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Sample records for dynamic kinetic resolution

  1. Dynamic kinetic resolution of biaryl atropisomers by chiral dialkylaminopyridine catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gaoyuan; Deng, Chao; Deng, Jun; Sibi, Mukund P

    2018-05-02

    The acylative dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) of configurationally unstable biaryl atropisomers is achieved by using newly developed chiral dialkylaminopyridine catalysts with fluxional chirality. Various types of biaryl substrates containing phenolic structures were subjected to the DKR to obtain a range of acylated biaryl products with enantiomeric ratios up to 90 : 10.

  2. Recent Advances in Dynamic Kinetic Resolution by Chiral Bifunctional (Thiourea- and Squaramide-Based Organocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The organocatalysis-based dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR process has proved to be a powerful strategy for the construction of chiral compounds. In this feature review, we summarized recent progress on the DKR process, which was promoted by chiral bifunctional (thiourea and squaramide catalysis via hydrogen-bonding interactions between substrates and catalysts. A wide range of asymmetric reactions involving DKR, such as asymmetric alcoholysis of azlactones, asymmetric Michael–Michael cascade reaction, and enantioselective selenocyclization, are reviewed and demonstrate the efficiency of this strategy. The (thiourea and squaramide catalysts with dual activation would be efficient for more unmet challenges in dynamic kinetic resolution.

  3. Recent Advances in Dynamic Kinetic Resolution by Chiral Bifunctional (Thio)urea- and Squaramide-Based Organocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pan; Hu, Xinquan; Dong, Xiu-Qin; Zhang, Xumu

    2016-10-14

    The organocatalysis-based dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) process has proved to be a powerful strategy for the construction of chiral compounds. In this feature review, we summarized recent progress on the DKR process, which was promoted by chiral bifunctional (thio)urea and squaramide catalysis via hydrogen-bonding interactions between substrates and catalysts. A wide range of asymmetric reactions involving DKR, such as asymmetric alcoholysis of azlactones, asymmetric Michael-Michael cascade reaction, and enantioselective selenocyclization, are reviewed and demonstrate the efficiency of this strategy. The (thio)urea and squaramide catalysts with dual activation would be efficient for more unmet challenges in dynamic kinetic resolution.

  4. Dual enzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution by Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and Candida antarctica lipase B

    KAUST Repository

    Karume, Ibrahim

    2016-10-04

    The immobilization of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (TeSADH) using sol–gel method enables its use to racemize enantiopure alcohols in organic media. Here, we report the racemization of enantiopure phenyl-ring-containing secondary alcohols using xerogel-immobilized W110A TeSADH in hexane rather than the aqueous medium required by the enzyme. We further showed that this racemization approach in organic solvent was compatible with Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB)-catalyzed kinetic resolution. This compatibility, therefore, allowed a dual enzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of racemic alcohols using CALB-catalyzed kinetic resolution and W110A TeSADH-catalyzed racemization of phenyl-ring-containing alcohols.

  5. High resolution kinetic beam schemes in generalized coordinates for ideal quantum gas dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yu-Hsin; Huang, J.C.; Yang, J.Y.

    2007-01-01

    A class of high resolution kinetic beam schemes in multiple space dimensions in general coordinates system for the ideal quantum gas is presented for the computation of quantum gas dynamical flows. The kinetic Boltzmann equation approach is adopted and the local equilibrium quantum statistics distribution is assumed. High-order accurate methods using essentially non-oscillatory interpolation concept are constructed. Computations of shock wave diffraction by a circular cylinder in an ideal quantum gas are conducted to illustrate the present method. The present method provides a viable means to explore various practical ideal quantum gas flows

  6. Kinetic energy spectra, vertical resolution and dissipation in high-resolution atmospheric simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skamarock, W. C.

    2017-12-01

    We have performed week-long full-physics simulations with the MPAS global model at 15 km cell spacing using vertical mesh spacings of 800, 400, 200 and 100 meters in the mid-troposphere through the mid-stratosphere. We find that the horizontal kinetic energy spectra in the upper troposphere and stratosphere does not converge with increasing vertical resolution until we reach 200 meter level spacing. Examination of the solutions indicates that significant inertia-gravity waves are not vertically resolved at the lower vertical resolutions. Diagnostics from the simulations indicate that the primary kinetic energy dissipation results from the vertical mixing within the PBL parameterization and from the gravity-wave drag parameterization, with smaller but significant contributions from damping in the vertical transport scheme and from the horizontal filters in the dynamical core. Most of the kinetic energy dissipation in the free atmosphere occurs within breaking mid-latitude baroclinic waves. We will briefly review these results and their implications for atmospheric model configuration and for atmospheric dynamics, specifically that related to the dynamics associated with the mesoscale kinetic energy spectrum.

  7. Merging Iron Catalysis and Biocatalysis-Iron Carbonyl Complexes as Efficient Hydrogen Autotransfer Catalysts in Dynamic Kinetic Resolutions

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama

    2016-09-29

    A dual catalytic iron/lipase system has been developed and applied in the dynamic kinetic resolution of benzylic and aliphatic secondary alcohols. A detailed study of the Knölker-type iron complexes demonstrated the hydrogen autotransfer of alcohols to proceed under mild reaction conditions and allowed the combination with the enzymatic resolution. Different racemic alcohols were efficiently converted to chiral acetates in good yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  8. Merging Iron Catalysis and Biocatalysis-Iron Carbonyl Complexes as Efficient Hydrogen Autotransfer Catalysts in Dynamic Kinetic Resolutions

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama; Alandini, Nurtalya; Rueping, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    A dual catalytic iron/lipase system has been developed and applied in the dynamic kinetic resolution of benzylic and aliphatic secondary alcohols. A detailed study of the Knölker-type iron complexes demonstrated the hydrogen autotransfer of alcohols to proceed under mild reaction conditions and allowed the combination with the enzymatic resolution. Different racemic alcohols were efficiently converted to chiral acetates in good yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  9. Stereoselective Preparation of N-Alkyl Dipeptide Analogues via Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of α-Halo Acyl Amino Esters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Eun Kyoung; Chang, Ji Yeon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Yong Tae; Park, Yong Sun

    2006-01-01

    We have shown that dynamic kinetic resolution of α-bromo and α-chloro amides in nucleophilic substitution reaction can be successfully applied towards the preparation of various N-terminal functionalized dipeptide analogues. The stereochemical aspects of the results showed that stereoselectivity depends critically on the structures of amine nucleophiles. This mild and practical method can be run on a multi-gram scale without any special precautions and should be applicable to stereoselective syntheses of various peptidomimetics. Extension of this synthetic methodology to dynamic resolution of N-(α-haloacetyl) peptides in the stereospecific nucleophilic substitution (S N 2) could be an attractive synthetic strategy for asymmetric syntheses of peptide analogues. Recently it has been shown from our group that the chiral information of adjacent amino acid residue is efficiently transferred to the new C-N bond formation at α-halo carbon center for asymmetric syntheses of di-, tri- and tetrapeptide analogues. The α-halo stereogenic center of undergoes rapid epimerization in the presence of diisopropylethylamine (DIEA) and tetrabutylammonium iodide (TBAI), and (αS) reacts with the nucleophile preferentially to provide the dipeptide analogue (αR). The mechanistic investigation showed that this is a case of dynamic kinetic resolution, in which the stereoselectivity is determined by the difference in the diastereomeric transition state energies for the reaction with the nucleophiles. Herein we describe our recent progress to extend the scope of the methodology to stereoselective preparation of N-terminal functionalized dipeptide analogues with various amine nucleophiles

  10. Large-scale ruthenium- and enzyme-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution of (rac-1-phenylethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bäckvall Jan-E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The scale-up of the ruthenium- and enzyme-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR of (rac-1-phenylethanol (2 is addressed. The immobilized lipase Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB was employed for the resolution, which shows high enantioselectivity in the transesterification. The ruthenium catalyst used, (η 5-C5Ph5RuCl(CO2 1, was shown to possess very high reactivity in the "in situ" redox racemization of 1-phenylethanol (2 in the presence of the immobilized enzyme, and could be used in 0.05 mol% with high efficiency. Commercially available isopropenyl acetate was employed as acylating agent in the lipase-catalyzed transesterifications, which makes the purification of the product very easy. In a successful large-scale DKR of 2, with 0.05 mol% of 1, (R-1-phenylethanol acetate (3 was obtained in 159 g (97% yield in excellent enantiomeric excess (99.8% ee.

  11. Development of dynamic kinetic resolution on large scale for (±-1-phenylethylamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Thalén

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB and racemization catalyst 4 were combined in the dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR of (±-1-phenylethylamine (1. Several reaction parameters have been investigated to modify the method for application on multigram scale. A comparison of isopropyl acetate and alkyl methoxyacetates as acyl donors was carried out. It was found that lower catalyst loadings could be used to obtain (R-2-methoxy-N-(1-phenylethylacetamide (3 in good yield and high ee when alkyl methoxyacetates were used as acyl donors compared to when isopropyl acetate was used as the acyl donor. The catalyst loading could be decreased to 1.25 mol % Ru-catalyst 4 and 10 mg CALB per mmol 1 when alkyl methoxyacetates were used as the acyl donor.

  12. Development of dynamic kinetic resolution on large scale for (±)-1-phenylethylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalén, Lisa K; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2010-09-13

    Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) and racemization catalyst 4 were combined in the dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) of (±)-1-phenylethylamine (1). Several reaction parameters have been investigated to modify the method for application on multigram scale. A comparison of isopropyl acetate and alkyl methoxyacetates as acyl donors was carried out. It was found that lower catalyst loadings could be used to obtain (R)-2-methoxy-N-(1-phenylethyl)acetamide (3) in good yield and high ee when alkyl methoxyacetates were used as acyl donors compared to when isopropyl acetate was used as the acyl donor. The catalyst loading could be decreased to 1.25 mol % Ru-catalyst 4 and 10 mg CALB per mmol 1 when alkyl methoxyacetates were used as the acyl donor.

  13. Kinetic and dynamic kinetic resolution of secondary alcohols with ionic-surfactant-coated Burkholderia cepacia lipase: substrate scope and enantioselectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheolwoo; Lee, Jusuk; Cho, Jeonghun; Oh, Yeonock; Choi, Yoon Kyung; Choi, Eunjeong; Park, Jaiwook; Kim, Mahn-Joo

    2013-03-15

    Forty-four different secondary alcohols, which can be classified into several types (II-IX), were tested as the substrates of ionic surfactant-coated Burkholderia cepacia lipase (ISCBCL) to see its substrate scope and enantioselectivity in kinetic and dynamic kinetic resolution (KR and DKR). They include 6 boron-containing alcohols, 24 chiral propargyl alcohols, and 14 diarylmethanols. The results from the studies on KR indicate that ISCBCL accepted most of them with high enantioselectivity at ambient temperature and with useful to high enantioselectivity at elevated temperatures. In particular, ISCBCL displayed high enantioselectivity toward sterically demanding secondary alcohols (types VIII and IX) which have two bulky substituents at the hydroxymethine center. DKR reactions were performed by the combination of ISCBCL with a ruthenium-based racemization catalyst at 25-60 °C. Forty-one secondary alcohols were tested for DKR. About half of them were transformed into their acetates of high enantiopurity (>90% ee) with good yields (>80%). It is concluded that ISCBCL appears to be a superb enzyme for the KR and DKR of secondary alcohols.

  14. Influence of the partial volume correction method on (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose brain kinetic modelling from dynamic PET images reconstructed with resolution model based OSEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Spencer L; Byars, Larry G; Michel, Christian J; Chonde, Daniel B; Catana, Ciprian

    2013-10-21

    Kinetic parameters estimated from dynamic (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET acquisitions have been used frequently to assess brain function in humans. Neglecting partial volume correction (PVC) for a dynamic series has been shown to produce significant bias in model estimates. Accurate PVC requires a space-variant model describing the reconstructed image spatial point spread function (PSF) that accounts for resolution limitations, including non-uniformities across the field of view due to the parallax effect. For ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM), image resolution convergence is local and influenced significantly by the number of iterations, the count density, and background-to-target ratio. As both count density and background-to-target values for a brain structure can change during a dynamic scan, the local image resolution may also concurrently vary. When PVC is applied post-reconstruction the kinetic parameter estimates may be biased when neglecting the frame-dependent resolution. We explored the influence of the PVC method and implementation on kinetic parameters estimated by fitting (18)F-FDG dynamic data acquired on a dedicated brain PET scanner and reconstructed with and without PSF modelling in the OSEM algorithm. The performance of several PVC algorithms was quantified with a phantom experiment, an anthropomorphic Monte Carlo simulation, and a patient scan. Using the last frame reconstructed image only for regional spread function (RSF) generation, as opposed to computing RSFs for each frame independently, and applying perturbation geometric transfer matrix PVC with PSF based OSEM produced the lowest magnitude bias kinetic parameter estimates in most instances, although at the cost of increased noise compared to the PVC methods utilizing conventional OSEM. Use of the last frame RSFs for PVC with no PSF modelling in the OSEM algorithm produced the lowest bias in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose estimates, although by less than 5% in

  15. Catalytic Kinetic Resolution of Biaryl Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gaoyuan; Sibi, Mukund P

    2015-08-10

    Biaryl compounds with axial chirality are very common in synthetic chemistry, especially in catalysis. Axially chiral biaryls are important due to their biological activities and extensive applications in asymmetric catalysis. Thus the development of efficient enantioselective methods for their synthesis has attracted considerable attention. This Minireview discusses the progress made in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl compounds and chronicles significant advances made recently in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl scaffolds. © 2015 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Lipase-catalyzed asymmetric synthesis of naphtho[2,3-c]furan-1(3H)-one derivatives by a one-pot dynamic kinetic resolution/intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction: Total synthesis of (-)-himbacine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Koji; Kawanishi, Shinji; Oki, Yasuhiro; Kamiya, Marin; Hanada, Ryosuke; Egi, Masahiro; Akai, Shuji

    2018-04-01

    One-pot sequential reactions using the acyl moieties installed by enzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of alcohols have been little investigated. In this work, the acryloyl moiety installed via the lipase/oxovanadium combo-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution of a racemic dienol [4-(cyclohex-1-en-1-yl)but-3-en-2-ol or 1-(cyclohex-1-en-1-yl)but-2-en-1-ol] with a (Z)-3-(phenylsulfonyl)acrylate underwent an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction in a one-pot procedure to produce an optically active naphtho[2,3-c]furan-1(3H)-one derivative (98% ee). This method was successfully applied to the asymmetric total synthesis of (-)-himbacine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of primary amines using a recyclable palladium nanoparticle catalyst together with lipases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Karl P J; Lihammar, Richard; Verho, Oscar; Engström, Karin; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2014-05-02

    A catalyst consisting of palladium nanoparticles supported on amino-functionalized siliceous mesocellular foam (Pd-AmP-MCF) was used in chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) to convert primary amines to amides in high yields and excellent ee's. The efficiency of the nanocatalyst at temperatures below 70 °C enables reaction conditions that are more suitable for enzymes. In the present study, this is exemplified by subjecting 1-phenylethylamine (1a) and analogous benzylic amines to DKR reactions using two commercially available lipases, Novozyme-435 (Candida antartica Lipase B) and Amano Lipase PS-C1 (lipase from Burkholderia cepacia) as biocatalysts. The latter enzyme has not previously been used in the DKR of amines because of its low stability at temperatures over 60 °C. The viability of the heterogeneous Pd-AmP-MCF was further demonstrated in a recycling study, which shows that the catalyst can be reused up to five times.

  18. Chemoenzymatic Dynamic Kinetic Resolution: A Powerful Tool for the Preparation of Enantiomerically Pure Alcohols and Amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) constitutes a convenient and efficient method to access enantiomerically pure alcohol and amine derivatives. This Perspective highlights the work carried out within this field during the past two decades and pinpoints important avenues for future research. First, the Perspective will summarize the more developed area of alcohol DKR, by delineating the way from the earliest proof-of-concept protocols to the current state-of-the-art systems that allows for the highly efficient and selective preparation of a wide range of enantiomerically pure alcohol derivatives. Thereafter, the Perspective will focus on the more challenging DKR of amines, by presenting the currently available homogeneous and heterogeneous methods and their respective limitations. In these two parts, significant attention will be dedicated to the design of efficient racemization methods as an important means of developing milder DKR protocols. In the final part of the Perspective, a brief overview of the research that has been devoted toward improving enzymes as biocatalysts is presented. PMID:25730714

  19. Kinetic Energy from Supernova Feedback in High-resolution Galaxy Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Christine M.; Bryan, Greg L.; Hummels, Cameron; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2015-08-01

    We describe a new method for adding a prescribed amount of kinetic energy to simulated gas modeled on a cartesian grid by directly altering grid cells’ mass and velocity in a distributed fashion. The method is explored in the context of supernova (SN) feedback in high-resolution (˜10 pc) hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation. Resolution dependence is a primary consideration in our application of the method, and simulations of isolated explosions (performed at different resolutions) motivate a resolution-dependent scaling for the injected fraction of kinetic energy that we apply in cosmological simulations of a 109 M⊙ dwarf halo. We find that in high-density media (≳50 cm-3) with coarse resolution (≳4 pc per cell), results are sensitive to the initial kinetic energy fraction due to early and rapid cooling. In our galaxy simulations, the deposition of small amounts of SN energy in kinetic form (as little as 1%) has a dramatic impact on the evolution of the system, resulting in an order-of-magnitude suppression of stellar mass. The overall behavior of the galaxy in the two highest resolution simulations we perform appears to converge. We discuss the resulting distribution of stellar metallicities, an observable sensitive to galactic wind properties, and find that while the new method demonstrates increased agreement with observed systems, significant discrepancies remain, likely due to simplistic assumptions that neglect contributions from SNe Ia and stellar winds.

  20. Kinetic investigation on enantioselective hydrolytic resolution of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kinetic investigation on enantioselective hydrolytic resolution of epichlorohydrin by crude epoxide hydrolase from domestic duck liver. X Ling, D Lu, J Wang, J Chen, L Ding, J Chen, H Chai, P Ouyang ...

  1. CATALYTIC KINETIC RESOLUTION OF 5-ALKOXY-2(5H)-FURANONES

    OpenAIRE

    FABER, WS; Kok, Johan C; DELANGE, B; FERINGA, BL; Faber, Wijnand S.; Lange, Ben de; Feringa, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    The kinetic resolution of racemic 5-alkoxy-2(5H)-furanones, using a chiral aminoalcohol catalyzed 1-4-addition of arylthiols, was examined. Using various butenolides it was shown that a gamma-alkoxy substituent appears to be essential to reach high enantioselectivities whereas electron-donating substituents in the arylthiols also increase the selectivity. Cinchona alkaloids are the preferred catalysts for the kinetic resolution, with quinine and quinidine leading to the most efficient and sel...

  2. Operational High Resolution Chemical Kinetics Simulation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Numerical simulations of chemical kinetics are critical to addressing urgent issues in both the developed and developing world. Ongoing demand for higher resolution...

  3. Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesbitt, David J. [Research/Professor

    2013-08-06

    Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ≈10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

  4. Oxidative kinetic resolution of racemic alcohols catalyzed by chiral ferrocenyloxazolinylphosphine-ruthenium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki; Yamauchi, Akiyoshi; Onodera, Gen; Uemura, Sakae

    2003-07-25

    Oxidative kinetic resolution of racemic secondary alcohols by using acetone as a hydrogen acceptor in the presence of a catalytic amount of [RuCl(2)(PPh(3))(ferrocenyloxazolinylphosphine)] (2) proceeds effectively to recover the corresponding alcohols in high yields with an excellent enantioselectivity. When 1-indanol is employed as a racemic alcohol, the oxidation proceeds quite smoothly even in the presence of 0.0025 mol % of the catalyst 2 to give an optically active 1-indanol in good yield with high enantioselectivity (up to 94% ee), where turnover frequency (TOF) exceeds 80,000 h(-1). From a practical viewpoint, the kinetic resolution is investigated in a large scale, optically pure (S)-1-indanol (75 g, 56% yield, >99% ee) being obtained from racemic 1-indanol (134 g) by employing this kinetic resolution method twice.

  5. Kinetics from Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzl, Lukas S; Hummer, Gerhard

    2017-08-08

    Transitions between metastable states govern many fundamental processes in physics, chemistry and biology, from nucleation events in phase transitions to the folding of proteins. The free energy surfaces underlying these processes can be obtained from simulations using enhanced sampling methods. However, their altered dynamics makes kinetic and mechanistic information difficult or impossible to extract. Here, we show that, with replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD), one can not only sample equilibrium properties but also extract kinetic information. For systems that strictly obey first-order kinetics, the procedure to extract rates is rigorous. For actual molecular systems whose long-time dynamics are captured by kinetic rate models, accurate rate coefficients can be determined from the statistics of the transitions between the metastable states at each replica temperature. We demonstrate the practical applicability of the procedure by constructing master equation (Markov state) models of peptide and RNA folding from REMD simulations.

  6. 3.5D dynamic PET image reconstruction incorporating kinetics-based clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Lijun; Chen Wufan; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Rahmim, Arman; Tang Jing

    2012-01-01

    Standard 3D dynamic positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging consists of independent image reconstructions of individual frames followed by application of appropriate kinetic model to the time activity curves at the voxel or region-of-interest (ROI). The emerging field of 4D PET reconstruction, by contrast, seeks to move beyond this scheme and incorporate information from multiple frames within the image reconstruction task. Here we propose a novel reconstruction framework aiming to enhance quantitative accuracy of parametric images via introduction of priors based on voxel kinetics, as generated via clustering of preliminary reconstructed dynamic images to define clustered neighborhoods of voxels with similar kinetics. This is then followed by straightforward maximum a posteriori (MAP) 3D PET reconstruction as applied to individual frames; and as such the method is labeled ‘3.5D’ image reconstruction. The use of cluster-based priors has the advantage of further enhancing quantitative performance in dynamic PET imaging, because: (a) there are typically more voxels in clusters than in conventional local neighborhoods, and (b) neighboring voxels with distinct kinetics are less likely to be clustered together. Using realistic simulated 11 C-raclopride dynamic PET data, the quantitative performance of the proposed method was investigated. Parametric distribution-volume (DV) and DV ratio (DVR) images were estimated from dynamic image reconstructions using (a) maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), and MAP reconstructions using (b) the quadratic prior (QP-MAP), (c) the Green prior (GP-MAP) and (d, e) two proposed cluster-based priors (CP-U-MAP and CP-W-MAP), followed by graphical modeling, and were qualitatively and quantitatively compared for 11 ROIs. Overall, the proposed dynamic PET reconstruction methodology resulted in substantial visual as well as quantitative accuracy improvements (in terms of noise versus bias performance) for parametric DV

  7. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF KINETIC RESOLUTION OF RACEMIC ALCOHOL USING BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA LIPASE IN ORGANIC SOLVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Mathpati

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipases, a subclass of hydrolases, have gained a lot of importance as they can catalyze esterification, transesterification and hydrolysis reaction in non-aqueous media. Lipases are also widely used for kinetic resolution of racemic alcohols into enantiopure compounds. The lipase activity is affected by organic solvents due to changes in the conformational rigidity of enzymes, the active site, or altering the solvation of the transition state. The activity of lipases strongly depends on the logP value of solvents. Molecular dynamics (MD can help to understand the effect of solvents on lipase conformation as well as protein-ligand complex. In this work, MD simulations of Burkholderia cepacia lipase (BCL and complex between R and S conformation of acetylated form of 1-phenylethanol with BCL using gromacs have been carried in various organic solvents. The RMSD values were within the range of 0.15 to 0.20 nm and radius of gyration was found to be with 1.65 to 1.9 nm. Major changes in the B factor compared to reference structure were observed between residues 60 to 80, 120 to 150 and 240 to 260. Higher unfolding was observed in toluene and diethyl ether compared to hexane and acetonitrile. R acetylated complex was found to favorably bind BCL compared to S form. The predicted enantioselectivity were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Fast Search and Adaptive Resolution for Complex Particle Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David J.

    2005-10-01

    A new plasma simulation algorithm, intended to bridge the gap between Eulerian fluid and kinetic regimes, is now being used for a variety of applications in ICF and weapon effects. The CPK method (Complex Particle Kinetic) concept [1] uses an ensemble of macro-particles with a Gaussian spatial profile and a Mawellian velocity distribution to represent particle distributions in phase space. Time evolution is modeled by a combination of Lagrangian motion and internal evolution within each individual macro-particle. Collisional particle-particle interactions [2] are facilitated by sorting particles into bins depending of the particle size. Different bin levels are connected by a linked list. Searching for neighboring particles is highly efficient because the search is limited to particles in neighboring bins with the possibility of interaction. The bin structure also allows the computation of various spatial moments at different resolutions. Combining the results of the moment calculations yields information on where and when increased resolution is necessary. We will present details of the particle binning process along with progress towards our goal of simulating the transition from continuum to fully kinetic physics. [1] D. W. Hewett, J. Comp. Phys. 189 (2003). [2] D. J. Larson, J. Comp. Phys. 188 (2003).

  9. Inflationary dynamics of kinetically-coupled gauge fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Ricardo J. Z.; Ganc, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the inflationary dynamics of two kinetically-coupled massless U(1) gauge fields with time-varying kinetic-term coefficients. Ensuring that the system does not have strongly coupled regimes shrinks the parameter space. Also, we further restrict ourselves to systems that can be quant......We investigate the inflationary dynamics of two kinetically-coupled massless U(1) gauge fields with time-varying kinetic-term coefficients. Ensuring that the system does not have strongly coupled regimes shrinks the parameter space. Also, we further restrict ourselves to systems that can...... be quantized using the standard creation, annihilation operator algebra. This second constraint limits us to scenarios where the system can be diagonalized into the sum of two decoupled, massless, vector fields with a varying kinetic-term coefficient. Such a system might be interesting for magnetogenesis...... because of how the strong coupling problem generalizes. We explore this idea by assuming that one of the gauge fields is the Standard Model U(1) field and that the other dark gauge field has no particles charged under its gauge group. We consider whether it would be possible to transfer a magnetic field...

  10. CATALYTIC KINETIC RESOLUTION OF 5-ALKOXY-2(5H)-FURANONES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FABER, WS; Kok, Johan C; DELANGE, B; FERINGA, BL; Faber, Wijnand S.; Lange, Ben de; Feringa, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    The kinetic resolution of racemic 5-alkoxy-2(5H)-furanones, using a chiral aminoalcohol catalyzed 1-4-addition of arylthiols, was examined. Using various butenolides it was shown that a gamma-alkoxy substituent appears to be essential to reach high enantioselectivities whereas electron-donating

  11. Influence of the interaction volume on the kinetic energy resolution of a velocity map imaging spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng; Feng Zheng-Peng; Luo Si-Qiang; Wang Zhe

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the interaction volume on the energy resolution of a velocity map imaging spectrometer. The simulation results show that the axial interaction size has a significant influence on the resolution. This influence is increased for a higher kinetic energy. We further show that the radial interaction size has a minor influence on the energy resolution for the electron or ion with medium energy, but it is crucial for the resolution of the electron or ion with low kinetic energy. By tracing the flight trajectories we show how the electron or ion energy resolution is influenced by the interaction size. (paper)

  12. Mesoscopic dynamics of diffusion-influenced enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-01-28

    A particle-based mesoscopic model for enzyme kinetics is constructed and used to investigate the influence of diffusion on the reactive dynamics. Enzymes and enzyme-substrate complexes are modeled as finite-size soft spherical particles, while substrate, product, and solvent molecules are point particles. The system is evolved using a hybrid molecular dynamics-multiparticle collision dynamics scheme. Both the nonreactive and reactive dynamics are constructed to satisfy mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws, and reversible reaction steps satisfy detailed balance. Hydrodynamic interactions among the enzymes and complexes are automatically accounted for in the dynamics. Diffusion manifests itself in various ways, notably in power-law behavior in the evolution of the species concentrations. In accord with earlier investigations, regimes where the product production rate exhibits either monotonic or nonmonotonic behavior as a function of time are found. In addition, the species concentrations display both t(-1/2) and t(-3/2) power-law behavior, depending on the dynamical regime under investigation. For high enzyme volume fractions, cooperative effects influence the enzyme kinetics. The time dependent rate coefficient determined from the mass action rate law is computed and shown to depend on the enzyme concentration. Lifetime distributions of substrate molecules newly released in complex dissociation events are determined and shown to have either a power-law form for rebinding to the same enzyme from which they were released or an exponential form for rebinding to different enzymes. The model can be used and extended to explore a variety of issues related concentration effects and diffusion on enzyme kinetics.

  13. Mesoscopic dynamics of diffusion-influenced enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    A particle-based mesoscopic model for enzyme kinetics is constructed and used to investigate the influence of diffusion on the reactive dynamics. Enzymes and enzyme-substrate complexes are modeled as finite-size soft spherical particles, while substrate, product, and solvent molecules are point particles. The system is evolved using a hybrid molecular dynamics-multiparticle collision dynamics scheme. Both the nonreactive and reactive dynamics are constructed to satisfy mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws, and reversible reaction steps satisfy detailed balance. Hydrodynamic interactions among the enzymes and complexes are automatically accounted for in the dynamics. Diffusion manifests itself in various ways, notably in power-law behavior in the evolution of the species concentrations. In accord with earlier investigations, regimes where the product production rate exhibits either monotonic or nonmonotonic behavior as a function of time are found. In addition, the species concentrations display both t^{-1/2} and t^{-3/2} power-law behavior, depending on the dynamical regime under investigation. For high enzyme volume fractions, cooperative effects influence the enzyme kinetics. The time dependent rate coefficient determined from the mass action rate law is computed and shown to depend on the enzyme concentration. Lifetime distributions of substrate molecules newly released in complex dissociation events are determined and shown to have either a power-law form for rebinding to the same enzyme from which they were released or an exponential form for rebinding to different enzymes. The model can be used and extended to explore a variety of issues related concentration effects and diffusion on enzyme kinetics.

  14. Fractional neutron point kinetics equations for nuclear reactor dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto; Polo-Labarrios, Marco-A.; Espinosa-Martinez, Erick-G.; Valle-Gallegos, Edmundo del

    2011-01-01

    The fractional point-neutron kinetics model for the dynamic behavior in a nuclear reactor is derived and analyzed in this paper. The fractional model retains the main dynamic characteristics of the neutron motion in which the relaxation time associated with a rapid variation in the neutron flux contains a fractional order, acting as exponent of the relaxation time, to obtain the best representation of a nuclear reactor dynamics. The physical interpretation of the fractional order is related with non-Fickian effects from the neutron diffusion equation point of view. The numerical approximation to the solution of the fractional neutron point kinetics model, which can be represented as a multi-term high-order linear fractional differential equation, is calculated by reducing the problem to a system of ordinary and fractional differential equations. The numerical stability of the fractional scheme is investigated in this work. Results for neutron dynamic behavior for both positive and negative reactivity and for different values of fractional order are shown and compared with the classic neutron point kinetic equations. Additionally, a related review with the neutron point kinetics equations is presented, which encompasses papers written in English about this research topic (as well as some books and technical reports) published since 1940 up to 2010.

  15. Flow chemistry and polymer-supported pseudoenantiomeric acylating agents enable parallel kinetic resolution of chiral saturated N-heterocycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreituss, Imants; Bode, Jeffrey W.

    2017-05-01

    Kinetic resolution is a common method to obtain enantioenriched material from a racemic mixture. This process will deliver enantiopure unreacted material when the selectivity factor of the process, s, is greater than 1; however, the scalemic reaction product is often discarded. Parallel kinetic resolution, on the other hand, provides access to two enantioenriched products from a single racemic starting material, but suffers from a variety of practical challenges regarding experimental design that limit its applications. Here, we describe the development of a flow-based system that enables practical parallel kinetic resolution of saturated N-heterocycles. This process provides access to both enantiomers of the starting material in good yield and high enantiopurity; similar results with classical kinetic resolution would require selectivity factors in the range of s = 100. To achieve this, two immobilized quasienantiomeric acylating agents were designed for the asymmetric acylation of racemic saturated N-heterocycles. Using the flow-based system we could efficiently separate, recover and reuse the polymer-supported reagents. The amide products could be readily separated and hydrolysed to the corresponding amines without detectable epimerization.

  16. Diels-Alder cycloaddition strategy for kinetic resolution of chiral pyrazolidinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Kawashima, Keisuke; Stanley, Levi M

    2009-09-03

    A rare example of the application of a catalytic, enantioselective Diels-Alder cycloaddition to affect a kinetic resolution has been developed. Chiral pyrazolidinones are resolved with high selectivity through a process that utilizes a relay of stereochemical information from a permanent chiral center to a fluxional chiral center to enhance the inherent selectivity of the chiral Lewis acid catalyst.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Kinetic Models for Chiral Dominance in Soft Condensed Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxvaerd, Søren

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality......Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality...

  18. Photon-Counting Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) for High Resolution Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are developing ultrasensitive Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) for high resolution far-infrared spectroscopy applications, with a long-term goal of...

  19. Key factors of combustion from kinetics to gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, Nikolai M

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the main advances in the mechanisms of combustion processes. It focuses on the analysis of kinetic mechanisms of gas combustion processes and experimental investigation into the interrelation of kinetics and gas dynamics in gas combustion. The book is complimentary to the one previously published, The Modes of Gaseous Combustion.

  20. Multi-scale method for the resolution of the neutronic kinetics equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvet, St.

    2008-10-01

    In this PhD thesis and in order to improve the time/precision ratio of the numerical simulation calculations, we investigate multi-scale techniques for the resolution of the reactor kinetics equations. We choose to focus on the mixed dual diffusion approximation and the quasi-static methods. We introduce a space dependency for the amplitude function which only depends on the time variable in the standard quasi-static context. With this new factorization, we develop two mixed dual problems which can be solved with Cea's solver MINOS. An algorithm is implemented, performing the resolution of these problems defined on different scales (for time and space). We name this approach: the Local Quasi-Static method. We present here this new multi-scale approach and its implementation. The inherent details of amplitude and shape treatments are discussed and justified. Results and performances, compared to MINOS, are studied. They illustrate the improvement on the time/precision ratio for kinetics calculations. Furthermore, we open some new possibilities to parallelize computations with MINOS. For the future, we also introduce some improvement tracks with adaptive scales. (author)

  1. Topological and kinetic determinants of the modal matrices of dynamic models of metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Du

    Full Text Available Large-scale kinetic models of metabolism are becoming increasingly comprehensive and accurate. A key challenge is to understand the biochemical basis of the dynamic properties of these models. Linear analysis methods are well-established as useful tools for characterizing the dynamic response of metabolic networks. Central to linear analysis methods are two key matrices: the Jacobian matrix (J and the modal matrix (M-1 arising from its eigendecomposition. The modal matrix M-1 contains dynamically independent motions of the kinetic model near a reference state, and it is sparse in practice for metabolic networks. However, connecting the structure of M-1 to the kinetic properties of the underlying reactions is non-trivial. In this study, we analyze the relationship between J, M-1, and the kinetic properties of the underlying network for kinetic models of metabolism. Specifically, we describe the origin of mode sparsity structure based on features of the network stoichiometric matrix S and the reaction kinetic gradient matrix G. First, we show that due to the scaling of kinetic parameters in real networks, diagonal dominance occurs in a substantial fraction of the rows of J, resulting in simple modal structures with clear biological interpretations. Then, we show that more complicated modes originate from topologically-connected reactions that have similar reaction elasticities in G. These elasticities represent dynamic equilibrium balances within reactions and are key determinants of modal structure. The work presented should prove useful towards obtaining an understanding of the dynamics of kinetic models of metabolism, which are rooted in the network structure and the kinetic properties of reactions.

  2. Emergence of dynamic cooperativity in the stochastic kinetics of fluctuating enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Chatterjee, Sambarta; Nandi, Mintu; Dua, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic co-operativity in monomeric enzymes is characterized in terms of a non-Michaelis-Menten kinetic behaviour. The latter is believed to be associated with mechanisms that include multiple reaction pathways due to enzymatic conformational fluctuations. Recent advances in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy have provided new fundamental insights on the possible mechanisms underlying reactions catalyzed by fluctuating enzymes. Here, we present a bottom-up approach to understand enzyme turnover kinetics at physiologically relevant mesoscopic concentrations informed by mechanisms extracted from single-molecule stochastic trajectories. The stochastic approach, presented here, shows the emergence of dynamic co-operativity in terms of a slowing down of the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics resulting in negative co-operativity. For fewer enzymes, dynamic co-operativity emerges due to the combined effects of enzymatic conformational fluctuations and molecular discreteness. The increase in the number of enzymes, however, suppresses the effect of enzymatic conformational fluctuations such that dynamic co-operativity emerges solely due to the discrete changes in the number of reacting species. These results confirm that the turnover kinetics of fluctuating enzyme based on the parallel-pathway MM mechanism switches over to the single-pathway MM mechanism with the increase in the number of enzymes. For large enzyme numbers, convergence to the exact MM equation occurs in the limit of very high substrate concentration as the stochastic kinetics approaches the deterministic behaviour.

  3. Emergence of dynamic cooperativity in the stochastic kinetics of fluctuating enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Chatterjee, Sambarta; Nandi, Mintu; Dua, Arti, E-mail: arti@iitm.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2016-08-28

    Dynamic co-operativity in monomeric enzymes is characterized in terms of a non-Michaelis-Menten kinetic behaviour. The latter is believed to be associated with mechanisms that include multiple reaction pathways due to enzymatic conformational fluctuations. Recent advances in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy have provided new fundamental insights on the possible mechanisms underlying reactions catalyzed by fluctuating enzymes. Here, we present a bottom-up approach to understand enzyme turnover kinetics at physiologically relevant mesoscopic concentrations informed by mechanisms extracted from single-molecule stochastic trajectories. The stochastic approach, presented here, shows the emergence of dynamic co-operativity in terms of a slowing down of the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics resulting in negative co-operativity. For fewer enzymes, dynamic co-operativity emerges due to the combined effects of enzymatic conformational fluctuations and molecular discreteness. The increase in the number of enzymes, however, suppresses the effect of enzymatic conformational fluctuations such that dynamic co-operativity emerges solely due to the discrete changes in the number of reacting species. These results confirm that the turnover kinetics of fluctuating enzyme based on the parallel-pathway MM mechanism switches over to the single-pathway MM mechanism with the increase in the number of enzymes. For large enzyme numbers, convergence to the exact MM equation occurs in the limit of very high substrate concentration as the stochastic kinetics approaches the deterministic behaviour.

  4. Emergence of dynamic cooperativity in the stochastic kinetics of fluctuating enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Chatterjee, Sambarta; Nandi, Mintu; Dua, Arti

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic co-operativity in monomeric enzymes is characterized in terms of a non-Michaelis-Menten kinetic behaviour. The latter is believed to be associated with mechanisms that include multiple reaction pathways due to enzymatic conformational fluctuations. Recent advances in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy have provided new fundamental insights on the possible mechanisms underlying reactions catalyzed by fluctuating enzymes. Here, we present a bottom-up approach to understand enzyme turnover kinetics at physiologically relevant mesoscopic concentrations informed by mechanisms extracted from single-molecule stochastic trajectories. The stochastic approach, presented here, shows the emergence of dynamic co-operativity in terms of a slowing down of the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics resulting in negative co-operativity. For fewer enzymes, dynamic co-operativity emerges due to the combined effects of enzymatic conformational fluctuations and molecular discreteness. The increase in the number of enzymes, however, suppresses the effect of enzymatic conformational fluctuations such that dynamic co-operativity emerges solely due to the discrete changes in the number of reacting species. These results confirm that the turnover kinetics of fluctuating enzyme based on the parallel-pathway MM mechanism switches over to the single-pathway MM mechanism with the increase in the number of enzymes. For large enzyme numbers, convergence to the exact MM equation occurs in the limit of very high substrate concentration as the stochastic kinetics approaches the deterministic behaviour.

  5. Relevance and bio-catalytic strategies for the kinetic resolution of ketoprofen towards dexketoprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, María Victoria; Briand, Laura Estefanía

    2017-11-10

    This review presents the most relevant investigations concerning the biocatalytic kinetic resolution of racemic ketoprofen to dexketoprofen for the last 22 years. The advantages related to the administration of the dex-enantiomer in terms of human health, the so called "chiral switch" in the pharmaceutical industry and the sustainability of biotransformations have been the driving forces to develop innovative technology to obtain dexketoprofen. In particular, the kinetic resolution of racemic ketoprofen through enantiomeric esterification and hydrolysis using lipases as biocatalysts are thoroughly revised and commented upon. In this context, the biocatalysts, acyl-acceptors (alcohols), reaction conditions, conversion, enantiomeric excess, and enantiomeric ratio among others are discussed. Moreover, the investigations concerning scaling up processes in order to obtain an optically pure enantiomer of the profen are presented. Finally, some guidelines about perspectives of the technology and research opportunities are given.

  6. Fluxionally chiral DMAP catalysts: kinetic resolution of axially chiral biaryl compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gaoyuan; Deng, Jun; Sibi, Mukund P

    2014-10-27

    Can organocatalysts that incorporate fluxional groups provide enhanced selectivity in asymmetric transformations? To address this issue, we have designed chiral 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) catalysts with fluxional chirality. These catalysts were found to be efficient in promoting the acylative kinetic resolution of secondary alcohols and axially chiral biaryl compounds with selectivity factors of up to 37 and 51, respectively. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Lipase-catalyzed highly enantioselective kinetic resolution of boron-containing chiral alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Leandro H; Barcellos, Thiago

    2009-07-16

    The first application of enzymes as catalysts to obtain optically pure boron compounds is described. The kinetic resolution of boron-containing chiral alcohols via enantioselective transesterification catalyzed by lipases was studied. Aromatic, allylic, and aliphatic secondary alcohols containing a boronate ester or boronic acid group were resolved by lipase from Candida antartica (CALB), and excellent E values (E > 200) and high enantiomeric excesses (up to >99%) of both remaining substrates and acetylated product were obtained.

  8. Dynamic positron emission tomography image restoration via a kinetics-induced bilateral filter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoying Bian

    Full Text Available Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET imaging is a powerful tool that provides useful quantitative information on physiological and biochemical processes. However, low signal-to-noise ratio in short dynamic frames makes accurate kinetic parameter estimation from noisy voxel-wise time activity curves (TAC a challenging task. To address this problem, several spatial filters have been investigated to reduce the noise of each frame with noticeable gains. These filters include the Gaussian filter, bilateral filter, and wavelet-based filter. These filters usually consider only the local properties of each frame without exploring potential kinetic information from entire frames. Thus, in this work, to improve PET parametric imaging accuracy, we present a kinetics-induced bilateral filter (KIBF to reduce the noise of dynamic image frames by incorporating the similarity between the voxel-wise TACs using the framework of bilateral filter. The aim of the proposed KIBF algorithm is to reduce the noise in homogeneous areas while preserving the distinct kinetics of regions of interest. Experimental results on digital brain phantom and in vivo rat study with typical (18F-FDG kinetics have shown that the present KIBF algorithm can achieve notable gains over other existing algorithms in terms of quantitative accuracy measures and visual inspection.

  9. Automated chemical kinetic modeling via hybrid reactive molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döntgen, Malte; Schmalz, Felix; Kopp, Wassja A; Kröger, Leif C; Leonhard, Kai

    2018-06-13

    An automated scheme for obtaining chemical kinetic models from scratch using reactive molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry simulations is presented. This methodology combines the phase space sampling of reactive molecular dynamics with the thermochemistry and kinetics prediction capabilities of quantum mechanics. This scheme provides the NASA polynomial and modified Arrhenius equation parameters for all species and reactions that are observed during the simulation and supplies them in the ChemKin format. The ab initio level of theory for predictions is easily exchangeable and the presently used G3MP2 level of theory is found to reliably reproduce hydrogen and methane oxidation thermochemistry and kinetics data. Chemical kinetic models obtained with this approach are ready-to-use for, e.g., ignition delay time simulations, as shown for hydrogen combustion. The presented extension of the ChemTraYzer approach can be used as a basis for methodologically advancing chemical kinetic modeling schemes and as a black-box approach to generate chemical kinetic models.

  10. Efficient Synthesis of Differentiated syn-1,2-Diol Derivatives by Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation-Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of α-Alkoxy-Substituted β-Ketoesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnereau, Laure; Cartigny, Damien; Scalone, Michelangelo; Ayad, Tahar; Ratovelomanana-Vidal, Virginie

    2015-08-10

    Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation was applied to a wide range of racemic aryl α-alkoxy-β-ketoesters in the presence of well-defined, commercially available, chiral catalyst Ru(II) -(N-p-toluenesulfonyl-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine) and a 5:2 mixture of formic acid and triethylamine as the hydrogen source. Under these conditions, dynamic kinetic resolution was efficiently promoted to provide the corresponding syn α-alkoxy-β-hydroxyesters derived from substituted aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes with a high level of diastereoselectivity (diastereomeric ratio (d.r.)>99:1) and an almost perfect enantioselectivity (enantiomeric excess (ee)>99 %). Additionally, after extensive screening of the reaction conditions, the use of Ru(II) - and Rh(III) -tethered precatalysts extended this process to more-challenging substrates that bore alkenyl-, alkynyl-, and alkyl substituents to provide the corresponding syn α-alkoxy-β-hydroxyesters with excellent enantiocontrol (up to 99 % ee) and good to perfect diastereocontrol (d.r.>99:1). Lastly, the synthetic utility of the present protocol was demonstrated by application to the asymmetric synthesis of chiral ester ethyl (2S)-2-ethoxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propanoate, which is an important pharmacophore in a number of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/γ dual agonist advanced drug candidates used for the treatment of type-II diabetes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Investigating sub-spine actin dynamics in rat hippocampal neurons with super-resolution optical imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedakumar Tatavarty

    Full Text Available Morphological changes in dendritic spines represent an important mechanism for synaptic plasticity which is postulated to underlie the vital cognitive phenomena of learning and memory. These morphological changes are driven by the dynamic actin cytoskeleton that is present in dendritic spines. The study of actin dynamics in these spines traditionally has been hindered by the small size of the spine. In this study, we utilize a photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM-based single-molecule tracking technique to analyze F-actin movements with approximately 30-nm resolution in cultured hippocampal neurons. We were able to observe the kinematic (physical motion of actin filaments, i.e., retrograde flow and kinetic (F-actin turn-over dynamics of F-actin at the single-filament level in dendritic spines. We found that F-actin in dendritic spines exhibits highly heterogeneous kinematic dynamics at the individual filament level, with simultaneous actin flows in both retrograde and anterograde directions. At the ensemble level, movements of filaments integrate into a net retrograde flow of approximately 138 nm/min. These results suggest a weakly polarized F-actin network that consists of mostly short filaments in dendritic spines.

  12. Investigating sub-spine actin dynamics in rat hippocampal neurons with super-resolution optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Kim, Eun-Ji; Rodionov, Vladimir; Yu, Ji

    2009-11-09

    Morphological changes in dendritic spines represent an important mechanism for synaptic plasticity which is postulated to underlie the vital cognitive phenomena of learning and memory. These morphological changes are driven by the dynamic actin cytoskeleton that is present in dendritic spines. The study of actin dynamics in these spines traditionally has been hindered by the small size of the spine. In this study, we utilize a photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM)-based single-molecule tracking technique to analyze F-actin movements with approximately 30-nm resolution in cultured hippocampal neurons. We were able to observe the kinematic (physical motion of actin filaments, i.e., retrograde flow) and kinetic (F-actin turn-over) dynamics of F-actin at the single-filament level in dendritic spines. We found that F-actin in dendritic spines exhibits highly heterogeneous kinematic dynamics at the individual filament level, with simultaneous actin flows in both retrograde and anterograde directions. At the ensemble level, movements of filaments integrate into a net retrograde flow of approximately 138 nm/min. These results suggest a weakly polarized F-actin network that consists of mostly short filaments in dendritic spines.

  13. Improved accuracy of quantitative parameter estimates in dynamic contrast-enhanced CT study with low temporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Mo, E-mail: Sunmo.Kim@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Haider, Masoom A. [Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Yeung, Ivan W. T. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Stronach Regional Cancer Centre, Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario L3Y 2P9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: A previously proposed method to reduce radiation dose to patient in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT is enhanced by principal component analysis (PCA) filtering which improves the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of time-concentration curves in the DCE-CT study. The efficacy of the combined method to maintain the accuracy of kinetic parameter estimates at low temporal resolution is investigated with pixel-by-pixel kinetic analysis of DCE-CT data. Methods: The method is based on DCE-CT scanning performed with low temporal resolution to reduce the radiation dose to the patient. The arterial input function (AIF) with high temporal resolution can be generated with a coarsely sampled AIF through a previously published method of AIF estimation. To increase the SNR of time-concentration curves (tissue curves), first, a region-of-interest is segmented into squares composed of 3 × 3 pixels in size. Subsequently, the PCA filtering combined with a fraction of residual information criterion is applied to all the segmented squares for further improvement of their SNRs. The proposed method was applied to each DCE-CT data set of a cohort of 14 patients at varying levels of down-sampling. The kinetic analyses using the modified Tofts’ model and singular value decomposition method, then, were carried out for each of the down-sampling schemes between the intervals from 2 to 15 s. The results were compared with analyses done with the measured data in high temporal resolution (i.e., original scanning frequency) as the reference. Results: The patients’ AIFs were estimated to high accuracy based on the 11 orthonormal bases of arterial impulse responses established in the previous paper. In addition, noise in the images was effectively reduced by using five principal components of the tissue curves for filtering. Kinetic analyses using the proposed method showed superior results compared to those with down-sampling alone; they were able to maintain the accuracy in the

  14. Breast MR imaging: correlation of high resolution dynamic MR findings with prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shin Ho; Cho, Nariya; Chung, Hye Kyung; Kim, Seung Ja; Cho, Kyung Soo; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cho, Joo Hee

    2005-01-01

    We wanted to correlate the kinetic and morphologic MR findings of invasive breast cancer with the classical and molecular prognostic factors. Eighty-seven patients with invasive ductal carcinoma NOS underwent dynamic MR imaging at 1.5 T, and with using the T1-weighted 3D FLASH technique. The morphologic findings (shape, margin, internal enhancement of the mass or the enhancement distribution and the internal enhancement of any non-mass lesion) and the kinetic findings (the initial phase and the delayed phase of the time-signal. Intensity curve) were interpreted using a ACR BI-RADS-MRI lexicon. We correlate MR findings with histopathologic prognostic factors (tumor size, lymph node status and tumor grade) and the immunohistochemically detected biomarkers (ER, PR, ρ 53, c-erbB-2, EGFR and Ki-67). Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were than performed. Among the MR findings, a spiculated margin, rim enhancement and washout were significantly correlated with the prognostic factors. A spiculated margin was independently associated with the established predictors of a good prognosis (a lower histologic and nuclear grade, positive ER and PR) and rim enhancement was associated with a poor prognosis (a higher histologic and nuclear grade, negative ER and PR). Wash out was a independent predictor of Ki-67 activity. Some of the findings of high resolution dynamic MR imaging were associated with the prognostic factors, and these findings may predict the prognosis of breast cancer

  15. Synthesis of Chiral Cyclic Carbonates via Kinetic Resolution of Racemic Epoxides and Carbon Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic synthesis of cyclic carbonates using carbon dioxide as a C1-building block is a highly active area of research. Here, we review the catalytic production of enantiomerically enriched cyclic carbonates via kinetic resolution of racemic epoxides catalysed by metal-containing catalyst systems.

  16. Dynamic high resolution imaging of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaoka, R.S.; Lewellen, T.K.; Bice, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    A positron emission tomography with the sensitivity and resolution to do dynamic imaging of rats would be an invaluable tool for biological researchers. In this paper, the authors determine the biological criteria for dynamic positron emission imaging of rats. To be useful, 3 mm isotropic resolution and 2-3 second time binning were necessary characteristics for such a dedicated tomograph. A single plane in which two objects of interest could be imaged simultaneously was considered acceptable. Multi-layered detector designs were evaluated as a possible solution to the dynamic imaging and high resolution imaging requirements. The University of Washington photon history generator was used to generate data to investigate a tomograph's sensitivity to true, scattered and random coincidences for varying detector ring diameters. Intrinsic spatial uniformity advantages of multi-layered detector designs over conventional detector designs were investigated using a Monte Carlo program. As a result, a modular three layered detector prototype is being developed. A module will consist of a layer of five 3.5 mm wide crystals and two layers of six 2.5 mm wide crystals. The authors believe adequate sampling can be achieved with a stationary detector system using these modules. Economical crystal decoding strategies have been investigated and simulations have been run to investigate optimum light channeling methods for block decoding strategies. An analog block decoding method has been proposed and will be experimentally evaluated to determine whether it can provide the desired performance

  17. Kinetic Resolution of sec-Thiols via Enantioselective Oxidation with Rationally Engineered 5-(Hydroxymethyl)furfural Oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickl, Mathias; Swoboda, Alexander; Romero, Elvira; Winkler, Christoph; Binda, Claudia; Mattevi, Andrea; Faber, Kurt; Fraaije, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Various flavoprotein oxidases were recently shown to oxidize prim-thiols. Here we extend this reactivity towards sec-thiols via structure-guided engineering of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural oxidase (HMFO). The variants obtained were employed for the oxidative kinetic resolution of rac-sec-thiols

  18. Catalyst dynamics: consequences for classical kinetic descriptions of reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Tue; Larsen, Jane Hvolbæk; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2001-01-01

    in situ studies and surface science investigations has brought added attention to the fact that catalysts may behave in a dynamic manner and reconstruct depending on the reaction conditions. This feature severely limits traditional kinetic descriptions. In the present paper, we present examples...

  19. Detectors for high resolution dynamic pet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1983-05-01

    This report reviews the motivation for high spatial resolution in dynamic positron emission tomography of the head and the technical problems in realizing this objective. We present recent progress in using small silicon photodiodes to measure the energy deposited by 511 keV photons in small BGO crystals with an energy resolution of 9.4% full-width at half-maximum. In conjunction with a suitable phototube coupled to a group of crystals, the photodiode signal to noise ratio is sufficient for the identification of individual crystals both for conventional and time-of-flight positron tomography

  20. Kinetics of the Dynamical Information Shannon Entropy for Complex Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulmetyev, R.M.; Yulmetyeva, D.G.

    1999-01-01

    Kinetic behaviour of dynamical information Shannon entropy is discussed for complex systems: physical systems with non-Markovian property and memory in correlation approximation, and biological and physiological systems with sequences of the Markovian and non-Markovian random noises. For the stochastic processes, a description of the information entropy in terms of normalized time correlation functions is given. The influence and important role of two mutually dependent channels of the entropy change, correlation (creation or generation of correlations) and anti-correlation (decay or annihilation of correlation) is discussed. The method developed here is also used in analysis of the density fluctuations in liquid cesium obtained from slow neutron scattering data, fractal kinetics of the long-range fluctuation in the short-time human memory and chaotic dynamics of R-R intervals of human ECG. (author)

  1. Automotive exhaust gas conversion: from elementary step kinetics to prediction of emission dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebink, J.H.B.J.; Harmsen, J.M.A.; Balenovic, M.; Backx, A.C.P.M.; Schouten, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Elementary step based kinetics show a high added value to describe the performance of catalytic exhaust gas converters under dynamic conditions, as demonstrated with a Euro test cycle. Combination of such kinetic models for individual global reactions covers the mutual interactions via common

  2. Microwave Assisted Enzymatic Kinetic Resolution of (±-1-Phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol in Nonaqueous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Devendran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic resolution of 1-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol, an important chiral synthon, was studied through trans-esterification with acyl acetate to investigate synergism between microwave irradiation and enzyme catalysis. Lipases from different microbial origins were employed for the kinetic resolution of (R/S-1-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol, among which Candida antarctica lipase B, immobilized on acrylic resin (Novozym 435, was found to be the best catalyst in n-hexane as solvent. Vinyl acetate was the most effective among different acyl esters studied. The effect of various parameters was studied in a systematic manner. Definite synergism between microwave and enzyme was observed. The initial rate was improved around 1.28 times under microwave irradiation than conventional heating. Under optimum conditions, maximum conversion (48.78% and high enantiomeric excess (93.25% were obtained in 2 h. From modeling studies, it is concluded that the reaction follows the Ping-Pong bi-bi mechanism with dead end alcohol inhibition. Kinetic parameters were obtained by using nonlinear regression. This process is green, clean, and easily scalable as compared to the chemical process.

  3. Kinetic modeling and dynamic analysis of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to bioethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadbahr, Jalil; Khan, Faisal; Zhang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Deeper understanding of saccharification and fermentation process. • A new kinetic model for dynamic analysis of the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. • Testing and validation of kinetic model. - Abstract: Kinetic modeling and dynamic analysis of the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of cellulose to ethanol was carried out in this study to determine the key reaction kinetics parameters and product inhibition features of the process. To obtain the more reliable kinetic parameters which can be applied for a wide range of operating conditions, batch SSF experiments were carried out at three enzyme loadings (10, 15 and 20 FPU/g cellulose) and two levels of initial concentrations of fermentable sugars (glucose and mannose). Results indicated that the maximum ethanol yield and concentration were achieved at high level of sugar concentrations with intermediate enzyme loading (15 FPU/g cellulose). Dynamic analysis of the acquired experimental results revealed that cellulase inhibition by cellobiose plays the most important role at high level of enzyme loading and low level of initial sugar concentrations. The inhibition of glucose becomes significant when high concentrations of sugars were present in the feedstock. Experimental results of SSF process also reveal that an efficient mixing between the phases helps to improve the ethanol yield significantly.

  4. Kinetics, dynamics and neutron noise in Molten Salt Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Reactor kinetic and dynamic properties of Molten Salt Reactors (MSR) are investigated in a simple model, which allows closed compact analytical solutions to be obtained. The goal is to gain insight, rather than to produce high-quality quantitative data. Through an interpretation of the different terms in the basic equations, and by means of analytical solutions, various approximations are introduced and their validity discussed. The dynamical behaviour of MSRs and their response to small stationary perturbations is described and discussed in comparison with traditional systems. (author)

  5. Striking dynamics and kinetic properties of boxing and MMA gloves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the growing popularity of Mixed Martial Arts (MMA as a competitive sport, questions regarding the dynamic response and properties of MMA gloves arise. High-energy impacts from punches are very similar to boxing yet MMA competition requires the use of 4 oz fingerless glove, compared to the larger full enclosure boxing glove. This work assessed the kinetic properties and strike dynamics of MMA gloves and compared findings with traditional boxing gloves. Gloves mounted on a molded fist were impacted repetitively on an instrumental anvil designed for impact, over a 5 hour period resulting in 10,000 continuous and consistent strikes. Kinetic data from impacts were sampled at the beginning of the data collection and subsequently every 30 minutes (every 1,000 strikes. MMA gloves produced 4-5 times greater peak force and 5 times faster load rate compared to the boxing glove. However, MMA gloves also showed signs of material fatigue, with peak force increasing by 35% and rate of loading increasing by 60% over the duration of the test. Boxing glove characteristics did deteriorate but to a lesser extent. In summary, the kinetic properties of MMA glove differed substantially from the boxing glove resulting in impacts characterized by higher peak forces and more rapid development of force. Material properties including stiffness and thickness play a role in the kinetic characteristics upon impact, and can be inferred to alter injury mechanisms of blunt force trauma.

  6. Kinetic and dynamic probability-density-function descriptions of disperse turbulent two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre; Profeta, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    This article analyzes the status of two classical one-particle probability density function (PDF) descriptions of the dynamics of discrete particles dispersed in turbulent flows. The first PDF formulation considers only the process made up by particle position and velocity Zp=(xp,Up) and is represented by its PDF p (t ;yp,Vp) which is the solution of a kinetic PDF equation obtained through a flux closure based on the Furutsu-Novikov theorem. The second PDF formulation includes fluid variables into the particle state vector, for example, the fluid velocity seen by particles Zp=(xp,Up,Us) , and, consequently, handles an extended PDF p (t ;yp,Vp,Vs) which is the solution of a dynamic PDF equation. For high-Reynolds-number fluid flows, a typical formulation of the latter category relies on a Langevin model for the trajectories of the fluid seen or, conversely, on a Fokker-Planck equation for the extended PDF. In the present work, a new derivation of the kinetic PDF equation is worked out and new physical expressions of the dispersion tensors entering the kinetic PDF equation are obtained by starting from the extended PDF and integrating over the fluid seen. This demonstrates that, under the same assumption of a Gaussian colored noise and irrespective of the specific stochastic model chosen for the fluid seen, the kinetic PDF description is the marginal of a dynamic PDF one. However, a detailed analysis reveals that kinetic PDF models of particle dynamics in turbulent flows described by statistical correlations constitute incomplete stand-alone PDF descriptions and, moreover, that present kinetic-PDF equations are mathematically ill posed. This is shown to be the consequence of the non-Markovian characteristic of the stochastic process retained to describe the system and the use of an external colored noise. Furthermore, developments bring out that well-posed PDF descriptions are essentially due to a proper choice of the variables selected to describe physical systems

  7. The effect of acquisition interval and spatial resolution on dynamic cardiac imaging with a stationary SPECT camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J; Maddula, R; Clackdoyle, R; DiBella, E; Fu, Z

    2007-01-01

    The current SPECT scanning paradigm that acquires images by slow rotation of multiple detectors in body-contoured orbits around the patient is not suited to the rapid collection of tomographically complete data. During rapid image acquisition, mechanical and patient safety constraints limit the detector orbit to circular paths at increased distances from the patient, resulting in decreased spatial resolution. We consider a novel dynamic rotating slant-hole (DyRoSH) SPECT camera that can collect full tomographic data every 2 s, employing three stationary detectors mounted with slant-hole collimators that rotate at 30 rpm. Because the detectors are stationary, they can be placed much closer to the patient than is possible with conventional SPECT systems. We propose that the decoupling of the detector position from the mechanics of rapid image acquisition offers an additional degree of freedom which can be used to improve accuracy in measured kinetic parameter estimates. With simulations and list-mode reconstructions, we consider the effects of different acquisition intervals on dynamic cardiac imaging, comparing a conventional three detector SPECT system with the proposed DyRoSH SPECT system. Kinetic parameters of a two-compartment model of myocardial perfusion for technetium-99m-teboroxime were estimated. When compared to a conventional SPECT scanner for the same acquisition periods, the proposed DyRoSH system shows equivalent or reduced bias or standard deviation values for the kinetic parameter estimates. The DyRoSH camera with a 2 s acquisition period does not show any improvement compared to a DyRoSH camera with a 10 s acquisition period

  8. The effect of acquisition interval and spatial resolution on dynamic cardiac imaging with a stationary SPECT camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J.; Maddula, R.; Clackdoyle, R.; Di Bella, E.; Fu, Z.

    2007-08-01

    The current SPECT scanning paradigm that acquires images by slow rotation of multiple detectors in body-contoured orbits around the patient is not suited to the rapid collection of tomographically complete data. During rapid image acquisition, mechanical and patient safety constraints limit the detector orbit to circular paths at increased distances from the patient, resulting in decreased spatial resolution. We consider a novel dynamic rotating slant-hole (DyRoSH) SPECT camera that can collect full tomographic data every 2 s, employing three stationary detectors mounted with slant-hole collimators that rotate at 30 rpm. Because the detectors are stationary, they can be placed much closer to the patient than is possible with conventional SPECT systems. We propose that the decoupling of the detector position from the mechanics of rapid image acquisition offers an additional degree of freedom which can be used to improve accuracy in measured kinetic parameter estimates. With simulations and list-mode reconstructions, we consider the effects of different acquisition intervals on dynamic cardiac imaging, comparing a conventional three detector SPECT system with the proposed DyRoSH SPECT system. Kinetic parameters of a two-compartment model of myocardial perfusion for technetium-99m-teboroxime were estimated. When compared to a conventional SPECT scanner for the same acquisition periods, the proposed DyRoSH system shows equivalent or reduced bias or standard deviation values for the kinetic parameter estimates. The DyRoSH camera with a 2 s acquisition period does not show any improvement compared to a DyRoSH camera with a 10 s acquisition period.

  9. Iron oxide nanoparticle-based magnetic resonance method to monitor release kinetics from polymeric particles with high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Minnie; Schopf, Eric; Sankaranarayanan, Jagadis; Almutairi, Adah

    2012-09-18

    A new method to precisely monitor rapid release kinetics from polymeric particles using super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, specifically by measuring spin-spin relaxation time (T(2)), is reported. Previously, we have published the formulation of logic gate particles from an acid-sensitive poly-β-aminoester ketal-2 polymer. Here, a series of poly-β-aminoester ketal-2 polymers with varying hydrophobicities were synthesized and used to formulate particles. We attempted to measure fluorescence of released Nile red to determine whether the structural adjustments could finely tune the release kinetics in the range of minutes to hours; however, this standard technique did not differentiate each release rate of our series. Thus, a new method based on encapsulation of iron oxide nanoparticles was developed, which enabled us to resolve the release kinetics of our particles. Moreover, the kinetics matched the relative hydrophobicity order determined by octanol-water partition coefficients. To the best of our knowledge, this method provides the highest resolution of release kinetics to date.

  10. Kinetic Resolution and Stereoselective Synthesis of 3-Substituted Aspartic Acids by Using Engineered Methylaspartate Ammonia Lyases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raj, Hans; Szymanski, Wiktor; Villiers, Jandré de; Puthan Veetil, Vinod; Quax, Wim J.; Shimamoto, Keiko; Janssen, Dick B.; Feringa, Ben L.; Poelarends, Gerrit J.

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic resolution and asymmetric synthesis of various valuable 3-substituted aspartic acids, which were obtained in fair to good yields with diastereomeric ratio values of up to >98:2 and enantiomeric excess values of up to >99 %, by using engineered methylaspartate ammonia lyases are described.

  11. Recrystallization kinetics of nanostructured copper processed by dynamic plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Fengxiang; Zhang, Yubin; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The recrystallization kinetics of nanostructured copper samples processed by dynamic plastic deformation was investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. It was found that the evolution of the recrystallized volume fraction as a function of annealing time has a very low slope (n=0.37) when...

  12. Experimental methods of investigation of kinetics and dynamics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Oliveira, Jaime M.

    1969-03-01

    The author presents experimental methods used to study kinetic and dynamic properties of nuclear reactors. Kinetic methods aim at determining characteristic parameters of the behaviour in time of neutrons. Dynamic methods aim at establishing the relationships between the reactor behaviour and its internal and external causes (notably the measurement of transfer functions). The author proposes a classification with respect to the excitation type: periodic excitation (reactivity sinusoidal modulation, source sinusoidal modulation, periodic pulse excitation), non periodic excitation (reactivity monitoring, reactivity linear variation, reactivity variation according to any given law, removal of starting source), random excitation (random reactivity or source excitation), natural fluctuations (alpha-Rossi method, methods of reduced variance, probabilistic methods, correlation methods, spectral analysis method). He also addresses space and energy effects. Applications are reported for low power and power reactors

  13. Data Driven Approach for High Resolution Population Distribution and Dynamics Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Rose, Amy N [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL; Urban, Marie L [ORNL; Stewart, Robert N [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    High resolution population distribution data are vital for successfully addressing critical issues ranging from energy and socio-environmental research to public health to human security. Commonly available population data from Census is constrained both in space and time and does not capture population dynamics as functions of space and time. This imposes a significant limitation on the fidelity of event-based simulation models with sensitive space-time resolution. This paper describes ongoing development of high-resolution population distribution and dynamics models, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, through spatial data integration and modeling with behavioral or activity-based mobility datasets for representing temporal dynamics of population. The model is resolved at 1 km resolution globally and describes the U.S. population for nighttime and daytime at 90m. Integration of such population data provides the opportunity to develop simulations and applications in critical infrastructure management from local to global scales.

  14. Kinetic resolution of α-bromoamides: Experimental and theoretical investigation of highly enantioselective reactions catalyzed by haloalkane dehalogenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerbeek, Alja; Szymanski, Wiktor; Wijma, Hein J.; Marrink, Siewert; Feringa, Ben L.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2011-01-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenases from five sources were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, isolated, and tested for their ability to achieve kinetic resolution of racemic alpha-bromoamides, which are important intermediates used in the preparation of bioactive compounds. To explore the substrate

  15. A robust state-space kinetics-guided framework for dynamic PET image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, S; Alessio, A M; Kinahan, P E; Liu, H; Shi, P

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic PET image reconstruction is a challenging issue due to the low SNR and the large quantity of spatio-temporal data. We propose a robust state-space image reconstruction (SSIR) framework for activity reconstruction in dynamic PET. Unlike statistically-based frame-by-frame methods, tracer kinetic modeling is incorporated to provide physiological guidance for the reconstruction, harnessing the temporal information of the dynamic data. Dynamic reconstruction is formulated in a state-space representation, where a compartmental model describes the kinetic processes in a continuous-time system equation, and the imaging data are expressed in a discrete measurement equation. Tracer activity concentrations are treated as the state variables, and are estimated from the dynamic data. Sampled-data H ∞ filtering is adopted for robust estimation. H ∞ filtering makes no assumptions on the system and measurement statistics, and guarantees bounded estimation error for finite-energy disturbances, leading to robust performance for dynamic data with low SNR and/or errors. This alternative reconstruction approach could help us to deal with unpredictable situations in imaging (e.g. data corruption from failed detector blocks) or inaccurate noise models. Experiments on synthetic phantom and patient PET data are performed to demonstrate feasibility of the SSIR framework, and to explore its potential advantages over frame-by-frame statistical reconstruction approaches.

  16. Imaging collagen type I fibrillogenesis with high spatiotemporal resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamov, Dimitar R; Stock, Erik; Franz, Clemens M; Jähnke, Torsten; Haschke, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen type I, belong to the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins and they have received much attention over the last five decades due to their large interactome, complex hierarchical structure and high mechanical stability. Nevertheless, the collagen self-assembly process is still incompletely understood. Determining the real-time kinetics of collagen type I formation is therefore pivotal for better understanding of collagen type I structure and function, but visualising the dynamic self-assembly process of collagen I on the molecular scale requires imaging techniques offering high spatiotemporal resolution. Fast and high-speed scanning atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide the means to study such processes on the timescale of seconds under near-physiological conditions. In this study we have applied fast AFM tip scanning to study the assembly kinetics of fibrillar collagen type I nanomatrices with a temporal resolution reaching eight seconds for a frame size of 500 nm. By modifying the buffer composition and pH value, the kinetics of collagen fibrillogenesis can be adjusted for optimal analysis by fast AFM scanning. We furthermore show that amplitude-modulation imaging can be successfully applied to extract additional structural information from collagen samples even at high scan rates. Fast AFM scanning with controlled amplitude modulation therefore provides a versatile platform for studying dynamic collagen self-assembly processes at high resolution. - Highlights: • Continuous non-invasive time-lapse investigation of collagen I fibrillogenesis in situ. • Imaging of collagen I self-assembly with high spatiotemporal resolution. • Application of setpoint modulation to study the hierarchical structure of collagen I. • Observing real-time formation of the D-banding pattern in collagen I

  17. Imaging collagen type I fibrillogenesis with high spatiotemporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamov, Dimitar R, E-mail: stamov@jpk.com [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Stock, Erik [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Franz, Clemens M [DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jähnke, Torsten; Haschke, Heiko [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen type I, belong to the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins and they have received much attention over the last five decades due to their large interactome, complex hierarchical structure and high mechanical stability. Nevertheless, the collagen self-assembly process is still incompletely understood. Determining the real-time kinetics of collagen type I formation is therefore pivotal for better understanding of collagen type I structure and function, but visualising the dynamic self-assembly process of collagen I on the molecular scale requires imaging techniques offering high spatiotemporal resolution. Fast and high-speed scanning atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide the means to study such processes on the timescale of seconds under near-physiological conditions. In this study we have applied fast AFM tip scanning to study the assembly kinetics of fibrillar collagen type I nanomatrices with a temporal resolution reaching eight seconds for a frame size of 500 nm. By modifying the buffer composition and pH value, the kinetics of collagen fibrillogenesis can be adjusted for optimal analysis by fast AFM scanning. We furthermore show that amplitude-modulation imaging can be successfully applied to extract additional structural information from collagen samples even at high scan rates. Fast AFM scanning with controlled amplitude modulation therefore provides a versatile platform for studying dynamic collagen self-assembly processes at high resolution. - Highlights: • Continuous non-invasive time-lapse investigation of collagen I fibrillogenesis in situ. • Imaging of collagen I self-assembly with high spatiotemporal resolution. • Application of setpoint modulation to study the hierarchical structure of collagen I. • Observing real-time formation of the D-banding pattern in collagen I.

  18. Role of tomography in providing radionuclide distribution and kinetic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    A major limitation in radionuclide dosimetry has been the lack of human organ-specific radionuclide distribution and kinetic data because methods of acquiring sequential quantitative information from volumes of interest were not available. Developments in emission computed tomography instrumentation and associated algorithms have overcome this basic limitation, thus allowing in vivo noninvasive tissue distribution studies to be performed. Five aspects of kinetic data acquisition using tomography are: (1) the resolution volume for quantitative work is about two times larger than the system resolution element size as defined by a spread function criterion of full width at half (peak) maximum; (2) scattered radiation might account for 30% of the activity in a given resolution volume and must be taken into account for accurate calculations; (3) proper attenuation compensation must be made to yield quantitative data, particularly with single photon tomography; (4) for dosimetry studies with short half-life labels, multisection systems with dynamic imaging capabilities commensurate with the half-life are needed; (5) the biological conditions such as patient disease and dietary history and the specific activity of the radiopharmaceutical are factors of prime importance in the distribution kinetics

  19. Effects of different per translational kinetics on the dynamics of a core circadian clock model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Paula S; Revelli, Jorge A; Garbarino-Pico, Eduardo; Condat, Carlos A; Guido, Mario E; Tamarit, Francisco A

    2015-01-01

    Living beings display self-sustained daily rhythms in multiple biological processes, which persist in the absence of external cues since they are generated by endogenous circadian clocks. The period (per) gene is a central player within the core molecular mechanism for keeping circadian time in most animals. Recently, the modulation PER translation has been reported, both in mammals and flies, suggesting that translational regulation of clock components is important for the proper clock gene expression and molecular clock performance. Because translational regulation ultimately implies changes in the kinetics of translation and, therefore, in the circadian clock dynamics, we sought to study how and to what extent the molecular clock dynamics is affected by the kinetics of PER translation. With this objective, we used a minimal mathematical model of the molecular circadian clock to qualitatively characterize the dynamical changes derived from kinetically different PER translational mechanisms. We found that the emergence of self-sustained oscillations with characteristic period, amplitude, and phase lag (time delays) between per mRNA and protein expression depends on the kinetic parameters related to PER translation. Interestingly, under certain conditions, a PER translation mechanism with saturable kinetics introduces longer time delays than a mechanism ruled by a first-order kinetics. In addition, the kinetic laws of PER translation significantly changed the sensitivity of our model to parameters related to the synthesis and degradation of per mRNA and PER degradation. Lastly, we found a set of parameters, with realistic values, for which our model reproduces some experimental results reported recently for Drosophila melanogaster and we present some predictions derived from our analysis.

  20. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-01-01

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  1. Super-resolution optical microscopy for studying membrane structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Erdinc

    2017-07-12

    Investigation of cell membrane structure and dynamics requires high spatial and temporal resolution. The spatial resolution of conventional light microscopy is limited due to the diffraction of light. However, recent developments in microscopy enabled us to access the nano-scale regime spatially, thus to elucidate the nanoscopic structures in the cellular membranes. In this review, we will explain the resolution limit, address the working principles of the most commonly used super-resolution microscopy techniques and summarise their recent applications in the biomembrane field.

  2. The kinetics of crossflow dynamic membrane bioreactor | Li | Water SA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crossflow dynamic membrane bioreactor (CDMBR) kinetics was investigated by treating caprolactam wastewater over a period of 180 d. The removal efficiencies of organic substances and nitrogen averaged over 99% and 80%, respectively. The observed sludge yield was only 0.14 g SS·g-1 COD·d-1 at an SRT of 30 d ...

  3. Comparison of molecular dynamics and kinetic modeling of gas-surface interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frezzotti, A.; Gaastra - Nedea, S.V.; Markvoort, A.J.; Spijker, P.; Gibelli, L.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of a dilute monatomic gas with a solid surface is studied byMolecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and by numerical solutions of a recently proposed kinetic model. Following previous investigations, the heat transport between parallel walls and Couette flow have been adopted as test

  4. Growth Kinetics and Size Distribution Dynamics of Viscous Secondary Organic Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Science and Global Change Div. (ASGC); Shilling, John E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Science and Global Change Div. (ASGC); Zelenyuk, Alla [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Physical Sciences Div.; Liu, Jiumeng [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Science and Global Change Div. (ASGC); Bell, David M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Physical Sciences Div.; Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. of Atmospheric Chemistry; D’Ambro, Emma L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences and Dept. of Chemistry; Gaston, Cassandra J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Univ. of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Thornton, Joel A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences and Dept. of Chemistry; Laskin, Alexander [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lin, Peng [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Wilson, Jacqueline [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Physical Sciences Div.; Easter, Richard C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Science and Global Change Div. (ASGC); Wang, Jian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Environmental & Climate Sciences Dept.; Bertram, Allan K. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Martin, Scot T. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences; Seinfeld, John H. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Div. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and Div. of Engineering and Applied Science; Worsnop, Douglas R. [Aerodyne Research, Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Aerosol and Cloud Chemistry

    2017-12-15

    Low bulk diffusivity inside viscous semisolid atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can prolong equilibration time scale, but its broader impacts on aerosol growth and size distribution dynamics are poorly understood. In this article, we present quantitative insights into the effects of bulk diffusivity on the growth and evaporation kinetics of SOA formed under dry conditions from photooxidation of isoprene in the presence of a bimodal aerosol consisting of Aitken (ammonium sulfate) and accumulation (isoprene or α-pinene SOA) mode particles. Aerosol composition measurements and evaporation kinetics indicate that isoprene SOA is composed of several semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), with some reversibly reacting to form oligomers. Model analysis shows that liquid-like bulk diffusivities can be used to fit the observed evaporation kinetics of accumulation mode particles but fail to explain the growth kinetics of bimodal aerosol by significantly under-predicting the evolution of the Aitken mode. In contrast, the semisolid scenario successfully reproduces both evaporation and growth kinetics, with the interpretation that hindered partitioning of SVOCs into large viscous particles effectively promotes the growth of smaller particles that have shorter diffusion time scales. This effect has important implications for the growth of atmospheric ultrafine particles to climatically active sizes.

  5. Fouling Kinetics and Associated Dynamics of Structural Modifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Jerome; Prádanos, Pedro; Calvo, J. I.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that the fouling behaviour of microfiltration membranes does not agree within all the time ranges of any of the commonly used membrane blocking models (i.e. complete, standard, intermediate or cake blocking). The resulting experimental kinetics of flux decline do not fit to only one...... of these models, but according to a successive or simultaneous coexistence of two or more of them. This is studied by analysing the structural modifications associated with the fouling kinetics. To achieve this goal, here we analyse the dynamical changes on the structure of four microporous membranes made...... by Sartorius (ST02 and ST045, neutral) and Spectrum (SP02 and SP045, positively charged) when fouled by permeating a protein aqueous solution (bovine serum albumin (BSA) at 1 g l(-1)) under 10 kPa in a dead-end device. The structure after different fouling times is obtained by using an extended bubble point...

  6. Dynamic Model of Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Process Based on Multi-zone Reaction Kinetics: Model Derivation and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Bapin Kumar; Brooks, Geoff; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Li, Zushu; Schrama, Frank N. H.; Sun, Jianjun

    2018-04-01

    A multi-zone kinetic model coupled with a dynamic slag generation model was developed for the simulation of hot metal and slag composition during the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) operation. The three reaction zones (i) jet impact zone, (ii) slag-bulk metal zone, (iii) slag-metal-gas emulsion zone were considered for the calculation of overall refining kinetics. In the rate equations, the transient rate parameters were mathematically described as a function of process variables. A micro and macroscopic rate calculation methodology (micro-kinetics and macro-kinetics) were developed to estimate the total refining contributed by the recirculating metal droplets through the slag-metal emulsion zone. The micro-kinetics involves developing the rate equation for individual droplets in the emulsion. The mathematical models for the size distribution of initial droplets, kinetics of simultaneous refining of elements, the residence time in the emulsion, and dynamic interfacial area change were established in the micro-kinetic model. In the macro-kinetics calculation, a droplet generation model was employed and the total amount of refining by emulsion was calculated by summing the refining from the entire population of returning droplets. A dynamic FetO generation model based on oxygen mass balance was developed and coupled with the multi-zone kinetic model. The effect of post-combustion on the evolution of slag and metal composition was investigated. The model was applied to a 200-ton top blowing converter and the simulated value of metal and slag was found to be in good agreement with the measured data. The post-combustion ratio was found to be an important factor in controlling FetO content in the slag and the kinetics of Mn and P in a BOF process.

  7. Kinetic equations within the formalism of non-equilibrium thermo field dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimitsu, Toshihico

    1988-01-01

    After reviewing the real-time formalism of dissipative quantum field theory, i.e. non-equilibrium thermo field dynamics (NETFD), a kinetic equation, a self-consistent equation for the dissipation coefficient and a ''mass'' or ''chemical potential'' renormalization equation for non-equilibrium transient situations are extracted out of the two-point Green's function of the Heisenberg field, in their most general forms upon the basic requirements of NETFD. The formulation is applied to the electron-phonon system, as an example, where the gradient expansion and the quasi-particle approximation are performed. The formalism of NETFD is reinvestigated in connection with the kinetic equations. (orig.)

  8. Understanding system dynamics of an adaptive enzyme network from globally profiled kinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Austin W T; Liu, Wei-Chung; Charusanti, Pep; Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2014-01-15

    A major challenge in mathematical modeling of biological systems is to determine how model parameters contribute to systems dynamics. As biological processes are often complex in nature, it is desirable to address this issue using a systematic approach. Here, we propose a simple methodology that first performs an enrichment test to find patterns in the values of globally profiled kinetic parameters with which a model can produce the required system dynamics; this is then followed by a statistical test to elucidate the association between individual parameters and different parts of the system's dynamics. We demonstrate our methodology on a prototype biological system of perfect adaptation dynamics, namely the chemotaxis model for Escherichia coli. Our results agreed well with those derived from experimental data and theoretical studies in the literature. Using this model system, we showed that there are motifs in kinetic parameters and that these motifs are governed by constraints of the specified system dynamics. A systematic approach based on enrichment statistical tests has been developed to elucidate the relationships between model parameters and the roles they play in affecting system dynamics of a prototype biological network. The proposed approach is generally applicable and therefore can find wide use in systems biology modeling research.

  9. Measuring Absolute RNA Copy Numbers at High Temporal Resolution Reveals Transcriptome Kinetics in Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick D.L. Owens

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcript regulation is essential for cell function, and misregulation can lead to disease. Despite technologies to survey the transcriptome, we lack a comprehensive understanding of transcript kinetics, which limits quantitative biology. This is an acute challenge in embryonic development, where rapid changes in gene expression dictate cell fate decisions. By ultra-high-frequency sampling of Xenopus embryos and absolute normalization of sequence reads, we present smooth gene expression trajectories in absolute transcript numbers. During a developmental period approximating the first 8 weeks of human gestation, transcript kinetics vary by eight orders of magnitude. Ordering genes by expression dynamics, we find that “temporal synexpression” predicts common gene function. Remarkably, a single parameter, the characteristic timescale, can classify transcript kinetics globally and distinguish genes regulating development from those involved in cellular metabolism. Overall, our analysis provides unprecedented insight into the reorganization of maternal and embryonic transcripts and redefines our ability to perform quantitative biology.

  10. Modal and Dynamic Analysis of a Vehicle with Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangji Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel kinetic dynamic suspension (KDS system is presented for the cooperative control of the roll and warp motion modes of off-road vehicles. The proposed KDS system consists of two hydraulic cylinders acting on the antiroll bars. Hence, the antiroll bars are not completely replaced by the hydraulic system, but both systems are installed. In this paper, the vibration analysis in terms of natural frequencies of different motion modes in frequency domain for an off-road vehicle equipped with different configurable suspension systems is studied by using the modal analysis method. The dynamic responses of the vehicle with different configurable suspension systems are investigated under different road excitations and maneuvers. The results of the modal and dynamic analysis prove that the KDS system can reduce the roll and articulation motions of the off-road vehicle without adding extra bounce stiffness and deteriorating the ride comfort. Furthermore, the roll stiffness is increased and the warp stiffness is decreased by the KDS system, which could significantly enhance handing performance and off-road capability.

  11. Hydrolytic kinetic resolution of the enantiomers of the structural isomers trans-1-phenylpropene oxide and (2,3-epoxypropyl) benzene by yeast epoxide hydrolase

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lotter, J

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic resolution of the enantiomers of trans-1-phenylpropene oxide and (2,3-epoxypropyl)benzene was achieved by yeasts from the genus Rhodotorula. The resolution of trans-1-phenylpropene oxide by Rhodotorula glutinis UOFS Y-0123 yielded (1R, 2R...

  12. Relativistic nuclear fluid dynamics and VUU kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molitoris, J.J.; Hahn, D.; Alonso, C.; Collazo, I.; D'Alessandris, P.; McAbee, T.; Wilson, J.; Zingman, J.

    1987-01-01

    Relativistic kinetic theory may be used to understand hot dense hadronic matter. We address the questions of collective flow and pion production in a 3 D relativistic fluid dynamic model and in the VUU microscopic theory. The GSI/LBL collective flow and pion data point to a stiff equation of state. The effect of the nuclear equation of state on the thermodynamic parameters is discussed. The properties of dense hot hadronic matter are studied in Au + Au collisions from 0.1 to 10 GeV/nucleon. 22 refs., 5 figs

  13. Numerical simulation of stochastic point kinetic equation in the dynamical system of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha Ray, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► In this paper stochastic neutron point kinetic equations have been analyzed. ► Euler–Maruyama method and Strong Taylor 1.5 order method have been discussed. ► These methods are applied for the solution of stochastic point kinetic equations. ► Comparison between the results of these methods and others are presented in tables. ► Graphs for neutron and precursor sample paths are also presented. -- Abstract: In the present paper, the numerical approximation methods, applied to efficiently calculate the solution for stochastic point kinetic equations () in nuclear reactor dynamics, are investigated. A system of Itô stochastic differential equations has been analyzed to model the neutron density and the delayed neutron precursors in a point nuclear reactor. The resulting system of Itô stochastic differential equations are solved over each time-step size. The methods are verified by considering different initial conditions, experimental data and over constant reactivities. The computational results indicate that the methods are simple and suitable for solving stochastic point kinetic equations. In this article, a numerical investigation is made in order to observe the random oscillations in neutron and precursor population dynamics in subcritical and critical reactors.

  14. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Cosmelli, C.; Di Domizio, S.; Castellano, M. G.; Tomei, C.

    2015-01-01

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm 2 are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm 2 silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σ E  = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency

  15. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardani, L., E-mail: laura.cardani@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Physics Department, Princeton University, Washington Road, 08544, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Cosmelli, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Di Domizio, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castellano, M. G. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy); Tomei, C. [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2015-08-31

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm{sup 2} are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm{sup 2} silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σ{sub E} = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  16. The Palladium-Catalyzed Aerobic Kinetic Resolution of Secondary Alcohols: Reaction Development, Scope, and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ebner, Davidâ C.; Bagdanoff, Jeffreyâ T.; Ferreira, Ericâ M.; McFadden, Ryanâ M.; Caspi, Danielâ D.; Trend, Raissaâ M.; Stoltz, Brianâ M.

    2009-01-01

    The first palladium-catalyzed enantioselective oxidation of secondary alcohols has been developed, utilizing the readily available diamine (-)-sparteine as a chiral ligand and molecular oxygen as the stoichiometric oxidant. Mechanistic insights regarding the role of the base and hydrogen-bond donors have resulted in several improvements to the original system. Namely, addition of cesium carbonate and tert-butyl alcohol greatly enhances reaction rates, promoting rapid resolutions. The use of chloroform as solvent allows the use of ambient air as the terminal oxidant at 23 degrees C, resulting in enhanced catalyst selectivity. These improved reaction conditions have permitted the successful kinetic resolution of benzylic, allylic, and cyclopropyl secondary alcohols to high enantiomeric excess with good-to-excellent selectivity factors. This catalyst system has also been applied to the desymmetrization of meso-diols, providing high yields of enantioenriched hydroxyketones.

  17. The Palladium-Catalyzed Aerobic Kinetic Resolution of Secondary Alcohols: Reaction Development, Scope, and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ebner, Davidâ C.

    2009-12-07

    The first palladium-catalyzed enantioselective oxidation of secondary alcohols has been developed, utilizing the readily available diamine (-)-sparteine as a chiral ligand and molecular oxygen as the stoichiometric oxidant. Mechanistic insights regarding the role of the base and hydrogen-bond donors have resulted in several improvements to the original system. Namely, addition of cesium carbonate and tert-butyl alcohol greatly enhances reaction rates, promoting rapid resolutions. The use of chloroform as solvent allows the use of ambient air as the terminal oxidant at 23 degrees C, resulting in enhanced catalyst selectivity. These improved reaction conditions have permitted the successful kinetic resolution of benzylic, allylic, and cyclopropyl secondary alcohols to high enantiomeric excess with good-to-excellent selectivity factors. This catalyst system has also been applied to the desymmetrization of meso-diols, providing high yields of enantioenriched hydroxyketones.

  18. Nonlinear saturation of the slab ITG instability and zonal flow generation with fully kinetic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miecnikowski, Matthew T.; Sturdevant, Benjamin J.; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott E.

    2018-05-01

    Fully kinetic turbulence models are of interest for their potential to validate or replace gyrokinetic models in plasma regimes where the gyrokinetic expansion parameters are marginal. Here, we demonstrate fully kinetic ion capability by simulating the growth and nonlinear saturation of the ion-temperature-gradient instability in shearless slab geometry assuming adiabatic electrons and including zonal flow dynamics. The ion trajectories are integrated using the Lorentz force, and the cyclotron motion is fully resolved. Linear growth and nonlinear saturation characteristics show excellent agreement with analogous gyrokinetic simulations across a wide range of parameters. The fully kinetic simulation accurately reproduces the nonlinearly generated zonal flow. This work demonstrates nonlinear capability, resolution of weak gradient drive, and zonal flow physics, which are critical aspects of modeling plasma turbulence with full ion dynamics.

  19. Modeling and Classification of Kinetic Patterns of Dynamic Metabolic Biomarkers in Physical Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Breit

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this work were the classification of dynamic metabolic biomarker candidates and the modeling and characterization of kinetic regulatory mechanisms in human metabolism with response to external perturbations by physical activity. Longitudinal metabolic concentration data of 47 individuals from 4 different groups were examined, obtained from a cycle ergometry cohort study. In total, 110 metabolites (within the classes of acylcarnitines, amino acids, and sugars were measured through a targeted metabolomics approach, combining tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS with the concept of stable isotope dilution (SID for metabolite quantitation. Biomarker candidates were selected by combined analysis of maximum fold changes (MFCs in concentrations and P-values resulting from statistical hypothesis testing. Characteristic kinetic signatures were identified through a mathematical modeling approach utilizing polynomial fitting. Modeled kinetic signatures were analyzed for groups with similar behavior by applying hierarchical cluster analysis. Kinetic shape templates were characterized, defining different forms of basic kinetic response patterns, such as sustained, early, late, and other forms, that can be used for metabolite classification. Acetylcarnitine (C2, showing a late response pattern and having the highest values in MFC and statistical significance, was classified as late marker and ranked as strong predictor (MFC = 1.97, P < 0.001. In the class of amino acids, highest values were shown for alanine (MFC = 1.42, P < 0.001, classified as late marker and strong predictor. Glucose yields a delayed response pattern, similar to a hockey stick function, being classified as delayed marker and ranked as moderate predictor (MFC = 1.32, P < 0.001. These findings coincide with existing knowledge on central metabolic pathways affected in exercise physiology, such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, glycolysis, and glycogenolysis. The presented modeling

  20. Comparison of quasi-static and dynamic squats: a three-dimensional kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic study of the lower limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Julien; Hagemeister, Nicola; Aissaoui, Rachid; de Guise, Jacques A

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have described 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and electromyography (EMG) of the lower limbs during quasi-static or dynamic squatting activities. One study compared these two squatting conditions but only at low speed on healthy subjects, and provided no information on kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs. The purpose of the present study was to contrast simultaneous recordings of 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs during quasi-stat ic and fast-dynamic squats in healthy and pathological subjects. Ten subjects were recruited: five healthy and five osteoarthritis subjects. A motion-capture system, force plate, and surface electrodes respectively recorded 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG of the lower limbs. Each subject performed a quasi-static squat and several fast-dynamic squats from 0° to 70° of knee flexion. The two squatting conditions were compared for positions where quasi-static and fast-dynamic knee flexion-extension angles were similar. Mean differences between quasi-static and fast-dynamic squats were 1.5° for rotations, 1.9 mm for translations, 2.1% of subjects' body weight for ground reaction forces, 6.6 Nm for torques, 11.2 mm for center of pressure, and 6.3% of maximum fast-dynamic electromyographic activities for EMG. Some significant differences (psquats were small. 69.5% of compared data were equivalent. In conclusion, this study showed that quasi-static and fast-dynamic squatting activities are comparable in terms of 3D kinematics, 3D kinetics and EMG, although some reservations still remain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A thermostatted kinetic theory model for event-driven pedestrian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianca, Carlo; Mogno, Caterina

    2018-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the modeling of the pedestrian dynamics by means of the thermostatted kinetic theory. Specifically the microscopic interactions among pedestrians and an external force field are modeled for simulating the evacuation of pedestrians from a metro station. The fundamentals of the stochastic game theory and the thermostatted kinetic theory are coupled for the derivation of a specific mathematical model which depicts the time evolution of the distribution of pedestrians at different exits of a metro station. The perturbation theory is employed in order to establish the stability analysis of the nonequilibrium stationary states in the case of a metro station consisting of two exits. A general sensitivity analysis on the initial conditions, the magnitude of the external force field and the number of exits is presented by means of numerical simulations which, in particular, show how the asymptotic distribution and the convergence time are affected by the presence of an external force field. The results show how, in evacuation conditions, the interaction dynamics among pedestrians can be negligible with respect to the external force. The important role of the thermostat term in allowing the reaching of the nonequilibrium stationary state is stressed out. Research perspectives are underlined at the end of paper, in particular for what concerns the derivation of frameworks that take into account the definition of local external actions and the introduction of the space and velocity dynamics.

  2. Simplification of lipase design in the enzymatic kinetic resolution of amines by saturation transfer difference NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcio S.; Pietrobom, Daniel, E-mail: s.marcio@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (CCNH/UFABC), Santo André, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for racemic amide and lipase interaction as a first-pass design method in the enzymatic kinetic resolution of amines. As a novel adaptation of commonly used protein-ligand screening NMR methodologies, this approach relies upon a lipase-amide interaction wherein the time-consuming is reduced drastically and new insights are produced during the development of biocatalysis reactions. (author)

  3. Electron and proton kinetics and dynamics in flaring atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Zharkova, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    This timely book presents new research results on high-energy particle physics related to solar flares, covering the theory and applications of the reconnection process in a clear and comprehensible way. It investigates particle kinetics and dynamics in flaring atmospheres and their diagnostics from spectral observations, while providing an analysis of the observation data and techniques and comparing various models. Written by an internationally acclaimed expert, this is vital reading for all solar, astro-, and plasma physicists working in the field.

  4. Ultrafast dynamics of laser-pulse excited semiconductors: non-Markovian quantum kinetic equations with nonequilibrium correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V.Ignatyuk

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-Markovian kinetic equations in the second Born approximation are derived for a two-zone semiconductor excited by a short laser pulse. Both collision dynamics and running nonequilibrium correlations are taken into consideration. The energy balance and relaxation of the system to equilibrium are discussed. Results of numerical solution of the kinetic equations for carriers and phonons are presented.

  5. Dynamic PET of human liver inflammation: impact of kinetic modeling with optimization-derived dual-blood input function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guobao; Corwin, Michael T; Olson, Kristin A; Badawi, Ramsey D; Sarkar, Souvik

    2018-05-30

    The hallmark of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is hepatocellular inflammation and injury in the setting of hepatic steatosis. Recent work has indicated that dynamic 18F-FDG PET with kinetic modeling has the potential to assess hepatic inflammation noninvasively, while static FDG-PET did not show a promise. Because the liver has dual blood supplies, kinetic modeling of dynamic liver PET data is challenging in human studies. The objective of this study is to evaluate and identify a dual-input kinetic modeling approach for dynamic FDG-PET of human liver inflammation. Fourteen human patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease were included in the study. Each patient underwent one-hour dynamic FDG-PET/CT scan and had liver biopsy within six weeks. Three models were tested for kinetic analysis: traditional two-tissue compartmental model with an image-derived single-blood input function (SBIF), model with population-based dual-blood input function (DBIF), and modified model with optimization-derived DBIF through a joint estimation framework. The three models were compared using Akaike information criterion (AIC), F test and histopathologic inflammation reference. The results showed that the optimization-derived DBIF model improved the fitting of liver time activity curves and achieved lower AIC values and higher F values than the SBIF and population-based DBIF models in all patients. The optimization-derived model significantly increased FDG K1 estimates by 101% and 27% as compared with traditional SBIF and population-based DBIF. K1 by the optimization-derived model was significantly associated with histopathologic grades of liver inflammation while the other two models did not provide a statistical significance. In conclusion, modeling of DBIF is critical for kinetic analysis of dynamic liver FDG-PET data in human studies. The optimization-derived DBIF model is more appropriate than SBIF and population-based DBIF for dynamic FDG-PET of liver inflammation. © 2018

  6. A method for estimation of elasticities in metabolic networks using steady state and dynamic metabolomics data and linlog kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Gulik Walter M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamic modeling of metabolic reaction networks under in vivo conditions is a crucial step in order to obtain a better understanding of the (disfunctioning of living cells. So far dynamic metabolic models generally have been based on mechanistic rate equations which often contain so many parameters that their identifiability from experimental data forms a serious problem. Recently, approximative rate equations, based on the linear logarithmic (linlog format have been proposed as a suitable alternative with fewer parameters. Results In this paper we present a method for estimation of the kinetic model parameters, which are equal to the elasticities defined in Metabolic Control Analysis, from metabolite data obtained from dynamic as well as steady state perturbations, using the linlog kinetic format. Additionally, we address the question of parameter identifiability from dynamic perturbation data in the presence of noise. The method is illustrated using metabolite data generated with a dynamic model of the glycolytic pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on mechanistic rate equations. Elasticities are estimated from the generated data, which define the complete linlog kinetic model of the glycolysis. The effect of data noise on the accuracy of the estimated elasticities is presented. Finally, identifiable subset of parameters is determined using information on the standard deviations of the estimated elasticities through Monte Carlo (MC simulations. Conclusion The parameter estimation within the linlog kinetic framework as presented here allows the determination of the elasticities directly from experimental data from typical dynamic and/or steady state experiments. These elasticities allow the reconstruction of the full kinetic model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the determination of the control coefficients. MC simulations revealed that certain elasticities are potentially unidentifiable from dynamic data only

  7. Solving kinetic equations with adaptive mesh in phase space for rarefied gas dynamics and plasma physics (Invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolobov, Vladimir; Arslanbekov, Robert; Frolova, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes an Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space (AMPS) technique for solving kinetic equations with deterministic mesh-based methods. The AMPS technique allows automatic generation of adaptive Cartesian mesh in both physical and velocity spaces using a Tree-of-Trees data structure. We illustrate advantages of AMPS for simulations of rarefied gas dynamics and electron kinetics on low temperature plasmas. In particular, we consider formation of the velocity distribution functions in hypersonic flows, particle kinetics near oscillating boundaries, and electron kinetics in a radio-frequency sheath. AMPS provide substantial savings in computational cost and increased efficiency of the mesh-based kinetic solvers

  8. Solving kinetic equations with adaptive mesh in phase space for rarefied gas dynamics and plasma physics (Invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolobov, Vladimir [CFD Research Corporation, Huntsville, AL 35805, USA and The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Arslanbekov, Robert [CFD Research Corporation, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Frolova, Anna [Computing Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 119333 (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-09

    The paper describes an Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space (AMPS) technique for solving kinetic equations with deterministic mesh-based methods. The AMPS technique allows automatic generation of adaptive Cartesian mesh in both physical and velocity spaces using a Tree-of-Trees data structure. We illustrate advantages of AMPS for simulations of rarefied gas dynamics and electron kinetics on low temperature plasmas. In particular, we consider formation of the velocity distribution functions in hypersonic flows, particle kinetics near oscillating boundaries, and electron kinetics in a radio-frequency sheath. AMPS provide substantial savings in computational cost and increased efficiency of the mesh-based kinetic solvers.

  9. Dynamic Modeling of Cell-Free Biochemical Networks Using Effective Kinetic Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Wayman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell-free systems offer many advantages for the study, manipulation and modeling of metabolism compared to in vivo processes. Many of the challenges confronting genome-scale kinetic modeling can potentially be overcome in a cell-free system. For example, there is no complex transcriptional regulation to consider, transient metabolic measurements are easier to obtain, and we no longer have to consider cell growth. Thus, cell-free operation holds several significant advantages for model development, identification and validation. Theoretically, genome-scale cell-free kinetic models may be possible for industrially important organisms, such as E. coli, if a simple, tractable framework for integrating allosteric regulation with enzyme kinetics can be formulated. Toward this unmet need, we present an effective biochemical network modeling framework for building dynamic cell-free metabolic models. The key innovation of our approach is the integration of simple effective rules encoding complex allosteric regulation with traditional kinetic pathway modeling. We tested our approach by modeling the time evolution of several hypothetical cell-free metabolic networks. We found that simple effective rules, when integrated with traditional enzyme kinetic expressions, captured complex allosteric patterns such as ultrasensitivity or non-competitive inhibition in the absence of mechanistic information. Second, when integrated into network models, these rules captured classic regulatory patterns such as product-induced feedback inhibition. Lastly, we showed, at least for the network architectures considered here, that we could simultaneously estimate kinetic parameters and allosteric connectivity from synthetic data starting from an unbiased collection of possible allosteric structures using particle swarm optimization. However, when starting with an initial population that was heavily enriched with incorrect structures, our particle swarm approach could converge

  10. Palladium-Catalyzed Enantioselective C-H Olefination of Diaryl Sulfoxides through Parallel Kinetic Resolution and Desymmetrization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu-Chao; Li, Yan; Zhang, Bo-Chao; Zhang, Feng-Xu; Yang, Yi-Nuo; Wang, Xi-Sheng

    2018-03-07

    The first example of Pd II -catalyzed enantioselective C-H olefination with non-chiral or racemic sulfoxides as directing groups was developed. A variety of chiral diaryl sulfoxides were synthesized with high enantioselectivity (up to 99 %) through both desymmetrization and parallel kinetic resolution (PKR). This is the first report of Pd II -catalyzed enantioselective C(sp 2 )-H functionalization through PKR, and it represents a novel strategy to construct sulfur chiral centers. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Practical considerations for high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Michael R. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: armstrong30@llnl.gov; Boyden, Ken [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Colvin, Jeffrey D.; De Hope, William J.; Frank, Alan M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Gibson, David J.; Hartemann, Fred [N Division, Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-280, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Kim, Judy S. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); King, Wayne E.; La Grange, Thomas B.; Pyke, Ben J.; Reed, Bryan W.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Torralva, Ben R. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5x10{sup 7} electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution <10{sup -6} s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed.

  12. Practical considerations for high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, Michael R.; Boyden, Ken; Browning, Nigel D.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Colvin, Jeffrey D.; De Hope, William J.; Frank, Alan M.; Gibson, David J.; Hartemann, Fred; Kim, Judy S.; King, Wayne E.; La Grange, Thomas B.; Pyke, Ben J.; Reed, Bryan W.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Torralva, Ben R.

    2007-01-01

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5x10 7 electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution -6 s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed

  13. Application of point kinetic model in the study of fluidized bed reactor dynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco Tullio de; Streck, Elaine E.

    1995-01-01

    In this work the dynamical behavior of the fluidized bed nuclear reactor is analysed. The main goal consist to study the effect of the acceleration term in the point kinetic equations. Numerical simulations are reported considering constant acceleration. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs

  14. Kinetic analysis of dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole PET correlates with radiation treatment outcome in head-and-neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulsen Frank

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia compromises local control in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC. In order to determine the value of [18F]-fluoromisonidazole (Fmiso with regard to tumor hypoxia, a patient study with dynamic Fmiso PET was performed. For a better understanding of tracer uptake and distribution, a kinetic model was developed to analyze dynamic Fmiso PET data. Methods For 15 HNC patients, dynamic Fmiso PET examinations were performed prior to radiotherapy (RT treatment. The data was analyzed using a two compartment model, which allows the determination of characteristic hypoxia and perfusion values. For different parameters, such as patient age, tumor size and standardized uptake value, the correlation to treatment outcome was tested using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney U-test. Statistical tests were also performed for hypoxia and perfusion parameters determined by the kinetic model and for two different metrics based on these parameters. Results The kinetic Fmiso analysis extracts local hypoxia and perfusion characteristics of a tumor tissue. These parameters are independent quantities. In this study, different types of characteristic hypoxia-perfusion patterns in tumors could be identified. The clinical verification of the results, obtained on the basis of the kinetic analysis, showed a high correlation of hypoxia-perfusion patterns and RT treatment outcome (p = 0.001 for this initial patient group. Conclusion The presented study established, that Fmiso PET scans may benefit from dynamic acquisition and analysis by a kinetic model. The pattern of distribution of perfusion and hypoxia in the tissue is correlated to local control in HNC.

  15. Programming chemical kinetics: engineering dynamic reaction networks with DNA strand displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Niranjan

    Over the last century, the silicon revolution has enabled us to build faster, smaller and more sophisticated computers. Today, these computers control phones, cars, satellites, assembly lines, and other electromechanical devices. Just as electrical wiring controls electromechanical devices, living organisms employ "chemical wiring" to make decisions about their environment and control physical processes. Currently, the big difference between these two substrates is that while we have the abstractions, design principles, verification and fabrication techniques in place for programming with silicon, we have no comparable understanding or expertise for programming chemistry. In this thesis we take a small step towards the goal of learning how to systematically engineer prescribed non-equilibrium dynamical behaviors in chemical systems. We use the formalism of chemical reaction networks (CRNs), combined with mass-action kinetics, as our programming language for specifying dynamical behaviors. Leveraging the tools of nucleic acid nanotechnology (introduced in Chapter 1), we employ synthetic DNA molecules as our molecular architecture and toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement as our reaction primitive. Abstraction, modular design and systematic fabrication can work only with well-understood and quantitatively characterized tools. Therefore, we embark on a detailed study of the "device physics" of DNA strand displacement (Chapter 2). We present a unified view of strand displacement biophysics and kinetics by studying the process at multiple levels of detail, using an intuitive model of a random walk on a 1-dimensional energy landscape, a secondary structure kinetics model with single base-pair steps, and a coarse-grained molecular model that incorporates three-dimensional geometric and steric effects. Further, we experimentally investigate the thermodynamics of three-way branch migration. Our findings are consistent with previously measured or inferred rates for

  16. Incorporating human-water dynamics in a hyper-resolution land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergopolan, N.; Chaney, N.; Wanders, N.; Sheffield, J.; Wood, E. F.

    2017-12-01

    The increasing demand for water, energy, and food is leading to unsustainable groundwater and surface water exploitation. As a result, the human interactions with the environment, through alteration of land and water resources dynamics, need to be reflected in hydrologic and land surface models (LSMs). Advancements in representing human-water dynamics still leave challenges related to the lack of water use data, water allocation algorithms, and modeling scales. This leads to an over-simplistic representation of human water use in large-scale models; this is in turn leads to an inability to capture extreme events signatures and to provide reliable information at stakeholder-level spatial scales. The emergence of hyper-resolution models allows one to address these challenges by simulating the hydrological processes and interactions with the human impacts at field scales. We integrated human-water dynamics into HydroBlocks - a hyper-resolution, field-scale resolving LSM. HydroBlocks explicitly solves the field-scale spatial heterogeneity of land surface processes through interacting hydrologic response units (HRUs); and its HRU-based model parallelization allows computationally efficient long-term simulations as well as ensemble predictions. The implemented human-water dynamics include groundwater and surface water abstraction to meet agricultural, domestic and industrial water demands. Furthermore, a supply-demand water allocation scheme based on relative costs helps to determine sectoral water use requirements and tradeoffs. A set of HydroBlocks simulations over the Midwest United States (daily, at 30-m spatial resolution for 30 years) are used to quantify the irrigation impacts on water availability. The model captures large reductions in total soil moisture and water table levels, as well as spatiotemporal changes in evapotranspiration and runoff peaks, with their intensity related to the adopted water management strategy. By incorporating human-water dynamics in

  17. Extracting a respiratory signal from raw dynamic PET data that contain tracer kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, P J; Thielemans, K; Marsden, P K

    2014-08-07

    Data driven gating (DDG) methods provide an alternative to hardware based respiratory gating for PET imaging. Several existing DDG approaches obtain a respiratory signal by observing the change in PET-counts within specific regions of acquired PET data. Currently, these methods do not allow for tracer kinetics which can interfere with the respiratory signal and introduce error. In this work, we produced a DDG method for dynamic PET studies that exhibit tracer kinetics. Our method is based on an existing approach that uses frequency-domain analysis to locate regions within raw PET data that are subject to respiratory motion. In the new approach, an optimised non-stationary short-time Fourier transform was used to create a time-varying 4D map of motion affected regions. Additional processing was required to ensure that the relationship between the sign of the respiratory signal and the physical direction of movement remained consistent for each temporal segment of the 4D map. The change in PET-counts within the 4D map during the PET acquisition was then used to generate a respiratory curve. Using 26 min dynamic cardiac NH3 PET acquisitions which included a hardware derived respiratory measurement, we show that tracer kinetics can severely degrade the respiratory signal generated by the original DDG method. In some cases, the transition of tracer from the liver to the lungs caused the respiratory signal to invert. The new approach successfully compensated for tracer kinetics and improved the correlation between the data-driven and hardware based signals. On average, good correlation was maintained throughout the PET acquisitions.

  18. Preclinical dynamic 18F-FDG PET - tumor characterization and radiotherapy response assessment by kinetic compartment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roee, Kathrine; Aleksandersen, Thomas B.; Nilsen, Line B.; Hong Qu; Ree, Anne H.; Malinen, Eirik; Kristian, Alexandr; Seierstad, Therese; Olsen, Dag R.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Non-invasive visualization of tumor biological and molecular processes of importance to diagnosis and treatment response is likely to be critical in individualized cancer therapy. Since conventional static 18 F-FDG PET with calculation of the semi-quantitative parameter standardized uptake value (SUV) may be subject to many sources of variability, we here present an approach of quantifying the 18 F-FDG uptake by analytic two-tissue compartment modeling, extracting kinetic tumor parameters from dynamic 18 F-FDG PET. Further, we evaluate the potential of such parameters in radiotherapy response assessment. Material and methods. Male, athymic mice with prostate carcinoma xenografts were subjected to dynamic PET either untreated (n=8) or 24 h post-irradiation (7.5 Gy single dose, n=8). After 10 h of fasting, intravenous bolus injections of 10-15 MBq 18 F-FDG were administered and a 1 h dynamic PET scan was performed. 4D emission data were reconstructed using OSEM-MAP, before remote post-processing. Individual arterial input functions were extracted from the image series. Subsequently, tumor 18 F-FDG uptake was fitted voxel-by-voxel to a compartment model, producing kinetic parameter maps. Results. The kinetic model separated the 18 F-FDG uptake into free and bound tracer and quantified three parameters; forward tracer diffusion (k1), backward tracer diffusion (k2), and rate of 18 F-FDG phosphorylation, i.e. the glucose metabolism (k3). The fitted kinetic model gave a goodness of fit (r2) to the observed data ranging from 0.91 to 0.99, and produced parametrical images of all tumors included in the study. Untreated tumors showed homogeneous intra-group median values of all three parameters (k1, k2 and k3), whereas the parameters significantly increased in the tumors irradiated 24 h prior to 18 F-FDG PET. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a two-tissue compartment kinetic analysis of dynamic 18 F-FDG PET images. If validated, extracted

  19. Nitrate denitrification with nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products: Stoichiometry, kinetics and dynamics of stable isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, V A; Rytov, S V

    2015-09-01

    A kinetic analysis of nitrate denitrification by a single or two species of denitrifying bacteria with glucose or ethanol as a carbon source and nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products was performed using experimental data published earlier (Menyailo and Hungate, 2006; Vidal-Gavilan et al., 2013). Modified Monod kinetics was used in the dynamic biological model. The special equations were added to the common dynamic biological model to describe how isotopic fractionation between N species changes. In contrast to the generally assumed first-order kinetics, in this paper, the traditional Rayleigh equation describing stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation in nitrate was derived from the dynamic isotopic equations for any type of kinetics. In accordance with the model, in Vidal-Gavilan's experiments, the maximum specific rate of nitrate reduction was proved to be less for ethanol compared to glucose. Conversely, the maximum specific rate of nitrite reduction was proved to be much less for glucose compared to ethanol. Thus, the intermediate nitrite concentration was negligible for the ethanol experiment, while it was significant for the glucose experiment. In Menyailo's and Hungate's experiments, the low value of maximum specific rate of nitrous oxide reduction gives high intermediate value of nitrous oxide concentration. The model showed that the dynamics of nitrogen and oxygen isotope signatures are responding to the biological dynamics. Two microbial species instead of single denitrifying bacteria are proved to be more adequate to describe the total process of nitrate denitrification to dinitrogen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Towards high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Buongiorno Nardelli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The MyOcean R&D project MESCLA (MEsoSCaLe dynamical Analysis through combined model, satellite and in situ data was devoted to the high resolution 3-D retrieval of tracer and velocity fields in the oceans, based on the combination of in situ and satellite observations and quasi-geostrophic dynamical models. The retrieval techniques were also tested and compared with the output of a primitive equation model, with particular attention to the accuracy of the vertical velocity field as estimated through the Q vector formulation of the omega equation. The project focused on a test case, covering the region where the Gulf Stream separates from the US East Coast. This work demonstrated that innovative methods for the high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations can be used to build the next generations of operational observation-based products.

  1. Kinetic studies of ICF target dynamics with ePLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. J.

    2016-10-01

    The ePLAS code was recently used1 to show that a modeling change from artificial to real viscosity can result in a decrease of the predicted performance of ICF targets. This code typically follows either fluid or PIC electrons with fluid ions in self-consistent E - and B - fields computed by the Implicit Moment Method2. For the present study the ions have instead been run as PIC particles undergoing Krook-like self-collisions. The ePLAS collision model continually redistributes the ion particle properties toward a local Maxwellian, while conserving the mean density, momentum and energy. Whereas the use of real viscosity captures large Knudsen Number effects as the active target dimensions shrink below the ion mean-free-path, the new kinetic modeling can manifest additional effects such as collisional shock precursors3 from the escape and streaming of the fastest particle ions. In 2D cylindrical geometry we will explore how such kinetic shock extensions might affect shell and core compression dynamics in ICF target implosions.

  2. Sub-minute kinetics of human red cell fumarase: 1 H spin-echo NMR spectroscopy and 13 C rapid-dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishmarev, Dmitry; Wright, Alan J; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Pileio, Giuseppe; Stevanato, Gabriele; Brindle, Kevin M; Kuchel, Philip W

    2018-03-01

    Fumarate is an important probe of metabolism in hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. It is used to detect the release of fumarase in cancer tissues, which is associated with necrosis and drug treatment. Nevertheless, there are limited reports describing the detailed kinetic studies of this enzyme in various cells and tissues. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the sub-minute kinetics of human red blood cell fumarase using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and to provide a quantitative description of the enzyme that is relevant to the use of fumarate as a probe of cell rupture. The fumarase reaction was studied using time courses of 1 H spin-echo and 13 C-NMR spectra. 1 H-NMR experiments showed that the fumarase reaction in hemolysates is sufficiently rapid to make its kinetics amenable to study in a period of approximately 3 min, a timescale characteristic of hyperpolarized 13 C-NMR spectroscopy. The rapid-dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (RD-DNP) technique was used to hyperpolarize [1,4- 13 C]fumarate, which was injected into concentrated hemolysates. The kinetic data were analyzed using recently developed FmR α analysis and modeling of the enzymatic reaction using Michaelis-Menten equations. In RD-DNP experiments, the decline in the 13 C-NMR signal from fumarate, and the concurrent rise and fall of that from malate, were captured with high spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, which allowed the robust quantification of fumarase kinetics. The kinetic parameters obtained indicate the potential contribution of hemolysis to the overall rate of the fumarase reaction when 13 C-NMR RD-DNP is used to detect necrosis in animal models of implanted tumors. The analytical procedures developed will be applicable to studies of other rapid enzymatic reactions using conventional and hyperpolarized substrate NMR spectroscopy. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Stereoselectivity and substrate specificity in the kinetic resolution of methyl-substituted 1-oxaspiro[2.5]octanes by Rhodotorula glutinis epoxide hydrolase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, C.A.G.M.; Meeuwse, P.; Herpers, R.L.J.M.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.

    2005-01-01

    [GRAPHICS] The kinetic resolution of a range of methyl-substituted 1-oxaspiro[2.5]octanes by yeast epoxide hydrolase (YEH) from Rhodotorula glutinis has been investigated. The structural determinants of substrate specificity and stereoselectivity of YEH toward these substrates appeared to be the

  4. Kinetic resolution and stereoselective synthesis of 3-substituted aspartic acids by using engineered methylaspartate ammonia lyases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Hans; Szymanski, Wiktor; de Villiers, Jandré; Puthan Veetil, Vinod; Quax, Wim J; Shimamoto, Keiko; Janssen, Dick B; Feringa, Ben L; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2013-08-19

    Enzymatic amino acid synthesis: Kinetic resolution and asymmetric synthesis of various valuable 3-substituted aspartic acids, which were obtained in fair to good yields with diastereomeric ratio values of up to >98:2 and enantiomeric excess values of up to >99 %, by using engineered methylaspartate ammonia lyases are described. These biocatalytic methodologies for the selective preparation of aspartic acid derivatives appear to be attractive alternatives for existing chemical methods. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Dynamic Ureas with Fast and pH-Independent Hydrolytic Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kaimin; Ying, Hanze; Cheng, Jianjun

    2018-04-06

    Low cost, high performance hydrolysable polymers are of great importance in biomedical applications and materials industries. While many applications require materials to have a degradation profile insensitive to external pH to achieve consistent release profiles under varying conditions, hydrolysable chemistry techniques developed so far have pH-dependent hydrolytic kinetics. This work reports the design and synthesis of a new type of hydrolysable polymer that has identical hydrolysis kinetics from pH 3 to 11. The unprecedented pH independent hydrolytic kinetics of the aryl ureas were shown to be related to the dynamic bond dissociation controlled hydrolysis mechanism; the resulting hindered poly(aryl urea) can be degraded with a hydrolysis half-life of 10 min in solution. More importantly, these fast degradable hindered aromatic polyureas can be easily prepared by addition polymerization from commercially available monomers and are resistant to hydrolysis in solid form for months under ambient storage conditions. The combined features of good stability in solid state and fast hydrolysis at various pH values is unprecedented in polyurea material, and will have implications for materials design and applications, such as sacrificial coatings and biomaterials. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Simulation of the hot flow behaviour of a medium carbon microalloyed steel. Part 2. Dynamic recrystallization: onset and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, J.M.; Al Omar, A.; Prado, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    According to the part 1 of this work, in this second part the dynamic recrystallization of a commercial medium carbon microalloyed steel is characterized from the point of view of its onset and kinetics. For this purpose uniaxial hot compression tests were carried out over a range of five orders of magnitude in strain rate and 300 degree centigree of temperature. Experimental results are compared with those reported in the literature and the possible effect of dynamic precipitation is also analyzed. It is verified that the kinetics of dynamics recrystallization can balefully be described by the classical Avrami equation. (Author) 42 refs

  7. Enantioselective Synthesis of Aminodiols by Sequential Rhodium-Catalysed Oxyamination/Kinetic Resolution: Expanding the Substrate Scope of Amidine-Based Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch, Joan; Giménez-Nueno, Irene; Funes-Ardoiz, Ignacio; Bernús, Miguel; Matheu, M Isabel; Maseras, Feliu; Castillón, Sergio; Díaz, Yolanda

    2018-03-26

    Regio- and stereoselective oxyamination of dienes through a tandem rhodium-catalysed aziridination-nucleophilic opening affords racemic oxazolidinone derivatives, which undergo a kinetic resolution acylation process with amidine-based catalysts (ABCs) to achieve s values of up to 117. This protocol was applied to the enantioselective synthesis of sphingosine. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A study of pH-dependent photodegradation of amiloride by a multivariate curve resolution approach to combined kinetic and acid-base titration UV data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Michele; Ioele, Giuseppina; Mas, Sílvia; Tauler, Romà; Ragno, Gaetano

    2012-11-21

    Amiloride photostability at different pH values was studied in depth by applying Multivariate Curve Resolution Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) to the UV spectrophotometric data from drug solutions exposed to stressing irradiation. Resolution of all degradation photoproducts was possible by simultaneous spectrophotometric analysis of kinetic photodegradation and acid-base titration experiments. Amiloride photodegradation showed to be strongly dependent on pH. Two hard modelling constraints were sequentially used in MCR-ALS for the unambiguous resolution of all the species involved in the photodegradation process. An amiloride acid-base system was defined by using the equilibrium constraint, and the photodegradation pathway was modelled taking into account the kinetic constraint. The simultaneous analysis of photodegradation and titration experiments revealed the presence of eight different species, which were differently distributed according to pH and time. Concentration profiles of all the species as well as their pure spectra were resolved and kinetic rate constants were estimated. The values of rate constants changed with pH and under alkaline conditions the degradation pathway and photoproducts also changed. These results were compared to those obtained by LC-MS analysis from drug photodegradation experiments. MS analysis allowed the identification of up to five species and showed the simultaneous presence of more than one acid-base equilibrium.

  9. Kinetic and dynamic Delaunay tetrahedralizations in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Gernot; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2004-09-01

    We describe algorithms to implement fully dynamic and kinetic three-dimensional unconstrained Delaunay triangulations, where the time evolution of the triangulation is not only governed by moving vertices but also by a changing number of vertices. We use three-dimensional simplex flip algorithms, a stochastic visibility walk algorithm for point location and in addition, we propose a new simple method of deleting vertices from an existing three-dimensional Delaunay triangulation while maintaining the Delaunay property. As an example, we analyse the performance in various cases of practical relevance. The dual Dirichlet tessellation can be used to solve differential equations on an irregular grid, to define partitions in cell tissue simulations, for collision detection etc.

  10. Dynamic PET reconstruction using temporal patch-based low rank penalty for ROI-based brain kinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyungsang; Ye, Jong Chul; Son, Young Don; Cho, Zang Hee; Bresler, Yoram; Ra, Jong Beom

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used to measure changes in the bio-distribution of radiopharmaceuticals within particular organs of interest over time. However, to retain sufficient temporal resolution, the number of photon counts in each time frame must be limited. Therefore, conventional reconstruction algorithms such as the ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) produce noisy reconstruction images, thus degrading the quality of the extracted time activity curves (TACs). To address this issue, many advanced reconstruction algorithms have been developed using various spatio-temporal regularizations. In this paper, we extend earlier results and develop a novel temporal regularization, which exploits the self-similarity of patches that are collected in dynamic images. The main contribution of this paper is to demonstrate that the correlation of patches can be exploited using a low-rank constraint that is insensitive to global intensity variations. The resulting optimization framework is, however, non-Lipschitz and non-convex due to the Poisson log-likelihood and low-rank penalty terms. Direct application of the conventional Poisson image deconvolution by an augmented Lagrangian (PIDAL) algorithm is, however, problematic due to its large memory requirements, which prevents its parallelization. Thus, we propose a novel optimization framework using the concave-convex procedure (CCCP) by exploiting the Legendre–Fenchel transform, which is computationally efficient and parallelizable. In computer simulation and a real in vivo experiment using a high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) scanner, we confirm that the proposed algorithm can improve image quality while also extracting more accurate region of interests (ROI) based kinetic parameters. Furthermore, we show that the total reconstruction time for HRRT PET is significantly accelerated using our GPU implementation, which makes the algorithm very practical in clinical environments

  11. Optically Controlled Electron-Transfer Reaction Kinetics and Solvation Dynamics : Effect of Franck-Condon States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Kriti; Patra, Aniket; Dhole, Kajal; Samanta, Alok Kumar; Ghosh, Swapan K.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental results for optically controlled electron-transfer reaction kinetics (ETRK) and nonequilibrium solvation dynamics (NESD) of Coumarin 480 in DMPC vesicle show their dependence on excitation wavelength λex. However, the celebrated Marcus theory and linear-response-theory-based approaches

  12. Textural kinetics: a novel dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI feature for breast lesion classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agner, Shannon C; Soman, Salil; Libfeld, Edward; McDonald, Margie; Thomas, Kathleen; Englander, Sarah; Rosen, Mark A; Chin, Deanna; Nosher, John; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-06-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast has emerged as an adjunct imaging tool to conventional X-ray mammography due to its high detection sensitivity. Despite the increasing use of breast DCE-MRI, specificity in distinguishing malignant from benign breast lesions is low, and interobserver variability in lesion classification is high. The novel contribution of this paper is in the definition of a new DCE-MRI descriptor that we call textural kinetics, which attempts to capture spatiotemporal changes in breast lesion texture in order to distinguish malignant from benign lesions. We qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrated on 41 breast DCE-MRI studies that textural kinetic features outperform signal intensity kinetics and lesion morphology features in distinguishing benign from malignant lesions. A probabilistic boosting tree (PBT) classifier in conjunction with textural kinetic descriptors yielded an accuracy of 90%, sensitivity of 95%, specificity of 82%, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.92. Graph embedding, used for qualitative visualization of a low-dimensional representation of the data, showed the best separation between benign and malignant lesions when using textural kinetic features. The PBT classifier results and trends were also corroborated via a support vector machine classifier which showed that textural kinetic features outperformed the morphological, static texture, and signal intensity kinetics descriptors. When textural kinetic attributes were combined with morphologic descriptors, the resulting PBT classifier yielded 89% accuracy, 99% sensitivity, 76% specificity, and an AUC of 0.91.

  13. xMDFF: molecular dynamics flexible fitting of low-resolution X-ray structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGreevy, Ryan; Singharoy, Abhishek; Li, Qufei; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong; Perozo, Eduardo; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    A new real-space refinement method for low-resolution X-ray crystallography is presented. The method is based on the molecular dynamics flexible fitting protocol targeted at addressing large-scale deformations of the search model to achieve refinement with minimal manual intervention. An explanation of the method is provided, augmented by results from the refinement of both synthetic and experimental low-resolution data, including an independent electrophysiological verification of the xMDFF-refined crystal structure of a voltage-sensor protein. X-ray crystallography remains the most dominant method for solving atomic structures. However, for relatively large systems, the availability of only medium-to-low-resolution diffraction data often limits the determination of all-atom details. A new molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF)-based approach, xMDFF, for determining structures from such low-resolution crystallographic data is reported. xMDFF employs a real-space refinement scheme that flexibly fits atomic models into an iteratively updating electron-density map. It addresses significant large-scale deformations of the initial model to fit the low-resolution density, as tested with synthetic low-resolution maps of d-ribose-binding protein. xMDFF has been successfully applied to re-refine six low-resolution protein structures of varying sizes that had already been submitted to the Protein Data Bank. Finally, via systematic refinement of a series of data from 3.6 to 7 Å resolution, xMDFF refinements together with electrophysiology experiments were used to validate the first all-atom structure of the voltage-sensing protein Ci-VSP

  14. xMDFF: molecular dynamics flexible fitting of low-resolution X-ray structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGreevy, Ryan; Singharoy, Abhishek [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Li, Qufei [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong [University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Perozo, Eduardo [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Schulten, Klaus, E-mail: kschulte@ks.uiuc.edu [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A new real-space refinement method for low-resolution X-ray crystallography is presented. The method is based on the molecular dynamics flexible fitting protocol targeted at addressing large-scale deformations of the search model to achieve refinement with minimal manual intervention. An explanation of the method is provided, augmented by results from the refinement of both synthetic and experimental low-resolution data, including an independent electrophysiological verification of the xMDFF-refined crystal structure of a voltage-sensor protein. X-ray crystallography remains the most dominant method for solving atomic structures. However, for relatively large systems, the availability of only medium-to-low-resolution diffraction data often limits the determination of all-atom details. A new molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF)-based approach, xMDFF, for determining structures from such low-resolution crystallographic data is reported. xMDFF employs a real-space refinement scheme that flexibly fits atomic models into an iteratively updating electron-density map. It addresses significant large-scale deformations of the initial model to fit the low-resolution density, as tested with synthetic low-resolution maps of d-ribose-binding protein. xMDFF has been successfully applied to re-refine six low-resolution protein structures of varying sizes that had already been submitted to the Protein Data Bank. Finally, via systematic refinement of a series of data from 3.6 to 7 Å resolution, xMDFF refinements together with electrophysiology experiments were used to validate the first all-atom structure of the voltage-sensing protein Ci-VSP.

  15. Extracting a respiratory signal from raw dynamic PET data that contain tracer kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleyer, P J; Thielemans, K; Marsden, P K

    2014-01-01

    Data driven gating (DDG) methods provide an alternative to hardware based respiratory gating for PET imaging. Several existing DDG approaches obtain a respiratory signal by observing the change in PET-counts within specific regions of acquired PET data. Currently, these methods do not allow for tracer kinetics which can interfere with the respiratory signal and introduce error. In this work, we produced a DDG method for dynamic PET studies that exhibit tracer kinetics. Our method is based on an existing approach that uses frequency-domain analysis to locate regions within raw PET data that are subject to respiratory motion. In the new approach, an optimised non-stationary short-time Fourier transform was used to create a time-varying 4D map of motion affected regions. Additional processing was required to ensure that the relationship between the sign of the respiratory signal and the physical direction of movement remained consistent for each temporal segment of the 4D map. The change in PET-counts within the 4D map during the PET acquisition was then used to generate a respiratory curve. Using 26 min dynamic cardiac NH 3 PET acquisitions which included a hardware derived respiratory measurement, we show that tracer kinetics can severely degrade the respiratory signal generated by the original DDG method. In some cases, the transition of tracer from the liver to the lungs caused the respiratory signal to invert. The new approach successfully compensated for tracer kinetics and improved the correlation between the data-driven and hardware based signals. On average, good correlation was maintained throughout the PET acquisitions. (paper)

  16. The dynamic range of ultra-high-resolution cryogenic gamma-ray spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Shafinaz [Advanced Detector Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Terracol, Stephane F. [Advanced Detector Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Drury, Owen B. [Advanced Detector Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Friedrich, Stephan [Advanced Detector Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)]. E-mail: friedrich1@llnl.gov

    2006-04-15

    We are developing high-resolution cryogenic gamma-ray spectrometers for nuclear science and non-proliferation applications. The gamma-ray detectors are composed of a bulk superconducting Sn foil absorber attached to a multilayer Mo/Cu transition-edge sensor (TES). The energy resolution of a detector with a 1x1x0.25 mm{sup 3} Sn absorber is 50-90 eV FWHM for {gamma}-rays up to 100 keV, and it decreases for larger absorbers. Here, we present the detector performance for different absorber volumes, and discuss the trade-offs between energy resolution and dynamic range.

  17. The Dynamic Range of Ultra-High Resolution Cryogenic Gamma-ray Spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S; Terracol, S F; Drury, O B; Friedrich, S

    2005-01-01

    We are developing high-resolution cryogenic gamma-ray spectrometers for nuclear science and non-proliferation applications. The gamma-ray detectors are composed of a bulk superconducting Sn foil absorber attached to multilayer Mo/Cu transition-edge sensors (TES). The energy resolution achieved with a 1 x 1 x 0.25 mm 3 Sn absorber is 50 -90eV for γ-rays up to 100 keV and it decreases for large absorber sizes. We discuss the trade-offs between energy resolution and dynamic range, as well as development of TES arrays for higher count rates and better sensitivity

  18. Dynamic phase transitions and dynamic phase diagrams in the kinetic spin-5/2 Blume–Capel model in an oscillating external magnetic field: Effective-field theory and the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertaş, Mehmet; Keskin, Mustafa; Deviren, Bayram

    2012-01-01

    Using an effective field theory with correlations, we study a kinetic spin-5/2 Blume–Capel model with bilinear exchange interaction and single-ion crystal field on a square lattice. The effective-field dynamic equation is derived by employing the Glauber transition rates. First, the phases in the kinetic system are obtained by solving this dynamic equation. Then, the thermal behavior of the dynamic magnetization, the hysteresis loop area and correlation are investigated in order to characterize the nature of the dynamic transitions and to obtain dynamic phase transition temperatures. Finally, we present the phase diagrams in two planes, namely (T/zJ, h 0 /zJ) and (T/zJ, D/zJ), where T absolute temperature, h 0 , the amplitude of the oscillating field, D, crystal field interaction or single-ion anisotropy constant and z denotes the nearest-neighbor sites of the central site. The phase diagrams exhibit four fundamental phases and ten mixed phases which are composed of binary, ternary and tetrad combination of fundamental phases, depending on the crystal field interaction parameter. Moreover, the phase diagrams contain a dynamic tricritical point (T), a double critical end point (B), a multicritical point (A) and zero-temperature critical point (Z). - Highlights: ► The effective-field theory is used to study the kinetic spin-5/2 Ising Blume–Capel model. ► Time variations of average order parameter have been studied to find phases in the system. ► The dynamic magnetization, hysteresis loop area and correlation have been calculated. ► The dynamic phase boundaries of the system depend on D/zJ. ► The dynamic phase diagrams are presented in the (T/zJ, h 0 /zJ) and (D/zJ, T/zJ) planes.

  19. Dynamic phase transitions and dynamic phase diagrams in the kinetic spin-5/2 Blume-Capel model in an oscillating external magnetic field: Effective-field theory and the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertas, Mehmet [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa, E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Deviren, Bayram [Department of Physics, Nevsehir University, 50300 Nevsehir (Turkey)

    2012-04-15

    Using an effective field theory with correlations, we study a kinetic spin-5/2 Blume-Capel model with bilinear exchange interaction and single-ion crystal field on a square lattice. The effective-field dynamic equation is derived by employing the Glauber transition rates. First, the phases in the kinetic system are obtained by solving this dynamic equation. Then, the thermal behavior of the dynamic magnetization, the hysteresis loop area and correlation are investigated in order to characterize the nature of the dynamic transitions and to obtain dynamic phase transition temperatures. Finally, we present the phase diagrams in two planes, namely (T/zJ, h{sub 0}/zJ) and (T/zJ, D/zJ), where T absolute temperature, h{sub 0}, the amplitude of the oscillating field, D, crystal field interaction or single-ion anisotropy constant and z denotes the nearest-neighbor sites of the central site. The phase diagrams exhibit four fundamental phases and ten mixed phases which are composed of binary, ternary and tetrad combination of fundamental phases, depending on the crystal field interaction parameter. Moreover, the phase diagrams contain a dynamic tricritical point (T), a double critical end point (B), a multicritical point (A) and zero-temperature critical point (Z). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effective-field theory is used to study the kinetic spin-5/2 Ising Blume-Capel model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Time variations of average order parameter have been studied to find phases in the system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamic magnetization, hysteresis loop area and correlation have been calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamic phase boundaries of the system depend on D/zJ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamic phase diagrams are presented in the (T/zJ, h{sub 0}/zJ) and (D/zJ, T/zJ) planes.

  20. Correlation between High Resolution Dynamic MR Features and Prognostic Factors in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shin Ho; Cho, Nariya; Kim, Seung Ja; Cho, Kyung Soo; Ko, Eun Sook; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cha, Joo Hee

    2008-01-01

    To correlate high resolution dynamic MR features with prognostic factors in breast cancer. One hundred and ninety-four women with invasive ductal carcinomas underwent dynamic MR imaging using T1-weighted three dimensional fast low-angle shot (3D-FLASH) sequence within two weeks prior to surgery. Morphological and kinetic MR features were determined based on the breast imaging and reporting data system (BI-RADS) MR imaging lexicon. Histological specimens were analyzed for tumor size, axillary lymph node status, histological grade, expression of estrogen receptor (ER), expression of progesterone receptor (PR), and expression of p53, c-erbB-2, and Ki-67. Correlations between the MR features and prognostic factors were determined using the Pearson x 2 test, linear-by-linear association, and logistic regression analysis. By multivariate analysis, a spiculated margin was a significant, independent predictor of a lower histological grade (p < 0.001), and lower expression of Ki-67 (p = 0.007). Rim enhancement was significant, independent predictor of a higher histological grade (p < 0.001), negative expression of ER (p 0.001), negative expression of PR (p < 0.001) and a larger tumor size (p = 0.006). A washout curve may predict a higher level of Ki-67 (p = 0.05). Most of the parameters of the initial enhancement phase cannot predict the status of the prognostic factors. Only the enhancement ratio may predict a larger tumor size (p 0.05). Of the BI-RADS-MR features, a spiculated margin may predict favorable prognosis, whereas rim enhancement or washout may predict unfavorable prognosis of breast cancer

  1. Viriato: a Fourier-Hermite spectral code for strongly magnetised fluid-kinetic plasma dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Nuno; Dorland, William; Fazendeiro, Luis; Kanekar, Anjor; Mallet, Alfred; Zocco, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    We report on the algorithms and numerical methods used in Viriato, a novel fluid-kinetic code that solves two distinct sets of equations: (i) the Kinetic Reduced Electron Heating Model equations [Zocco & Schekochihin, 2011] and (ii) the kinetic reduced MHD (KRMHD) equations [Schekochihin et al., 2009]. Two main applications of these equations are magnetised (Alfvnénic) plasma turbulence and magnetic reconnection. Viriato uses operator splitting to separate the dynamics parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field (assumed strong). Along the magnetic field, Viriato allows for either a second-order accurate MacCormack method or, for higher accuracy, a spectral-like scheme. Perpendicular to the field Viriato is pseudo-spectral, and the time integration is performed by means of an iterative predictor-corrector scheme. In addition, a distinctive feature of Viriato is its spectral representation of the parallel velocity-space dependence, achieved by means of a Hermite representation of the perturbed distribution function. A series of linear and nonlinear benchmarks and tests are presented, with focus on 3D decaying kinetic turbulence. Work partially supported by Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia via Grants UID/FIS/50010/2013 and IF/00530/2013.

  2. Chemo-enzymatic Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of 4-methylcyclohexanone via kinetic resolution of racemic carboxylic acids: direct access to enantioenriched lactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drożdż, Agnieszka; Chrobok, Anna

    2016-01-21

    A new method for the asymmetric chemo-enzymatic Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of prochiral 4-methylcyclohexanone to (R)-4-methylcaprolactone in the presence of (±)-4-methyloctanoic acid, Candida Antarctica lipase B and 30% aq. H2O2 has been developed. A mechanism for the asymmetric induction based on kinetic resolution of racemic carboxylic acids is proposed.

  3. New types of experimental data shape the use of enzyme kinetics for dynamic network modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummler, Katja; Lubitz, Timo; Schelker, Max; Klipp, Edda

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of Leonor Michaelis and Maude Menten's paper on the reaction kinetics of the enzyme invertase in 1913, molecular biology has evolved tremendously. New measurement techniques allow in vivo characterization of the whole genome, proteome or transcriptome of cells, whereas the classical enzyme essay only allows determination of the two Michaelis-Menten parameters V and K(m). Nevertheless, Michaelis-Menten kinetics are still commonly used, not only in the in vitro context of enzyme characterization but also as a rate law for enzymatic reactions in larger biochemical reaction networks. In this review, we give an overview of the historical development of kinetic rate laws originating from Michaelis-Menten kinetics over the past 100 years. Furthermore, we briefly summarize the experimental techniques used for the characterization of enzymes, and discuss web resources that systematically store kinetic parameters and related information. Finally, describe the novel opportunities that arise from using these data in dynamic mathematical modeling. In this framework, traditional in vitro approaches may be combined with modern genome-scale measurements to foster thorough understanding of the underlying complex mechanisms. © 2013 FEBS.

  4. Dynamic Model of Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Process Based on Multizone Reaction Kinetics: Modeling of Decarburization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Bapin Kumar; Brooks, Geoffrey; Akbar Rhamdhani, M.; Li, Zushu; Schrama, Frank N. H.; Overbosch, Aart

    2018-03-01

    In a previous study by the authors (Rout et al. in Metall Mater Trans B 49:537-557, 2018), a dynamic model for the BOF, employing the concept of multizone kinetics was developed. In the current study, the kinetics of decarburization reaction is investigated. The jet impact and slag-metal emulsion zones were identified to be primary zones for carbon oxidation. The dynamic parameters in the rate equation of decarburization such as residence time of metal drops in the emulsion, interfacial area evolution, initial size, and the effects of surface-active oxides have been included in the kinetic rate equation of the metal droplet. A modified mass-transfer coefficient based on the ideal Langmuir adsorption equilibrium has been proposed to take into account the surface blockage effects of SiO2 and P2O5 in slag on the decarburization kinetics of a metal droplet in the emulsion. Further, a size distribution function has been included in the rate equation to evaluate the effect of droplet size on reaction kinetics. The mathematical simulation indicates that decarburization of the droplet in the emulsion is a strong function of the initial size and residence time. A modified droplet generation rate proposed previously by the authors has been used to estimate the total decarburization rate by slag-metal emulsion. The model's prediction shows that about 76 pct of total carbon is removed by reactions in the emulsion, and the remaining is removed by reactions at the jet impact zone. The predicted bath carbon by the model has been found to be in good agreement with the industrially measured data.

  5. Dynamic Model of Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Process Based on Multizone Reaction Kinetics: Modeling of Decarburization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Bapin Kumar; Brooks, Geoffrey; Akbar Rhamdhani, M.; Li, Zushu; Schrama, Frank N. H.; Overbosch, Aart

    2018-06-01

    In a previous study by the authors (Rout et al. in Metall Mater Trans B 49:537-557, 2018), a dynamic model for the BOF, employing the concept of multizone kinetics was developed. In the current study, the kinetics of decarburization reaction is investigated. The jet impact and slag-metal emulsion zones were identified to be primary zones for carbon oxidation. The dynamic parameters in the rate equation of decarburization such as residence time of metal drops in the emulsion, interfacial area evolution, initial size, and the effects of surface-active oxides have been included in the kinetic rate equation of the metal droplet. A modified mass-transfer coefficient based on the ideal Langmuir adsorption equilibrium has been proposed to take into account the surface blockage effects of SiO2 and P2O5 in slag on the decarburization kinetics of a metal droplet in the emulsion. Further, a size distribution function has been included in the rate equation to evaluate the effect of droplet size on reaction kinetics. The mathematical simulation indicates that decarburization of the droplet in the emulsion is a strong function of the initial size and residence time. A modified droplet generation rate proposed previously by the authors has been used to estimate the total decarburization rate by slag-metal emulsion. The model's prediction shows that about 76 pct of total carbon is removed by reactions in the emulsion, and the remaining is removed by reactions at the jet impact zone. The predicted bath carbon by the model has been found to be in good agreement with the industrially measured data.

  6. Molecular theory of mass transfer kinetics and dynamics at gas-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Akihiro; Garrett, Bruce C

    2008-01-01

    The mass transfer mechanism across gas-water interface is studied with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD results provide a robust and qualitatively consistent picture to previous studies about microscopic aspects of mass transfer, including interface structure, free energy profiles for the uptake, scattering dynamics and energy relaxation of impinging molecules. These MD results are quantitatively compared with experimental uptake measurements, and we find that the apparent inconsistency between MD and experiment could be partly resolved by precise decomposition of the observed kinetics into elemental steps. Remaining issues and future perspectives toward constructing a comprehensive multi-scale description of interfacial mass transfer are summarized.

  7. Chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Houston, Paul L

    2006-01-01

    This text teaches the principles underlying modern chemical kinetics in a clear, direct fashion, using several examples to enhance basic understanding. It features solutions to selected problems, with separate sections and appendices that cover more technical applications.Each chapter is self-contained and features an introduction that identifies its basic goals, their significance, and a general plan for their achievement. This text's important aims are to demonstrate that the basic kinetic principles are essential to the solution of modern chemical problems, and to show how the underlying qu

  8. New approaches for the reliable in vitro assessment of binding affinity based on high-resolution real-time data acquisition of radioligand-receptor binding kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Markus; Pichler, Florian; Nics, Lukas; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Spreitzer, Helmut; Hacker, Marcus; Mitterhauser, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Resolving the kinetic mechanisms of biomolecular interactions have become increasingly important in early-phase drug development. Since traditional in vitro methods belong to dose-dependent assessments, binding kinetics is usually overlooked. The present study aimed at the establishment of two novel experimental approaches for the assessment of binding affinity of both, radiolabelled and non-labelled compounds targeting the A 3 R, based on high-resolution real-time data acquisition of radioligand-receptor binding kinetics. A novel time-resolved competition assay was developed and applied to determine the K i of eight different A 3 R antagonists, using CHO-K1 cells stably expressing the hA 3 R. In addition, a new kinetic real-time cell-binding approach was established to quantify the rate constants k on and k off , as well as the dedicated K d of the A 3 R agonist [ 125 I]-AB-MECA. Furthermore, lipophilicity measurements were conducted to control influences due to physicochemical properties of the used compounds. Two novel real-time cell-binding approaches were successfully developed and established. Both experimental procedures were found to visualize the kinetic binding characteristics with high spatial and temporal resolution, resulting in reliable affinity values, which are in good agreement with values previously reported with traditional methods. Taking into account the lipophilicity of the A 3 R antagonists, no influences on the experimental performance and the resulting affinity were investigated. Both kinetic binding approaches comprise tracer administration and subsequent binding to living cells, expressing the dedicated target protein. Therefore, the experiments resemble better the true in vivo physiological conditions and provide important markers of cellular feedback and biological response.

  9. Detectors for high resolution dynamic positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Tomography is the technique of producing a photographic image of an opaque specimen by transmitting a beam of x-rays or gamma rays through the specimen onto an adjacent photographic film. The image results from variations in thickness, density, and chemical composition, of the specimen. This technique is used to study the metabolism of the human brain. This article examines the design of equipment used for high resolution dynamic positron emission tomography. 27 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  10. Many-body kinetics of dynamic nuclear polarization by the cross effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabanov, A.; Wiśniewski, D.; Raimondi, F.; Lesanovsky, I.; Köckenberger, W.

    2018-03-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is an out-of-equilibrium method for generating nonthermal spin polarization which provides large signal enhancements in modern diagnostic methods based on nuclear magnetic resonance. A particular instance is cross-effect DNP, which involves the interaction of two coupled electrons with the nuclear spin ensemble. Here we develop a theory for this important DNP mechanism and show that the nonequilibrium nuclear polarization buildup is effectively driven by three-body incoherent Markovian dissipative processes involving simultaneous state changes of two electrons and one nucleus. We identify different parameter regimes for effective polarization transfer and discuss under which conditions the polarization dynamics can be simulated by classical kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Our theoretical approach allows simulations of the polarization dynamics on an individual spin level for ensembles consisting of hundreds of nuclear spins. The insight obtained by these simulations can be used to find optimal experimental conditions for cross-effect DNP and to design tailored radical systems that provide optimal DNP efficiency.

  11. A model for plasticity kinetics and its role in simulating the dynamic behavior of Fe at high strain rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvin, J D; Minich, R W; Kalantar, D H

    2007-03-29

    The recent diagnostic capability of the Omega laser to study solid-solid phase transitions at pressures greater than 10 GPa and at strain rates exceeding 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} has also provided valuable information on the dynamic elastic-plastic behavior of materials. We have found, for example, that plasticity kinetics modifies the effective loading and thermodynamic paths of the material. In this paper we derive a kinetics equation for the time-dependent plastic response of the material to dynamic loading, and describe the model's implementation in a radiation-hydrodynamics computer code. This model for plasticity kinetics incorporates the Gilman model for dislocation multiplication and saturation. We discuss the application of this model to the simulation of experimental velocity interferometry data for experiments on Omega in which Fe was shock compressed to pressures beyond the {alpha}-to-{var_epsilon} phase transition pressure. The kinetics model is shown to fit the data reasonably well in this high strain rate regime and further allows quantification of the relative contributions of dislocation multiplication and drag. The sensitivity of the observed signatures to the kinetics model parameters is presented.

  12. Dynamics of asymmetric kinetic Ising systems revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Haiping; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of an asymmetric kinetic Ising model is studied. Two schemes for improving the existing mean-field description are proposed. In the first scheme, we derive the formulas for instantaneous magnetization, equal-time correlation, and time-delayed correlation, considering the correlation between different local fields. To derive the time-delayed correlation, we emphasize that the small-correlation assumption adopted in previous work (Mézard and Sakellariou, 2011 J. Stat. Mech. L07001) is in fact not required. To confirm the prediction efficiency of our method, we perform extensive simulations on single instances with either temporally constant external driving fields or sinusoidal external fields. In the second scheme, we develop an improved mean-field theory for instantaneous magnetization prediction utilizing the notion of the cavity system in conjunction with a perturbative expansion approach. Its efficiency is numerically confirmed by comparison with the existing mean-field theory when partially asymmetric couplings are present. (paper)

  13. Iridium-Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Isomerization: Expedient Synthesis of Carbohydrates from Achmatowicz Rearrangement Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao-Yuan; Yang, Ka; Bennett, Scott R; Guo, Sheng-rong; Tang, Weiping

    2015-07-20

    A highly stereoselective dynamic kinetic isomerization of Achmatowicz rearrangement products was discovered. This new internal redox isomerization provided ready access to key intermediates for the enantio- and diastereoselective synthesis of a series of naturally occurring sugars. The nature of the de novo synthesis also enables the preparation of both enantiomers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Kinetic modeling of particle dynamics in H− negative ion sources (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatayama, A.; Shibata, T.; Nishioka, S.; Ohta, M.; Yasumoto, M.; Nishida, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Fukano, A.; Mizuno, T.

    2014-01-01

    Progress in the kinetic modeling of particle dynamics in H − negative ion source plasmas and their comparisons with experiments are reviewed, and discussed with some new results. Main focus is placed on the following two topics, which are important for the research and development of large negative ion sources and high power H − ion beams: (i) Effects of non-equilibrium features of EEDF (electron energy distribution function) on H − production, and (ii) extraction physics of H − ions and beam optics

  15. Role of conformational dynamics in kinetics of an enzymatic cycle in a nonequilibrium steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wei; Xie, X. Sunney; Bagchi, Biman

    2009-08-01

    Enzyme is a dynamic entity with diverse time scales, ranging from picoseconds to seconds or even longer. Here we develop a rate theory for enzyme catalysis that includes conformational dynamics as cycling on a two-dimensional (2D) reaction free energy surface involving an intrinsic reaction coordinate (X) and an enzyme conformational coordinate (Q). The validity of Michaelis-Menten (MM) equation, i.e., substrate concentration dependence of enzymatic velocity, is examined under a nonequilibrium steady state. Under certain conditions, the classic MM equation holds but with generalized microscopic interpretations of kinetic parameters. However, under other conditions, our rate theory predicts either positive (sigmoidal-like) or negative (biphasic-like) kinetic cooperativity due to the modified effective 2D reaction pathway on X-Q surface, which can explain non-MM dependence previously observed on many monomeric enzymes that involve slow or hysteretic conformational transitions. Furthermore, we find that a slow conformational relaxation during product release could retain the enzyme in a favorable configuration, such that enzymatic turnover is dynamically accelerated at high substrate concentrations. The effect of such conformation retainment in a nonequilibrium steady state is evaluated.

  16. Hydrodynamics in adaptive resolution particle simulations: Multiparticle collision dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseeva, Uliana, E-mail: Alekseeva@itc.rwth-aachen.de [Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC), Institute for Advanced Simulation (IAS), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); German Research School for Simulation Sciences (GRS), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Winkler, Roland G., E-mail: r.winkler@fz-juelich.de [Theoretical Soft Matter and Biophysics, Institute for Advanced Simulation (IAS), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Sutmann, Godehard, E-mail: g.sutmann@fz-juelich.de [Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC), Institute for Advanced Simulation (IAS), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); ICAMS, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-06-01

    A new adaptive resolution technique for particle-based multi-level simulations of fluids is presented. In the approach, the representation of fluid and solvent particles is changed on the fly between an atomistic and a coarse-grained description. The present approach is based on a hybrid coupling of the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) method and molecular dynamics (MD), thereby coupling stochastic and deterministic particle-based methods. Hydrodynamics is examined by calculating velocity and current correlation functions for various mixed and coupled systems. We demonstrate that hydrodynamic properties of the mixed fluid are conserved by a suitable coupling of the two particle methods, and that the simulation results agree well with theoretical expectations.

  17. Dynamic Raman imaging system with high spatial and temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Dai, Yinzhen; He, Hao; Lv, Ruiqi; Zong, Cheng; Ren, Bin

    2017-09-01

    There is an increasing need to study dynamic changing systems with significantly high spatial and temporal resolutions. In this work, we integrated point-scanning, line-scanning, and wide-field Raman imaging techniques into a single system. By using an Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) with a high gain and high frame rate, we significantly reduced the time required for wide-field imaging, making it possible to monitor the electrochemical reactions in situ. The highest frame rate of EMCDD was ˜50 fps, and the Raman images for a specific Raman peak can be obtained by passing the signal from the sample through the Liquid Crystal Tunable Filter. The spatial resolutions of scanning imaging and wide-field imaging with a 100× objective (NA = 0.9) are 0.5 × 0.5 μm2 and 0.36 × 0.36 μm2, respectively. The system was used to study the surface plasmon resonance of Au nanorods, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal distribution for Au Nanoparticle aggregates, and dynamic Raman imaging of an electrochemical reacting system.

  18. Kinetic and structural fragility—a correlation between structures and dynamics in metallic liquids and glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelton, K F

    2017-01-01

    The liquid phase remains poorly understood. In many cases, the densities of liquids and their crystallized solid phases are similar, but since they are amorphous they lack the spatial order of the solid. Their dynamical properties change remarkably over a very small temperature range. At high temperatures, near their melting temperature, liquids flow easily under shear. However, only a few hundred degrees lower flow effectively ceases, as the liquid transforms into a solid-like glass. This temperature-dependent dynamical behavior is frequently characterized by the concept of kinetic fragility (or, generally, simply fragility). Fragility is believed to be an important quantity in glass formation, making it of significant practical interest. The microscopic origin of fragility remains unclear, however, making it also of fundamental interest. It is widely (although not uniformly) believed that the dynamical behavior is linked to the atomic structure of the liquid, yet experimental studies show that although the viscosity changes by orders of magnitude with temperature, the structural change is barely perceptible. In this article the concept of fragility is discussed, building to a discussion of recent results in metallic glass-forming liquids that demonstrate the presumed connection between structural and dynamical changes. In particular, it becomes possible to define a structural fragility parameter that can be linked with the kinetic fragility. (topical review)

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Kinetic Measurements to Estimate and Predict Protein-Ligand Residence Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Luca; Theret, Isabelle; Antoine, Mathias; Perron-Sierra, Françoise; Charton, Yves; Fourquez, Jean-Marie; Wierzbicki, Michel; Boutin, Jean A; Ferry, Gilles; Decherchi, Sergio; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Ducrot, Pierre; Cavalli, Andrea

    2016-08-11

    Ligand-target residence time is emerging as a key drug discovery parameter because it can reliably predict drug efficacy in vivo. Experimental approaches to binding and unbinding kinetics are nowadays available, but we still lack reliable computational tools for predicting kinetics and residence time. Most attempts have been based on brute-force molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which are CPU-demanding and not yet particularly accurate. We recently reported a new scaled-MD-based protocol, which showed potential for residence time prediction in drug discovery. Here, we further challenged our procedure's predictive ability by applying our methodology to a series of glucokinase activators that could be useful for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined scaled MD with experimental kinetics measurements and X-ray crystallography, promptly checking the protocol's reliability by directly comparing computational predictions and experimental measures. The good agreement highlights the potential of our scaled-MD-based approach as an innovative method for computationally estimating and predicting drug residence times.

  20. ReaDDy--a software for particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics in crowded cellular environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Schöneberg

    Full Text Available We introduce the software package ReaDDy for simulation of detailed spatiotemporal mechanisms of dynamical processes in the cell, based on reaction-diffusion dynamics with particle resolution. In contrast to other particle-based reaction kinetics programs, ReaDDy supports particle interaction potentials. This permits effects such as space exclusion, molecular crowding and aggregation to be modeled. The biomolecules simulated can be represented as a sphere, or as a more complex geometry such as a domain structure or polymer chain. ReaDDy bridges the gap between small-scale but highly detailed molecular dynamics or Brownian dynamics simulations and large-scale but little-detailed reaction kinetics simulations. ReaDDy has a modular design that enables the exchange of the computing core by efficient platform-specific implementations or dynamical models that are different from Brownian dynamics.

  1. Determination of the crystal-melt interface kinetic coefficient from molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monk, J; Mendelev, M I; Yang, Y; Asta, M; Hoyt, J J; Sun, D Y

    2010-01-01

    The generation and dissipation of latent heat at the moving solid–liquid boundary during non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of crystallization can lead to significant underestimations of the interface mobility. In this work we examine the heat flow problem in detail for an embedded atom description of pure Ni and offer strategies to obtain an accurate value of the kinetic coefficient, μ. For free-solidification simulations in which the entire system is thermostated using a Nose–Hoover or velocity rescaling algorithm a non-uniform temperature profile is observed and a peak in the temperature is found at the interface position. It is shown that if the actual interface temperature, rather than the thermostat set point temperature, is used to compute the kinetic coefficient then μ is approximately a factor of 2 larger than previous estimates. In addition, we introduce a layered thermostat method in which several sub-regions, aligned normal to the crystallization direction, are indepently thermostated to a desired undercooling. We show that as the number of thermostats increases (i.e., as the width of each independently thermostated layer decreases) the kinetic coefficient converges to a value consistent with that obtained using a single thermostat and the calculated interface temperature. Also, the kinetic coefficient was determined from an analysis of the equilibrium fluctuations of the solid–liquid interface position. We demonstrate that the kinetic coefficient obtained from the relaxation times of the fluctuation spectrum is equivalent to the two values obtained from free-solidification simulations provided a simple correction is made for the contribution of heat flow controlled interface motion. Finally, a one-dimensional phase field model that captures the effect of thermostats has been developed. The mesoscale model reproduces qualitatively the results from MD simulations and thus allows for an a priori estimate of the accuracy of a

  2. Inverse stochastic–dynamic models for high-resolution Greenland ice core records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Boers

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Proxy records from Greenland ice cores have been studied for several decades, yet many open questions remain regarding the climate variability encoded therein. Here, we use a Bayesian framework for inferring inverse, stochastic–dynamic models from δ18O and dust records of unprecedented, subdecadal temporal resolution. The records stem from the North Greenland Ice Core Project (NGRIP, and we focus on the time interval 59–22 ka b2k. Our model reproduces the dynamical characteristics of both the δ18O and dust proxy records, including the millennial-scale Dansgaard–Oeschger variability, as well as statistical properties such as probability density functions, waiting times and power spectra, with no need for any external forcing. The crucial ingredients for capturing these properties are (i high-resolution training data, (ii cubic drift terms, (iii nonlinear coupling terms between the δ18O and dust time series, and (iv non-Markovian contributions that represent short-term memory effects.

  3. Inverse stochastic-dynamic models for high-resolution Greenland ice core records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, Niklas; Chekroun, Mickael D.; Liu, Honghu; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Rousseau, Denis-Didier; Svensson, Anders; Bigler, Matthias; Ghil, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Proxy records from Greenland ice cores have been studied for several decades, yet many open questions remain regarding the climate variability encoded therein. Here, we use a Bayesian framework for inferring inverse, stochastic-dynamic models from δ18O and dust records of unprecedented, subdecadal temporal resolution. The records stem from the North Greenland Ice Core Project (NGRIP), and we focus on the time interval 59-22 ka b2k. Our model reproduces the dynamical characteristics of both the δ18O and dust proxy records, including the millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger variability, as well as statistical properties such as probability density functions, waiting times and power spectra, with no need for any external forcing. The crucial ingredients for capturing these properties are (i) high-resolution training data, (ii) cubic drift terms, (iii) nonlinear coupling terms between the δ18O and dust time series, and (iv) non-Markovian contributions that represent short-term memory effects.

  4. Critical Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification Models. Part II: Kinetic and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Żogała

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: This paper presents state of art in the field of coal gasification modeling using kinetic and computational fluid dynamics approach. The paper also presents own comparative analysis (concerned with mathematical formulation, input data and parameters, basic assumptions, obtained results etc. of the most important models of underground coal gasification.

  5. Dynamic surface tension measurements of ionic surfactants using maximum bubble pressure tensiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Camilla U.; Moreno, Norman; Sharma, Vivek

    Dynamic surface tension refers to the time dependent variation in surface tension, and is intimately linked with the rate of mass transfer of a surfactant from liquid sub-phase to the interface. The diffusion- or adsorption-limited kinetics of mass transfer to interfaces is said to impact the so-called foamability and the Gibbs-Marangoni elasticity of surfaces. Dynamic surface tension measurements carried out with conventional methods like pendant drop analysis, Wilhelmy plate, etc. are limited in their temporal resolution (>50 ms). In this study, we describe design and application of maximum bubble pressure tensiometry for the measurement of dynamic surface tension effects at extremely short (1-50 ms) timescales. Using experiments and theory, we discuss the overall adsorption kinetics of charged surfactants, paying special attention to the influence of added salt on dynamic surface tension.

  6. Super-resolution microscopy reveals cell wall dynamics and peptidoglycan architecture in ovococcal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard; Mesnage, Stéphane; Boneca, Ivo G; Hobbs, Jamie K; Foster, Simon J

    2011-12-01

    Cell morphology and viability in Eubacteria is dictated by the architecture of peptidoglycan, the major and essential structural component of the cell wall. Although the biochemical composition of peptidoglycan is well understood, how the peptidoglycan architecture can accommodate the dynamics of growth and division while maintaining cell shape remains largely unknown. Here, we elucidate the peptidoglycan architecture and dynamics of bacteria with ovoid cell shape (ovococci), which includes a number of important pathogens, by combining biochemical analyses with atomic force and super-resolution microscopies. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed preferential orientation of the peptidoglycan network parallel to the short axis of the cell, with distinct architectural features associated with septal and peripheral wall synthesis. Super-resolution three-dimensional structured illumination fluorescence microscopy was applied for the first time in bacteria to unravel the dynamics of peptidoglycan assembly in ovococci. The ovococci have a unique peptidoglycan architecture and growth mode not observed in other model organisms. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. xMDFF: molecular dynamics flexible fitting of low-resolution X-ray structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Ryan; Singharoy, Abhishek; Li, Qufei; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong; Perozo, Eduardo; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the most dominant method for solving atomic structures. However, for relatively large systems, the availability of only medium-to-low-resolution diffraction data often limits the determination of all-atom details. A new molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF)-based approach, xMDFF, for determining structures from such low-resolution crystallographic data is reported. xMDFF employs a real-space refinement scheme that flexibly fits atomic models into an iteratively updating electron-density map. It addresses significant large-scale deformations of the initial model to fit the low-resolution density, as tested with synthetic low-resolution maps of D-ribose-binding protein. xMDFF has been successfully applied to re-refine six low-resolution protein structures of varying sizes that had already been submitted to the Protein Data Bank. Finally, via systematic refinement of a series of data from 3.6 to 7 Å resolution, xMDFF refinements together with electrophysiology experiments were used to validate the first all-atom structure of the voltage-sensing protein Ci-VSP.

  8. Detection of kinetic change points in piece-wise linear single molecule motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Flynn R.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Duderstadt, Karl E.

    2018-03-01

    Single-molecule approaches present a powerful way to obtain detailed kinetic information at the molecular level. However, the identification of small rate changes is often hindered by the considerable noise present in such single-molecule kinetic data. We present a general method to detect such kinetic change points in trajectories of motion of processive single molecules having Gaussian noise, with a minimum number of parameters and without the need of an assumed kinetic model beyond piece-wise linearity of motion. Kinetic change points are detected using a likelihood ratio test in which the probability of no change is compared to the probability of a change occurring, given the experimental noise. A predetermined confidence interval minimizes the occurrence of false detections. Applying the method recursively to all sub-regions of a single molecule trajectory ensures that all kinetic change points are located. The algorithm presented allows rigorous and quantitative determination of kinetic change points in noisy single molecule observations without the need for filtering or binning, which reduce temporal resolution and obscure dynamics. The statistical framework for the approach and implementation details are discussed. The detection power of the algorithm is assessed using simulations with both single kinetic changes and multiple kinetic changes that typically arise in observations of single-molecule DNA-replication reactions. Implementations of the algorithm are provided in ImageJ plugin format written in Java and in the Julia language for numeric computing, with accompanying Jupyter Notebooks to allow reproduction of the analysis presented here.

  9. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics - Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-05-10

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle's Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas.

  10. Joint reconstruction of dynamic PET activity and kinetic parametric images using total variation constrained dictionary sparse coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiqing; Chen, Shuhang; Chen, Yunmei; Liu, Huafeng

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) is capable of providing both spatial and temporal information of radio tracers in vivo. In this paper, we present a novel joint estimation framework to reconstruct temporal sequences of dynamic PET images and the coefficients characterizing the system impulse response function, from which the associated parametric images of the system macro parameters for tracer kinetics can be estimated. The proposed algorithm, which combines statistical data measurement and tracer kinetic models, integrates a dictionary sparse coding (DSC) into a total variational minimization based algorithm for simultaneous reconstruction of the activity distribution and parametric map from measured emission sinograms. DSC, based on the compartmental theory, provides biologically meaningful regularization, and total variation regularization is incorporated to provide edge-preserving guidance. We rely on techniques from minimization algorithms (the alternating direction method of multipliers) to first generate the estimated activity distributions with sub-optimal kinetic parameter estimates, and then recover the parametric maps given these activity estimates. These coupled iterative steps are repeated as necessary until convergence. Experiments with synthetic, Monte Carlo generated data, and real patient data have been conducted, and the results are very promising.

  11. Investigation of Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, Francine [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Agblevor, Foster [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Klein, Michael [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Sheikhi, Reza [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-12-31

    A collaborative effort involving experiments, kinetic modeling, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to understand co-gasification of coal-biomass mixtures. The overall goal of the work was to determine the key reactive properties for coal-biomass mixed fuels. Sub-bituminous coal was mixed with biomass feedstocks to determine the fluidization and gasification characteristics of hybrid poplar wood, switchgrass and corn stover. It was found that corn stover and poplar wood were the best feedstocks to use with coal. The novel approach of this project was the use of a red mud catalyst to improve gasification and lower gasification temperatures. An important results was the reduction of agglomeration of the biomass using the catalyst. An outcome of this work was the characterization of the chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms of the co-gasification fuels, and the development of a set of models that can be integrated into other modeling environments. The multiphase flow code, MFIX, was used to simulate and predict the hydrodynamics and co-gasification, and results were validated with the experiments. The reaction kinetics modeling was used to develop a smaller set of reactions for tractable CFD calculations that represented the experiments. Finally, an efficient tool was developed, MCHARS, and coupled with MFIX to efficiently simulate the complex reaction kinetics.

  12. Modeling bubble dynamics and radical kinetics in ultrasound induced microalgal cell disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Yuan, Wenqiao

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal cell disruption induced by acoustic cavitation was simulated through solving the bubble dynamics in an acoustical field and their radial kinetics (chemical kinetics of radical species) occurring in the bubble during its oscillation, as well as calculating the bubble wall pressure at the collapse point. Modeling results indicated that increasing ultrasonic intensity led to a substantial increase in the number of bubbles formed during acoustic cavitation, however, the pressure generated when the bubbles collapsed decreased. Therefore, cumulative collapse pressure (CCP) of bubbles was used to quantify acoustic disruption of a freshwater alga, Scenedesmus dimorphus, and a marine alga, Nannochloropsis oculata and compare with experimental results. The strong correlations between CCP and the intracellular lipid fluorescence density, chlorophyll-a fluorescence density, and cell particle/debris concentration were found, which suggests that the developed models could accurately predict acoustic cell disruption, and can be utilized in the scale up and optimization of the process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Derivation of fluid dynamics from kinetic theory with the 14-moment approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denicol, G.S.; Molnar, E.; Niemi, H.; Rischke, D.H.

    2012-01-01

    We review the traditional derivation of the fluid-dynamical equations from kinetic theory according to Israel and Stewart. We show that their procedure to close the fluid-dynamical equations of motion is not unique. Their approach contains two approximations, the first being the so-called 14-moment approximation to truncate the single-particle distribution function. The second consists in the choice of equations of motion for the dissipative currents. Israel and Stewart used the second moment of the Boltzmann equation, but this is not the only possible choice. In fact, there are infinitely many moments of the Boltzmann equation which can serve as equations of motion for the dissipative currents. All resulting equations of motion have the same form, but the transport coefficients are different in each case. (orig.)

  14. Dynamical scaling, domain-growth kinetics, and domain-wall shapes of quenched two-dimensional anisotropic XY models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Praestgaard, Eigil

    1988-01-01

    obeys dynamical scaling and the shape of the dynamical scaling function pertaining to the structure factor is found to depend on P. Specifically, this function is described by a Porod-law behavior, q-ω, where ω increases with the wall softness. The kinetic exponent, which describes how the linear domain...... infinite to zero temperature as well as to nonzero temperatures below the ordering transition. The continuous nature of the spin variables causes the domain walls to be ‘‘soft’’ and characterized by a finite thickness. The steady-state thickness of the walls can be varied by a model parameter, P. At zero...... size varies with time, R(t)∼tn, is for both models at zero temperature determined to be n≃0.25, independent of P. At finite temperatures, the growth kinetics is found to cross over to the Lifshitz-Allen-Cahn law characterized by n≃0.50. The results support the idea of two separate zero...

  15. Energetics of small scale turbulence in the lower stratosphere from high resolution radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dole

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Very high resolution radar measurements were performed in the troposphere and lower stratosphere by means of the PROUST radar. The PROUST radar operates in the UHF band (961 MHz and is located in St. Santin, France (44°39’ N, 2°12’ E. A field campaign involving high resolution balloon measurements and the PROUST radar was conducted during April 1998. Under the classical hypothesis that refractive index inhomogeneities at half radar wavelength lie within the inertial subrange, assumed to be isotropic, kinetic energy and temperature variance dissipation rates were estimated independently in the lower stratosphere. The dissipation rate of temperature variance is proportional to the dissipation rate of available potential energy. We therefore estimate the ratio of dissipation rates of potential to kinetic energy. This ratio is a key parameter of atmospheric turbulence which, in locally homogeneous and stationary conditions, is simply related to the flux Richardson number, Rf .Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence – Radio science (remote sensing

  16. Mapping the dissociative ionization dynamics of molecular nitrogen with attosecond resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinker, M; González-Vázquez, J; Martin, F; Trabattoni, A; Sansone, G; Nisoli, M; Liu, C; Linguerri, R; Hochlaf, M; Klei, J; Vrakking, M J J; Calegari, F

    2015-01-01

    We wish to understand the processes underlying the ionization dynamics of N 2 as experimentally induced and studied by recording the kinetic energy release (KER) in a XUV-pump/IR-probe setup. To this end a theoretical model was developed describing the ionization process using Dyson Orbitals and, subsequently, the dissociation process using a large set of diabatic potential energy surfaces (PES) on which to propagate. From said set of PES, a small subset is extracted allowing for the identification of one and two photon processes chiefly responsible for the experimentally observed features. (paper)

  17. Resolution enhancement in neural networks with dynamical synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Alan Fung

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, information is represented by spike rates in the neural system. Here, we consider the ability of temporally modulated activities in neuronal networks to carry information extra to spike rates. These temporal modulations, commonly known as population spikes, are due to the presence of synaptic depression in a neuronal network model. We discuss its relevance to an experiment on transparent motions in macaque monkeys by Treue et al. in 2000. They found that if the moving directions of objects are too close, the firing rate profile will be very similar to that with one direction. As the difference in the moving directions of objects is large enough, the neuronal system would respond in such a way that the network enhances the resolution in the moving directions of the objects. In this paper, we propose that this behavior can be reproduced by neural networks with dynamical synapses when there are multiple external inputs. We will demonstrate how resolution enhancement can be achieved, and discuss the conditions under which temporally modulated activities are able to enhance information processing performances in general.

  18. A kinetic model of trp-cage folding from multiple biased molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Marinelli

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Trp-cage is a designed 20-residue polypeptide that, in spite of its size, shares several features with larger globular proteins.Although the system has been intensively investigated experimentally and theoretically, its folding mechanism is not yet fully understood. Indeed, some experiments suggest a two-state behavior, while others point to the presence of intermediates. In this work we show that the results of a bias-exchange metadynamics simulation can be used for constructing a detailed thermodynamic and kinetic model of the system. The model, although constructed from a biased simulation, has a quality similar to those extracted from the analysis of long unbiased molecular dynamics trajectories. This is demonstrated by a careful benchmark of the approach on a smaller system, the solvated Ace-Ala3-Nme peptide. For theTrp-cage folding, the model predicts that the relaxation time of 3100 ns observed experimentally is due to the presence of a compact molten globule-like conformation. This state has an occupancy of only 3% at 300 K, but acts as a kinetic trap.Instead, non-compact structures relax to the folded state on the sub-microsecond timescale. The model also predicts the presence of a state at Calpha-RMSD of 4.4 A from the NMR structure in which the Trp strongly interacts with Pro12. This state can explain the abnormal temperature dependence of the Pro12-delta3 and Gly11-alpha3 chemical shifts. The structures of the two most stable misfolded intermediates are in agreement with NMR experiments on the unfolded protein. Our work shows that, using biased molecular dynamics trajectories, it is possible to construct a model describing in detail the Trp-cage folding kinetics and thermodynamics in agreement with experimental data.

  19. Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Gui; Hu, Han; Sun, Ying; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger

  20. Measuring the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of proteins at high spatial resolution by mass spectrometry: overcoming gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium scrambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2014-10-21

    Proteins are dynamic molecules that exhibit conformational flexibility to function properly. Well-known examples of this are allosteric regulation of protein activity and ligand-induced conformational changes in protein receptors. Detailed knowledge of the conformational properties of proteins is therefore pertinent to both basic and applied research, including drug development, since the majority of drugs target protein receptors and a growing number of drugs introduced to the market are therapeutic peptides or proteins. X-ray crystallography provides a static picture at atomic resolution of the lowest-energy structure of the native ensemble. There is a growing need for sensitive analytical tools to explore all of the significant molecular structures in the conformational landscape of proteins. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has recently emerged as a powerful method for characterizing protein conformational dynamics. The basis of this method is the fact that backbone amides in stable hydrogen-bonded structures (e.g., α-helices and β-sheets) are protected against exchange with the aqueous solvent. All protein structures are dynamic, however, and eventually all of the protecting hydrogen bonds will transiently break as the protein--according to thermodynamic principles--cycles through partially unfolded states that correspond to excited free energy levels. As a result, all of the backbone amides will eventually become temporarily solvent-exposed and exchange-competent over time. Consequently, a folded protein in D2O will gradually incorporate deuterium into its backbone amides, and the kinetics of the process can be readily monitored by mass spectrometry. The deuterium uptake kinetics for the intact protein (global exchange kinetics) represents the sum of the exchange kinetics for the individual backbone amides. Local exchange kinetics is typically achieved by using pepsin digestion under quench conditions (i.e., under cold

  1. Kinetic Resolution of sec-Thiols by Enantioselective Oxidation with Rationally Engineered 5-(Hydroxymethyl)furfural Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickl, Mathias; Swoboda, Alexander; Romero, Elvira; Winkler, Christoph K; Binda, Claudia; Mattevi, Andrea; Faber, Kurt; Fraaije, Marco W

    2018-03-05

    Various flavoprotein oxidases were recently shown to oxidize primary thiols. Herein, this reactivity is extended to sec-thiols by using structure-guided engineering of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural oxidase (HMFO). The variants obtained were employed for the oxidative kinetic resolution of racemic sec-thiols, thus yielding the corresponding thioketones and nonreacted R-configured thiols with excellent enantioselectivities (E≥200). The engineering strategy applied went beyond the classic approach of replacing bulky amino acid residues with smaller ones, as the active site was additionally enlarged by a newly introduced Thr residue. This residue established a hydrogen-bonding interaction with the substrates, as verified in the crystal structure of the variant. These strategies unlocked HMFO variants for the enantioselective oxidation of a range of sec-thiols. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Dynamic single photon emission computed tomography-basic principles and cardiac applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullberg, Grant T; Reutter, Bryan W; Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F [E O Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sitek, Arkadiusz, E-mail: gtgullberg@lbl.go [Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-10-21

    The very nature of nuclear medicine, the visual representation of injected radiopharmaceuticals, implies imaging of dynamic processes such as the uptake and wash-out of radiotracers from body organs. For years, nuclear medicine has been touted as the modality of choice for evaluating function in health and disease. This evaluation is greatly enhanced using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), which permits three-dimensional (3D) visualization of tracer distributions in the body. However, to fully realize the potential of the technique requires the imaging of in vivo dynamic processes of flow and metabolism. Tissue motion and deformation must also be addressed. Absolute quantification of these dynamic processes in the body has the potential to improve diagnosis. This paper presents a review of advancements toward the realization of the potential of dynamic SPECT imaging and a brief history of the development of the instrumentation. A major portion of the paper is devoted to the review of special data processing methods that have been developed for extracting kinetics from dynamic cardiac SPECT data acquired using rotating detector heads that move as radiopharmaceuticals exchange between biological compartments. Recent developments in multi-resolution spatiotemporal methods enable one to estimate kinetic parameters of compartment models of dynamic processes using data acquired from a single camera head with slow gantry rotation. The estimation of kinetic parameters directly from projection measurements improves bias and variance over the conventional method of first reconstructing 3D dynamic images, generating time-activity curves from selected regions of interest and then estimating the kinetic parameters from the generated time-activity curves. Although the potential applications of SPECT for imaging dynamic processes have not been fully realized in the clinic, it is hoped that this review illuminates the potential of SPECT for dynamic imaging

  3. Dynamic single photon emission computed tomography-basic principles and cardiac applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, Grant T; Reutter, Bryan W; Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F; Sitek, Arkadiusz

    2010-01-01

    The very nature of nuclear medicine, the visual representation of injected radiopharmaceuticals, implies imaging of dynamic processes such as the uptake and wash-out of radiotracers from body organs. For years, nuclear medicine has been touted as the modality of choice for evaluating function in health and disease. This evaluation is greatly enhanced using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), which permits three-dimensional (3D) visualization of tracer distributions in the body. However, to fully realize the potential of the technique requires the imaging of in vivo dynamic processes of flow and metabolism. Tissue motion and deformation must also be addressed. Absolute quantification of these dynamic processes in the body has the potential to improve diagnosis. This paper presents a review of advancements toward the realization of the potential of dynamic SPECT imaging and a brief history of the development of the instrumentation. A major portion of the paper is devoted to the review of special data processing methods that have been developed for extracting kinetics from dynamic cardiac SPECT data acquired using rotating detector heads that move as radiopharmaceuticals exchange between biological compartments. Recent developments in multi-resolution spatiotemporal methods enable one to estimate kinetic parameters of compartment models of dynamic processes using data acquired from a single camera head with slow gantry rotation. The estimation of kinetic parameters directly from projection measurements improves bias and variance over the conventional method of first reconstructing 3D dynamic images, generating time-activity curves from selected regions of interest and then estimating the kinetic parameters from the generated time-activity curves. Although the potential applications of SPECT for imaging dynamic processes have not been fully realized in the clinic, it is hoped that this review illuminates the potential of SPECT for dynamic imaging

  4. SYSTEM OF GUARANTEED RESOLUTION OF DYNAMIC CONFLICTS OF AIRCRAFTS IN REAL TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Pavlova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present work is devoted to improving of flight safety in civil aviation by creating and implementing a new system of resolution of dynamic conflict of aircrafts. The developed system is aimed at ensuring a guaranteed level of safety when resolution of rarefied conflict situations of aircraft in real-time. Methods: The proposed system is based on a new method of conflict resolution of aircraft on the basis of the theory of invariance. Results: The development of the system of conflict resolution of aircraft in real time and the implementation of the respective algorithms such control will ensure effective prevention of dangerous approaches. Discussion: The system is implemented as single unified equipment using satellite and radar navigation systems that will ensure the positioning of aircraft in real time. Provided that the system should be installed on all aircraft and integrated on board to properly ensure its functionality and interact with navigation systems.

  5. The kinetics of dynamic recrystallization of a low carbon vanadium-nitride microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Baochun; Zhao, Tan; Li, Guiyan; Lu, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Single-pass compression tests were performed on a Gleeble-3800 thermo-mechanical simulator to study the dynamic recrystallization behavior of a low carbon vanadium-nitride microalloyed steel at the temperature in the range from 900 °C to 1050 °C and strain rate in the range from 0.1 s −1 to 10 s −1 . Based on the flow curves from the tests, the effects of temperature and strain rate on the dynamic recrystallization behavior were analyzed. With the assistance of the process parameters, constitutive equations were used to obtain the activation energy and hot working equation. The strain hardening rate versus stress curves were used to determine the critical stress (strain) or the peak stress (strain). The dependence of the characteristic values on Zener–Hollomon was found. The dynamic recrystallization kinetics model of the tested steel was constructed and the validity was confirmed based on the experimental results

  6. High-resolution dynamic pressure sensor array based on piezo-phototronic effect tuned photoluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mingzeng; Li, Zhou; Liu, Caihong; Zheng, Qiang; Shi, Xieqing; Song, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Du, Shiyu; Zhai, Junyi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-03-24

    A high-resolution dynamic tactile/pressure display is indispensable to the comprehensive perception of force/mechanical stimulations such as electronic skin, biomechanical imaging/analysis, or personalized signatures. Here, we present a dynamic pressure sensor array based on pressure/strain tuned photoluminescence imaging without the need for electricity. Each sensor is a nanopillar that consists of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells. Its photoluminescence intensity can be modulated dramatically and linearly by small strain (0-0.15%) owing to the piezo-phototronic effect. The sensor array has a high pixel density of 6350 dpi and exceptional small standard deviation of photoluminescence. High-quality tactile/pressure sensing distribution can be real-time recorded by parallel photoluminescence imaging without any cross-talk. The sensor array can be inexpensively fabricated over large areas by semiconductor product lines. The proposed dynamic all-optical pressure imaging with excellent resolution, high sensitivity, good uniformity, and ultrafast response time offers a suitable way for smart sensing, micro/nano-opto-electromechanical systems.

  7. Full dynamic resolution low lower DA-Converters for flat panel displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Saas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that stepwise charging can reduce the power dissipated in the source drivers of a flat panel display. However the solution presented only provided a dynamic resolution of 3 bits which is not sufficient for obtaining a full color resolution display. In this work a further development of the basic idea is presented. The stepwise charging is increased to 4 bits and supplemented by a current source to provide an output signal which represents an 8 bit value with sufficient accuracy. Within this work the application is an AM-OLED flat panel display, but the concept can easily be applied to other display technologies like TFT-LCD as well.

  8. Analyzing the Molecular Kinetics of Water Spreading on Hydrophobic Surfaces via Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Cheng, Jiangtao

    2017-09-07

    In this paper, we report molecular kinetic analyses of water spreading on hydrophobic surfaces via molecular dynamics simulation. The hydrophobic surfaces are composed of amorphous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with a static contact angle of ~112.4° for water. On the basis of the molecular kinetic theory (MKT), the influences of both viscous damping and solid-liquid retarding were analyzed in evaluating contact line friction, which characterizes the frictional force on the contact line. The unit displacement length on PTFE was estimated to be ~0.621 nm and is ~4 times as long as the bond length of C-C backbone. The static friction coefficient was found to be ~[Formula: see text] Pa·s, which is on the same order of magnitude as the dynamic viscosity of water, and increases with the droplet size. A nondimensional number defined by the ratio of the standard deviation of wetting velocity to the characteristic wetting velocity was put forward to signify the strength of the inherent contact line fluctuation and unveil the mechanism of enhanced energy dissipation in nanoscale, whereas such effect would become insignificant in macroscale. Moreover, regarding a liquid droplet on hydrophobic or superhydrophobic surfaces, an approximate solution to the base radius development was derived by an asymptotic expansion approach.

  9. Computer-aided classification of lesions by means of their kinetic signatures in dynamic contrast-enhanced MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twellmann, Thorsten; ter Haar Romeny, Bart

    2008-03-01

    The kinetic characteristics of tissue in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data are an important source of information for the differentiation of benign and malignant lesions. Kinetic curves measured for each lesion voxel allow to infer information about the state of the local tissue. As a whole, they reflect the heterogeneity of the vascular structure within a lesion, an important criterion for the preoperative classification of lesions. Current clinical practice in analysis of tissue kinetics however is mainly based on the evaluation of the "most-suspect curve", which is only related to a small, manually or semi-automatically selected region-of-interest within a lesion and does not reflect any information about tissue heterogeneity. We propose a new method which exploits the full range of kinetic information for the automatic classification of lesions. Instead of breaking down the large amount of kinetic information to a single curve, each lesion is considered as a probability distribution in a space of kinetic features, efficiently represented by its kinetic signature obtained by adaptive vector quantization of the corresponding kinetic curves. Dissimilarity of two signatures can be objectively measured using the Mallows distance, which is a metric defined on probability distributions. The embedding of this metric in a suitable kernel function enables us to employ modern kernel-based machine learning techniques for the classification of signatures. In a study considering 81 breast lesions, the proposed method yielded an A z value of 0.89+/-0.01 for the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions in a nested leave-one-lesion-out evaluation setting.

  10. Modeling Photo-Bleaching Kinetics to Create High Resolution Maps of Rod Rhodopsin in the Human Retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ehler

    Full Text Available We introduce and describe a novel non-invasive in-vivo method for mapping local rod rhodopsin distribution in the human retina over a 30-degree field. Our approach is based on analyzing the brightening of detected lipofuscin autofluorescence within small pixel clusters in registered imaging sequences taken with a commercial 488nm confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO over a 1 minute period. We modeled the kinetics of rhodopsin bleaching by applying variational optimization techniques from applied mathematics. The physical model and the numerical analysis with its implementation are outlined in detail. This new technique enables the creation of spatial maps of the retinal rhodopsin and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE bisretinoid distribution with an ≈ 50μm resolution.

  11. Modeling Photo-Bleaching Kinetics to Create High Resolution Maps of Rod Rhodopsin in the Human Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehler, Martin; Dobrosotskaya, Julia; Cunningham, Denise; Wong, Wai T.; Chew, Emily Y.; Czaja, Wojtek; Bonner, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and describe a novel non-invasive in-vivo method for mapping local rod rhodopsin distribution in the human retina over a 30-degree field. Our approach is based on analyzing the brightening of detected lipofuscin autofluorescence within small pixel clusters in registered imaging sequences taken with a commercial 488nm confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) over a 1 minute period. We modeled the kinetics of rhodopsin bleaching by applying variational optimization techniques from applied mathematics. The physical model and the numerical analysis with its implementation are outlined in detail. This new technique enables the creation of spatial maps of the retinal rhodopsin and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) bisretinoid distribution with an ≈ 50μm resolution. PMID:26196397

  12. A unified gas-kinetic scheme for continuum and rarefied flows IV: Full Boltzmann and model equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang, E-mail: cliuaa@ust.hk [Department of Mathematics and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Xu, Kun, E-mail: makxu@ust.hk [Department of Mathematics and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Sun, Quanhua, E-mail: qsun@imech.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High-temperature Gas Dynamics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 15 Beisihuan Xi Rd, Beijing 100190 (China); Cai, Qingdong, E-mail: caiqd@mech.pku.edu.cn [Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-06-01

    Fluid dynamic equations are valid in their respective modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier–Stokes (NS) equations. With a variation of the modeling scales, theoretically there should have a continuous spectrum of fluid dynamic equations. Even though the Boltzmann equation is claimed to be valid in all scales, many Boltzmann solvers, including direct simulation Monte Carlo method, require the cell resolution to the order of particle mean free path scale. Therefore, they are still single scale methods. In order to study multiscale flow evolution efficiently, the dynamics in the computational fluid has to be changed with the scales. A direct modeling of flow physics with a changeable scale may become an appropriate approach. The unified gas-kinetic scheme (UGKS) is a direct modeling method in the mesh size scale, and its underlying flow physics depends on the resolution of the cell size relative to the particle mean free path. The cell size of UGKS is not limited by the particle mean free path. With the variation of the ratio between the numerical cell size and local particle mean free path, the UGKS recovers the flow dynamics from the particle transport and collision in the kinetic scale to the wave propagation in the hydrodynamic scale. The previous UGKS is mostly constructed from the evolution solution of kinetic model equations. Even though the UGKS is very accurate and effective in the low transition and continuum flow regimes with the time step being much larger than the particle mean free time, it still has space to develop more accurate flow solver in the region, where the time step is comparable with the local particle mean free time. In such a scale, there is dynamic difference from the full Boltzmann collision term and the model equations. This work is about the further development of the UGKS with the implementation of the full Boltzmann collision term in the region

  13. Budget of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in a Shock Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Waindim, Mbu; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2016-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Quantities present in the exact equation of the turbulent kinetic energy transport were accumulated and used to calculate terms like production, dissipation, molecular diffusion, and turbulent transport. The present results for a turbulent boundary layer were validated by comparison with direct numerical simulation data. It was found that a longer development domain was necessary for the boundary layer to reach an equilibrium state and a finer mesh resolution would improve the predictions. In spite of these findings, trends of the present budget match closely with that of the direct numerical simulation. Budgets for the SBLI region are presented at key axial stations. These budgets showed interesting dynamics as the incoming boundary layer transforms and the terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget change behavior within the interaction region.

  14. Wave-Particle Energy Exchange Directly Observed in a Kinetic Alfven-Branch Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Daniel J.; F-Vinas, Adolfo; Dorelli, John C.; Boardsen, Scott A. (Inventor); Avanov, Levon A.; Bellan, Paul M.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Lavraud, Benoit; Coffey, Victoria N.; Chandler, Michael O.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Alfven waves are fundamental plasma wave modes that permeate the universe. At small kinetic scales they provide a critical mechanism for the transfer of energy between electromagnetic fields and charged particles. These waves are important not only in planetary magnetospheres, heliospheres, and astrophysical systems, but also in laboratory plasma experiments and fusion reactors. Through measurement of charged particles and electromagnetic fields with NASAs Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we utilize Earths magnetosphere as a plasma physics laboratory. Here we confirm the conservative energy exchange between the electromagnetic field fluctuations and the charged particles that comprise an undamped kinetic Alfven wave. Electrons confined between adjacent wave peaks may have contributed to saturation of damping effects via non-linear particle trapping. The investigation of these detailed wave dynamics has been unexplored territory in experimental plasma physics and is only recently enabled by high-resolution MMS observations.

  15. Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data to Constrain a Positron Emission Tomography Kinetic Model: Theory and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob U. Fluckiger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We show how dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI data can constrain a compartmental model for analyzing dynamic positron emission tomography (PET data. We first develop the theory that enables the use of DCE-MRI data to separate whole tissue time activity curves (TACs available from dynamic PET data into individual TACs associated with the blood space, the extravascular-extracellular space (EES, and the extravascular-intracellular space (EIS. Then we simulate whole tissue TACs over a range of physiologically relevant kinetic parameter values and show that using appropriate DCE-MRI data can separate the PET TAC into the three components with accuracy that is noise dependent. The simulations show that accurate blood, EES, and EIS TACs can be obtained as evidenced by concordance correlation coefficients >0.9 between the true and estimated TACs. Additionally, provided that the estimated DCE-MRI parameters are within 10% of their true values, the errors in the PET kinetic parameters are within approximately 20% of their true values. The parameters returned by this approach may provide new information on the transport of a tracer in a variety of dynamic PET studies.

  16. Dynamic phase transition in the kinetic spin-2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model in an oscillating field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertas, Mehmet; Canko, Osman; Keskin, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    We extend our recent paper [M. Keskin, O. Canko, M. Ertas, J. Exp. Theor. Phys. (Sov. Phys. JETP) 105 (2007) 1190.] to present a study, within a mean-field approach, the stationary states of the kinetic spin-2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model in the presence of a time-dependent oscillating magnetic field by using the Glauber-type of stochastic dynamics. We found 20 fundamental types of dynamic phase diagrams where exhibit more complex and richer phase diagrams than our recent paper. Especially, the obtained dynamic phase diagrams show the dynamic triple, quadruple and dynamic double critical end points besides dynamic tricritical points that depending on interaction parameters. The phase diagrams also exhibit a disordered (d) and the ferromagnetic-2 (f 2 ) phases, and the f 2 +d, f 2 +fq, fq+d, f 2 +f 1 +fq and f 2 +fq+d, where f 1 are fq the ferromagnetic-1 and ferroquadrupolar or simply quadrupolar phases respectively, coexistence phase regions that strongly depend on interaction parameters

  17. Dynamic phase transition in the kinetic spin-2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model in an oscillating field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertaş, Mehmet; Canko, Osman; Keskin, Mustafa

    We extend our recent paper [M. Keskin, O. Canko, M. Ertaş, J. Exp. Theor. Phys. (Sov. Phys. JETP) 105 (2007) 1190.] to present a study, within a mean-field approach, the stationary states of the kinetic spin-2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model in the presence of a time-dependent oscillating magnetic field by using the Glauber-type of stochastic dynamics. We found 20 fundamental types of dynamic phase diagrams where exhibit more complex and richer phase diagrams than our recent paper. Especially, the obtained dynamic phase diagrams show the dynamic triple, quadruple and dynamic double critical end points besides dynamic tricritical points that depending on interaction parameters. The phase diagrams also exhibit a disordered ( d) and the ferromagnetic-2 ( f2) phases, and the f2+ d, f2+ fq, fq+ d, f2+ f1+ fq and f2+ fq+ d, where f1 are fq the ferromagnetic-1 and ferroquadrupolar or simply quadrupolar phases respectively, coexistence phase regions that strongly depend on interaction parameters.

  18. Is cancer a pure growth curve or does it follow a kinetics of dynamical structural transformation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Maraelys Morales; Joa, Javier Antonio González; Cabrales, Luis Enrique Bergues; Pupo, Ana Elisa Bergues; Schneider, Baruch; Kondakci, Suleyman; Ciria, Héctor Manuel Camué; Reyes, Juan Bory; Jarque, Manuel Verdecia; Mateus, Miguel Angel O'Farril; González, Tamara Rubio; Brooks, Soraida Candida Acosta; Cáceres, José Luis Hernández; González, Gustavo Victoriano Sierra

    2017-03-07

    Unperturbed tumor growth kinetics is one of the more studied cancer topics; however, it is poorly understood. Mathematical modeling is a useful tool to elucidate new mechanisms involved in tumor growth kinetics, which can be relevant to understand cancer genesis and select the most suitable treatment. The classical Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami as well as the modified Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami models to describe unperturbed fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumor growth are used and compared with the Gompertz modified and Logistic models. Viable tumor cells (1×10 5 ) are inoculated to 28 BALB/c male mice. Modified Gompertz, Logistic, Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami classical and modified Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami models fit well to the experimental data and agree with one another. A jump in the time behaviors of the instantaneous slopes of classical and modified Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami models and high values of these instantaneous slopes at very early stages of tumor growth kinetics are observed. The modified Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation can be used to describe unperturbed fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumor growth. It reveals that diffusion-controlled nucleation/growth and impingement mechanisms are involved in tumor growth kinetics. On the other hand, tumor development kinetics reveals dynamical structural transformations rather than a pure growth curve. Tumor fractal property prevails during entire TGK.

  19. The coke drum thermal kinetic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldescu, Maria M.; Romero, Sim; Larson, Mel [KBC Advanced Technologies plc, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The coke drum thermal kinetic dynamics fundamentally affect the coker unit yields as well as the coke product properties and unit reliability. In the drum the thermal cracking and polymerization or condensation reactions take place in a semi-batch environment. Understanding the fundamentals of the foaming kinetics that occur in the coke drums is key to avoiding a foam-over that could result in a unit shutdown for several months. Although the most dynamic changes with time occur during drum filling, other dynamics of the coker process will be discussed as well. KBC has contributed towards uncovering and modelling the complexities of heavy oil thermal dynamics. (author)

  20. Mechanical behavior and high-resolution EBSD investigation of the microstructural evolution in AISI 321 stainless steel under dynamic loading condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiamiyu, A.A.; Eskandari, M.; Sanayei, Mohsen; Odeshi, A.G.; Szpunar, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    The impact response of three regions (top, mid and center) across the thickness of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel plate at high strain rates (>6000 s −1 ) was studied using the split Hopkinson pressure bar system. The result shows that texture and stored energy heterogeneity across plate thickness influenced the mechanical responses of the investigated steel in these regions. Microstructural evaluation using high-resolution electron backscattered diffraction (HR-EBSD) analysis showed that strengthening in AISI 321 steel originates from the evolution of strain-induced martensite and formation of nano-carbides in addition to plastic deformation by mechanical twinning and slip. This resulted in a desirable combination of high strength and good ductility (approx. 2000 MPa at 0.42 true strain). Phase transformation, dynamic recrystallization and formation of nano-carbides were confirmed within the adiabatic shear band (ASB) region. The average dynamic recrystallized (DRX) grain size in the shear band region is 0.28 µm in comparison to grain size of 15 µm outside the shear bands. The nano-sized grain inside the shear bands is proposed to form by rotational dynamic recrystallization. A comparative study of the alloy's behavior under dynamic and quasi-static compression shows that the stability of austenite is higher at high strain rates and lower at a low strain rate. The strength in the dynamically impacted specimen is compromised as a result of the suppressed evolution of strain-induced martensite and mechanical twin. Martensitic transformation under both loading conditions follows the FCC É£-austenite→BCC ά-martensite kinetic path and both phases obey the Kurdjumov-Sachs' {(111)É£||(110)ά and <−101>É£||<1–11>ά} orientation relationship.

  1. Mechanical behavior and high-resolution EBSD investigation of the microstructural evolution in AISI 321 stainless steel under dynamic loading condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiamiyu, A.A., E-mail: ahmed.tiamiyu@usask.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Sask. (Canada); Eskandari, M. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sanayei, Mohsen; Odeshi, A.G.; Szpunar, J.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Sask. (Canada)

    2016-09-15

    The impact response of three regions (top, mid and center) across the thickness of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel plate at high strain rates (>6000 s{sup −1}) was studied using the split Hopkinson pressure bar system. The result shows that texture and stored energy heterogeneity across plate thickness influenced the mechanical responses of the investigated steel in these regions. Microstructural evaluation using high-resolution electron backscattered diffraction (HR-EBSD) analysis showed that strengthening in AISI 321 steel originates from the evolution of strain-induced martensite and formation of nano-carbides in addition to plastic deformation by mechanical twinning and slip. This resulted in a desirable combination of high strength and good ductility (approx. 2000 MPa at 0.42 true strain). Phase transformation, dynamic recrystallization and formation of nano-carbides were confirmed within the adiabatic shear band (ASB) region. The average dynamic recrystallized (DRX) grain size in the shear band region is 0.28 µm in comparison to grain size of 15 µm outside the shear bands. The nano-sized grain inside the shear bands is proposed to form by rotational dynamic recrystallization. A comparative study of the alloy's behavior under dynamic and quasi-static compression shows that the stability of austenite is higher at high strain rates and lower at a low strain rate. The strength in the dynamically impacted specimen is compromised as a result of the suppressed evolution of strain-induced martensite and mechanical twin. Martensitic transformation under both loading conditions follows the FCC É£-austenite→BCC ά-martensite kinetic path and both phases obey the Kurdjumov-Sachs' {(111)É£||(110)ά and <−101>É£||<1–11>ά} orientation relationship.

  2. Interplay between excitation kinetics and reaction-center dynamics in purple bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; RodrIguez, Ferney J; Quiroga, Luis; Johnson, Neil F

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthesis is arguably the fundamental process of life, since it enables energy from the Sun to enter the food chain on the Earth. It is a remarkable non-equilibrium process in which photons are converted to many-body excitations, which traverse a complex biomolecular membrane, where they are captured and fuel chemical reactions within a reaction center (RC) in order to produce nutrients. The precise nature of these dynamical processes-which lie at the interface between quantum and classical behavior and involve both noise and coordination-is still being explored. Here, we focus on a striking recent empirical finding concerning an illumination-driven transition in the biomolecular membrane architecture of the purple bacteria Rsp. photometricum. Using stochastic realizations to describe a hopping rate model for excitation transfer, we show numerically and analytically that this surprising shift in preferred architectures can be traced to the interplay between the excitation kinetics and the RC dynamics. The net effect is that the bacteria profit from efficient metabolism at low illumination intensities while using dissipation to avoid an oversupply of energy at high illumination intensities.

  3. Structure, Dynamics, and Kinetics of Weak Protein-Protein Complexes from NMR Spin Relaxation Measurements of Titrated Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, L.; Licinio, A.; Jensen, M.R.; Blackledge, M.; Ortega Roldan, J.L.; Van Nuland, N.; Lescop, E.

    2011-01-01

    We have recently presented a titration approach for the determination of residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) from experimentally inaccessible complexes. Here, we extend this approach to the measurement of 15 N spin relaxation rates and demonstrate that this can provide long-range structural, dynamic, and kinetic information about these elusive systems. (authors)

  4. Dynamic high-resolution ultrasound of the shoulder: How we do it

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corazza, Angelo, E-mail: angelcoraz@libero.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Orlandi, Davide, E-mail: theabo@libero.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Fabbro, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.fabbro@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Ferrero, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.ferrero@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Messina, Carmelo, E-mail: carmelomessina.md@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Piazza Malan 2, 20097 San Donato Milanese (Italy); Sartoris, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.sartoris@hotmail.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Perugin Bernardi, Silvia, E-mail: silvy-86-@hotmail.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Arcidiacono, Alice, E-mail: a.arcidiacono84@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Silvestri, Enzo, E-mail: silvi.enzo@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Radiologia, Ospedale Evangelico Internazionale, Corso Solferino 29A, 16121 Genova (Italy); and others

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • This paper shows how to apply US technique to image soft tissues around the shoulder. • Readers will learn to recognize normal US anatomy of tendons of the shoulder. • Readers will learn to apply dynamic maneuvers to improve rotator cuff visibility. - Abstract: Ultrasonography (US) is an established and well-accepted modality that can be used to evaluate articular and peri-articular structures around the shoulder. US has been proven to be useful in a wide range of rotator cuff diseases (tendon tears, tendinosis, and bursitis) as well as non-rotator cuff abnormalities (instability problems, synovial joint diseases, and nerve entrapment syndromes). Diagnostic accuracy of shoulder US when evaluating rotator cuff tears can reach 91–100% for partial and full thickness tears detection, respectively, having been reported to be as accurate as magnetic resonance imaging in experienced hands. US is cheap, readily available, capable to provide high-resolution images, and does not use ionizing radiations. In addition, US is the only imaging modality that allows performing dynamic evaluation of musculoskeletal structures, that may help to further increase diagnostic performance. In this setting, a standardized imaging protocol is essential for an exhaustive and efficient examination, also helping reducing the intrinsic dependence from operators of US. Furthermore, knowledge of pitfalls that can be encountered when examining the shoulder may help to avoid erroneous images interpretation. In this article we use detailed anatomic schemes and high-resolution US images to describe the normal US anatomy of soft tissues, articular, and para-articular structures located in and around the shoulder. Short video clips emphasizing the crucial role of dynamic maneuvers and dynamic real-time US examination of these structures are included as supplementary material.

  5. Dynamic high-resolution ultrasound of the shoulder: How we do it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corazza, Angelo; Orlandi, Davide; Fabbro, Emanuele; Ferrero, Giulio; Messina, Carmelo; Sartoris, Riccardo; Perugin Bernardi, Silvia; Arcidiacono, Alice; Silvestri, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper shows how to apply US technique to image soft tissues around the shoulder. • Readers will learn to recognize normal US anatomy of tendons of the shoulder. • Readers will learn to apply dynamic maneuvers to improve rotator cuff visibility. - Abstract: Ultrasonography (US) is an established and well-accepted modality that can be used to evaluate articular and peri-articular structures around the shoulder. US has been proven to be useful in a wide range of rotator cuff diseases (tendon tears, tendinosis, and bursitis) as well as non-rotator cuff abnormalities (instability problems, synovial joint diseases, and nerve entrapment syndromes). Diagnostic accuracy of shoulder US when evaluating rotator cuff tears can reach 91–100% for partial and full thickness tears detection, respectively, having been reported to be as accurate as magnetic resonance imaging in experienced hands. US is cheap, readily available, capable to provide high-resolution images, and does not use ionizing radiations. In addition, US is the only imaging modality that allows performing dynamic evaluation of musculoskeletal structures, that may help to further increase diagnostic performance. In this setting, a standardized imaging protocol is essential for an exhaustive and efficient examination, also helping reducing the intrinsic dependence from operators of US. Furthermore, knowledge of pitfalls that can be encountered when examining the shoulder may help to avoid erroneous images interpretation. In this article we use detailed anatomic schemes and high-resolution US images to describe the normal US anatomy of soft tissues, articular, and para-articular structures located in and around the shoulder. Short video clips emphasizing the crucial role of dynamic maneuvers and dynamic real-time US examination of these structures are included as supplementary material

  6. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CONVECTION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radice, David; Ott, Christian D. [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abdikamalov, Ernazar [Department of Physics, School of Science and Technology, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Couch, Sean M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Haas, Roland [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Schnetter, Erik, E-mail: dradice@caltech.edu [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2016-03-20

    We present results from high-resolution semiglobal simulations of neutrino-driven convection in core-collapse supernovae. We employ an idealized setup with parameterized neutrino heating/cooling and nuclear dissociation at the shock front. We study the internal dynamics of neutrino-driven convection and its role in redistributing energy and momentum through the gain region. We find that even if buoyant plumes are able to locally transfer heat up to the shock, convection is not able to create a net positive energy flux and overcome the downward transport of energy from the accretion flow. Turbulent convection does, however, provide a significant effective pressure support to the accretion flow as it favors the accumulation of energy, mass, and momentum in the gain region. We derive an approximate equation that is able to explain and predict the shock evolution in terms of integrals of quantities such as the turbulent pressure in the gain region or the effects of nonradial motion of the fluid. We use this relation as a way to quantify the role of turbulence in the dynamics of the accretion shock. Finally, we investigate the effects of grid resolution, which we change by a factor of 20 between the lowest and highest resolution. Our results show that the shallow slopes of the turbulent kinetic energy spectra reported in previous studies are a numerical artifact. Kolmogorov scaling is progressively recovered as the resolution is increased.

  7. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CONVECTION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radice, David; Ott, Christian D.; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Couch, Sean M.; Haas, Roland; Schnetter, Erik

    2016-01-01

    We present results from high-resolution semiglobal simulations of neutrino-driven convection in core-collapse supernovae. We employ an idealized setup with parameterized neutrino heating/cooling and nuclear dissociation at the shock front. We study the internal dynamics of neutrino-driven convection and its role in redistributing energy and momentum through the gain region. We find that even if buoyant plumes are able to locally transfer heat up to the shock, convection is not able to create a net positive energy flux and overcome the downward transport of energy from the accretion flow. Turbulent convection does, however, provide a significant effective pressure support to the accretion flow as it favors the accumulation of energy, mass, and momentum in the gain region. We derive an approximate equation that is able to explain and predict the shock evolution in terms of integrals of quantities such as the turbulent pressure in the gain region or the effects of nonradial motion of the fluid. We use this relation as a way to quantify the role of turbulence in the dynamics of the accretion shock. Finally, we investigate the effects of grid resolution, which we change by a factor of 20 between the lowest and highest resolution. Our results show that the shallow slopes of the turbulent kinetic energy spectra reported in previous studies are a numerical artifact. Kolmogorov scaling is progressively recovered as the resolution is increased

  8. Kinetic modeling of particle dynamics in H{sup −} negative ion sources (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatayama, A., E-mail: akh@ppl.appi.keio.ac.jp; Shibata, T.; Nishioka, S.; Ohta, M.; Yasumoto, M.; Nishida, K.; Yamamoto, T. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, 223-8522 (Japan); Miyamoto, K. [Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan); Fukano, A. [Monozukuri Department, Tokyo Metropolitan College of Industrial Technology, Shinagawa, Tokyo 140-0011 (Japan); Mizuno, T. [Department of Management Science, College of Engineering, Tamagawa University, Machida, Tokyo 194-8610 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Progress in the kinetic modeling of particle dynamics in H{sup −} negative ion source plasmas and their comparisons with experiments are reviewed, and discussed with some new results. Main focus is placed on the following two topics, which are important for the research and development of large negative ion sources and high power H{sup −} ion beams: (i) Effects of non-equilibrium features of EEDF (electron energy distribution function) on H{sup −} production, and (ii) extraction physics of H{sup −} ions and beam optics.

  9. Wetting kinetics of nanodroplets on lyophilic nanopillar-arrayed surfaces: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Diyuan; Yang, Zhen; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2017-10-01

    Wetting kinetics of water droplets on substrates with lyophilic nanopillars was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Early spreading of the droplet is hindered by the nanopillars because of the penetration of the liquid which induce an extra dissipation in the droplet. Droplet spreading is mainly controlled by liquid viscosity and surface tension and not dependent on solid wettability. Propagation of the fringe film is hindered by the enhanced solid wettability because of the energy barrier introduced by the interaction between water molecules and nanopillars which increase with solid wettability.

  10. Energetics of small scale turbulence in the lower stratosphere from high resolution radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dole

    Full Text Available Very high resolution radar measurements were performed in the troposphere and lower stratosphere by means of the PROUST radar. The PROUST radar operates in the UHF band (961 MHz and is located in St. Santin, France (44°39’ N, 2°12’ E. A field campaign involving high resolution balloon measurements and the PROUST radar was conducted during April 1998. Under the classical hypothesis that refractive index inhomogeneities at half radar wavelength lie within the inertial subrange, assumed to be isotropic, kinetic energy and temperature variance dissipation rates were estimated independently in the lower stratosphere. The dissipation rate of temperature variance is proportional to the dissipation rate of available potential energy. We therefore estimate the ratio of dissipation rates of potential to kinetic energy. This ratio is a key parameter of atmospheric turbulence which, in locally homogeneous and stationary conditions, is simply related to the flux Richardson number, Rf .

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence – Radio science (remote sensing

  11. Kinetics of gamma quanta initiated difluoroethane chlorization in inert solvent in dynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begishev, I.R.; Poluehktov, V.A.

    1979-01-01

    Studied is the kinetics of asymmetric difluoroethane chlorination under dynamic conditions where difluoroethane and chlorine are passed through liquid tetrachloromethane layer. It is shown that initiating chlorination of asymmetric difluoroethane by gamma quanta in the dose and temperature ranges of 2-50 rad/s and -30-100 deg C respectively brings to the significant increase of the reaction rate and unusually high trend for halogenated hydrocarbons, i.e. practically 1, 1, 1 - difluorochloroethane with quantitative yield is formed. In this case radiation chemical yield G=10 4 -10 5 is achieved. It is shown that the chlorination process under dynamic conditions, complicated by the transport of initial reagents from a gas phase to a liquid one and reaction products from a liquid phase to a gas one, is described satisfactorily by the model of ideal substitution reactor

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Dynamic single photon emission computed tomography—basic principles and cardiac applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Grant T.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Maltz, Jonathan S.; Budinger, Thomas F.

    2010-10-01

    The very nature of nuclear medicine, the visual representation of injected radiopharmaceuticals, implies imaging of dynamic processes such as the uptake and wash-out of radiotracers from body organs. For years, nuclear medicine has been touted as the modality of choice for evaluating function in health and disease. This evaluation is greatly enhanced using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), which permits three-dimensional (3D) visualization of tracer distributions in the body. However, to fully realize the potential of the technique requires the imaging of in vivo dynamic processes of flow and metabolism. Tissue motion and deformation must also be addressed. Absolute quantification of these dynamic processes in the body has the potential to improve diagnosis. This paper presents a review of advancements toward the realization of the potential of dynamic SPECT imaging and a brief history of the development of the instrumentation. A major portion of the paper is devoted to the review of special data processing methods that have been developed for extracting kinetics from dynamic cardiac SPECT data acquired using rotating detector heads that move as radiopharmaceuticals exchange between biological compartments. Recent developments in multi-resolution spatiotemporal methods enable one to estimate kinetic parameters of compartment models of dynamic processes using data acquired from a single camera head with slow gantry rotation. The estimation of kinetic parameters directly from projection measurements improves bias and variance over the conventional method of first reconstructing 3D dynamic images, generating time-activity curves from selected regions of interest and then estimating the kinetic parameters from the generated time-activity curves. Although the potential applications of SPECT for imaging dynamic processes have not been fully realized in the clinic, it is hoped that this review illuminates the potential of SPECT for dynamic imaging

  13. WRF high resolution dynamical downscaling of ERA-Interim for Portugal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Pedro M.M. [University of Lisbon, Instituto Dom Luiz, Lisbon (Portugal); Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Cardoso, Rita M.; Miranda, Pedro M.A.; Medeiros, Joana de [University of Lisbon, Instituto Dom Luiz, Lisbon (Portugal); Belo-Pereira, Margarida; Espirito-Santo, Fatima [Instituto de Meteorologia, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2012-11-15

    This study proposes a dynamically downscaled climatology of Portugal, produced by a high resolution (9 km) WRF simulation, forced by 20 years of ERA-Interim reanalysis (1989-2008), nested in an intermediate domain with 27 km of resolution. The Portuguese mainland is characterized by large precipitation gradients, with observed mean annual precipitation ranging from about 400 to over 2,200 mm, with a very wet northwest and rather dry southeast, largely explained by orographic processes. Model results are compared with all available stations with continuous records, comprising daily information in 32 stations for temperature and 308 for precipitation, through the computation of mean climatologies, standard statistical errors on daily to seasonally timescales, and distributions of extreme events. Results show that WRF at 9 km outperforms ERA-Interim in all analyzed variables, with good results in the representation of the annual cycles in each region. The biases of minimum and maximum temperature are reduced, with improvement of the description of temperature variability at the extreme range of its distribution. The largest gain of the high resolution simulations is visible in the rainiest regions of Portugal, where orographic enhancement is crucial. These improvements are striking in the high ranking percentiles in all seasons, describing extreme precipitation events. WRF results at 9 km compare favorably with published results supporting its use as a high-resolution regional climate model. This higher resolution allows a better representation of extreme events that are of major importance to develop mitigation/adaptation strategies by policy makers and downstream users of regional climate models in applications such as flash floods or heat waves. (orig.)

  14. Motion robust high resolution 3D free-breathing pulmonary MRI using dynamic 3D image self-navigator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenwen; Ong, Frank; Johnson, Kevin M; Nagle, Scott K; Hope, Thomas A; Lustig, Michael; Larson, Peder E Z

    2018-06-01

    To achieve motion robust high resolution 3D free-breathing pulmonary MRI utilizing a novel dynamic 3D image navigator derived directly from imaging data. Five-minute free-breathing scans were acquired with a 3D ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence with 1.25 mm isotropic resolution. From this data, dynamic 3D self-navigating images were reconstructed under locally low rank (LLR) constraints and used for motion compensation with one of two methods: a soft-gating technique to penalize the respiratory motion induced data inconsistency, and a respiratory motion-resolved technique to provide images of all respiratory motion states. Respiratory motion estimation derived from the proposed dynamic 3D self-navigator of 7.5 mm isotropic reconstruction resolution and a temporal resolution of 300 ms was successful for estimating complex respiratory motion patterns. This estimation improved image quality compared to respiratory belt and DC-based navigators. Respiratory motion compensation with soft-gating and respiratory motion-resolved techniques provided good image quality from highly undersampled data in volunteers and clinical patients. An optimized 3D UTE sequence combined with the proposed reconstruction methods can provide high-resolution motion robust pulmonary MRI. Feasibility was shown in patients who had irregular breathing patterns in which our approach could depict clinically relevant pulmonary pathologies. Magn Reson Med 79:2954-2967, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Novel approaches to estimating the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate from low- and moderate-resolution velocity fluctuation time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wacławczyk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose two approaches to estimating the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE dissipation rate, based on the zero-crossing method by Sreenivasan et al. (1983. The original formulation requires a fine resolution of the measured signal, down to the smallest dissipative scales. However, due to finite sampling frequency, as well as measurement errors, velocity time series obtained from airborne experiments are characterized by the presence of effective spectral cutoffs. In contrast to the original formulation the new approaches are suitable for use with signals originating from airborne experiments. The suitability of the new approaches is tested using measurement data obtained during the Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST airborne research campaign as well as synthetic turbulence data. They appear useful and complementary to existing methods. We show the number-of-crossings-based approaches respond differently to errors due to finite sampling and finite averaging than the classical power spectral method. Hence, their application for the case of short signals and small sampling frequencies is particularly interesting, as it can increase the robustness of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate retrieval.

  16. Improving estimation of kinetic parameters in dynamic force spectroscopy using cluster analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Fu; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2018-03-01

    Dynamic Force Spectroscopy (DFS) is a widely used technique to characterize the dissociation kinetics and interaction energy landscape of receptor-ligand complexes with single-molecule resolution. In an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM)-based DFS experiment, receptor-ligand complexes, sandwiched between an AFM tip and substrate, are ruptured at different stress rates by varying the speed at which the AFM-tip and substrate are pulled away from each other. The rupture events are grouped according to their pulling speeds, and the mean force and loading rate of each group are calculated. These data are subsequently fit to established models, and energy landscape parameters such as the intrinsic off-rate (koff) and the width of the potential energy barrier (xβ) are extracted. However, due to large uncertainties in determining mean forces and loading rates of the groups, errors in the estimated koff and xβ can be substantial. Here, we demonstrate that the accuracy of fitted parameters in a DFS experiment can be dramatically improved by sorting rupture events into groups using cluster analysis instead of sorting them according to their pulling speeds. We test different clustering algorithms including Gaussian mixture, logistic regression, and K-means clustering, under conditions that closely mimic DFS experiments. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we benchmark the performance of these clustering algorithms over a wide range of koff and xβ, under different levels of thermal noise, and as a function of both the number of unbinding events and the number of pulling speeds. Our results demonstrate that cluster analysis, particularly K-means clustering, is very effective in improving the accuracy of parameter estimation, particularly when the number of unbinding events are limited and not well separated into distinct groups. Cluster analysis is easy to implement, and our performance benchmarks serve as a guide in choosing an appropriate method for DFS data analysis.

  17. Kinetic Behavior of on Various Cheeses under Constant and Dynamic Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed kinetic models to predict the growth of pathogenic Escherichia coli on cheeses during storage at constant and changing temperatures. A five-strain mixture of pathogenic E. coli was inoculated onto natural cheeses (Brie and Camembert and processed cheeses (sliced Mozzarella and sliced Cheddar at 3 to 4 log CFU/g. The inoculated cheeses were stored at 4, 10, 15, 25, and 30°C for 1 to 320 h, with a different storage time being used for each temperature. Total bacteria and E. coli cells were enumerated on tryptic soy agar and MacConkey sorbitol agar, respectively. E. coli growth data were fitted to the Baranyi model to calculate the maximum specific growth rate (μmax; log CFU/g/h, lag phase duration (LPD; h, lower asymptote (log CFU/g, and upper asymptote (log CFU/g. The kinetic parameters were then analyzed as a function of storage temperature, using the square root model, polynomial equation, and linear equation. A dynamic model was also developed for varying temperature. The model performance was evaluated against observed data, and the root mean square error (RMSE was calculated. At 4°C, E. coli cell growth was not observed on any cheese. However, E. coli growth was observed at 10°C to 30°C with a μmax of 0.01 to 1.03 log CFU/g/h, depending on the cheese. The μmax values increased as temperature increased, while LPD values decreased, and μmax and LPD values were different among the four types of cheese. The developed models showed adequate performance (RMSE = 0.176–0.337, indicating that these models should be useful for describing the growth kinetics of E. coli on various cheeses.

  18. Comparison of morphological and kinetic parameters in distinction of benign and malignant breast lesions in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Direnç Özlem Aksoy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the value of qualitative morphologicaland kinetic data and quantitative kinetic data indistinction of malignancy in dynamic contrast enhancedmagnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI of the breast.Methods: DCE-MRIs of 49 subjects were evaluated.Morphological and contrast enhancement parameters of95 lesions were recorded in these subjects. Post-contrastkinetic behavior of these lesions were also investigated.Among the quantitative parameters, relative enhancements(E1, E2, Epeak, time-to-peak (Tpeak, slope ofcurve (Slope, signal enhancement ratio (SER, and maximumintensity time ratio (MITR were calculated. Theseresults were compared with the pathological diagnosis.Results: Spiculated contour (100%, rim enhancement(97.87%, irregular shape (95.74%, and irregular margin(91.49% were the most specific morphological featuresof malignancy in mass lesions. In non-mass lesions, focalzone (91.49% was the most specific feature of malignancy.74.5% of the benign lesions showed type 1, 77.1%of the malignant lesions showed type 2 and 3 curves accordingto the kinetic curve evaluation. All quantitativeparameters except Epeak were found to be statisticallysignificant in distinction of malignancy.Conclusion: None of the morphological features of thebenign lesions were found to be significantly specific.More specific features can be described for malignantlesions. Early behavior of the kinetic curve is not usefulfor diagnosis of malignancy but the intermediate and latebehavior gives useful information. Quantitative data involvedin this study might be promising.Key words: Morphological, kinetic, breast lesions, magnetic resonance imaging, dynamic

  19. Dynamic phase transition in the kinetic spin-2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model in an oscillating field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertas, Mehmet [Institute of Science, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Canko, Osman [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)], E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr

    2008-06-15

    We extend our recent paper [M. Keskin, O. Canko, M. Ertas, J. Exp. Theor. Phys. (Sov. Phys. JETP) 105 (2007) 1190.] to present a study, within a mean-field approach, the stationary states of the kinetic spin-2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model in the presence of a time-dependent oscillating magnetic field by using the Glauber-type of stochastic dynamics. We found 20 fundamental types of dynamic phase diagrams where exhibit more complex and richer phase diagrams than our recent paper. Especially, the obtained dynamic phase diagrams show the dynamic triple, quadruple and dynamic double critical end points besides dynamic tricritical points that depending on interaction parameters. The phase diagrams also exhibit a disordered (d) and the ferromagnetic-2 (f{sub 2}) phases, and the f{sub 2}+d, f{sub 2}+fq, fq+d, f{sub 2}+f{sub 1}+fq and f{sub 2}+fq+d, where f{sub 1} are fq the ferromagnetic-1 and ferroquadrupolar or simply quadrupolar phases respectively, coexistence phase regions that strongly depend on interaction parameters.

  20. Assessments of the kinetic and dynamic transient behavior of sub-critical systems (ADS) in comparison to critical reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schikorr, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    The neutron kinetic and the reactor dynamic behavior of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) is significantly different from those of conventional power reactor systems currently in use for the production of power. It is the objective of this study to examine and to demonstrate the intrinsic differences of the kinetic and dynamic behavior of accelerator driven systems to typical plant transient initiators in comparison to the known, kinetic and dynamic behavior of critical thermal and fast reactor systems. It will be shown that in sub-critical assemblies, changes in reactivity or in the external neutron source strength lead to an asymptotic power level essentially described by the instantaneous power change (i.e. prompt jump). Shutdown of ADS operating at high levels of sub-criticality, (i.e. k eff ∼0.99), without the support of reactivity control systems (such as control or safety rods), may be problematic in case the ability of cooling of the core should be impaired (i.e. loss of coolant flow). In addition, the dynamic behavior of sub-critical systems to typical plant transients such as protected or unprotected loss of flow (LOF) or heat sink (LOH) transients are not necessarily substantially different from the plant dynamic behavior of critical systems if the reactivity feedback coefficients of the ADS design are unfavorable. As expected, the state of sub-criticality and the temperature feedback coefficients, such as Doppler and coolant temperature coefficient, play dominant roles in determining the course and direction of plant transients. Should the combination of these safety coefficients be very unfavorable, not much additional margin in safety may be gained by making a critical system only sub-critical (i.e. k eff ∼0.95). A careful optimization procedure between the selected operating level of sub-criticality, the safety reactivity coefficients and the possible need for additional reactivity control systems seems, therefore, advisable during the early

  1. Access to Optically Pure β-Hydroxy Esters via Non-Enzymatic Kinetic Resolution by a Planar-Chiral DMAP Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba E. Díazlvarez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of new approaches to obtain optically pure β-hydroxy esters is an important area in synthetic organic chemistry since they are precursors of other high value compounds. Herein, the kinetic resolution of racemic β-hydroxy esters using a planar-chiral DMAP derivative catalyst is presented. Following this procedure, a range of aromatic β-hydroxy esters was obtained in excellent selectivities (up to s = 107 and high enantiomeric excess (up to 99% ee. Furthermore, the utility of the present method was demonstrated in the synthesis of (S-3-hydroxy-N-methyl-3-phenylpropanamide, a key intermediate for bioactive molecules such as fluoxetine, tomoxetine or nisoxetine, in its enantiomerically pure form.

  2. Time-resolved PIV technique for high temporal resolution measurement of mechanical prosthetic aortic valve fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, R; Morbiducci, U; Rossi, M; Scalise, L; Verdonck, P; Grigioni, M

    2007-02-01

    Prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) have been used to replace diseased native valves for more than five decades. Among these, mechanical PHVs are the most frequently implanted. Unfortunately, these devices still do not achieve ideal behavior and lead to many complications, many of which are related to fluid mechanics. The fluid dynamics of mechanical PHVs are particularly complex and the fine-scale characteristics of such flows call for very accurate experimental techniques. Adequate temporal resolution can be reached by applying time-resolved PIV, a high-resolution dynamic technique which is able to capture detailed chronological changes in the velocity field. The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the evolution of the flow field in a detailed time domain of a commercial bileaflet PHV in a mock-loop mimicking unsteady conditions, by means of time-resolved 2D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The investigated flow field corresponded to the region immediately downstream of the valve plane. Spatial resolution as in "standard" PIV analysis of prosthetic valve fluid dynamics was used. The combination of a Nd:YLF high-repetition-rate double-cavity laser with a high frame rate CMOS camera allowed a detailed, highly temporally resolved acquisition (up to 10000 fps depending on the resolution) of the flow downstream of the PHV. Features that were observed include the non-homogeneity and unsteadiness of the phenomenon and the presence of large-scale vortices within the field, especially in the wake of the valve leaflets. Furthermore, we observed that highly temporally cycle-resolved analysis allowed the different behaviors exhibited by the bileaflet valve at closure to be captured in different acquired cardiac cycles. By accurately capturing hemodynamically relevant time scales of motion, time-resolved PIV characterization can realistically be expected to help designers in improving PHV performance and in furnishing comprehensive validation with experimental data

  3. High-resolution polypeptide structure and dynamics in anisotropic environments: The gramicidin channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Lee, K.C.; Ketchem, R.R.; Hu, W.; Lazo, N.D.; Huo, S. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    To understand the details of macromolecular function, high-resolution structural and dynamic detail is essential. The polypeptide fold of the gramicidin channel has been effectively modeled for the past 20 years, yet the functional changes in conductance and channel lifetime associated with amino acid substitutions cannot be predicted. To accomplish this goal, high-resolution electrostatic modeling and the precise orientation of all dipoles are required. Furthermore, an enhanced knowledge of the complex molecular environment of this membrane-bound peptide is needed. An aqueous environment is relatively uniform and achiral. The membrane environment is very heterogenous and chiral. A knowledge of the interactions, specific and nonspecific, between peptide and lipid will aid in developing a better understanding of this environment. To accomplish this goal, it is necessary to study the peptide in an extended lipid bilayer, rather than in a vesicular or micellar form. These latter environments are likely to possess increased dynamics, increased water penetration, and distorted interactions between the polypeptide and membrane surface. To perform NMR studies on bilayer bound peptides, solid state NMR methods are required, and for specific site information, isotopic labels are incorporated using solid phase peptide synthesis.

  4. Reproducibility of intrarenal kinetics of Gd-DOTA with rabbits with dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, N.; Broussin, J.; Barat, J.L.; Ducassou, D.

    1989-01-01

    Ten normal rabbits and seven rabbits with experimental acute renal failure by tubular necrosis were studied with dynamic MR to evaluate the reproducibility of intrarenal kinetics of Gd-DOTA. Sequential spin-echo sequences with short TR (200 msec)/TE (26 msec) were used yielding a 29 sec acquisition time. A usual semi-quantitative analysis of intrarenal contrast demonstrated the reproducilibity of some phases of the dynamic sequence in particular a drop in the signal within inner medulla between the third and the fourth minute after infusion. This effect, related to a high concentration of Gd-DOTA within the tubules was observed in 9 over 10 normal rabbits and in none of the rabbits with acute renal failure. The quantitative analysis calculation was based on relative signal intensity and contrast-to-noise ratio from the absolute signal intensity measure on regions-of-interest (ROI) on the cortex, outer medulla and inner medulla. No reproducibility of the variations with time of these parameters could be assessed. A gread number of factors of variations or error, mainly during the measurements of signal intensity with ROI, could explain this lack of reproducibility. At the present, dynamic MR is therefore not able to quantitatively evaluate the renal function. Only a semi-quantitative estimation of tubular concentration can be deduced [fr

  5. Combination of Markov state models and kinetic networks for the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations of peptide folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Isolde H; Fersht, Alan R; Settanni, Giovanni

    2011-06-09

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the TZ1 beta-hairpin peptide have been carried out using an implicit model for the solvent. The trajectories have been analyzed using a Markov state model defined on the projections along two significant observables and a kinetic network approach. The Markov state model allowed for an unbiased identification of the metastable states of the system, and provided the basis for commitment probability calculations performed on the kinetic network. The kinetic network analysis served to extract the main transition state for folding of the peptide and to validate the results from the Markov state analysis. The combination of the two techniques allowed for a consistent and concise characterization of the dynamics of the peptide. The slowest relaxation process identified is the exchange between variably folded and denatured species, and the second slowest process is the exchange between two different subsets of the denatured state which could not be otherwise identified by simple inspection of the projected trajectory. The third slowest process is the exchange between a fully native and a partially folded intermediate state characterized by a native turn with a proximal backbone H-bond, and frayed side-chain packing and termini. The transition state for the main folding reaction is similar to the intermediate state, although a more native like side-chain packing is observed.

  6. Dynamic phase transition in the kinetic spin-3/2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model in an oscillating field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canko, Osman; Deviren, Bayram; Keskin, Mustafa [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2006-07-26

    The dynamic phase transitions are studied, within a mean-field approach, in the kinetic Blume-Emery-Griffiths model under the presence of a time varying (sinusoidal) magnetic field by using the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics. The behaviour of the time-dependence of the order parameters and the behaviour of the average order parameters in a period, which is also called the dynamic order parameters, as a function of reduced temperature, are investigated. The nature (continuous and discontinuous) of transition is characterized by studying the average order parameters in a period. The dynamic phase transition points are obtained and the phase diagrams are presented in the reduced magnetic field amplitude and reduced temperature plane. The phase diagrams exhibit one, two, or three dynamic tricritical points and a dynamic double critical end point, and besides a disordered and two ordered phases, seven coexistence phase regions exist, which strongly depend on interaction parameters. We also calculate the Liapunov exponent to verify the stability of solutions and the dynamic phase transition points.

  7. Dynamic phase transition in the kinetic spin-3/2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model in an oscillating field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canko, Osman; Deviren, Bayram; Keskin, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic phase transitions are studied, within a mean-field approach, in the kinetic Blume-Emery-Griffiths model under the presence of a time varying (sinusoidal) magnetic field by using the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics. The behaviour of the time-dependence of the order parameters and the behaviour of the average order parameters in a period, which is also called the dynamic order parameters, as a function of reduced temperature, are investigated. The nature (continuous and discontinuous) of transition is characterized by studying the average order parameters in a period. The dynamic phase transition points are obtained and the phase diagrams are presented in the reduced magnetic field amplitude and reduced temperature plane. The phase diagrams exhibit one, two, or three dynamic tricritical points and a dynamic double critical end point, and besides a disordered and two ordered phases, seven coexistence phase regions exist, which strongly depend on interaction parameters. We also calculate the Liapunov exponent to verify the stability of solutions and the dynamic phase transition points

  8. Candida Rugosa Lipase-catalyzed Kinetic Resolution of 3-(Isobutyryloxy)methyl 4-[2-(Difluoromethoxy)phenyl]-2-methyl-5,5-dioxo-1,4-dihydrobenzothieno[3,2-b]pyridine-3-carboxylate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobolev, A.; Zhalubovskis, R.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Vigante, B.; Chekavichus, B.; Duburs, G.; Groot, de Æ.

    2004-01-01

    The lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution of 3-(isobutyryloxy)methyl 4-[2-(difluoromethoxy)phenyl]-2-methyl-5,5-dioxo-1,4-dihydrobenzothieno[3,2-b]pyridine-3-carboxylate has been performed. The most enantioselective reaction (E = 28) was transesterification with n-butanol in water-saturated toluene at

  9. Investigation of nucleation kinetics in H2SO4 vapor through modeling of gas phase kinetics coupled with particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Philip T. M.; Zeuch, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    We have developed a new model utilizing our existing kinetic gas phase models to simulate experimental particle size distributions emerging in dry supersaturated H2SO4 vapor homogeneously produced by rapid oxidation of SO2 through stabilized Criegee-Intermediates from 2-butene ozonolysis. We use a sectional method for simulating the particle dynamics. The particle treatment in the model is based on first principles and takes into account the transition from the kinetic to the diffusion-limited regime. It captures the temporal evolution of size distributions at the end of the ozonolysis experiment well, noting a slight underrepresentation of coagulation effects for larger particle sizes. The model correctly predicts the shape and the modes of the experimentally observed particle size distributions. The predicted modes show an extremely high sensitivity to the H2SO4 evaporation rates of the initially formed H2SO4 clusters (dimer to pentamer), which were arbitrarily restricted to decrease exponentially with increasing cluster size. In future, the analysis presented in this work can be extended to allow a direct validation of quantum chemically predicted stabilities of small H2SO4 clusters, which are believed to initiate a significant fraction of atmospheric new particle formation events. We discuss the prospects and possible limitations of the here presented approach.

  10. Photodissociation dynamics of propene at 157.6 nm: Kinetic energy distributions and branching ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.-H.; Lee, Y.-Y.; Lee, Yuan T.; Yang Xueming

    2003-01-01

    Photodissociation dynamics of propene at 157.6 nm has been investigated in a molecular beam apparatus using the photofragment translational spectroscopic technique combined with the vacuum ultraviolet ionization method. Eleven photofragments have been successfully detected and ascribed to eight (five binary and three triple) dissociation channels: namely, C 3 H 5 +H, C 3 H 4 +H+H, C 3 H 4 +H 2 , C 3 H 3 +H 2 +H, C 2 H 4 +CH 2 , C 2 H 3 +CH 3 , C 2 H 2 +CH 4 , and C 2 H 2 +CH 3 +H. Their branching ratios have been determined to be 1%, 7%, 2 H 2 +CH 3 +H channel. In addition, the averaged kinetic energy releases and the fractions in translational energy have also been determined from the measured kinetic energy distributions. For the binary dissociation channels, the fractions in translational energy are less than 18% except the C 3 H 5 +H channel, whereas they are more than 42% for the triple dissociation channels. An intriguing finding indicates that the C 2 H 4 +CH 2 channel has a nearly identical kinetic energy distribution and a similar branching ratio to the C 2 H 3 +CH 3 channel, although the former undergoes a three-center elimination process different from the C-C bond rupture occurring in the latter

  11. Kinetic Modifications to MHD Phenomena in Toroidal Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; Kramer, G.J.; Fredrickson, E.

    2004-01-01

    Particle kinetic effects involving small spatial and fast temporal scales can strongly affect MHD phenomena and the long time behavior of plasmas. In particular, kinetic effects such as finite ion gyroradii, trapped particle dynamics, and wave-particle resonances have been shown to greatly modify the stability of MHD modes. Here, the kinetic effects of trapped electron dynamics and finite ion gyroradii are shown to have a large stabilizing effect on kinetic ballooning modes in low aspect ratio toroidal plasmas such as NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment]. We also present the analysis of Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes (TAEs) destabilized by fast neutral-beam injected ions in NSTX experiments and TAE stability in ITER due to alpha-particles and MeV negatively charged neutral beam injected ions

  12. Dynamic phase transition in the kinetic spin-1 Blume-Capel model: Phase diagrams in the temperature and crystal-field interaction plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskin, M.; Canko, O.; Temizer, U.

    2007-01-01

    Within a mean-field approach, the stationary states of the kinetic spin-1 Blume-Capel model in the presence of a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field is studied. The Glauber-type stochastic dynamics is used to describe the time evolution of the system and obtain the mean-field dynamic equation of motion. The dynamic phase-transition points are calculated and phase diagrams are presented in the temperature and crystal-field interaction plane. According to the values of the magnetic field amplitude, three fundamental types of phase diagrams are found: One exhibits a dynamic tricritical point, while the other two exhibit a dynamic zero-temperature critical point

  13. Mucuna pruriens in Parkinson Disease: A Kinetic-Dynamic Comparison With Levodopa Standard Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contin, Manuela; Lopane, Giovanna; Passini, Andrea; Poli, Ferruccio; Iannello, Carmelina; Guarino, Maria

    2015-01-01

    We compared levodopa (LD) kinetic-dynamic profile of a dose of LD/aromatic amino acid decarboxylase peripheral inhibitors versus a nominally equivalent dose of a commercial Mucuna pruriens (Mucuna) seeds extract in 2 patients with Parkinson disease chronically taking LD standard combined with self-prescribed Mucuna. Patients were challenged with a fasting morning dose of 100 mg LD/25 mg carbidopa (patient 1) or benserazide (patient 2) versus 100 mg LD from Mucuna capsules in 2 different sessions, after a 12-hour standard LD formulations' washout. They underwent kinetic-dynamic LD monitoring based on LD dose intake and simultaneous serial assessments of plasma drug concentrations and motor test performances. Quantitative analysis of LD in Mucuna capsules was also performed. Levodopa bioavailability was markedly lower after Mucuna administration compared with LD standard formulations: in patient 1, peak plasma LD concentration (Cmax) decreased from 2.0 to 1.0 mg/L and the area under the plasma concentration time curve from 137 to 33.6 mg/L per minute; in patient 2, Cmax was 0.7 mg/L after LD/benserazide and nearly undetectable after Mucuna. In patient 1, impaired LD bioavailability from Mucuna resulted in reduced duration and overall extent of drug response compared with LD/carbidopa. In patient 2, no significant subacute LD motor response was observed in either condition. Quantitative analysis of Mucuna formulation confirmed the 100 mg LD content for the utilized capsules. Our results show an impaired LD bioavailability from Mucuna preparation, as expected by the lacking aromatic amino acid decarboxylase inhibitors coadministration, which might explain the suggested lower dyskinetic potential of Mucuna compared with standard LD formulations.

  14. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-07

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  15. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-01

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  16. Tracer kinetic model-driven registration for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI time-series data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A; O'Connor, James P B; Caunce, Angela; Roberts, Caleb; Cheung, Sue; Watson, Yvonne; Davies, Karen; Hope, Lynn; Jackson, Alan; Jayson, Gordon C; Parker, Geoffrey J M

    2007-11-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) time series data are subject to unavoidable physiological motion during acquisition (e.g., due to breathing) and this motion causes significant errors when fitting tracer kinetic models to the data, particularly with voxel-by-voxel fitting approaches. Motion correction is problematic, as contrast enhancement introduces new features into postcontrast images and conventional registration similarity measures cannot fully account for the increased image information content. A methodology is presented for tracer kinetic model-driven registration that addresses these problems by explicitly including a model of contrast enhancement in the registration process. The iterative registration procedure is focused on a tumor volume of interest (VOI), employing a three-dimensional (3D) translational transformation that follows only tumor motion. The implementation accurately removes motion corruption in a DCE-MRI software phantom and it is able to reduce model fitting errors and improve localization in 3D parameter maps in patient data sets that were selected for significant motion problems. Sufficient improvement was observed in the modeling results to salvage clinical trial DCE-MRI data sets that would otherwise have to be rejected due to motion corruption. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Kinetics of Reactive Fronts in Porous Media: quantification through a laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Anna, P.; Jimenez-Martinez, J.; Turuban, R.; Tabuteau, H.; Derrien, M.; Le Borgne, T.; Meheust, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The kinetics of reaction fronts in heterogeneous flows is tightly linked to the mixing dynamics governed by the combined action of stretching, diffusion and dispersion. Focusing on porous media flows, with a new experimental setup we show that the invading solute is organized into stretched lamellae, whose deformation and coalescence control the effective reaction kinetics of the mixing limited bimolecular reaction A + B --> C. While the classic advection-dispersion theory predicts a scaling of the cumulative product mass of C as t^(0.5), we observe two distinct kinetics regimes, one characterized by the stretching and the other by the coalescence of the invading lamellae, in which the mass of C scales faster than t^(0.5). The proposed experimental set up allows for direct quantification of mixing and reactive transport in porous media with a high spatial resolution, at the pore scale. The analogous two dimensional porous medium consists in a Hele-Shaw cell containing a single layer of cylindrical solid grains built by soft lithography. On the one hand, the measurement of the local, intra-pore, conservative concentration field is done using a fluorescent tracer. On the other hand, considering a fast bimolecular advection-dispersion reaction A + B --> C occurring as A displaces B, we quantify the reaction kinetics from the spatially-resolved measurement of the pore scale reaction rate, using a chemiluminescent reaction.

  18. Multi-step cure kinetic model of ultra-thin glass fiber epoxy prepreg exhibiting both autocatalytic and diffusion-controlled regimes under isothermal and dynamic-heating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye Chan; Min, Hyunsung; Hong, Sungyong; Wang, Mei; Sun, Hanna; Park, In-Kyung; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon; Moon, Hyungpil; Kim, Kwang J.; Suhr, Jonghwan; Nam, Jae-Do

    2017-08-01

    As packaging technologies are demanded that reduce the assembly area of substrate, thin composite laminate substrates require the utmost high performance in such material properties as the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and stiffness. Accordingly, thermosetting resin systems, which consist of multiple fillers, monomers and/or catalysts in thermoset-based glass fiber prepregs, are extremely complicated and closely associated with rheological properties, which depend on the temperature cycles for cure. For the process control of these complex systems, it is usually required to obtain a reliable kinetic model that could be used for the complex thermal cycles, which usually includes both the isothermal and dynamic-heating segments. In this study, an ultra-thin prepreg with highly loaded silica beads and glass fibers in the epoxy/amine resin system was investigated as a model system by isothermal/dynamic heating experiments. The maximum degree of cure was obtained as a function of temperature. The curing kinetics of the model prepreg system exhibited a multi-step reaction and a limited conversion as a function of isothermal curing temperatures, which are often observed in epoxy cure system because of the rate-determining diffusion of polymer chain growth. The modified kinetic equation accurately described the isothermal behavior and the beginning of the dynamic-heating behavior by integrating the obtained maximum degree of cure into the kinetic model development.

  19. Dynamic placement of plasmonic hotspots for super-resolution surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertsgaard, Christopher T; McKoskey, Rachel M; Rich, Isabel S; Lindquist, Nathan C

    2014-10-28

    In this paper, we demonstrate dynamic placement of locally enhanced plasmonic fields using holographic laser illumination of a silver nanohole array. To visualize these focused "hotspots", the silver surface was coated with various biological samples for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) imaging. Due to the large field enhancements, blinking behavior of the SERS hotspots was observed and processed using a stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy algorithm enabling super-resolution localization of the hotspots to within 10 nm. These hotspots were then shifted across the surface in subwavelength (hotspots. Using this technique, we also show that such subwavelength shifting and localization of plasmonic hotspots has potential for imaging applications. Interestingly, illuminating the surface with randomly shifting SERS hotspots was sufficient to completely fill in a wide field of view for super-resolution chemical imaging.

  20. Quantum kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bonitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book presents quantum kinetic theory in a comprehensive way. The focus is on density operator methods and on non-equilibrium Green functions. The theory allows to rigorously treat nonequilibrium dynamics in quantum many-body systems. Of particular interest are ultrafast processes in plasmas, condensed matter and trapped atoms that are stimulated by rapidly developing experiments with short pulse lasers and free electron lasers. To describe these experiments theoretically, the most powerful approach is given by non-Markovian quantum kinetic equations that are discussed in detail, including computational aspects.

  1. In Vivo Optical Imaging for Targeted Drug Kinetics and Localization for Oral Surgery and Super-Resolution, Facilitated by Printed Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Brian Z.

    Many human cancer cell types over-express folate receptors, and this provides an opportunity to develop targeted anti-cancer drugs. For these drugs to be effective, their kinetics must be well understood in vivo and in deep tissue where tumors occur. We demonstrate a method for imaging these parameters by incorporating a kinetic compartment model and fluorescence into optical diffusion tomography (ODT). The kinetics were imaged in a live mouse, and found to be in agreement with previous in vitro studies, demonstrating the validity of the method and its feasibility as an effective tool in preclinical drug development studies. Progress in developing optical imaging for biomedical applications requires customizable and often complex objects known as "phantoms" for testing and evaluation. We present new optical phantoms fabricated using inexpensive 3D printing methods with multiple materials, allowing for the placement of complex inhomogeneities in heterogeneous or anatomically realistic geometries, as opposed to previous phantoms which were limited to simple shapes formed by molds or machining. Furthermore, we show that Mie theory can be used to design the optical properties to match a target tissue. The phantom fabrication methods are versatile, can be applied to optical imaging methods besides diffusive imaging, and can be used in the calibration of live animal imaging data. Applications of diffuse optical imaging in the operating theater have been limited in part due to computational burden. We present an approach for the fast localization of arteries in the roof of the mouth that has the potential to reduce complications. Furthermore, we use the extracted position information to fabricate a custom surgical guide using 3D printing that could protect the arteries during surgery. The resolution of ODT is severely limited by the attenuation of high spatial frequencies. We present a super-resolution method achieved through the point localization of fluorescent

  2. High-resolution dynamic angiography using flat-panel volume CT: feasibility demonstration for neuro and lower limb vascular applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehndiratta, Amit; Rabinov, James D.; Grasruck, Michael; Liao, Eric C.; Crandell, David; Gupta, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates a prototype flat-panel volume CT (fpVCT) for dynamic in vivo imaging in a variety of neurovascular and lower limb applications. Dynamic CTA was performed on 12 patients (neuro = 8, lower limb = 4) using an fpVCT with 120 kVp, 50 mA, rotation time varying from 8 to 19 s, and field of view of 25 x 25 x 18 cm 3 . Four-dimensional data sets (i.e. 3D images over time) were reconstructed and reviewed. Dynamic CTA demonstrated sufficient spatio-temporal resolution to elucidate first-pass and recirculation dynamics of contrast bolus through neurovasclar pathologies and phasic blood flow though lower-limb vasculature and grafts. The high spatial resolution of fpVCT resulted in reduced partial volume and metal beam-hardening artefacts. This facilitated assessment of vascular lumen in the presence of calcified plaque and evaluation of fractures, especially in the presence of fixation hardware. Evaluation of arteriovenous malformation using dynamic fpVCT angiography was of limited utility. Dynamic CTA using fpVCT can visualize time-varying phenomena in neuro and lower limb vascular applications and has sufficient diagnostic imaging quality to evaluate a number of pathologies affecting these regions. (orig.)

  3. Development of High-Resolution Dynamic Dust Source Function - A Case Study with a Strong Dust Storm in a Regional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongchul; Chin, Mian; Kemp, Eric M.; Tao, Zhining; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Ginoux, Paul

    2017-01-01

    A high-resolution dynamic dust source has been developed in the NASA Unified-Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model to improve the existing coarse static dust source. In the new dust source map, topographic depression is in 1-km resolution and surface bareness is derived using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The new dust source better resolves the complex topographic distribution over the Western United States where its magnitude is higher than the existing, coarser resolution static source. A case study is conducted with an extreme dust storm that occurred in Phoenix, Arizona in 0203 UTC July 6, 2011. The NU-WRF model with the new high-resolution dynamic dust source is able to successfully capture the dust storm, which was not achieved with the old source identification. However the case study also reveals several challenges in reproducing the time evolution of the short-lived, extreme dust storm events.

  4. Development of High-Resolution Dynamic Dust Source Function -A Case Study with a Strong Dust Storm in a Regional Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongchul; Chin, Mian; Kemp, Eric M; Tao, Zhining; Peters-Lidard, Christa D; Ginoux, Paul

    2017-06-01

    A high-resolution dynamic dust source has been developed in the NASA Unified-Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model to improve the existing coarse static dust source. In the new dust source map, topographic depression is in 1-km resolution and surface bareness is derived using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The new dust source better resolves the complex topographic distribution over the Western United States where its magnitude is higher than the existing, coarser resolution static source. A case study is conducted with an extreme dust storm that occurred in Phoenix, Arizona in 02-03 UTC July 6, 2011. The NU-WRF model with the new high-resolution dynamic dust source is able to successfully capture the dust storm, which was not achieved with the old source identification. However the case study also reveals several challenges in reproducing the time evolution of the short-lived, extreme dust storm events.

  5. Wave-particle energy exchange directly observed in a kinetic Alfvén-branch wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Daniel J; F-Viñas, Adolfo; Dorelli, John C; Boardsen, Scott A; Avanov, Levon A; Bellan, Paul M; Schwartz, Steven J; Lavraud, Benoit; Coffey, Victoria N; Chandler, Michael O; Saito, Yoshifumi; Paterson, William R; Fuselier, Stephen A; Ergun, Robert E; Strangeway, Robert J; Russell, Christopher T; Giles, Barbara L; Pollock, Craig J; Torbert, Roy B; Burch, James L

    2017-03-31

    Alfvén waves are fundamental plasma wave modes that permeate the universe. At small kinetic scales, they provide a critical mechanism for the transfer of energy between electromagnetic fields and charged particles. These waves are important not only in planetary magnetospheres, heliospheres and astrophysical systems but also in laboratory plasma experiments and fusion reactors. Through measurement of charged particles and electromagnetic fields with NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we utilize Earth's magnetosphere as a plasma physics laboratory. Here we confirm the conservative energy exchange between the electromagnetic field fluctuations and the charged particles that comprise an undamped kinetic Alfvén wave. Electrons confined between adjacent wave peaks may have contributed to saturation of damping effects via nonlinear particle trapping. The investigation of these detailed wave dynamics has been unexplored territory in experimental plasma physics and is only recently enabled by high-resolution MMS observations.

  6. Gyrokinetic Electron and Fully Kinetic Ion Particle Simulation of Collisionless Plasma Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Lin; Xueyi Wang; Liu Chen; Zhihong Lin

    2009-08-11

    Fully kinetic-particle simulations and hybrid simulations have been utilized for decades to investigate various fundamental plasma processes, such as magnetic reconnection, fast compressional waves, and wave-particle interaction. Nevertheless, due to disparate temporal and spatial scales between electrons and ions, existing fully kinetic-particle codes have to employ either unrealistically high electron-to-ion mass ratio, me/mi, or simulation domain limited to a few or a few ten's of the ion Larmor radii, or/and time much less than the global Alfven time scale in order to accommodate available computing resources. On the other hand, in the hybrid simulation, the ions are treated as fully kinetic particles but the electrons are treated as a massless fluid. The electron kinetic effects, e.g., wave-particle resonances and finite electron Larmor radius effects, are completely missing. Important physics, such as the electron transit time damping of fast compressional waves or the triggering mechanism of magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas is absent in the hybrid codes. Motivated by these considerations and noting that dynamics of interest to us has frequencies lower than the electron gyrofrequency, we planned to develop an innovative particle simulation model, gyrokinetic (GK) electrons and fully kinetic (FK) ions. In the GK-electron and FK-ion (GKe/FKi) particle simulation model, the rapid electron cyclotron motion is removed, while keeping finite electron Larmor radii, realistic me/mi ratio, wave-particle interactions, and off-diagonal components of electron pressure tensor. The computation power can thus be significantly improved over that of the full-particle codes. As planned in the project DE-FG02-05ER54826, we have finished the development of the new GK-electron and FK-ion scheme, finished its benchmark for a uniform plasma in 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D systems against linear waves obtained from analytical theories, and carried out a further convergence

  7. Gyrokinetic Electron and Fully Kinetic Ion Particle Simulation of Collisionless Plasma Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Chen, Liu; Lin, Zhihong

    2009-01-01

    Fully kinetic-particle simulations and hybrid simulations have been utilized for decades to investigate various fundamental plasma processes, such as magnetic reconnection, fast compressional waves, and wave-particle interaction. Nevertheless, due to disparate temporal and spatial scales between electrons and ions, existing fully kinetic-particle codes have to employ either unrealistically high electron-to-ion mass ratio, me/mi, or simulation domain limited to a few or a few ten's of the ion Larmor radii, or/and time much less than the global Alfven time scale in order to accommodate available computing resources. On the other hand, in the hybrid simulation, the ions are treated as fully kinetic particles but the electrons are treated as a massless fluid. The electron kinetic effects, e.g., wave-particle resonances and finite electron Larmor radius effects, are completely missing. Important physics, such as the electron transit time damping of fast compressional waves or the triggering mechanism of magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas is absent in the hybrid codes. Motivated by these considerations and noting that dynamics of interest to us has frequencies lower than the electron gyrofrequency, we planned to develop an innovative particle simulation model, gyrokinetic (GK) electrons and fully kinetic (FK) ions. In the GK-electron and FK-ion (GKe/FKi) particle simulation model, the rapid electron cyclotron motion is removed, while keeping finite electron Larmor radii, realistic me/mi ratio, wave-particle interactions, and off-diagonal components of electron pressure tensor. The computation power can thus be significantly improved over that of the full-particle codes. As planned in the project DE-FG02-05ER54826, we have finished the development of the new GK-electron and FK-ion scheme, finished its benchmark for a uniform plasma in 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D systems against linear waves obtained from analytical theories, and carried out a further convergence test

  8. Functional Dynamics of Hexameric Helicase Probed by Hydrogen Exchange and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radou, Gaël; Dreyer, Frauke N.; Tuma, Roman; Paci, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    The biological function of large macromolecular assemblies depends on their structure and their dynamics over a broad range of timescales; for this reason, it is a significant challenge to investigate these assemblies using conventional experimental techniques. One of the most promising experimental techniques is hydrogen-deuterium exchange detected by mass spectrometry. Here, we describe to our knowledge a new computational method for quantitative interpretation of deuterium exchange kinetics and apply it to a hexameric viral helicase P4 that unwinds and translocates RNA into a virus capsid at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Room-temperature dynamics probed by a hundred nanoseconds of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is sufficient to predict the exchange kinetics of most sequence fragments and provide a residue-level interpretation of the low-resolution experimental results. The strategy presented here is also a valuable tool to validate experimental data, e.g., assignments, and to probe mechanisms that cannot be observed by x-ray crystallography, or that occur over timescales longer than those that can be realistically simulated, such as the opening of the hexameric ring. PMID:25140434

  9. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hak, Sjoerd; Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only...... because angiogenesis plays an important role in various pathologies, but also since endothelial cell surface receptors are directly accessible for relatively large circulating nanoparticles. Typically, nanoparticle targeting towards these receptors is studied by analyzing the contrast distribution...... kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging...

  10. An improved experimental scheme for simultaneous measurement of high-resolution zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron and threshold photoion (MATI) spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, François; Mazzoni, Federico; Becucci, Maurizio; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus

    2017-10-01

    An improved detection scheme is presented for threshold ionization spectroscopy with simultaneous recording of the Zero Electron Kinetic Energy (ZEKE) and Mass Analysed Threshold Ionisation (MATI) signals. The objective is to obtain accurate dissociation energies for larger molecular clusters by simultaneously detecting the fragment and parent ion MATI signals with identical transmission. The scheme preserves an optimal ZEKE spectral resolution together with excellent separation of the spontaneous ion and MATI signals in the time-of-flight mass spectrum. The resulting improvement in sensitivity will allow for the determination of dissociation energies in clusters with substantial mass difference between parent and daughter ions.

  11. Adaptive resolution simulation of a biomolecule and its hydration shell: Structural and dynamical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogarty, Aoife C.; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    A fully atomistic modelling of many biophysical and biochemical processes at biologically relevant length- and time scales is beyond our reach with current computational resources, and one approach to overcome this difficulty is the use of multiscale simulation techniques. In such simulations, when system properties necessitate a boundary between resolutions that falls within the solvent region, one can use an approach such as the Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS), in which solvent particles change their resolution on the fly during the simulation. Here, we apply the existing AdResS methodology to biomolecular systems, simulating a fully atomistic protein with an atomistic hydration shell, solvated in a coarse-grained particle reservoir and heat bath. Using as a test case an aqueous solution of the regulatory protein ubiquitin, we first confirm the validity of the AdResS approach for such systems, via an examination of protein and solvent structural and dynamical properties. We then demonstrate how, in addition to providing a computational speedup, such a multiscale AdResS approach can yield otherwise inaccessible physical insights into biomolecular function. We use our methodology to show that protein structure and dynamics can still be correctly modelled using only a few shells of atomistic water molecules. We also discuss aspects of the AdResS methodology peculiar to biomolecular simulations

  12. Adaptive resolution simulation of a biomolecule and its hydration shell: Structural and dynamical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogarty, Aoife C., E-mail: fogarty@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Potestio, Raffaello, E-mail: potestio@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Kremer, Kurt, E-mail: kremer@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-05-21

    A fully atomistic modelling of many biophysical and biochemical processes at biologically relevant length- and time scales is beyond our reach with current computational resources, and one approach to overcome this difficulty is the use of multiscale simulation techniques. In such simulations, when system properties necessitate a boundary between resolutions that falls within the solvent region, one can use an approach such as the Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS), in which solvent particles change their resolution on the fly during the simulation. Here, we apply the existing AdResS methodology to biomolecular systems, simulating a fully atomistic protein with an atomistic hydration shell, solvated in a coarse-grained particle reservoir and heat bath. Using as a test case an aqueous solution of the regulatory protein ubiquitin, we first confirm the validity of the AdResS approach for such systems, via an examination of protein and solvent structural and dynamical properties. We then demonstrate how, in addition to providing a computational speedup, such a multiscale AdResS approach can yield otherwise inaccessible physical insights into biomolecular function. We use our methodology to show that protein structure and dynamics can still be correctly modelled using only a few shells of atomistic water molecules. We also discuss aspects of the AdResS methodology peculiar to biomolecular simulations.

  13. High resolution neutron spectroscopy - a tool for the investigation of dynamics of polymers and soft matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monkenbusch, M.; Richter, D.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron scattering, with the ability to vary the contrast of molecular items by hydrogen/deuterium exchanges, is an invaluable tool for soft matter research. Besides the structural information on the mesoscopic scale that is obtained by diffraction methods like small angle neutron scattering, the slow dynamics of molecular motion on mesoscopic scale is accessible by high resolution neutron spectroscopy. The basic features of neutron backscattering spectroscopy, and in particular neutron spin-echo spectroscopy, are presented, in combination with illustrations of results from polymer melt dynamics to protein dynamics which are obtained by these techniques. (authors)

  14. Comparison of elastic-viscous-plastic and viscous-plastic dynamics models using a high resolution Arctic sea ice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunke, E.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Zhang, Y. [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A nonlinear viscous-plastic (VP) rheology proposed by Hibler (1979) has been demonstrated to be the most suitable of the rheologies commonly used for modeling sea ice dynamics. However, the presence of a huge range of effective viscosities hinders numerical implementations of this model, particularly on high resolution grids or when the ice model is coupled to an ocean or atmosphere model. Hunke and Dukowicz (1997) have modified the VP model by including elastic waves as a numerical regularization in the case of zero strain rate. This modification (EVP) allows an efficient, fully explicit discretization that adapts well to parallel architectures. The authors present a comparison of EVP and VP dynamics model results from two 5-year simulations of Arctic sea ice, obtained with a high resolution sea ice model. The purpose of the comparison is to determine how differently the two dynamics models behave, and to decide whether the elastic-viscous-plastic model is preferable for high resolution climate simulations, considering its high efficiency in parallel computation. Results from the first year of this experiment (1990) are discussed in detail in Hunke and Zhang (1997).

  15. Inverse stochastic-dynamic models for high-resolution Greenland ice core records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boers, Niklas; Chekroun, Mickael D.; Liu, Honghu

    2017-01-01

    as statistical properties such as probability density functions, waiting times and power spectra, with no need for any external forcing. The crucial ingredients for capturing these properties are (i) high-resolution training data, (ii) cubic drift terms, (iii) nonlinear coupling terms between the 18O and dust......Proxy records from Greenland ice cores have been studied for several decades, yet many open questions remain regarding the climate variability encoded therein. Here, we use a Bayesian framework for inferring inverse, stochastic-dynamic models from 18O and dust records of unprecedented, subdecadal...

  16. Expanding the linear dynamic range for quantitative liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry utilizing natural isotopologue signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hanghui; Lam, Lily; Yan, Lin; Chi, Bert; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Less abundant isotopologue ions were utilized to decrease detector saturation. • A 25–50 fold increase in the upper limit of dynamic range was demonstrated. • Linear dynamic range was expanded without compromising mass resolution. - Abstract: The linear dynamic range (LDR) for quantitative liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry can be extended until ionization saturation is reached by using a number of target isotopologue ions in addition to the normally used target ion that provides the highest sensitivity. Less abundant isotopologue ions extend the LDR: the lower ion abundance decreases the probability of ion detector saturation. Effectively the sensitivity decreases and the upper limit of the LDR increases. We show in this paper that the technique is particularly powerful with a high resolution time of flight mass spectrometer because the data for all ions are automatically acquired, and we demonstrated this for four small organic molecules; the upper limits of LDRs increased by 25–50 times

  17. Statistical dynamic image reconstruction in state-of-the-art high-resolution PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmim, Arman; Cheng, J-C; Blinder, Stephan; Camborde, Maurie-Laure; Sossi, Vesna

    2005-01-01

    Modern high-resolution PET is now more than ever in need of scrutiny into the nature and limitations of the imaging modality itself as well as image reconstruction techniques. In this work, we have reviewed, analysed and addressed the following three considerations within the particular context of state-of-the-art dynamic PET imaging: (i) the typical average numbers of events per line-of-response (LOR) are now (much) less than unity (ii) due to the physical and biological decay of the activity distribution, one requires robust and efficient reconstruction algorithms applicable to a wide range of statistics and (iii) the computational considerations in dynamic imaging are much enhanced (i.e., more frames to be stored and reconstructed). Within the framework of statistical image reconstruction, we have argued theoretically and shown experimentally that the sinogram non-negativity constraint (when using the delayed-coincidence and/or scatter-subtraction techniques) is especially expected to result in an overestimation bias. Subsequently, two schemes are considered: (a) subtraction techniques in which an image non-negativity constraint has been imposed and (b) implementation of random and scatter estimates inside the reconstruction algorithms, thus enabling direct processing of Poisson-distributed prompts. Both techniques are able to remove the aforementioned bias, while the latter, being better conditioned theoretically, is able to exhibit superior noise characteristics. We have also elaborated upon and verified the applicability of the accelerated list-mode image reconstruction method as a powerful solution for accurate, robust and efficient dynamic reconstructions of high-resolution data (as well as a number of additional benefits in the context of state-of-the-art PET)

  18. A three-state kinetic agent-based model to analyze tax evasion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crokidakis, Nuno

    2014-11-01

    In this work we study the problem of tax evasion on a fully-connected population. For this purpose, we consider that the agents may be in three different states, namely honest tax payers, tax evaders and undecided, that are individuals in an intermediate class among honests and evaders. Every individual can change his/her state following a kinetic exchange opinion dynamics, where the agents interact by pairs with competitive negative (with probability q) and positive (with probability 1-q) couplings, representing agreement/disagreement between pairs of agents. In addition, we consider the punishment rules of the Zaklan econophysics model, for which there is a probability pa of an audit each agent is subject to in every period and a length of time k detected tax evaders remain honest. Our results suggest that below the critical point qc=1/4 of the opinion dynamics the compliance is high, and the punishment rules have a small effect in the population. On the other hand, for q>qc the tax evasion can be considerably reduced by the enforcement mechanism. We also discuss the impact of the presence of the undecided agents in the evolution of the system.

  19. Adsorption kinetics and dynamics of small organic molecules on a silica wafer: Butane, pentane, nonane, thiophene, and methanol adsorption on SiO2/Si(1 1 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funk, S.; Goering, J.; Burghaus, U.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption kinetics (by thermal desorption spectroscopy) and adsorption dynamics (by molecular beam scattering) have been determined for a number of alkanes, methanol, thiophene, and water on a silica wafer-SiO 2 /Si(1 1 1). No indications for bond activation were present, i.e., all probe molecules adsorb molecularly obeying 1st order kinetics. The coverage-dependent heat of adsorption has been determined accordingly. The adsorption dynamics are precursor-mediated with Kisliuk-like shapes of the adsorption probabilities at low impact energies and adsorbate-assisted adsorption at large impact energies

  20. High-resolution dynamic angiography using flat-panel volume CT: feasibility demonstration for neuro and lower limb vascular applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehndiratta, Amit [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); University of Oxford, Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Keble College, Oxford (United Kingdom); Indian Institute of Technology Delhi and All India Institute of Medical Science, Centre for Biomedical Engineering, New Delhi (India); Rabinov, James D. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Interventional Neuroradiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Grasruck, Michael [Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany); Liao, Eric C. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Center for Regenerative Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Crandell, David [Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA (United States); Gupta, Rajiv [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    This paper evaluates a prototype flat-panel volume CT (fpVCT) for dynamic in vivo imaging in a variety of neurovascular and lower limb applications. Dynamic CTA was performed on 12 patients (neuro = 8, lower limb = 4) using an fpVCT with 120 kVp, 50 mA, rotation time varying from 8 to 19 s, and field of view of 25 x 25 x 18 cm{sup 3}. Four-dimensional data sets (i.e. 3D images over time) were reconstructed and reviewed. Dynamic CTA demonstrated sufficient spatio-temporal resolution to elucidate first-pass and recirculation dynamics of contrast bolus through neurovasclar pathologies and phasic blood flow though lower-limb vasculature and grafts. The high spatial resolution of fpVCT resulted in reduced partial volume and metal beam-hardening artefacts. This facilitated assessment of vascular lumen in the presence of calcified plaque and evaluation of fractures, especially in the presence of fixation hardware. Evaluation of arteriovenous malformation using dynamic fpVCT angiography was of limited utility. Dynamic CTA using fpVCT can visualize time-varying phenomena in neuro and lower limb vascular applications and has sufficient diagnostic imaging quality to evaluate a number of pathologies affecting these regions. (orig.)

  1. High-Resolution Imaging Reveals New Features of Nuclear Export of mRNA through the Nuclear Pore Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Kelich

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear envelope (NE of eukaryotic cells provides a physical barrier for messenger RNA (mRNA and the associated proteins (mRNPs traveling from sites of transcription in the nucleus to locations of translation processing in the cytoplasm. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs embedded in the NE serve as a dominant gateway for nuclear export of mRNA. However, the fundamental characterization of export dynamics of mRNPs through the NPC has been hindered by several technical limits. First, the size of NPC that is barely below the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy requires a super-resolution microscopy imaging approach. Next, the fast transit of mRNPs through the NPC further demands a high temporal resolution by the imaging approach. Finally, the inherent three-dimensional (3D movements of mRNPs through the NPC demand the method to provide a 3D mapping of both transport kinetics and transport pathways of mRNPs. This review will highlight the recently developed super-resolution imaging techniques advanced from 1D to 3D for nuclear export of mRNPs and summarize the new features in the dynamic nuclear export process of mRNPs revealed from these technical advances.

  2. Experimental techniques for subnanosecond resolution of laser-launched plates and impact studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paisley, D.L.; Warnes, R.H.; Stahl, D.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Dynamic Experimentation Div.

    1994-09-01

    Miniature laser-launched plates have applications in shock wave physics, studying dynamic properties of materials and can be used to generate experimental data in a manner similar to a laboratory gas gun for one-dimensional impact experiments. Laser-launched plates have the advantage of small size, low kinetic energy, and can be launched with ubiquitous laboratory lasers. Because of the small size and high accelerations (10{sup 7}--10{sup 10} g`s), improved temporal resolution and optical non-contact methods to collect data are required. Traditional mechanical in-situ gauges would significantly impair the data quality and do not have the required time response.

  3. Impact of time-of-flight on indirect 3D and direct 4D parametric image reconstruction in the presence of inconsistent dynamic PET data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotasidis, F. A.; Mehranian, A.; Zaidi, H.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetic parameter estimation in dynamic PET suffers from reduced accuracy and precision when parametric maps are estimated using kinetic modelling following image reconstruction of the dynamic data. Direct approaches to parameter estimation attempt to directly estimate the kinetic parameters from the measured dynamic data within a unified framework. Such image reconstruction methods have been shown to generate parametric maps of improved precision and accuracy in dynamic PET. However, due to the interleaving between the tomographic and kinetic modelling steps, any tomographic or kinetic modelling errors in certain regions or frames, tend to spatially or temporally propagate. This results in biased kinetic parameters and thus limits the benefits of such direct methods. Kinetic modelling errors originate from the inability to construct a common single kinetic model for the entire field-of-view, and such errors in erroneously modelled regions could spatially propagate. Adaptive models have been used within 4D image reconstruction to mitigate the problem, though they are complex and difficult to optimize. Tomographic errors in dynamic imaging on the other hand, can originate from involuntary patient motion between dynamic frames, as well as from emission/transmission mismatch. Motion correction schemes can be used, however, if residual errors exist or motion correction is not included in the study protocol, errors in the affected dynamic frames could potentially propagate either temporally, to other frames during the kinetic modelling step or spatially, during the tomographic step. In this work, we demonstrate a new strategy to minimize such error propagation in direct 4D image reconstruction, focusing on the tomographic step rather than the kinetic modelling step, by incorporating time-of-flight (TOF) within a direct 4D reconstruction framework. Using ever improving TOF resolutions (580 ps, 440 ps, 300 ps and 160 ps), we demonstrate that direct 4D TOF image

  4. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-01-01

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution

  5. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-01

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution.

  6. Video-to-Video Dynamic Super-Resolution for Grayscale and Color Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elad Michael

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the dynamic super-resolution (SR problem of reconstructing a high-quality set of monochromatic or color super-resolved images from low-quality monochromatic, color, or mosaiced frames. Our approach includes a joint method for simultaneous SR, deblurring, and demosaicing, this way taking into account practical color measurements encountered in video sequences. For the case of translational motion and common space-invariant blur, the proposed method is based on a very fast and memory efficient approximation of the Kalman filter (KF. Experimental results on both simulated and real data are supplied, demonstrating the presented algorithms, and their strength.

  7. Hybrid dynamic modeling of Escherichia coli central metabolic network combining Michaelis–Menten and approximate kinetic equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Rafael S.; Machado, Daniel; Rocha, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    , represent nowadays the limiting factor in the construction of such models. In this study, we compare four alternative modeling approaches based on Michaelis–Menten kinetics for the bi-molecular reactions and different types of simplified rate equations for the remaining reactions (generalized mass action......The construction of dynamic metabolic models at reaction network level requires the use of mechanistic enzymatic rate equations that comprise a large number of parameters. The lack of knowledge on these equations and the difficulty in the experimental identification of their associated parameters...

  8. Kinetic Behavior of Escherichia coli on Various Cheeses under Constant and Dynamic Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K; Lee, H; Gwak, E; Yoon, Y

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we developed kinetic models to predict the growth of pathogenic Escherichia coli on cheeses during storage at constant and changing temperatures. A five-strain mixture of pathogenic E. coli was inoculated onto natural cheeses (Brie and Camembert) and processed cheeses (sliced Mozzarella and sliced Cheddar) at 3 to 4 log CFU/g. The inoculated cheeses were stored at 4, 10, 15, 25, and 30°C for 1 to 320 h, with a different storage time being used for each temperature. Total bacteria and E. coli cells were enumerated on tryptic soy agar and MacConkey sorbitol agar, respectively. E. coli growth data were fitted to the Baranyi model to calculate the maximum specific growth rate (μ max; log CFU/g/h), lag phase duration (LPD; h), lower asymptote (log CFU/g), and upper asymptote (log CFU/g). The kinetic parameters were then analyzed as a function of storage temperature, using the square root model, polynomial equation, and linear equation. A dynamic model was also developed for varying temperature. The model performance was evaluated against observed data, and the root mean square error (RMSE) was calculated. At 4°C, E. coli cell growth was not observed on any cheese. However, E. coli growth was observed at 10°C to 30°C with a μ max of 0.01 to 1.03 log CFU/g/h, depending on the cheese. The μ max values increased as temperature increased, while LPD values decreased, and μ max and LPD values were different among the four types of cheese. The developed models showed adequate performance (RMSE = 0.176-0.337), indicating that these models should be useful for describing the growth kinetics of E. coli on various cheeses.

  9. Rarefied gas flow simulations using high-order gas-kinetic unified algorithms for Boltzmann model equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Peng, Ao-Ping; Zhang, Han-Xin; Yang, Jaw-Yen

    2015-04-01

    This article reviews rarefied gas flow computations based on nonlinear model Boltzmann equations using deterministic high-order gas-kinetic unified algorithms (GKUA) in phase space. The nonlinear Boltzmann model equations considered include the BGK model, the Shakhov model, the Ellipsoidal Statistical model and the Morse model. Several high-order gas-kinetic unified algorithms, which combine the discrete velocity ordinate method in velocity space and the compact high-order finite-difference schemes in physical space, are developed. The parallel strategies implemented with the accompanying algorithms are of equal importance. Accurate computations of rarefied gas flow problems using various kinetic models over wide ranges of Mach numbers 1.2-20 and Knudsen numbers 0.0001-5 are reported. The effects of different high resolution schemes on the flow resolution under the same discrete velocity ordinate method are studied. A conservative discrete velocity ordinate method to ensure the kinetic compatibility condition is also implemented. The present algorithms are tested for the one-dimensional unsteady shock-tube problems with various Knudsen numbers, the steady normal shock wave structures for different Mach numbers, the two-dimensional flows past a circular cylinder and a NACA 0012 airfoil to verify the present methodology and to simulate gas transport phenomena covering various flow regimes. Illustrations of large scale parallel computations of three-dimensional hypersonic rarefied flows over the reusable sphere-cone satellite and the re-entry spacecraft using almost the largest computer systems available in China are also reported. The present computed results are compared with the theoretical prediction from gas dynamics, related DSMC results, slip N-S solutions and experimental data, and good agreement can be found. The numerical experience indicates that although the direct model Boltzmann equation solver in phase space can be computationally expensive

  10. Multiphasic analysis of gas production kinetics for in vitro fermentation of ruminant feeds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, J.C.J.; Cone, J.W.; Williams, B.A.; Debersaques, F.M.A.; Lantinga, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed time-related gas production techniques to quantify the kinetics of ruminant feed fermentation have a high resolution. Consequently, fermentation processes with clearly contrasting gas production kinetics can be identified. Parameterization of the separate processes is possible

  11. A discontinuous Galerkin method on kinetic flocking models

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Changhui

    2014-01-01

    We study kinetic representations of flocking models. They arise from agent-based models for self-organized dynamics, such as Cucker-Smale and Motsch-Tadmor models. We prove flocking behavior for the kinetic descriptions of flocking systems, which indicates a concentration in velocity variable in infinite time. We propose a discontinuous Galerkin method to treat the asymptotic $\\delta$-singularity, and construct high order positive preserving scheme to solve kinetic flocking systems.

  12. Resolution of the diffusional paradox predicting infinitely fast kinetics on the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beke, D. L.; Erdélyi, Z.

    2006-01-01

    In our paper, we offer a natural resolution for a long-standing paradox in diffusion. We show that the growth rate of the diffusion zone (reaction layer) should not go to infinity with decreasing time (as 1/t ), just because the diffusion permeability of the interface is finite. Expression for the changeover thickness X* between the linear and parabolic regimes of the interface shift in phase separating binary A(B) systems is derived in the framework of a deterministic atomistic model for diffusion. X* lies typically between 0.01 and 300nm , depending on the composition dependence of the diffusion coefficient and the phase separation tendency of the alloy. While in ideal binary alloys with composition independent diffusivity, the deviation from the parabolic law practically cannot be observed, in real systems (where the diffusion coefficient can change several orders of magnitude with the composition), measurable deviations are expected as it was experimentally observed very recently in the Ni/Cu and Au/Ni systems. We also offer an atomistic explanation for the phenomenological interface transfer coefficient K . It measures the finite interface permeability (proportional to the jump frequency across the interface) and thus it controls the shift of the interface at short times (diffusion distances). Although it is almost exclusively accepted in the literature that linear growth kinetics are the result of interface reaction control, our results suggest that the linear or nonparabolic growth of a reaction layer on the nanoscale cannot be automatically interpreted by an interface reaction.

  13. Chemical kinetic modeling of H{sub 2} applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinov, N.M.; Westbrook, C.K.; Cloutman, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Work being carried out at LLNL has concentrated on studies of the role of chemical kinetics in a variety of problems related to hydrogen combustion in practical combustion systems, with an emphasis on vehicle propulsion. Use of hydrogen offers significant advantages over fossil fuels, and computer modeling provides advantages when used in concert with experimental studies. Many numerical {open_quotes}experiments{close_quotes} can be carried out quickly and efficiently, reducing the cost and time of system development, and many new and speculative concepts can be screened to identify those with sufficient promise to pursue experimentally. This project uses chemical kinetic and fluid dynamic computational modeling to examine the combustion characteristics of systems burning hydrogen, either as the only fuel or mixed with natural gas. Oxidation kinetics are combined with pollutant formation kinetics, including formation of oxides of nitrogen but also including air toxics in natural gas combustion. We have refined many of the elementary kinetic reaction steps in the detailed reaction mechanism for hydrogen oxidation. To extend the model to pressures characteristic of internal combustion engines, it was necessary to apply theoretical pressure falloff formalisms for several key steps in the reaction mechanism. We have continued development of simplified reaction mechanisms for hydrogen oxidation, we have implemented those mechanisms into multidimensional computational fluid dynamics models, and we have used models of chemistry and fluid dynamics to address selected application problems. At the present time, we are using computed high pressure flame, and auto-ignition data to further refine the simplified kinetics models that are then to be used in multidimensional fluid mechanics models. Detailed kinetics studies have investigated hydrogen flames and ignition of hydrogen behind shock waves, intended to refine the detailed reactions mechanisms.

  14. Kinetic energy measurement of hydrogen in LHD peripheral plasma with a multi-wavelength-range fine-resolution spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Mizushiri, Keisuke; Nishioka, Tomomi; Shikama, Taiichi; Iwamae, Atsushi; Goto, Motoshi; Morita, Shigeru; Hasuo, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    We have simultaneously measured high resolution emission spectra of the hydrogen atomic Balmer-α, -β, -γ lines and molecular Fulcher-α band for a LHD peripheral plasma generated under a central magnetic field strength of 0.4 T. It is found that the velocity distributions of excited atoms calculated from the Balmer-α, -β, and -γ line shapes show similar profiles to each other. The translational kinetic energy corresponding to the average velocity is about 13 eV, which is about 300 times larger than the rotational energy of hydrogen molecules estimated from the line intensities in the Fulcher-α band. The velocity distributions differ from Maxwellian and have a high velocity tail over 1x10 5 m/s. A correlation between the high velocity tail and the electron temperature and density is seen and suggesting the excited atoms having such high velocities to be generated by the charge exchange collisions from high velocity protons in the peripheral region.

  15. Extended-Range High-Resolution Dynamical Downscaling over a Continental-Scale Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, S. Z.; Separovic, L.; Yu, W.; Fernig, D.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution mesoscale simulations, when applied for downscaling meteorological fields over large spatial domains and for extended time periods, can provide valuable information for many practical application scenarios including the weather-dependent renewable energy industry. In the present study, a strategy has been proposed to dynamically downscale coarse-resolution meteorological fields from Environment Canada's regional analyses for a period of multiple years over the entire Canadian territory. The study demonstrates that a continuous mesoscale simulation over the entire domain is the most suitable approach in this regard. Large-scale deviations in the different meteorological fields pose the biggest challenge for extended-range simulations over continental scale domains, and the enforcement of the lateral boundary conditions is not sufficient to restrict such deviations. A scheme has therefore been developed to spectrally nudge the simulated high-resolution meteorological fields at the different model vertical levels towards those embedded in the coarse-resolution driving fields derived from the regional analyses. A series of experiments were carried out to determine the optimal nudging strategy including the appropriate nudging length scales, nudging vertical profile and temporal relaxation. A forcing strategy based on grid nudging of the different surface fields, including surface temperature, soil-moisture, and snow conditions, towards their expected values obtained from a high-resolution offline surface scheme was also devised to limit any considerable deviation in the evolving surface fields due to extended-range temporal integrations. The study shows that ensuring large-scale atmospheric similarities helps to deliver near-surface statistical scores for temperature, dew point temperature and horizontal wind speed that are better or comparable to the operational regional forecasts issued by Environment Canada. Furthermore, the meteorological fields

  16. Temporal dynamics of motivation-cognitive control interactions revealed by high-resolution pupillometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Sarah Chiew

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivational manipulations, such as the presence of performance-contingent reward incentives, can have substantial influences on cognitive control. Previous evidence suggests that reward incentives may enhance cognitive performance specifically through increased preparatory, or proactive, control processes. The present study examined reward influences on cognitive control dynamics in the AX-Continuous Performance Task (AX-CPT, using high-resolution pupillometry. In the AX-CPT, contextual cues must be actively maintained over a delay in order to appropriately respond to ambiguous target probes. A key feature of the task is that it permits dissociable characterization of preparatory, proactive control processes (i.e., utilization of context and reactive control processes (i.e., target-evoked interference resolution. Task performance profiles suggested that reward incentives enhanced proactive control (context utilization. Critically, pupil dilation was also increased on reward incentive trials during context maintenance periods, suggesting trial-specific shifts in proactive control, particularly when context cues indicated the need to overcome the dominant target response bias. Reward incentives had both transient (i.e., trial-by-trial and sustained (i.e., block-based effects on pupil dilation, which may reflect distinct underlying processes. The transient pupillary effects were present even when comparing against trials matched in task performance, suggesting a unique motivational influence of reward incentives. These results suggest that pupillometry may be a useful technique for investigating reward motivational signals and their dynamic influence on cognitive control.

  17. Total Synthesis and Stereochemical Assignment of Delavatine A: Rh-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Indene-Type Tetrasubstituted Olefins and Kinetic Resolution through Pd-Catalyzed Triflamide-Directed C-H Olefination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongyin; Wang, Jinxin; Li, Jian; Yang, Fan; Liu, Guodu; Tang, Wenjun; He, Weiwei; Fu, Jian-Jun; Shen, Yun-Heng; Li, Ang; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2017-04-19

    Delavatine A (1) is a structurally unusual isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Incarvillea delavayi. The first and gram-scale total synthesis of 1 was accomplished in 13 steps (the longest linear sequence) from commercially available starting materials. We exploited an isoquinoline construction strategy and developed two reactions, namely Rh-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of indene-type tetrasubstituted olefins and kinetic resolution of β-alkyl phenylethylamine derivatives through Pd-catalyzed triflamide-directed C-H olefination. The substrate scope of the first reaction covered unfunctionalized olefins and those containing polar functionalities such as sulfonamides. The kinetic resolution provided a collection of enantioenriched indane- and tetralin-based triflamides, including those bearing quaternary chiral centers. The selectivity factor (s) exceeded 100 for a number of substrates. These reactions enabled two different yet related approaches to a key intermediate 28 in excellent enantiopurity. In the synthesis, the triflamide served as not only an effective directing group for C-H bond activation but also a versatile functional group for further elaborations. The relative and absolute configurations of delavatine A were unambiguously assigned by the syntheses of the natural product and its three stereoisomers. Their cytotoxicity against a series of cancer cell lines was evaluated.

  18. Transient Response Dynamic Module Modifications to Include Static and Kinetic Friction Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misel, J. E.; Nenno, S. B.; Takahashi, D.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology that supports forced transient response dynamic solutions when both static and kinetic friction effects are included in a structural system model is described. Modifications that support this type of nonlinear transient response solution are summarized for the transient response dynamics (TRD) NASTRAN module. An overview of specific modifications for the NASTRAN processing subroutines, INITL, TRD1C, and TRD1D, are described with further details regarding inspection of nonlinear input definitions to define the type of nonlinear solution required, along with additional initialization requirements and specific calculation subroutines to successfully solve the transient response problem. The extension of the basic NASTRAN nonlinear methodology is presented through several stages of development to the point where constraint equations and residual flexibility effects are introduced into the finite difference Newmark-Beta recurrsion formulas. Particular emphasis is placed on cost effective solutions for large finite element models such as the Space Shuttle with friction degrees of freedom between the orbiter and payloads mounted in the cargo bay. An alteration to the dynamic finite difference equations of motion is discussed, which allows one to include friction effects at reasonable cost for large structural systems such as the Space Shuttle. Data are presented to indicate the possible impact of transient friction loads to the payload designer for the Space Shuttle. Transient response solution data are also included, which compare solutions without friction forces and those with friction forces for payloads mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. These data indicate that payload components can be sensitive to friction induced loads.

  19. Exercise: Kinetic considerations for gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Harry B

    2011-01-01

    The activities of daily living typically occur at metabolic rates below the maximum rate of aerobic energy production. Such activity is characteristic of the nonsteady state, where energy demands, and consequential physiological responses, are in constant flux. The dynamics of the integrated physiological processes during these activities determine the degree to which exercise can be supported through rates of O₂ utilization and CO₂ clearance appropriate for their demands and, as such, provide a physiological framework for the notion of exercise intensity. The rate at which O₂ exchange responds to meet the changing energy demands of exercise--its kinetics--is dependent on the ability of the pulmonary, circulatory, and muscle bioenergetic systems to respond appropriately. Slow response kinetics in pulmonary O₂ uptake predispose toward a greater necessity for substrate-level energy supply, processes that are limited in their capacity, challenge system homeostasis and hence contribute to exercise intolerance. This review provides a physiological systems perspective of pulmonary gas exchange kinetics: from an integrative view on the control of muscle oxygen consumption kinetics to the dissociation of cellular respiration from its pulmonary expression by the circulatory dynamics and the gas capacitance of the lungs, blood, and tissues. The intensity dependence of gas exchange kinetics is discussed in relation to constant, intermittent, and ramped work rate changes. The influence of heterogeneity in the kinetic matching of O₂ delivery to utilization is presented in reference to exercise tolerance in endurance-trained athletes, the elderly, and patients with chronic heart or lung disease. © 2011 American Physiological Society.

  20. FitEM2EM--tools for low resolution study of macromolecular assembly and dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziv Frankenstein

    Full Text Available Studies of the structure and dynamics of macromolecular assemblies often involve comparison of low resolution models obtained using different techniques such as electron microscopy or atomic force microscopy. We present new computational tools for comparing (matching and docking of low resolution structures, based on shape complementarity. The matched or docked objects are represented by three dimensional grids where the value of each grid point depends on its position with regard to the interior, surface or exterior of the object. The grids are correlated using fast Fourier transformations producing either matches of related objects or docking models depending on the details of the grid representations. The procedures incorporate thickening and smoothing of the surfaces of the objects which effectively compensates for differences in the resolution of the matched/docked objects, circumventing the need for resolution modification. The presented matching tool FitEM2EMin successfully fitted electron microscopy structures obtained at different resolutions, different conformers of the same structure and partial structures, ranking correct matches at the top in every case. The differences between the grid representations of the matched objects can be used to study conformation differences or to characterize the size and shape of substructures. The presented low-to-low docking tool FitEM2EMout ranked the expected models at the top.

  1. Dynamic phase transition in the kinetic spin-32 Blume-Capel model: Phase diagrams in the temperature and crystal-field interaction plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskin, Mustafa; Canko, Osman; Deviren, Bayram

    2007-01-01

    We analyze, within a mean-field approach, the stationary states of the kinetic spin-32 Blume-Capel (BC) model by the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics and subject to a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field. The dynamic phase transition (DPT) points are obtained by investigating the behavior of the dynamic magnetization as a function of temperature and as well as calculating the Liapunov exponent. Phase diagrams are constructed in the temperature and crystal-field interaction plane. We find five fundamental types of phase diagrams for the different values of the reduced magnetic field amplitude parameter (h) in which they present a disordered, two ordered phases and the coexistences phase regions. The phase diagrams also exhibit a dynamic double-critical end point for 0 5.06

  2. Role of dynamical screening in excitation kinetics of biased quantum wells: Nonlinear absorption and ultrabroadband terahertz emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, B. S.; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2006-01-01

    In this work we describe the ultrafast excitation kinetics of biased quantum well, arising from the optically induced dynamical screening of a bias electric field. The initial bia electric field inside the quantum well is screened by the optically excited polarized electron-hole pairs. This leads...... wells are in good agreement with our experimental observations [Turchinovich et al., Phys. Rev. B 68, 241307(R) (2003)], as well as in perfect compliance with qualitative considerations. ©2006 American Institute of Physics...

  3. Evaluations of high-resolution dynamically downscaled ensembles over the contiguous United States Climate Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobel, Zachary; Wang, Jiali; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Kotamarthi, V. Rao

    2018-02-01

    This study uses Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model to evaluate the performance of six dynamical downscaled decadal historical simulations with 12-km resolution for a large domain (7200 x 6180 km) that covers most of North America. The initial and boundary conditions are from three global climate models (GCMs) and one reanalysis data. The GCMs employed in this study are the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Earth System Model with Generalized Ocean Layer Dynamics component, Community Climate System Model, version 4, and the Hadley Centre Global Environment Model, version 2-Earth System. The reanalysis data is from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-US. Department of Energy Reanalysis II. We analyze the effects of bias correcting, the lateral boundary conditions and the effects of spectral nudging. We evaluate the model performance for seven surface variables and four upper atmospheric variables based on their climatology and extremes for seven subregions across the United States. The results indicate that the simulation’s performance depends on both location and the features/variable being tested. We find that the use of bias correction and/or nudging is beneficial in many situations, but employing these when running the RCM is not always an improvement when compared to the reference data. The use of an ensemble mean and median leads to a better performance in measuring the climatology, while it is significantly biased for the extremes, showing much larger differences than individual GCM driven model simulations from the reference data. This study provides a comprehensive evaluation of these historical model runs in order to make informed decisions when making future projections.

  4. Studies of pyrolysis kinetics of sewage sludge obtained from dynamic experiments; Estudio cinetico de la pirolisis de fangos mediante experimentos dinamicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arauzo, J; Gonzalo, A; Sanchez, J L [Universidad de Zaragoza, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Investigacion en Ingenieria de Aragon. Grupo de Procesos Termoquimicos; Resende, F L.P. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Rocha, J D [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico (NIPE); Mesa Perez, J M [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola

    2004-07-01

    In this work, a pyrolysis model is presented in order to describe the pyrolysis kinetics of sewage sludge. Data were obtained from dynamic experiments, at heating rates of 5 to 20 deg C/min and in a temperature range of 40 to 900 deg C. A simple first order or near first order can predict reasonably well the final conversion reached, but, in what concerns the weight loss rate, a simple model cannot predict the peaks obtained in the weight loss rate. As it is shown, the best fit has been obtained by a model which takes into account four fractions which decompose independently following a first order kinetics. (author)

  5. Galactic and stellar dynamics in the era of high resolution surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boily, C. M.; Combes, F.; Hensler, G.; Spurzem, R.

    2008-12-01

    The conference Galactic and Stellar Dynamics in the Era of High Resolution Surveys took place at the European Doctoral College (EDC) in Strasbourg from 2008 March 16 to 20. The event was co-sponsored by the Astronomische Gesellschaft (AG) and the Société Fran\\c{c}aise d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique (SF2A), a joint venture aiming to set a new trend of regular thematic meetings in specific areas of research. This special issue of the Astronomische Nachrichten is a compilation of the papers presented at the meeting. We give an outline of the meeting together with a short history of the relations of the two societies.

  6. Impact of the lateral boundary conditions resolution on dynamical downscaling of precipitation in mediterranean spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amengual, A.; Romero, R.; Homar, V.; Ramis, C.; Alonso, S. [Universitat de les Illes Balears, Grup de Meteorologia, Departament de Fisica, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    Conclusions on the General Circulation Models (GCMs) horizontal and temporal optimum resolution for dynamical downscaling of rainfall in Mediterranean Spain are derived based on the statistical analysis of mesoscale simulations of past events. These events correspond to the 165 heavy rainfall days during 1984-1993, which are simulated with the HIRLAM mesoscale model. The model is nested within the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts atmospheric grid analyses. We represent the spectrum of GCMs resolutions currently applied in climate change research by using varying horizontal and temporal resolutions of these analyses. Three sets of simulations are designed using input data with 1 , 2 and 3 horizontal resolutions (available at 6 h intervals), and three additional sets are designed using 1 horizontal resolution with less frequent boundary conditions updated every 12, 24 and 48 h. The quality of the daily rainfall forecasts is verified against rain-gauge observations using correlation and root mean square error analysis as well as Relative Operating Characteristic curves. Spatial distribution of average precipitation fields are also computed and verified against observations. For the whole Mediterranean Spain, model skill is not appreciably improved when using enhanced spatial input data, suggesting that there is no clear benefit in using high resolution data from General Circulation Model for the regional downscaling of precipitation under the conditions tested. However, significant differences are found in verification scores when boundary conditions are interpolated less frequently than 12 h apart. The analysis is particularized for six major rain bearing flow regimes that affect the region, and differences in model performance are found among the flow types, with slightly better forecasts for Atlantic and cold front passage flows. A remarkable spatial variability in forecast quality is found in the domain, with an overall tendency for higher

  7. Modeling chemical kinetics graphically

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, A.

    2012-01-01

    In literature on chemistry education it has often been suggested that students, at high school level and beyond, can benefit in their studies of chemical kinetics from computer supported activities. Use of system dynamics modeling software is one of the suggested quantitative approaches that could

  8. Dynamic phase transition in the kinetic spin-32 Blume-Capel model: Phase diagrams in the temperature and crystal-field interaction plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskin, Mustafa [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)]. E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr; Canko, Osman [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Deviren, Bayram [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2007-06-15

    We analyze, within a mean-field approach, the stationary states of the kinetic spin-32 Blume-Capel (BC) model by the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics and subject to a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field. The dynamic phase transition (DPT) points are obtained by investigating the behavior of the dynamic magnetization as a function of temperature and as well as calculating the Liapunov exponent. Phase diagrams are constructed in the temperature and crystal-field interaction plane. We find five fundamental types of phase diagrams for the different values of the reduced magnetic field amplitude parameter (h) in which they present a disordered, two ordered phases and the coexistences phase regions. The phase diagrams also exhibit a dynamic double-critical end point for 0dynamic tricritical point for 1.44dynamic tricritical points for h>5.06.

  9. Evidence for Dynamic Chemical Kinetics at Individual Molecular Ruthenium Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, Quinn T; Blum, Suzanne A

    2018-02-05

    Catalytic cycles are typically depicted as possessing time-invariant steps with fixed rates. Yet the true behavior of individual catalysts with respect to time is unknown, hidden by the ensemble averaging inherent to bulk measurements. Evidence is presented for variable chemical kinetics at individual catalysts, with a focus on ring-opening metathesis polymerization catalyzed by the second-generation Grubbs' ruthenium catalyst. Fluorescence microscopy is used to probe the chemical kinetics of the reaction because the technique possesses sufficient sensitivity for the detection of single chemical reactions. Insertion reactions in submicron regions likely occur at groups of many (not single) catalysts, yet not so many that their unique kinetic behavior is ensemble averaged. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. An Explicit Finite Difference scheme for numerical solution of fractional neutron point kinetic equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha Ray, S.; Patra, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► In this paper fractional neutron point kinetic equation has been analyzed. ► The numerical solution for fractional neutron point kinetic equation is obtained. ► Explicit Finite Difference Method has been applied. ► Supercritical reactivity, critical reactivity and subcritical reactivity analyzed. ► Comparison between fractional and classical neutron density is presented. - Abstract: In the present article, a numerical procedure to efficiently calculate the solution for fractional point kinetics equation in nuclear reactor dynamics is investigated. The Explicit Finite Difference Method is applied to solve the fractional neutron point kinetic equation with the Grunwald–Letnikov (GL) definition (). Fractional Neutron Point Kinetic Model has been analyzed for the dynamic behavior of the neutron motion in which the relaxation time associated with a variation in the neutron flux involves a fractional order acting as exponent of the relaxation time, to obtain the best operation of a nuclear reactor dynamics. Results for neutron dynamic behavior for subcritical reactivity, supercritical reactivity and critical reactivity and also for different values of fractional order have been presented and compared with the classical neutron point kinetic (NPK) equation as well as the results obtained by the learned researchers .

  11. Effective potential kinetic theory for strongly coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Daligault, Jérôme

    2016-11-01

    The effective potential theory (EPT) is a recently proposed method for extending traditional plasma kinetic and transport theory into the strongly coupled regime. Validation from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations have shown it to be accurate up to the onset of liquid-like correlation parameters (corresponding to Γ ≃ 10-50 for the one-component plasma, depending on the process of interest). Here, this theory is briefly reviewed along with comparisons between the theory and molecular dynamics simulations for self-diffusivity and viscosity of the one-component plasma. A number of new results are also provided, including calculations of friction coefficients, energy exchange rates, stopping power, and mobility. The theory is also cast in the Landau and Fokker-Planck kinetic forms, which may prove useful for enabling efficient kinetic computations.

  12. Effective-field theory for dynamic phase diagrams of the kinetic spin-3/2 Blume–Capel model under a time oscillating longitudinal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertaş, Mehmet [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Kocakaplan, Yusuf [Institute of Science, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa, E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2013-12-15

    Dynamic phase diagrams are presented for the kinetic spin-3/2 Blume–Capel model under a time oscillating longitudinal field by use of the effective-field theory with correlations. The dynamic equation of the average magnetization is obtained for the square lattice by utilizing the Glauber-type stochastic process. Dynamic phase diagrams are presented in the reduced temperature and the magnetic field amplitude plane. We also investigated the effect of longitudinal field frequency. Finally, the discussion and comparison of the phase diagrams are given. - Highlights: • Dynamic behaviors in the spin-3/2 Blume–Capel system is investigated by the effective-field theory based on the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics. • The dynamic phase transitions and dynamic phase diagrams are obtained. • The effects of the longitudinal field frequency on the dynamic phase diagrams of the system are investigated. • Dynamic phase diagrams exhibit several ordered phases, coexistence phase regions and several critical points as well as a re-entrant behavior.

  13. Effective-field theory for dynamic phase diagrams of the kinetic spin-3/2 Blume–Capel model under a time oscillating longitudinal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertaş, Mehmet; Kocakaplan, Yusuf; Keskin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic phase diagrams are presented for the kinetic spin-3/2 Blume–Capel model under a time oscillating longitudinal field by use of the effective-field theory with correlations. The dynamic equation of the average magnetization is obtained for the square lattice by utilizing the Glauber-type stochastic process. Dynamic phase diagrams are presented in the reduced temperature and the magnetic field amplitude plane. We also investigated the effect of longitudinal field frequency. Finally, the discussion and comparison of the phase diagrams are given. - Highlights: • Dynamic behaviors in the spin-3/2 Blume–Capel system is investigated by the effective-field theory based on the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics. • The dynamic phase transitions and dynamic phase diagrams are obtained. • The effects of the longitudinal field frequency on the dynamic phase diagrams of the system are investigated. • Dynamic phase diagrams exhibit several ordered phases, coexistence phase regions and several critical points as well as a re-entrant behavior

  14. Quantitative modeling of the reaction/diffusion kinetics of two-chemistry photopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Benjamin Andrew

    Optically driven diffusion in photopolymers is an appealing material platform for a broad range of applications, in which the recorded refractive index patterns serve either as images (e.g. data storage, display holography) or as optical elements (e.g. custom GRIN components, integrated optical devices). A quantitative understanding of the reaction/diffusion kinetics is difficult to obtain directly, but is nevertheless necessary in order to fully exploit the wide array of design freedoms in these materials. A general strategy for characterizing these kinetics is proposed, in which key processes are decoupled and independently measured. This strategy enables prediction of a material's potential refractive index change, solely on the basis of its chemical components. The degree to which a material does not reach this potential reveals the fraction of monomer that has participated in unwanted reactions, reducing spatial resolution and dynamic range. This approach is demonstrated for a model material similar to commercial media, achieving quantitative predictions of index response over three orders of exposure dose (~1 to ~103 mJ cm-2) and three orders of feature size (0.35 to 500 microns). The resulting insights enable guided, rational design of new material formulations with demonstrated performance improvement.

  15. Dynamics of High-Resolution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekara, Vedran

    the unprecedented amounts of information collected by mobile phones to gain detailed insight into the dynamics of social systems. This dissertation presents an unparalleled data collection campaign, collecting highly detailed traces for approximately 1000 people over the course of multiple years. The availability...... are we all affected by an ever changing network structure? Answering these questions will enrich our understanding of ourselves, our organizations, and our societies. Yet, mapping the dynamics of social networks has traditionally been an arduous undertaking. Today, however, it is possible to use...... of such dynamic maps allows us to probe the underlying social network and understand how individuals interact and form lasting friendships. More importantly, these highly detailed dynamic maps provide us new perspectives at traditional problems and allow us to quantify and predict human life....

  16. Spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy and super-resolution microscopy to quantify molecular dynamics in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashdown, George W; Owen, Dylan M

    2018-02-02

    Many cellular processes are regulated by the spatio-temporal organisation of signalling complexes, cytoskeletal components and membranes. One such example is at the T cell immunological synapse where the retrograde flow of cortical filamentous (F)-actin from the synapse periphery drives signalling protein microclusters towards the synapse centre. The density of this mesh however, makes visualisation and analysis of individual actin fibres difficult due to the resolution limit of conventional microscopy. Recently, super-resolution methods such as structured illumination microscopy (SIM) have surpassed this resolution limit. Here, we apply SIM to better visualise the dense cortical actin meshwork in T cell synapses formed against activating, antibody-coated surfaces and image under total-internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) illumination. To analyse the observed molecular flows, and the relationship between them, we apply spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) and its cross-correlation variant (STICCS). We show that the dynamic cortical actin mesh can be visualised with unprecedented detail and that STICS/STICCS can output accurate, quantitative maps of molecular flow velocity and directionality from such data. We find that the actin flow can be disrupted using small molecule inhibitors of actin polymerisation. This combination of imaging and quantitative analysis may provide an important new tool for researchers to investigate the molecular dynamics at cellular length scales. Here we demonstrate the retrograde flow of F-actin which may be important for the clustering and dynamics of key signalling proteins within the plasma membrane, a phenomenon which is vital to correct T cell activation and therefore the mounting of an effective immune response. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. High resolution geodynamo simulations with strongly-driven convection and low viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Nathanael; Fournier, Alexandre; Jault, Dominique; Aubert, Julien

    2015-04-01

    Numerical simulations have been successful at explaining the magnetic field of the Earth for 20 years. However, the regime in which these simulations operate is in many respect very far from what is expected in the Earth's core. By reviewing previous work, we find that it appears difficult to have both low viscosity (low magnetic Prandtl number) and strong magnetic fields in numerical models (large ratio of magnetic over kinetic energy, a.k.a inverse squared Alfvén number). In order to understand better the dynamics and turbulence of the core, we have run a series of 3 simulations, with increasingly demanding parameters. The last simulation is at the limit of what nowadays codes can do on current super computers, with a resolution of 2688 grid points in longitude, 1344 in latitude, and 1024 radial levels. We will show various features of these numerical simulations, including what appears as trends when pushing the parameters toward the one of the Earth. The dynamics is very rich. From short time scales to large time scales, we observe at large scales: Inertial Waves, Torsional Alfvén Waves, columnar convective overturn dynamics and long-term thermal winds. In addition, the dynamics inside and outside the tangent cylinder seem to follow different routes. We find that the ohmic dissipation largely dominates the viscous one and that the magnetic energy dominates the kinetic energy. The magnetic field seems to play an ambiguous role. Despite the large magnetic field, which has an important impact on the flow, we find that the force balance for the mean flow is a thermal wind balance, and that the scale of convective cells is still dominated by viscous effects.

  18. Influence of Prolonged Spaceflight on Heart Rate and Oxygen Uptake Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, U.; Moore, A.; Drescher, U.

    2013-02-01

    During prolonged spaceflight, physical training is used to minimize cardiovascular deconditioning. Measurement of the kinetics of cardiorespiratory parameters, in particular the kinetic analysis of heart rate, respiratory and muscular oxygen uptake, provides useful information with regard to the efficiency and regulation of the cardiorespiratory system. Practically, oxygen uptake kinetics can only be measured at the lung site (V’O2 resp). The dynamics of V’O2 resp, however, is not identical with the dynamics at the site of interest: skeletal muscle. Eight Astronauts were tested pre- and post-flight using pseudo random binary workload changes between 30 and 80 W. Their kinetic responses of heart rate, respiratory as well as muscular V’O2 kinetics were estimated by using time-series analysis. Statistical analysis revealed that the kinetic responses of respiratory as well as muscular V’O2 kinetics are slowed post-flight than pre-flight. Heart rate seems not to be influenced following flight. The influence of other factors (e. g. astronauts’ exercise training) may impact these parameters and is an area for future studies.

  19. Registration of dynamic dopamine D2receptor images using principal component analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acton, P.D.; Ell, P.J.; Pilowsky, L.S.; Brammer, M.J.; Suckling, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a novel technique for registering a dynamic sequence of single-photon emission tomography (SPET) dopamine D 2 receptor images, using principal component analysis (PCA). Conventional methods for registering images, such as count difference and correlation coefficient algorithms, fail to take into account the dynamic nature of the data, resulting in large systematic errors when registering time-varying images. However, by using principal component analysis to extract the temporal structure of the image sequence, misregistration can be quantified by examining the distribution of eigenvalues. The registration procedures were tested using a computer-generated dynamic phantom derived from a high-resolution magnetic resonance image of a realistic brain phantom. Each method was also applied to clinical SPET images of dopamine D 2 receptors, using the ligands iodine-123 iodobenzamide and iodine-123 epidepride, to investigate the influence of misregistration on kinetic modelling parameters and the binding potential. The PCA technique gave highly significant (P 123 I-epidepride scans. The PCA method produced data of much greater quality for subsequent kinetic modelling, with an improvement of nearly 50% in the χ 2 of the fit to the compartmental model, and provided superior quality registration of particularly difficult dynamic sequences. (orig.)

  20. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching.…

  1. Molecular kinetics. Ras activation by SOS: allosteric regulation by altered fluctuation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Lars; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Lin, Wan-Chen; Christensen, Sune M; Abel, Steven M; Iwig, Jeff; Wu, Hung-Jen; Gureasko, Jodi; Rhodes, Christopher; Petit, Rebecca S; Hansen, Scott D; Thill, Peter; Yu, Cheng-Han; Stamou, Dimitrios; Chakraborty, Arup K; Kuriyan, John; Groves, Jay T

    2014-07-04

    Activation of the small guanosine triphosphatase H-Ras by the exchange factor Son of Sevenless (SOS) is an important hub for signal transduction. Multiple layers of regulation, through protein and membrane interactions, govern activity of SOS. We characterized the specific activity of individual SOS molecules catalyzing nucleotide exchange in H-Ras. Single-molecule kinetic traces revealed that SOS samples a broad distribution of turnover rates through stochastic fluctuations between distinct, long-lived (more than 100 seconds), functional states. The expected allosteric activation of SOS by Ras-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) was conspicuously absent in the mean rate. However, fluctuations into highly active states were modulated by Ras-GTP. This reveals a mechanism in which functional output may be determined by the dynamical spectrum of rates sampled by a small number of enzymes, rather than the ensemble average. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. The Einstein-Vlasov System/Kinetic Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréasson, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to provide a guide to theorems on global properties of solutions to the Einstein-Vlasov system. This system couples Einstein's equations to a kinetic matter model. Kinetic theory has been an important field of research during several decades in which the main focus has been on non-relativistic and special relativistic physics, i.e., to model the dynamics of neutral gases, plasmas, and Newtonian self-gravitating systems. In 1990, Rendall and Rein initiated a mathematical study of the Einstein-Vlasov system. Since then many theorems on global properties of solutions to this system have been established. This paper gives introductions to kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes and then the Einstein-Vlasov system is introduced. We believe that a good understanding of kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes is fundamental to a good comprehension of kinetic theory in general relativity.

  3. Dynamic pressure sensor calibration techniques offering expanded bandwidth with increased resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewiski, David

    2015-03-01

    Advancements in the aerospace, defense and energy markets are being made possible by increasingly more sophisticated systems and sub-systems which rely upon critical information to be conveyed from the physical environment being monitored through ever more specialized, extreme environment sensing components. One sensing parameter of particular interest is dynamic pressure measurement. Crossing the boundary of all three markets (i.e. aerospace, defense and energy) is dynamic pressure sensing which is used in research and development of gas turbine technology, and subsequently embedded into a control loop used for long-term monitoring. Applications include quantifying the effects of aircraft boundary layer ingestion into the engine inlet to provide a reliable and robust design. Another application includes optimization of combustor dynamics by "listening" to the acoustic signature so that fuel-to-air mixture can be adjusted in real-time to provide cost operating efficiencies and reduced NOx emissions. With the vast majority of pressure sensors supplied today being calibrated either statically or "quasi" statically, the dynamic response characterization of the frequency dependent sensitivity (i.e. transfer function) of the pressure sensor is noticeably absent. The shock tube has been shown to be an efficient vehicle to provide frequency response of pressure sensors from extremely high frequencies down to 500 Hz. Recent development activity has lowered this starting frequency; thereby augmenting the calibration bandwidth with increased frequency resolution so that as the pressure sensor is used in an actual test application, more understanding of the physical measurement can be ascertained by the end-user.

  4. Rethinking wave-kinetic theory applied to zonal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey

    2017-10-01

    Over the past two decades, a number of studies have employed a wave-kinetic theory to describe fluctuations interacting with zonal flows. Recent work has uncovered a defect in this wave-kinetic formulation: the system is dominated by the growth of (arbitrarily) small-scale zonal structures. Theoretical calculations of linear growth rates suggest, and nonlinear simulations confirm, that this system leads to the concentration of zonal flow energy in the smallest resolved scales, irrespective of the numerical resolution. This behavior results from the assumption that zonal flows are extremely long wavelength, leading to the neglect of key terms responsible for conservation of enstrophy. A corrected theory, CE2-GO, is presented; it is free of these errors yet preserves the intuitive phase-space mathematical structure. CE2-GO properly conserves enstrophy as well as energy, and yields accurate growth rates of zonal flow. Numerical simulations are shown to be well-behaved and not dependent on box size. The steady-state limit simplifies into an exact wave-kinetic form which offers the promise of deeper insight into the behavior of wavepackets. The CE2-GO theory takes its place in a hierarchy of models as the geometrical-optics reduction of the more complete cumulant-expansion statistical theory CE2. The new theory represents the minimal statistical description, enabling an intuitive phase-space formulation and an accurate description of turbulence-zonal flow dynamics. This work was supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, a US DOE Fusion Energy Sciences Fellowship, and US DOE Contract Nos. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. Dynamic rupture scenarios from Sumatra to Iceland - High-resolution earthquake source physics on natural fault systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Alice-Agnes; Madden, Elizabeth H.; Ulrich, Thomas; Wollherr, Stephanie

    2017-04-01

    Capturing the observed complexity of earthquake sources in dynamic rupture simulations may require: non-linear fault friction, thermal and fluid effects, heterogeneous fault stress and fault strength initial conditions, fault curvature and roughness, on- and off-fault non-elastic failure. All of these factors have been independently shown to alter dynamic rupture behavior and thus possibly influence the degree of realism attainable via simulated ground motions. In this presentation we will show examples of high-resolution earthquake scenarios, e.g. based on the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake, the 1994 Northridge earthquake and a potential rupture of the Husavik-Flatey fault system in Northern Iceland. The simulations combine a multitude of representations of source complexity at the necessary spatio-temporal resolution enabled by excellent scalability on modern HPC systems. Such simulations allow an analysis of the dominant factors impacting earthquake source physics and ground motions given distinct tectonic settings or distinct focuses of seismic hazard assessment. Across all simulations, we find that fault geometry concurrently with the regional background stress state provide a first order influence on source dynamics and the emanated seismic wave field. The dynamic rupture models are performed with SeisSol, a software package based on an ADER-Discontinuous Galerkin scheme for solving the spontaneous dynamic earthquake rupture problem with high-order accuracy in space and time. Use of unstructured tetrahedral meshes allows for a realistic representation of the non-planar fault geometry, subsurface structure and bathymetry. The results presented highlight the fact that modern numerical methods are essential to further our understanding of earthquake source physics and complement both physic-based ground motion research and empirical approaches in seismic hazard analysis.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of kinetic boundary condition at an interface between a polyatomic vapor and its condensed phase

    OpenAIRE

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Yano, Takeru; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    2004-01-01

    The kinetic boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation at an interface between a polyatomic vapor and its liquid phase is investigated by the numerical method of molecular dynamics, with particular emphasis on the functional form of the evaporation part of the boundary condition, including the evaporation coefficient. The present study is an extension of a previous one for argon [Ishiyama, Yano, and Fujikawa, Phys. Fluids 16, 2899 (2004)] to water and methanol, typical examples of polyatom...

  7. Simultaneous measurement of amyloid fibril formation by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence reveals complex aggregation kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M Streets

    Full Text Available An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, β-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports β-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation.

  8. Kinetic analysis of dynamic PET data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knittel, B.

    1983-12-01

    Our goal is to quantify regional physiological processes such as blood flow and metabolism by means of tracer kinetic modeling and positron emission tomography (PET). Compartmental models are one way of characterizing the behavior of tracers in physiological systems. This paper describes a general method of estimating compartmental model rate constants from measurements of the concentration of tracers in blood and tissue, taken at multiple time intervals. A computer program which applies the method is described, and examples are shown for simulated and actual data acquired from the Donner 280-Crystal Positron Tomograph.

  9. Kinetic analysis of dynamic PET data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knittel, B.

    1983-12-01

    Our goal is to quantify regional physiological processes such as blood flow and metabolism by means of tracer kinetic modeling and positron emission tomography (PET). Compartmental models are one way of characterizing the behavior of tracers in physiological systems. This paper describes a general method of estimating compartmental model rate constants from measurements of the concentration of tracers in blood and tissue, taken at multiple time intervals. A computer program which applies the method is described, and examples are shown for simulated and actual data acquired from the Donner 280-Crystal Positron Tomograph

  10. Modeling in applied sciences a kinetic theory approach

    CERN Document Server

    Pulvirenti, Mario

    2000-01-01

    Modeling complex biological, chemical, and physical systems, in the context of spatially heterogeneous mediums, is a challenging task for scientists and engineers using traditional methods of analysis Modeling in Applied Sciences is a comprehensive survey of modeling large systems using kinetic equations, and in particular the Boltzmann equation and its generalizations An interdisciplinary group of leading authorities carefully develop the foundations of kinetic models and discuss the connections and interactions between model theories, qualitative and computational analysis and real-world applications This book provides a thoroughly accessible and lucid overview of the different aspects, models, computations, and methodology for the kinetic-theory modeling process Topics and Features * Integrated modeling perspective utilized in all chapters * Fluid dynamics of reacting gases * Self-contained introduction to kinetic models * Becker–Doring equations * Nonlinear kinetic models with chemical reactions * Kinet...

  11. Quantitative dynamic ¹⁸FDG-PET and tracer kinetic analysis of soft tissue sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusten, Espen; Rødal, Jan; Revheim, Mona E; Skretting, Arne; Bruland, Oyvind S; Malinen, Eirik

    2013-08-01

    To study soft tissue sarcomas using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose analog tracer [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)FDG), to investigate correlations between derived PET image parameters and clinical characteristics, and to discuss implications of dynamic PET acquisition (D-PET). D-PET images of 11 patients with soft tissue sarcomas were analyzed voxel-by-voxel using a compartment tracer kinetic model providing estimates of transfer rates between the vascular, non-metabolized, and metabolized compartments. Furthermore, standard uptake values (SUVs) in the early (2 min p.i.; SUVE) and late (45 min p.i.; SUVL) phases of the PET acquisition were obtained. The derived transfer rates K1, k2 and k3, along with the metabolic rate of (18)FDG (MRFDG) and the vascular fraction νp, was fused with the computed tomography (CT) images for visual interpretation. Correlations between D-PET imaging parameters and clinical parameters, i.e. tumor size, grade and clinical status, were calculated with a significance level of 0.05. The temporal uptake pattern of (18)FDG in the tumor varied considerably from patient to patient. SUVE peak was higher than SUVL peak for four patients. The images of the rate constants showed a systematic pattern, often with elevated intensity in the tumors compared to surrounding tissue. Significant correlations were found between SUVE/L and some of the rate parameters. Dynamic (18)FDG-PET may provide additional valuable information on soft tissue sarcomas not obtainable from conventional (18)FDG-PET. The prognostic role of dynamic imaging should be investigated.

  12. Resonance transport and kinetic entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Yu.B.; Knoll, J.; Voskresensky, D.N.

    2000-01-01

    We continue the description of the dynamics of unstable particles within the real-time formulation of nonequilibrium field theory initiated in a previous paper . There we suggest to use Baym's PHI-functional method in order to achieve approximation schemes with 'built in' consistency with respect to conservation laws and thermodynamics even in the case of particles with finite damping width. Starting from Kadanoff-Baym equations we discuss a consistent first order gradient approach to transport which preserves the PHI-derivable properties. The validity conditions for the resulting quantum four-phase-space kinetic theory are discussed under the perspective to treat particles with broad damping widths. This non-equilibrium dynamics naturally includes all those quantum features already inherent in the corresponding equilibrium limit (e.g. Matsubara formalism) at the same level of PHI-derivable approximation. Various collision-term diagrams are discussed including those of higher order which lead to memory effects. As an important novel part we derive a generalized nonequilibrium expression for the kinetic entropy flow, which includes contributions from fluctuations and mass-width effects. In special cases an H-theorem is derived implying that the entropy can only increase with time. Memory effects in the kinetic terms provide contributions to the kinetic entropy flow that in the equilibrium limit recover the famous bosonic type T 3 lnT correction to the specific heat in the case of Fermi liquids like Helium-3

  13. Multicritical dynamical phase diagrams of the kinetic Blume-Emery-Griffiths model with repulsive biquadratic coupling in an oscillating field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temizer, Umuet [Department of Physics, Bozok University, 66100 Yozgat (Turkey); Kantar, Ersin [Institute of Science, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)], E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr; Canko, Osman [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2008-06-15

    We study, within a mean-field approach, the stationary states of the kinetic Blume-Emery-Griffiths model with repulsive biquadratic coupling under the presence of a time-varying (sinusoidal) magnetic field. We employ the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics to construct set of dynamic equations of motion. The behavior of the time dependence of the order parameters and the behavior of the average order parameters in a period, which is also called the dynamic order parameters, as functions of the reduced temperature are investigated. The dynamic phase transition points are calculated and phase diagrams are presented in the reduced magnetic field amplitude and reduced temperature plane. The dynamical transition from one regime to the other can be of first- or second order depending on the region in the phase diagram. According to the values of the crystal field interaction or single-ion anisotropy constant and biquadratic exchange constant, we find 20 fundamental types of phase diagrams which exhibit many dynamic critical points, such as tricritical points, zero-temperature critical points, double critical end points, critical end point, triple point and multicritical point. Moreover, besides a disordered and ordered phases, seven coexistence phase regions exist in the system.

  14. Method of Obtaining High Resolution Intrinsic Wire Boom Damping Parameters for Multi-Body Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Alvin G.; Chai, Dean J.; Olney, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission is to understand magnetic reconnection with sensor measurements from four spinning satellites flown in a tight tetrahedron formation. Four of the six electric field sensors on each satellite are located at the end of 60- meter wire booms to increase measurement sensitivity in the spin plane and to minimize motion coupling from perturbations on the main body. A propulsion burn however, might induce boom oscillations that could impact science measurements if oscillations do not damp to values on the order of 0.1 degree in a timely fashion. Large damping time constants could also adversely affect flight dynamics and attitude control performance. In this paper, we will discuss the implementation of a high resolution method for calculating the boom's intrinsic damping, which was used in multi-body dynamics simulations. In summary, experimental data was obtained with a scaled-down boom, which was suspended as a pendulum in vacuum. Optical techniques were designed to accurately measure the natural decay of angular position and subsequently, data processing algorithms resulted in excellent spatial and temporal resolutions. This method was repeated in a parametric study for various lengths, root tensions and vacuum levels. For all data sets, regression models for damping were applied, including: nonlinear viscous, frequency-independent hysteretic, coulomb and some combination of them. Our data analysis and dynamics models have shown that the intrinsic damping for the baseline boom is insufficient, thereby forcing project management to explore mitigation strategies.

  15. Assessment of input function distortions on kinetic model parameters in simulated dynamic 82Rb PET perfusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Carsten; Peligrad, Dragos-Nicolae; Weibrecht, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac 82 rubidium dynamic PET studies allow quantifying absolute myocardial perfusion by using tracer kinetic modeling. Here, the accurate measurement of the input function, i.e. the tracer concentration in blood plasma, is a major challenge. This measurement is deteriorated by inappropriate temporal sampling, spillover, etc. Such effects may influence the measured input peak value and the measured blood pool clearance. The aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of input function distortions on the myocardial perfusion as estimated by the model. To this end, we simulate noise-free myocardium time activity curves (TACs) with a two-compartment kinetic model. The input function to the model is a generic analytical function. Distortions of this function have been introduced by varying its parameters. Using the distorted input function, the compartment model has been fitted to the simulated myocardium TAC. This analysis has been performed for various sets of model parameters covering a physiologically relevant range. The evaluation shows that ±10% error in the input peak value can easily lead to ±10-25% error in the model parameter K 1 , which relates to myocardial perfusion. Variations in the input function tail are generally less relevant. We conclude that an accurate estimation especially of the plasma input peak is crucial for a reliable kinetic analysis and blood flow estimation

  16. Self-Consistent System of Equations for a Kinetic Description of the Low-Pressure Discharges Accounting for the Nonlocal and Collisionless Electron Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Polomarov, Oleg

    2003-01-01

    In low-pressure discharges, when the electron mean free path is larger or comparable with the discharge length, the electron dynamics is essentially non-local. Moreover, the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) deviates considerably from a Maxwellian. Therefore, an accurate kinetic description of the low-pressure discharges requires knowledge of the non-local conductivity operator and calculation of the non-Maxwellian EEDF. The previous treatments made use of simplifying assumptions: a uniform density profile and a Maxwellian EEDF. In the present study a self-consistent system of equations for the kinetic description of nonlocal, non-uniform, nearly collisionless plasmas of low-pressure discharges is derived. It consists of the nonlocal conductivity operator and the averaged kinetic equation for calculation of the non-Maxwellian EEDF. The importance of accounting for the non-uniform plasma density profile on both the current density profile and the EEDF is demonstrated

  17. Highly multiplexible thermal kinetic inductance detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulbricht, Gerhard; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Szypryt, Paul; Walter, Alex B.; Bockstiegel, Clint; Bumble, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    For X-ray imaging spectroscopy, high spatial resolution over a large field of view is often as important as high energy resolution, but current X-ray detectors do not provide both in the same device. Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors (TKIDs) are being developed as they offer a feasible way to combine the energy resolution of transition edge sensors with pixel counts approaching CCDs and thus promise significant improvements for many X-ray spectroscopy applications. TKIDs are a variation of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) and share their multiplexibility: working MKID arrays with 2024 pixels have recently been demonstrated and much bigger arrays are under development. In this work, we present a TKID prototype, which is able to achieve an energy resolution of 75 eV at 5.9 keV, even though its general design still has to be optimized. We further describe TKID fabrication, characterization, multiplexing, and working principle and demonstrate the necessity of a data fitting algorithm in order to extract photon energies. With further design optimizations, we expect to be able to improve our TKID energy resolution to less than 10 eV at 5.9 keV

  18. Highly multiplexible thermal kinetic inductance detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulbricht, Gerhard, E-mail: ulbricht@physics.ucsb.edu; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Szypryt, Paul; Walter, Alex B.; Bockstiegel, Clint [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bumble, Bruce [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-06-22

    For X-ray imaging spectroscopy, high spatial resolution over a large field of view is often as important as high energy resolution, but current X-ray detectors do not provide both in the same device. Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors (TKIDs) are being developed as they offer a feasible way to combine the energy resolution of transition edge sensors with pixel counts approaching CCDs and thus promise significant improvements for many X-ray spectroscopy applications. TKIDs are a variation of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) and share their multiplexibility: working MKID arrays with 2024 pixels have recently been demonstrated and much bigger arrays are under development. In this work, we present a TKID prototype, which is able to achieve an energy resolution of 75 eV at 5.9 keV, even though its general design still has to be optimized. We further describe TKID fabrication, characterization, multiplexing, and working principle and demonstrate the necessity of a data fitting algorithm in order to extract photon energies. With further design optimizations, we expect to be able to improve our TKID energy resolution to less than 10 eV at 5.9 keV.

  19. Dynamic inundation mapping of Hurricane Harvey flooding in the Houston metro area using hyper-resolution modeling and quantitative image reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, S. J.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, S.; Zhang, Y.; Seo, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Hurricane Harvey was one of the most extreme weather events in Texas history and left significant damages in the Houston and adjoining coastal areas. To understand better the relative impact to urban flooding of extreme amount and spatial extent of rainfall, unique geography, land use and storm surge, high-resolution water modeling is necessary such that natural and man-made components are fully resolved. In this presentation, we reconstruct spatiotemporal evolution of inundation during Hurricane Harvey using hyper-resolution modeling and quantitative image reanalysis. The two-dimensional urban flood model used is based on dynamic wave approximation and 10 m-resolution terrain data, and is forced by the radar-based multisensor quantitative precipitation estimates. The model domain includes Buffalo, Brays, Greens and White Oak Bayous in Houston. The model is simulated using hybrid parallel computing. To evaluate dynamic inundation mapping, we combine various qualitative crowdsourced images and video footages with LiDAR-based terrain data.

  20. Intramolecular diffusive motion in alkane monolayers studied by high-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Criswell, L.; Fuhrmann, D

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a tetracosane (n-C24H50) monolayer adsorbed on a graphite basal-plane surface show that there are diffusive motions associated with the creation and annihilation of gauche defects occurring on a time scale of similar to0.1-4 ns. We present evidence...... that these relatively slow motions are observable by high-energy-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering (QNS) thus demonstrating QNS as a technique, complementary to nuclear magnetic resonance, for studying conformational dynamics on a nanosecond time scale in molecular monolayers....

  1. Early Events, Kinetic Intermediates and the Mechanism of Protein Folding in Cytochrome c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Kliger

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic studies of the early events in cytochrome c folding are reviewed with a focus on the evidence for folding intermediates on the submillisecond timescale. Evidence from time-resolved absorption, circular dichroism, magnetic circular dichroism, fluorescence energy and electron transfer, small-angle X-ray scattering and amide hydrogen exchange studies on the t £ 1 ms timescale reveals a picture of cytochrome c folding that starts with the ~ 1-ms conformational diffusion dynamics of the unfolded chains. A fractional population of the unfolded chains collapses on the 1 – 100 ms timescale to a compact intermediate IC containing some native-like secondary structure. Although the existence and nature of IC as a discrete folding intermediate remains controversial, there is extensive high time-resolution kinetic evidence for the rapid formation of IC as a true intermediate, i.e., a metastable state separated from the unfolded state by a discrete free energy barrier. Final folding to the native state takes place on millisecond and longer timescales, depending on the presence of kinetic traps such as heme misligation and proline mis-isomerization. The high folding rates observed in equilibrium molten globule models suggest that IC may be a productive folding intermediate. Whether it is an obligatory step on the pathway to the high free energy barrier associated with millisecond timescale folding to the native state, however, remains to be determined.

  2. Chemical kinetic insights into the ignition dynamics of n-hexane

    KAUST Repository

    Tingas, Alexandros

    2017-10-13

    Normal alkanes constitute a significant fraction of transportation fuels, and are the primary drivers of ignition processes in gasoline and diesel fuels. Low temperature ignition of n-alkanes is driven by a complex sequence of oxidation reactions, for which detailed mechanisms are still being developed. The current study explores the dynamics of low-temperature ignition of n-hexane/air mixtures, and identifies chemical pathways that characterize the combustion process. Two chemical kinetic mechanisms were selected as a comparative study in order to better understand the role of specific reaction sequences in ignition dynamics: one mechanism including a new third sequential O2 addition reaction pathways (recently proposed by Wang et al. 2017), while the other without (Zhang et al. 2015). The analysis is conducted by applying tools generated from the computational singular perturbation (CSP) approach to two distinct ignition phenomena: constant volume and compression ignition. In both cases, the role of the third sequential O2 addition reactions proves to be significant, although it is found to be much more pronounced in the constant volume cases compared to the HCCI. In particular, in the constant volume ignition case, reactions present in the third sequential O2 addition reaction pathways (e.g., KDHP  →  products + OH) contribute significantly to the explosivity of the mixture; when accounted for along with reactions P(OOH)2 + O2  →  OOP(OOH)2 and OOP(OOH)2  →  KDHP + OH, they decrease ignition delay time of the mixture by up to 40%. Under HCCI conditions, in the first-stage ignition, the third-O2 addition reactions contribute to the process, although their role decays with time and becomes negligible at the end of the first stage. The second ignition stage is dominated almost exclusively by hydrogen-related chemistry.

  3. Multicharged Ion-induced simple molecule fragmentation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarisien, M.

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this work is to study the dynamics of swift multicharged ion-induced fragmentation of diatomic (CO) and triatomic (CO 2 ) molecules. Performed at the GANIL facility, this study used the Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy technique (RIMS), which consists of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, coupled with a multi-hit capability position sensitive detector (delay line anode). The high-resolution measurement of the kinetic energy distribution released (KER) during the CO fragmentation points out the limitation of the Coulomb Explosion Model, revealing, for example, the di-cation CO 2 + electronic state contribution in the case of C + /O + fragmentation pathway. Furthermore, the multi-ionization cross section dependence with the orientation of the internuclear axis of CO is compared with a geometrical model calculation. Finally, different behaviours are observed for the dissociation dynamics of a triatomic molecule (CO 2 ). While triple ionization leads mainly to a synchronous concerted fragmentation dynamics, a weak fraction of dissociating molecule follows a sequential dynamics involving CO 2 + metastable states. In the case of double ionization, (CO 2 ) 2+ di-cation dissociation dynamics is asynchronously concerted and has been interpreted using a simple model involving an asymmetrical vibration of the molecule. (author)

  4. Alternative kinetic energy metrics for Lagrangian systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlet, W.; Prince, G.

    2010-11-01

    We examine Lagrangian systems on \\ {R}^n with standard kinetic energy terms for the possibility of additional, alternative Lagrangians with kinetic energy metrics different to the Euclidean one. Using the techniques of the inverse problem in the calculus of variations we find necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of such Lagrangians. We illustrate the problem in two and three dimensions with quadratic and cubic potentials. As an aside we show that the well-known anomalous Lagrangians for the Coulomb problem can be removed by switching on a magnetic field, providing an appealing resolution of the ambiguous quantizations of the hydrogen atom.

  5. The impact of wind energy turbine piles on ocean dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grashorn, Sebastian; Stanev, Emil V.

    2016-04-01

    The small- and meso-scale ocean response to wind parks has not been investigated in the southern North Sea until now with the help of high-resolution numerical modelling. Obstacles such as e.g. wind turbine piles may influence the ocean current system and produce turbulent kinetic energy which could affect sediment dynamics in the surrounding area. Two setups of the unstructured-grid model SCHISM (Semi-implicit Cross-scale Hydroscience Integrated System Model) have been developed for an idealized channel including a surface piercing cylindrical obstacle representing the pile and a more realistic test case including four exemplary piles. Experiments using a constant flow around the obstacles and a rotating M2 tidal wave are carried out. The resulting current and turbulence patterns are investigated to estimate the influence of the obstacles on the surrounding ocean dynamics. We demonstrate that using an unstructured ocean model provides the opportunity to embed a high-resolution representation of a wind park turbine pile system into a coarser North Sea setup, which is needed in order to perform a seamless investigation of the resulting geophysical processes.

  6. Exploring New Challenges of High-Resolution SWOT Satellite Altimetry with a Regional Model of the Solomon Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, P.; Verron, J. A.; Djath, B.; Duran, M.; Gaultier, L.; Gourdeau, L.; Melet, A.; Molines, J. M.; Ubelmann, C.

    2014-12-01

    The upcoming high-resolution SWOT altimetry satellite will provide an unprecedented description of the ocean dynamic topography for studying sub- and meso-scale processes in the ocean. But there is still much uncertainty on the signal that will be observed. There are many scientific questions that are unresolved about the observability of altimetry at vhigh resolution and on the dynamical role of the ocean meso- and submesoscales. In addition, SWOT data will raise specific problems due to the size of the data flows. These issues will probably impact the data assimilation approaches for future scientific or operational oceanography applications. In this work, we propose to use a high-resolution numerical model of the Western Pacific Solomon Sea as a regional laboratory to explore such observability and dynamical issues, as well as new data assimilation challenges raised by SWOT. The Solomon Sea connects subtropical water masses to the equatorial ones through the low latitude western boundary currents and could potentially modulate the tropical Pacific climate. In the South Western Pacific, the Solomon Sea exhibits very intense eddy kinetic energy levels, while relatively little is known about the mesoscale and submesoscale activities in this region. The complex bathymetry of the region, complicated by the presence of narrow straits and numerous islands, raises specific challenges. So far, a Solomon sea model configuration has been set up at 1/36° resolution. Numerical simulations have been performed to explore the meso- and submesoscales dynamics. The numerical solutions which have been validated against available in situ data, show the development of small scale features, eddies, fronts and filaments. Spectral analysis reveals a behavior that is consistent with the SQG theory. There is a clear evidence of energy cascade from the small scales including the submesoscales, although those submesoscales are only partially resolved by the model. In parallel

  7. Seeking kinetic pathways relevant to the structural evolution of metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haldar, Paramita; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the kinetic pathways that cause metal nanoparticles to structurally evolve over time is essential for predicting their shape and size distributions and catalytic properties. Consequently, we need detailed kinetic models that can provide such information. Most kinetic Monte Carlo models used for metal systems contain a fixed catalogue of atomic moves; the catalogue is largely constructed based on our physical understanding of the material. In some situations, it is possible that an incorrect picture of the overall dynamics is obtained when kinetic pathways that are relevant to the dynamics are missing from the catalogue. Hence, a computational framework that can systematically determine the relevant pathways is required. This work intends to fulfil this requirement. Examples involving an Ag nanoparticle are studied to illustrate how molecular dynamics (MD) calculations can be employed to find the relevant pathways in a system. Since pathways that are unlikely to be selected at short timescales can become relevant at longer times, the accuracy of the catalogue is maintained by continually seeking these pathways using MD. We discuss various aspects of our approach, namely, defining the relevance of atomic moves to the dynamics and determining when additional MD is required to ensure the desired accuracy, as well as physical insights into the Ag nanoparticle. (paper)

  8. Learning reduced kinetic Monte Carlo models of complex chemistry from molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Sing-Long, Carlos A; Reed, Evan J

    2017-08-01

    We propose a novel statistical learning framework for automatically and efficiently building reduced kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) models of large-scale elementary reaction networks from data generated by a single or few molecular dynamics simulations (MD). Existing approaches for identifying species and reactions from molecular dynamics typically use bond length and duration criteria, where bond duration is a fixed parameter motivated by an understanding of bond vibrational frequencies. In contrast, we show that for highly reactive systems, bond duration should be a model parameter that is chosen to maximize the predictive power of the resulting statistical model. We demonstrate our method on a high temperature, high pressure system of reacting liquid methane, and show that the learned KMC model is able to extrapolate more than an order of magnitude in time for key molecules. Additionally, our KMC model of elementary reactions enables us to isolate the most important set of reactions governing the behavior of key molecules found in the MD simulation. We develop a new data-driven algorithm to reduce the chemical reaction network which can be solved either as an integer program or efficiently using L1 regularization, and compare our results with simple count-based reduction. For our liquid methane system, we discover that rare reactions do not play a significant role in the system, and find that less than 7% of the approximately 2000 reactions observed from molecular dynamics are necessary to reproduce the molecular concentration over time of methane. The framework described in this work paves the way towards a genomic approach to studying complex chemical systems, where expensive MD simulation data can be reused to contribute to an increasingly large and accurate genome of elementary reactions and rates.

  9. Ensemble Kinetic Modeling of Metabolic Networks from Dynamic Metabolic Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengjie Jia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic modeling of metabolic pathways has important applications in metabolic engineering, but significant challenges still remain. The difficulties faced vary from finding best-fit parameters in a highly multidimensional search space to incomplete parameter identifiability. To meet some of these challenges, an ensemble modeling method is developed for characterizing a subset of kinetic parameters that give statistically equivalent goodness-of-fit to time series concentration data. The method is based on the incremental identification approach, where the parameter estimation is done in a step-wise manner. Numerical efficacy is achieved by reducing the dimensionality of parameter space and using efficient random parameter exploration algorithms. The shift toward using model ensembles, instead of the traditional “best-fit” models, is necessary to directly account for model uncertainty during the application of such models. The performance of the ensemble modeling approach has been demonstrated in the modeling of a generic branched pathway and the trehalose pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using generalized mass action (GMA kinetics.

  10. Effects of Resolution on the Simulation of Boundary-layer Clouds and the Partition of Kinetic Energy to Subgrid Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anning Cheng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Seven boundary-layer cloud cases are simulated with UCLA-LES (The University of California, Los Angeles – large eddy simulation model with different horizontal and vertical gridspacing to investigate how the results depend on gridspacing. Some variables are more sensitive to horizontal gridspacing, while others are more sensitive to vertical gridspacing, and still others are sensitive to both horizontal and vertical gridspacings with similar or opposite trends. For cloud-related variables having the opposite dependence on horizontal and vertical gridspacings, changing the gridspacing proportionally in both directions gives the appearance of convergence. In this study, we mainly discuss the impact of subgrid-scale (SGS kinetic energy (KE on the simulations with coarsening of horizontal and vertical gridspacings. A running-mean operator is used to separate the KE of the high-resolution benchmark simulations into that of resolved scales of coarse-resolution simulations and that of SGSs. The diagnosed SGS KE is compared with that parameterized by the Smagorinsky-Lilly SGS scheme at various gridspacings. It is found that the parameterized SGS KE for the coarse-resolution simulations is usually underestimated but the resolved KE is unrealistically large, compared to benchmark simulations. However, the sum of resolved and SGS KEs is about the same for simulations with various gridspacings. The partitioning of SGS and resolved heat and moisture transports is consistent with that of SGS and resolved KE, which means that the parameterized transports are underestimated but resolved-scale transports are overestimated. On the whole, energy shifts to large-scales as the horizontal gridspacing becomes coarse, hence the size of clouds and the resolved circulation increase, the clouds become more stratiform-like with an increase in cloud fraction, cloud liquid-water path and surface precipitation; when coarse vertical gridspacing is used, cloud sizes do not

  11. The eddy kinetic energy budget in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Peng; Subramanian, Aneesh C.; Yao, Fengchao; Kartadikaria, Aditya R.; Guo, Daquan; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    The budget of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in the Red Sea, including the sources, redistributions and sink, is examined using a high-resolution eddy-resolving ocean circulation model. A pronounced seasonally varying EKE is identified, with its maximum

  12. Association of footprint measurements with plantar kinetics: a linear regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fascione, Jeanna M; Crews, Ryan T; Wrobel, James S

    2014-03-01

    The use of foot measurements to classify morphology and interpret foot function remains one of the focal concepts of lower-extremity biomechanics. However, only 27% to 55% of midfoot variance in foot pressures has been determined in the most comprehensive models. We investigated whether dynamic walking footprint measurements are associated with inter-individual foot loading variability. Thirty individuals (15 men and 15 women; mean ± SD age, 27.17 ± 2.21 years) walked at a self-selected speed over an electronic pedography platform using the midgait technique. Kinetic variables (contact time, peak pressure, pressure-time integral, and force-time integral) were collected for six masked regions. Footprints were digitized for area and linear boundaries using digital photo planimetry software. Six footprint measurements were determined: contact area, footprint index, arch index, truncated arch index, Chippaux-Smirak index, and Staheli index. Linear regression analysis with a Bonferroni adjustment was performed to determine the association between the footprint measurements and each of the kinetic variables. The findings demonstrate that a relationship exists between increased midfoot contact and increased kinetic values in respective locations. Many of these variables produced large effect sizes while describing 38% to 71% of the common variance of select plantar kinetic variables in the medial midfoot region. In addition, larger footprints were associated with larger kinetic values at the medial heel region and both masked forefoot regions. Dynamic footprint measurements are associated with dynamic plantar loading kinetics, with emphasis on the midfoot region.

  13. High resolution mapping of riffle-pool dynamics based on ADCP and close-range remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Jouni; Kasvi, Elina; Alho, Petteri

    2017-04-01

    Present development of mobile laser scanning (MLS) and close-range photogrammetry with unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) enable us to create seamless digital elevation models (DEMs) of the riverine environment. Remote-controlled flow measurement platforms have also improved spatio-temporal resolution of the flow field data. In this study, acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) attached to remote-controlled mini-boat, UAV-based bathymetry and MLS techniques were utilized to create the high-resolution DEMs of the river channel. These high-resolution measurements can be used in many fluvial applications such as computational fluid dynamics, channel change detection, habitat mapping or hydro-electric power plant planning. In this study we aim: 1) to analyze morphological changes of river channel especially riffle and pool formations based on fine-scale DEMs and ADCP measurements, 2) to analyze flow fields and their effect on morphological changes. The interest was mainly focused on reach-scale riffle-pool dynamics within two-year period of 2013 and 2014. The study was performed in sub-arctic meandering Pulmankijoki River located in Northern Finland. The river itself has shallow and clear water and sandy bed sediment. Discharge remains typically below 10 m3s-1 most of the year but during snow melt period in spring the discharge may exceed 70 m3s-1. We compared DEMs and ADCP measurements to understand both magnitude and spatio-temporal change of the river bed. Models were accurate enough to study bed form changes and locations and persistence of riffles and pools. We analyzed their locations with relation to flow during the peak and low discharge. Our demonstrated method has improved significantly spatio-temporal resolution of riverine DEMs compared to other cross-sectional and photogrammetry based models. Together with flow field measurements we gained better understanding of riverbed-water interaction

  14. Validation of the Regional Climate Model ALARO with different dynamical downscaling approaches and different horizontal resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berckmans, Julie; Hamdi, Rafiq; De Troch, Rozemien; Giot, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    At the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium (RMI), climate simulations are performed with the regional climate model (RCM) ALARO, a version of the ALADIN model with improved physical parameterizations. In order to obtain high-resolution information of the regional climate, lateral bounary conditions (LBC) are prescribed from the global climate model (GCM) ARPEGE. Dynamical downscaling is commonly done in a continuous long-term simulation, with the initialisation of the model at the start and driven by the regularly updated LBCs of the GCM. Recently, more interest exists in the dynamical downscaling approach of frequent reinitializations of the climate simulations. For these experiments, the model is initialised daily and driven for 24 hours by the GCM. However, the surface is either initialised daily together with the atmosphere or free to evolve continuously. The surface scheme implemented in ALARO is SURFEX, which can be either run in coupled mode or in stand-alone mode. The regional climate is simulated on different domains, on a 20km horizontal resolution over Western-Europe and a 4km horizontal resolution over Belgium. Besides, SURFEX allows to perform a stand-alone or offline simulation on 1km horizontal resolution over Belgium. This research is in the framework of the project MASC: "Modelling and Assessing Surface Change Impacts on Belgian and Western European Climate", a 4-year project funded by the Belgian Federal Government. The overall aim of the project is to study the feedbacks between climate changes and land surface changes in order to improve regional climate model projections at the decennial scale over Belgium and Western Europe and thus to provide better climate projections and climate change evaluation tools to policy makers, stakeholders and the scientific community.

  15. Dynamics of entropy perturbations in assisted dark energy with mixed kinetic terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karwan, Khamphee

    2011-01-01

    We study dynamics of entropy perturbations in the two-field assisted dark energy model. Based on the scenario of assisted dark energy, in which one scalar field is subdominant compared with the other in the early epoch, we show that the entropy perturbations in this two-field system tend to be constant on large scales in the early epoch and hence survive until the present era for a generic evolution of both fields during the radiation and matter eras. This behaviour of the entropy perturbations is preserved even when the fields are coupled via kinetic interaction. Since, for assisted dark energy, the subdominant field in the early epoch becomes dominant at late time, the entropy perturbations can significantly influence the dynamics of density perturbations in the universe. Assuming correlations between the entropy and curvature perturbations, the entropy perturbations can enhance the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect if the signs of the contributions from entropy perturbations and curvature perturbations are opposite after the matter era, otherwise the ISW contribution is suppressed. For canonical scalar field the effect of entropy perturbations on ISW effect is small because the initial value of the entropy perturbations estimated during inflation cannot be sufficiently large. However, in the case of k-essence, the initial value of the entropy perturbations can be large enough to affect the ISW effect to leave a significant imprint on the CMB power spectrum

  16. Nonlinear Kinetics on Lattices Based on the Kinetic Interaction Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Kaniadakis

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Master equations define the dynamics that govern the time evolution of various physical processes on lattices. In the continuum limit, master equations lead to Fokker–Planck partial differential equations that represent the dynamics of physical systems in continuous spaces. Over the last few decades, nonlinear Fokker–Planck equations have become very popular in condensed matter physics and in statistical physics. Numerical solutions of these equations require the use of discretization schemes. However, the discrete evolution equation obtained by the discretization of a Fokker–Planck partial differential equation depends on the specific discretization scheme. In general, the discretized form is different from the master equation that has generated the respective Fokker–Planck equation in the continuum limit. Therefore, the knowledge of the master equation associated with a given Fokker–Planck equation is extremely important for the correct numerical integration of the latter, since it provides a unique, physically motivated discretization scheme. This paper shows that the Kinetic Interaction Principle (KIP that governs the particle kinetics of many body systems, introduced in G. Kaniadakis, Physica A 296, 405 (2001, univocally defines a very simple master equation that in the continuum limit yields the nonlinear Fokker–Planck equation in its most general form.

  17. Performance evaluation of a mouse-sized camera for dynamic studies in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loudos, George; Majewski, Stan; Wojcik, Randy; Weisenberger, Andrew; Sakellios, Nicolas; Nikita, Konstantina; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos; Bouziotis, Penelope; Varvarigou, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    A mouse sized camera has been built in terms of collaboration between the presenting institutions. The system is used for the performance of dynamic studies in small animals, in order to evaluate novel radiopharmaceuticals. The active area of the detector is approximately 48x96 mm allowing depiction of the entire mouse in a single view. The system is based on two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT), a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator and a copper-beryllium (CuBe) parallel-hole collimator. In this work, the evaluation results of the system are presented, using phantoms and small animals injected with conventional radiophrmaceuticals. Average resolution was ∼1.6 mm on the collimator surface and increased to ∼4.1 mm in 12 cm distance from the detector. The average energy resolution was measured and found to be ∼15.6% for Tc 99m . Results from imaging thin capillaries demonstrated system's high resolution and sensitivity in activity variations was shown. Initial dynamic studies have been carried out in small animals injected with Tc 99m -DTPA and Tc 99m -MDP. The results show system's ability to perform kinetic imaging in small animals

  18. Improving malignancy prediction in breast lesions with the combination of apparent diffusion coefficient and dynamic contrast-enhanced kinetic descriptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Luisa; Brandão, Sofia; Matos, Eduarda; Gouveia Nunes, Rita; Ferreira, Hugo Alexandre; Loureiro, Joana; Ramos, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess how the joint use of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and kinetic parameters (uptake phase and delayed enhancement characteristics) from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) can boost the ability to predict breast lesion malignancy. Materials and methods: Breast magnetic resonance examinations including DCE and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) were performed on 51 women. The association between kinetic parameters and ADC were evaluated and compared between lesion types. Models with binary outcome of malignancy were studied using generalized estimating equations (GEE), (GEE), and using kinetic parameters and ADC values as malignancy predictors. Model accuracy was assessed using the corrected maximum quasi-likelihood under the independence confidence criterion (QICC). Predicted probability of malignancy was estimated for the best model. Results: ADC values were significantly associated with kinetic parameters: medium and rapid uptake phase (p<0.001) and plateau and washout curve types (p=0.004). Comparison between lesion type showed significant differences for ADC (p=0.001), early phase (p<0.001), and curve type (p<0.001). The predicted probabilities of malignancy for the first ADC quartile (≤1.17×10 −3  mm 2 /s) and persistent, plateau and washout curves, were 54.6%, 86.9%, and 97.8%, respectively, and for the third ADC quartile (≥1.51×10 −3  mm 2 /s) were 3.2%, 15.5%, and 54.8%, respectively. The predicted probability of malignancy was less than 5% for 18.8% of the lesions and greater than 33% for 50.7% of the lesions (24/35 lesions, corresponding to a malignancy rate of 68.6%). Conclusion: The best malignancy predictors were low ADCs and washout curves. ADC and kinetic parameters provide differentiated information on the microenvironment of the lesion, with joint models displaying improved predictive performance. -- Highlights: •ADC and kinetic parameters provide diverse information regarding lesion environment. •The best predictors

  19. The Einstein-Vlasov System/Kinetic Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Andréasson

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to provide a guide to theorems on global properties of solutions to the Einstein-Vlasov system. This system couples Einstein's equations to a kinetic matter model. Kinetic theory has been an important field of research during several decades in which the main focus has been on nonrelativistic and special relativistic physics, i.e., to model the dynamics of neutral gases, plasmas, and Newtonian self-gravitating systems. In 1990, Rendall and Rein initiated a mathematical study of the Einstein-Vlasov system. Since then many theorems on global properties of solutions to this system have been established. The Vlasov equation describes matter phenomenologically, and it should be stressed that most of the theorems presented in this article are not presently known for other such matter models (i.e., fluid models. This paper gives introductions to kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes and then the Einstein-Vlasov system is introduced. We believe that a good understanding of kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes is fundamental to good comprehension of kinetic theory in general relativity.

  20. Extracting a kinetic relation from the dynamics of a bistable chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Qingze; Purohit, Prashant K

    2014-01-01

    We integrate Newton's second law for a chain of masses and bistable springs with a spinodal region with the goal of extracting a kinetic relation for propagating phase boundaries. Our numerical experiments correspond to the impact on a bar made of phase changing material. By reading off the spring extensions ahead and behind the phase boundaries in our numerical experiments, we compute a driving force and plot it as a function of the phase boundary velocity to get a kinetic relation. We then show that this kinetic relation results in solutions to Riemann problems in continuum bars that agree with the corresponding numerical experiments on the discrete mass–spring chain. We also integrate Langevin's equations of motion for the same chain of masses and springs to account for the presence of a heat bath at a fixed temperature. We find that the xt-plane looks similar to the purely mechanical numerical experiments at low temperatures but at high temperatures there is an increased incidence of random nucleation events. Using results from both impact and Riemann problems, we show that the kinetic relation is a function of the bath temperature. (paper)

  1. Dynamic Hybrid Simulation of the Lunar Wake During ARTEMIS Crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiehle, S.; Plaschke, F.; Angelopoulos, V.; Auster, H.; Glassmeier, K.; Kriegel, H.; Motschmann, U. M.; Mueller, J.

    2010-12-01

    The interaction of the highly dynamic solar wind with the Moon is simulated with the A.I.K.E.F. (Adaptive Ion Kinetic Electron Fluid) code for the ARTEMIS P1 flyby on February 13, 2010. The A.I.K.E.F. hybrid plasma simulation code is the improved version of the Braunschweig code. It is able to automatically increase simulation grid resolution in areas of interest during runtime, which greatly increases resolution as well as performance. As the Moon has no intrinsic magnetic field and no ionosphere, the solar wind particles are absorbed at its surface, resulting in the formation of the lunar wake at the nightside. The solar wind magnetic field is basically convected through the Moon and the wake is slowly filled up with solar wind particles. However, this interaction is strongly influenced by the highly dynamic solar wind during the flyby. This is considered by a dynamic variation of the upstream conditions in the simulation using OMNI solar wind measurement data. By this method, a very good agreement between simulation and observations is achieved. The simulations show that the stationary structure of the lunar wake constitutes a tableau vivant in space representing the well-known Friedrichs diagram for MHD waves.

  2. Microtubule dynamics. II. Kinetics of self-assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Jobs, E.

    1997-01-01

    Inverse scattering theory describes the conditions necessary and sufficient to determine an unknown potential from known scattering data. No similar theory exists for when and how one may deduce the kinetics of an unknown chemical reaction from quantitative information about its final state and i...... to analyze the self-assembly of microtubules from tubulin are general, and many other reactions and processes may be studied as inverse problems with these methods when enough experimental data are available....

  3. Impact of human milk pasteurization on the kinetics of peptide release during in vitro dynamic term newborn digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglaire, Amélie; De Oliveira, Samira C; Jardin, Julien; Briard-Bion, Valérie; Emily, Mathieu; Ménard, Olivia; Bourlieu, Claire; Dupont, Didier

    2016-07-01

    Holder pasteurization (62.5°C, 30 min) ensures sanitary quality of donor's human milk but also denatures beneficial proteins. Understanding whether this further impacts the kinetics of peptide release during gastrointestinal digestion of human milk was the aim of the present paper. Mature raw (RHM) or pasteurized (PHM) human milk were digested (RHM, n = 2; PHM, n = 3) by an in vitro dynamic system (term stage). Label-free quantitative peptidomics was performed on milk and digesta (ten time points). Ascending hierarchical clustering was conducted on "Pasteurization × Digestion time" interaction coefficients. Preproteolysis occurred in human milk (159 unique peptides; RHM: 91, PHM: 151), mostly on β-casein (88% of the endogenous peptides). The predicted cleavage number increased with pasteurization, potentially through plasmin activation (plasmin cleavages: RHM, 53; PHM, 76). During digestion, eight clusters resumed 1054 peptides from RHM and PHM, originating for 49% of them from β-casein. For seven clusters (57% of peptides), the kinetics of peptide release differed between RHM and PHM. The parent protein was significantly linked to the clustering (p-value = 1.4 E-09), with β-casein and lactoferrin associated to clusters in an opposite manner. Pasteurization impacted selectively gastric and intestinal kinetics of peptide release in term newborns, which may have further nutritional consequences. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Kinetic theory and transport phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Soto, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    This textbook presents kinetic theory, which is a systematic approach to describing nonequilibrium systems. The text is balanced between the fundamental concepts of kinetic theory (irreversibility, transport processes, separation of time scales, conservations, coarse graining, distribution functions, etc.) and the results and predictions of the theory, where the relevant properties of different systems are computed. The book is organised in thematic chapters where different paradigmatic systems are studied. The specific features of these systems are described, building and analysing the appropriate kinetic equations. Specifically, the book considers the classical transport of charges, the dynamics of classical gases, Brownian motion, plasmas, and self-gravitating systems, quantum gases, the electronic transport in solids and, finally, semiconductors. Besides these systems that are studied in detail, concepts are applied to some modern examples including the quark–gluon plasma, the motion of bacterial suspen...

  5. Tracer kinetic modelling of tumour angiogenesis based on dynamic contrast-enhanced CT and MRI measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brix, Gunnar [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Medical and Occupational Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS), Abteilung fuer medizinischen und beruflichen Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Griebel, Juergen [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Medical and Occupational Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Kiessling, Fabian [RWTH-Aachen University, Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Aachen (Germany); Wenz, Frederik [University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Technical developments in both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) have helped to reduce scan times and expedited the development of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging techniques. Since the temporal change of the image signal following the administration of a diffusible, extracellular contrast agent (CA) is related to the local blood supply and the extravasation of the CA into the interstitial space, DCE imaging can be used to assess tissue microvasculature and microcirculation. It is the aim of this review to summarize the biophysical and tracer kinetic principles underlying this emerging imaging technique offering great potential for non-invasive characterization of tumour angiogenesis. In the first part, the relevant contrast mechanisms are presented that form the basis to relate signal variations measured by serial CT and MRI to local tissue concentrations of the administered CA. In the second part, the concepts most widely used for tracer kinetic modelling of concentration-time courses derived from measured DCE image data sets are described in a consistent and unified manner to highlight their particular structure and assumptions as well as the relationships among them. Finally, the concepts presented are exemplified by the analysis of representative DCE data as well as discussed with respect to present and future applications in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Depending on the specific protocol used for the acquisition of DCE image data and the particular model applied for tracer kinetic analysis of the derived concentration-time courses, different aspects of tumour angiogenesis can be quantified in terms of well-defined physiological tissue parameters. DCE imaging offers promising prospects for improved tumour diagnosis, individualization of cancer treatment as well as the evaluation of novel therapeutic concepts in preclinical and early-stage clinical trials. (orig.)

  6. Prozessentwicklung für die kontinuierliche dynamisch kinetische Racematspaltung

    OpenAIRE

    Roosen, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    A dynamic kinetic resolution is an interesting and reasonable extension for a simple kinetic resolution. Especially for the connection of an enzymatic catalysed kinetic resolution and a chemical catalysed racemisation very good results are known from literature. Common compatibility problems between both reactions and interaction between both catalysts require a long development which is a criterion of exclusion for many industrial processes. Within this thesis a reaction engineering solution...

  7. Measurement of cardiovascular function using a novel view-sharing PET reconstruction method and tracer kinetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Territo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advancements in PET instrumentation have made the non-invasive assessment of cardiovascular function in small animals a reality. The majority of small animal PET systems use stationary detector gantries, thus affording high temporal resolution imaging of cardiac function. Systems designed to maximize spatial resolution and detection sensitivity employing rotating gantry designs are suboptimal when high temporal resolution imaging is needed. To overcome this limitation, the current work developed a novel view-sharing data analysis scheme suitable for dynamic cardiac PET imaging using 18F-NaF as the tracer and tracer kinetic model analysis. This scheme was tested in a rat model of cardiovascular function where the relationship between direct transonic flow measures of cardiac output were highly correlated (f(x = 1.0216x − 24.233, R = 0.9158, p < 0.001 with the new model. Similarly, derived measures of stroke volume were also highly correlated (f(x = 0.9655x − 0.0428, R = 0.9453, p < 0.001 with the current approach. Administration of xylazine caused a statistically significant increase in stroke volume (0.32 ± 0.07 ml, p = 0.003, n = 4 and a significant decrease in both heart rate (−155 ± 7.1 beats/min, p < 0.001, n = 4 and cardiac output (−75.9 ± 23.0 ml/kg min, p = 0.01, n = 4. These findings suggest that the new sinogram binning and kinetic modeling methods produce reliable cardiac function measures suitable for longitudinal monitoring of cardiovascular function.

  8. Quasiclassical Theory of Spin Dynamics in Superfluid ^3He: Kinetic Equations in the Bulk and Spin Response of Surface Majorana States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silaev, M. A.

    2018-06-01

    We develop a theory based on the formalism of quasiclassical Green's functions to study the spin dynamics in superfluid ^3He. First, we derive kinetic equations for the spin-dependent distribution function in the bulk superfluid reproducing the results obtained earlier without quasiclassical approximation. Then, we consider spin dynamics near the surface of fully gapped ^3He-B-phase taking into account spin relaxation due to the transitions in the spectrum of localized fermionic states. The lifetimes of longitudinal and transverse spin waves are calculated taking into account the Fermi-liquid corrections which lead to a crucial modification of fermionic spectrum and spin responses.

  9. Kinetic theory for strongly coupled Coulomb systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufty, James; Wrighton, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    The calculation of dynamical properties for matter under extreme conditions is a challenging task. The popular Kubo-Greenwood model exploits elements from equilibrium density-functional theory (DFT) that allow a detailed treatment of electron correlations, but its origin is largely phenomenological; traditional kinetic theories have a more secure foundation but are limited to weak ion-electron interactions. The objective here is to show how a combination of the two evolves naturally from the short-time limit for the generator of the effective single-electron dynamics governing time correlation functions without such limitations. This provides a theoretical context for the current DFT-related approach, the Kubo-Greenwood model, while showing the nature of its corrections. The method is to calculate the short-time dynamics in the single-electron subspace for a given configuration of the ions. This differs from the usual kinetic theory approach in which an average over the ions is performed as well. In this way the effective ion-electron interaction includes strong Coulomb coupling and is shown to be determined from DFT. The correlation functions have the form of the random-phase approximation for an inhomogeneous system but with renormalized ion-electron and electron-electron potentials. The dynamic structure function, density response function, and electrical conductivity are calculated as examples. The static local field corrections in the dielectric function are identified in this way. The current analysis is limited to semiclassical electrons (quantum statistical potentials), so important quantum conditions are excluded. However, a quantization of the kinetic theory is identified for broader application while awaiting its detailed derivation.

  10. Numeric kinetic energy operators for molecules in polyspherical coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadri, Keyvan; Meyer, Hans-Dieter; Lauvergnat, David; Gatti, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    Generalized curvilinear coordinates, as, e.g., polyspherical coordinates, are in general better adapted to the resolution of the nuclear Schrödinger equation than rectilinear ones like the normal mode coordinates. However, analytical expressions of the kinetic energy operators (KEOs) for molecular systems in polyspherical coordinates may be prohibitively complicated for large systems. In this paper we propose a method to generate a KEO numerically and bring it to a form practicable for dynamical calculations. To examine the new method we calculated vibrational spectra and eigenenergies for nitrous acid (HONO) and compare it with results obtained with an exact analytical KEO derived previously [F. Richter, P. Rosmus, F. Gatti, and H.-D. Meyer, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 6072 (2004)]. In a second example we calculated π→π* photoabsorption spectrum and eigenenergies of ethene (C 2 H 4 ) and compared it with previous work [M. R. Brill, F. Gatti, D. Lauvergnat, and H.-D. Meyer, Chem. Phys. 338, 186 (2007)]. In this ethene study the dimensionality was reduced from 12 to 6 by freezing six internal coordinates. Results for both molecules show that the proposed method for obtaining an approximate KEO is reliable for dynamical calculations. The error in eigenenergies was found to be below 1 cm −1 for most states calculated.

  11. Aquatic Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Yeun; Kim, Oh Sik; Kim, Chang Guk; Park, Cheong Gil; Lee, Gwi Hyeon; Lee, Cheol Hui

    1987-07-01

    This book deals aquatic chemistry, which treats water and environment, chemical kinetics, chemical balance like dynamical characteristic, and thermodynamics, acid-base chemistry such as summary, definition, kinetics, and PH design for mixture of acid-base chemistry, complex chemistry with definition, and kinetics, precipitation and dissolution on summary, kinetics of precipitation and dissolution, and balance design oxidation and resolution with summary, balance of oxidation and resolution.

  12. Kinetics and dynamics of cyclosporine A in three hepatic cell culture systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellwon, P; Truisi, G L; Bois, Frederic Y; Wilmes, A; Schmidt, T.; Savary, C C; Parmentier, C.C.; Hewitt, P.G.; Schmal, O; Josse, R.; Richert, L.; Guillouzo, A; Mueller, S O; Jennings, P; Testai, E; Dekant, W.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro experiments have a high potential to improve current chemical safety assessment and reduce the number of animals used. However, most studies conduct hazard assessment alone, largely ignoring exposure and kinetic parameters. Therefore, in this study the kinetics of cyclosporine A (CsA) and

  13. Development and application of coupled system dynamics and game theory: A dynamic water conflict resolution method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Zomorodian

    strategies for the reservoirs using the mixed-strategy game and Markov chain methods. The two models were then evaluated against three performance indices: Reliability, Resilience and Vulnerability (R-R-V. The results showed that, while both models were well capable of dealing with conflict resolution over water resources in the Langat River basin, the second model achieved a substantially improved performance through its ability to deal with dynamicity, complexity and uncertainty in the river system.

  14. Development and application of coupled system dynamics and game theory: A dynamic water conflict resolution method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomorodian, Mehdi; Lai, Sai Hin; Homayounfar, Mehran; Ibrahim, Shaliza; Pender, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    the reservoirs using the mixed-strategy game and Markov chain methods. The two models were then evaluated against three performance indices: Reliability, Resilience and Vulnerability (R-R-V). The results showed that, while both models were well capable of dealing with conflict resolution over water resources in the Langat River basin, the second model achieved a substantially improved performance through its ability to deal with dynamicity, complexity and uncertainty in the river system.

  15. High resolution polarimeter-interferometer system for fast equilibrium dynamics and MHD instability studies on Joint-TEXT tokamak (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Zhuang, G., E-mail: ge-zhuang@hust.edu.cn; Li, Q.; Liu, Y.; Gao, L.; Zhou, Y. N.; Jian, X.; Xiong, C. Y.; Wang, Z. J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A high-performance Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system has been developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. This system has time response up to 1 μs, phase resolution < 0.1° and minimum spatial resolution ∼15 mm. High resolution permits investigation of fast equilibrium dynamics as well as magnetic and density perturbations associated with intrinsic Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) instabilities and external coil-induced Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMP). The 3-wave technique, in which the line-integrated Faraday angle and electron density are measured simultaneously by three laser beams with specific polarizations and frequency offsets, is used. In order to achieve optimum resolution, three frequency-stabilized HCOOH lasers (694 GHz, >35 mW per cavity) and sensitive Planar Schottky Diode mixers are used, providing stable intermediate-frequency signals (0.5–3 MHz) with S/N > 50. The collinear R- and L-wave probe beams, which propagate through the plasma poloidal cross section (a = 0.25–0.27 m) vertically, are expanded using parabolic mirrors to cover the entire plasma column. Sources of systematic errors, e.g., stemming from mechanical vibration, beam non-collinearity, and beam polarization distortion are individually examined and minimized to ensure measurement accuracy. Simultaneous density and Faraday measurements have been successfully achieved for 14 chords. Based on measurements, temporal evolution of safety factor profile, current density profile, and electron density profile are resolved. Core magnetic and density perturbations associated with MHD tearing instabilities are clearly detected. Effects of non-axisymmetric 3D RMP in ohmically heated plasmas are directly observed by polarimetry for the first time.

  16. Experimental research of kinetic and dynamic characteristics of temperature movements of machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, I. V.; Polyakov, A. N.

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, the urgency of informational support of machines at different stages of their life cycle is increasing in the form of various experimental characteristics that determine the criteria for working capacity. The effectiveness of forming the base of experimental characteristics of machines is related directly to the duration of their field tests. In this research, the authors consider a new technique that allows reducing the duration of full-scale testing of machines by 30%. To this end, three new indicator coefficients were calculated in real time to determine the moments corresponding to the characteristic points. In the work, new terms for thermal characteristics of machine tools are introduced: kinetic and dynamic characteristics of the temperature movements of the machine. This allow taking into account not only the experimental values for the temperature displacements of the elements of the carrier system of the machine, but also their derivatives up to the third order, inclusively. The work is based on experimental data obtained in the course of full-scale thermal tests of a drilling-milling and boring CNC machine.

  17. Satellite microwave remote sensing of North Eurasian inundation dynamics: development of coarse-resolution products and comparison with high-resolution synthetic aperture radar data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, R; Rawlins, M A; McDonald, K C; Podest, E; Zimmermann, R; Kueppers, M

    2010-01-01

    Wetlands are not only primary producers of atmospheric greenhouse gases but also possess unique features that are favourable for application of satellite microwave remote sensing to monitoring their status and trend. In this study we apply combined passive and active microwave remote sensing data sets from the NASA sensors AMSR-E and QuikSCAT to map surface water dynamics over Northern Eurasia. We demonstrate our method on the evolution of large wetland complexes for two consecutive years from January 2006 to December 2007. We apply river discharge measurements from the Ob River along with land surface runoff simulations derived from the Pan-Arctic Water Balance Model during and after snowmelt in 2006 and 2007 to interpret the abundance of widespread flooding along the River Ob in early summer of 2007 observed in the remote sensing products. The coarse-resolution, 25 km, surface water product is compared to a high-resolution, 30 m, inundation map derived from ALOS PALSAR (Advanced Land Observation Satellite phased array L-band synthetic aperture radar) imagery acquired for 11 July 2006, and extending along a transect in the central Western Siberian Plain. We found that the surface water fraction derived from the combined AMSR-E/QuikSCAT data sets closely tracks the inundation mapped using higher-resolution ALOS PALSAR data.

  18. Molecular dynamics study of the nanosized droplet spreading: The effect of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hong Min [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kondaraju, Sasidhar [Department of Mechanical Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751013 (India); Lee, Jung Shin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Youngho; Lee, Joonho H. [Samsung Electronics, Mechatronics R& D Center, Hwaseong-si, Gyeonggi-do 445-330 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon Sang, E-mail: joonlee@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Contact line forces, including friction and spreading forces are directly calculated. • Overall trends of variations in contact line forces during droplet spreading process show characteristics of contact line forces. • Detail relations of contact line forces and atomic kinetics in the contact line provide a clear evidence of the possible energy dissipation mechanism in droplet spreading process. - Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that contact line forces play an important role in the droplet spreading process. Despite their significance, the physics related to them has been studied only indirectly and the effect of contact line forces is still being disputed. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and mimicked the droplet spreading process at the nanoscale. Based on the results of the simulation, the contact line forces were directly calculated. We found that the forces acting on the bulk and the contact line region showed different trends. Distinct positive and negative forces, contact line spreading, and friction forces were observed near the contact line. We also observed a strong dependency of the atomic kinetics in the contact line region on the variations in the contact line forces. The atoms of the liquid in the contact line region lost their kinetic energy due to the contact line friction force and became partially immobile on the solid surface. The results of the current study will be useful for understanding the role of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation in the contact line region.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of the nanosized droplet spreading: The effect of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hong Min; Kondaraju, Sasidhar; Lee, Jung Shin; Suh, Youngho; Lee, Joonho H.; Lee, Joon Sang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Contact line forces, including friction and spreading forces are directly calculated. • Overall trends of variations in contact line forces during droplet spreading process show characteristics of contact line forces. • Detail relations of contact line forces and atomic kinetics in the contact line provide a clear evidence of the possible energy dissipation mechanism in droplet spreading process. - Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that contact line forces play an important role in the droplet spreading process. Despite their significance, the physics related to them has been studied only indirectly and the effect of contact line forces is still being disputed. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and mimicked the droplet spreading process at the nanoscale. Based on the results of the simulation, the contact line forces were directly calculated. We found that the forces acting on the bulk and the contact line region showed different trends. Distinct positive and negative forces, contact line spreading, and friction forces were observed near the contact line. We also observed a strong dependency of the atomic kinetics in the contact line region on the variations in the contact line forces. The atoms of the liquid in the contact line region lost their kinetic energy due to the contact line friction force and became partially immobile on the solid surface. The results of the current study will be useful for understanding the role of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation in the contact line region.

  20. Numerical solutions of the semiclassical Boltzmann ellipsoidal-statistical kinetic model equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaw-Yen; Yan, Chin-Yuan; Huang, Juan-Chen; Li, Zhihui

    2014-01-01

    Computations of rarefied gas dynamical flows governed by the semiclassical Boltzmann ellipsoidal-statistical (ES) kinetic model equation using an accurate numerical method are presented. The semiclassical ES model was derived through the maximum entropy principle and conserves not only the mass, momentum and energy, but also contains additional higher order moments that differ from the standard quantum distributions. A different decoding procedure to obtain the necessary parameters for determining the ES distribution is also devised. The numerical method in phase space combines the discrete-ordinate method in momentum space and the high-resolution shock capturing method in physical space. Numerical solutions of two-dimensional Riemann problems for two configurations covering various degrees of rarefaction are presented and various contours of the quantities unique to this new model are illustrated. When the relaxation time becomes very small, the main flow features a display similar to that of ideal quantum gas dynamics, and the present solutions are found to be consistent with existing calculations for classical gas. The effect of a parameter that permits an adjustable Prandtl number in the flow is also studied. PMID:25104904

  1. Spectroscopy and reaction kinetics of HCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yili.

    1989-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared spectrum of the C-H stretching fundamental of HCO has been studied by means of infrared flash kinetic spectroscopy. HCO was generated by flash photolysis of acetaldehyde or formaldehyde using a 308 nm (XeCl) excimer laser. The transient absorption was probed with an infrared difference frequency laser system. The high resolution spectra obtained were assigned and fitted with rotational, spin-rotational, and centrifugal distortion constants. The ν 1 band origin is 2434.48 cm/sup /minus/1/. New ground state constants have been derived from a least-squares fit combining the ν 1 data with previous microwave and FIR LMR measurements. A new set of spectroscopic constants for the (1, 0, 0) state, the equilibrium rotational constants, and the orientation of the transition dipole moment are also reported. The kinetics and product branching ratios of the HCO + NO 2 reaction have been studied using visible and infrared laser flash kinetic spectroscopy. The rate constant for the disappearance of HCO radical at 296 K is (5.7 +- 0.9) /times/ 10/sup /minus/11/ cm 3 molec/sup /minus/1/ sec/sup /minus/1/, and it is independent of the pressure of SF 6 buffer gas up to 700 torr. Less than 10% of the reaction goes through the most exothermic product channel, HNO + CO 2 . The product channel, H + CO 2 + NO, is responsible for 52% of the reaction. HONO has been observed, though not quantitatively, as a reaction product corresponding to the HONO + CO channel. 51 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs

  2. Reaction dynamics of the four-centered elimination CH2OH + --> CHO + +H2: Measurement of kinetic energy release distribution and classical trajectory calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Geol; Park, Seung C.; Kim, Myung Soo

    1996-03-01

    Mass-analyzed ion kinetic energy (MIKE) spectrum of CHO+ generated in the unimolecular dissociation of CH2OH+ was measured. Kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) was evaluated by analyzing the spectrum according to the algorithm developed previously. The average kinetic energy release evaluated from the distribution was extraordinarily large, 1.63 eV, corresponding to 75% of the reverse barrier of the reaction. A global analytical potential energy surface was constructed such that the experimental energetics was represented and that various features in the ab initio potential energy surface were closely reproduced. Classical trajectory calculation was carried out with the global analytical potential energy surface to investigate the causes for the extraordinarily large kinetic energy release. Based on the detailed dynamical calculations, it was found that the strained bending forces at the transition state and strengthening of the CO bond from double to triple bond character were mainly responsible for such a significant kinetic energy release. In addition, the dissociation products H2 and CHO+ ion were found to be rotationally excited in the trajectory calculations. This was attributed to the asymmetry of the transition state and the release of asymmetric bending forces. Also, the bending vibrational modes of CHO+ and the H2 stretching mode, which are coupled with the bending coordinates, were found to be moderately excited.

  3. Carcinoma of the uterine cervix. High-resolution turbo spin-echo MR imaging with contrast-enhanced dynamic scanning and T2-weighting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Namimoto, T.; Takahashi, M.; Katabuchi, H.; Tanaka, N.; Okamura, H.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To compare high-resolution contrast-enhanced (Gd-DTPA) dynamic MR imaging with T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) imaging in the evaluation of uterine cervical carcinoma. Material and Methods: Thirty-two patients with cervical carcinoma underwent MR imaging on a 1.5 T superconductive unit to have the extension of the disease assessed before treatment. A phased-array coil was used in all patients. In 25 patients, surgical confirmation of the diagnosis was obtained after imaging. Radiation therapy was selected for the remaining 7 patients with advanced carcinoma. Qualitative and quantitative image analyses were also performed. Results: The cervical carcinomas showed maximum contrast in the cervical stroma and myometrium in the early dynamic phase. The tumor/cervical-stroma contrast in the early dynamic phase obtained with the T1-weighted TSE technique (contrast-to-noise ratio 22.6) was significantly higher than that obtained in T2-weighted TSE imaging (contrast-to-noise ratio 4.3). In the evaluation of parametrial invasion, the accuracy of T2-weighted imaging was 71.8% and contrast-enhanced dynamic imaging 81.2%. Conclusion: High-resolution contrast-enhanced (Gd-DTPA) dynamic MR imaging in cervical cancer offers improved tumor/cervical-stroma contrast and provides useful information on parametrial invasion. (orig.)

  4. Resistivity recovery simulations of electron-irradiated iron: Kinetic Monte Carlo versus cluster dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Torre, J.; Fu, C.-C.; Willaime, F.; Barbu, A.; Bocquet, J.-L.

    2006-01-01

    The isochronal resistivity recovery in high purity α-iron irradiated by electrons was successfully reproduced by a multiscale modelling approach. The stability and mobility of small self-defect clusters determined by ab initio methods were used as input data for an event based Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model, used to explore the defect population evolution during the annealing and to extract the resistivity recovery peaks. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of using an efficient mesoscale model, the Cluster Dynamics (CD), instead of KMC in this approach. The comparison between the two methods for various CD initial conditions shows the importance of spatial correlations between defects, which are neglected in the CD model. However, using appropriate initial conditions, e.g. starting from the concentration of Frenkel pairs after the uncorrelated stage I E , the CD model captures the main characteristics of subsequent defect population evolution, and it can therefore be used for fast and semi-quantitative investigations

  5. Kinetic modeling of the effect of solids retention time on methanethiol dynamics in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dian; Strawn, Mary; Novak, John T; Wang, Zhi-Wu

    2018-07-01

    The highly volatile methanethiol (MT) with an extremely low odor threshold and distinctive putrid smell is often identified as a major odorous compound generated under anaerobic conditions. As an intermediate compound in the course of anaerobic digestion, the extent of MT emission is closely related to the time of anaerobic reaction. In this study, lab-scale anaerobic digesters were operated at solids retention time (SRTs) of 15, 20, 25, 30, 40 and 50 days to investigate the effect of SRT on MT emission. The experimental results demonstrated a bell-shaped curve of MT emission versus SRT with a peak around 20 days SRT. In order to understand this SRT effect, a kinetic model was developed to describe MT production and utilization dynamics in the course of anaerobic digestion and calibrated with the experimental results collected from this study. The model outcome revealed that the high protein content in the feed sludge together with the large maintenance coefficient of MT fermenters are responsible for the peak MT emission emergence in the range of typical SRT used for anaerobic digestion. A further analysis of the kinetic model shows that it can be extensively simplified with reasonable approximation to a form that anaerobic digestion practitioners could easily use to predict the MT and SRT relationship. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic (4D) CT perfusion offers simultaneous functional and anatomical insights into pulmonary embolism resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsadraee, Saeed, E-mail: saeed.mirsadraee@ed.ac.uk [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Reid, John H.; Connell, Martin [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); MacNee, William; Hirani, Nikhil [The Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Murchison, John T. [Department of Radiology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4SA (United Kingdom); Beek, Edwin J. van [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    Objective: Resolution and long-term functional effects of pulmonary emboli are unpredictable. This study was carried out to assess persisting vascular bed perfusion abnormalities and resolution of arterial thrombus in patients with recent pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods and materials: 26 Patients were prospectively evaluated by dynamic (4D) contrast enhanced CT perfusion dynamic pulmonary CT perfusion. Intermittent volume imaging was performed every 1.5–1.7 s during breath-hold and perfusion values were calculated by maximum-slope technique. Thrombus load (modified Miller score; MMS) and ventricular diameter were determined. Perfusion maps were visually scored and correlated with residual endoluminal filling defects. Results: The mean initial thrombus load was 13.1 ± 4.6 MMS (3–16), and 1.2 ± 2.1 MMS (0–8) at follow up. From the 24 CTPs with diagnostic quality perfusion studies, normal perfusion was observed in 7 (29%), and mildly-severely abnormal in 17 (71%). In 15 patients with no residual thrombus on follow up CTPA, normal perfusion was observed in 6, and abnormal perfusion in 9. Perfusion was abnormal in all patients with residual thrombus on follow up CTPA. Pulmonary perfusion changes were classified as reduced (n = 4), delayed (systemic circulation pattern; n = 5), and absent (no-flow; n = 5). The right ventricle was dilated in 12/25 (48%) at presentation, and normal in all 26 follow up scans. Weak correlation was found between initial ventricular dilatation and perfusion abnormality at follow up (r = 0.15). Conclusions: Most patients had substantial perfusion abnormality at 3–6 months post PE. Abnormal perfusion patterns were frequently observed in patients and in regions with no corresponding evidence of residual thrombus on CTPA. Some defects exhibit delayed, presumed systemic, enhancement (which we have termed ‘stunned’ lung). CT perfusion provides combined anatomical and functional information about PE resolution.

  7. Spatial Inhomogeneity of Kinetic and Magnetic Dissipations in Thermal Convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotta, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba university, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan)

    2017-08-20

    We investigate the inhomogeneity of kinetic and magnetic dissipations in thermal convection using high-resolution calculations. In statistically steady turbulence, the injected and dissipated energies are balanced. This means that a large amount of energy is continuously converted into internal energy via dissipation. As in thermal convection, downflows are colder than upflows and the inhomogeneity of the dissipation potentially changes the convection structure. Our investigation of the inhomogeneity of the dissipation shows the following. (1) More dissipation is seen around the bottom of the calculation domain, and this tendency is promoted with the magnetic field. (2) The dissipation in the downflow is much larger than that in the upflow. The dissipation in the downflow is more than 80% of the total at maximum. This tendency is also promoted with the magnetic field. (3) Although 2D probability density functions of the kinetic and magnetic dissipations versus the vertical velocity are similar, the kinetic and magnetic dissipations are not well correlated. Our result suggests that the spatial inhomogeneity of the dissipation is significant and should be considered when modeling a small-scale strong magnetic field generated with an efficient small-scale dynamo for low-resolution calculations.

  8. Dosimetric and qualitative analysis of kinetic properties of millennium 80 multileaf collimator system for dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj Anup

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the positional accuracy, kinetic properties of the dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC and dosimetric evaluation of fractional dose delivery for the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for step and shoot and sliding window (dynamic techniques of Varian multileaf collimator millennium 80. Various quality assurance tests such as accuracy in leaf positioning and speed, stability of dynamic MLC output, inter and intra leaf transmission, dosimetric leaf separation and multiple carriage field verification were performed. Evaluation of standard field patterns as pyramid, peaks, wedge, chair, garden fence test, picket fence test and sweeping gap output was done. Patient dose quality assurance procedure consists of an absolute dose measurement for all fields at 5 cm depth on solid water phantom using 0.6cc water proof ion chamber and relative dose verification using Kodak EDR-2 films for all treatment fields along transverse and coronal direction using IMRT phantom. The relative dose verification was performed using Omni Pro IMRT film verification software. The tests performed showed acceptable results for commissioning the millennium 80 MLC and Clinac DHX for dynamic and step and shoot IMRT treatments.

  9. 动力学视角下的冲突解决策略%A Dynamic Perspective on Conflict Resolution Strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小平

    2013-01-01

      传统的冲突解决策略是基于问题解决模型,它着眼于各方的利益关系和沟通、控制等因素在解决冲突中的作用;动力学系统模型主要从推动冲突的吸引子出发,探讨冲突演化的过程。动力学的观点认为,冲突解决的关键在于改变系统内在的动力学性质,即引发和决定冲突演化趋向的吸引子,冲突的解决策略则主要从打破系统的封闭性、改变系统的反馈环路、恢复系统的多维性、创造和激活潜在的正性吸引子等方面入手。冲突解决的最终目的是使冲突各方形成新的心理和行为模式和不同于以往的心理和社会环境。%Traditional conflict resolution strategy is based on a problem-solving model which focuses on the role played by such factors in conflict resolution as the interest relations,communication and con-trol between different parties. Unlike the problem-solving model,the dynamic system model highlights the role played by the attractor which promotes the escalation of conflict,and explores the evolutionary process of a conflict. From the dynamic perspective,the key to conflict resolution consists in changing the inherent dynamical nature of a conflict system,which means changing the attractor that initiates and determines the evolution of a conflict in time. The dynamic conflict resolution strategies involve breaking up the closed system of a conflict,changing its feedback loops,restoring the multidimension-ality of its system and creating and activating the latent attractors. The ultimate aims of conflict resolu-tion are to form a new mental and behavior pattern along with a different psychological and social envi-ronment.

  10. Dynamical influence of gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains in Antarctica: radar observations, fine-scale modelling and kinetic energy budget analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Arnault

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains (in western Droning Maud Land, Antarctica, southwest of the Finnish/Swedish Aboa/Wasa station have been observed with the Moveable atmospheric radar for Antarctica (MARA during the SWEDish Antarctic Research Programme (SWEDARP in December 2007/January 2008. These radar observations are compared with a 2-month Weather Research Forecast (WRF model experiment operated at 2 km horizontal resolution. A control simulation without orography is also operated in order to separate unambiguously the contribution of the mountain waves on the simulated atmospheric flow. This contribution is then quantified with a kinetic energy budget analysis computed in the two simulations. The results of this study confirm that mountain waves reaching lower-stratospheric heights break through convective overturning and generate inertia gravity waves with a smaller vertical wavelength, in association with a brief depletion of kinetic energy through frictional dissipation and negative vertical advection. The kinetic energy budget also shows that gravity waves have a strong influence on the other terms of the budget, i.e. horizontal advection and horizontal work of pressure forces, so evaluating the influence of gravity waves on the mean-flow with the vertical advection term alone is not sufficient, at least in this case. We finally obtain that gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains reaching lower stratospheric heights generally deplete (create kinetic energy in the lower troposphere (upper troposphere–lower stratosphere, in contradiction with the usual decelerating effect attributed to gravity waves on the zonal circulation in the upper troposphere–lower stratosphere.

  11. Modelling opinion formation by means of kinetic equations

    OpenAIRE

    Boudin , Laurent; Salvarani , Francesco

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we review some mechanisms of opinion dynamics that can be modelled by kinetic equations. Beside the sociological phenomenon of compromise, naturally linked to collisional operators of Boltzmann kind, many other aspects, already mentioned in the sociophysical literature or no, can enter in this framework. While describing some contributions appeared in the literature, we enlighten some mathematical tools of kinetic theory that can be useful in the context of sociophysics.

  12. Partial Overhaul and Initial Parallel Optimization of KINETICS, a Coupled Dynamics and Chemistry Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Howard; Willacy, Karen; Allen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    KINETICS is a coupled dynamics and chemistry atmosphere model that is data intensive and computationally demanding. The potential performance gain from using a supercomputer motivates the adaptation from a serial version to a parallelized one. Although the initial parallelization had been done, bottlenecks caused by an abundance of communication calls between processors led to an unfavorable drop in performance. Before starting on the parallel optimization process, a partial overhaul was required because a large emphasis was placed on streamlining the code for user convenience and revising the program to accommodate the new supercomputers at Caltech and JPL. After the first round of optimizations, the partial runtime was reduced by a factor of 23; however, performance gains are dependent on the size of the data, the number of processors requested, and the computer used.

  13. Vlasov simulations of kinetic Alfvén waves at proton kinetic scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vásconez, C. L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Observatorio Astronómico de Quito, Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Quito (Ecuador); Valentini, F.; Veltri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Camporeale, E. [Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Kinetic Alfvén waves represent an important subject in space plasma physics, since they are thought to play a crucial role in the development of the turbulent energy cascade in the solar wind plasma at short wavelengths (of the order of the proton gyro radius ρ{sub p} and/or inertial length d{sub p} and beyond). A full understanding of the physical mechanisms which govern the kinetic plasma dynamics at these scales can provide important clues on the problem of the turbulent dissipation and heating in collisionless systems. In this paper, hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations are employed to analyze in detail the features of the kinetic Alfvén waves at proton kinetic scales, in typical conditions of the solar wind environment (proton plasma beta β{sub p} = 1). In particular, linear and nonlinear regimes of propagation of these fluctuations have been investigated in a single-wave situation, focusing on the physical processes of collisionless Landau damping and wave-particle resonant interaction. Interestingly, since for wavelengths close to d{sub p} and β{sub p} ≃ 1 (for which ρ{sub p} ≃ d{sub p}) the kinetic Alfvén waves have small phase speed compared to the proton thermal velocity, wave-particle interaction processes produce significant deformations in the core of the particle velocity distribution, appearing as phase space vortices and resulting in flat-top velocity profiles. Moreover, as the Eulerian hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell algorithm allows for a clean almost noise-free description of the velocity space, three-dimensional plots of the proton velocity distribution help to emphasize how the plasma departs from the Maxwellian configuration of thermodynamic equilibrium due to nonlinear kinetic effects.

  14. Dynamic range broadening for photomultipliers in kinetic spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumas, V.K.

    1983-01-01

    The circuit of switching on a photomultiplier with prestage modulation developed for kinetic spectrophotometry purposes is described. Distinguishing features of the scheme are wide range of control pulse duration (40 nc - 2.5 mc) and direct transistor photostart by laser light pulse. In the case of PM prestage modulation for the second dynode modulation depth attains 400 while PM opening time constitutes 40 nc

  15. Point Genetics: A New Concept to Assess Neutron Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein Meulekamp, R.; Kuijper, J.C.; Schikorr, M.

    2005-01-01

    Point genetic equations are introduced. These equations are similar to the well-known point kinetic equations but characterize and couple individual fission generations in subcritical systems. Point genetic equations are able to describe dynamic behavior of source-driven subcritical systems on shorter timescales than is possible with point kinetic equations. Point genetic parameters can be used as a first-order characterization of the system and can be calculated using standard Monte Carlo techniques; the implementation in other calculational schemes seems straightforward. A Godiva sphere is considered to show the applicability of the point genetic equations in describing a detector response on short timescales. For this system the point genetic parameters are calculated and compared with reference calculations. Typical dynamic source behavior is considered by studying a transient in which the neutron source energy decreases from 20 to 1 MeV. For all cases studied, the point genetic equations are compared to full space-time kinetic solutions, and it is shown that point genetics performs well

  16. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Colonna, Gianpiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gorse, Claudine; Hassouni, Khaled; Laricchiuta, Annarita; Longo, Savino

    2016-01-01

    Describing non-equilibrium "cold" plasmas through a chemical physics approach, this book uses the state-to-state plasma kinetics, which considers each internal state as a new species with its own cross sections. Extended atomic and molecular master equations are coupled with Boltzmann and Monte Carlo methods to solve the electron energy distribution function. Selected examples in different applied fields, such as microelectronics, fusion, and aerospace, are presented and discussed including the self-consistent kinetics in RF parallel plate reactors, the optimization of negative ion sources and the expansion of high enthalpy flows through nozzles of different geometries. The book will cover the main aspects of the state-to-state kinetic approach for the description of nonequilibrium cold plasmas, illustrating the more recent achievements in the development of kinetic models including the self-consistent coupling of master equations and Boltzmann equation for electron dynamics. To give a complete portrayal, the...

  17. Fractional Dynamics Applications of Fractional Calculus to Dynamics of Particles, Fields and Media

    CERN Document Server

    Tarasov, Vasily E

    2010-01-01

    "Fractional Dynamics: Applications of Fractional Calculus to Dynamics of Particles, Fields and Media" presents applications of fractional calculus, integral and differential equations of non-integer orders in describing systems with long-time memory, non-local spatial and fractal properties. Mathematical models of fractal media and distributions, generalized dynamical systems and discrete maps, non-local statistical mechanics and kinetics, dynamics of open quantum systems, the hydrodynamics and electrodynamics of complex media with non-local properties and memory are considered. This book is intended to meet the needs of scientists and graduate students in physics, mechanics and applied mathematics who are interested in electrodynamics, statistical and condensed matter physics, quantum dynamics, complex media theories and kinetics, discrete maps and lattice models, and nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Dr. Vasily E. Tarasov is a Senior Research Associate at Nuclear Physics Institute of Moscow State University and...

  18. Some concepts in condensed phase chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelman, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    Some concepts in condensed phase chemical kinetics which have emerged from a recent rigorous statistical mechanical treatment of condensed phase chemical reaction dynamics (S.A. Adelman, Adv. Chem. Phys.53:61 (1983)) are discussed in simple physical terms

  19. Estimating kinetic parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted MRI of a diffusable tracer: standardized quantities and symbols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tofts, P.S.; Brix, G; Buckley, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a standard set of quantity names and symbols related to the estimation of kinetic parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging data, using diffusable agents such as gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA). These include a) the volume transfer constant K......-limited conditions K(trans) equals the blood plasma flow per unit volume of tissue; under permeability-limited conditions K(trans) equals the permeability surface area product per unit volume of tissue. We relate these quantities to previously published work from our groups; our future publications will refer...

  20. On the dynamics of k-essence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, Pedro; Mimoso, Jose P; Wands, David

    2007-01-01

    We investigate cosmological dynamics of models with higher-order corrections to the canonical (second-order) kinetic lagrangian for a scalar field, which have been termed k -essence . We study the qualitative dynamics of simple purely kinetic k-essence models and find that the simplest attempts to construct non-singular cosmological models by including higher-order terms in the kinetic lagrangian fail because of a different type of singularity where the scalar field theory becomes ill-defined

  1. Three-dimensional velocity map imaging: Setup and resolution improvement compared to three-dimensional ion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauczok, S.; Goedecke, N.; Veckenstedt, M.; Maul, C.; Gericke, K.-H.; Chichinin, A. I.

    2009-01-01

    For many years the three-dimensional (3D) ion imaging technique has not benefited from the introduction of ion optics into the field of imaging in molecular dynamics. Thus, a lower resolution of kinetic energy as in comparable techniques making use of inhomogeneous electric fields was inevitable. This was basically due to the fact that a homogeneous electric field was needed in order to obtain the velocity component in the direction of the time of flight spectrometer axis. In our approach we superimpose an Einzel lens field with the homogeneous field. We use a simulation based technique to account for the distortion of the ion cloud caused by the inhomogeneous field. In order to demonstrate the gain in kinetic energy resolution compared to conventional 3D Ion Imaging, we use the spatial distribution of H + ions emerging from the photodissociation of HCl following the two photon excitation to the V 1 Σ + state. So far a figure of merit of approximately four has been achieved, which means in absolute numbers Δv/v=0.022 compared to 0.086 at v≅17 000 m/s. However, this is not a theoretical limit of the technique, but due to our rather short TOF spectrometer (15 cm). The photodissociation of HBr near 243 nm has been used to recognize and eliminate systematic deviations between the simulation and the experimentally observed distribution. The technique has also proven to be essential for the precise measurement of translationally cold distributions.

  2. High-resolution Mapping of Permafrost and Soil Freeze/thaw Dynamics in the Tibetan Plateau Based on Multi-sensor Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Yi, Y.; Yang, K.; Kimball, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is underlain by the world's largest extent of alpine permafrost ( 2.5×106 km2), dominated by sporadic and discontinuous permafrost with strong sensitivity to climate warming. Detailed permafrost distributions and patterns in most of the TP region are still unknown due to extremely sparse in-situ observations in this region characterized by heterogeneous land cover and large temporal dynamics in surface soil moisture conditions. Therefore, satellite-based temperature and moisture observations are essential for high-resolution mapping of permafrost distribution and soil active layer changes in the TP region. In this study, we quantify the TP regional permafrost distribution at 1-km resolution using a detailed satellite data-driven soil thermal process model (GIPL2). The soil thermal model is calibrated and validated using in-situ soil temperature/moisture observations from the CAMP/Tibet field campaign (9 sites: 0-300 cm soil depth sampling from 1997-2007), a multi-scale soil moisture and temperature monitoring network in the central TP (CTP-SMTMN, 57 sites: 5-40 cm, 2010-2014) and across the whole plateau (China Meteorology Administration, 98 sites: 0-320 cm, 2000-2015). Our preliminary results using the CAMP/Tibet and CTP-SMTMN network observations indicate strong controls of surface thermal and soil moisture conditions on soil freeze/thaw dynamics, which vary greatly with underlying topography, soil texture and vegetation cover. For regional mapping of soil freeze/thaw and permafrost dynamics, we use the most recent soil moisture retrievals from the NASA SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) sensor to account for the effects of temporal soil moisture dynamics on soil thermal heat transfer, with surface thermal conditions defined by MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) land surface temperature records. Our study provides the first 1-km map of spatial patterns and recent changes of permafrost conditions in the TP.

  3. Improved Kinetic Models for High-Speed Combustion Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montgomery, C. J; Tang, Q; Sarofim, A. F; Bockelie, M. J; Gritton, J. K; Bozzelli, J. W; Gouldin, F. C; Fisher, E. M; Chakravarthy, S

    2008-01-01

    Report developed under an STTR contract. The overall goal of this STTR project has been to improve the realism of chemical kinetics in computational fluid dynamics modeling of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustors...

  4. Remotely Sensed High-Resolution Global Cloud Dynamics for Predicting Ecosystem and Biodiversity Distributions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Wilson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloud cover can influence numerous important ecological processes, including reproduction, growth, survival, and behavior, yet our assessment of its importance at the appropriate spatial scales has remained remarkably limited. If captured over a large extent yet at sufficiently fine spatial grain, cloud cover dynamics may provide key information for delineating a variety of habitat types and predicting species distributions. Here, we develop new near-global, fine-grain (≈1 km monthly cloud frequencies from 15 y of twice-daily Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS satellite images that expose spatiotemporal cloud cover dynamics of previously undocumented global complexity. We demonstrate that cloud cover varies strongly in its geographic heterogeneity and that the direct, observation-based nature of cloud-derived metrics can improve predictions of habitats, ecosystem, and species distributions with reduced spatial autocorrelation compared to commonly used interpolated climate data. These findings support the fundamental role of remote sensing as an effective lens through which to understand and globally monitor the fine-grain spatial variability of key biodiversity and ecosystem properties.

  5. Numerical simulations of subcritical reactor kinetics in thermal hydraulic transient phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J; Park, W S [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    A subcritical reactor driven by a linear proton accelerator has been considered as a nuclear waste incinerator at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Since the multiplication factor of a subcritical reactor is less than unity, to compensate exponentially decreasing fission neutrons, external neutrons form spallation reactions are essentially required for operating the reactor in its steady state. Furthermore, the profile of accelerator beam currents is very important in controlling a subcritical reactor, because the reactor power varies in accordance to the profile of external neutrons. We have developed a code system to find numerical solutions of reactor kinetics equations, which are the simplest dynamic model for controlling reactors. In a due course of our previous numerical study of point kinetics equations for critical reactors, however, we learned that the same code system can be used in studying dynamic behavior of the subcritical reactor. Our major motivation of this paper is to investigate responses of subcritical reactors for small changes in thermal hydraulic parameters. Building a thermal hydraulic model for the subcritical reactor dynamics, we performed numerical simulations for dynamic responses of the reactor based on point kinetics equations with a source term. Linearizing a set of coupled differential equations for reactor responses, we focus our research interest on dynamic responses of the reactor to variations of the thermal hydraulic parameters in transient phases. 5 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  6. Numerical simulations of subcritical reactor kinetics in thermal hydraulic transient phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J.; Park, W. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A subcritical reactor driven by a linear proton accelerator has been considered as a nuclear waste incinerator at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Since the multiplication factor of a subcritical reactor is less than unity, to compensate exponentially decreasing fission neutrons, external neutrons form spallation reactions are essentially required for operating the reactor in its steady state. Furthermore, the profile of accelerator beam currents is very important in controlling a subcritical reactor, because the reactor power varies in accordance to the profile of external neutrons. We have developed a code system to find numerical solutions of reactor kinetics equations, which are the simplest dynamic model for controlling reactors. In a due course of our previous numerical study of point kinetics equations for critical reactors, however, we learned that the same code system can be used in studying dynamic behavior of the subcritical reactor. Our major motivation of this paper is to investigate responses of subcritical reactors for small changes in thermal hydraulic parameters. Building a thermal hydraulic model for the subcritical reactor dynamics, we performed numerical simulations for dynamic responses of the reactor based on point kinetics equations with a source term. Linearizing a set of coupled differential equations for reactor responses, we focus our research interest on dynamic responses of the reactor to variations of the thermal hydraulic parameters in transient phases. 5 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  7. Direct modeling for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun

    2015-06-01

    All fluid dynamic equations are valid under their modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path and mean collision time scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and its aim is to get the accurate solution of these governing equations. Under such a CFD practice, it is hard to develop a unified scheme that covers flow physics from kinetic to hydrodynamic scales continuously because there is no such governing equation which could make a smooth transition from the Boltzmann to the NS modeling. The study of fluid dynamics needs to go beyond the traditional numerical partial differential equations. The emerging engineering applications, such as air-vehicle design for near-space flight and flow and heat transfer in micro-devices, do require further expansion of the concept of gas dynamics to a larger domain of physical reality, rather than the traditional distinguishable governing equations. At the current stage, the non-equilibrium flow physics has not yet been well explored or clearly understood due to the lack of appropriate tools. Unfortunately, under the current numerical PDE approach, it is hard to develop such a meaningful tool due to the absence of valid PDEs. In order to construct multiscale and multiphysics simulation methods similar to the modeling process of constructing the Boltzmann or the NS governing equations, the development of a numerical algorithm should be based on the first principle of physical modeling. In this paper, instead of following the traditional numerical PDE path, we introduce direct modeling as a principle for CFD algorithm development. Since all computations are conducted in a discretized space with limited cell resolution, the flow physics to be modeled has to be done in the mesh size and time step scales. Here, the CFD is more or less a direct

  8. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  9. Principles of magnetoplasma dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    A self-contained account is given of magnetoplasma dynamics covering fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, particle dynamics and electromagnetism. The six chapter headings are, basic concepts, magnetohydrodynamics, dynamics of charged particles, transport in a magnetoplasma, magnetoplasma shock waves, and transport in tokamaks. There are 231 references. (U.K.)

  10. Study the oxidation kinetics of uranium using XRD and Rietveld method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanzhi; Guan, Weijun; Wang, Qinguo; Wang, Xiaolin; Lai, Xinchun; Shuai, Maobing

    2010-03-01

    The surface oxidation of uranium metal has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld method in the range of 50~300°C in air. The oxidation processes are analyzed by XRD to determine the extent of surface oxidation and the oxide structure. The dynamics expression for the formation of UO2 was derived. At the beginning, the dynamic expression was nonlinear, but switched to linear subsequently for uranium in air and humid oxygen. That is, the growth kinetics of UO2 can be divided into two stages: nonlinear portion and linear portion. Using the kinetic data of linear portion, the activation energy of reaction between uranium and air was calculated about 46.0 kJ/mol. However the content of oxide as a function of time was linear in humid helium ambience. Contrast the dynamics results, it prove that the absence of oxygen would accelerate the corrosion rate of uranium in the humid gas. We can find that the XRD and Rietveld method are a useful convenient method to estimate the kinetics and thermodynamics of solid-gas reaction.

  11. Dynamic MR mammography: multidimensional visualization of contrast enhancement in virtual reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englmeier, K.-H.; Siebert, M.; Griebel, J.; Lucht, R.; Brix, G.; Knopp, M.

    2000-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was the development of a method for fast and efficient analysis of dynamic MR images of the female breast. The image data sets were acquired with a saturation-recovery turbo-FLASH sequence which enables the detection of the kinetics of the contrast agent concentration in the whole breast with a high temporal and spatial resolution. In addition, a morphologic 3D-FLASH data set was acquired. Methods: The dynamic image datasets were analyzed by a pharmacokinetic model which enables the representation of the relevant functional tissue information by two parameters. In order to display simultaneously morphologic and functional tissue information, we developed a multidimensional visualization system, which enables a practical and intuitive human-computer interface in virtual reality. Discussions: The developed system allows the fast and efficient analysis of dynamic MR data sets. An important clinical application is the localization and definition of multiple lesions of the female breast. (orig.) [de

  12. omega-Amino acid:pyruvate transaminase from Alcaligenes denitrificans Y2k-2: a new catalyst for kinetic resolution of beta-amino acids and amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyungdon; Lim, Seongyop; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2004-04-01

    Alcaligenes denitrificans Y2k-2 was obtained by selective enrichment followed by screening from soil samples, which showed omega-amino acid:pyruvate transaminase activity, to kinetically resolve aliphatic beta-amino acid, and the corresponding structural gene (aptA) was cloned. The gene was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 by using an isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible pET expression system (9.6 U/mg), and the recombinant AptA was purified to show a specific activity of 77.2 U/mg for L-beta-amino-n-butyric acid (L-beta-ABA). The enzyme converts various beta-amino acids and amines to the corresponding beta-keto acids and ketones by using pyruvate as an amine acceptor. The apparent K(m) and V(max) for L-beta-ABA were 56 mM and 500 U/mg, respectively, in the presence of 10 mM pyruvate. In the presence of 10 mM L-beta-ABA, the apparent K(m) and V(max) for pyruvate were 11 mM and 370 U/mg, respectively. The enzyme exhibits high stereoselectivity (E > 80) in the kinetic resolution of 50 mM D,L-beta-ABA, producing optically pure D-beta-ABA (99% enantiomeric excess) with 53% conversion.

  13. ω-Amino Acid:Pyruvate Transaminase from Alcaligenes denitrificans Y2k-2: a New Catalyst for Kinetic Resolution of β-Amino Acids and Amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyungdon; Lim, Seongyop; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2004-01-01

    Alcaligenes denitrificans Y2k-2 was obtained by selective enrichment followed by screening from soil samples, which showed ω-amino acid:pyruvate transaminase activity, to kinetically resolve aliphatic β-amino acid, and the corresponding structural gene (aptA) was cloned. The gene was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 by using an isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible pET expression system (9.6 U/mg), and the recombinant AptA was purified to show a specific activity of 77.2 U/mg for l-β-amino-n-butyric acid (l-β-ABA). The enzyme converts various β-amino acids and amines to the corresponding β-keto acids and ketones by using pyruvate as an amine acceptor. The apparent Km and Vmax for l-β-ABA were 56 mM and 500 U/mg, respectively, in the presence of 10 mM pyruvate. In the presence of 10 mM l-β-ABA, the apparent Km and Vmax for pyruvate were 11 mM and 370 U/mg, respectively. The enzyme exhibits high stereoselectivity (E > 80) in the kinetic resolution of 50 mM d,l-β-ABA, producing optically pure d-β-ABA (99% enantiomeric excess) with 53% conversion. PMID:15066855

  14. Recrystallization of deformed copper - kinetics and microstructural evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Fengxiang

    The objective of this study is to investigate the recrystallization kinetics and microstructural evolution in copper deformed to high strains, including copper deformed by cold-rolling and copper deformed by dynamic plastic deformation (DPD). Various characterization techniques were used, including...... electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), Vickers hardness test, 3D X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). For the cold-rolled samples, a series of initial parameters was investigated for their effects on the recrystallization kinetics and textures, including initial grain...

  15. Improved High Resolution Models of Subduction Dynamics: Use of transversely isotropic viscosity with a free-surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Gurnis, M.; Stadler, G.; Rudi, J.; Ratnaswamy, V.; Ghattas, O.

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic topography, or uncompensated topography, is controlled by internal dynamics, and provide constraints on the buoyancy structure and rheological parameters in the mantle. Compared with other surface manifestations such as the geoid, dynamic topography is very sensitive to shallower and more regional mantle structure. For example, the significant dynamic topography above the subduction zone potentially provides a rich mine for inferring the rheological and mechanical properties such as plate coupling, flow, and lateral viscosity variations, all critical in plate tectonics. However, employing subduction zone topography in the inversion study requires that we have a better understanding of the topography from forward models, especially the influence of the viscosity formulation, numerical resolution, and other factors. One common approach to formulating a fault between the subducted slab and the overriding plates in viscous flow models assumes a thin weak zone. However, due to the large lateral variation in viscosity, topography from free-slip numerical models typically has artificially large magnitude as well as high-frequency undulations over subduction zone, which adds to the difficulty in making comparisons between model results and observations. In this study, we formulate a weak zone with the transversely isotropic viscosity (TI) where the tangential viscosity is much smaller than the viscosity in the normal direction. Similar with isotropic weak zone models, TI models effectively decouple subducted slabs from the overriding plates. However, we find that the topography in TI models is largely reduced compared with that in weak zone models assuming an isotropic viscosity. Moreover, the artificial `tooth paste' squeezing effect observed in isotropic weak zone models vanishes in TI models, although the difference becomes less significant when the dip angle is small. We also implement a free-surface condition in our numerical models, which has a smoothing

  16. Feedback-controlled electro-kinetic traps for single-molecule ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-11

    Jan 11, 2014 ... limited residence time of a given molecule within the detection volume. A common ... information on individual folding pathways, as well as to the internal dynamics between ..... Essentials for building an electro-kinetic trap.

  17. Studies in Chemical Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabitz, Herschel; Ho, Tak-San

    2003-01-01

    This final report draws together the research carried from February, 1986 through January, 2003 concerning a series of topics in chemical dynamics. The specific areas of study include molecular collisions, chemical kinetics, data inversion to extract potential energy surfaces, and model reduction of complex kinetic systems

  18. Kinetic mechanism for modeling of electrochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenka, Petr; Hrdlička, Jiří; Přibyl, Michal; Snita, Dalimil

    2012-04-01

    We propose a kinetic mechanism of electrochemical interactions. We assume fast formation and recombination of electron donors D- and acceptors A+ on electrode surfaces. These mediators are continuously formed in the electrode matter by thermal fluctuations. The mediators D- and A+, chemically equivalent to the electrode metal, enter electrochemical interactions on the electrode surfaces. Electrochemical dynamics and current-voltage characteristics of a selected electrochemical system are studied. Our results are in good qualitative agreement with those given by the classical Butler-Volmer kinetics. The proposed model can be used to study fast electrochemical processes in microsystems and nanosystems that are often out of the thermal equilibrium. Moreover, the kinetic mechanism operates only with the surface concentrations of chemical reactants and local electric potentials, which facilitates the study of electrochemical systems with indefinable bulk.

  19. Determination of kinetic coefficients for proton-nucleus collisions at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzato, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    From the effective proton dynamics, the approximations in the context of high energy collisions which lead to the Boltzmann equation, are established. From this equation, general expressions for the kinetic coefficients are deduced. Using a simple model, analytical expressions for kinetic coefficients are obtained. The importance of the effect of Pauli blocking is also shown. (author) [pt

  20. Kinetic Study of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation in Continuous Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Edward A.; Mesbah, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by clostridia has shown promise for industrial-scale production of biobutanol. However, the continuous ABE fermentation suffers from low product yield, titer, and productivity. Systems analysis of the continuous ABE fermentation will offer insights into its metabolic pathway as well as into optimal fermentation design and operation. For the ABE fermentation in continuous Clostridium acetobutylicum culture, this paper presents a kinetic model that includes the effects of key metabolic intermediates and enzymes as well as culture pH, product inhibition, and glucose inhibition. The kinetic model is used for elucidating the behavior of the ABE fermentation under the conditions that are most relevant to continuous cultures. To this end, dynamic sensitivity analysis is performed to systematically investigate the effects of culture conditions, reaction kinetics, and enzymes on the dynamics of the ABE production pathway. The analysis provides guidance for future metabolic engineering and fermentation optimization studies. PMID:27486663

  1. Vacuum FTIR Observation on the Dynamic Hygroscopicity of Aerosols under Pulsed Relative Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chun-Bo; Pang, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yun; Cai, Chen; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2015-08-04

    A novel approach based on a combination of a pulse RH controlling system and a rapid scan vacuum FTIR spectrometer (PRHCS-RSVFTIR) was utilized to investigate dynamic hygroscopicity of two atmospheric aerosols: ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) and magnesium sulfate (MgSO4). In this approach, rapid-scan infrared spectra of water vapor and aerosols were obtained to determine relative humidity (RH) in sample cell and hygroscopic property of aerosols with a subsecond time resolution. Heterogeneous nucleation rates of (NH4)2SO4 were, for the first time, measured under low RH conditions (nucleation kinetics of liquid aerosols.

  2. High-resolution regional climate model evaluation using variable-resolution CESM over California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X.; Rhoades, A.; Ullrich, P. A.; Zarzycki, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the effect of climate change at regional scales remains a topic of intensive research. Though computational constraints remain a problem, high horizontal resolution is needed to represent topographic forcing, which is a significant driver of local climate variability. Although regional climate models (RCMs) have traditionally been used at these scales, variable-resolution global climate models (VRGCMs) have recently arisen as an alternative for studying regional weather and climate allowing two-way interaction between these domains without the need for nudging. In this study, the recently developed variable-resolution option within the Community Earth System Model (CESM) is assessed for long-term regional climate modeling over California. Our variable-resolution simulations will focus on relatively high resolutions for climate assessment, namely 28km and 14km regional resolution, which are much more typical for dynamically downscaled studies. For comparison with the more widely used RCM method, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model will be used for simulations at 27km and 9km. All simulations use the AMIP (Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project) protocols. The time period is from 1979-01-01 to 2005-12-31 (UTC), and year 1979 was discarded as spin up time. The mean climatology across California's diverse climate zones, including temperature and precipitation, is analyzed and contrasted with the Weather Research and Forcasting (WRF) model (as a traditional RCM), regional reanalysis, gridded observational datasets and uniform high-resolution CESM at 0.25 degree with the finite volume (FV) dynamical core. The results show that variable-resolution CESM is competitive in representing regional climatology on both annual and seasonal time scales. This assessment adds value to the use of VRGCMs for projecting climate change over the coming century and improve our understanding of both past and future regional climate related to fine

  3. Thermal contact through a two-temperature kinetic Ising chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M.; Cornu, F.

    2018-05-01

    We consider a model for thermal contact through a diathermal interface between two macroscopic bodies at different temperatures: an Ising spin chain with nearest neighbor interactions is endowed with a Glauber dynamics with different temperatures and kinetic parameters on alternating sites. The inhomogeneity of the kinetic parameter is a novelty with respect to the model of Racz and Zia (1994 Phys. Rev. E 49 139), and we exhibit its influence upon the stationary non equilibrium values of the two-spin correlations at any distance. By mapping to the dynamics of spin domain walls and using free fermion techniques, we determine the scaled generating function for the cumulants of the exchanged heat amounts per unit of time in the long time limit.

  4. Development of a Procedure to Apply Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms to CFD Simulations as Post Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth-Rasmussen, Martin Skov; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker

    2003-01-01

    mechanism. It involves post-processing of data extracted from computational fluid dynamics simulations. Application of this approach successfully describes combustion chemistry in a standard swirl burner, the so-called Harwell furnace. Nevertheless, it needs validation against more complex combustion models......It is desired to make detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms applicable to the complex geometries of practical combustion devices simulated with computational fluid dynamics tools. This work presents a novel general approach to combining computational fluid dynamics and a detailed chemical kinetic...

  5. [Dynamic MR mammography. Multidimensional visualization of contrast medium enhancement in virtual reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englmeier, K H; Griebel, J; Lucht, R; Knopp, M; Siebert, M; Brix, G

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this study was the development of a method for fast and efficient analysis of dynamic MR images of the female breast. The image data sets were acquired with a saturation-recovery turbo-FLASH sequence which enables the detection of the kinetics of the contrast agent concentration in the whole breast with a high temporal and spatial resolution. In addition, a morphologic 3D-FLASH data set was acquired. The dynamic image datasets were analyzed by a pharmacokinetic model which enables the representation of the relevant functional tissue information by two parameters. In order to display simultaneously morphologic and functional tissue information, we developed a multidimensional visualization system, which enables a practical and intuitive human-computer interface in virtual reality. The developed system allows the fast and efficient analysis of dynamic MR data sets. An important clinical application is the localization and definition of multiple lesions of the female breast.

  6. Development of the Atomic-Resolution Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gai, Pratibha L.; Boyes, Edward D.; Yoshida, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    The development of the novel atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope (atomic-resolution ETEM) for directly probing dynamic gas–solid reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions consisting of gas environment and elevated temperatures is descr......The development of the novel atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope (atomic-resolution ETEM) for directly probing dynamic gas–solid reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions consisting of gas environment and elevated temperatures...... is used to study steels, graphene, nanowires, etc. In this chapter, the experimental setup of the microscope column and its peripherals are described....

  7. A High-Resolution Sensor Network for Monitoring Glacier Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, S.; Murray, T.; O'Farrell, T.; Rutt, I. C.; Loskot, P.; Martin, I.; Selmes, N.; Aspey, R.; James, T.; Bevan, S. L.; Baugé, T.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets due to ice flow/ice-berg calving are a major uncertainty affecting sea-level rise forecasts. Latterly GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) have been employed extensively to monitor such glacier dynamics. Until recently however, the favoured methodology has been to deploy sensors onto the glacier surface, collect data for a period of time, then retrieve and download the sensors. This approach works well in less dynamic environments where the risk of sensor loss is low. In more extreme environments e.g. approaching the glacial calving front, the risk of sensor loss and hence data loss increases dramatically. In order to provide glaciologists with new insights into flow dynamics and calving processes we have developed a novel sensor network to increase the robustness of data capture. We present details of the technological requirements for an in-situ Zigbee wireless streaming network infrastructure supporting instantaneous data acquisition from high resolution GNSS sensors thereby increasing data capture robustness. The data obtained offers new opportunities to investigate the interdependence of mass flow, uplift, velocity and geometry and the network architecture has been specifically designed for deployment by helicopter close to the calving front to yield unprecedented detailed information. Following successful field trials of a pilot three node network during 2012, a larger 20 node network was deployed on the fast-flowing Helheim glacier, south-east Greenland over the summer months of 2013. The utilisation of dual wireless transceivers in each glacier node, multiple frequencies and four ';collector' stations located on the valley sides creates overlapping networks providing enhanced capacity, diversity and redundancy of data 'back-haul', even close to ';floor' RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indication) levels around -100 dBm. Data loss through radio packet collisions within sub-networks are avoided through the

  8. Kinetic Constrained Optimization of the Golf Swing Hub Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Nesbit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study details an optimization of the golf swing, where the hand path and club angular trajectories are manipulated. The optimization goal was to maximize club head velocity at impact within the interaction kinetic limitations (force, torque, work, and power of the golfer as determined through the analysis of a typical swing using a two-dimensional dynamic model. The study was applied to four subjects with diverse swing capabilities and styles. It was determined that it is possible for all subjects to increase their club head velocity at impact within their respective kinetic limitations through combined modifications to their respective hand path and club angular trajectories. The manner of the modifications, the degree of velocity improvement, the amount of kinetic reduction, and the associated kinetic limitation quantities were subject dependent. By artificially minimizing selected kinetic inputs within the optimization algorithm, it was possible to identify swing trajectory characteristics that indicated relative kinetic weaknesses of a subject. Practical implications are offered based upon the findings of the study.

  9. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy of spins: Magnetization dynamics in thin magnetic films with spatio-temporal resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpene, E.; Mancini, E.; Dallera, C.; Puppin, E.; De Silvestri, S.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE), we have developed an experimental set-up that allows us to fully characterize the magnetization dynamics in thin magnetic films by measuring all three real space components of the magnetization vector M. By means of the pump-probe technique it is possible to extract the time dependence of each individual projection with sub-picosecond resolution. This method has been exploited to investigate the temporal evolution of the magnetization (modulus and orientation) induced by an ultrashort laser pulse in thin epitaxial iron films. According to our results, we deduced that the initial, sub-picosecond demagnetization is established at the electronic level through electron-magnon excitations. The subsequent dynamics is characterized by a precessional motion on the 100 ps time scale, around an effective, time-dependent magnetic field. Following the full dynamics of M, the temporal evolution of the magneto-crystalline anisotropy constant can be unambiguously determined, providing the experimental evidence that the precession is triggered by the rapid, optically-induced misalignment between the magnetization vector and the effective magnetic field. These results suggest a possible pathway toward the ultrarapid switching of the magnetization.

  10. Technique development of 3D dynamic CS-EPSI for hyperpolarized 13 C pyruvate MR molecular imaging of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Larson, Peder E Z; Gordon, Jeremy W; Bok, Robert A; Ferrone, Marcus; van Criekinge, Mark; Carvajal, Lucas; Cao, Peng; Pauly, John M; Kerr, Adam B; Park, Ilwoo; Slater, James B; Nelson, Sarah J; Munster, Pamela N; Aggarwal, Rahul; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2018-03-25

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new 3D dynamic carbon-13 compressed sensing echoplanar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) MR sequence and test it in phantoms, animal models, and then in prostate cancer patients to image the metabolic conversion of hyperpolarized [1- 13 C]pyruvate to [1- 13 C]lactate with whole gland coverage at high spatial and temporal resolution. A 3D dynamic compressed sensing (CS)-EPSI sequence with spectral-spatial excitation was designed to meet the required spatial coverage, time and spatial resolution, and RF limitations of the 3T MR scanner for its clinical translation for prostate cancer patient imaging. After phantom testing, animal studies were performed in rats and transgenic mice with prostate cancers. For patient studies, a GE SPINlab polarizer (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) was used to produce hyperpolarized sterile GMP [1- 13 C]pyruvate. 3D dynamic 13 C CS-EPSI data were acquired starting 5 s after injection throughout the gland with a spatial resolution of 0.5 cm 3 , 18 time frames, 2-s temporal resolution, and 36 s total acquisition time. Through preclinical testing, the 3D CS-EPSI sequence developed in this project was shown to provide the desired spectral, temporal, and spatial 5D HP 13 C MR data. In human studies, the 3D dynamic HP CS-EPSI approach provided first-ever simultaneously volumetric and dynamic images of the LDH-catalyzed conversion of [1- 13 C]pyruvate to [1- 13 C]lactate in a biopsy-proven prostate cancer patient with full gland coverage. The results demonstrate the feasibility to characterize prostate cancer metabolism in animals, and now patients using this new 3D dynamic HP MR technique to measure k PL , the kinetic rate constant of [1- 13 C]pyruvate to [1- 13 C]lactate conversion. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Controlling laser-induced jet formation for bioprinting mesenchymal stem cells with high viability and high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Muhammad; Pages, Emeline; Ducom, Alexandre; Fontaine, Aurelien; Guillemot, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Laser-assisted bioprinting is a versatile, non-contact, nozzle-free printing technique which has demonstrated high potential for cell printing with high resolution. Improving cell viability requires determining printing conditions which minimize shear stress for cells within the jet and cell impact at droplet landing. In this context, this study deals with laser-induced jet dynamics to determine conditions from which jets arise with minimum kinetic energies. The transition from a sub-threshold regime to jetting regime has been associated with a geometrical parameter (vertex angle) which can be harnessed to print mesenchymal stem cells with high viability using slow jet conditions. Finally, hydrodynamic jet stability is also studied for higher laser pulse energies which give rise to supersonic but turbulent jets. (paper)

  12. Ultrafast Ge-Te bond dynamics in a phase-change superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestuto, Marco; Caretta, Antonio; Casarin, Barbara; Cilento, Federico; Dell'Angela, Martina; Fausti, Daniele; Calarco, Raffaella; Kooi, Bart J.; Varesi, Enrico; Robertson, John; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2016-09-01

    A long-standing question for avant-garde data storage technology concerns the nature of the ultrafast photoinduced phase transformations in the wide class of chalcogenide phase-change materials (PCMs). Overall, a comprehensive understanding of the microstructural evolution and the relevant kinetics mechanisms accompanying the out-of-equilibrium phases is still missing. Here, after overheating a phase-change chalcogenide superlattice by an ultrafast laser pulse, we indirectly track the lattice relaxation by time resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy (tr-XAS) with a sub-ns time resolution. The approach to the tr-XAS experimental results reported in this work provides an atomistic insight of the mechanism that takes place during the cooling process; meanwhile a first-principles model mimicking the microscopic distortions accounts for a straightforward representation of the observed dynamics. Finally, we envisage that our approach can be applied in future studies addressing the role of dynamical structural strain in PCMs.

  13. Introduction to dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    This concise textbook for students preferably of a postgraduate level, but also for engineers in practice, contains the basic kinematical and kinetic structures of dynamics together with carefully selected applications. The book is a condensed introduction to the fundamental laws of kinematics and kinetics, on the most important principles of mechanics and presents the equations of motion in the form of Lagrange and Newton-Euler. Selected problems of linear and nonlinear dynamics are treated, as well as problems of vibration formation. The presented selection of topics gives a useful basis for stepping into more advanced problems of dynamics. The contents of this book represent the result of a regularly revised course, which has been and still is given for masters students at the Technische Universität München. .

  14. Spectral methods in chemistry and physics applications to kinetic theory and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Shizgal, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    This book is a pedagogical presentation of the application of spectral and pseudospectral methods to kinetic theory and quantum mechanics. There are additional applications to astrophysics, engineering, biology and many other fields. The main objective of this book is to provide the basic concepts to enable the use of spectral and pseudospectral methods to solve problems in diverse fields of interest and to a wide audience. While spectral methods are generally based on Fourier Series or Chebychev polynomials, non-classical polynomials and associated quadratures are used for many of the applications presented in the book. Fourier series methods are summarized with a discussion of the resolution of the Gibbs phenomenon. Classical and non-classical quadratures are used for the evaluation of integrals in reaction dynamics including nuclear fusion, radial integrals in density functional theory, in elastic scattering theory and other applications. The subject matter includes the calculation of transport coefficient...

  15. Absorption Spectroscopy, Molecular Dynamics Calculations, and Multivariate Curve Resolution on the Phthalocyanine Aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajloo, Davood; Ghadamgahi, Maryam; Shaheri, Freshte; Zarei, Kobra [Damghan Univ., Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Co(II)-tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine (CoTSP) is known to be aggregated to dimer at high concentration levels in water. A study on the aggregation of CoTSP using multivariate curve resolution analysis of the visible absorbance spectra over a concentration range of 30, 40 and 50 μM in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl formamide (DMF), acetonitrile (AN) and ethanol (EtOH) in the concentration range of 0 to 3.57 M is conducted. A hard modeling-based multivariate curve resolution method was applied to determine the dissociation constants of the CoTSP aggregates at various temperatures ranging from 25, 45 and 65 .deg. C and in the presence of various co-solvents. Dissociation constant for aggregation was increased and then decrease by temperature and concentration of phthalocyanine, respectively. Utilizing the vant Hoff relation, the enthalpy and entropy of the dissociation equilibriums were calculated. For the dissociation of both aggregates, the enthalpy and entropy changes were positive and negative, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulation of cosolvent effect on CoTSP aggregation was done to confirm spectroscopy results. Results of radial distribution function (RDF), root mean square deviation (RMSD) and distance curves confirmed more effect of polar solvent to decrease monomer formation.

  16. Absorption Spectroscopy, Molecular Dynamics Calculations, and Multivariate Curve Resolution on the Phthalocyanine Aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajloo, Davood; Ghadamgahi, Maryam; Shaheri, Freshte; Zarei, Kobra

    2014-01-01

    Co(II)-tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine (CoTSP) is known to be aggregated to dimer at high concentration levels in water. A study on the aggregation of CoTSP using multivariate curve resolution analysis of the visible absorbance spectra over a concentration range of 30, 40 and 50 μM in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl formamide (DMF), acetonitrile (AN) and ethanol (EtOH) in the concentration range of 0 to 3.57 M is conducted. A hard modeling-based multivariate curve resolution method was applied to determine the dissociation constants of the CoTSP aggregates at various temperatures ranging from 25, 45 and 65 .deg. C and in the presence of various co-solvents. Dissociation constant for aggregation was increased and then decrease by temperature and concentration of phthalocyanine, respectively. Utilizing the vant Hoff relation, the enthalpy and entropy of the dissociation equilibriums were calculated. For the dissociation of both aggregates, the enthalpy and entropy changes were positive and negative, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulation of cosolvent effect on CoTSP aggregation was done to confirm spectroscopy results. Results of radial distribution function (RDF), root mean square deviation (RMSD) and distance curves confirmed more effect of polar solvent to decrease monomer formation

  17. Derivation of kinetic coefficients by atomistic methods for studying defect behavior in Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insepov, Z.; Rest, J.; Yacout, A.M.; Kuksin, A.Yu.; Norman, G.E.; Stegailov, V.V.; Starikov, S.V.; Yanilkin, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A multiscale concept couples molecular dynamics (MD) with ab initio and kinetic rate theory. ► Evolution of a system of self-interstitial atoms and vacancies in Mo is studied by MD. ► Formation of di-SIA clusters and SIA–vacancy recombination is analyzed. ► 1D diffusion of self-interstitials at various temperature and defect concentrations were studied. ► This paper provides a powerful predictive tool for simulating irradiation of nuclear materials. - Abstract: A multiscale concept for irradiated materials simulation is formulated based on coupling molecular dynamics simulations (MD) where the potential was obtained from ab initio data of energies of the basic defect structures, with kinetic mesoscale models. The evolution of a system containing self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and vacancies in crystalline molybdenum is investigated by means of MD. The kinetics of formation of di-SIA clusters and SIA–vacancy recombination is analyzed via approaches used in the kinetic theory of radiation ageing. The effects of 1D diffusion of SIAs, temperature, and defect concentrations on the reaction rates are also studied. This approach can validate both the kinetic mechanisms and the appropriate kinetic coefficients, offering the potential to significantly reduce the uncertainty of the kinetic methodology and providing a powerful predictive tool for simulating irradiation behavior of nuclear materials.

  18. Instrumentation for millisecond-resolution scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, G.B.; Ludwig, K.F. Jr.; Jordan-Sweet, J.L.; Brauer, S.; Mainville, J.; Yang, Y.S.; Sutton, M.

    1989-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray scattering studies of phase transition kinetics have been carried out using the wide-bandpass monochromator and fast linear position-sensitive detector system at the IBM/MIT beamline X-20C at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). We report here on the instrumentation that has been developed for these studies, and in particular on the methods used to measure, change, and control sample temperature with millisecond resolution

  19. Experimental evidence of the role of viscosity in the molecular kinetic theory of dynamic wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvivier, D; Seveno, D; Rioboo, R; Blake, T D; De Coninck, J

    2011-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the dynamics of spontaneous spreading of aqueous glycerol drops on glass. For a range of glycerol concentrations, we follow the evolution of the radius and contact angle over several decades of time and investigate the influence of solution viscosity. The application of the molecular kinetic theory to the resulting data allows us to extract the coefficient of contact-line friction ζ, the molecular jump frequency κ(0), and the jump length λ for each solution. Our results show that the modified theory, which explicitly accounts for the effect of viscosity, can successfully be applied to droplet spreading. The viscosity affects the jump frequency but not the jump length. In combining these data, we confirm that the contact-line friction of the solution/air interface against the glass is proportional to the viscosity and exponentially dependent on the work of adhesion.

  20. Study the oxidation kinetics of uranium using XRD and Rietveld method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yanzhi; Guan Weijun; Wang Qinguo; Wang Xiaolin; Lai Xinchun; Shuai Maobing, E-mail: yanzhizh@163.com [China Academy of Engineering Physics, PO Box 919-71, Mianyang, Sichuan, 621900 (China)

    2010-03-15

    The surface oxidation of uranium metal has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld method in the range of 50{approx}300deg. C in air. The oxidation processes are analyzed by XRD to determine the extent of surface oxidation and the oxide structure. The dynamics expression for the formation of UO{sub 2} was derived. At the beginning, the dynamic expression was nonlinear, but switched to linear subsequently for uranium in air and humid oxygen. That is, the growth kinetics of UO{sub 2} can be divided into two stages: nonlinear portion and linear portion. Using the kinetic data of linear portion, the activation energy of reaction between uranium and air was calculated about 46.0 kJ/mol. However the content of oxide as a function of time was linear in humid helium ambience. Contrast the dynamics results, it prove that the absence of oxygen would accelerate the corrosion rate of uranium in the humid gas. We can find that the XRD and Rietveld method are a useful convenient method to estimate the kinetics and thermodynamics of solid-gas reaction.

  1. Evaluations of high-resolution dynamically downscaled ensembles over the contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobel, Zachary; Wang, Jiali; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Kotamarthi, V. Rao

    2018-02-01

    This study uses Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model to evaluate the performance of six dynamical downscaled decadal historical simulations with 12-km resolution for a large domain (7200 × 6180 km) that covers most of North America. The initial and boundary conditions are from three global climate models (GCMs) and one reanalysis data. The GCMs employed in this study are the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Earth System Model with Generalized Ocean Layer Dynamics component, Community Climate System Model, version 4, and the Hadley Centre Global Environment Model, version 2-Earth System. The reanalysis data is from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-US. Department of Energy Reanalysis II. We analyze the effects of bias correcting, the lateral boundary conditions and the effects of spectral nudging. We evaluate the model performance for seven surface variables and four upper atmospheric variables based on their climatology and extremes for seven subregions across the United States. The results indicate that the simulation's performance depends on both location and the features/variable being tested. We find that the use of bias correction and/or nudging is beneficial in many situations, but employing these when running the RCM is not always an improvement when compared to the reference data. The use of an ensemble mean and median leads to a better performance in measuring the climatology, while it is significantly biased for the extremes, showing much larger differences than individual GCM driven model simulations from the reference data. This study provides a comprehensive evaluation of these historical model runs in order to make informed decisions when making future projections.

  2. Supporting interpretation of dynamic simulation. Application to chemical kinetic models; Aides a l`interpretation de simulations dynamiques. Application aux modeles de cinetique chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunschweig, B

    1998-04-22

    Numerous scientific and technical domains make constant use of dynamical simulations. Such simulators are put in the hands of a growing number of users. This phenomenon is due both to the extraordinary increase in computing performance, and to better graphical user interfaces which make simulation models easy to operate. But simulators are still computer programs which produce series of numbers from other series of numbers, even if they are displayed graphically. This thesis presents new interaction paradigms between a dynamical simulator and its user. The simulator produces a self-made interpretation of its results, thanks to a dedicated representation of its domain with objects. It shows dominant cyclic mechanisms identified by their instantaneous loop gain estimates, it uses a notion of episodes for splitting the simulation into homogeneous time intervals, and completes this by animations which rely on the graphical structure of the system. These new approaches are demonstrated with examples from chemical kinetics, because of the energic and exemplary characteristics of the encountered behaviors. They are implemented in the Spike software, Software Platform for Interactive Chemical Kinetics Experiments. Similar concepts are also shown in two other domains: interpretation of seismic wave propagation, and simulation of large projects. (author) 95 refs.

  3. Direct and dynamic detection of HIV-1 in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Helma

    Full Text Available In basic and applied HIV research, reliable detection of viral components is crucial to monitor progression of infection. While it is routine to detect structural viral proteins in vitro for diagnostic purposes, it previously remained impossible to directly and dynamically visualize HIV in living cells without genetic modification of the virus. Here, we describe a novel fluorescent biosensor to dynamically trace HIV-1 morphogenesis in living cells. We generated a camelid single domain antibody that specifically binds the HIV-1 capsid protein (CA at subnanomolar affinity and fused it to fluorescent proteins. The resulting fluorescent chromobody specifically recognizes the CA-harbouring HIV-1 Gag precursor protein in living cells and is applicable in various advanced light microscopy systems. Confocal live cell microscopy and super-resolution microscopy allowed detection and dynamic tracing of individual virion assemblies at the plasma membrane. The analysis of subcellular binding kinetics showed cytoplasmic antigen recognition and incorporation into virion assembly sites. Finally, we demonstrate the use of this new reporter in automated image analysis, providing a robust tool for cell-based HIV research.

  4. Insight derived from molecular dynamics simulations into molecular motions, thermodynamics and kinetics of HIV-1 gp120.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Sang

    Full Text Available Although the crystal structures of the HIV-1 gp120 core bound and pre-bound by CD4 are known, the details of dynamics involved in conformational equilibrium and transition in relation to gp120 function have remained elusive. The homology models of gp120 comprising the N- and C-termini and loops V3 and V4 in the CD4-bound and CD4-unbound states were built and subjected to molecular dynamics (MD simulations to investigate the differences in dynamic properties and molecular motions between them. The results indicate that the CD4-bound gp120 adopted a more compact and stable conformation than the unbound form during simulations. For both the unbound and bound gp120, the large concerted motions derived from essential dynamics (ED analyses can influence the size/shape of the ligand-binding channel/cavity of gp120 and, therefore, were related to its functional properties. The differences in motion direction between certain structural components of these two forms of gp120 were related to the conformational interconversion between them. The free energy calculations based on the metadynamics simulations reveal a more rugged and complex free energy landscape (FEL for the unbound than for the bound gp120, implying that gp120 has a richer conformational diversity in the unbound form. The estimated free energy difference of ∼-6.0 kJ/mol between the global minimum free energy states of the unbound and bound gp120 indicates that gp120 can transform spontaneously from the unbound to bound states, revealing that the bound state represents a high-probability "ground state" for gp120 and explaining why the unbound state resists crystallization. Our results provide insight into the dynamics-and-function relationship of gp120, and facilitate understandings of the thermodynamics, kinetics and conformational control mechanism of HIV-1 gp120.

  5. Formulation, construction and analysis of kinetic models of metabolism: A review of modelling frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saa, Pedro A.; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic models are critical to predict the dynamic behaviour of metabolic networks. Mechanistic kinetic models for large networks remain uncommon due to the difficulty of fitting their parameters. Recent modelling frameworks promise new ways to overcome this obstacle while retaining predictive ca...

  6. Kinetic energy budgets near the turbulent/nonturbulent interface in jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveira, Rodrigo R.; da Silva, Carlos B.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of the kinetic energy near the turbulent/nonturbulent (T/NT) interface separating the turbulent from the irrotational flow regions is analysed using three direct numerical simulations of turbulent planar jets, with Reynolds numbers based on the Taylor micro-scale across the jet shear layer in the range Reλ ≈ 120-160. Important levels of kinetic energy are already present in the irrotational region near the T/NT interface. The mean pressure and kinetic energy are well described by the Bernoulli equation in this region and agree with recent results obtained from rapid distortion theory in the turbulent region [M. A. C. Teixeira and C. B. da Silva, "Turbulence dynamics near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface," J. Fluid Mech. 695, 257-287 (2012)], 10.1017/jfm.2012.17 while the normal Reynolds stresses agree with the theoretical predictions from Phillips ["The irrotational motion outside a free turbulent boundary," Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 51, 220 (1955)], 10.1017/S0305004100030073. The use of conditional statistics in relation to the distance from the T/NT interface allow a detailed study of the build up of kinetic energy across the T/NT interface, pointing to a very different picture than using classical statistics. Conditional kinetic energy budgets show that apart from the viscous dissipation of kinetic energy, the maximum of all the mechanisms governing the kinetic energy are concentrated in a very narrow region distancing about one to two Taylor micro-scales from the T/NT interface. The (total and fluctuating) kinetic energy starts increasing in the irrotational region by pressure-velocity interactions - a mechanism that can act at distance, and continue to grow by advection (for the total kinetic energy) and turbulent diffusion (for the turbulent kinetic energy) inside the turbulent region. These mechanisms tend to occur preferentially around the core of the large-scale vortices existing near T/NT interface. The production of turbulent

  7. PREFACE: Dynamics of wetting Dynamics of wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grest, Gary S.; Oshanin, Gleb; Webb, Edmund B., III

    2009-11-01

    Capillary phenomena associated with fluids wetting other condensed matter phases have drawn great scientific interest for hundreds of years; consider the recent bicentennial celebration of Thomas Young's paper on equilibrium contact angles, describing the geometric shape assumed near a three phase contact line in terms of the relevant surface energies of the constituent phases [1]. Indeed, nearly a century has passed since the seminal papers of Lucas and Washburn, describing dynamics of capillary imbibition [2, 3]. While it is generally appreciated that dynamics of fluid wetting processes are determined by the degree to which a system is out of capillary equilibrium, myriad complications exist that challenge the fundamental understanding of dynamic capillary phenomena. The topic has gathered much interest from recent Nobel laureate Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, who provided a seminal review of relevant dissipation mechanisms for fluid droplets spreading on solid surfaces [4] Although much about the dynamics of wetting has been revealed, much remains to be learned and intrinsic technological and fundamental interest in the topic drives continuing high levels of research activity. This is enabled partly by improved experimental capabilities for resolving wetting processes at increasingly finer temporal, spatial, and chemical resolution. Additionally, dynamic wetting research advances via higher fidelity computational modeling capabilities, which drive more highly refined theory development. The significance of this topic both fundamentally and technologically has resulted in a number of reviews of research activity in wetting dynamics. One recent example addresses the evaluation of existing wetting dynamics theories from an experimentalist's perspective [5]. A Current Opinion issue was recently dedicated to high temperature capillarity, including dynamics of high temperature spreading [6]. New educational tools have recently emerged for providing instruction in wetting

  8. Iteration scheme for implicit calculations of kinetic and equilibrium chemical reactions in fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Chang, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    An iteration scheme for the implicit treatment of equilibrium chemical reactions in partial equilibrium flow has previously been described. Here we generalize this scheme to kinetic reactions as well as equilibrium reactions. This extends the applicability of the scheme to problems with kinetic reactions that are fast in regions of the flow field but slow in others. The resulting scheme thereby provides a single unified framework for the implicit treatment of an arbitrary number of coupled equilibrium and kinetic reactions in chemically reacting fluid flow. 10 refs., 2 figs

  9. Multivariate curve resolution of incomplete fused multiset data from chromatographic and spectrophotometric analyses for drug photostability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luca, Michele De; Ragno, Gaetano; Ioele, Giuseppina; Tauler, Romà

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new MCR-ALS algorithm is proposed for the analysis of incomplete fused multiset. • Resolution of the data allowed the description of amiloride kinetic photodegradation. • The new MCR-ALS algorithm can be easily applied to other drugs and chemicals. - Abstract: An advanced and powerful chemometric approach is proposed for the analysis of incomplete multiset data obtained by fusion of hyphenated liquid chromatographic DAD/MS data with UV spectrophotometric data from acid–base titration and kinetic degradation experiments. Column- and row-wise augmented data blocks were combined and simultaneously processed by means of a new version of the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) technique, including the simultaneous analysis of incomplete multiset data from different instrumental techniques. The proposed procedure was applied to the detailed study of the kinetic photodegradation process of the amiloride (AML) drug. All chemical species involved in the degradation and equilibrium reactions were resolved and the pH dependent kinetic pathway described

  10. Multivariate curve resolution of incomplete fused multiset data from chromatographic and spectrophotometric analyses for drug photostability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, Michele De, E-mail: michele.deluca@unical.it [Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci, Rende, CS 87036 (Italy); Ragno, Gaetano; Ioele, Giuseppina [Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci, Rende, CS 87036 (Italy); Tauler, Romà [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA-CSIC, C/Jordi Girona, 18-26, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)

    2014-07-21

    Highlights: • A new MCR-ALS algorithm is proposed for the analysis of incomplete fused multiset. • Resolution of the data allowed the description of amiloride kinetic photodegradation. • The new MCR-ALS algorithm can be easily applied to other drugs and chemicals. - Abstract: An advanced and powerful chemometric approach is proposed for the analysis of incomplete multiset data obtained by fusion of hyphenated liquid chromatographic DAD/MS data with UV spectrophotometric data from acid–base titration and kinetic degradation experiments. Column- and row-wise augmented data blocks were combined and simultaneously processed by means of a new version of the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) technique, including the simultaneous analysis of incomplete multiset data from different instrumental techniques. The proposed procedure was applied to the detailed study of the kinetic photodegradation process of the amiloride (AML) drug. All chemical species involved in the degradation and equilibrium reactions were resolved and the pH dependent kinetic pathway described.

  11. Kinetic theory for electron dynamics near a positive ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrighton, Jeffrey M; Dufty, James W

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical description of time correlation functions for electron properties in the presence of a positive ion of charge number Z is given. The simplest case of an electron gas distorted by a single ion is considered. A semi-classical representation with a regularized electron–ion potential is used to obtain a linear kinetic theory that is asymptotically exact at short times. This Markovian approximation includes all initial (equilibrium) electron–electron and electron–ion correlations through renormalized pair potentials. The kinetic theory is solved in terms of single-particle trajectories of the electron–ion potential and a dielectric function for the inhomogeneous electron gas. The results are illustrated by a calculation of the autocorrelation function for the electron field at the ion. The dependence on charge number Z is shown to be dominated by the bound states of the effective electron–ion potential. On this basis, a very simple practical representation of the trajectories is proposed and shown to be accurate over a wide range including strong electron–ion coupling. This simple representation is then used for a brief analysis of the dielectric function for the inhomogeneous electron gas

  12. Dynamic phase transition and multicritical dynamic phase diagrams of the kinetic spin-3/2 Blume Emery Griffiths model with repulsive biquadratic coupling under a time-dependent oscillating external field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviren, Bayram; Keskin, Mustafa; Canko, Osman

    2008-03-01

    We extend our recent paper [O. Canko, B. Deviren, M. Keskin, J. Phys.: Condens. Mater 118 (2006) 6635] to present a study, within a mean-field approach, the stationary states of the kinetic spin-3/2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model with repulsive biquadratic interaction under the presence of a time varying (sinusoidal) magnetic field. We found that the dynamic phase diagrams of the present work exhibit more complex, richer and more topological different types of phase diagrams than our recent paper. Especially, the obtained dynamic phase diagrams show the ferrimagnetic ( i) phase in addition to the ferromagnetic ±3/2 ( f), ferromagnetic ±1/2 ( f), antiquadrupolar or staggered ( a) and disordered ( d) phases, and the f+i, f+d, i+d, f+i+d, a+d and/or f+i+a coexistence regions in addition to the f+f, f+d, f+a, f+d and/or f+a+d coexistence regions, depending on interaction parameters. Moreover, the phase diagrams exhibit dynamic zero-temperature critical, critical end, double critical end, multicritical, and/or pentacritical special points in addition to the dynamic tricritical, double critical end point, triple, quadruple and/or tetracritical special points that depending on the interaction parameters.

  13. WE-FG-206-06: Dual-Input Tracer Kinetic Modeling and Its Analog Implementation for Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced (DCE-) MRI of Malignant Mesothelioma (MPM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Rimner, A; Hayes, S; Hunt, M; Deasy, J; Zauderer, M; Rusch, V; Tyagi, N [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To use dual-input tracer kinetic modeling of the lung for mapping spatial heterogeneity of various kinetic parameters in malignant MPM Methods: Six MPM patients received DCE-MRI as part of their radiation therapy simulation scan. 5 patients had the epitheloid subtype of MPM, while one was biphasic. A 3D fast-field echo sequence with TR/TE/Flip angle of 3.62ms/1.69ms/15° was used for DCE-MRI acquisition. The scan was collected for 5 minutes with a temporal resolution of 5-9 seconds depending on the spatial extent of the tumor. A principal component analysis-based groupwise deformable registration was used to co-register all the DCE-MRI series for motion compensation. All the images were analyzed using five different dual-input tracer kinetic models implemented in analog continuous-time formalism: the Tofts-Kety (TK), extended TK (ETK), two compartment exchange (2CX), adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity (AATH), and distributed parameter (DP) models. The following parameters were computed for each model: total blood flow (BF), pulmonary flow fraction (γ), pulmonary blood flow (BF-pa), systemic blood flow (BF-a), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), permeability-surface area product (PS), fractional interstitial volume (vi), extraction fraction (E), volume transfer constant (Ktrans) and efflux rate constant (kep). Results: Although the majority of patients had epitheloid histologies, kinetic parameter values varied across different models. One patient showed a higher total BF value in all models among the epitheloid histologies, although the γ value was varying among these different models. In one tumor with a large area of necrosis, the TK and ETK models showed higher E, Ktrans, and kep values and lower interstitial volume as compared to AATH and DP and 2CX models. Kinetic parameters such as BF-pa, BF-a, PS, Ktrans values were higher in surviving group compared to non-surviving group across most models. Conclusion: Dual-input tracer

  14. Kinetic computer modeling of microwave surface-wave plasma production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganachev, Ivan P.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic computer plasma modeling occupies an intermediate position between the time consuming rigorous particle dynamic simulation and the fast but rather rough cold- or warm-plasma fluid models. The present paper reviews the kinetic modeling of microwave surface-wave discharges with accent on recent kinetic self-consistent models, where the external input parameters are reduced to the necessary minimum (frequency and intensity of the applied microwave field and pressure and geometry of the discharge vessel). The presentation is limited to low pressures, so that Boltzmann equation is solved in non-local approximation and collisional electron heating is neglected. The numerical results reproduce correctly the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution functions observed experimentally. (author)

  15. MR-guided dynamic PET reconstruction with the kernel method and spectral temporal basis functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosad, Philip; Reader, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve markedly improved end-point kinetic parameter maps by incorporating a temporal model of the radiotracer directly into the reconstruction algorithm. In this work we have developed a highly constrained, fully dynamic PET reconstruction algorithm incorporating both spectral analysis temporal basis functions and spatial basis functions derived from the kernel method applied to a co-registered T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) image. The dynamic PET image is modelled as a linear combination of spatial and temporal basis functions, and a maximum likelihood estimate for the coefficients can be found using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Following reconstruction, kinetic fitting using any temporal model of interest can be applied. Based on a BrainWeb T1-weighted MR phantom, we performed a realistic dynamic [18F]FDG simulation study with two noise levels, and investigated the quantitative performance of the proposed reconstruction algorithm, comparing it with reconstructions incorporating either spectral analysis temporal basis functions alone or kernel spatial basis functions alone, as well as with conventional frame-independent reconstruction. Compared to the other reconstruction algorithms, the proposed algorithm achieved superior performance, offering a decrease in spatially averaged pixel-level root-mean-square-error on post-reconstruction kinetic parametric maps in the grey/white matter, as well as in the tumours when they were present on the co-registered MR image. When the tumours were not visible in the MR image, reconstruction with the proposed algorithm performed similarly to reconstruction with spectral temporal basis functions and was superior to both conventional frame-independent reconstruction and frame-independent reconstruction with kernel spatial basis functions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a joint spectral

  16. Mechanistic basis for high stereoselectivity and broad substrate scope in the (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, David D; Nielsen, Lars P C; Zuend, Stephan J; Musgrave, Charles B; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2013-10-16

    In the (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of terminal epoxides, the rate- and stereoselectivity-determining epoxide ring-opening step occurs by a cooperative bimetallic mechanism with one Co(III) complex acting as a Lewis acid and another serving to deliver the hydroxide nucleophile. In this paper, we analyze the basis for the extraordinarily high stereoselectivity and broad substrate scope observed in the HKR. We demonstrate that the stereochemistry of each of the two (salen)Co(III) complexes in the rate-determining transition structure is important for productive catalysis: a measurable rate of hydrolysis occurs only if the absolute stereochemistry of each of these (salen)Co(III) complexes is the same. Experimental and computational studies provide strong evidence that stereochemical communication in the HKR is mediated by the stepped conformation of the salen ligand, and not the shape of the chiral diamine backbone of the ligand. A detailed computational analysis reveals that the epoxide binds the Lewis acidic Co(III) complex in a well-defined geometry imposed by stereoelectronic rather than steric effects. This insight serves as the basis of a complete stereochemical and transition structure model that sheds light on the reasons for the broad substrate generality of the HKR.

  17. A derivation and scalable implementation of the synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo method for simulating long-time dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Hye Suk; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2017-10-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are used to study long-time dynamics of a wide variety of systems. Unfortunately, the conventional KMC algorithm is not scalable to larger systems, since its time scale is inversely proportional to the simulated system size. A promising approach to resolving this issue is the synchronous parallel KMC (SPKMC) algorithm, which makes the time scale size-independent. This paper introduces a formal derivation of the SPKMC algorithm based on local transition-state and time-dependent Hartree approximations, as well as its scalable parallel implementation based on a dual linked-list cell method. The resulting algorithm has achieved a weak-scaling parallel efficiency of 0.935 on 1024 Intel Xeon processors for simulating biological electron transfer dynamics in a 4.2 billion-heme system, as well as decent strong-scaling parallel efficiency. The parallel code has been used to simulate a lattice of cytochrome complexes on a bacterial-membrane nanowire, and it is broadly applicable to other problems such as computational synthesis of new materials.

  18. Production of solar radiation bankable datasets from high-resolution solar irradiance derived with dynamical downscaling Numerical Weather prediction model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassine Charabi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A bankable solar radiation database is required for the financial viability of solar energy project. Accurate estimation of solar energy resources in a country is very important for proper siting, sizing and life cycle cost analysis of solar energy systems. During the last decade an important progress has been made to develop multiple solar irradiance database (Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI, using satellite of different resolution and sophisticated models. This paper assesses the performance of High-resolution solar irradiance derived with dynamical downscaling Numerical Weather Prediction model with, GIS topographical solar radiation model, satellite data and ground measurements, for the production of bankable solar radiation datasets. For this investigation, NWP model namely Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO is used for the dynamical downscaling of solar radiation. The obtained results increase confidence in solar radiation data base obtained from dynamical downscaled NWP model. The mean bias of dynamical downscaled NWP model is small, on the order of a few percents for GHI, and it could be ranked as a bankable datasets. Fortunately, these data are usually archived in the meteorological department and gives a good idea of the hourly, monthly, and annual incident energy. Such short time-interval data are valuable in designing and operating the solar energy facility. The advantage of the NWP model is that it can be used for solar radiation forecast since it can estimate the weather condition within the next 72–120 hours. This gives a reasonable estimation of the solar radiation that in turns can be used to forecast the electric power generation by the solar power plant.

  19. Study of kinetics of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate degradation by 31P-NMR technique in depleted human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataullakhanov, F.I.; Vitvitskii, V.M.; Dubinskaya, E.I.; Dubinskii, V.Z.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate degradation in depleted human erythrocytes was studied by the high-resolution 31 P-NMR technique. A plateau was found on the kinetic curve in the first 1.5-2 h after the beginning of depletion. The mechanisms that may be responsible for the existence of such a plateau are discussed

  20. Spatial dynamics of thermokarst and thermo-erosion at lakes and ponds in North Siberia and Northwest Alaska using high-resolution remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, G.; Tillapaugh, M.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Walter, K. M.; Plug, L. J.

    2008-12-01

    Formation, growth, and drainage of thermokarst lakes in ice-rich permafrost deposits are important factors of landscape dynamics in extent Arctic lowlands. Monitoring of spatial and temporal dynamics of such lakes will allow an assessment of permafrost stability and enhance the capabilities for modelling and quantifying biogeochemical processes related to permafrost degradation in a warming Arctic. In this study we use high-resolution remote sensing and GIS to analyze the development of thermokarst lakes and ponds in two study regions in North Siberia and Northwest Alaska. The sites are 1) the Cherskii region in the Kolyma lowland (Siberia) and 2) the Kitluk River area on the northern Seward Peninsula (Alaska). Both regions are characterized by continuous permafrost, a highly dissected and dynamic thermokarst landscape, uplands of Late Pleistocene permafrost deposits with high excess ice contents, and a large total volume of permafrost-stored carbon. These ice-rich Yedoma or Yedoma-like deposits are highly vulnerable to permafrost degradation forced by climate warming or other surface disturbance. Time series of high- resolution imagery (aerial, Corona, Ikonos, Alos Prism) covering more than 50 years of lake dynamics allow detailed assessments of processes and spatial patterns of thermokarst lake expansion and drainage in continuous permafrost. Time series of high-resolution imagery (aerial, Corona, Ikonos, Alos Prism) covering more than 50 years of lake dynamics allow detailed assessments of processes and spatial patterns of thermokarst lake expansion and drainage in continuous permafrost. Processes identified include thaw slumping, wave undercutting of frozen sediments or peat blocks and subsequent mass wasting, thaw collapse of near-shore zones, sinkhole formation and ice-wedge tunnelling, and gully formation by thermo-erosion. We use GIS-based tools to relate the remote sensing results to field data (ground ice content, topography, lithology, and relative age

  1. Dynamic functional coupling of high resolution EEG potentials related to unilateral internally triggered one-digit movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, A; Babiloni, C; Onorati, P; Babiloni, F

    1998-06-01

    Between-electrode cross-covariances of delta (0-3 Hz)- and theta (4-7 Hz)-filtered high resolution EEG potentials related to preparation, initiation. and execution of human unilateral internally triggered one-digit movements were computed to investigate statistical dynamic coupling between these potentials. Significant (P planning, starting, and performance of unilateral movement. The involvement of these cortical areas is supported by the observation that averaged spatially enhanced delta- and theta-bandpassed potentials were computed from the scalp regions where task-related electrical activation of primary sensorimotor areas and supplementary motor area was roughly represented.

  2. Neural estimation of kinetic rate constants from dynamic PET-scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Torben L.; Nielsen, Lars Hupfeldt; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1994-01-01

    A feedforward neural net is trained to invert a simple three compartment model describing the tracer kinetics involved in the metabolism of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose in the human brain. The network can estimate rate constants from positron emission tomography sequences and is about 50 times faster ...

  3. Analysis of forward and inverse problems in chemical dynamics and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabitz, H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The overall scope of this research concerns the development and application of forward and inverse analysis tools for problems in chemical dynamics and chemical kinetics. The chemical dynamics work is specifically associated with relating features in potential surfaces and resultant dynamical behavior. The analogous inverse research aims to provide stable algorithms for extracting potential surfaces from laboratory data. In the case of chemical kinetics, the focus is on the development of systematic means to reduce the complexity of chemical kinetic models. Recent progress in these directions is summarized below.

  4. Real-time single-molecule co-immunoprecipitation analyses reveal cancer-specific Ras signalling dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Won; Kyung, Taeyoon; Yoo, Janghyun; Kim, Tackhoon; Chung, Chaeuk; Ryu, Ji Young; Lee, Hanki; Park, Kihyun; Lee, Sangkyu; Jones, Walton D.; Lim, Dae-Sik; Hyeon, Changbong; Do Heo, Won; Yoon, Tae-Young

    2013-01-01

    Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) has become a standard technique, but its protein-band output provides only static, qualitative information about protein–protein interactions. Here we demonstrate a real-time single-molecule co-IP technique that generates real-time videos of individual protein–protein interactions as they occur in unpurified cell extracts. By analysing single Ras–Raf interactions with a 50-ms time resolution, we have observed transient intermediates of the protein–protein interaction and determined all the essential kinetic rates. Using this technique, we have quantified the active fraction of native Ras proteins in xenograft tumours, normal tissue and cancer cell lines. We demonstrate that the oncogenic Ras mutations selectively increase the active-Ras fraction by one order of magnitude, without affecting total Ras levels or single-molecule signalling kinetics. Our approach allows us to probe the previously hidden, dynamic aspects of weak protein–protein interactions. It also suggests a path forward towards precision molecular diagnostics at the protein–protein interaction level. PMID:23422673

  5. Registration of dynamic dopamine D{sub 2}receptor images using principal component analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acton, P.D.; Ell, P.J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Pilowsky, L.S.; Brammer, M.J. [Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London (United Kingdom); Suckling, J. [Clinical Age Research Unit, Kings College School of Medicine and Dentistry, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-11-01

    This paper describes a novel technique for registering a dynamic sequence of single-photon emission tomography (SPET) dopamine D{sub 2}receptor images, using principal component analysis (PCA). Conventional methods for registering images, such as count difference and correlation coefficient algorithms, fail to take into account the dynamic nature of the data, resulting in large systematic errors when registering time-varying images. However, by using principal component analysis to extract the temporal structure of the image sequence, misregistration can be quantified by examining the distribution of eigenvalues. The registration procedures were tested using a computer-generated dynamic phantom derived from a high-resolution magnetic resonance image of a realistic brain phantom. Each method was also applied to clinical SPET images of dopamine D {sub 2}receptors, using the ligands iodine-123 iodobenzamide and iodine-123 epidepride, to investigate the influence of misregistration on kinetic modelling parameters and the binding potential. The PCA technique gave highly significant (P <0.001) improvements in image registration, leading to alignment errors in x and y of about 25% of the alternative methods, with reductions in autocorrelations over time. It could also be applied to align image sequences which the other methods failed completely to register, particularly {sup 123}I-epidepride scans. The PCA method produced data of much greater quality for subsequent kinetic modelling, with an improvement of nearly 50% in the {chi}{sup 2}of the fit to the compartmental model, and provided superior quality registration of particularly difficult dynamic sequences. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 26 refs.

  6. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains nonsteady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Federico; Riley, William J.

    2009-12-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic isotope fractionation often assumes first-order or Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the latter solved under the quasi-steady state assumption. Both formulations lead to a constant isotope fractionation factor, therefore they may return incorrect estimations of isotopic effects and misleading interpretations of isotopic signatures when fractionation is not a steady process. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitrification in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate (2006) in which high and variable 15N-N2O enrichment during N2O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N2O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. When Michaelis-Menten kinetics were coupled to Monod kinetics to describe biomass and enzyme dynamics, and the quasi-steady state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observed concentrations, and variable and inverse isotope fractionations. These results imply a substantial revision in modeling isotopic effects, suggesting that steady state kinetics such as first-order, Rayleigh, and classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics should be superseded by transient kinetics in conjunction with biomass and enzyme dynamics.

  7. Dynamics of Saturn’s 2010 Great White Spot from high-resolution Cassini ISS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, Ricardo; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; del Río-Gaztelurrutia, T.

    2012-10-01

    On December 5th 2010 a storm erupted in Saturn’s North Temperate latitudes which were experiencing early spring season. The storm quickly developed to a planet-wide disturbance of the Great White Spot type. The ISS instrument onboard Cassini acquired its first images of the storm on 23th December 2010 and performed repeated observations with a variety of spatial resolutions over the nearly 10 months period the storm continued active. Here we present an analysis of two of the image sequences with better spatial resolution of the mature storm when it was fully developed and very active. We used an image correlation algorithm to measure the cloud motions obtained from images separated 20 minutes and obtained 16,000 wind tracers in a domain of 60 degrees longitude per 20 degrees in latitude. Intense zonal and meridional motions accompanied the storm and reached values of 120 m/s in particular regions of the active storm. The storm released a chain of anticyclonic and cyclonic vortices at planetocentric latitudes of 36° and 32° respectively. The short time difference between the images results in estimated wind uncertainties of 15 m/s that did not allow to perform a complete analysis of the turbulence and kinetic spectrum of the motions. We identify locations of the updrafts and link those with the morphology in different observing filters. The global behaviour of the storm was examined in images separated by 10 hours confirming the intensity of the winds and the global behaviour of the vortices. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by the Spanish MICIIN project AYA2009-10701 with FEDER funds, by Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07 and by Universidad País Vasco UPV/EHU through program UFI11/55.

  8. Effective-field theory on the kinetic Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xiaoling; Wei Guozhu; Li Lin

    2008-01-01

    As an analytical method, the effective-field theory (EFT) is used to study the dynamical response of the kinetic Ising model in the presence of a sinusoidal oscillating field. The effective-field equations of motion of the average magnetization are given for the square lattice (Z=4) and the simple cubic lattice (Z=6), respectively. The dynamic order parameter, the hysteresis loop area and the dynamic correlation are calculated. In the field amplitude h 0 /ZJ-temperature T/ZJ plane, the phase boundary separating the dynamic ordered and the disordered phase has been drawn, and the dynamical tricritical point has been observed. We also make the compare results of EFT with that given by using the mean field theory (MFT)

  9. A quenched-flow system for measuring heterogeneous enzyme kinetics with sub-second time resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Johan Pelck; Kari, Jeppe; Borch, Kim

    2017-01-01

    of insoluble substrate. Perhaps for this reason, transient kinetics has rarely been reported for heterogeneous enzyme reactions. Here, we describe a quenched-flow system using peristaltic pumps and stirred substrate suspensions with a dead time below 100 ms. The general performance was verified by alkali...

  10. On the kinetic theory of the one-component plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis, kinetic theory is applied to transport phenomena of a one-component plasma. Existing kinetic equations, containing both dynamical screening effects and close binary collisions do not suffer from divergencies. Recently an approximation for the pair correlation function has been proposed that is valid for small values of the plasma collision parameter. Upon insertion of this expression into the general form of the collision integral, one obtains another convergent kinetic equation. This thesis shows that both kinetic equations yield the same coefficient of heat conductivity and viscosity; and that for a hot dilute plasma the arbitrary transport coefficient is rather insensitive to the pair correlation function. In the second part, the author studies the diffusion of a tagged particle in an external magnetic field. It is found that the longitudinal self-diffusion coefficient contra-varies monotonically with the magnetic field strength. (Auth.)

  11. Control of DNA strand displacement kinetics using toehold exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, David Yu; Winfree, Erik

    2009-12-02

    DNA is increasingly being used as the engineering material of choice for the construction of nanoscale circuits, structures, and motors. Many of these enzyme-free constructions function by DNA strand displacement reactions. The kinetics of strand displacement can be modulated by toeholds, short single-stranded segments of DNA that colocalize reactant DNA molecules. Recently, the toehold exchange process was introduced as a method for designing fast and reversible strand displacement reactions. Here, we characterize the kinetics of DNA toehold exchange and model it as a three-step process. This model is simple and quantitatively predicts the kinetics of 85 different strand displacement reactions from the DNA sequences. Furthermore, we use toehold exchange to construct a simple catalytic reaction. This work improves the understanding of the kinetics of nucleic acid reactions and will be useful in the rational design of dynamic DNA and RNA circuits and nanodevices.

  12. Effect of surfactant on kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Emilia; Kovalchuk, Nina; Simmons, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges is of great scientific and industrial interest being of vital importance for example in various emulsification and microfluidic processes. It is well known that the rate of bridge thinning is proportional to the interfacial tension. Therefore it is expected that the process should slow down by addition of surfactant. The kinetics of capillary bridges in the presence of surfactant was studied by the dripping of liquid from a capillary tip under conditions of nearly zero flow rate (We personal care products. The viscosity, surfactant activity and adsorption kinetics have been controlled by addition of glycerol and sodium chloride. The study has shown that the kinetics of capillary bridges are determined by dynamic surface tension rather than by its equilibrium value. In particular, the kinetics of the bridge thinning for the 0.1 g L-1 aqueous SLES solution is practically the same as that of pure water despite twice lower equilibrium surface tension. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  13. Modeling uptake kinetics of cadmium by field-grown lettuce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Weiping [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)], E-mail: chenweip@yahoo.com.cn; Li Lianqing [Institute of Resources, Ecosystem and Environment of Agriculture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Chang, Andrew C.; Wu Laosheng [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Kwon, Soon-Ik [Agricultural Environmental and Ecology Division, National Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology, Suwon 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Bottoms, Rick [Desert Research and Extension Center, 1004 East Holton Road, El Centro, CA 92243 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Cadmium uptake by field grown Romaine lettuce treated with P-fertilizers of different Cd levels was investigated over an entire growing season. Results indicated that the rate of Cd uptake at a given time of the season can be satisfactorily described by the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, that is, plant uptake increases as the Cd concentration in soil solution increases, and it gradually approaches a saturation level. However, the rate constant of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics changes over the growing season. Under a given soil Cd level, the cadmium content in plant tissue decreases exponentially with time. To account for the dynamic nature of Cd uptake, a kinetic model integrating the time factor was developed to simulate Cd plant uptake over the growing season: C{sub Plant} = C{sub Solution} . PUF{sub max} . exp[-b . t], where C{sub Plant} and C{sub Solution} refer to the Cd content in plant tissue and soil solution, respectively, PUF{sub max} and b are kinetic constants. - A kinetic model was developed to evaluate the uptake of Cd under field conditions.

  14. Modeling uptake kinetics of cadmium by field-grown lettuce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Weiping; Li Lianqing; Chang, Andrew C.; Wu Laosheng; Kwon, Soon-Ik; Bottoms, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Cadmium uptake by field grown Romaine lettuce treated with P-fertilizers of different Cd levels was investigated over an entire growing season. Results indicated that the rate of Cd uptake at a given time of the season can be satisfactorily described by the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, that is, plant uptake increases as the Cd concentration in soil solution increases, and it gradually approaches a saturation level. However, the rate constant of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics changes over the growing season. Under a given soil Cd level, the cadmium content in plant tissue decreases exponentially with time. To account for the dynamic nature of Cd uptake, a kinetic model integrating the time factor was developed to simulate Cd plant uptake over the growing season: C Plant = C Solution . PUF max . exp[-b . t], where C Plant and C Solution refer to the Cd content in plant tissue and soil solution, respectively, PUF max and b are kinetic constants. - A kinetic model was developed to evaluate the uptake of Cd under field conditions

  15. High resolution field study of sediment dynamics on a strongly heterogeneous bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly Du Bois, P.; Blanpain, O.; Lafite, R.; Cugier, P.; Lunven, M.

    2010-12-01

    Extensive field measurements have been carried out at several stations in a macrotidal inner continental shelf in the English Channel (around 25 m depth) during spring tide period. The strong tidal current measured (up to 1.6 m.s-1) allowed sediment dynamics on a bed characterised by a mixture of size with coarse grains to be dominant. Data acquired in such hydro-sedimentary conditions are scarce. A new instrument, the DYnamic Sediment Profile Imagery (DySPI) system, was specifically conceived and implemented in-situ to observe and measure, with a high temporal resolution, the dynamics of a strongly heterogeneous mixture of particles in a grain-size scale. The data collected covered: 1) grain size range (side scan sonar, video observations, Shipeck grab samples, DySPI images) and vertical sorting (stratigraphic sampling by divers) of sediment cover, 2) hydrodynamic features (acoustic Doppler velocimeter, acoustic Doppler profiler), 3) suspended load nature and dynamics (optical backscatter, chlorophyll fluorometer, particle size analyser, Niskin bottles, scanning electron microscopy), 4) sand and gravel bedload transport estimates (DySPI image processing), 5) transfer dynamics of fine grains within a coarse matrix and their depth of penetration (radionuclides measurements in stratigraphic samples). The four stations present different grain size vertical sorting from a quasi-permanent armouring to a homogenous distribution. The sediment cover condition is directly linked to hydrodynamic capacity and sediment availability. Fine grain ratio within deep sediment layers (up to 10 cm) is higher when the bed armouring is durable. However, fine sediments are not permanently depth trapped: deep layers are composed of few years-old radionuclide tracers fixed on fine grains and a vertical mixing coefficient has been evaluated for each sediment cover. Fine grain dynamics within a coarse matrix is inversely proportional to the robustness of the armour layer. For current

  16. Relaxation and kinetics in scalar field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyanovsky, D.; Lawrie, I.D.; Lee, D.

    1996-01-01

    A new approach to the dynamics of relaxation and kinetics of thermalization in a scalar field theory is presented that incorporates the relevant time scales through the resummation of hard thermal loops. An alternative derivation of the kinetic equations for the open-quote open-quote quasiparticle close-quote close-quote distribution functions is obtained that allows a clear understanding of the different open-quote open-quote coarse-graining close-quote close-quote approximations usually involved in a kinetic description. This method leads to a systematic perturbative expansion to obtain the kinetic equations including hard thermal loop resummation and to an improvement including renormalization, off-shell effects, and contributions that change chemical equilibrium on short time scales. As a by-product of these methods we establish the equivalence between the relaxation time scale in the linearized equation of motion of the quasiparticles and the thermalization time scale of the quasiparticle distribution function in the open-quote open-quote relaxation time approximation close-quote close-quote including hard thermal loop effects. Hard thermal loop resummation dramatically modifies the scattering rate for long wavelength modes as compared to the usual (semi)classical estimate. Relaxation and kinetics are studied both in the unbroken and broken symmetry phases of the theory. The broken symmetry phase also provides the setting to obtain the contribution to the kinetic equations from processes that involve decay of a heavy scalar into light scalar particles in the medium. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. Repair kinetics in tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Monoexponential repair kinetics is based on the assumption of a single, dose-independent rate of repair of sublethal injury in the target cells for tissue injury after exposure to ionizing radiation. Descriptions of the available data based on this assumption have proved fairly successful for both acutely responding (skin, lip mucosa, gut) and late-responding (lung, spinal cord) normal tissues. There are indications of biphasic exponential repair in both categories, however. Unfortunately, the data usually lack sufficient resolution to permit unambiguous determination of the repair rates. There are also indications that repair kinetics may depend on the size of the dose. The data are conflicting on this account, however, with suggestions of both faster and slower repair after larger doses. Indeed, experiments that have been explicitly designed to test this hypothesis show either no effect (gut, spinal cord), faster repair after higher doses (lung, kidney), or slower repair after higher doses (skin). Monoexponential repair appears to be a fairly accurate description that provides an approximation to a more complicated picture, the elucidation of whose details will, however, require very careful and extensive experimental study. (author). 30 refs.; 1 fig

  18. Kinetics of the chiral phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hees, Hendrik van [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Frankfurt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Frankfurt (Germany); Wesp, Christian; Meistrenko, Alex; Greiner, Carsten [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We simulate the kinetics of the chiral phase transition in hot and dense strongly interacting matter within a novel kinetic-theory approach. Employing an effective linear σ model for quarks, σ mesons, and pions we treat the quarks within a test-particle ansatz for solving the Boltzmann transport equation and the mesons in terms of classical fields. The decay-recombination processes like σ <-> anti q+q are treated using a kind of wave-particle dualism using the exact conservation of energy and momentum. After demonstrating the correct thermodynamic limit for particles and fields in a ''box calculation'' we apply the simulation to the dynamics of an expanding fireball similar to the medium created in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  19. Example-Based Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shu; Han, Boran; Kutz, J Nathan

    2018-04-23

    Capturing biological dynamics with high spatiotemporal resolution demands the advancement in imaging technologies. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy offers spatial resolution surpassing the diffraction limit to resolve near-molecular-level details. While various strategies have been reported to improve the temporal resolution of super-resolution imaging, all super-resolution techniques are still fundamentally limited by the trade-off associated with the longer image acquisition time that is needed to achieve higher spatial information. Here, we demonstrated an example-based, computational method that aims to obtain super-resolution images using conventional imaging without increasing the imaging time. With a low-resolution image input, the method provides an estimate of its super-resolution image based on an example database that contains super- and low-resolution image pairs of biological structures of interest. The computational imaging of cellular microtubules agrees approximately with the experimental super-resolution STORM results. This new approach may offer potential improvements in temporal resolution for experimental super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and provide a new path for large-data aided biomedical imaging.

  20. Modelling reveals kinetic advantages of co-transcriptional splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Aitken

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Messenger RNA splicing is an essential and complex process for the removal of intron sequences. Whereas the composition of the splicing machinery is mostly known, the kinetics of splicing, the catalytic activity of splicing factors and the interdependency of transcription, splicing and mRNA 3' end formation are less well understood. We propose a stochastic model of splicing kinetics that explains data obtained from high-resolution kinetic analyses of transcription, splicing and 3' end formation during induction of an intron-containing reporter gene in budding yeast. Modelling reveals co-transcriptional splicing to be the most probable and most efficient splicing pathway for the reporter transcripts, due in part to a positive feedback mechanism for co-transcriptional second step splicing. Model comparison is used to assess the alternative representations of reactions. Modelling also indicates the functional coupling of transcription and splicing, because both the rate of initiation of transcription and the probability that step one of splicing occurs co-transcriptionally are reduced, when the second step of splicing is abolished in a mutant reporter.

  1. Modelling reveals kinetic advantages of co-transcriptional splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Stuart; Alexander, Ross D; Beggs, Jean D

    2011-10-01

    Messenger RNA splicing is an essential and complex process for the removal of intron sequences. Whereas the composition of the splicing machinery is mostly known, the kinetics of splicing, the catalytic activity of splicing factors and the interdependency of transcription, splicing and mRNA 3' end formation are less well understood. We propose a stochastic model of splicing kinetics that explains data obtained from high-resolution kinetic analyses of transcription, splicing and 3' end formation during induction of an intron-containing reporter gene in budding yeast. Modelling reveals co-transcriptional splicing to be the most probable and most efficient splicing pathway for the reporter transcripts, due in part to a positive feedback mechanism for co-transcriptional second step splicing. Model comparison is used to assess the alternative representations of reactions. Modelling also indicates the functional coupling of transcription and splicing, because both the rate of initiation of transcription and the probability that step one of splicing occurs co-transcriptionally are reduced, when the second step of splicing is abolished in a mutant reporter.

  2. Kinetic roughening and pinning of coupled precursor and impregnation fronts in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Garcia Paredes, Rafael; Marquez Gonsalez, Jesus; Susarrey Huerta, Orlando; Morales Matamoros, Daniel; Castrejon Vacio, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    In the paper wetting experiments at low evaporation rate, after a short Washburn regime the film flow of filtered water overtakes the main impregnation front. Accordingly, we study the kinetic roughening dynamics and pinning of two strongly coupled fronts moving in different papers. We find that the kinetic roughening dynamics of precursor and main fronts belongs to different universality classes, nevertheless, at the final stage the distance between the fronts decrease until both fronts are pinned in the same configuration z P (x,y), the scaling properties of which are determined by the long-range correlations in the pore network

  3. Nonlinear dynamics of thin current sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daughton, William

    2002-01-01

    Observations indicate that the current sheet in the Earth's geomagnetic tail may compress to a thickness comparable to an ion gyro-radius prior to substorm onset. In recent years, there has been considerable controversy regarding the kinetic stability of these thin structures. In particular, the growth rate of the kink instability and its relevance to magnetotail dynamics is still being debated. In this work, a series of fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations are performed for a thin Harris sheet. The ion to electron mass ratio is varied between m i /m e =4→400 and careful comparisons are made with a formally exact approach to the linear Vlasov theory. At low mass ratio m i /m e <64, the simulations are in excellent agreement with the linear theory, but at high mass ratio the kink instability is observed to grow more rapidly in the kinetic simulations than predicted by theory. The resolution to this apparent discrepancy involves the lower hybrid instability which is active on the edge of the sheet and rapidly produces nonlinear modifications to the initial equilibrium. The nature of this nonlinear deformation is characterized and a simple model is proposed to explain the physics. After the growth and saturation of the lower hybrid fluctuations, the deformed current sheet is similar in structure to a Harris equilibrium with an additional background population. This may explain the large growth rate of the kink instability at later times, since this type of modification to the Harris sheet has been shown to greatly enhance the growth rate of the kink mode

  4. Kinetic modeling and exploratory numerical simulation of chloroplastic starch degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nag Ambarish

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Higher plants and algae are able to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide through photosynthesis and store this fixed carbon in large quantities as starch, which can be hydrolyzed into sugars serving as feedstock for fermentation to biofuels and precursors. Rational engineering of carbon flow in plant cells requires a greater understanding of how starch breakdown fluxes respond to variations in enzyme concentrations, kinetic parameters, and metabolite concentrations. We have therefore developed and simulated a detailed kinetic ordinary differential equation model of the degradation pathways for starch synthesized in plants and green algae, which to our knowledge is the most complete such model reported to date. Results Simulation with 9 internal metabolites and 8 external metabolites, the concentrations of the latter fixed at reasonable biochemical values, leads to a single reference solution showing β-amylase activity to be the rate-limiting step in carbon flow from starch degradation. Additionally, the response coefficients for stromal glucose to the glucose transporter kcat and KM are substantial, whereas those for cytosolic glucose are not, consistent with a kinetic bottleneck due to transport. Response coefficient norms show stromal maltopentaose and cytosolic glucosylated arabinogalactan to be the most and least globally sensitive metabolites, respectively, and β-amylase kcat and KM for starch to be the kinetic parameters with the largest aggregate effect on metabolite concentrations as a whole. The latter kinetic parameters, together with those for glucose transport, have the greatest effect on stromal glucose, which is a precursor for biofuel synthetic pathways. Exploration of the steady-state solution space with respect to concentrations of 6 external metabolites and 8 dynamic metabolite concentrations show that stromal metabolism is strongly coupled to starch levels, and that transport between compartments serves to

  5. Using linear time-invariant system theory to estimate kinetic parameters directly from projection measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, G.L.; Gullberg, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    It is common practice to estimate kinetic parameters from dynamically acquired tomographic data by first reconstructing a dynamic sequence of three-dimensional reconstructions and then fitting the parameters to time activity curves generated from the time-varying reconstructed images. However, in SPECT, the pharmaceutical distribution can change during the acquisition of a complete tomographic data set, which can bias the estimated kinetic parameters. It is hypothesized that more accurate estimates of the kinetic parameters can be obtained by fitting to the projection measurements instead of the reconstructed time sequence. Estimation from projections requires the knowledge of their relationship between the tissue regions of interest or voxels with particular kinetic parameters and the project measurements, which results in a complicated nonlinear estimation problem with a series of exponential factors with multiplicative coefficients. A technique is presented in this paper where the exponential decay parameters are estimated separately using linear time-invariant system theory. Once the exponential factors are known, the coefficients of the exponentials can be estimated using linear estimation techniques. Computer simulations demonstrate that estimation of the kinetic parameters directly from the projections is more accurate than the estimation from the reconstructed images

  6. A high resolution large dynamic range TDC circuit implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Wuhu; Liu Songqiu; Ye Weiguo; Han Hui; Li Pengyu

    2003-01-01

    Time measurement technology is usually used in nuclear experimentation. There are many methods of time measurement. The implementation method of Time to Digital Conversion (TDC) by means of electronic is a classical technology. The range and resolution of TDC is different according with different usage. A wide range and high resolution TDC circuit, including its theory and implementation way, is introduced in this paper. The test result is also given. (authors)

  7. A high resolution large dynamic range TDC circuit implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Wuhu; Liu Songqiu; Li Pengyu; Han Hui; Ye Yanlin

    2005-01-01

    Time measurement technology is usually used in nuclear experimentation. There are many methods of time measurement. The implementation method of Time to Digital Conversion (TDC) by means of electronics is a classical technology. The range and resolution of TDC is different according with different usage. A wide range and high resolution TDC circuit, including its theory and implementation way, is introduced in this paper. The test result is also given. (authors)

  8. Intramolecular and nonlinear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program focuses on three interconnected areas. The first involves the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly of highly excited systems. The second area involves the use of nonlinear dynamics as a tool for the study of molecular dynamics and complex kinetics. The third area is the study of the classical/quantum correspondence for highly excited systems, particularly systems exhibiting classical chaos.

  9. A study of static, kinetic, and dynamic visual acuity in 102 Japanese professional baseball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshina K

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kohji Hoshina,1 Yuichi Tagami,2 Osamu Mimura,3 Hiroshi Edagawa,4 Masao Matsubara,5 Teiichi Nakayama6 1Hoshina Eye Clinic, Nishinomiya, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kobe Century Memorial Hospital, Kobe, Japan; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Japan; 4Edagawa Eye Clinic, Tokyo, Japan; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Women's Medical University Medical Center East, Tokyo, Japan; 6Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, Japan Background: It seemed that visual functions might have some effects on the performance of baseball players. We measured static, kinetic, and dynamic visual acuity (SVA, KVA, and DVA, respectively of Japanese professional baseball players to ascertain whether there would be any difference in SVA, KVA, and DVA among player groups stratified according to their performance level. Methods: The subjects were 102 male professional baseball players with a mean age of 26 years who were members of a Japanese professional baseball club from 2000 to 2009. They were stratified into three groups according to their performance level: A (players who were on the roster of the top-level team all the time throughout the study period, B (players who were on the roster of the top-level team sometimes but not all the time, and C (players who were never on the roster of the top-level team. They were interviewed for the use of corrective visual aids, and examined for SVA, KVA, and DVA. The measurements of these parameters were compared among groups A, B, and C. We also investigated and analyzed the association of KVA or DVA with player position (pitchers or fielders and with hand dominance for batting. KVA was compared between the pitchers and the fielders because they each require different playing skills. DVA was compared between the right-handed and the left-handed batters. Results: There was no statistically significant difference among groups A, B, and C. There was a statistically significant difference in

  10. High-Resolution Monitoring of Himalayan Glacier Dynamics Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immerzeel, W.; Kraaijenbrink, P. D. A.; Shea, J.; Shrestha, A. B.; Pellicciotti, F.; Bierkens, M. F.; de Jong, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Himalayan glacier tongues are commonly debris covered and play an important role in modulating the glacier response to climate . However, they remain relatively unstudied because of the inaccessibility of the terrain and the difficulties in field work caused by the thick debris mantles. Observations of debris-covered glaciers are therefore limited to point locations and airborne remote sensing may bridge the gap between scarce, point field observations and coarse resolution space-borne remote sensing. In this study we deploy an Unmanned Airborne Vehicle (UAV) on two debris covered glaciers in the Nepalese Himalayas: the Lirung and Langtang glacier during four field campaigns in 2013 and 2014. Based on stereo-imaging and the structure for motion algorithm we derive highly detailed ortho-mosaics and digital elevation models (DEMs), which we geometrically correct using differential GPS observations collected in the field. Based on DEM differencing and manual feature tracking we derive the mass loss and the surface velocity of the glacier at a high spatial resolution and accuracy. We also assess spatiotemporal changes in supra-glacial lakes and ice cliffs based on the imagery. On average, mass loss is limited and the surface velocity is very small. However, the spatial variability of melt rates is very high, and ice cliffs and supra-glacial ponds show mass losses that can be an order of magnitude higher than the average. We suggest that future research should focus on the interaction between supra-glacial ponds, ice cliffs and englacial hydrology to further understand the dynamics of debris-covered glaciers. Finally, we conclude that UAV deployment has large potential in glaciology and it represents a substantial advancement over methods currently applied in studying glacier surface features.

  11. AIRCRAFT CONFLICTS RESOLUTION BY COURSE MANEUVERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Харченко

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Enhancement of requirements for air traffic efficiency at increasing of flights intensity determines the necessity of development of new optimization methods for aircraft conflict resolutions. The statement of problem of optimal conflict resolutions at Cooperative Air Traffic Management was done. The method for optimal aircraft conflict  resolution by course maneuvering has been  developed. The method using dynamic programming provides planning of aircraft conflict-free trajectory with minimum length. The decomposition of conflict resolution process on phases and stages, definition of states, controls and recursive  equations for generation of optimal course control program were done. Computer modeling of aircraft conflict resolution by developed method was done

  12. High-resolution Statistics of Solar Wind Turbulence at Kinetic Scales Using the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasapis, Alexandros; Matthaeus, W. H.; Parashar, T. N.; Maruca, B. A. [University of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Fuselier, S. A.; Burch, J. L. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Phan, T. D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Moore, T. E.; Pollock, C. J.; Gershman, D. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Torbert, R. B. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J., E-mail: chasapis@udel.edu [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-07-20

    Using data from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Cluster missions obtained in the solar wind, we examine second-order and fourth-order structure functions at varying spatial lags normalized to ion inertial scales. The analysis includes direct two-spacecraft results and single-spacecraft results employing the familiar Taylor frozen-in flow approximation. Several familiar statistical results, including the spectral distribution of energy, and the sale-dependent kurtosis, are extended down to unprecedented spatial scales of ∼6 km, approaching electron scales. The Taylor approximation is also confirmed at those small scales, although small deviations are present in the kinetic range. The kurtosis is seen to attain very high values at sub-proton scales, supporting the previously reported suggestion that monofractal behavior may be due to high-frequency plasma waves at kinetic scales.

  13. Shock wave, fluid instability and implosion studies with a kinetic particle approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagert, Irina; Even, Wesley P.; Strother, Terrance T.

    2016-10-01

    Many problems in laboratory plasma physics are subject to flows that move between the continuum and the kinetic regime. The correct description of these flows is crucial in order to capture their impact on the system's dynamical evolution. Examples are capsule implosions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Although their dynamics is predominantly shaped by shock waves and fluid instabilities, non-equilibrium flows in form of deuterium/tritium ions have been shown to play a significant role. We present recent studies with our Monte Carlo kinetic particle code that is designed to capture continuum and kinetic flows in large physical systems with possible applications in ICF studies. Discussed results will include standard shock wave and fluid instability tests and simulations that are adapted towards future ICF studies with comparisons to hydrodynamic simulations. This work used the Wolf TriLAB Capacity Cluster at LANL. I.S. acknowledges support through a Director's fellowship (20150741PRD3) from Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  14. Modeling the degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Micha; Normand, Mark D; Dixon, William R; Goulette, Timothy R

    2018-06-13

    Most published reports on ascorbic acid (AA) degradation during food storage and heat preservation suggest that it follows first-order kinetics. Deviations from this pattern include Weibullian decay, and exponential drop approaching finite nonzero retention. Almost invariably, the degradation rate constant's temperature-dependence followed the Arrhenius equation, and hence the simpler exponential model too. A formula and freely downloadable interactive Wolfram Demonstration to convert the Arrhenius model's energy of activation, E a , to the exponential model's c parameter, or vice versa, are provided. The AA's isothermal and non-isothermal degradation can be simulated with freely downloadable interactive Wolfram Demonstrations in which the model's parameters can be entered and modified by moving sliders on the screen. Where the degradation is known a priori to follow first or other fixed order kinetics, one can use the endpoints method, and in principle the successive points method too, to estimate the reaction's kinetic parameters from considerably fewer AA concentration determinations than in the traditional manner. Freeware to do the calculations by either method has been recently made available on the Internet. Once obtained in this way, the kinetic parameters can be used to reconstruct the entire degradation curves and predict those at different temperature profiles, isothermal or dynamic. Comparison of the predicted concentration ratios with experimental ones offers a way to validate or refute the kinetic model and the assumptions on which it is based.

  15. Detection and Extraction of Roads from High Resolution Satellites Images with Dynamic Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzouai, Siham; Smara, Youcef

    2010-12-01

    The advent of satellite images allows now a regular and a fast digitizing and update of geographic data, especially roads which are very useful for Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications such as transportation, urban pollution, geomarketing, etc. For this, several studies have been conducted to automate roads extraction in order to minimize the manual processes [4]. In this work, we are interested in roads extraction from satellite imagery with high spatial resolution (at best equal to 10 m). The method is semi automatic and follows a linear approach where road is considered as a linear object. As roads extraction is a pattern recognition problem, it is useful, above all, to characterize roads. After, we realize a pre-processing by applying an Infinite Size Edge Filter -ISEF- and processing method based on dynamic programming concept, in particular, Fishler algorithm designed by F*.

  16. Variational data assimilation system with nesting model for high resolution ocean circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Yoichi; Igarashi, Hiromichi; Hiyoshi, Yoshimasa; Sasaki, Yuji; Wakamatsu, Tsuyoshi; Awaji, Toshiyuki [Center for Earth Information Science and Technology, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25 Showa-machi, Kanazawa-Ku, Yokohama 236-0001 (Japan); In, Teiji [Japan Marine Science Foundation, 4-24, Minato-cho, Mutsu, Aomori, 035-0064 (Japan); Nakada, Satoshi [Graduate School of Maritime Science, Kobe University, 5-1-1, Fukae-minamimachi, Higashinada-Ku, Kobe, 658-0022 (Japan); Nishina, Kei, E-mail: ishikaway@jamstec.go.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawaoiwake-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    To obtain the high-resolution analysis fields for ocean circulation, a new incremental approach is developed using a four-dimensional variational data assimilation system with nesting models. The results show that there are substantial biases when using a classical method combined with data assimilation and downscaling, caused by different dynamics resulting from the different resolutions of the models used within the nesting models. However, a remarkable reduction in biases of the low-resolution model relative to the high-resolution model was observed using our new approach in narrow strait regions, such as the Tsushima and Tsugaru straits, where the difference in the dynamics represented by the high- and low-resolution models is substantial. In addition, error reductions are demonstrated in the downstream region of these narrow channels associated with the propagation of information through the model dynamics. (paper)

  17. Evaluation of a compartmental model for estimating tumor hypoxia via FMISO dynamic PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenli; Nehmeh, Sadek A; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Zanzonico, Pat B; Schmidtlein, C Ross; Lee, Nancy Y; Humm, John L; Georgi, Jens-Christoph; Paulus, Timo; Narayanan, Manoj; Bal, Matthieu

    2009-01-01

    This paper systematically evaluates a pharmacokinetic compartmental model for identifying tumor hypoxia using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). A generic irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartmental model was used. A dynamic PET image dataset was simulated with three tumor regions-normoxic, hypoxic and necrotic-embedded in a normal-tissue background, and with an image-based arterial input function. Each voxelized tissue's time activity curve (TAC) was simulated with typical values of kinetic parameters, as deduced from FMISO-PET data from nine head-and-neck cancer patients. The dynamic dataset was first produced without any statistical noise to ensure that correct kinetic parameters were reproducible. Next, to investigate the stability of kinetic parameter estimation in the presence of noise, 1000 noisy samples of the dynamic dataset were generated, from which 1000 noisy estimates of kinetic parameters were calculated and used to estimate the sample mean and covariance matrix. It is found that a more peaked input function gave less variation in various kinetic parameters, and the variation of kinetic parameters could also be reduced by two region-of-interest averaging techniques. To further investigate how bias in the arterial input function affected the kinetic parameter estimation, a shift error was introduced in the peak amplitude and peak location of the input TAC, and the bias of various kinetic parameters calculated. In summary, mathematical phantom studies have been used to determine the statistical accuracy and precision of model-based kinetic analysis, which helps to validate this analysis and provides guidance in planning clinical dynamic FMISO-PET studies.

  18. Quantification of in vivo metabolic kinetics of hyperpolarized pyruvate in rat kidneys using dynamic 13C MRSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Mayer, Dirk; Gu, Meng; Yen, Yi-Fen; Josan, Sonal; Tropp, James; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Hurd, Ralph; Spielman, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    With signal-to-noise ratio enhancements on the order of 10,000-fold, hyperpolarized MRSI of metabolically active substrates allows the study of both the injected substrate and downstream metabolic products in vivo. Although hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate, in particular, has been used to demonstrate metabolic activities in various animal models, robust quantification and metabolic modeling remain important areas of investigation. Enzyme saturation effects are routinely seen with commonly used doses of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate; however, most metrics proposed to date, including metabolite ratios, time-to-peak of metabolic products and single exchange rate constants, fail to capture these saturation effects. In addition, the widely used small-flip-angle excitation approach does not correctly model the inflow of fresh downstream metabolites generated proximal to the target slice, which is often a significant factor in vivo. In this work, we developed an efficient quantification framework employing a spiral-based dynamic spectroscopic imaging approach. The approach overcomes the aforementioned limitations and demonstrates that the in vivo (13)C labeling of lactate and alanine after a bolus injection of [1-(13)C]pyruvate is well approximated by saturatable kinetics, which can be mathematically modeled using a Michaelis-Menten-like formulation, with the resulting estimated apparent maximal reaction velocity V(max) and apparent Michaelis constant K(M) being unbiased with respect to critical experimental parameters, including the substrate dose, bolus shape and duration. Although the proposed saturatable model has a similar mathematical formulation to the original Michaelis-Menten kinetics, it is conceptually different. In this study, we focus on the (13)C labeling of lactate and alanine and do not differentiate the labeling mechanism (net flux or isotopic exchange) or the respective contribution of various factors (organ perfusion rate, substrate transport

  19. THE DYNAMICS OF PEACEFUL RESOLUTION OF THE GEORGIAN-ABKHAZ CONFLICT (BEFORE THE AUGUST 2008 EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А О Ласария

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, research attention is paid to the structure and dynamics of the peaceful resolu-tion of ethnopolitical conflicts in the Caucasus region (on the example of the Georgian-Abkhaz confrontation. The study takes into account the factors that were the catalysts of the escalation of the ethnopolitical conflict in the territory of Abkhazia. The collapse of the USSR and the collapse of the ideology of internationalism led to the need to develop a completely new identity. Most of the elites and socio-political movements of the post-Soviet period have focused on the formation of ideological structures from national and historical roots. In the last decade of the 20th century, the tendencies towards the realization of the right to national self-determination (in Abkhazia and South Ossetia and on the other hand to maintain the territorial integrity of the state (for example, in post-Soviet Georgia acquired an antagonistic character. An important political goal is to identify conceptual aspects of the resolution of the Georgian-Abkhaz conflict, which can be used as a basis for elaborating mechanisms for regulating ethnopolitical conflicts in the Caucasus region.

  20. Impact of respiratory motion correction and spatial resolution on lesion detection in PET: a simulation study based on real MR dynamic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polycarpou, Irene; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; King, Andrew P.; Marsden, Paul K.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of respiratory motion correction and spatial resolution on lesion detectability in PET as a function of lesion size and tracer uptake. Real respiratory signals describing different breathing types are combined with a motion model formed from real dynamic MR data to simulate multiple dynamic PET datasets acquired from a continuously moving subject. Lung and liver lesions were simulated with diameters ranging from 6 to 12 mm and lesion to background ratio ranging from 3:1 to 6:1. Projection data for 6 and 3 mm PET scanner resolution were generated using analytic simulations and reconstructed without and with motion correction. Motion correction was achieved using motion compensated image reconstruction. The detectability performance was quantified by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis obtained using a channelized Hotelling observer and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated as the figure of merit. The results indicate that respiratory motion limits the detectability of lung and liver lesions, depending on the variation of the breathing cycle length and amplitude. Patients with large quiescent periods had a greater AUC than patients with regular breathing cycles and patients with long-term variability in respiratory cycle or higher motion amplitude. In addition, small (less than 10 mm diameter) or low contrast (3:1) lesions showed the greatest improvement in AUC as a result of applying motion correction. In particular, after applying motion correction the AUC is improved by up to 42% with current PET resolution (i.e. 6 mm) and up to 51% for higher PET resolution (i.e. 3 mm). Finally, the benefit of increasing the scanner resolution is small unless motion correction is applied. This investigation indicates high impact of respiratory motion correction on lesion detectability in PET and highlights the importance of motion correction in order to benefit from the increased resolution of future

  1. Impact of respiratory motion correction and spatial resolution on lesion detection in PET: a simulation study based on real MR dynamic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycarpou, Irene; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; King, Andrew P; Marsden, Paul K

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of respiratory motion correction and spatial resolution on lesion detectability in PET as a function of lesion size and tracer uptake. Real respiratory signals describing different breathing types are combined with a motion model formed from real dynamic MR data to simulate multiple dynamic PET datasets acquired from a continuously moving subject. Lung and liver lesions were simulated with diameters ranging from 6 to 12 mm and lesion to background ratio ranging from 3:1 to 6:1. Projection data for 6 and 3 mm PET scanner resolution were generated using analytic simulations and reconstructed without and with motion correction. Motion correction was achieved using motion compensated image reconstruction. The detectability performance was quantified by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis obtained using a channelized Hotelling observer and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated as the figure of merit. The results indicate that respiratory motion limits the detectability of lung and liver lesions, depending on the variation of the breathing cycle length and amplitude. Patients with large quiescent periods had a greater AUC than patients with regular breathing cycles and patients with long-term variability in respiratory cycle or higher motion amplitude. In addition, small (less than 10 mm diameter) or low contrast (3:1) lesions showed the greatest improvement in AUC as a result of applying motion correction. In particular, after applying motion correction the AUC is improved by up to 42% with current PET resolution (i.e. 6 mm) and up to 51% for higher PET resolution (i.e. 3 mm). Finally, the benefit of increasing the scanner resolution is small unless motion correction is applied. This investigation indicates high impact of respiratory motion correction on lesion detectability in PET and highlights the importance of motion correction in order to benefit from the increased resolution of future

  2. A Microfluidic Platform for Correlative Live-Cell and Super-Resolution Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Johnny; Cordier, Guillaume Alan; Bálint, Štefan; Sandoval Álvarez, Ángel; Borbely, Joseph Steven; Lakadamyali, Melike

    2014-01-01

    Recently, super-resolution microscopy methods such as stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) have enabled visualization of subcellular structures below the optical resolution limit. Due to the poor temporal resolution, however, these methods have mostly been used to image fixed cells or dynamic processes that evolve on slow time-scales. In particular, fast dynamic processes and their relationship to the underlying ultrastructure or nanoscale protein organization cannot be discerned. To overcome this limitation, we have recently developed a correlative and sequential imaging method that combines live-cell and super-resolution microscopy. This approach adds dynamic background to ultrastructural images providing a new dimension to the interpretation of super-resolution data. However, currently, it suffers from the need to carry out tedious steps of sample preparation manually. To alleviate this problem, we implemented a simple and versatile microfluidic platform that streamlines the sample preparation steps in between live-cell and super-resolution imaging. The platform is based on a microfluidic chip with parallel, miniaturized imaging chambers and an automated fluid-injection device, which delivers a precise amount of a specified reagent to the selected imaging chamber at a specific time within the experiment. We demonstrate that this system can be used for live-cell imaging, automated fixation, and immunostaining of adherent mammalian cells in situ followed by STORM imaging. We further demonstrate an application by correlating mitochondrial dynamics, morphology, and nanoscale mitochondrial protein distribution in live and super-resolution images. PMID:25545548

  3. Modeling initial contact dynamics during ambulation with dynamic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Andrew R; Wang, Mei; Smith, Peter A; Harris, Gerald F

    2007-04-01

    Ankle-foot orthoses are frequently used interventions to correct pathological gait. Their effects on the kinematics and kinetics of the proximal joints are of great interest when prescribing ankle-foot orthoses to specific patient groups. Mathematical Dynamic Model (MADYMO) is developed to simulate motor vehicle crash situations and analyze tissue injuries of the occupants based multibody dynamic theories. Joint kinetics output from an inverse model were perturbed and input to the forward model to examine the effects of changes in the internal sagittal ankle moment on knee and hip kinematics following heel strike. Increasing the internal ankle moment (augmentation, equivalent to gastroc-soleus contraction) produced less pronounced changes in kinematic results at the hip, knee and ankle than decreasing the moment (attenuation, equivalent to gastroc-soleus relaxation). Altering the internal ankle moment produced two distinctly different kinematic curve morphologies at the hip. Decreased internal ankle moments increased hip flexion, peaking at roughly 8% of the gait cycle. Increasing internal ankle moments decreased hip flexion to a lesser degree, and approached normal at the same point in the gait cycle. Increasing the internal ankle moment produced relatively small, well-behaved extension-biased kinematic results at the knee. Decreasing the internal ankle moment produced more substantial changes in knee kinematics towards flexion that increased with perturbation magnitude. Curve morphologies were similar to those at the hip. Immediately following heel strike, kinematic results at the ankle showed movement in the direction of the internal moment perturbation. Increased internal moments resulted in kinematic patterns that rapidly approach normal after initial differences. When the internal ankle moment was decreased, differences from normal were much greater and did not rapidly decrease. This study shows that MADYMO can be successfully applied to accomplish forward

  4. Polar Coordinate Lattice Boltzmann Kinetic Modeling of Detonation Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chuan-Dong; Li Ying-Jun; Xu Ai-Guo; Zhang Guang-Cai

    2014-01-01

    A novel polar coordinate lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for detonation phenomena is presented and applied to investigate typical implosion and explosion processes. In this model, the change of discrete distribution function due to local chemical reaction is dynamically coupled into the modified lattice Boltzmann equation which could recover the Navier—Stokes equations, including contribution of chemical reaction, via the Chapman—Enskog expansion. For the numerical investigations, the main focuses are the nonequilibrium behaviors in these processes. The system at the disc center is always in its thermodynamic equilibrium in the highly symmetric case. The internal kinetic energies in different degrees of freedom around the detonation front do not coincide. The dependence of the reaction rate on the pressure, influences of the shock strength and reaction rate on the departure amplitude of the system from its local thermodynamic equilibrium are probed. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  5. Protein dynamics by neutron scattering: The protein dynamical transition and the fragile-to-strong dynamical crossover in hydrated lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magazù, Salvatore; Migliardo, Federica; Benedetto, Antonio; Vertessy, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The role played by the instrumental energy resolution in neutron scattering is presented. • The effect of natural bioprotectants on protein dynamics is shown. • A connection between the protein dynamical transition and the fragile-to-strong dynamical crossover is formulated. - Abstract: In this work Elastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering (EINS) results on lysozyme water mixtures in absence and in presence of bioprotectant systems are presented. The EINS data have been collected by using the IN13 and the IN10 spectrometers at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL, Grenoble, France) allowing to evaluate the temperature behaviour of the mean square displacement and of the relaxation time for the investigated systems. The obtained experimental findings together with theoretical calculations allow to put into evidence the