was targeted under our SPR system by conjugating antibodies against OB-cadherin on the surface of the object. A linear relationship between the duration of osteogenic induction and the difference in refractive angle shift with very high correlation coefficient was observed. To sum up, the SPR system and the protocol reported in this study can rapidly and accurately define osteogenic maturation of MSCs in a live cell and label-free manner with no need of cell breakage. This SPR biosensor will facilitate future advances in a vast array of fields in biomedical research and medical diagnosis.

  16. Microfabricated Electrochemical Cell-Based Biosensors for Analysis of Living Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cellular biochemical parameters can be used to reveal the physiological and functional information of various cells. Due to demonstrated high accuracy and non-invasiveness, electrochemical detection methods have been used for cell-based investigation. When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring. In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology. This review aims to give an overview of the microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors, such as microelectrode arrays (MEA, the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS technique, and the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS. The details in their working principles, measurement systems, and applications in cell monitoring are covered. Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

  17. Fast spatiotemporal correlation spectroscopy to determine protein lateral diffusion laws in live cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, Carmine; Gratton, Enrico; Beltram, Fabio; Cardarelli, Francesco

    2013-07-23

    Spatial distribution and dynamics of plasma-membrane proteins are thought to be modulated by lipid composition and by the underlying cytoskeleton, which forms transient barriers to diffusion. So far this idea was probed by single-particle tracking of membrane components in which gold particles or antibodies were used to individually monitor the molecules of interest. Unfortunately, the relatively large particles needed for single-particle tracking can in principle alter the very dynamics under study. Here, we use a method that makes it possible to investigate plasma-membrane proteins by means of small molecular labels, specifically single GFP constructs. First, fast imaging of the region of interest on the membrane is performed. For each time delay in the resulting stack of images the average spatial correlation function is calculated. We show that by fitting the series of correlation functions, the actual protein "diffusion law" can be obtained directly from imaging, in the form of a mean-square displacement vs. time-delay plot, with no need for interpretative models. This approach is tested with several simulated 2D diffusion conditions and in live Chinese hamster ovary cells with a GFP-tagged transmembrane transferrin receptor, a well-known benchmark of membrane-skeleton-dependent transiently confined diffusion. This approach does not require extraction of the individual trajectories and can be used also with dim and dense molecules. We argue that it represents a powerful tool for the determination of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters over very wide spatial and temporal scales.

  18. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein influences microtubule dynamics at the cell periphery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, M.P.; Mehra, N.; Jorna, A.S.; Beest, M. van; Giles, R.H.; Voest, E.E.

    2004-01-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein protects microtubules (MTs) from destabilization by nocodazole treatment. Based on this fixed-cell assay with static end points, VHL has been reported to directly stabilize the MT cytoskeleton. To investigate the dynamic changes in MTs induced by VHL in living cel

  19. Live-attenuated measles virus vaccine targets dendritic cells and macrophages in muscle of nonhuman primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Rennick (Linda); R.D. de Vries (Rory); T.J. Carsillo (Thomas J.); K. Lemon (Ken); G. van Amerongen (Geert); M. Ludlow (Martin); D.T. Nguyen (Tien); S. Yüksel (Selma); R.J. Verbugh (Joyce); P. Haddock (Paula); S. McQuaid (Stephen); W.P. Duprex (Paul); R.L. de Swart (Rik)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAlthough live-attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccines have been used successfully for over 50 years, the target cells that sustain virus replication in vivo are still unknown. We generated a reverse genetics system for the live-attenuated MV vaccine strain Edmonston- Zagreb (EZ), allowing

  20. Live-attenuated measles virus vaccine targets dendritic cells and macrophages in muscle of nonhuman primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Rennick (Linda); R.D. de Vries (Rory); T.J. Carsillo (Thomas J.); K. Lemon (Ken); G. van Amerongen (Geert); M. Ludlow (Martin); D.T. Nguyen (Tien); S. Yüksel (Selma); R.J. Verbugh (Joyce); P. Haddock (Paula); S. McQuaid (Stephen); W.P. Duprex (Paul); R.L. de Swart (Rik)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAlthough live-attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccines have been used successfully for over 50 years, the target cells that sustain virus replication in vivo are still unknown. We generated a reverse genetics system for the live-attenuated MV vaccine strain Edmonston- Zagreb (EZ), allowing

  1. Dynamic synchrony of local cell assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yoshio; Takahashi, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper, we focus on the problem of the dynamic size of a cell assembly and discuss how we can detect synchronized firing of a local cell assembly consisting of closely neighboring neurons in the working brain. A local cell assembly is difficult to detect because of the problem of spike overlapping of neighboring neurons, which cannot be overcome by ordinary spike-sorting techniques. We introduce a unique technique of spike-sorting that combines independent component analysis (ICA) and an ordinary sorting method to separate individual neighboring neurons and analyze their firing synchrony in behaving animals. One of our experiments employing this method showed that some closely neighboring neurons in the monkey prefrontal cortex have dynamic and sharp synchrony of firing reflecting local cell assemblies during working-memory processes. Another experiment showed that our other method (ICSort) of novel spike-sorting by ICA using special electrodes (dodecatrodes) can distinguish firing signals from the soma and those from the dendrites of individual neurons in behaving rats and suggests that the somatic and dendritic signals have different roles in information processing. This indicates that functional connectivity among neurons may be more dynamic and complex and spikes from the soma and dendrites of individual neurons should be considered in the investigation of the activity of local cell assemblies. We finally propose that detailed and real features of a local cell assembly consisting of closely neighboring neurons should be examined further and detection of local cell assemblies could be applied to the development of neuronal prosthetic devices, that is, brain-machine interfaces (BMIs).

  2. Measuring the acoustophoretic contrast factor of living cells in microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustsson, P.; Barnkob, Rune; Grenvall, C.

    2010-01-01

    We report a new method, which allows for accurate measurement of the acostophoretic contrast factor Φ of different cell types, an acousto-physical parameter of fundamental importance in microchip acoustophoresis. As a test case the Φ factor is measured for undifferentiated and four-days different......We report a new method, which allows for accurate measurement of the acostophoretic contrast factor Φ of different cell types, an acousto-physical parameter of fundamental importance in microchip acoustophoresis. As a test case the Φ factor is measured for undifferentiated and four......-days differentiated cells from a human embryonic ventral mesencephalic cell line. The measured cell Φ factors are distributed around 0.04 and 0.07 for the two cell types, respectively. Despite a close acoustic similarity, the two cell populations are shown to be separable by acoustophoresis....

  3. Measuring the acoustophoretic contrast factor of living cells in microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustsson, P.; Barnkob, Rune; Grenvall, C.

    2010-01-01

    We report a new method, which allows for accurate measurement of the acostophoretic contrast factor Φ of different cell types, an acousto-physical parameter of fundamental importance in microchip acoustophoresis. As a test case the Φ factor is measured for undifferentiated and four-days different......We report a new method, which allows for accurate measurement of the acostophoretic contrast factor Φ of different cell types, an acousto-physical parameter of fundamental importance in microchip acoustophoresis. As a test case the Φ factor is measured for undifferentiated and four......-days differentiated cells from a human embryonic ventral mesencephalic cell line. The measured cell Φ factors are distributed around 0.04 and 0.07 for the two cell types, respectively. Despite a close acoustic similarity, the two cell populations are shown to be separable by acoustophoresis....

  4. The Dynamics and Turnover of Tau Aggregates in Cultured Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing L.; Buist, Arjan; Soares, Alberto; Callaerts, Kathleen; Calafate, Sara; Stevenaert, Frederik; Daniels, Joshua P.; Zoll, Bryan E.; Crowe, Alex; Brunden, Kurt R.; Moechars, Diederik; Lee, Virginia M. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous tau aggregates, the hallmark lesions of Alzheimer disease (AD), play key roles in neurodegeneration. Activation of protein degradation systems has been proposed to be a potential strategy for removing pathological tau, but it remains unclear how effectively tau aggregates can be degraded by these systems. By applying our previously established cellular model system of AD-like tau aggregate induction using preformed tau fibrils, we demonstrate that tau aggregates induced in cells with regulated expression of full-length mutant tau can be gradually cleared when soluble tau expression is suppressed. This clearance is at least partially mediated by the autophagy-lysosome pathway, although both the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosome pathway are deficient in handling large tau aggregates. Importantly, residual tau aggregates left after the clearance phase leads to a rapid reinstatement of robust tau pathology once soluble tau expression is turned on again. Moreover, we succeeded in generating monoclonal cells persistently carrying tau aggregates without obvious cytotoxicity. Live imaging of GFP-tagged tau aggregates showed that tau inclusions are dynamic structures constantly undergoing “fission” and “fusion,” which facilitate stable propagation of tau pathology in dividing cells. These findings provide a greater understanding of cell-to-cell transmission of tau aggregates in dividing cells and possibly neurons. PMID:27129267

  5. Cell volume and geometric parameters determination in living cells using confocal microscopy and 3D reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: David Hevia, Aida Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta Alonso-Gervós, Isabel Quirós-González, Henar M Cimadevilla, Carmen Gómez-Cordovés, Rosa M Sainz & Juan C Mayo ### Abstract The protocol reported here describes a simple, easy, fast and reproducible method aimed to know the geometric parameters of living cells based on confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with 3D reconstruction software. Briefly, the method is based on intrinsic fluorescence properties of acridine orange (AO...

  6. Tracking single cells in live animals using a photoconvertible near-infrared cell membrane label.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia L Carlson

    Full Text Available We describe a novel photoconversion technique to track individual cells in vivo using a commercial lipophilic membrane dye, DiR. We show that DiR exhibits a permanent fluorescence emission shift (photoconversion after light exposure and does not reacquire the original color over time. Ratiometric imaging can be used to distinguish photoconverted from non-converted cells with high sensitivity. Combining the use of this photoconvertible dye with intravital microscopy, we tracked the division of individual hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells within the calvarium bone marrow of live mice. We also studied the peripheral differentiation of individual T cells by tracking the gain or loss of FoxP3-GFP expression, a marker of the immune suppressive function of CD4(+ T cells. With the near-infrared photoconvertible membrane dye, the entire visible spectral range is available for simultaneous use with other fluorescent proteins to monitor gene expression or to trace cell lineage commitment in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  7. Quantification of GPCR internalization by single-molecule microscopy in living cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serge, A.; Keijzer, S. de; Hemert, F. Van; Hickman, M.R.; Hereld, D.; Spaink, H.P.; Schmidt, T.; Snaar-Jagalska, B.E.

    2011-01-01

    Receptor internalization upon ligand stimulation is a key component of a cell's response and allows a cell to correctly sense its environment. Novel fluorescent methods have enabled the direct visualization of the agonist-stimulated G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) trafficking in living cells. How

  8. Dissecting the Factors Affecting the Fluorescence Stability of Quantum Dots in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Shu-Lin; Hu, Yuan-Jun; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Hu, Bin; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2016-04-06

    Labeling and imaging of live cells with quantum dots (QDs) has attracted great attention in the biomedical field over the past two decades. Maintenance of the fluorescence of QDs in a biological environment is crucial for performing long-term cell tracking to investigate the proliferation and functional evolution of cells. The cell-penetrating peptide transactivator of transcription (TAT) is a well-studied peptide to efficiently enhance the transmembrane delivery. Here, we used TAT peptide-conjugated QDs (TAT-QDs) as a model system to examine the fluorescence stability of QDs in live cells. By confocal microscopy, we found that TAT-QDs were internalized into cells by endocytosis, and transported into the cytoplasm via the mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and lysosomes. More importantly, the fluorescence of TAT-QDs in live cells was decreased mainly by cell proliferation, and the low pH value in the lysosomes could also lower the fluorescence intensity of intracellular QDs. Quantitative analysis of the amount of QDs in the extracellular region and whole cells indicated that the exocytosis was not the primary cause of fluorescence decay of intracellular QDs. This work facilitates a better understanding of the fluorescence stability of QDs for cell imaging and long-term tracking in live cells. Also, it provides insights into the utility of TAT for transmembrane transportation, and the preparation and modification of QDs for cell imaging and tracking.

  9. A simple optical fiber device for quantitative fluorescence microscopy of single living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graft, van Marja; Oosterhuis, Bernard; Werf, van der Kees O.; Grooth, de Bart G.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    simple and relatively inexpensive system is described for obtaining quantitative fluorescence measurements on single living cells loaded with a fluorescent probe to study cell physiological processes. The light emitted from the fluorescent cells is captured by and transported through an optical fibe

  10. [The dynamics of the family that lives with and takes care of an elderly dependent relative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro, Hugo; Lopes, Manuel

    2010-03-01

    Constant depletion of some functional capacities and an increasing vulnerability are associated with the ageing process. Eventually, the individual becomes dependent on someone and the family is the main supportive institution. In view of this situation, one question guided our study: What is the relation between the family dynamics and to live with and take care of an elderly dependent relative? Our purpose is to analyse how the care provided by the family works, relating the family dynamics with the level of dependency of that relative and the age of the caregivers. We developed a related and transversal study, with an intentionally sample composed by 80 families and 143 caregivers. An evaluation scale was used to measure the dependency level of the elderly anda family adaptability and cohesion evaluation scale (FACES III). We concluded that the elderly level of dependency does not change the cohesion and adaptability of the family. Nonetheless, we also observed that the age of the caregiver alters the family dynamics, what can lead to the development of a pathological picture.

  11. Spatial stochastic dynamics enable robust cell polarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Lawson

    Full Text Available Although cell polarity is an essential feature of living cells, it is far from being well-understood. Using a combination of computational modeling and biological experiments we closely examine an important prototype of cell polarity: the pheromone-induced formation of the yeast polarisome. Focusing on the role of noise and spatial heterogeneity, we develop and investigate two mechanistic spatial models of polarisome formation, one deterministic and the other stochastic, and compare the contrasting predictions of these two models against experimental phenotypes of wild-type and mutant cells. We find that the stochastic model can more robustly reproduce two fundamental characteristics observed in wild-type cells: a highly polarized phenotype via a mechanism that we refer to as spatial stochastic amplification, and the ability of the polarisome to track a moving pheromone input. Moreover, we find that only the stochastic model can simultaneously reproduce these characteristics of the wild-type phenotype and the multi-polarisome phenotype of a deletion mutant of the scaffolding protein Spa2. Significantly, our analysis also demonstrates that higher levels of stochastic noise results in increased robustness of polarization to parameter variation. Furthermore, our work suggests a novel role for a polarisome protein in the stabilization of actin cables. These findings elucidate the intricate role of spatial stochastic effects in cell polarity, giving support to a cellular model where noise and spatial heterogeneity combine to achieve robust biological function.

  12. A nanobiosensor for dynamic single cell analysis during microvascular self-organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Sun, J; Zhang, D D; Wong, P K

    2016-10-14

    The formation of microvascular networks plays essential roles in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Nevertheless, the self-organization mechanisms underlying the dynamic morphogenic process are poorly understood due to a paucity of effective tools for mapping the spatiotemporal dynamics of single cell behaviors. By establishing a single cell nanobiosensor along with live cell imaging, we perform dynamic single cell analysis of the morphology, displacement, and gene expression during microvascular self-organization. Dynamic single cell analysis reveals that endothelial cells self-organize into subpopulations with specialized phenotypes to form microvascular networks and identifies the involvement of Notch1-Dll4 signaling in regulating the cell subpopulations. The cell phenotype correlates with the initial Dll4 mRNA expression level and each subpopulation displays a unique dynamic Dll4 mRNA expression profile. Pharmacological perturbations and RNA interference of Notch1-Dll4 signaling modulate the cell subpopulations and modify the morphology of the microvascular network. Taken together, a nanobiosensor enables a dynamic single cell analysis approach underscoring the importance of Notch1-Dll4 signaling in microvascular self-organization.

  13. Atomic force microscopy stiffness tomography on living Arabidopsis thaliana cells reveals the mechanical properties of surface and deep cell-wall layers during growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radotić, Ksenija; Roduit, Charles; Simonović, Jasna; Hornitschek, Patricia; Fankhauser, Christian; Mutavdžić, Dragosav; Steinbach, Gabor; Dietler, Giovanni; Kasas, Sandor

    2012-08-08

    Cell-wall mechanical properties play a key role in the growth and the protection of plants. However, little is known about genuine wall mechanical properties and their growth-related dynamics at subcellular resolution and in living cells. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) stiffness tomography to explore stiffness distribution in the cell wall of suspension-cultured Arabidopsis thaliana as a model of primary, growing cell wall. For the first time that we know of, this new imaging technique was performed on living single cells of a higher plant, permitting monitoring of the stiffness distribution in cell-wall layers as a function of the depth and its evolution during the different growth phases. The mechanical measurements were correlated with changes in the composition of the cell wall, which were revealed by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In the beginning and end of cell growth, the average stiffness of the cell wall was low and the wall was mechanically homogenous, whereas in the exponential growth phase, the average wall stiffness increased, with increasing heterogeneity. In this phase, the difference between the superficial and deep wall stiffness was highest. FTIR spectra revealed a relative increase in the polysaccharide/lignin content.

  14. Dynamic measurements of flowing cells labeled by gold nanoparticles using full-field photothermal interferometric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turko, Nir A.; Roitshtain, Darina; Blum, Omry; Kemper, Björn; Shaked, Natan T.

    2017-06-01

    We present highly dynamic photothermal interferometric phase microscopy for quantitative, selective contrast imaging of live cells during flow. Gold nanoparticles can be biofunctionalized to bind to specific cells, and stimulated for local temperature increase due to plasmon resonance, causing a rapid change of the optical phase. These phase changes can be recorded by interferometric phase microscopy and analyzed to form an image of the binding sites of the nanoparticles in the cells, gaining molecular specificity. Since the nanoparticle excitation frequency might overlap with the sample dynamics frequencies, photothermal phase imaging was performed on stationary or slowly dynamic samples. Furthermore, the computational analysis of the photothermal signals is time consuming. This makes photothermal imaging unsuitable for applications requiring dynamic imaging or real-time analysis, such as analyzing and sorting cells during fast flow. To overcome these drawbacks, we utilized an external interferometric module and developed new algorithms, based on discrete Fourier transform variants, enabling fast analysis of photothermal signals in highly dynamic live cells. Due to the self-interference module, the cells are imaged with and without excitation in video-rate, effectively increasing signal-to-noise ratio. Our approach holds potential for using photothermal cell imaging and depletion in flow cytometry.

  15. A simple way to identify non-viable cells within living plant tissue using confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truernit Elisabeth

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cell death is a normal process during plant development. Mutant plants may exhibit misregulation of this process, which can lead to severe growth defects. Simple ways of visualising cell death in living plant tissues can aid the study of plant development and physiology. Results Spectral variants of the fluorescent SYTOX dyes were tested for their usefulness for the detection of non-viable cells within plant embryos and roots using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The dyes were selective for non-viable cells and showed very little background staining in living cells. Simultaneous detection of SYTOX dye and fluorescent protein (e.g. GFP fluorescence was possible. Conclusion The fluorescent SYTOX dyes are useful for an easy and quick first assay of plant cell viability in living plant samples using fluorescence and confocal laser-scanning microscopy.

  16. Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel microstructures encapsulating living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Won-Gun; Revzin, Alexander; Pishko, Michael V.

    2002-01-01

    We present an easy and effective method for the encapsulation of cells inside PEG-based hydrogel microstructures fabricated using photolithography. High-density arrays of three-dimensional microstructures were created on substrates using this method. Mammalian cells were encapsulated in cylindrical hydrogel microstructures of 600 and 50 micrometers in diameter or in cubic hydrogel structures in microfluidic channels. Reducing lateral dimension of the individual hydrogel microstructure to 50 micrometers allowed us to isolate 1-3 cells per microstructure. Viability assays demonstrated that cells remained viable inside these hydrogels after encapsulation for up to 7 days.

  17. Modeling cell dynamics under mobile phone radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minelli, Tullio Antonio; Balduzzo, Maurizio; Milone, Francesco Ferro; Nofrate, Valentina

    2007-04-01

    Perturbations by pulse-modulated microwave radiation from GSM mobile phones on neuron cell membrane gating and calcium oscillations have been suggested as a possible mechanism underlying activation of brain states and electroencephalographic epiphenomena. As the employ of UMTS phones seems to reveal other symptoms, a unified phenomenological framework is needed. In order to explain possible effects of mobile phone radiation on cell oscillations, GSM and UMTS low-frequency envelopes have been detected, recorded and used as input in cell models. Dynamical systems endowed with contiguous regular and chaotic regimes suitable to produce stochastic resonance can both account for the perturbation of the neuro-electrical activity and even for the low intensity of the signal perceived by high sensitive subjects. Neuron models of this kind can be employed as a reductionist hint for the mentioned phenomenology. The Hindmarsh-Rose model exhibits frequency enhancement and regularization phenomena induced by weak GSM and UMTS. More realistic simulations of cell membrane gating and calcium oscillations have been performed with the help of an adaptation of the Chay-Keizer dynamical system. This scheme can explain the suspected subjective sensitivity to mobile phone signals under the thermal threshold, in terms of cell calcium regularity mechanisms. Concerning the two kinds of emission, the stronger occupation of the ELF band of last generation UMTS phones is compensated by lower power emitted.

  18. [Expression of CD48 as a live marker to distinguish division of hematopoietic stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Lu-Yun; Pang, Ya-Kun; Dong, Fang; Ji, Qing; Xu, Jing; Cheng, Tao; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Gao, Ying-Dai

    2014-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are capable of self-renewal or differentiation when they divide. Three types of cell divisions exist. A dividing stem cell may generate 2 new stem cells (symmetrical renewal division), or 2 differentiating cells (symmetrical differentiation division), or 1 cell of each type (asymmetrical division). This study was aimed to explore an efficient and stable method to distinguish the way of cell division in hematopoietic stem cells. Previous studies showed that the distribution of Numb in a cell could be used to distinguish the type of cell division in various kinds of cells. Therefore, the distribution of Numb protein was detected by immunofluorescence in mitotic CD48(-)CD150(+)LSK cells of mice exploring the relationship between Numb protein and centrosomes. Since CD48 positive marks the HSC that have lost the ability to reconstitute the blood system in mice, CD48 marker could be used to distinguish cell fate decision between self-renewal and differentiation as a living marker. In this study, the CD48(-)CD150(+)LSK cells were sorted from bone marrow cells of mice and the cells were directly labeled with Alexa Fluor (AF) 488-conjugated anti-CD48 antibody in living cultures. After 3 days, the percentage of AF488(+) cells was evaluated under microscope and by FACS. Then colony forming cell assay (CFC) was performed and the ability of cell proliferation were compared between AF488(+) and AF488(-) cells. The results showed that Numb could be used to distinguish different cell division types of hematopoietic stem cells, which was symmetrically or asymmetrically segregated in mitotic CD48(-)CD150(+)LSK cells. The self-labeled fluorochrome could be detected both by FACS as well as microscope. There were about 40% AF488(+) cells after 3 day-cultures in medium titrated with self-labeled AF 488-conjugated anti-CD48 antibody, and the results were consistent between confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis. The colony forming ability of

  19. Live Cell Discovery of Microbial Vitamin Transport and Enzyme-Cofactor Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Lindsey N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Landorf, Elizabeth V.; Konopka, Allan; Collart, Frank; Lipton, Mary S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2016-02-02

    The rapid completion of microbial genomes is inducing a conundrum in functional gene discovery. Novel methods are critically needed to shorten the gap between characterizing a microbial genome and experimentally validating bioinformatically-predicted functions. Of particular importance are transport mechanisms, used to shuttle nutrients and metabolites across cell mem-branes, such as B vitamins, which are indispensable to metabolic reactions crucial to the survival of diverse microbes ranging from members of environmental microbial communities to human pathogens. Methods to accurately assign function and specificity for a wide range of experimentally unidentified and/or predicted membrane-embedded transport proteins, and characterization of intra-cellular enzyme-cofactor/nutrient associations are needed to enable a significantly improved understanding of microbial biochemis-try and physiology, how microbes associate with others, and how they sense and respond to environmental perturbations. Chemical probes derived from B vitamins B1, B2, and B7 have allowed us to experimentally address the aforementioned needs by identifying B vitamin transporters and intracellular protein-cofactor associations through live cell labeling of the filamentous anoxygenic pho-toheterotroph, Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl, known for both B vitamin biosynthesis and environmental salvage. Our probes provide a unique opportunity to directly link cellular activity and protein function back to ecosystem and/or host dynamics by iden-tifying B vitamin transport and disposition mechanisms required for survival.

  20. Two-photon fluorescent sensor for K+ imaging in live cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Binglin; Yue, Xiling; Kim, Bosung; Belfield, Kevin D.

    2016-03-01

    It is difficult to overstate the physiological importance of potassium for life as its indispensable roles in a variety of biological processes are widely known. As a result, efficient methods for determining physiological levels of potassium are of paramount importance. Despite this, relatively few K+ fluorescence sensors have been reported, with only one being commercially available. A new two-photon excited fluorescent K+ sensor is reported. The sensor is comprised of three moieties, a highly selective K+ chelator as the K+ recognition unit, a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivative modified with phenylethynyl groups as the fluorophore, and two polyethylene glycol chains to afford water solubility. The sensor displays very high selectivity (physiological metal cations. Upon binding K+, the sensor switches from non-fluorescent to highly fluorescent, emitting red to near-IR (NIR) fluorescence. The sensor exhibited a good two-photon absorption cross section, 500 GM at 940 nm. Moreover, it is not sensitive to pH in the physiological pH range. Time-dependent cell imaging studies via both one- and two-photon fluorescence microscopy demonstrate that the sensor is suitable for dynamic K+ sensing in living cells.

  1. Live cell discovery of microbial vitamin transport and enzyme-cofactor interactions by chemoproteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Lindsey N; Koech, Phillip K; Plymale, Andrew E; Landorf, Elizabeth V; Konopka, Allan; Collart, Frank R.; Lipton, Mary S; Romine, Margaret F; Wright, Aaron T

    2016-02-01

    The rapid completion of microbial genomes is inducing a conundrum in functional gene discovery. Novel methods are critically needed to shorten the gap between characterizing a microbial genome and experimentally validating bioinformatically-predicted functions. Of particular importance are transport mechanisms, used to shuttle nutrients and metabolites across cell mem-branes, such as B vitamins, which are indispensable to metabolic reactions crucial to the survival of diverse microbes ranging from members of environmental microbial communities to human pathogens. Methods to accurately assign function and specificity for a wide range of experimentally unidentified and/or predicted membrane-embedded transport proteins, and characterization of intra-cellular enzyme-cofactor/nutrient associations are needed to enable a significantly improved understanding of microbial biochemis-try and physiology, how microbes associate with others, and how they sense and respond to environmental perturbations. Chemical probes derived from B vitamins B1, B2, and B7 have allowed us to experimentally address the aforementioned needs by identifying B vitamin transporters and intracellular protein-cofactor associations through live cell labeling of the filamentous anoxygenic pho-toheterotroph, Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl, known for both B vitamin biosynthesis and environmental salvage. Our probes provide a unique opportunity to directly link cellular activity and protein function back to ecosystem and/or host dynamics by iden-tifying B vitamin transport and disposition mechanisms required for survival.

  2. Real-time imaging of microparticles and living cells with CMOS nanocapacitor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde, C.; Pittino, F.; Verhoeven, H. A.; Lemay, S. G.; Selmi, L.; Jongsma, M. A.; Widdershoven, F. P.

    2015-09-01

    Platforms that offer massively parallel, label-free biosensing can, in principle, be created by combining all-electrical detection with low-cost integrated circuits. Examples include field-effect transistor arrays, which are used for mapping neuronal signals and sequencing DNA. Despite these successes, however, bioelectronics has so far failed to deliver a broadly applicable biosensing platform. This is due, in part, to the fact that d.c. or low-frequency signals cannot be used to probe beyond the electrical double layer formed by screening salt ions, which means that under physiological conditions the sensing of a target analyte located even a short distance from the sensor (∼1 nm) is severely hampered. Here, we show that high-frequency impedance spectroscopy can be used to detect and image microparticles and living cells under physiological salt conditions. Our assay employs a large-scale, high-density array of nanoelectrodes integrated with CMOS electronics on a single chip and the sensor response depends on the electrical properties of the analyte, allowing impedance-based fingerprinting. With our platform, we image the dynamic attachment and micromotion of BEAS, THP1 and MCF7 cancer cell lines in real time at submicrometre resolution in growth medium, demonstrating the potential of the platform for label/tracer-free high-throughput screening of anti-tumour drug candidates.

  3. Novel insights into host-fungal pathogen interactions derived from live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Judith; Gow, Neil A R; Erwig, Lars-Peter

    2015-03-01

    The theoretical physicist and Nobel laureate Richard Feynman outlined in his 1959 lecture, "There's plenty of room at the bottom", the enormous possibility of producing and visualising things at smaller scales. The advent of advanced scanning and transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution microscopy has begun to open the door to visualise host-pathogen interactions at smaller scales, and spinning disc confocal and two-photon microscopy has improved our ability to study these events in real time in three dimensions. The aim of this review is to illustrate some of the advances in understanding host-fungal interactions that have been made in recent years in particular those relating to the interactions of live fungal pathogens with phagocytes. Dynamic imaging of host-pathogen interactions has recently revealed novel detail and unsuspected mechanistic insights, facilitating the dissection of the phagocytic process into its component parts. Here, we will highlight advances in our knowledge of host-fungal pathogen interactions, including the specific effects of fungal cell viability, cell wall composition and morphogenesis on the phagocytic process and try to define the relative contributions of neutrophils and macrophages to the clearance of fungal pathogens in vitro and the infected host.

  4. Diffusion wave and signal transduction in biological live cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Tian You

    2012-01-01

    Transduction of mechanical stimuli into biochemical signals is a fundamental subject for cell physics. In the experiments of FRET signal in cells a wave propagation in nanoscope was observed. We here develop a diffusion wave concept and try to give an explanation to the experimental observation. The theoretical prediction is in good agreement to result of the experiment.

  5. Question 7: Construction of a Semi-Synthetic Minimal Cell: A Model for Early Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtas, Giovanni

    2007-10-01

    Using a Synthetic Biology approach we are building a semi-synthetic minimal cell. This represents an exercise to shape a minimal-cell model system recalling the simplicity of early living cells in early evolution. We have recently introduced into liposome compartments a minimal set of enzymes named “Puresystem” (PS) synthesizing EGFP proteins. To establish reproduction of the shell compartment with a minimal set of genes we have cloned the genes for the Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS) type I enzymes. These FAS genes introduced into liposomes, translated into FAS enzymes by PS and in the presence of precursors produce fatty acids. The resulting release of fatty acid molecules within liposome vesicles should promote vesicle growth and reproduction. The core reproduction of a minimal cell corresponding to the replication of the minimal genome will require a few genes for the DNA replication and the PS, and a minimum set of genes for the synthesis of t-RNAs. In future the reconstruction of a minimal ribosome will bring the number of genes for ribosomal proteins from 54 of an existing minimal genome down to 30 20 genes. A Synthetic Biology approach could bring the number of essential genes for a minimal cell down to 100 or less.

  6. Proteorhodopsin in living color: diversity of spectral properties within living bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Bradley R; Du, Mai; Jensen, Rasmus B

    2003-12-03

    Proteorhodopsin is a family of over 50 proteins that provide phototrophic capability to marine bacteria by acting as light-powered proton pumps. The potential importance of proteorhodopsin to global ocean ecosystems and the possible applications of proteorhodopsin in optical data storage and optical signal processing have spurred diverse research in this new family of proteins. We show that proteorhodopsin expressed in Escherichia coli is functional and properly inserted in the membrane. At high expression levels, it appears to self-associate. We present a method for determining spectral properties of proteorhodopsin in intact E. coli cells that matches results obtained with detergent-solubilized, purified proteins. Using this method, we observe distinctly different spectra for protonated and deprotonated forms of 21 natural proteorhodopsin proteins in intact E. coli cells. Upon protonation, the wavelength maxima red shifts between 13 and 53 nm. We find that pKa values between 7.1 and 8.5 describe the pH-dependent spectral shift for all of the 21 natural variants of proteorhodopsin. The wavelength maxima of the deprotonated forms of the 21 natural proteorhodopsins cluster in two sequence-related groups: blue proteorhodopsins (B-PR) and green proteorhodopsins (G-PR). The site-directed substitution Leu105Gln in Bac31A8 proteorhodopsin shifts this G-PR's wavelength maximum to a wavelength maximum the same as that of the B-PR Hot75m1 proteorhodopsin. The site-directed substitution Gln107Leu in Hot75m1 proteorhodopsin shifts this B-PR's wavelength maximum to a wavelength maximum as that of Bac31A8 proteorhodopsin.

  7. Optical micromanipulation of nanoparticles and cells inside living zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Patrick Lie; Fenaroli, Federico; Evensen, Lasse; Griffiths, Gareth; Koster, Gerbrand

    2016-03-01

    Regulation of biological processes is often based on physical interactions between cells and their microenvironment. To unravel how and where interactions occur, micromanipulation methods can be used that offer high-precision control over the duration, position and magnitude of interactions. However, lacking an in vivo system, micromanipulation has generally been done with cells in vitro, which may not reflect the complex in vivo situation inside multicellular organisms. Here using optical tweezers we demonstrate micromanipulation throughout the transparent zebrafish embryo. We show that different cells, as well as injected nanoparticles and bacteria can be trapped and that adhesion properties and membrane deformation of endothelium and macrophages can be analysed. This non-invasive micromanipulation inside a whole-organism gives direct insights into cell interactions that are not accessible using existing approaches. Potential applications include screening of nanoparticle-cell interactions for cancer therapy or tissue invasion studies in cancer and infection biology.

  8. Fast, label-free super-resolution live-cell imaging using rotating coherent scattering (ROCS) microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jünger, Felix; Olshausen, Philipp V.; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Living cells are highly dynamic systems with cellular structures being often below the optical resolution limit. Super-resolution microscopes, usually based on fluorescence cell labelling, are usually too slow to resolve small, dynamic structures. We present a label-free microscopy technique, which can generate thousands of super-resolved, high contrast images at a frame rate of 100 Hertz and without any post-processing. The technique is based on oblique sample illumination with coherent light, an approach believed to be not applicable in life sciences because of too many interference artefacts. However, by circulating an incident laser beam by 360° during one image acquisition, relevant image information is amplified. By combining total internal reflection illumination with dark-field detection, structures as small as 150 nm become separable through local destructive interferences. The technique images local changes in refractive index through scattered laser light and is applied to living mouse macrophages and helical bacteria revealing unexpected dynamic processes.

  9. Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell staining and sorting with the live-cell fluorescence imaging probe CDy1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nam-Young; Yun, Seong-Wook; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Park, Sung-Jin; Chang, Young-Tae

    2011-06-30

    Detecting and isolating specific types of cells is crucial to understanding a variety of biological processes, including development, aging, regeneration and pathogenesis; this understanding, in turn, allows the use of cells for therapeutic purposes, for which stem cells have emerged recently as invaluable materials. The current methods of isolation and characterization of stem cells depend on cell morphology in culture or on immunostaining of specific markers. These methods are, however, time consuming and involve the use of antibodies that may often make the cells unsuitable for further study. We recently developed a fluorescent small molecule named CDy1 (compound of designation yellow 1) that selectively stains live embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This protocol describes detailed procedures for staining ESC and iPSC in live conditions and for fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of ESC using CDy1. Cell staining, image acquisition and FACS can be done within 6 h.

  10. Design And Efficient Deployment Of Honeypot And Dynamic Rule Based Live Network Intrusion Collaborative System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Prasad.B

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The continuously emerging, operationally and managerially independent, geographically distributedcomputer networks deployable in an evolutionarily manner have created greater challenges in securingthem. Several research works and experiments have convinced the security expert that Network IntrusionDetection Systems (NIDS or Network Intrusion Prevention Systems (NIPS alone are not capable ofsecuring the Computer Networks from internal and external threats completely. In this paper we presentthe design of Intrusion Collaborative System which is a combination of NIDS,NIPS, Honeypots, softwaretools like nmap, iptables etc. Our Design is tested against existing attacks based on Snort Rules andseveral customized DDOS , remote and guest attacks. Dynamic rules are generated during every unusualbehavior that helps Intrusion Collaborative System to continuously learn about new attacks. Also aformal approach to deploy Live Intrusion Collaboration Systems based on System of Systems Concept isProposed.

  11. Stretchable living materials and devices with hydrogel-elastomer hybrids hosting programmed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyue; Tang, Tzu-Chieh; Tham, Eléonore; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Lin, Shaoting; Lu, Timothy K; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2017-02-28

    Living systems, such as bacteria, yeasts, and mammalian cells, can be genetically programmed with synthetic circuits that execute sensing, computing, memory, and response functions. Integrating these functional living components into materials and devices will provide powerful tools for scientific research and enable new technological applications. However, it has been a grand challenge to maintain the viability, functionality, and safety of living components in freestanding materials and devices, which frequently undergo deformations during applications. Here, we report the design of a set of living materials and devices based on stretchable, robust, and biocompatible hydrogel-elastomer hybrids that host various types of genetically engineered bacterial cells. The hydrogel provides sustainable supplies of water and nutrients, and the elastomer is air-permeable, maintaining long-term viability and functionality of the encapsulated cells. Communication between different bacterial strains and with the environment is achieved via diffusion of molecules in the hydrogel. The high stretchability and robustness of the hydrogel-elastomer hybrids prevent leakage of cells from the living materials and devices, even under large deformations. We show functions and applications of stretchable living sensors that are responsive to multiple chemicals in a variety of form factors, including skin patches and gloves-based sensors. We further develop a quantitative model that couples transportation of signaling molecules and cellular response to aid the design of future living materials and devices.

  12. Stretchable living materials and devices with hydrogel–elastomer hybrids hosting programmed cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyue; Tang, Tzu-Chieh; Tham, Eléonore; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Lin, Shaoting; Lu, Timothy K.; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2017-01-01

    Living systems, such as bacteria, yeasts, and mammalian cells, can be genetically programmed with synthetic circuits that execute sensing, computing, memory, and response functions. Integrating these functional living components into materials and devices will provide powerful tools for scientific research and enable new technological applications. However, it has been a grand challenge to maintain the viability, functionality, and safety of living components in freestanding materials and devices, which frequently undergo deformations during applications. Here, we report the design of a set of living materials and devices based on stretchable, robust, and biocompatible hydrogel–elastomer hybrids that host various types of genetically engineered bacterial cells. The hydrogel provides sustainable supplies of water and nutrients, and the elastomer is air-permeable, maintaining long-term viability and functionality of the encapsulated cells. Communication between different bacterial strains and with the environment is achieved via diffusion of molecules in the hydrogel. The high stretchability and robustness of the hydrogel–elastomer hybrids prevent leakage of cells from the living materials and devices, even under large deformations. We show functions and applications of stretchable living sensors that are responsive to multiple chemicals in a variety of form factors, including skin patches and gloves-based sensors. We further develop a quantitative model that couples transportation of signaling molecules and cellular response to aid the design of future living materials and devices. PMID:28202725

  13. mRNA detection in living cell using phosphorothioate-modified molecular beacon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG HongXing; YANG XiaoHai; WANG KeMin; TAN WeiHong; LI Wei

    2009-01-01

    In this study, GFP mRNA in COS-7 cell and GFP-transfected COS-7 cell was detected in real time using phosphorothioate-modified molecular beacon based on living cell imaging method. Results showed that phosphorothioate-modified molecular beacon still kept the advantages of molecular beacon, such as, excellent selectivity, high sensitivity, and no separation detection. In addition, this modification could significantly increase the nuclease resistance of molecular beacon. Phosphorothioate-modified molecular beacon can efficiently reduce the false positive signal and improve the accuracy of living cell mRNA detection.

  14. BTeam, a Novel BRET-based Biosensor for the Accurate Quantification of ATP Concentration within Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tomoki; Kakizuka, Akira; Imamura, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    ATP levels may represent fundamental health conditions of cells. However, precise measurement of intracellular ATP levels in living cells is hindered by the lack of suitable methodologies. Here, we developed a novel ATP biosensor termed “BTeam”. BTeam comprises a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), the ATP binding domain of the ε subunit of the bacterial ATP synthase, and an ATP-nonconsuming luciferase (NLuc). To attain emission, BTeam simply required NLuc substrate. BTeam showed elevated bioluminescence resonance energy transfer efficiency upon ATP binding, resulted in the emission spectra changes correlating with ATP concentrations. By using values of YFP/NLuc emission ratio to represent ATP levels, BTeam achieved steady signal outputs even though emission intensities were altered. With this biosensor, we succeeded in the accurate quantification of intracellular ATP concentrations of a population of living cells, as demonstrated by detecting the slight distribution in the cytosol (3.7–4.1 mM) and mitochondrial matrix (2.4–2.7 mM) within some cultured cell lines. Furthermore, BTeam allowed continuous tracing of cytosolic ATP levels of the same cells, as well as bioluminescent imaging of cytosolic ATP dynamics within individual cells. This simple and accurate technique should be an effective method for quantitative measurement of intracellular ATP concentrations. PMID:28000761

  15. AFM-based study of fullerenol (C60(OH)24)-induced changes of elasticity in living SMCC-7721 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Zuobin; Wang, Xinyue

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the alterations of the morphology and biomechanical properties of living SMCC-7721 cancer cells treated with fullerenol (C60(OH)24) for 24, 48, and 72h were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Comparative analyses show that the elastic moduli of the SMCC-7721 cells exposed to fullerenol decrease significantly with the increase of the treatment periods. Furthermore, in different phases of the treatment, a global decrease in elasticity is accompanied by cellular morphological changes, and the time-dependent effect of the fullerenol can be observed using AFM and optical microscope. In addition, as the treatment duration increases, the indentation force and depth penetrated into the cell membrane by the AFM tip are in a declining trend. The reduction in the stiffness of the cells exposed to fullerenol could be associated with the disruption of the cellular cytoskeleton network. The investigation indicates that the elastic modulus of single living cells can be a useful biomarker to evaluate the effects of fullerenol or other anticancer agents on the cells and reveal instructive information for cellular dynamic behaviors.

  16. Robot Comedy Lab: Experimenting with the Social Dynamics of Live Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleomenis eKatevas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The success of live comedy depends on a performer's ability to 'work' an audience. Ethnographic studies suggest that this involves the co-ordinated use of subtle social signals such as body orientation, gesture, gaze by both performers and audience members. Robots provide a unique opportunity to test the effects of these signals experimentally. Using a life-size humanoid robot, programmed to perform a stand-up comedy routine, we manipulated the robot's patterns of gesture and gaze and examined their effects on the real-time responses of a live audience. The strength and type of responses were captured using SHOREtm computer vision analytics. The results highlight the complex, reciprocal social dynamics of performer and audience behavior. People respond more positively when the robot looks at them, negatively when it looks away and that different performative gestures elicit systematically different patterns of audience response. This demonstrates that the responses of individual audience members depend on the specific interaction they're having with the performer. This work provides insights into how to design more effective, more socially engaging, forms of robot interaction that can be used in a variety of service contexts.

  17. Robot Comedy Lab: experimenting with the social dynamics of live performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katevas, Kleomenis; Healey, Patrick G T; Harris, Matthew Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The success of live comedy depends on a performer's ability to "work" an audience. Ethnographic studies suggest that this involves the co-ordinated use of subtle social signals such as body orientation, gesture, gaze by both performers and audience members. Robots provide a unique opportunity to test the effects of these signals experimentally. Using a life-size humanoid robot, programmed to perform a stand-up comedy routine, we manipulated the robot's patterns of gesture and gaze and examined their effects on the real-time responses of a live audience. The strength and type of responses were captured using SHORE™computer vision analytics. The results highlight the complex, reciprocal social dynamics of performer and audience behavior. People respond more positively when the robot looks at them, negatively when it looks away and performative gestures also contribute to different patterns of audience response. This demonstrates how the responses of individual audience members depend on the specific interaction they're having with the performer. This work provides insights into how to design more effective, more socially engaging forms of robot interaction that can be used in a variety of service contexts.

  18. Subcellular metabolic contrast in living tissue using dynamic full field OCT (D-FFOCT) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelian, Clement; Harms, Fabrice; Thouvenin, Olivier; Boccara, Claude A.

    2016-03-01

    Cells shape or density is an important marker of tissues pathology. However, individual cells are difficult to observe in thick tissues frequently presenting highly scattering structures such as collagen fibers. Endogenous techniques struggle to image cells in these conditions. Moreover, exogenous contrast agents like dyes, fluorophores or nanoparticles cannot always be used, especially if non-invasive imaging is required. Scatterers motion happening down to the millisecond scale, much faster than the fix and highly scattering structures (global motion of the tissue), allowed us to develop a new approach based on the time dependence of the FF-OCT signals. This method reveals hidden cells after a spatiotemporal analysis based on singular value decomposition and wavelet analysis concepts. It does also give us access to local dynamics of imaged scatterers. This dynamic information is linked with the local metabolic activity that drives these scatterers. Our technique can explore subcellular scales with micrometric resolution and dynamics ranging from the millisecond to seconds. By this mean we studied a wide range of tissues, animal and human in both normal and pathological conditions (cancer, ischemia, osmotic shock…) in different organs such as liver, kidney, and brain among others. Different cells, undetectable with FF-OCT, were identified (erythrocytes, hepatocytes…). Different scatterer clusters express different characteristic times and thus can be related to different mechanisms that we identify with metabolic functions. We are confident that the D-FFOCT, by accessing to a new spatiotemporal metabolic contrast, will be a leading technique on tissue imaging and could lead to better medical diagnosis.

  19. Chitosan-based nanocoatings for hypothermic storage of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulwan, Maria; Antosiak-Iwańska, Magdalena; Godlewska, Ewa; Granicka, Ludomira; Zapotoczny, Szczepan; Nowakowska, Maria

    2013-11-01

    The formation of ultrathin chitosan-based nanocoating on HL-60 model cells and their protective function in hypothermic storage are presented. HL-60 cells are encapsulated in ultrathin shells by adsorbing cationic and anionic chitosan derivatives in a stepwise, layer-by-layer, procedure carried out in an aqueous medium under mild conditions. The chitosan-based films are also deposited on model lipid bilayer and the interactions are studied using ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy. The cells covered with the chitosan-based films and stored at 4 °C for 24 h express viability comparable to that of the control sample incubated at 37 °C, while the unprotected cells stored under the same conditions do not show viability. It is shown that the chitosan-based shell protects HL-60 cells against damaging effect of hypothermic storage. Such nanocoatings provide protection, mechanical stability, and support the cell membrane, while ensuring penetration of small molecules such as nutrients/gases what is essential for cell viability.

  20. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickney, Zachary; Losacco, Joseph; McDevitt, Sophie; Zhang, Zhiwen; Lu, Biao

    2016-03-25

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell-cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy.

  1. Single-cell census of mechanosensitive channels in living bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Bialecka-Fornal

    Full Text Available Bacteria are subjected to a host of different environmental stresses. One such insult occurs when cells encounter changes in the osmolarity of the surrounding media resulting in an osmotic shock. In recent years, a great deal has been learned about mechanosensitive (MS channels which are thought to provide osmoprotection in these circumstances by opening emergency release valves in response to membrane tension. However, even the most elementary physiological parameters such as the number of MS channels per cell, how MS channel expression levels influence the physiological response of the cells, and how this mean number of channels varies from cell to cell remain unanswered. In this paper, we make a detailed quantitative study of the expression of the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL in different media and at various stages in the growth history of