WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamic inverse computation

  1. Inverse problems in stochastic computational dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Capiez-Lernout, Evangéline; Soize, Christian

    2008-01-01

    International audience; This paper deals with robust updating of dynamical systems using stochastic computational models for which model and parameter uncertainties are taken into account by the nonparametric probabilistic approach. Such a problem is formulated as an inverse problem consisting in identifying the parameters of the mean computational model and the parameters of the probabilistic model of uncertainties. This inverse problem leads us to solve an optimization problem for which the...

  2. Dynamical inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Gladwell, Graham ML

    2011-01-01

    The papers in this volume present an overview of the general aspects and practical applications of dynamic inverse methods, through the interaction of several topics, ranging from classical and advanced inverse problems in vibration, isospectral systems, dynamic methods for structural identification, active vibration control and damage detection, imaging shear stiffness in biological tissues, wave propagation, to computational and experimental aspects relevant for engineering problems.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics vs. inverse dynamics methods to determine passive drag in two breaststroke glide positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, L; Mantha, V R; Silva, A J; Fernandes, R J; Marinho, D A; Vilas-Boas, J P; Machado, L; Rouboa, A

    2015-07-16

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) plays an important role to quantify, understand and "observe" the water movements around the human body and its effects on drag (D). We aimed to investigate the flow effects around the swimmer and to compare the drag and drag coefficient (CD) values obtained from experiments (using cable velocimetry in a swimming pool) with those of CFD simulations for the two ventral gliding positions assumed during the breaststroke underwater cycle (with shoulders flexed and upper limbs extended above the head-GP1; with shoulders in neutral position and upper limbs extended along the trunk-GP2). Six well-trained breaststroke male swimmers (with reasonable homogeneity of body characteristics) participated in the experimental tests; afterwards a 3D swimmer model was created to fit within the limits of the sample body size profile. The standard k-ε turbulent model was used to simulate the fluid flow around the swimmer model. Velocity ranged from 1.30 to 1.70 m/s for GP1 and 1.10 to 1.50 m/s for GP2. Values found for GP1 and GP2 were lower for CFD than experimental ones. Nevertheless, both CFD and experimental drag/drag coefficient values displayed a tendency to jointly increase/decrease with velocity, except for GP2 CD where CFD and experimental values display opposite tendencies. Results suggest that CFD values obtained by single model approaches should be considered with caution due to small body shape and dimension differences to real swimmers. For better accuracy of CFD studies, realistic individual 3D models of swimmers are required, and specific kinematics respected.

  4. State-space solutions to the dynamic magnetoencephalography inverse problem using high performance computing

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Christopher J; Temereanca, Simona; Desai, Neil U; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Brown, Emery N; 10.1214/11-AOAS483

    2011-01-01

    Determining the magnitude and location of neural sources within the brain that are responsible for generating magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals measured on the surface of the head is a challenging problem in functional neuroimaging. The number of potential sources within the brain exceeds by an order of magnitude the number of recording sites. As a consequence, the estimates for the magnitude and location of the neural sources will be ill-conditioned because of the underdetermined nature of the problem. One well-known technique designed to address this imbalance is the minimum norm estimator (MNE). This approach imposes an $L^2$ regularization constraint that serves to stabilize and condition the source parameter estimates. However, these classes of regularizer are static in time and do not consider the temporal constraints inherent to the biophysics of the MEG experiment. In this paper we propose a dynamic state-space model that accounts for both spatial and temporal correlations within and across candida...

  5. The representation and computation of generalized inverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xingping; Chen, Guoliang; Gong, Yi

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a novel representation for the generalized inverse . Based on this, we give an algorithm to compute this generalized inverse. As an application, we use Gauss-Jordan elimination to compute the weighted Moore-Penrose inverse and the Drazin inverse Ad.

  6. Integration of gravitational torques in cerebellar pathways allows for the dynamic inverse computation of vertical pointing movements of a robot arm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe J Gentili

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several authors suggested that gravitational forces are centrally represented in the brain for planning, control and sensorimotor predictions of movements. Furthermore, some studies proposed that the cerebellum computes the inverse dynamics (internal inverse model whereas others suggested that it computes sensorimotor predictions (internal forward model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study proposes a model of cerebellar pathways deduced from both biological and physical constraints. The model learns the dynamic inverse computation of the effect of gravitational torques from its sensorimotor predictions without calculating an explicit inverse computation. By using supervised learning, this model learns to control an anthropomorphic robot arm actuated by two antagonists McKibben artificial muscles. This was achieved by using internal parallel feedback loops containing neural networks which anticipate the sensorimotor consequences of the neural commands. The artificial neural networks architecture was similar to the large-scale connectivity of the cerebellar cortex. Movements in the sagittal plane were performed during three sessions combining different initial positions, amplitudes and directions of movements to vary the effects of the gravitational torques applied to the robotic arm. The results show that this model acquired an internal representation of the gravitational effects during vertical arm pointing movements. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is consistent with the proposal that the cerebellar cortex contains an internal representation of gravitational torques which is encoded through a learning process. Furthermore, this model suggests that the cerebellum performs the inverse dynamics computation based on sensorimotor predictions. This highlights the importance of sensorimotor predictions of gravitational torques acting on upper limb movements performed in the gravitational field.

  7. Inverse Computation and the Universal Resolving Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We survey fundamental concepts for inverse programming and thenpresent the Uni v ersal Resolving Algorithm, an algorithm for inverse computation in a first-orde r , functional programming language. We discuss the key concepts of the algorithm, including a three-step approach based on the notion of a perfect process tree, and demonstrate our implementation with several examples of inverse computation.

  8. Inversion based on computational simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.; Saquib, S.S.

    1998-09-01

    A standard approach to solving inversion problems that involve many parameters uses gradient-based optimization to find the parameters that best match the data. The authors discuss enabling techniques that facilitate application of this approach to large-scale computational simulations, which are the only way to investigate many complex physical phenomena. Such simulations may not seem to lend themselves to calculation of the gradient with respect to numerous parameters. However, adjoint differentiation allows one to efficiently compute the gradient of an objective function with respect to all the variables of a simulation. When combined with advanced gradient-based optimization algorithms, adjoint differentiation permits one to solve very large problems of optimization or parameter estimation. These techniques will be illustrated through the simulation of the time-dependent diffusion of infrared light through tissue, which has been used to perform optical tomography. The techniques discussed have a wide range of applicability to modeling including the optimization of models to achieve a desired design goal.

  9. Location identification for indoor instantaneous point contaminant source by probability-based inverse Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Zhai, Z

    2008-02-01

    Indoor pollutions jeopardize human health and welfare and may even cause serious morbidity and mortality under extreme conditions. To effectively control and improve indoor environment quality requires immediate interpretation of pollutant sensor readings and accurate identification of indoor pollution history and source characteristics (e.g. source location and release time). This procedure is complicated by non-uniform and dynamic contaminant indoor dispersion behaviors as well as diverse sensor network distributions. This paper introduces a probability concept based inverse modeling method that is able to identify the source location for an instantaneous point source placed in an enclosed environment with known source release time. The study presents the mathematical models that address three different sensing scenarios: sensors without concentration readings, sensors with spatial concentration readings, and sensors with temporal concentration readings. The paper demonstrates the inverse modeling method and algorithm with two case studies: air pollution in an office space and in an aircraft cabin. The predictions were successfully verified against the forward simulation settings, indicating good capability of the method in finding indoor pollutant sources. The research lays a solid ground for further study of the method for more complicated indoor contamination problems. The method developed can help track indoor contaminant source location with limited sensor outputs. This will ensure an effective and prompt execution of building control strategies and thus achieve a healthy and safe indoor environment. The method can also assist the design of optimal sensor networks.

  10. Recurrent Neural Network for Computing Outer Inverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Živković, Ivan S; Stanimirović, Predrag S; Wei, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Two linear recurrent neural networks for generating outer inverses with prescribed range and null space are defined. Each of the proposed recurrent neural networks is based on the matrix-valued differential equation, a generalization of dynamic equations proposed earlier for the nonsingular matrix inversion, the Moore-Penrose inversion, as well as the Drazin inversion, under the condition of zero initial state. The application of the first approach is conditioned by the properties of the spectrum of a certain matrix; the second approach eliminates this drawback, though at the cost of increasing the number of matrix operations. The cases corresponding to the most common generalized inverses are defined. The conditions that ensure stability of the proposed neural network are presented. Illustrative examples present the results of numerical simulations.

  11. Multi-task Gaussian Process Learning of Robot Inverse Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Kian Ming; Williams, Christopher K. I.; Klanke, Stefan; Vijayakumar, Sethu

    2008-01-01

    The inverse dynamics problem for a robotic manipulator is to compute the torques needed at the joints to drive it along a given trajectory; it is beneficial to be able to learn this function for adaptive control. A robotic manipulator will often need to be controlled while holding different loads in its end effector, giving rise to a multi-task learning problem. By placing independent Gaussian process priors over the latent functions of the inverse dynamics, we obtain a multi-t...

  12. The inverse maximum dynamic flow problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAGHERIAN; Mehri

    2010-01-01

    We consider the inverse maximum dynamic flow (IMDF) problem.IMDF problem can be described as: how to change the capacity vector of a dynamic network as little as possible so that a given feasible dynamic flow becomes a maximum dynamic flow.After discussing some characteristics of this problem,it is converted to a constrained minimum dynamic cut problem.Then an efficient algorithm which uses two maximum dynamic flow algorithms is proposed to solve the problem.

  13. An inverse problem in analytical dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guang-Cheng; Mei-Feng-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an inverse problem in analytical dynamics.The inverse problem is to construct the Lagrangian when the integrals of a system are given.Firstly,the differential equations are obtained by using the time derivative of the integrals.Secondly,the differential equations can be written in the Lagrange equations under certain conditions and the Lagrangian can be obtained.Finally,two examples are given to illustrate the application of the result.

  14. Inverse Dynamics of Flexible Manipulators

    OpenAIRE

    Moberg, Stig; Hanssen, Sven

    2010-01-01

    High performance robot manipulators, in terms of cycle time and accuracy, require well designed control methods, based on accurate dynamic models. Robot manipulators are traditionally described by the flexible joint model or the flexible link model. These models only consider elasticity in the rotational direction. When these models are used for control or simulation, the accuracy can be limited due to the model simplifications, since a real manipulator has a distributed flexibility inall directi...

  15. Recurrent Neural Network for Computing the Drazin Inverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanimirović, Predrag S; Zivković, Ivan S; Wei, Yimin

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a recurrent neural network (RNN) for computing the Drazin inverse of a real matrix in real time. This recurrent neural network (RNN) is composed of n independent parts (subnetworks), where n is the order of the input matrix. These subnetworks can operate concurrently, so parallel and distributed processing can be achieved. In this way, the computational advantages over the existing sequential algorithms can be attained in real-time applications. The RNN defined in this paper is convenient for an implementation in an electronic circuit. The number of neurons in the neural network is the same as the number of elements in the output matrix, which represents the Drazin inverse. The difference between the proposed RNN and the existing ones for the Drazin inverse computation lies in their network architecture and dynamics. The conditions that ensure the stability of the defined RNN as well as its convergence toward the Drazin inverse are considered. In addition, illustrative examples and examples of application to the practical engineering problems are discussed to show the efficacy of the proposed neural network.

  16. Computationally efficient Bayesian inference for inverse problems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzouk, Youssef M.; Najm, Habib N.; Rahn, Larry A.

    2007-10-01

    Bayesian statistics provides a foundation for inference from noisy and incomplete data, a natural mechanism for regularization in the form of prior information, and a quantitative assessment of uncertainty in the inferred results. Inverse problems - representing indirect estimation of model parameters, inputs, or structural components - can be fruitfully cast in this framework. Complex and computationally intensive forward models arising in physical applications, however, can render a Bayesian approach prohibitive. This difficulty is compounded by high-dimensional model spaces, as when the unknown is a spatiotemporal field. We present new algorithmic developments for Bayesian inference in this context, showing strong connections with the forward propagation of uncertainty. In particular, we introduce a stochastic spectral formulation that dramatically accelerates the Bayesian solution of inverse problems via rapid evaluation of a surrogate posterior. We also explore dimensionality reduction for the inference of spatiotemporal fields, using truncated spectral representations of Gaussian process priors. These new approaches are demonstrated on scalar transport problems arising in contaminant source inversion and in the inference of inhomogeneous material or transport properties. We also present a Bayesian framework for parameter estimation in stochastic models, where intrinsic stochasticity may be intermingled with observational noise. Evaluation of a likelihood function may not be analytically tractable in these cases, and thus several alternative Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) schemes, operating on the product space of the observations and the parameters, are introduced.

  17. Handling of impact forces in inverse dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisseling, Rob W.; Hof, At L.

    2006-01-01

    In the standard inverse dynamic method, joint moments are assessed from ground reaction force data and position data, where segmental accelerations are calculated by numerical differentiation of position data after low-pass filtering. This method falls short in analyzing the impact phase, e.g.

  18. Linear inverse problem of the reactor dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, N. P.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is the study transient processes in nuclear reactors. The mathematical model of the reactor dynamics excluding reverse thermal coupling is investigated. This model is described by a system of integral-differential equations, consisting of a non-stationary anisotropic multispeed kinetic transport equation and a delayed neutron balance equation. An inverse problem was formulated to determine the stationary part of the function source along with the solution of the direct problem. The author obtained sufficient conditions for the existence and uniqueness of a generalized solution of this inverse problem.

  19. Double inverse stochastic resonance with dynamic synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuntarla, Muhammet; Torres, Joaquin J.; So, Paul; Ozer, Mahmut; Barreto, Ernest

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of a model neuron that receives a biophysically realistic noisy postsynaptic current based on uncorrelated spiking activity from a large number of afferents. We show that, with static synapses, such noise can give rise to inverse stochastic resonance (ISR) as a function of the presynaptic firing rate. We compare this to the case with dynamic synapses that feature short-term synaptic plasticity and show that the interval of presynaptic firing rate over which ISR exists can be extended or diminished. We consider both short-term depression and facilitation. Interestingly, we find that a double inverse stochastic resonance (DISR), with two distinct wells centered at different presynaptic firing rates, can appear.

  20. Inverse Eigenvalue Problem in Structural Dynamics Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqing Xie; Hua Dai

    2006-01-01

    A kind of inverse eigenvalue problem in structural dynamics design is considered. The problem is formulated as an optimization problem. The properties of this problem are analyzed, and the existence of the optimum solution is proved. The directional derivative of the objective function is obtained and a necessary condition for a point to be a local minimum point is given. Then a numerical algorithm for solving the problem is presented and a plane-truss problem is discussed to show the applications of the theories and the algorithm.

  1. Computing the Moore-Penrose Inverse of a Matrix with a Computer Algebra System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    In this paper "Derive" functions are provided for the computation of the Moore-Penrose inverse of a matrix, as well as for solving systems of linear equations by means of the Moore-Penrose inverse. Making it possible to compute the Moore-Penrose inverse easily with one of the most commonly used Computer Algebra Systems--and to have the blueprint…

  2. Inverse Dynamics and the Immeasurable Motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, John; Andersen, Michael Skipper; Damsgaard, Michael

    , typically gait, and a well-conducted experiment with a good-quality motion capture system will register this degree-of-freedom with sufficient accuracy for most applications. However, it is known from bone pin studies (Benoit et al. 2006) that the knee has significant movements additional to flexion...... complications of this scheme is that a large part of the acting forces are due to muscle contractions, which in this case also must be simulated. The ability to predict muscle contraction in complex movements has improved significantly in recent years, but the simultaneous prediction of movement and force...... in a reformulation of the underdeterminate inverse dynamics-type equilibrium equations to allow certain degrees of freedom to be governed by elastic equilibrium rather than measured movements. We briefly outline the method and compare predicted movements during overground gait on a treadmill measured using...

  3. A GPU-Computing Approach to Solar Stokes Profile Inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Harker, Brian J

    2012-01-01

    We present a new computational approach to the inversion of solar photospheric Stokes polarization profiles, under the Milne-Eddington model, for vector magnetography. Our code, named GENESIS (GENEtic Stokes Inversion Strategy), employs multi-threaded parallel-processing techniques to harness the computing power of graphics processing units GPUs, along with algorithms designed to exploit the inherent parallelism of the Stokes inversion problem. Using a genetic algorithm (GA) engineered specifically for use with a GPU, we produce full-disc maps of the photospheric vector magnetic field from polarized spectral line observations recorded by the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) instrument. We show the advantages of pairing a population-parallel genetic algorithm with data-parallel GPU-computing techniques, and present an overview of the Stokes inversion problem, including a description of our adaptation to the GPU-computing paradigm. Full-disc vector ma...

  4. Computer-Aided Numerical Inversion of Laplace Transform

    OpenAIRE

    Umesh Kumar

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the technique for the computer aided numerical inversion of Laplace transform. The inversion technique is based on the properties of a family of three parameter exponential probability density functions. The only limitation in the technique is the word length of the computer being used. The Laplace transform has been used extensively in the frequency domain solution of linear, lumped time invariant networks but its application to the time domain has been limited, mainly be...

  5. Dynamic data integration and stochastic inversion of a confined aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Zhang, Y.; Irsa, J.; Huang, H.; Wang, L.

    2013-12-01

    Much work has been done in developing and applying inverse methods to aquifer modeling. The scope of this paper is to investigate the applicability of a new direct method for large inversion problems and to incorporate uncertainty measures in the inversion outcomes (Wang et al., 2013). The problem considered is a two-dimensional inverse model (50×50 grid) of steady-state flow for a heterogeneous ground truth model (500×500 grid) with two hydrofacies. From the ground truth model, decreasing number of wells (12, 6, 3) were sampled for facies types, based on which experimental indicator histograms and directional variograms were computed. These parameters and models were used by Sequential Indicator Simulation to generate 100 realizations of hydrofacies patterns in a 100×100 (geostatistical) grid, which were conditioned to the facies measurements at wells. These realizations were smoothed with Simulated Annealing, coarsened to the 50×50 inverse grid, before they were conditioned with the direct method to the dynamic data, i.e., observed heads and groundwater fluxes at the same sampled wells. A set of realizations of estimated hydraulic conductivities (Ks), flow fields, and boundary conditions were created, which centered on the 'true' solutions from solving the ground truth model. Both hydrofacies conductivities were computed with an estimation accuracy of ×10% (12 wells), ×20% (6 wells), ×35% (3 wells) of the true values. For boundary condition estimation, the accuracy was within × 15% (12 wells), 30% (6 wells), and 50% (3 wells) of the true values. The inversion system of equations was solved with LSQR (Paige et al, 1982), for which coordinate transform and matrix scaling preprocessor were used to improve the condition number (CN) of the coefficient matrix. However, when the inverse grid was refined to 100×100, Gaussian Noise Perturbation was used to limit the growth of the CN before the matrix solve. To scale the inverse problem up (i.e., without smoothing

  6. Equivalence Between Approximate Dynamic Inversion and Proportional-Integral Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-29

    Hovakimyan, E. Lavretsky, and C. Cao, “Dynamic inversion of multi- input nonaffine systems via time-scale separation,” in Proceedings of the American Control Conference , Minneapolis...Adaptive dynamic inversion for nonaffine-in-control systems via time-scale separation: Part II,” in Proceedings of the American Control Conference , Portland

  7. Computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Blazek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics: Principles and Applications, Third Edition presents students, engineers, and scientists with all they need to gain a solid understanding of the numerical methods and principles underlying modern computation techniques in fluid dynamics. By providing complete coverage of the essential knowledge required in order to write codes or understand commercial codes, the book gives the reader an overview of fundamentals and solution strategies in the early chapters before moving on to cover the details of different solution techniques. This updated edition includes new

  8. Gas Dynamics Equations: Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Gui-Qiang G

    2012-01-01

    Shock waves, vorticity waves, and entropy waves are fundamental discontinuity waves in nature and arise in supersonic or transonic gas flow, or from a very sudden release (explosion) of chemical, nuclear, electrical, radiation, or mechanical energy in a limited space. Tracking these discontinuities and their interactions, especially when and where new waves arise and interact in the motion of gases, is one of the main motivations for numerical computation for the gas dynamics equations. In this paper, we discuss some historic and recent developments, as well as mathematical challenges, in designing and formulating efficient numerical methods and algorithms to compute weak entropy solutions for the Euler equations for gas dynamics.

  9. Computing generalized inverses using LU factorization of matrix product

    CERN Document Server

    Stanimirović,; Tasić,; B, M; 10.1080/00207160701582077

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm for computing {2, 3}, {2, 4}, {1, 2, 3}, {1, 2, 4} -inverses and the Moore-Penrose inverse of a given rational matrix A is established. Classes A(2, 3)s and A(2, 4)s are characterized in terms of matrix products (R*A)+R* and T*(AT*)+, where R and T are rational matrices with appropriate dimensions and corresponding rank. The proposed algorithm is based on these general representations and the Cholesky factorization of symmetric positive matrices. The algorithm is implemented in programming languages MATHEMATICA and DELPHI, and illustrated via examples. Numerical results of the algorithm, corresponding to the Moore-Penrose inverse, are compared with corresponding results obtained by several known methods for computing the Moore-Penrose inverse.

  10. Breast ultrasound computed tomography using waveform inversion with source encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Matthews, Thomas; Anis, Fatima; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) holds great promise for improving the detection and management of breast cancer. Because they are based on the acoustic wave equation, waveform inversion-based reconstruction methods can produce images that possess improved spatial resolution properties over those produced by ray-based methods. However, waveform inversion methods are computationally demanding and have not been applied widely in USCT breast imaging. In this work, source encoding concepts are employed to develop an accelerated USCT reconstruction method that circumvents the large computational burden of conventional waveform inversion methods. This method, referred to as the waveform inversion with source encoding (WISE) method, encodes the measurement data using a random encoding vector and determines an estimate of the speed-of-sound distribution by solving a stochastic optimization problem by use of a stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Computer-simulation studies are conducted to demonstrate the use of the WISE method. Using a single graphics processing unit card, each iteration can be completed within 25 seconds for a 128 × 128 mm2 reconstruction region. The results suggest that the WISE method maintains the high spatial resolution of waveform inversion methods while significantly reducing the computational burden.

  11. Computer-Aided Numerical Inversion of Laplace Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Kumar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the technique for the computer aided numerical inversion of Laplace transform. The inversion technique is based on the properties of a family of three parameter exponential probability density functions. The only limitation in the technique is the word length of the computer being used. The Laplace transform has been used extensively in the frequency domain solution of linear, lumped time invariant networks but its application to the time domain has been limited, mainly because of the difficulty in finding the necessary poles and residues. The numerical inversion technique mentioned above does away with the poles and residues but uses precomputed numbers to find the time response. This technique is applicable to the solution of partially differentiable equations and certain classes of linear systems with time varying components.

  12. Influence of the 3D inverse dynamic method on the joint forces and moments during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, R; Nicol, E; Chèze, L

    2007-10-01

    The joint forces and moments are commonly used in gait analysis. They can be computed by four different 3D inverse dynamic methods proposed in the literature, either based on vectors and Euler angles, wrenches and quaternions, homogeneous matrices, or generalized coordinates and forces. In order to analyze the influence of the inverse dynamic method, the joint forces and moments were computed during gait on nine healthy subjects. A ratio was computed between the relative dispersions (due to the method) and the absolute amplitudes of the gait curves. The influence of the inverse dynamic method was negligible at the ankle (2%) but major at the knee and the hip joints (40%). This influence seems to be due to the dynamic computation rather than the kinematic computation. Compared to the influence of the joint center location, the body segment inertial parameter estimation, and more, the influence of the inverse dynamic method is at least of equivalent importance. This point should be confirmed with other subjects, possibly pathologic, and other movements.

  13. Kalman filtering, smoothing and recursive robot arm forward and inverse dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, G.

    1986-01-01

    The inverse and forward dynamics problems for multi-link serial manipulators are solved by using recursive techniques from linear filtering and smoothing theory. The pivotal step is to cast the system dynamics and kinematics as a two-point boundary-value problem. Solution of this problem leads to filtering and smoothing techniques identical to the equations of Kalman filtering and Bryson-Frazier fixed time-interval smoothing. The solutions prescribe an inward filtering recursion to compute a sequence of constraint moments and forces followed by an outward recursion to determine a corresponding sequence of angular and linear accelerations. In addition to providing techniques to compute joint accelerations from applied joint moments (and vice versa), the report provides an approach to evaluate recursively the composite multi-link system inertia matrix and its inverse. The report lays the foundation for the potential use of filtering and smoothing techniques in robot inverse and forward dynamics and in robot control design.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Magoules, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    Exploring new variations of classical methods as well as recent approaches appearing in the field, Computational Fluid Dynamics demonstrates the extensive use of numerical techniques and mathematical models in fluid mechanics. It presents various numerical methods, including finite volume, finite difference, finite element, spectral, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), mixed-element-volume, and free surface flow.Taking a unified point of view, the book first introduces the basis of finite volume, weighted residual, and spectral approaches. The contributors present the SPH method, a novel ap

  15. Essential Computational Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    This book serves as a complete and self-contained introduction to the principles of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis. It is deliberately short (at approximately 300 pages) and can be used as a text for the first part of the course of applied CFD followed by a software tutorial. The main objectives of this non-traditional format are: 1) To introduce and explain, using simple examples where possible, the principles and methods of CFD analysis and to demystify the `black box’ of a CFD software tool, and 2) To provide a basic understanding of how CFD problems are set and

  16. Precise integration method without inverse matrix calculation for structural dynamic equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Mengfu; F. T. K. Au

    2007-01-01

    The precise integration method proposed for linear time-invariant homogeneous dynamic systems can provide accurate numerical results that approach an exact solution at integration points. However, difficulties arise when the algorithm is used for non-homogeneous dynamic systems due to the inverse matrix calculation required. In this paper, the structural dynamic equalibrium equations are converted into a special form, the inverse matrix calculation is replaced by the Crout decomposition method to solve the dynamic equilibrium equations, and the precise integration method without the inverse matrix calculation is obtained. The new algorithm enhances the present precise integration method by improving both the computational accuracy and efficiency. Two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the validity and efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  17. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  18. Computing approximate (symmetric block) rational Krylov subspaces without explicit inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Mach, Thomas; Pranić, Miroslav S.; Vandebril, Raf

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown, see TW623, that approximate extended Krylov subspaces can be computed —under certain assumptions— without any explicit inversion or system solves. Instead the necessary products A-1v are obtained in an implicit way retrieved from an enlarged Krylov subspace. In this paper this approach is generalized to rational Krylov subspaces, which contain besides poles at infinite and zero also finite non-zero poles. Also an adaption of the algorithm to the block and the symmetric ...

  19. Dynamic inversion method based on the time-staggered stereo-modeling scheme and its acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Hao; Yang, Dinghui; Wu, Hao

    2016-12-01

    A set of second-order differential equations describing the space-time behaviour of derivatives of displacement with respect to model parameters (i.e. waveform sensitivities) is obtained via taking the derivative of the original wave equations. The dynamic inversion method obtains sensitivities of the seismic displacement field with respect to earth properties directly by solving differential equations for them instead of constructing sensitivities from the displacement field itself. In this study, we have taken a new perspective on the dynamic inversion method and used acceleration approaches to reduce the computational time and memory usage to improve its ability of performing high-resolution imaging. The dynamic inversion method, which can simultaneously use different waves and multicomponent observation data, is appropriate for directly inverting elastic parameters, medium density or wave velocities. Full wavefield information is utilized as much as possible at the expense of a larger amount of calculations. To mitigate the computational burden, two ways are proposed to accelerate the method from a computer-implementation point of view. One is source encoding which uses a linear combination of all shots, and the other is to reduce the amount of calculations on forward modeling. We applied a new finite-difference (FD) method to the dynamic inversion to improve the computational accuracy and speed up the performance. Numerical experiments indicated that the new FD method can effectively suppress the numerical dispersion caused by the discretization of wave equations, resulting in enhanced computational efficiency with less memory cost for seismic modeling and inversion based on the full wave equations. We present some inversion results to demonstrate the validity of this method through both checkerboard and Marmousi models. It shows that this method is also convergent even with big deviations for the initial model. Besides, parallel calculations can be easily

  20. INVERSE DYNAMIC FORMULATION OF A NOVEL HYBRID MACHINE TOOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, hybrid devices have increasingly received more research.However, few of researchers studied the dynamic analysis.The inverse dynamic analysis of a novel hybrid machine tool designed in Tsinghua University is presented.The hybrid machine tool under consideration consists of parallel and serial structures, which is based on a new 2-DOF parallel platform and serial orientations.The kinematics and the dynamic equations are studied first for the parallel structure through Newton-Euler approach.And then, the dynamic analysis for serial structures is conducted.Finally, a closed-form inverse dynamic formulation is derived by using some elimination techniques.Some simulation results are also given.

  1. Dynamic inverse models in human-cyber-physical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ryan M.; Scobee, Dexter R. R.; Burden, Samuel A.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2016-05-01

    Human interaction with the physical world is increasingly mediated by automation. This interaction is characterized by dynamic coupling between robotic (i.e. cyber) and neuromechanical (i.e. human) decision-making agents. Guaranteeing performance of such human-cyber-physical systems will require predictive mathematical models of this dynamic coupling. Toward this end, we propose a rapprochement between robotics and neuromechanics premised on the existence of internal forward and inverse models in the human agent. We hypothesize that, in tele-robotic applications of interest, a human operator learns to invert automation dynamics, directly translating from desired task to required control input. By formulating the model inversion problem in the context of a tracking task for a nonlinear control system in control-a_ne form, we derive criteria for exponential tracking and show that the resulting dynamic inverse model generally renders a portion of the physical system state (i.e., the internal dynamics) unobservable from the human operator's perspective. Under stability conditions, we show that the human can achieve exponential tracking without formulating an estimate of the system's state so long as they possess an accurate model of the system's dynamics. These theoretical results are illustrated using a planar quadrotor example. We then demonstrate that the automation can intervene to improve performance of the tracking task by solving an optimal control problem. Performance is guaranteed to improve under the assumption that the human learns and inverts the dynamic model of the altered system. We conclude with a discussion of practical limitations that may hinder exact dynamic model inversion.

  2. Computational and methodological developments towards 3D full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, V.; Virieux, J.; Hu, G.; Jia, Y.; Operto, S.

    2010-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is one of the most promising techniques for seismic imaging. It relies on a formalism taking into account every piece of information contained in the seismic data as opposed to more classical techniques such as travel time tomography. As a result, FWI is a high resolution imaging process able to reach a spatial accuracy equal to half a wavelength. FWI is based on a local optimization scheme and therefore the main limitation concerns the starting model which has to be closed enough to the real one in order to converge to the global minimum. Another counterpart of FWI is the required computational resources when considering models and frequencies of interest. The task becomes even more tremendous when one tends to perform the inversion using the elastic equation instead of using the acoustic approximation. This is the reason why until recently most studies were limited to 2D cases. In the last few years, due to the increase of the available computational power, FWI has focused a lot of interests and continuous efforts towards inversion of 3D models, leading to remarkable applications up to the continental scale. We investigate the computational burden induced by FWI in 3D elastic media and propose some strategic features leading to the reduction of the numerical cost while providing a great flexibility in the inversion parametrization. First, in order to release the memory requirements, we developed our FWI algorithm in the frequency domain and take benefit of the wave-number redundancy in the seismic data to process a quite reduced number of frequencies. To do so, we extract frequency solutions from time marching techniques which are efficient for 3D structures. Moreover, this frequency approach permits a multi-resolution strategy by proceeding from low to high frequencies: the final model at one frequency is used as the starting model for the next frequency. This procedure overcomes partially the non-linear behavior of the inversion

  3. Giant dynamical Zeeman split in inverse spin valves

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X. R.

    2008-01-01

    The inversion of a spin valve device is proposed. Opposite to a conventional spin valve of a non-magnetic spacer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic metals, an inverse spin valve is a ferromagnet sandwiched between two non-magnetic metals. It is predicted that, under a bias, the chemical potentials of spin-up and spin-down electrons in the metals split at metal-ferromagnet interfaces, a dynamical Zeeman effect. This split is of the order of an applied bias. Thus, there should be no problem o...

  4. Inverse and forward dynamics: models of multi-body systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, E

    2003-01-01

    Connected multi-body systems exhibit notoriously complex behaviour when driven by external and internal forces and torques. The problem of reconstructing the internal forces and/or torques from the movements and known external forces is called the 'inverse dynamics problem', whereas calculating motion from known internal forces and/or torques and resulting reaction forces is called the 'forward dynamics problem'. When stepping forward to cross the street, people use muscle forces that generate angular accelerations of their body segments and, by virtue of reaction forces from the street, a forward acceleration of the centre of mass of their body. Inverse dynamics calculations applied to a set of motion data from such an event can teach us how temporal patterns of joint torques were responsible for the observed motion. In forward dynamics calculations we may attempt to create motion from such temporal patterns, which is extremely difficult, because of the complex mechanical linkage along the chains forming the multi-body system. To understand, predict and sometimes control multi-body systems, we may want to have mathematical expressions for them. The Newton-Euler, Lagrangian and Featherstone approaches have their advantages and disadvantages. The simulation of collisions and the inclusion of muscle forces or other internal forces are discussed. Also, the possibility to perform a mixed inverse and forward dynamics calculation are dealt with. The use and limitations of these approaches form the conclusion. PMID:14561340

  5. Dynamical Systems Some Computational Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Guckenheimer, J; Guckenheimer, John; Worfolk, Patrick

    1993-01-01

    We present several topics involving the computation of dynamical systems. The emphasis is on work in progress and the presentation is informal -- there are many technical details which are not fully discussed. The topics are chosen to demonstrate the various interactions between numerical computation and mathematical theory in the area of dynamical systems. We present an algorithm for the computation of stable manifolds of equilibrium points, describe the computation of Hopf bifurcations for equilibria in parametrized families of vector fields, survey the results of studies of codimension two global bifurcations, discuss a numerical analysis of the Hodgkin and Huxley equations, and describe some of the effects of symmetry on local bifurcation.

  6. Inverse problem of HIV cell dynamics using Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, J. A.; Guzmán, F. S.

    2017-01-01

    In order to describe the cell dynamics of T-cells in a patient infected with HIV, we use a flavour of Perelson's model. This is a non-linear system of Ordinary Differential Equations that describes the evolution of healthy, latently infected, infected T-cell concentrations and the free viral cells. Different parameters in the equations give different dynamics. Considering the concentration of these types of cells is known for a particular patient, the inverse problem consists in estimating the parameters in the model. We solve this inverse problem using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) that minimizes the error between the solutions of the model and the data from the patient. These errors depend on the parameters of the GA, like mutation rate and population, although a detailed analysis of this dependence will be described elsewhere.

  7. Computational simulation of bone fracture healing under inverse dynamisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Cameron J; Schütz, Michael A; Epari, Devakara R

    2017-02-01

    Adaptive finite element models have allowed researchers to test hypothetical relationships between the local mechanical environment and the healing of bone fractures. However, their predictive power has not yet been demonstrated by testing hypotheses ahead of experimental testing. In this study, an established mechano-biological scheme was used in an iterative finite element simulation of sheep tibial osteotomy healing under a hypothetical fixation regime, "inverse dynamisation". Tissue distributions, interfragmentary movement and stiffness across the fracture site were compared between stiff and flexible fixation conditions and scenarios in which fixation stiffness was increased at a discrete time-point. The modelling work was conducted blind to the experimental study to be published subsequently. The simulations predicted the fastest and most direct healing under constant stiff fixation, and the slowest healing under flexible fixation. Although low fixation stiffness promoted more callus formation prior to bridging, this conferred little additional stiffness to the fracture in the first 5 weeks. Thus, while switching to stiffer fixation facilitated rapid subsequent bridging of the fracture, no advantage of inverse dynamisation could be demonstrated. In vivo data remains necessary to conclusively test this treatment protocol and this will, in turn, provide an evaluation of the model's performance. The publication of both hypotheses and their computational simulation, prior to experimental testing, offers an appealing means to test the predictive power of mechano-biological models.

  8. Forward and Inverse Dynamics of the Biped PASIBOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Corral

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the supporting foot slippage of the biped robot PASIBOT and develops its forward and inverse dynamics for simple and double support phases. To address the slippage phenomenon, we consider an additional degree of freedom at the supporting foot and also distinguish between static and kinetic friction conditions. The inverse and forward dynamics, accounting for support foot slippage, are encoded in MATLAB. The algorithm predicts the motion of the biped from the torque function given by the biped’s sole motor. Thus, the algorithm becomes an indispensable tool for studying transient states of the biped (for example, the torques required for starting and braking, as well as defining the conditions that prevent or control slippage. Since the developed code is parametric, its output can greatly assist in the design, optimization and control of PASIBOT and similar biped robots. The topology, kinematics and inverse dynamics of the one-degree-of-freedom biped PASIBOT have been previously described, but without regard to slippage between the supporting foot and the ground.

  9. Minkowski decomposition of associahedra and the computation of Moebius inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Realisations of associahedra with linearly non-isomorphic normal fans can be obtained by alteration of the right-hand sides of the facet-defining inequalities from a classical permutahedron. These polytopes can be expressed as Minkowski sums and differences of dilated faces of a standard simplex as described by Ardila, Benedetti & Doker (2010). The coefficients $y_I$ of such a Minkowski decomposition can be computed by M\\"obius inversion if tight right-hand sides $z_I$ are known not just for the facet-defining inequalities of the associahedron but also for all inequalities of the permutahedron that are redundant for the associahedron. We show for certain families of these associahedra: (a) how to compute tight values $z_I$ for the redundant inequalities from the values $z_I$ for the facet-defining inequalities; (b) the computation of the values $y_I$ of Ardila, Benedetti & Doker can be significantly simplified and at most four values $z_{a(I)}$, $z_{b(I)}$, $z_{c(I)}$ and $z_{d(I)}$ are needed to comp...

  10. A fast algorithm for sparse matrix computations related to inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S.; Wu, W.; Darve, E.

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a fast algorithm for computing certain entries of the inverse of a sparse matrix. Such computations are critical to many applications, such as the calculation of non-equilibrium Green's functions Gr and Gcost of FIND. The other problem is that the partitioning scheme used by FIND is incompatible with most existing partitioning methods and libraries for nested dissection, which all use width-1 separators. Our new algorithm resolves these problems by thoroughly decomposing the computation process such that width-1 separators can be used, resulting in a significant speedup over FIND for realistic devices — up to twelve-fold in simulation. The new algorithm also has the added advantage that desired off-diagonal entries can be computed for free. Consequently, our algorithm is faster than the current state-of-the-art recursive methods for meshes of any size. Furthermore, the framework used in the analysis of our algorithm is the first attempt to explicitly apply the widely-used relationship between mesh nodes and matrix computations to the problem of multiple eliminations with reuse of intermediate results. This framework makes our algorithm easier to generalize, and also easier to compare against other methods related to elimination trees. Finally, our accuracy analysis shows that the algorithms that require back-substitution are subject to significant extra round-off errors, which become extremely large even for some well-conditioned matrices or matrices with only moderately large condition numbers. When compared to these back-substitution algorithms, our algorithm is generally a few orders of magnitude more accurate, and our produced round-off errors stay at a reasonable level.

  11. Output Feedback for Stochastic Nonlinear Systems with Unmeasurable Inverse Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Yu; Na Duan

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers a concrete stochastic nonlinear system with stochastic unmeasurable inverse dynamics. Motivated by the concept of integral input-to-state stability (iISS) in deterministic systems and stochastic input-to-state stability (SISS) in stochastic systems, a concept of stochastic integral input-to-state stability (SiISS) using Lyapunov functions is first introduced. A constructive strategy is proposed to design a dynamic output feedback control law, which drives the state to the origin almost surely while keeping all other closed-loop signals almost surely bounded. At last, a simulation is given to verify the effectiveness of the control law.

  12. GARCH modelling of covariance in dynamical estimation of inverse solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galka, Andreas [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany) and Institute of Statistical Mathematics (ISM), Minami-Azabu 4-6-7, Tokyo 106-8569 (Japan)]. E-mail: galka@physik.uni-kiel.de; Yamashita, Okito [ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories, Hikaridai 2-2-2, Kyoto 619-0288 (Japan); Ozaki, Tohru [Institute of Statistical Mathematics (ISM), Minami-Azabu 4-6-7, Tokyo 106-8569 (Japan)

    2004-12-06

    The problem of estimating unobserved states of spatially extended dynamical systems poses an inverse problem, which can be solved approximately by a recently developed variant of Kalman filtering; in order to provide the model of the dynamics with more flexibility with respect to space and time, we suggest to combine the concept of GARCH modelling of covariance, well known in econometrics, with Kalman filtering. We formulate this algorithm for spatiotemporal systems governed by stochastic diffusion equations and demonstrate its feasibility by presenting a numerical simulation designed to imitate the situation of the generation of electroencephalographic recordings by the human cortex.

  13. Are patient-specific joint and inertial parameters necessary for accurate inverse dynamics analyses of gait?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Haftka, Raphael T; Chmielewski, Terese L; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2007-05-01

    Variations in joint parameter (JP) values (axis positions and orientations in body segments) and inertial parameter (IP) values (segment masses, mass centers, and moments of inertia) as well as kinematic noise alter the results of inverse dynamics analyses of gait. Three-dimensional linkage models with joint constraints have been proposed as one way to minimize the effects of noisy kinematic data. Such models can also be used to perform gait optimizations to predict post-treatment function given pre-treatment gait data. This study evaluates whether accurate patient-specific JP and IP values are needed in three-dimensional linkage models to produce accurate inverse dynamics results for gait. The study was performed in two stages. First, we used optimization analyses to evaluate whether patient-specific JP and IP values can be calibrated accurately from noisy kinematic data, and second, we used Monte Carlo analyses to evaluate how errors in JP and IP values affect inverse dynamics calculations. Both stages were performed using a dynamic, 27 degrees-of-freedom, full-body linkage model and synthetic (i.e., computer generated) gait data corresponding to a nominal experimental gait motion. In general, JP but not IP values could be found accurately from noisy kinematic data. Root-mean-square (RMS) errors were 3 degrees and 4 mm for JP values and 1 kg, 22 mm, and 74 500 kg * mm2 for IP values. Furthermore, errors in JP but not IP values had a significant effect on calculated lower-extremity inverse dynamics joint torques. The worst RMS torque error averaged 4% bodyweight * height (BW * H) due to JP variations but less than 0.25% (BW * H) due to IP variations. These results suggest that inverse dynamics analyses of gait utilizing linkage models with joint constraints should calibrate the model's JP values to obtain accurate joint torques.

  14. A generalized computationally efficient inverse characterization approach combining direct inversion solution initialization with gradient-based optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyu; Brigham, John C.

    2017-03-01

    A computationally efficient gradient-based optimization approach for inverse material characterization from incomplete system response measurements that can utilize a generally applicable parameterization (e.g., finite element-type parameterization) is presented and evaluated. The key to this inverse characterization algorithm is the use of a direct inversion strategy with Gappy proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) response field estimation to initialize the inverse solution estimate prior to gradient-based optimization. Gappy POD is used to estimate the complete (i.e., all components over the entire spatial domain) system response field from incomplete (e.g., partial spatial distribution) measurements obtained from some type of system testing along with some amount of a priori information regarding the potential distribution of the unknown material property. The estimated complete system response is used within a physics-based direct inversion procedure with a finite element-type parameterization to estimate the spatial distribution of the desired unknown material property with minimal computational expense. Then, this estimated spatial distribution of the unknown material property is used to initialize a gradient-based optimization approach, which uses the adjoint method for computationally efficient gradient calculations, to produce the final estimate of the material property distribution. The three-step [(1) Gappy POD, (2) direct inversion, and (3) gradient-based optimization] inverse characterization approach is evaluated through simulated test problems based on the characterization of elastic modulus distributions with localized variations (e.g., inclusions) within simple structures. Overall, this inverse characterization approach is shown to efficiently and consistently provide accurate inverse characterization estimates for material property distributions from incomplete response field measurements. Moreover, the solution procedure is shown to be capable

  15. Computer-Assisted Inverse Design of Inorganic Electrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunwei Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrides are intrinsic electron-rich materials enabling applications as excellent electron emitters, superior catalysts, and strong reducing agents. There are a number of organic electrides; however, their instability at room temperature and sensitivity to moisture are bottlenecks for their practical uses. Known inorganic electrides are rare, but they appear to have greater thermal stability at ambient conditions and are thus better characterized for application. Here, we develop a computer-assisted inverse-design method for searching for a large variety of inorganic electrides unbiased by any known electride structures. It uses the intrinsic property of interstitial electron localization of electrides as the global variable function for swarm intelligence structure searches. We construct two rules of thumb on the design of inorganic electrides pointing to electron-rich ionic systems and low electronegativity of the cationic elements involved. By screening 99 such binary compounds through large-scale computer simulations, we identify 24 stable and 65 metastable new inorganic electrides that show distinct three-, two-, and zero-dimensional conductive properties, among which 18 are existing compounds that have not been pointed to as electrides. Our work reveals the rich abundance of inorganic electrides by providing 33 hitherto unexpected structure prototypes of electrides, of which 19 are not in the known structure databases.

  16. Computer-Assisted Inverse Design of Inorganic Electrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunwei; Wang, Hui; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2017-01-01

    Electrides are intrinsic electron-rich materials enabling applications as excellent electron emitters, superior catalysts, and strong reducing agents. There are a number of organic electrides; however, their instability at room temperature and sensitivity to moisture are bottlenecks for their practical uses. Known inorganic electrides are rare, but they appear to have greater thermal stability at ambient conditions and are thus better characterized for application. Here, we develop a computer-assisted inverse-design method for searching for a large variety of inorganic electrides unbiased by any known electride structures. It uses the intrinsic property of interstitial electron localization of electrides as the global variable function for swarm intelligence structure searches. We construct two rules of thumb on the design of inorganic electrides pointing to electron-rich ionic systems and low electronegativity of the cationic elements involved. By screening 99 such binary compounds through large-scale computer simulations, we identify 24 stable and 65 metastable new inorganic electrides that show distinct three-, two-, and zero-dimensional conductive properties, among which 18 are existing compounds that have not been pointed to as electrides. Our work reveals the rich abundance of inorganic electrides by providing 33 hitherto unexpected structure prototypes of electrides, of which 19 are not in the known structure databases.

  17. Inverse Dynamics of Delta Robot Based on the Principle of Virtual Work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yongjie; YANG Zhiyong; HUANG Tian

    2005-01-01

    A systematic methodology for solving the inverse dynamics of the Delta robot is presented.First,the inverse kinematics is solved based on the vector method.A new form of the Jacobi matrix formulized by the vectors is obtained so the three types kinematics singularities namely inverse, direct and combined types, can be identified with the physical meaning.Then based on the principle of virtual work, a methodology for driving the dynamical equations of motion is developed.Meanwhile the whole actuating torques, the torques caused by the gravity, the velocity and the acceleration are computed respectively in the numerical example. Results show that torque caused by the acceleration term is much bigger than the other two terms.This approach leads to efficient algorithms since the constraint forces and moments of the robot system have been eliminated from the equations of motion and there is no differential equation for the whole procedure when the principle of virtual work is applied to solving the inverse dynamical problem.

  18. Computer Modelling of Dynamic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rybakin

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of numerical modeling of dynamic problems are summed in the article up. These problems are characteristic for various areas of human activity, in particular for problem solving in ecology. The following problems are considered in the present work: computer modeling of dynamic effects on elastic-plastic bodies, calculation and determination of performances of gas streams in gas cleaning equipment, modeling of biogas formation processes.

  19. Inverse Methods. Interdisciplinary Elements of Methodology, Computation, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Bo Holm; Mosegaard, Klaus; Sibani, Paolo

    Over the last few decades inversion concepts have become an integral part of experimental data interpretation in several branches of science. In numerous cases similar inversion-like techniques were developed independently in separate disciplines, sometimes based on different lines of reasoning, but not always to the same level of sophistication. This book is based on the Interdisciplinary Inversion Conference held at the University of Aarhus, Denmark. For scientists and graduate students in geophysics, astronomy, oceanography, petroleum geology, and geodesy, the book offers a wide variety of examples and theoretical background in the field of inversion techniques.

  20. Ascent guidance for air-breathing hypersonic vehicles based on dynamic inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an adaptive ascent guidance strategy based on dynamic inversion for air-breathing hypersonic vehicles. Since dynamic inversion is effective to deal with nonlinear problems, this method is employed here to design the ascent guidance command. Compared with conventional dynamic inversion, an adaptive scheme is added into the guidance strategy, which significantly improves the robust performance of this method. And the stability analysis is given to prove the convergence of the nonlinear system. Besides, considering the real-world dynamic motions of the vehicle should be aware to calculate the guidance command instead of referring to the nominal model, the least squares algorithm with forgetting factor is adopted in this article to estimate the real thrust acceleration. And the reference trajectory generated online by polynomial fitting shows better adaptation to the change of flight environment and less computation time than other trajectory generation methods. Results of simulation are provided to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of this approach.

  1. Loading applied on prosthetic knee of transfemoral amputee: comparison of inverse dynamics and direct measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, R; Cheze, L; Frossard, L

    2009-11-01

    Inverse dynamics is the most comprehensive method that gives access to the net joint forces and moments during walking. However it is based on assumptions (i.e., rigid segments linked by ideal joints) and it is known to be sensitive to the input data (e.g., kinematic derivatives, positions of joint centres and centre of pressure, inertial parameters). Alternatively, transducers can be used to measure directly the load applied on the residuum of transfemoral amputees. So, the purpose of this study was to compare the forces and moments applied on a prosthetic knee measured directly with the ones calculated by three inverse dynamics computations--corresponding to 3 and 2 segments, and "ground reaction vector technique"--during the gait of one patient. The maximum RMSEs between the estimated and directly measured forces (i.e., 56 N) and moment (i.e., 5 N m) were relatively small. However the dynamic outcomes of the prosthetic components (i.e., absorption of the foot, friction and limit stop of the knee) were only partially assessed with inverse dynamic methods.

  2. Real-time inverse kinematics and inverse dynamics for lower limb applications using OpenSim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, C; Reggiani, M; Modenese, L; Lloyd, D G

    2017-03-01

    Real-time estimation of joint angles and moments can be used for rapid evaluation in clinical, sport, and rehabilitation contexts. However, real-time calculation of kinematics and kinetics is currently based on approximate solutions or generic anatomical models. We present a real-time system based on OpenSim solving inverse kinematics and dynamics without simplifications at 2000 frame per seconds with less than 31.5 ms of delay. We describe the software architecture, sensitivity analyses to minimise delays and errors, and compare offline and real-time results. This system has the potential to strongly impact current rehabilitation practices enabling the use of personalised musculoskeletal models in real-time.

  3. Bayesian inversion analysis of nonlinear dynamics in surface heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Toshiaki; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Okamoto, Atsushi; Hukushima, Koji

    2016-09-01

    It is essential to extract nonlinear dynamics from time-series data as an inverse problem in natural sciences. We propose a Bayesian statistical framework for extracting nonlinear dynamics of surface heterogeneous reactions from sparse and noisy observable data. Surface heterogeneous reactions are chemical reactions with conjugation of multiple phases, and they have the intrinsic nonlinearity of their dynamics caused by the effect of surface-area between different phases. We adapt a belief propagation method and an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to partial observation problem, in order to simultaneously estimate the time course of hidden variables and the kinetic parameters underlying dynamics. The proposed belief propagation method is performed by using sequential Monte Carlo algorithm in order to estimate nonlinear dynamical system. Using our proposed method, we show that the rate constants of dissolution and precipitation reactions, which are typical examples of surface heterogeneous reactions, as well as the temporal changes of solid reactants and products, were successfully estimated only from the observable temporal changes in the concentration of the dissolved intermediate product.

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Paul

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics has reached a stage where flow field in practical situation can be predicted to aid the design and to probe into the fundamental flow physics to understand and resolve the issues in fundamental fluid mechanics. The study examines the computation of reacting flows. After exploring the conservation equations for species and energy, the methods of closing the reaction rate terms in turbulent flow have been examined briefly. Two cases of computation, where combustion-flow interaction plays important role, have been discussed to illustrate the computational aspects and the physical insight that can be gained by the reacting flow computation.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(6, pp.577-582, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.600

  5. Success Stories in Control: Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, John T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA plays an important role in advancing the state of the art in flight control systems. In the case of Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion (NDI) NASA supported initial implementation of the theory in an aircraft and demonstration in a space vehicle. Dr. Dale Enns of Honeywell Aerospace Advanced Technology performed this work in cooperation with NASA and under NASA contract. Honeywell and Lockheed Martin were subsequently contracted by AFRL to create "Design Guidelines for Multivariable Control Theory". This foundational work directly contributed to the advancement of the technology and the credibility of the control law as a design option. As a result Honeywell collaborated with Lockheed Martin to produce a Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion controller for the X-35 and subsequently Lockheed Martin did the same for the production Lockheed Martin F-35 vehicle. The theory behind NDI is to use a systematic generalized approach to controlling a vehicle. Using general aircraft nonlinear equations of motion and onboard aerodynamic, mass properties, and engine models specific to the vehicle, a relationship between control effectors and desired aircraft motion can be formulated. Using this formulation a control combination is used that provides a predictable response to commanded motion. Control loops around this formulation shape the response as desired and provide robustness to modeling errors. Once the control law is designed it can be used on a similar class of vehicle with only an update to the vehicle specific onboard models.

  6. Influence of inverse dynamics methods on the calculation of inter-segmental moments in vertical jumping and weightlifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleather Daniel J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A vast number of biomechanical studies have employed inverse dynamics methods to calculate inter-segmental moments during movement. Although all inverse dynamics methods are rooted in classical mechanics and thus theoretically the same, there exist a number of distinct computational methods. Recent research has demonstrated a key influence of the dynamics computation of the inverse dynamics method on the calculated moments, despite the theoretical equivalence of the methods. The purpose of this study was therefore to explore the influence of the choice of inverse dynamics on the calculation of inter-segmental moments. Methods An inverse dynamics analysis was performed to analyse vertical jumping and weightlifting movements using two distinct methods. The first method was the traditional inverse dynamics approach, in this study characterized as the 3 step method, where inter-segmental moments were calculated in the local coordinate system of each segment, thus requiring multiple coordinate system transformations. The second method (the 1 step method was the recently proposed approach based on wrench notation that allows all calculations to be performed in the global coordinate system. In order to best compare the effect of the inverse dynamics computation a number of the key assumptions and methods were harmonized, in particular unit quaternions were used to parameterize rotation in both methods in order to standardize the kinematics. Results Mean peak inter-segmental moments calculated by the two methods were found to agree to 2 decimal places in all cases and were not significantly different (p > 0.05. Equally the normalized dispersions of the two methods were small. Conclusions In contrast to previously documented research the difference between the two methods was found to be negligible. This study demonstrates that the 1 and 3 step method are computationally equivalent and can thus be used interchangeably in

  7. Fair and Square Computation of Inverse "Z"-Transforms of Rational Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, M. V.; Basilio, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    All methods presented in textbooks for computing inverse "Z"-transforms of rational functions have some limitation: 1) the direct division method does not, in general, provide enough information to derive an analytical expression for the time-domain sequence "x"("k") whose "Z"-transform is "X"("z"); 2) computation using the inversion integral…

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Allard, Francis; Awbi, Hazim B.;

    2008-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation Design is a new title in the is a new title in the REHVA guidebook series. The guidebook is written for people who need to use and discuss results based on CFD predictions, and it gives insight into the subject for those who are not used to work with CFD...

  9. A recursive algorithm for computing the inverse of the Vandermonde matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youness Aliyari Ghassabeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The inverse of a Vandermonde matrix has been used for signal processing, polynomial interpolation, curve fitting, wireless communication, and system identification. In this paper, we propose a novel fast recursive algorithm to compute the inverse of a Vandermonde matrix. The algorithm computes the inverse of a higher order Vandermonde matrix using the available lower order inverse matrix with a computational cost of $ O(n^2 $. The proposed algorithm is given in a matrix form, which makes it appropriate for hardware implementation. The running time of the proposed algorithm to find the inverse of a Vandermonde matrix using a lower order Vandermonde matrix is compared with the running time of the matrix inversion function implemented in MATLAB.

  10. Humanoid Walking Robot: Modeling, Inverse Dynamics, and Gain Scheduling Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvedin Kljuno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents reference-model-based control design for a 10 degree-of-freedom bipedal walking robot, using nonlinear gain scheduling. The main goal is to show concentrated mass models can be used for prediction of the required joint torques for a bipedal walking robot. Relatively complicated architecture, high DOF, and balancing requirements make the control task of these robots difficult. Although linear control techniques can be used to control bipedal robots, nonlinear control is necessary for better performance. The emphasis of this work is to show that the reference model can be a bipedal walking model with concentrated mass at the center of gravity, which removes the problems related to design of a pseudo-inverse system. Another significance of this approach is the reduced calculation requirements due to the simplified procedure of nominal joint torques calculation. Kinematic and dynamic analysis is discussed including results for joint torques and ground force necessary to implement a prescribed walking motion. This analysis is accompanied by a comparison with experimental data. An inverse plant and a tracking error linearization-based controller design approach is described. We propose a novel combination of a nonlinear gain scheduling with a concentrated mass model for the MIMO bipedal robot system.

  11. A Computationally Efficient Parallel Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm for Large-Scale Big-Data Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; O'Malley, D.; Vesselinov, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse modeling seeks model parameters given a set of observed state variables. However, for many practical problems due to the facts that the observed data sets are often large and model parameters are often numerous, conventional methods for solving the inverse modeling can be computationally expensive. We have developed a new, computationally-efficient Levenberg-Marquardt method for solving large-scale inverse modeling. Levenberg-Marquardt methods require the solution of a dense linear system of equations which can be prohibitively expensive to compute for large-scale inverse problems. Our novel method projects the original large-scale linear problem down to a Krylov subspace, such that the dimensionality of the measurements can be significantly reduced. Furthermore, instead of solving the linear system for every Levenberg-Marquardt damping parameter, we store the Krylov subspace computed when solving the first damping parameter and recycle it for all the following damping parameters. The efficiency of our new inverse modeling algorithm is significantly improved by using these computational techniques. We apply this new inverse modeling method to invert for a random transitivity field. Our algorithm is fast enough to solve for the distributed model parameters (transitivity) at each computational node in the model domain. The inversion is also aided by the use regularization techniques. The algorithm is coded in Julia and implemented in the MADS computational framework (http://mads.lanl.gov). Julia is an advanced high-level scientific programing language that allows for efficient memory management and utilization of high-performance computational resources. By comparing with a Levenberg-Marquardt method using standard linear inversion techniques, our Levenberg-Marquardt method yields speed-up ratio of 15 in a multi-core computational environment and a speed-up ratio of 45 in a single-core computational environment. Therefore, our new inverse modeling method is a

  12. Recursive Factorization of the Inverse Overlap Matrix in Linear-Scaling Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negre, Christian F A; Mniszewski, Susan M; Cawkwell, Marc J; Bock, Nicolas; Wall, Michael E; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2016-07-12

    We present a reduced complexity algorithm to compute the inverse overlap factors required to solve the generalized eigenvalue problem in a quantum-based molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Our method is based on the recursive, iterative refinement of an initial guess of Z (inverse square root of the overlap matrix S). The initial guess of Z is obtained beforehand by using either an approximate divide-and-conquer technique or dynamical methods, propagated within an extended Lagrangian dynamics from previous MD time steps. With this formulation, we achieve long-term stability and energy conservation even under the incomplete, approximate, iterative refinement of Z. Linear-scaling performance is obtained using numerically thresholded sparse matrix algebra based on the ELLPACK-R sparse matrix data format, which also enables efficient shared-memory parallelization. As we show in this article using self-consistent density-functional-based tight-binding MD, our approach is faster than conventional methods based on the diagonalization of overlap matrix S for systems as small as a few hundred atoms, substantially accelerating quantum-based simulations even for molecular structures of intermediate size. For a 4158-atom water-solvated polyalanine system, we find an average speedup factor of 122 for the computation of Z in each MD step.

  13. Principles of computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wesseling, Pieter

    2001-01-01

    The book is aimed at graduate students, researchers, engineers and physicists involved in flow computations. An up-to-date account is given of the present state-of-the-art of numerical methods employed in computational fluid dynamics. The underlying numerical principles are treated with a fair amount of detail, using elementary mathematical analysis. Attention is given to difficulties arising from geometric complexity of the flow domain and of nonuniform structured boundary-fitted grids. Uniform accuracy and efficiency for singular perturbation problems is studied, pointing the way to accurate computation of flows at high Reynolds number. Much attention is given to stability analysis, and useful stability conditions are provided, some of them new, for many numerical schemes used in practice. Unified methods for compressible and incompressible flows are discussed. Numerical analysis of the shallow-water equations is included. The theory of hyperbolic conservation laws is treated. Godunov's order barrier and ho...

  14. Modeling Dynamic Programming Problems over Sequences and Trees with Inverse Coupled Rewrite Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Giegerich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic programming is a classical algorithmic paradigm, which often allows the evaluation of a search space of exponential size in polynomial time. Recursive problem decomposition, tabulation of intermediate results for re-use, and Bellman’s Principle of Optimality are its well-understood ingredients. However, algorithms often lack abstraction and are difficult to implement, tedious to debug, and delicate to modify. The present article proposes a generic framework for specifying dynamic programming problems. This framework can handle all kinds of sequential inputs, as well as tree-structured data. Biosequence analysis, document processing, molecular structure analysis, comparison of objects assembled in a hierarchic fashion, and generally, all domains come under consideration where strings and ordered, rooted trees serve as natural data representations. The new approach introduces inverse coupled rewrite systems. They describe the solutions of combinatorial optimization problems as the inverse image of a term rewrite relation that reduces problem solutions to problem inputs. This specification leads to concise yet translucent specifications of dynamic programming algorithms. Their actual implementation may be challenging, but eventually, as we hope, it can be produced automatically. The present article demonstrates the scope of this new approach by describing a diverse set of dynamic programming problems which arise in the domain of computational biology, with examples in biosequence and molecular structure analysis.

  15. A Dynamic BI–Orthogonal Field Equation Approach to Efficient Bayesian Inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagade Piyush M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel computationally efficient stochastic spectral projection based approach to Bayesian inversion of a computer simulator with high dimensional parametric and model structure uncertainty. The proposed method is based on the decomposition of the solution into its mean and a random field using a generic Karhunen-Loève expansion. The random field is represented as a convolution of separable Hilbert spaces in stochastic and spatial dimensions that are spectrally represented using respective orthogonal bases. In particular, the present paper investigates generalized polynomial chaos bases for the stochastic dimension and eigenfunction bases for the spatial dimension. Dynamic orthogonality is used to derive closed-form equations for the time evolution of mean, spatial and the stochastic fields. The resultant system of equations consists of a partial differential equation (PDE that defines the dynamic evolution of the mean, a set of PDEs to define the time evolution of eigenfunction bases, while a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs define dynamics of the stochastic field. This system of dynamic evolution equations efficiently propagates the prior parametric uncertainty to the system response. The resulting bi-orthogonal expansion of the system response is used to reformulate the Bayesian inference for efficient exploration of the posterior distribution. The efficacy of the proposed method is investigated for calibration of a 2D transient diffusion simulator with an uncertain source location and diffusivity. The computational efficiency of the method is demonstrated against a Monte Carlo method and a generalized polynomial chaos approach.

  16. Waveform Inversion with Source Encoding for Breast Sound Speed Reconstruction in Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Kun; Anis, Fatima; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) holds great promise for improving the detection and management of breast cancer. Because they are based on the acoustic wave equation, waveform inversion-based reconstruction methods can produce images that possess improved spatial resolution properties over those produced by ray-based methods. However, waveform inversion methods are computationally demanding and have not been applied widely in USCT breast imaging. In this work, source encoding concepts are employed to develop an accelerated USCT reconstruction method that circumvents the large computational burden of conventional waveform inversion methods. This method, referred to as the waveform inversion with source encoding (WISE) method, encodes the measurement data using a random encoding vector and determines an estimate of the sound speed distribution by solving a stochastic optimization problem by use of a stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Both computer-simulation and experimental phantom studies are conduc...

  17. Soliton dynamics in computational anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Darryl D; Ratnanather, J Tilak; Trouvé, Alain; Younes, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Computational anatomy (CA) has introduced the idea of anatomical structures being transformed by geodesic deformations on groups of diffeomorphisms. Among these geometric structures, landmarks and image outlines in CA are shown to be singular solutions of a partial differential equation that is called the geodesic EPDiff equation. A recently discovered momentum map for singular solutions of EPDiff yields their canonical Hamiltonian formulation, which in turn provides a complete parameterization of the landmarks by their canonical positions and momenta. The momentum map provides an isomorphism between landmarks (and outlines) for images and singular soliton solutions of the EPDiff equation. This isomorphism suggests a new dynamical paradigm for CA, as well as new data representation.

  18. Spatial neighborhood matrix computation: Inverse distance weighted versus binary contiguity

    OpenAIRE

    Negreiros, J

    2009-01-01

    Paper presented at Geo-Spatial Crossroad GI_Forum, Salzburg, Austria. A particular GIS aspect is the existence of the spatial neighborhood weighted matrix (W) needed for their assessment and commonly setup by the binary or inverse distance weight (IDW)contiguity. This article recommends that if the former approach fulfills W specification quite well, the distance decay contiguity of IDW, by itself, is blinded to its natural neighbors because the exponent of 1/dexp already underlies the con...

  19. Evolutionary computation for dynamic optimization problems

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a compilation on the state-of-the-art and recent advances of evolutionary computation for dynamic optimization problems. The motivation for this book arises from the fact that many real-world optimization problems and engineering systems are subject to dynamic environments, where changes occur over time. Key issues for addressing dynamic optimization problems in evolutionary computation, including fundamentals, algorithm design, theoretical analysis, and real-world applications, are presented. "Evolutionary Computation for Dynamic Optimization Problems" is a valuable reference to scientists, researchers, professionals and students in the field of engineering and science, particularly in the areas of computational intelligence, nature- and bio-inspired computing, and evolutionary computation.

  20. Full tensor gravity gradiometry data inversion: Performance analysis of parallel computing algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhen-Long; Wei, Xiao-Hui; Huang, Da-Nian; Sun, Xu

    2015-09-01

    We apply reweighted inversion focusing to full tensor gravity gradiometry data using message-passing interface (MPI) and compute unified device architecture (CUDA) parallel computing algorithms, and then combine MPI with CUDA to formulate a hybrid algorithm. Parallel computing performance metrics are introduced to analyze and compare the performance of the algorithms. We summarize the rules for the performance evaluation of parallel algorithms. We use model and real data from the Vinton salt dome to test the algorithms. We find good match between model and real density data, and verify the high efficiency and feasibility of parallel computing algorithms in the inversion of full tensor gravity gradiometry data.

  1. PREFACE: First International Congress of the International Association of Inverse Problems (IPIA): Applied Inverse Problems 2007: Theoretical and Computational Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    2008-07-01

    This volume represents the proceedings of the fourth Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) international conference and the first congress of the Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) which was held in Vancouver, Canada, June 25 29, 2007. The organizing committee was formed by Uri Ascher, University of British Columbia, Richard Froese, University of British Columbia, Gary Margrave, University of Calgary, and Gunther Uhlmann, University of Washington, chair. The conference was part of the activities of the Pacific Institute of Mathematical Sciences (PIMS) Collaborative Research Group on inverse problems (http://www.pims.math.ca/scientific/collaborative-research-groups/past-crgs). This event was also supported by grants from NSF and MITACS. Inverse Problems (IP) are problems where causes for a desired or an observed effect are to be determined. They lie at the heart of scientific inquiry and technological development. The enormous increase in computing power and the development of powerful algorithms have made it possible to apply the techniques of IP to real-world problems of growing complexity. Applications include a number of medical as well as other imaging techniques, location of oil and mineral deposits in the earth's substructure, creation of astrophysical images from telescope data, finding cracks and interfaces within materials, shape optimization, model identification in growth processes and, more recently, modelling in the life sciences. The series of Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) Conferences aims to provide a primary international forum for academic and industrial researchers working on all aspects of inverse problems, such as mathematical modelling, functional analytic methods, computational approaches, numerical algorithms etc. The steering committee of the AIP conferences consists of Heinz Engl (Johannes Kepler Universität, Austria), Joyce McLaughlin (RPI, USA), William Rundell (Texas A&M, USA), Erkki Somersalo (Helsinki University of Technology

  2. Computational electromagnetics and model-based inversion a modern paradigm for eddy-current nondestructive evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Sabbagh, Harold A; Sabbagh, Elias H; Aldrin, John C; Knopp, Jeremy S

    2013-01-01

    Computational Electromagnetics and Model-Based Inversion: A Modern Paradigm for Eddy Current Nondestructive Evaluation describes the natural marriage of the computer to eddy-current NDE. Three distinct topics are emphasized in the book: (a) fundamental mathematical principles of volume-integral equations as a subset of computational electromagnetics, (b) mathematical algorithms applied to signal-processing and inverse scattering problems, and (c) applications of these two topics to problems in which real and model data are used. By showing how mathematics and the computer can solve problems more effectively than current analog practices, this book defines the modern technology of eddy-current NDE. This book will be useful to advanced students and practitioners in the fields of computational electromagnetics, electromagnetic inverse-scattering theory, nondestructive evaluation, materials evaluation and biomedical imaging. Users of eddy-current NDE technology in industries as varied as nuclear power, aerospace,...

  3. Computational methods for fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferziger, Joel H

    2002-01-01

    In its 3rd revised and extended edition the book offers an overview of the techniques used to solve problems in fluid mechanics on computers and describes in detail those most often used in practice. Included are advanced methods in computational fluid dynamics, like direct and large-eddy simulation of turbulence, multigrid methods, parallel computing, moving grids, structured, block-structured and unstructured boundary-fitted grids, free surface flows. The 3rd edition contains a new section dealing with grid quality and an extended description of discretization methods. The book shows common roots and basic principles for many different methods. The book also contains a great deal of practical advice for code developers and users, it is designed to be equally useful to beginners and experts. The issues of numerical accuracy, estimation and reduction of numerical errors are dealt with in detail, with many examples. A full-feature user-friendly demo-version of a commercial CFD software has been added, which ca...

  4. Dynamic Source Inversion of Intermediate Depth Earthquakes in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuto Sho Mirwald, Aron; Cruz-Atienza, Victor Manuel; Krishna Singh-Singh, Shri

    2017-04-01

    The source mechanisms of earthquakes at intermediate depth (50-300 km) are still under debate. Due to the high confining pressure at depths below 50 km, rocks ought to deform by ductile flow rather than brittle failure, which is the mechanism originating most earthquakes. Several source mechanisms have been proposed, but for neither of them conclusive evidence has been found. One of two viable mechanisms is Dehydration Embrittlement, where liberation of water lowers the effective pressure and enables brittle fracture. The other is Thermal Runaway, a highly localized ductile deformation (Prieto et. al., Tecto., 2012). In the Mexican subduction zone, intermediate depth earthquakes represent a real hazard in central Mexico due to their proximity to highly populated areas and the large accelerations induced on ground motion (Iglesias et. al., BSSA, 2002). To improve our understanding of these rupture processes, we use a recently introduced inversion method (Diaz-Mojica et. al., JGR, 2014) to analyze several intermediate depth earthquakes in Mexico. The method inverts strong motion seismograms to determine the dynamic source parameters based on a genetic algorithm. It has been successfully used for the M6.5 Zumpango earthquake that occurred at a depth of 62 km in the state of Guerrero, Mexico. For this event, high radiated energy, low radiation efficiency and low rupture velocity were determined. This indicates a highly dissipative rupture process, suggesting that Thermal Runaway could probably be the dominant source process. In this work we improved the inversion method by introducing a theoretical consideration for the nucleation process that minimizes the effects of rupture initiation and guarantees self-sustained rupture propagation (Galis et. al., GJInt., 2014). Preliminary results indicate that intermediate depth earthquakes in central Mexico may vary in their rupture process. For instance, for a M5.9 normal-faulting earthquake at 55 km depth that produced very

  5. Dynamic Shape Reconstruction of Three-Dimensional Frame Structures Using the Inverse Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherlone, Marco; Cerracchio, Priscilla; Mattone, Massimiliano; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A robust and efficient computational method for reconstructing the three-dimensional displacement field of truss, beam, and frame structures, using measured surface-strain data, is presented. Known as shape sensing , this inverse problem has important implications for real-time actuation and control of smart structures, and for monitoring of structural integrity. The present formulation, based on the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM), uses a least-squares variational principle involving strain measures of Timoshenko theory for stretching, torsion, bending, and transverse shear. Two inverse-frame finite elements are derived using interdependent interpolations whose interior degrees-of-freedom are condensed out at the element level. In addition, relationships between the order of kinematic-element interpolations and the number of required strain gauges are established. As an example problem, a thin-walled, circular cross-section cantilevered beam subjected to harmonic excitations in the presence of structural damping is modeled using iFEM; where, to simulate strain-gauge values and to provide reference displacements, a high-fidelity MSC/NASTRAN shell finite element model is used. Examples of low and high-frequency dynamic motion are analyzed and the solution accuracy examined with respect to various levels of discretization and the number of strain gauges.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics as an engine of computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Behnam; Lindner, John F; Ditto, William L

    2017-03-06

    Control of chaos teaches that control theory can tame the complex, random-like behaviour of chaotic systems. This alliance between control methods and physics-cybernetical physics-opens the door to many applications, including dynamics-based computing. In this article, we introduce nonlinear dynamics and its rich, sometimes chaotic behaviour as an engine of computation. We review our work that has demonstrated how to compute using nonlinear dynamics. Furthermore, we investigate the interrelationship between invariant measures of a dynamical system and its computing power to strengthen the bridge between physics and computation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Horizons of cybernetical physics'.

  7. Nonlinear dynamics as an engine of computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Behnam; Lindner, John F.; Ditto, William L.

    2017-03-01

    Control of chaos teaches that control theory can tame the complex, random-like behaviour of chaotic systems. This alliance between control methods and physics-cybernetical physics-opens the door to many applications, including dynamics-based computing. In this article, we introduce nonlinear dynamics and its rich, sometimes chaotic behaviour as an engine of computation. We review our work that has demonstrated how to compute using nonlinear dynamics. Furthermore, we investigate the interrelationship between invariant measures of a dynamical system and its computing power to strengthen the bridge between physics and computation. This article is part of the themed issue 'Horizons of cybernetical physics'.

  8. HOMOTOPY SOLUTION OF THE INVERSE GENERALIZED EIGENVALUE PROBLEMS IN STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李书; 王波; 胡继忠

    2004-01-01

    The structural dynamics problems, such as structural design, parameter identification and model correction, are considered as a kind of the inverse generalized eigenvalue problems mathematically. The inverse eigenvalue problems are nonlinear. In general, they could be transformed into nonlinear equations to solve. The structural dynamics inverse problems were treated as quasi multiplicative inverse eigenalue problems which were solved by homotopy method for nonlinear equations. This method had no requirements for initial value essentially because of the homotopy path to solution. Numerical examples were presented to illustrate the homotopy method.

  9. A computationally efficient parallel Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for highly parameterized inverse model analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Youzuo; O'Malley, Daniel; Vesselinov, Velimir V.

    2016-09-01

    Inverse modeling seeks model parameters given a set of observations. However, for practical problems because the number of measurements is often large and the model parameters are also numerous, conventional methods for inverse modeling can be computationally expensive. We have developed a new, computationally efficient parallel Levenberg-Marquardt method for solving inverse modeling problems with a highly parameterized model space. Levenberg-Marquardt methods require the solution of a linear system of equations which can be prohibitively expensive to compute for moderate to large-scale problems. Our novel method projects the original linear problem down to a Krylov subspace such that the dimensionality of the problem can be significantly reduced. Furthermore, we store the Krylov subspace computed when using the first damping parameter and recycle the subspace for the subsequent damping parameters. The efficiency of our new inverse modeling algorithm is significantly improved using these computational techniques. We apply this new inverse modeling method to invert for random transmissivity fields in 2-D and a random hydraulic conductivity field in 3-D. Our algorithm is fast enough to solve for the distributed model parameters (transmissivity) in the model domain. The algorithm is coded in Julia and implemented in the MADS computational framework (http://mads.lanl.gov). By comparing with Levenberg-Marquardt methods using standard linear inversion techniques such as QR or SVD methods, our Levenberg-Marquardt method yields a speed-up ratio on the order of ˜101 to ˜102 in a multicore computational environment. Therefore, our new inverse modeling method is a powerful tool for characterizing subsurface heterogeneity for moderate to large-scale problems.

  10. Computer programs for forward and inverse modeling of acoustic and electromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    A suite of computer programs was developed by U.S. Geological Survey personnel for forward and inverse modeling of acoustic and electromagnetic data. This report describes the computer resources that are needed to execute the programs, the installation of the programs, the program designs, some tests of their accuracy, and some suggested improvements.

  11. Inverse Force Determination on a Small Scale Launch Vehicle Model Using a Dynamic Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Christina L.; Powell, Jessica M.; Ross, James C.

    2017-01-01

    A launch vehicle can experience large unsteady aerodynamic forces in the transonic regime that, while usually only lasting for tens of seconds during launch, could be devastating if structural components and electronic hardware are not designed to account for them. These aerodynamic loads are difficult to experimentally measure and even harder to computationally estimate. The current method for estimating buffet loads is through the use of a few hundred unsteady pressure transducers and wind tunnel test. Even with a large number of point measurements, the computed integrated load is not an accurate enough representation of the total load caused by buffeting. This paper discusses an attempt at using a dynamic balance to experimentally determine buffet loads on a generic scale hammer head launch vehicle model tested at NASA Ames Research Center's 11' x 11' transonic wind tunnel. To use a dynamic balance, the structural characteristics of the model needed to be identified so that the natural modal response could be and removed from the aerodynamic forces. A finite element model was created on a simplified version of the model to evaluate the natural modes of the balance flexures, assist in model design, and to compare to experimental data. Several modal tests were conducted on the model in two different configurations to check for non-linearity, and to estimate the dynamic characteristics of the model. The experimental results were used in an inverse force determination technique with a psuedo inverse frequency response function. Due to the non linearity, the model not being axisymmetric, and inconsistent data between the two shake tests from different mounting configuration, it was difficult to create a frequency response matrix that satisfied all input and output conditions for wind tunnel configuration to accurately predict unsteady aerodynamic loads.

  12. Waveform Inversion with Source Encoding for Breast Sound Speed Reconstruction in Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Matthews, Thomas; Anis, Fatima; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) holds great promise for improving the detection and management of breast cancer. Because they are based on the acoustic wave equation, waveform inversion-based reconstruction methods can produce images that possess improved spatial resolution properties over those produced by ray-based methods. However, waveform inversion methods are computationally demanding and have not been applied widely in USCT breast imaging. In this work, source encoding concepts are employed to develop an accelerated USCT reconstruction method that circumvents the large computational burden of conventional waveform inversion methods. This method, referred to as the waveform inversion with source encoding (WISE) method, encodes the measurement data using a random encoding vector and determines an estimate of the sound speed distribution by solving a stochastic optimization problem by use of a stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Both computer-simulation and experimental phantom studies are conducted to demonstrate the use of the WISE method. The results suggest that the WISE method maintains the high spatial resolution of waveform inversion methods while significantly reducing the computational burden. PMID:25768816

  13. Waveform inversion with source encoding for breast sound speed reconstruction in ultrasound computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Matthews, Thomas; Anis, Fatima; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) holds great promise for improving the detection and management of breast cancer. Because they are based on the acoustic wave equation, waveform inversion-based reconstruction methods can produce images that possess improved spatial resolution properties over those produced by ray-based methods. However, waveform inversion methods are computationally demanding and have not been applied widely in USCT breast imaging. In this work, source encoding concepts are employed to develop an accelerated USCT reconstruction method that circumvents the large computational burden of conventional waveform inversion methods. This method, referred to as the waveform inversion with source encoding (WISE) method, encodes the measurement data using a random encoding vector and determines an estimate of the sound speed distribution by solving a stochastic optimization problem by use of a stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Both computer simulation and experimental phantom studies are conducted to demonstrate the use of the WISE method. The results suggest that the WISE method maintains the high spatial resolution of waveform inversion methods while significantly reducing the computational burden.

  14. Dynamics of Information as Natural Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Dodig Crnkovic

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Processes considered rendering information dynamics have been studied, among others in: questions and answers, observations, communication, learning, belief revision, logical inference, game-theoretic interactions and computation. This article will put the computational approaches into a broader context of natural computation, where information dynamics is not only found in human communication and computational machinery but also in the entire nature. Information is understood as representing the world (reality as an informational web for a cognizing agent, while information dynamics (information processing, computation realizes physical laws through which all the changes of informational structures unfold. Computation as it appears in the natural world is more general than the human process of calculation modeled by the Turing machine. Natural computing is epitomized through the interactions of concurrent, in general asynchronous computational processes which are adequately represented by what Abramsky names “the second generation models of computation” [1] which we argue to be the most general representation of information dynamics.

  15. INVERSE COMPUTATION OF OPTICAL-ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT IN INHOMOGENEOUS MATERIAL WITH VARIED THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuJianxin

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,for an inhomogeneous material in which the thermal conductivity varies as a function of depth,an efficient treatment is proposed to inversely calculate the depth distribution of optical-absorption coefficient by the surface temperature of the material. It is demonstrated that the results of inverse computation by that method are more similar to the experimental ones measured by some destructive method. Thus ,the treatment is more feasible to nondestructively estimate the distribution.

  16. COMPUTING EIGENVECTORS OF NORMAL MATRICES WITH SIMPLE INVERSE ITERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-yue Zhang; Tiang-wei Ouyang

    2003-01-01

    It is well-known that if we have an approximate eigenvalue λ of a normal matrix Aof order n, a good approximation to the corresponding eigenvector u can be computedby one inverse iteration provided the position, say kmax, of the largest component of u isknown. In this paper we give a detailed theoretical analysis to show relations between thesolution to the system (A - λI)x = ek with ek the kth column of the identity matrix I.We prove that under some weak conditions, the index kmax is of some optimal propertiesrelated to the smallest residual and smallest approximation error to u in spectral norm andFrobenius norm. We also prove that the normalized absolute vector v = |u|/‖u‖∞ of uupper bounds of |u(k)| for those "optimal" indexes such as Fernando's heuristic for kmaxwithout any assumptions. A stable double orthogonal factorization method and a simplerbut may less stable approach are proposed for locating the largest component of u.

  17. Inverse computational feedback optimization imaging applied to time varying changes in a homogeneous structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Daniel J; Manwaring, Mark L; Soule, Terence

    2008-01-01

    The technique of inverse computational feedback optimization imaging allows for the imaging of varying tissue without the continuous need of a complex imaging systems such as an MRI or CT. Our method trades complex imaging equipment for computing power. The objective is to use a baseline scan from an imaging system along with finite element method computational software to calculate the physically measurable parameters (such as voltage or temperature). As the physically measurable parameters change the computational model is iteratively run until it matches the measured values. Optimization routines are implemented to accelerate the process of finding the new values. Presented is a computational model demonstrating how the inverse imaging technique would work with a simple homogeneous sample with a circular structure. It demonstrates the ability to locate an object with only a few point measurements. The presented computational model uses swarm optimization techniques to help find the object location from the measured data (which in this case is voltage).

  18. Non-recursive augmented Lagrangian algorithms for the forward and inverse dynamics of constrained flexible multibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayo, Eduardo; Ledesma, Ragnar

    1993-01-01

    A technique is presented for solving the inverse dynamics of flexible planar multibody systems. This technique yields the non-causal joint efforts (inverse dynamics) as well as the internal states (inverse kinematics) that produce a prescribed nominal trajectory of the end effector. A non-recursive global Lagrangian approach is used in formulating the equations for motion as well as in solving the inverse dynamics equations. Contrary to the recursive method previously presented, the proposed method solves the inverse problem in a systematic and direct manner for both open-chain as well as closed-chain configurations. Numerical simulation shows that the proposed procedure provides an excellent tracking of the desired end effector trajectory.

  19. Computational Methods for Aerodynamic Design (Inverse) and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    small local supersonic flow field has to be extended jFiq. 18), using a higher contour curva - ture near the end of the supersonic region and...TT - Total temperature AP - Computed changa in design paraneters x - NACAO012 airfoil axial coordinate xn - Position vectors of Bezier control points...x(u) - Bernstein- Bezier polynomial x(u v,w) Three-dimensional Bezier polynomial y(x) = Function which defines a NACAOO12 airfoil 1.0 INTRODUCTION

  20. Computational dynamics for robotics systems using a non-strict computational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orin, David E.; Wong, Ho-Cheung; Sadayappan, P.

    1989-01-01

    A Non-Strict computational approach for real-time robotics control computations is proposed. In contrast to the traditional approach to scheduling such computations, based strictly on task dependence relations, the proposed approach relaxes precedence constraints and scheduling is guided instead by the relative sensitivity of the outputs with respect to the various paths in the task graph. An example of the computation of the Inverse Dynamics of a simple inverted pendulum is used to demonstrate the reduction in effective computational latency through use of the Non-Strict approach. A speedup of 5 has been obtained when the processes of the task graph are scheduled to reduce the latency along the crucial path of the computation. While error is introduced by the relaxation of precedence constraints, the Non-Strict approach has a smaller error than the conventional Strict approach for a wide range of input conditions.

  1. Model dynamics for quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabakin, Frank

    2017-08-01

    A model master equation suitable for quantum computing dynamics is presented. In an ideal quantum computer (QC), a system of qubits evolves in time unitarily and, by virtue of their entanglement, interfere quantum mechanically to solve otherwise intractable problems. In the real situation, a QC is subject to decoherence and attenuation effects due to interaction with an environment and with possible short-term random disturbances and gate deficiencies. The stability of a QC under such attacks is a key issue for the development of realistic devices. We assume that the influence of the environment can be incorporated by a master equation that includes unitary evolution with gates, supplemented by a Lindblad term. Lindblad operators of various types are explored; namely, steady, pulsed, gate friction, and measurement operators. In the master equation, we use the Lindblad term to describe short time intrusions by random Lindblad pulses. The phenomenological master equation is then extended to include a nonlinear Beretta term that describes the evolution of a closed system with increasing entropy. An external Bath environment is stipulated by a fixed temperature in two different ways. Here we explore the case of a simple one-qubit system in preparation for generalization to multi-qubit, qutrit and hybrid qubit-qutrit systems. This model master equation can be used to test the stability of memory and the efficacy of quantum gates. The properties of such hybrid master equations are explored, with emphasis on the role of thermal equilibrium and entropy constraints. Several significant properties of time-dependent qubit evolution are revealed by this simple study.

  2. Computational experiment on the numerical solution of some inverse problems of mathematical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, V. I.; Kardashevsky, A. M.; Sivtsev, PV

    2016-11-01

    In this article the computational experiment on the numerical solution of the most popular linear inverse problems for equations of mathematical physics are presented. The discretization of retrospective inverse problem for parabolic equation is performed using difference scheme with non-positive weight multiplier. Similar difference scheme is also used for the numerical solution of Cauchy problem for two-dimensional Laplace equation. The results of computational experiment, performed on model problems with exact solution, including ones with randomly perturbed input data are presented and discussed.

  3. A radial basis function network approach for the computation of inverse continuous time variant functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, René V; Carrera, Jonathan

    2007-06-01

    This Paper presents an efficient approach for the fast computation of inverse continuous time variant functions with the proper use of Radial Basis Function Networks (RBFNs). The approach is based on implementing RBFNs for computing inverse continuous time variant functions via an overall damped least squares solution that includes a novel null space vector for singularities prevention. The singularities avoidance null space vector is derived from developing a sufficiency condition for singularities prevention that conduces to establish some characterizing matrices and an associated performance index.

  4. Zero Dynamics Analysis for Inverse Decoupling Control of Asynchronous Traction Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiying Dong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering the problem for inverse system method in EMU AC induction traction motor linear decoupling, the zero dynamics subsystem will be separated from the original dynamic system through coordinate transformation. Firstly, a getting method for zero dynamics of the multiple input multiple output nonlinear system is discussed when γ<n. Second, the zero dynamics analysis for five order nonlinear model of asynchronous traction motor which base on the stationary coordinate system is given by using inverse decoupling method. The analysis results show that if the stability of the zero dynamics can be ensured, then the entire linearization of original nonlinear system is not necessary, need only partial linearization which effect on the external dynamic portion. The inverse decoupling process of asynchronous traction motor can be simplified by this conclusion.

  5. Security Dynamics of Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled M. Khan

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores various dimensions of cloud computing security. It argues that security concerns of cloud computing need to be addressed from the perspective of individual stakeholder. Security focuses of cloud computing are essentially different in terms of its characteristics and business model. Conventional way of viewing as well as addressing security such as ‘bolting-in’ on the top of cloud computing may not work well. The paper attempts to portray the security spectrum necessary for...

  6. VLSI architectures for computing multiplications and inverses in GF(2-m)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. C.; Truong, T. K.; Shao, H. M.; Deutsch, L. J.; Omura, J. K.; Reed, I. S.

    1983-01-01

    Finite field arithmetic logic is central in the implementation of Reed-Solomon coders and in some cryptographic algorithms. There is a need for good multiplication and inversion algorithms that are easily realized on VLSI chips. Massey and Omura recently developed a new multiplication algorithm for Galois fields based on a normal basis representation. A pipeline structure is developed to realize the Massey-Omura multiplier in the finite field GF(2m). With the simple squaring property of the normal-basis representation used together with this multiplier, a pipeline architecture is also developed for computing inverse elements in GF(2m). The designs developed for the Massey-Omura multiplier and the computation of inverse elements are regular, simple, expandable and, therefore, naturally suitable for VLSI implementation.

  7. VLSI architectures for computing multiplications and inverses in GF(2m)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. C.; Truong, T. K.; Shao, H. M.; Deutsch, L. J.; Omura, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Finite field arithmetic logic is central in the implementation of Reed-Solomon coders and in some cryptographic algorithms. There is a need for good multiplication and inversion algorithms that are easily realized on VLSI chips. Massey and Omura recently developed a new multiplication algorithm for Galois fields based on a normal basis representation. A pipeline structure is developed to realize the Massey-Omura multiplier in the finite field GF(2m). With the simple squaring property of the normal-basis representation used together with this multiplier, a pipeline architecture is also developed for computing inverse elements in GF(2m). The designs developed for the Massey-Omura multiplier and the computation of inverse elements are regular, simple, expandable and, therefore, naturally suitable for VLSI implementation.

  8. Dynamic source inversion for physical parameters controlling the 2016 Amatrice, Central Italy, earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, Filip; Gallovic, Frantisek

    2017-04-01

    We perform dynamic finite-extent source inversion to study the source processes of three earthquakes that occurred close to Amatrice and Norcia, Central Italy, in August-October 2016. The events had moment magnitudes of 6.1-6.5 and resulted in >300 fatalities. To that end, we utilize a modified version of dynamic inversion code by Twardzik et al. (2014). The direct problem is solved by 3D fourth-order staggered-grid finite difference method in a box assuming linear slip-weakening friction law on a planar fault (Madariaga et al., 1998). The optimal solution is sought using the Neighborhood Algorithm by Sambridge (1999). We invert displacement waveforms from the 20-30 nearest stations. The distribution and evolution of slip calculated from physical parameters (stress drop, frictional properties) obtained from the dynamic inversion are compared with results of kinematic inversions and discussed in terms of fault mechanics.

  9. Large scale inverse problems computational methods and applications in the earth sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Scheichl, Robert; Freitag, Melina A; Kindermann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This book is thesecond volume of three volume series recording the ""Radon Special Semester 2011 on Multiscale Simulation & Analysis in Energy and the Environment"" taking place in Linz, Austria, October 3-7, 2011. The volume addresses the common ground in the mathematical and computational procedures required for large-scale inverse problems and data assimilation in forefront applications.

  10. Factors Affecting Energy Barriers for Pyramidal Inversion in Amines and Phosphines: A Computational Chemistry Lab Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate exercise in computational chemistry that investigates the energy barrier for pyramidal inversion of amines and phosphines is presented. Semiempirical calculations (PM3) of the ground-state and transition-state energies for NR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] and PR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] allow…

  11. Computing the $\\sin_{p}$ function via the inverse power method

    CERN Document Server

    Biezuner, Rodney Josué; Martins, Eder Marinho

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a new iterative method for computing $\\sin_{p}$. This function was introduced by Lindqvist in connection with the unidimensional nonlinear Dirichlet eigenvalue problem for the $p$-Laplacian. The iterative technique was inspired by the inverse power method in finite dimensional linear algebra and is competitive with other methods available in the literature.

  12. Inflationary Dynamics Reconstruction via Inverse-Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mastache, Jorge; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of inflationary fluctuations can be recast as an inverse scattering problem. In this context, we employ the Gel'fand-Levitan method from inverse-scattering theory to reconstruct the evolution of both the inflaton field freeze-out horizon and the Hubble parameter during inflation. We demonstrate this reconstruction procedure numerically for a scenario of slow-roll inflation, as well as for a scenario which temporarily departs from slow-roll. The field freeze-out horizon is reconstructed from the accessible primordial scalar power spectrum alone, while the reconstruction of the Hubble parameter requires additional information from the tensor power spectrum. We briefly discuss the application of this technique to more realistic cases incorporating estimates of the primordial power spectra over limited ranges of scales and with specified uncertainties.

  13. Optimization of computations for adjoint field and Jacobian needed in 3D CSEM inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehiya, Rahul; Singh, Arun; Gupta, Pravin K.; Israil, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present the features and results of a newly developed code, based on Gauss-Newton optimization technique, for solving three-dimensional Controlled-Source Electromagnetic inverse problem. In this code a special emphasis has been put on representing the operations by block matrices for conjugate gradient iteration. We show how in the computation of Jacobian, the matrix formed by differentiation of system matrix can be made independent of frequency to optimize the operations at conjugate gradient step. The coarse level parallel computing, using OpenMP framework, is used primarily due to its simplicity in implementation and accessibility of shared memory multi-core computing machine to almost anyone. We demonstrate how the coarseness of modeling grid in comparison to source (comp`utational receivers) spacing can be exploited for efficient computing, without compromising the quality of the inverted model, by reducing the number of adjoint calls. It is also demonstrated that the adjoint field can even be computed on a grid coarser than the modeling grid without affecting the inversion outcome. These observations were reconfirmed using an experiment design where the deviation of source from straight tow line is considered. Finally, a real field data inversion experiment is presented to demonstrate robustness of the code.

  14. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2001-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes Two distinguishing features of the discourse are solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty Matlab codes are presented and discussed for a broad...

  15. Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics: Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner. The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming. This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice. There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes. Two distinguishing features of the discourse are: solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty. Matlab codes are presented and discussed for ...

  16. A method for improving the computational efficiency of a Laplace-Fourier domain waveform inversion based on depth estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Xiaolei; Yuan, Jianzheng; Ke, Rui; Yang, Yan; Hu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The Laplace-Fourier domain full waveform inversion can simultaneously restore both the long and intermediate short-wavelength information of velocity models because of its unique characteristics of complex frequencies. This approach solves the problem of conventional frequency-domain waveform inversion in which the inversion result is excessively dependent on the initial model due to the lack of low frequency information in seismic data. Nevertheless, the Laplace-Fourier domain waveform inversion requires substantial computational resources and long computation time because the inversion must be implemented on different combinations of multiple damping constants and multiple frequencies, namely, the complex frequencies, which are much more numerous than the Fourier frequencies. However, if the entire target model is computed on every complex frequency for the Laplace-Fourier domain inversion (as in the conventional frequency domain inversion), excessively redundant computation will occur. In the Laplace-Fourier domain waveform inversion, the maximum depth penetrated by the seismic wave decreases greatly due to the application of exponential damping to the seismic record, especially with use of a larger damping constant. Thus, the depth of the area effectively inverted on a complex frequency tends to be much less than the model depth. In this paper, we propose a method for quantitative estimation of the effective inversion depth in the Laplace-Fourier domain inversion based on the principle of seismic wave propagation and mathematical analysis. According to the estimated effective inversion depth, we can invert and update only the model area above the effective depth for every complex frequency without loss of accuracy in the final inversion result. Thus, redundant computation is eliminated, and the efficiency of the Laplace-Fourier domain waveform inversion can be improved. The proposed method was tested in numerical experiments. The experimental results show that

  17. Analysis of forward and inverse problems in chemical dynamics and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabitz, H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The overall scope of this research concerns the development and application of forward and inverse analysis tools for problems in chemical dynamics and chemical kinetics. The chemical dynamics work is specifically associated with relating features in potential surfaces and resultant dynamical behavior. The analogous inverse research aims to provide stable algorithms for extracting potential surfaces from laboratory data. In the case of chemical kinetics, the focus is on the development of systematic means to reduce the complexity of chemical kinetic models. Recent progress in these directions is summarized below.

  18. Modelling and Control of Inverse Dynamics for a 5-DOF Parallel Kinematic Polishing Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyang Lin

    2013-08-01

     /  control method is presented and investigated 2∞ in order to track the error control of the inverse dynamic model; the simulation results from different conditions show that the mixed  /  control method could 2∞ achieve an optimal and robust control performance. This work shows that the presented PKPM has a higher dynamic performance than conventional machine tools.

  19. On trajectory generation for flexible space crane: Inverse dynamics analysis by LATDYN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.-S.; Housner, J. M.; Wu, S.-C.; Chang, C.-W.

    1989-01-01

    For future in-space construction facility, one or more space cranes capable of manipulating and positioning large and massive spacecraft components will be needed. Inverse dynamics was extensively studied as a basis for trajectory generation and control of robot manipulators. The focus here is on trajectory generation in the gross-motion phase of space crane operation. Inverse dynamics of the flexible crane body is much more complex and intricate as compared with rigid robot link. To model and solve the space crane's inverse dynamics problem, LATDYN program which employs a three-dimensional finite element formulation for the multibody truss-type structures will be used. The formulation is oriented toward a joint dominated structure which is suitable for the proposed space crane concept. To track a planned trajectory, procedures will be developed to obtain the actuation profile and dynamics envelope which are pertinent to the design and performance requirements of the space crane concept.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics modeling in yarn engineering

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Patanaik, A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This chapter deals with the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling in reducing yarn hairiness during the ring spinning process and thereby “engineering” yarn with desired properties. Hairiness significantly affects the appearance...

  1. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Algorithm on a Massively Parallel Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of computational fluid dynamics is demanding ever-increasing computational power to deal with complex fluid flow problems. We investigate the performance of a finite-difference computational fluid dynamics algorithm on a massively parallel computer, the Connection Machine. Of special interest is an implicit time-stepping algorithm; to obtain maximum performance from the Connection Machine, it is necessary to use a nonstandard algorithm to solve the linear systems that arise in the implicit algorithm. We find that the Connection Machine ran achieve very high computation rates on both explicit and implicit algorithms. The performance of the Connection Machine puts it in the same class as today's most powerful conventional supercomputers.

  2. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an accessible introduction to the basic theory of fluid mechanics and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical computation. Methods of scientific computing are introduced alongside with theoretical analysis and MATLAB® codes are presented and discussed for a broad range of topics: from interfacial shapes in hydrostatics, to vortex dynamics, to viscous flow, to turbulent flow, to panel methods for flow past airfoils. The third edition includes new topics, additional examples, solved and unsolved problems, and revised images. It adds more computational algorithms and MATLAB programs. It also incorporates discussion of the latest version of the fluid dynamics software library FDLIB, which is freely available online. FDLIB offers an extensive range of computer codes that demonstrate the implementation of elementary and advanced algorithms and provide an invaluable resource for research, teaching, classroom instruction, and self-study. This ...

  3. Classical and quantum dynamics in an inverse square potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillaumín-España, Elisa, E-mail: ege@correo.azc.uam.mx [Laboratorio de Sistemas Dinámicos, Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco, Azcapotzalco CP 02200 D. F. (Mexico); Núñez-Yépez, H. N., E-mail: nyhn@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-534, Iztapalapa CP 09340 D. F. (Mexico); Salas-Brito, A. L., E-mail: asb@correo.azc.uam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (ICN-UNAM), Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 México D F (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The classical motion of a particle in a 3D inverse square potential with negative energy, E, is shown to be geodesic, i.e., equivalent to the particle's free motion on a non-compact phase space manifold irrespective of the sign of the coupling constant. We thus establish that all its classical orbits with E < 0 are unbounded. To analyse the corresponding quantum problem, the Schrödinger equation is solved in momentum space. No discrete energy levels exist in the unrenormalized case and the system shows a complete “fall-to-the-center” with an energy spectrum unbounded by below. Such behavior corresponds to the non-existence of bound classical orbits. The symmetry of the problem is SO(3) × SO(2, 1) corroborating previously obtained results.

  4. Three-dimensional electromagnetic modeling and inversion on massively parallel computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, G.A.; Alumbaugh, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geophysics Dept.

    1996-03-01

    This report has demonstrated techniques that can be used to construct solutions to the 3-D electromagnetic inverse problem using full wave equation modeling. To this point great progress has been made in developing an inverse solution using the method of conjugate gradients which employs a 3-D finite difference solver to construct model sensitivities and predicted data. The forward modeling code has been developed to incorporate absorbing boundary conditions for high frequency solutions (radar), as well as complex electrical properties, including electrical conductivity, dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability. In addition both forward and inverse codes have been ported to a massively parallel computer architecture which allows for more realistic solutions that can be achieved with serial machines. While the inversion code has been demonstrated on field data collected at the Richmond field site, techniques for appraising the quality of the reconstructions still need to be developed. Here it is suggested that rather than employing direct matrix inversion to construct the model covariance matrix which would be impossible because of the size of the problem, one can linearize about the 3-D model achieved in the inverse and use Monte-Carlo simulations to construct it. Using these appraisal and construction tools, it is now necessary to demonstrate 3-D inversion for a variety of EM data sets that span the frequency range from induction sounding to radar: below 100 kHz to 100 MHz. Appraised 3-D images of the earth`s electrical properties can provide researchers opportunities to infer the flow paths, flow rates and perhaps the chemistry of fluids in geologic mediums. It also offers a means to study the frequency dependence behavior of the properties in situ. This is of significant relevance to the Department of Energy, paramount to characterizing and monitoring of environmental waste sites and oil and gas exploration.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Byoung-kwon

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a mechanical engineering field for analyzing fluid flow, heat transfer, and associated phenomena, using computer-based simulation. CFD is a widely adopted methodology for solving complex problems in many modern engineering fields. The merit of CFD is developing new and improved devices and system designs, and optimization is conducted on existing equipment through computational simulations, resulting in enhanced efficiency and lower operating costs. Howev...

  6. A Computationally Efficient Tool for Assessing the Depth Resolution in Potential-Field Inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paoletti, V.; Hansen, Per Christian; Hansen, Mads Friis

    In potential-field inversion problems, it can be dicult to obtain reliable information about the source distribution with respect to depth. Moreover, spatial resolution of the reconstructions decreases with depth, and in fact the more ill-posed the problem - and the more noisy the data - the less...... a computational/visual analysis of how much the depth resolution in a computational potential-field inversion problem can be obtained from the given data. Through synthetic and real data examples we demonstrate that ApproxDRP, when used in combination with a plot of the approximate SVD quantities, may...... successfully show the limitations of depth resolution resulting from noise in the data. This allows a reliable analysis of the retrievable depth information and effectively guides the user in choosing the optimal number of iterations, for a given problem....

  7. Partial inversion of elliptic operator to speed up computation of likelihood in Bayesian inference

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2017-08-09

    In this paper, we speed up the solution of inverse problems in Bayesian settings. By computing the likelihood, the most expensive part of the Bayesian formula, one compares the available measurement data with the simulated data. To get simulated data, repeated solution of the forward problem is required. This could be a great challenge. Often, the available measurement is a functional $F(u)$ of the solution $u$ or a small part of $u$. Typical examples of $F(u)$ are the solution in a point, solution on a coarser grid, in a small subdomain, the mean value in a subdomain. It is a waste of computational resources to evaluate, first, the whole solution and then compute a part of it. In this work, we compute the functional $F(u)$ direct, without computing the full inverse operator and without computing the whole solution $u$. The main ingredients of the developed approach are the hierarchical domain decomposition technique, the finite element method and the Schur complements. To speed up computations and to reduce the storage cost, we approximate the forward operator and the Schur complement in the hierarchical matrix format. Applying the hierarchical matrix technique, we reduced the computing cost to $\\\\mathcal{O}(k^2n \\\\log^2 n)$, where $k\\\\ll n$ and $n$ is the number of degrees of freedom. Up to the $\\\\H$-matrix accuracy, the computation of the functional $F(u)$ is exact. To reduce the computational resources further, we can approximate $F(u)$ on, for instance, multiple coarse meshes. The offered method is well suited for solving multiscale problems. A disadvantage of this method is the assumption that one has to have access to the discretisation and to the procedure of assembling the Galerkin matrix.

  8. Model calibration for ice sheets and glaciers dynamics: a general theory of inverse problems in glaciology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Giudici

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modelling of the dynamic evolution of ice sheets and glaciers requires the solution of discrete equations which are based on physical principles (e.g. conservation of mass, linear momentum and energy and phenomenological constitutive laws (e.g. Glen's and Fourier's laws. These equations must be accompanied by information on the forcing term and by initial and boundary conditions (IBCs on ice velocity, stress and temperature; on the other hand the constitutive laws involve many physical parameters, some of which depend on the ice thermodynamical state. The proper forecast of the dynamics of ice sheets and glaciers requires a precise knowledge of several quantities which appear in the IBCs, in the forcing terms and in the phenomenological laws. As these quantities cannot be easily measured at the study scale in the field, they are often obtained through model calibration by solving an inverse problem (IP. The objective of this paper is to provide a thorough and rigorous conceptual framework for IPs in cryospheric studies and in particular: to clarify the role of experimental and monitoring data to determine the calibration targets and the values of the parameters that can be considered to be fixed; to define and characterise identifiability, a property related to the solution to the forward problem; to study well-posedness in a correct way, without confusing instability with ill-conditioning or with the properties of the method applied to compute a solution; to cast sensitivity analysis in a general framework and to differentiate between the computation of local sensitivity indicators with a one-at-a-time approach and first-order sensitivity indicators that consider the whole possible variability of the model parameters. The conceptual framework and the relevant properties are illustrated by means of a simple numerical example of isothermal ice flow, based on the shallow-ice approximation.

  9. MODIFIED NEWTON'S ALGORITHM FOR COMPUTING THE GROUP INVERSES OF SINGULAR TOEPLITZ MATRICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-feng Cai; Michael K.Ng; Yi-min Wei

    2006-01-01

    Newton's iteration is modified for the computation of the group inverses of singular Toeplitz matrices. At each iteration,the iteration matrix is approximated by a matrix with a low displacement rank. Because of the displacement structure of the iteration matrix,the matrix-vector multiplication involved in Newton's iteration can be done efficiently. We show that the convergence of the modified Newton iteration is still very fast. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the fast convergence of the proposed method.

  10. Computing approximate (block) rational Krylov subspaces without explicit inversion with extensions to symmetric matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Mach, Thomas; Pranić, Miroslav S.; Vandebril, Raf

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that approximate extended Krylov subspaces can be computed, under certain assumptions, without any explicit inversion or system solves. Instead, the vectors spanning the extended Krylov space are retrieved in an implicit way, via unitary similarity transformations, from an enlarged Krylov subspace. In this paper this approach is generalized to rational Krylov subspaces, which aside from poles at infinity and zero, also contain finite non-zero poles. Furthermore, the algorith...

  11. A hyperpower iterative method for computing the generalized Drazin inverse of Banach algebra element

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SHWETABH SRIVASTAVA; DHARMENDRA K GUPTA; PREDRAG STANIMIROVIC; SUKHJIT SINGH; FALGUNI ROY

    2017-05-01

    A quadratically convergent Newton-type iterative scheme is proposed for approximating the generalized Drazin inverse bd of the Banach algebra element b. Further, its extension into the form of the hyperpower iterative method of arbitrary order p$\\leq$2 is presented. Convergence criteria along with the estimation of error bounds in the computation of bd are discussed. Convergence results confirms the high order convergence rate of the proposed iterative scheme.

  12. FOREWORD: 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, (NCMIP 2012). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, in Cachan, France, on 15 May 2012, at the initiative of Institut Farman. The first edition of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, within the scope of the ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/). The NCMIP Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finance. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational aspects of inversion, Bayesian estimation, kernel methods, learning methods, convex optimization, free discontinuity problems, metamodels, proper orthogonal decomposition

  13. FOREWORD: 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2013-10-01

    Conference logo This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the scientific contributions presented during the 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems, NCMIP 2013 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2013.html). This workshop took place at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, in Cachan, France, on 22 May 2013, at the initiative of Institut Farman. The prior editions of NCMIP also took place in Cachan, France, firstly within the scope of the ValueTools Conference, in May 2011 (http://www.ncmip.org/2011/), and secondly at the initiative of Institut Farman, in May 2012 (http://www.farman.ens-cachan.fr/NCMIP_2012.html). The NCMIP Workshop focused on recent advances in the resolution of inverse problems. Indeed inverse problems appear in numerous scientific areas such as geophysics, biological and medical imaging, material and structure characterization, electrical, mechanical and civil engineering, and finances. The resolution of inverse problems consists of estimating the parameters of the observed system or structure from data collected by an instrumental sensing or imaging device. Its success firstly requires the collection of relevant observation data. It also requires accurate models describing the physical interactions between the instrumental device and the observed system, as well as the intrinsic properties of the solution itself. Finally, it requires the design of robust, accurate and efficient inversion algorithms. Advanced sensor arrays and imaging devices provide high rate and high volume data; in this context, the efficient resolution of the inverse problem requires the joint development of new models and inversion methods, taking computational and implementation aspects into account. During this one-day workshop, researchers had the opportunity to bring to light and share new techniques and results in the field of inverse problems. The topics of the workshop were: algorithms and computational

  14. Dynamics and computation in functional shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2004-07-01

    We introduce a new type of shift dynamics as an extended model of symbolic dynamics, and investigate the characteristics of shift spaces from the viewpoints of both dynamics and computation. This shift dynamics is called a functional shift, which is defined by a set of bi-infinite sequences of some functions on a set of symbols. To analyse the complexity of functional shifts, we measure them in terms of topological entropy, and locate their languages in the Chomsky hierarchy. Through this study, we argue that considering functional shifts from the viewpoints of both dynamics and computation gives us opposite results about the complexity of systems. We also describe a new class of shift spaces whose languages are not recursively enumerable.

  15. Neural circuits as computational dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussillo, David

    2014-04-01

    Many recent studies of neurons recorded from cortex reveal complex temporal dynamics. How such dynamics embody the computations that ultimately lead to behavior remains a mystery. Approaching this issue requires developing plausible hypotheses couched in terms of neural dynamics. A tool ideally suited to aid in this question is the recurrent neural network (RNN). RNNs straddle the fields of nonlinear dynamical systems and machine learning and have recently seen great advances in both theory and application. I summarize recent theoretical and technological advances and highlight an example of how RNNs helped to explain perplexing high-dimensional neurophysiological data in the prefrontal cortex.

  16. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haworth, D.C.; O' Rourke, P.J.; Ranganathan, R.

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one discipline falling under the broad heading of computer-aided engineering (CAE). CAE, together with computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), comprise a mathematical-based approach to engineering product and process design, analysis and fabrication. In this overview of CFD for the design engineer, our purposes are three-fold: (1) to define the scope of CFD and motivate its utility for engineering, (2) to provide a basic technical foundation for CFD, and (3) to convey how CFD is incorporated into engineering product and process design.

  17. Single neuron dynamics and computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, Nicolas; Hakim, Vincent; Richardson, Magnus J E

    2014-04-01

    At the single neuron level, information processing involves the transformation of input spike trains into an appropriate output spike train. Building upon the classical view of a neuron as a threshold device, models have been developed in recent years that take into account the diverse electrophysiological make-up of neurons and accurately describe their input-output relations. Here, we review these recent advances and survey the computational roles that they have uncovered for various electrophysiological properties, for dendritic arbor anatomy as well as for short-term synaptic plasticity.

  18. Persistent inversion dynamics and wintertime PM10 air pollution in Alpine valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largeron, Yann; Staquet, Chantal

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigates persistent inversions dynamics during a whole winter in Alpine valleys of the area of Grenoble (French Alps), and their relationship to PM10 air pollution episodes and synoptic scale meteorology. For this purpose, hourly time series from November to March of PM10 concentration measurements at the bottom of the valleys and of ground-based temperature data at different altitudes are used. A methodology is developed to quantify a simple estimate of the inversion strength from temperature profiles deduced from the ground-based observations. This estimate is shown to be equivalent to the boundary layer heat deficit. A criterion based on this estimate is proposed to identify persistent (more than 3 days) inversions. Persistent inversions are found to occur from November to February and span 35% of the time. It is shown that they are closely related to PM10 pollution episodes, the PM10 concentration increasing with the boundary layer stability as the inversion develops. Polluted episodes are primarily driven by persistent inversions and consequently, pollution is of fully local origin from November to February. In March local dynamics become less important and long-range transport can dominate. Persistent inversions occur systematically during a high-pressure regime, which first triggers a synoptic scale elevated inversion due to the advection of warm air masses in the mid-troposphere. In valleys, the sheltered boundary layer becomes decoupled from the free troposphere, which allows a ground-based inversion to intensify in the following days. An inversion layer of quasi-constant temperature gradient, greater than 5 K km-1, then forms up to an altitude of about 1600 m, close to the average elevation of the summits. If the episode is sufficiently long, a stagnation stage is reached during which daytime insolation produces a shallow convective surface layer which does not destroy the persistent inversion. The inversion break-up occurs rapidly

  19. Ultrasonic computed tomography based on full-waveform inversion for bone quantitative imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Simon; Monteiller, Vadim; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Lasaygues, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    We introduce an ultrasonic quantitative imaging method for long bones based on full-waveform inversion. The cost function is defined as the difference in the L 2-norm sense between observed data and synthetic results at a given iteration of the iterative inversion process. For simplicity, and in order to reduce the computational cost, we use a two-dimensional acoustic approximation. The inverse problem is solved iteratively based on a quasi-Newton technique called the Limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno method. We show how the technique can be made to work fine for benchmark models consisting of a single cylinder, and then five cylinders, the latter case including significant multiple diffraction effects. We then show pictures obtained for a tibia-fibula bone pair model. Convergence is fast, typically in 15 to 30 iterations in practice in each frequency band used. We discuss the so-called ‘cycle skipping’ effect that can occur in such full waveform inversion techniques and make them remain trapped in a local minimum of the cost function. We illustrate strategies that can be used in practice to avoid this. Future work should include viscoelastic materials rather than acoustic, and real data instead of synthetic data.

  20. Dynamic computer-generated nonlinear-optical holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haigang; Li, Jun; Fang, Xiangling; Zhao, Xiaohui; Zheng, Yuanlin; Chen, Xianfeng

    2017-08-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate dynamic nonlinear optical holograms by introducing the concept of computer-generated holograms for second-harmonic generation of a structured fundamental wave with a specially designed wave front. The generation of Laguerre-Gaussian second-harmonic beams is investigated in our experiment. Such a method, which only dynamically controls the wave front of the fundamental wave by a spatial light modulator, does not need domain inversion in nonlinear crystals and hence is a more flexible way to achieve the off-axis nonlinear second-harmonic beams. It can also be adopted in other schemes and has potential applications in nonlinear frequency conversion, optical signal processing, and real-time hologram, etc.

  1. Analysis of forward and inverse problems in chemical dynamics and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabitz, H.

    1991-01-01

    This research is concerned with the development and application of advanced analysis tools for studying dynamics, kinetics, and spectroscopic phenomena from a forward and inverse perspective. In particular, the forward problem is concerned with understanding how detailed interatomic potential information maps onto a hierarchy of chemical dynamic and kinetic observables. The inverse aspects of the research are concerned with exactly the reverse of this process, whereby we desire to understand how particular measurements project back to yield information regarding the potential surface. Thus, in the latter domain, our research is concerned with the development of theoretically based tools ultimately aimed at applications to the inversion of quality laboratory data for the extraction of microscopic potential information.

  2. Learning the Inverse Dynamics of Robotic Manipulators in Structured Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-An; Huang, Han-Pang; Hsu, Huan-Kun; Lai, Wei-Zh; Cheng, Chih-Chun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the modeling of inverse dynamics without prior kinematic information for holonomic rigid-body robots. Despite success in compensating robot dynamics and friction, general inverse dynamics models are nontrivial. Rigid-body models are restrictive or inefficient; learning-based models are generalizable yet require large training data. The structured kernels address the dilemma by embedding the robot dynamics in reproducing kernel Hilbert space. The proposed kernels autonomously converge to rigid-body models but require fewer samples; with a semi-parametric framework that incorporates additional parametric basis for friction, the structured kernels can efficiently model general rigid-body robots. We tested the proposed scheme in simulations and experiments; the models that consider the structure of function space are more accurate.

  3. A general nonlinear inverse transport algorithm using forward and adjoint flux computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Iterative approaches to the nonlinear inverse transport problem are described, which give rise to the structure that best predicts a set of transport observations. Such methods are based on minimizing a global error functional measuring the discrepancy between predicted and observed transport data. Required for this minimization is the functional gradient (Frechet derivative) of the global error evaluated with respect to a set of unknown material parameters (specifying boundary locations, scattering cross sections, etc.) which are to be determined. It is shown how this functional gradient is obtained from numerical solutions to the forward and adjoint transport problems computed once per iteration. This approach is not only far more efficient, but also more accurate, than a finite-difference method for computing the gradient of the global error. The general technique can be applied to inverse-transport problems of all descriptions, provided only that solutions to the forward and adjoint problems can be found numerically. As an illustration, two inverse problems are treated: the reconstruction of an anisotropic scattering function in a one-dimensional homogeneous slab and the two-dimensional imaging of a spatially-varying scattering cross section.

  4. Control of a high beta maneuvering reentry vehicle using dynamic inversion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, Alfred Chapman

    2005-05-01

    The design of flight control systems for high performance maneuvering reentry vehicles presents a significant challenge to the control systems designer. These vehicles typically have a much higher ballistic coefficient than crewed vehicles like as the Space Shuttle or proposed crew return vehicles such as the X-38. Moreover, the missions of high performance vehicles usually require a steeper reentry flight path angle, followed by a pull-out into level flight. These vehicles then must transit the entire atmosphere and robustly perform the maneuvers required for the mission. The vehicles must also be flown with small static margins in order to perform the required maneuvers, which can result in highly nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics that frequently transition from being aerodynamically stable to unstable as angle of attack increases. The control system design technique of dynamic inversion has been applied successfully to both high performance aircraft and low beta reentry vehicles. The objective of this study was to explore the application of this technique to high performance maneuvering reentry vehicles, including the basic derivation of the dynamic inversion technique, followed by the extension of that technique to the use of tabular trim aerodynamic models in the controller. The dynamic inversion equations are developed for high performance vehicles and augmented to allow the selection of a desired response for the control system. A six degree of freedom simulation is used to evaluate the performance of the dynamic inversion approach, and results for both nominal and off nominal aerodynamic characteristics are presented.

  5. A Systematic and Numerically Efficient Procedure for Stable Dynamic Model Inversion of LTI Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, K.; Verhaegen, M.; Scherpen, J.M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Output tracking via the novel Stable Dynamic model Inversion (SDI) technique, applicable to non-minimum phase systems, and which naturally takes into account the presence of noise in target time histories, is considered here. We are motivated by the typical need to replicate time signals in the auto

  6. Comparison of inverse dynamics calculated by two- and three-dimensional models during walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Simonsen, E B; Dyhre-Poulsen, P

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare joint moments calculated by a two- (2D) and a three-dimensional (3D) inverse dynamics model to examine how the different approaches influenced the joint moment profiles. Fifteen healthy male subjects participated in the study. A five-camera video system rec...

  7. Dynamic Associations in Nonlinear Computing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberman, B. A.; Hogg, T.

    1985-10-01

    We experimentally show that nonlinear parallel arrays can be made to compute with attractors. This leads to fast adaptive behavior in which dynamical associations can be made between different inputs which initially produce sharply distinct outputs. We first define a set of simple local procedures which allow a general computing structure to change its state in time so as to produce classical Pavlovian conditioning. We then examine the dynamics of coalescence and dissociation of attractors with a number of quantitative experiments. We also show how such arrays exhibit generalization and differentiation of inputs in their behavior.

  8. An introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    1999-01-01

    CFD is the shortname for Computational Fluid Dynamics and is a numerical method by means of which we can analyze systems containing fluids. For instance systems dealing with heat flow or smoke control systems acting when a fire occur in a building.......CFD is the shortname for Computational Fluid Dynamics and is a numerical method by means of which we can analyze systems containing fluids. For instance systems dealing with heat flow or smoke control systems acting when a fire occur in a building....

  9. A fast inverse consistent deformable image registration method based on symmetric optical flow computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deshan; Li, Hua; Low, Daniel A.; Deasy, Joseph O.; El Naqa, Issam

    2008-11-01

    Deformable image registration is widely used in various radiation therapy applications including daily treatment planning adaptation to map planned tissue or dose to changing anatomy. In this work, a simple and efficient inverse consistency deformable registration method is proposed with aims of higher registration accuracy and faster convergence speed. Instead of registering image I to a second image J, the two images are symmetrically deformed toward one another in multiple passes, until both deformed images are matched and correct registration is therefore achieved. In each pass, a delta motion field is computed by minimizing a symmetric optical flow system cost function using modified optical flow algorithms. The images are then further deformed with the delta motion field in the positive and negative directions respectively, and then used for the next pass. The magnitude of the delta motion field is forced to be less than 0.4 voxel for every pass in order to guarantee smoothness and invertibility for the two overall motion fields that are accumulating the delta motion fields in both positive and negative directions, respectively. The final motion fields to register the original images I and J, in either direction, are calculated by inverting one overall motion field and combining the inversion result with the other overall motion field. The final motion fields are inversely consistent and this is ensured by the symmetric way that registration is carried out. The proposed method is demonstrated with phantom images, artificially deformed patient images and 4D-CT images. Our results suggest that the proposed method is able to improve the overall accuracy (reducing registration error by 30% or more, compared to the original and inversely inconsistent optical flow algorithms), reduce the inverse consistency error (by 95% or more) and increase the convergence rate (by 100% or more). The overall computation speed may slightly decrease, or increase in most cases

  10. A fast inverse consistent deformable image registration method based on symmetric optical flow computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Deshan; Li Hua; Low, Daniel A; Deasy, Joseph O; Naqa, Issam El [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, 4921 Parkview Place, LL, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2008-11-07

    Deformable image registration is widely used in various radiation therapy applications including daily treatment planning adaptation to map planned tissue or dose to changing anatomy. In this work, a simple and efficient inverse consistency deformable registration method is proposed with aims of higher registration accuracy and faster convergence speed. Instead of registering image I to a second image J, the two images are symmetrically deformed toward one another in multiple passes, until both deformed images are matched and correct registration is therefore achieved. In each pass, a delta motion field is computed by minimizing a symmetric optical flow system cost function using modified optical flow algorithms. The images are then further deformed with the delta motion field in the positive and negative directions respectively, and then used for the next pass. The magnitude of the delta motion field is forced to be less than 0.4 voxel for every pass in order to guarantee smoothness and invertibility for the two overall motion fields that are accumulating the delta motion fields in both positive and negative directions, respectively. The final motion fields to register the original images I and J, in either direction, are calculated by inverting one overall motion field and combining the inversion result with the other overall motion field. The final motion fields are inversely consistent and this is ensured by the symmetric way that registration is carried out. The proposed method is demonstrated with phantom images, artificially deformed patient images and 4D-CT images. Our results suggest that the proposed method is able to improve the overall accuracy (reducing registration error by 30% or more, compared to the original and inversely inconsistent optical flow algorithms), reduce the inverse consistency error (by 95% or more) and increase the convergence rate (by 100% or more). The overall computation speed may slightly decrease, or increase in most cases

  11. Modeling locomotion of a soft-bodied arthropod using inverse dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Frank; Trimmer, Barry A; Rife, Jason, E-mail: Frank.Saunders@tufts.edu [Tufts University, 204 Anderson Hall, 200 College Avenue, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Most bio-inspired robots have been based on animals with jointed, stiff skeletons. There is now an increasing interest in mimicking the robust performance of animals in natural environments by incorporating compliant materials into the locomotory system. However, the mechanics of moving, highly conformable structures are particularly difficult to predict. This paper proposes a planar, extensible-link model for the soft-bodied tobacco hornworm caterpillar, Manduca sexta, to provide insight for biologists and engineers studying locomotion by highly deformable animals and caterpillar-like robots. Using inverse dynamics to process experimentally acquired point-tracking data, ground reaction forces and internal forces were determined for a crawling caterpillar. Computed ground reaction forces were compared to experimental data to validate the model. The results show that a system of linked extendable joints can faithfully describe the general form and magnitude of the contact forces produced by a crawling caterpillar. Furthermore, the model can be used to compute internal forces that cannot be measured experimentally. It is predicted that between different body segments in stance phase the body is mostly kept in tension and that compression only occurs during the swing phase when the prolegs release their grip. This finding supports a recently proposed mechanism for locomotion by soft animals in which the substrate transfers compressive forces from one part of the body to another (the environmental skeleton) thereby minimizing the need for hydrostatic stiffening. The model also provides a new means to characterize and test control strategies used in caterpillar crawling and soft robot locomotion.

  12. Light-Directed Dynamic Chirality Inversion in Functional Self-Organized Helical Superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Li, Quan

    2016-02-24

    Helical superstructures are widely observed in nature, in synthetic polymers, and in supramolecular assemblies. Controlling the chirality (the handedness) of dynamic helical superstructures of molecular and macromolecular systems by external stimuli is a challenging task, but is of great fundamental significance with appealing morphology-dependent applications. Light-driven chirality inversion in self-organized helical superstructures (i.e. cholesteric, chiral nematic liquid crystals) is currently in the limelight because inversion of the handedness alters the chirality of the circularly polarized light that they selectively reflect, which has wide potential for application. Here we discuss the recent developments toward inversion of the handedness of cholesteric liquid crystals enabled by photoisomerizable chiral molecular switches or motors. Different classes of chiral photoresponsive dopants (guests) capable of conferring light-driven reversible chirality inversion of helical superstructures fabricated from different nematic hosts are discussed. Rational molecular designs of chiral molecular switches toward endowing handedness inversion to the induced helical superstructures of cholesteric liquid crystals are highlighted. This Review is concluded by throwing light on the challenges and opportunities in this emerging frontier, and it is expected to provide useful guidelines toward the development of self-organized soft materials with stimuli-directed chirality inversion capability and multifunctional host-guest systems.

  13. Inverse optimal sliding mode control of spacecraft with coupled translation and attitude dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukdeboon, Chutiphon

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes two robust inverse optimal control schemes for spacecraft with coupled translation and attitude dynamics in the presence of external disturbances. For the first controller, an inverse optimal control law is designed based on Sontag-type formula and the control Lyapunov function. Then a robust inverse optimal position and attitude controller is designed by using a new second-order integral sliding mode control method to combine a sliding mode control with the derived inverse optimal control. The global asymptotic stability of the proposed control law is proved by using the second method of Lyapunov. For the other control law, a nonlinear H∞ inverse optimal controller for spacecraft position and attitude tracking motion is developed to achieve the design conditions of controller gains that the control law becomes suboptimal H∞ state feedback control. The ultimate boundedness of system state is proved by using the Lyapunov stability theory. Both developed robust inverse optimal controllers can minimise a performance index and ensure the stability of the closed-loop system and external disturbance attenuation. An example of position and attitude tracking manoeuvres is presented and simulation results are included to show the performance of the proposed controllers.

  14. Approximate Bayesian computation for machine learning, inverse problems and big data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2017-06-01

    This paper summarizes my tutorial talk in MaxEnt 2016 workshop. Starting from the basics of the Bayesian approach and simple example of low dimensional parameter estimation where almost all the computations can be done easily, we go very fast to high dimensional case. In those real world cases, even for the sample case of linear model with Gaussian prior, where the posterior law is also Gaussian, the cost of the computation of the posterior covariance becomes important and needs approximate and fast algorithms. Different approximation methods for model comparison and model selection in machine learning problems are presented in summary. Among the existing methods, we mention Laplace approximation, Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) and Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) Methods. Finally, through two examples of inverse problems in imaging systems: X ray and Diffraction wave Computed Tomography (CT), we show how to handle the real great dimensional problems.

  15. Acceleration of FEM-based transfer matrix computation for forward and inverse problems of electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Dmytro; Jiang, Y; Dössel, O

    2009-12-01

    The distributions of transmembrane voltage (TMV) within the cardiac tissue are linearly connected with the patient's body surface potential maps (BSPMs) at every time instant. The matrix describing the relation between the respective distributions is referred to as the transfer matrix. This matrix can be employed to carry out forward calculations in order to find the BSPM for any given distribution of TMV inside the heart. Its inverse can be used to reconstruct the cardiac activity non-invasively, which can be an important diagnostic tool in the clinical practice. The computation of this matrix using the finite element method can be quite time-consuming. In this work, a method is proposed allowing to speed up this process by computing an approximate transfer matrix instead of the precise one. The method is tested on three realistic anatomical models of real-world patients. It is shown that the computation time can be reduced by 50% without loss of accuracy.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics in oil burner design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T.A. [Brookhaven National Labs., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-09-01

    In Computational Fluid Dynamics, the differential equations which describe flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer are approximately solved using a very laborious numerical procedure. Flows of practical interest to burner designs are always turbulent, adding to the complexity of requiring a turbulence model. This paper presents a model for burner design.

  17. Engineering applications of computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Awang, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis that can be used for conceptual studies of product design, detail product development, process troubleshooting. It demonstrates the benefit of CFD modeling as a cost saving, timely, safe and easy to scale-up methodology.

  18. From Cnn Dynamics to Cellular Wave Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roska, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    Embedded in a historical overview, the development of the Cellular Wave Computing paradigm is presented, starting from the standard CNN dynamics. The theoretical aspects, the physical implementation, the innovation process, as well as the biological relevance are discussed in details. Finally, the latest developments, the physical versus virtual cellular machines, as well as some open questions are presented.

  19. A Stochastic Dynamic Model of Computer Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunming Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A stochastic computer virus spread model is proposed and its dynamic behavior is fully investigated. Specifically, we prove the existence and uniqueness of positive solutions, and the stability of the virus-free equilibrium and viral equilibrium by constructing Lyapunov functions and applying Ito's formula. Some numerical simulations are finally given to illustrate our main results.

  20. The status of Computational Fluis Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Liu, Li; Peng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was first introduced in the building ventilation industry in the 1970s. Since then, it has been increasingly used as testified by the growth of the number of peer-reviewed articles, which was less than 10 per year in the 1990s and 60 to 70 per year in the recent...

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on the new REHVA Guidebook Computational Fluid  Dynamics in Ventilation Design (Nielsen et al. 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis(Nielsen 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis Allard, Hazim B. Awbi, Lars Davidson and Alois Schälin. The guidebook is made for people...

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Ventilation Airflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was first introduced in the ventilation industry in the 1970s. CFD has been increasingly used since then, as testified by the number of peer-reviewed articles, which was less than 10 per year in the 1990s, and which is now 60 to 70 per year. This article discusses...

  3. Computational Methods in Stochastic Dynamics Volume 2

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanou, George; Papadopoulos, Vissarion

    2013-01-01

    The considerable influence of inherent uncertainties on structural behavior has led the engineering community to recognize the importance of a stochastic approach to structural problems. Issues related to uncertainty quantification and its influence on the reliability of the computational models are continuously gaining in significance. In particular, the problems of dynamic response analysis and reliability assessment of structures with uncertain system and excitation parameters have been the subject of continuous research over the last two decades as a result of the increasing availability of powerful computing resources and technology.   This book is a follow up of a previous book with the same subject (ISBN 978-90-481-9986-0) and focuses on advanced computational methods and software tools which can highly assist in tackling complex problems in stochastic dynamic/seismic analysis and design of structures. The selected chapters are authored by some of the most active scholars in their respective areas and...

  4. On computational experiments in some inverse problems of heat and mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilchenko, G. G.; Bilchenko, N. G.

    2016-11-01

    The results of mathematical modeling of effective heat and mass transfer on hypersonic aircraft permeable surfaces are considered. The physic-chemical processes (the dissociation and the ionization) in laminar boundary layer of compressible gas are appreciated. Some algorithms of control restoration are suggested for the interpolation and approximation statements of heat and mass transfer inverse problems. The differences between the methods applied for the problem solutions search for these statements are discussed. Both the algorithms are realized as programs. Many computational experiments were accomplished with the use of these programs. The parameters of boundary layer obtained by means of the A.A.Dorodnicyn's generalized integral relations method from solving the direct problems have been used to obtain the inverse problems solutions. Two types of blowing laws restoration for the inverse problem in interpolation statement are presented as the examples. The influence of the temperature factor on the blowing restoration is investigated. The different character of sensitivity of controllable parameters (the local heat flow and local tangent friction) respectively to step (discrete) changing of control (the blowing) and the switching point position is studied.

  5. Fast and Scalable Computation of the Forward and Inverse Discrete Periodic Radon Transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Cesar; Llamocca, Daniel; Pattichis, Marios

    2016-01-01

    The discrete periodic radon transform (DPRT) has extensively been used in applications that involve image reconstructions from projections. Beyond classic applications, the DPRT can also be used to compute fast convolutions that avoids the use of floating-point arithmetic associated with the use of the fast Fourier transform. Unfortunately, the use of the DPRT has been limited by the need to compute a large number of additions and the need for a large number of memory accesses. This paper introduces a fast and scalable approach for computing the forward and inverse DPRT that is based on the use of: a parallel array of fixed-point adder trees; circular shift registers to remove the need for accessing external memory components when selecting the input data for the adder trees; an image block-based approach to DPRT computation that can fit the proposed architecture to available resources; and fast transpositions that are computed in one or a few clock cycles that do not depend on the size of the input image. As a result, for an N × N image (N prime), the proposed approach can compute up to N(2) additions per clock cycle. Compared with the previous approaches, the scalable approach provides the fastest known implementations for different amounts of computational resources. For example, for a 251×251 image, for approximately 25% fewer flip-flops than required for a systolic implementation, we have that the scalable DPRT is computed 36 times faster. For the fastest case, we introduce optimized just 2N + ⌈log(2) N⌉ + 1 and 2N + 3 ⌈log(2) N⌉ + B + 2 cycles, architectures that can compute the DPRT and its inverse in respectively, where B is the number of bits used to represent each input pixel. On the other hand, the scalable DPRT approach requires more 1-b additions than for the systolic implementation and provides a tradeoff between speed and additional 1-b additions. All of the proposed DPRT architectures were implemented in VHSIC Hardware Description Language

  6. Designing a Robust Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Controller for Spacecraft Formation Flying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inseok Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The robust nonlinear dynamic inversion (RNDI control technique is proposed to keep the relative position of spacecrafts while formation flying. The proposed RNDI control method is based on nonlinear dynamic inversion (NDI. NDI is nonlinear control method that replaces the original dynamics into the user-selected desired dynamics. Because NDI removes nonlinearities in the model by inverting the original dynamics directly, it also eliminates the need of designing suitable controllers for each equilibrium point; that is, NDI works as self-scheduled controller. Removing the original model also provides advantages of ease to satisfy the specific requirements by simply handling desired dynamics. Therefore, NDI is simple and has many similarities to classical control. In real applications, however, it is difficult to achieve perfect cancellation of the original dynamics due to uncertainties that lead to performance degradation and even make the system unstable. This paper proposes robustness assurance method for NDI. The proposed RNDI is designed by combining NDI and sliding mode control (SMC. SMC is inherently robust using high-speed switching inputs. This paper verifies similarities of NDI and SMC, firstly. And then RNDI control method is proposed. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by simulations applied to spacecraft formation flying problem.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics In GARUDA Grid Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Chandra Bhushan

    2011-01-01

    GARUDA Grid developed on NKN (National Knowledge Network) network by Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC) hubs High Performance Computing (HPC) Clusters which are geographically separated all over India. C-DAC has been associated with development of HPC infrastructure since its establishment in year 1988. The Grid infrastructure provides a secure and efficient way of accessing heterogeneous resource . Enabling scientific applications on Grid has been researched for some time now. In this regard we have successfully enabled Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) application which can help CFD community as a whole in effective manner to carry out computational research which requires huge compuational resource beyond once in house capability. This work is part of current on-going project Grid GARUDA funded by Department of Information Technology.

  8. Computationally Efficient Multiconfigurational Reactive Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takefumi; Peng, Yuxing; Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A

    2012-12-11

    It is a computationally demanding task to explicitly simulate the electronic degrees of freedom in a system to observe the chemical transformations of interest, while at the same time sampling the time and length scales required to converge statistical properties and thus reduce artifacts due to initial conditions, finite-size effects, and limited sampling. One solution that significantly reduces the computational expense consists of molecular models in which effective interactions between particles govern the dynamics of the system. If the interaction potentials in these models are developed to reproduce calculated properties from electronic structure calculations and/or ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, then one can calculate accurate properties at a fraction of the computational cost. Multiconfigurational algorithms model the system as a linear combination of several chemical bonding topologies to simulate chemical reactions, also sometimes referred to as "multistate". These algorithms typically utilize energy and force calculations already found in popular molecular dynamics software packages, thus facilitating their implementation without significant changes to the structure of the code. However, the evaluation of energies and forces for several bonding topologies per simulation step can lead to poor computational efficiency if redundancy is not efficiently removed, particularly with respect to the calculation of long-ranged Coulombic interactions. This paper presents accurate approximations (effective long-range interaction and resulting hybrid methods) and multiple-program parallelization strategies for the efficient calculation of electrostatic interactions in reactive molecular simulations.

  9. A real-time inverse quantised transform for multi-standard with dynamic resolution support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chi-Chia; Lin, Chun-Ying; Zhang, Ce

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a real-time configurable intelligent property (IP) core is presented for image/video decoding process in compatibility with the standard MPEG-4 Visual and the standard H.264/AVC. The inverse quantised discrete cosine and integer transform can be used to perform inverse quantised discrete cosine transform and inverse quantised inverse integer transforms which only required shift and add operations. Meanwhile, COordinate Rotation DIgital Computer iterations and compensation steps are adjustable in order to compensate for the video compression quality regarding various data throughput. The implementations are embedded in publicly available software XVID Codes 1.2.2 for the standard MPEG-4 Visual and the H.264/AVC reference software JM 16.1, where the experimental results show that the balance between the computational complexity and video compression quality is retained. At the end, FPGA synthesised results show that the proposed IP core can bring advantages to low hardware costs and also provide real-time performance for Full HD and 4K-2K video decoding.

  10. Capillary dynamics of drops and bubbles: Splashing, wetting, electrocoalescence, inverse coarsening, and thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, James Chandler

    Small drops and the thin-films of bubbles are similar in that the surface to volume ratio is large. Consequently, capillary forces, which result from changes in the surface energy, tend to dominate the drop and bubble dynamics. For example, capillarity is responsible for breaking up a liquid jet from a faucet in a sink into a stream of individual droplets, and for coalescing these droplets into a puddle at the bottom of the sink. This dissertation identifies four situations in which a drop or a bubble exhibits unusual and perhaps counter-intuitive dynamics. The first example (Chapter 2) occurs when a drop impacts either an angled or moving dry, solid surface. Existing physical models attempt to predict the resulting dynamics, spreading or splashing, based on a variety of parameters. Yet it is unclear how these models would extend to include tangential velocity. Our high-speed experiments highlight a distinct third regime in which a fraction of the drop spreads while the other part splashes. The second example (Chapter 3) occurs when a drop contacts a wettable surface with a finite contact angle. Our high-speed experiments challenge the existing models by both showing that the spreading is inertially dominated and that the distance spread follows a power-law scaling in time where the exponent depends on the equilibrium contact angle. The third example (Chapter 4) occurs when two drops are drawn together in an electric field. When the voltage between the drops is low, the drops contact and coalesce. However, when the voltage is sufficiently high, the drops contact and then recoil. The fourth example (Chapter 5) occurs when a bubble on a liquid or solid surface ruptures. Foam coarsening theory would predict that the bubble vanishes when it pops, yet our experiments show that a ring of smaller bubbles is created from the retracting film. This inverse coarsening phenomena is a source of aerosols, and therefore may have implications for health and climate. This

  11. The Brain Dynamics of Linguistic Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliot eMurphy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural oscillations at distinct frequencies are increasingly being related to a number of basic and higher cognitive faculties. Oscillations enable the construction of coherently organised neuronal assemblies through establishing transitory temporal correlations. By exploring the elementary operations of the language faculty – labeling, concatenation, cyclic transfer – alongside neural dynamics, a new model of linguistic computation is proposed. It is argued that the universality of language, and the true biological source of Universal Grammar, is not to be found purely in the genome as has long been suggested, but more specifically within the extraordinarily preserved nature of mammalian brain rhythms employed in the computation of linguistic structures. Computational-representational theories are used as a guide in investigating the neurobiological foundations of the human ‘cognome’ – the set of computations performed by the nervous system – and new directions are suggested for how the dynamics of brain (the ‘dynome’ operates and execute linguistic operations. The extent to which brain rhythms are the suitable neuronal processes which can capture the computational properties of the human language faculty is considered against a backdrop of existing cartographic research into the localisation of linguistic interpretation. Particular focus is placed on labeling, the operation elsewhere argued to be species-specific. A Basic Label model of the human cognome-dynome is proposed, leading to clear, causally-addressable empirical predictions, to be investigated by a suggested research program, Dynamic Cognomics. In addition, a distinction between minimal and maximal degrees of explanation is introduced to differentiate between the depth of analysis provided by cartographic, rhythmic, neurochemical and other approaches to computation.

  12. The brain dynamics of linguistic computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elliot

    2015-01-01

    Neural oscillations at distinct frequencies are increasingly being related to a number of basic and higher cognitive faculties. Oscillations enable the construction of coherently organized neuronal assemblies through establishing transitory temporal correlations. By exploring the elementary operations of the language faculty-labeling, concatenation, cyclic transfer-alongside neural dynamics, a new model of linguistic computation is proposed. It is argued that the universality of language, and the true biological source of Universal Grammar, is not to be found purely in the genome as has long been suggested, but more specifically within the extraordinarily preserved nature of mammalian brain rhythms employed in the computation of linguistic structures. Computational-representational theories are used as a guide in investigating the neurobiological foundations of the human "cognome"-the set of computations performed by the nervous system-and new directions are suggested for how the dynamics of the brain (the "dynome") operate and execute linguistic operations. The extent to which brain rhythms are the suitable neuronal processes which can capture the computational properties of the human language faculty is considered against a backdrop of existing cartographic research into the localization of linguistic interpretation. Particular focus is placed on labeling, the operation elsewhere argued to be species-specific. A Basic Label model of the human cognome-dynome is proposed, leading to clear, causally-addressable empirical predictions, to be investigated by a suggested research program, Dynamic Cognomics. In addition, a distinction between minimal and maximal degrees of explanation is introduced to differentiate between the depth of analysis provided by cartographic, rhythmic, neurochemical, and other approaches to computation.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics using CATIA created geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gengler, Jeanne E.

    1989-07-01

    A method has been developed to link the geometry definition residing on a CAD/CAM system with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool needed to evaluate aerodynamic designs and requiring the memory capacity of a supercomputer. Requirements for surfaces suitable for CFD analysis are discussed. Techniques for developing surfaces and verifying their smoothness are compared, showing the capability of the CAD/CAM system. The utilization of a CAD/CAM system to create a computational mesh is explained, and the mesh interaction with the geometry and input file preparation for the CFD analysis is discussed.

  14. 3D Multisource Full‐Waveform Inversion using Dynamic Random Phase Encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Boonyasiriwat, Chaiwoot

    2010-10-17

    We have developed a multisource full‐waveform inversion algorithm using a dynamic phase encoding strategy with dual‐randomization—both the position and polarity of simultaneous sources are randomized and changed every iteration. The dynamic dual‐randomization is used to promote the destructive interference of crosstalk noise resulting from blending a large number of common shot gathers into a supergather. We compare our multisource algorithm with various algorithms in a numerical experiment using the 3D SEG/EAGE overthrust model and show that our algorithm provides a higher‐quality velocity tomogram than the other methods that use only monorandomization. This suggests that increasing the degree of randomness in phase encoding should improve the quality of the inversion result.

  15. Analysis of forward and inverse problems in chemical dynamics and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabitz, H.

    1992-01-01

    The forward aspects of the research were concerned with mapping the relation between input potential surface structure, and laboratory dynamical and kinetic observables. The research on inverse analysis complemented the forward analysis studies; objective was to develop algorithms for inversion of quality laboratory data, back to underlying potential surfaces. 24 items of research in molecular dynamics and chemical kinetics are reported. The following collisions/reactions were studied: H + H[sub 2], He - H[sub 2], He - Xe/C(0001), thermal explosions, CO/H[sub 2]/O[sub 2], H[sub 2] + HD, H[sup +] + F([sup 2]P[sub 1/2]), He[sup +] + Ne(2p[sup 6]), Na + I, F + H[sub 2], CO - H[sub 2] - O[sub 2].

  16. Adaptive Neural Network Dynamic Inversion with Prescribed Performance for Aircraft Flight Control

    OpenAIRE

    Wendong Gai; Honglun Wang; Jing Zhang; Yuxia Li

    2013-01-01

    An adaptive neural network dynamic inversion with prescribed performance method is proposed for aircraft flight control. The aircraft nonlinear attitude angle model is analyzed. And we propose a new attitude angle controller design method based on prescribed performance which describes the convergence rate and overshoot of the tracking error. Then the model error is compensated by the adaptive neural network. Subsequently, the system stability is analyzed in detail. Finally, the proposed meth...

  17. Meshfree methods for computational fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Jícha M.; Čermák L.; Niedoba P.

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with the convergence problem of the SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) meshfree method for the solution of fluid dynamics tasks. In the introductory part, fundamental aspects of mesh- free methods, their definition, computational approaches and classification are discussed. In the following part, the methods of local integral representation, where SPH belongs are analyzed and specifically the method RKPM (Reproducing Kernel Particle Method) is described. In the contribution...

  18. Delaunay triangulation and computational fluid dynamics meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posenau, Mary-Anne K.; Mount, David M.

    1992-01-01

    In aerospace computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations, the Delaunay triangulation of suitable quadrilateral meshes can lead to unsuitable triangulated meshes. Here, we present case studies which illustrate the limitations of using structured grid generation methods which produce points in a curvilinear coordinate system for subsequent triangulations for CFD applications. We discuss conditions under which meshes of quadrilateral elements may not produce a Delaunay triangulation suitable for CFD calculations, particularly with regard to high aspect ratio, skewed quadrilateral elements.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics in ventilation design

    CERN Document Server

    Allard, Francis; Awbi, Hazim B; Davidson, Lars; Schälin, Alois

    2007-01-01

    CFD-calculations have been rapidly developed to a powerful tool for the analysis of air pollution distribution in various spaces. However, the user of CFD-calculation should be aware of the basic principles of calculations and specifically the boundary conditions. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) – in Ventilation Design models is written by a working group of highly qualified international experts representing research, consulting and design.

  20. Colour in visualisation for computational fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Colour is used in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations in two key ways. First it is used to visualise the geometry and allow the engineers to be confident that the model constructed is a good representation of the engineering situation. Once an analysis has been completed, colour is used in post-processing the data from the simulations to illustrate the complex fluid mechanic phenomena under investigation. This paper describes these two uses of colour and provides some examples to il...

  1. Application of parallel computing to robot dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Schäfer, Peter; Schiehlen, Werner

    1993-01-01

    In this paper an approach for the application of parallel processing to the dynamic analysis of robots based on the multibody system method is presented. The inherent structure of the symbolic equations of motion is used for partitioning those into independent modules for concurrent evaluation. The applied strategies for parallelization include the parallel evaluation of subsystem equations and the parallel computation of the inertia matrix along with its factorization, and of the force vecto...

  2. A computationally efficient tool for assessing the depth resolution in large-scale potential-field inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paoletti, Valeria; Hansen, Per Christian; Hansen, Mads Friis;

    2014-01-01

    on memory and computing time. We used the ApproxDRP to study retrievable depth resolution in inversion of the gravity field of the Neapolitan Volcanic Area. Our main contribution is the combined use of the Lanczos bidiagonalization algorithm, established in the scientific computing community, and the depth......In potential-field inversion, careful management of singular value decomposition components is crucial for obtaining information about the source distribution with respect to depth. In principle, the depth-resolution plot provides a convenient visual tool for this analysis, but its computational...

  3. Inverse Dynamics Model for the Ankle Joint with Applications in Tibia Malleolus Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budescu, E.; Merticaru, E.; Chirazi, M.

    The paper presents a biomechanical model of the ankle joint, in order to determine the force and the torque of reaction into the articulation, through inverse dynamic analysis, in various stages of the gait. Thus, knowing the acceleration of the foot and the reaction force between foot and ground during the gait, determined by experimental measurement, there was calculated, for five different positions of the foot, the joint reaction forces, on the basis of dynamic balance equations. The values numerically determined were compared with the admissible forces appearing in the technical systems of osteosynthesis of tibia malleolus fracture, in order to emphasize the motion restrictions during bone healing.

  4. 3-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor computers - Part II: direct data-space inverse solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    Following the creation described in Part I of a deformable edge finite-element simulator for 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) responses using direct solvers, in Part II we develop an algorithm named HexMT for 3-D regularized inversion of MT data including topography. Direct solvers parallelized on large-RAM, symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) workstations are used also for the Gauss-Newton model update. By exploiting the data-space approach, the computational cost of the model update becomes much less in both time and computer memory than the cost of the forward simulation. In order to regularize using the second norm of the gradient, we factor the matrix related to the regularization term and apply its inverse to the Jacobian, which is done using the MKL PARDISO library. For dense matrix multiplication and factorization related to the model update, we use the PLASMA library which shows very good scalability across processor cores. A synthetic test inversion using a simple hill model shows that including topography can be important; in this case depression of the electric field by the hill can cause false conductors at depth or mask the presence of resistive structure. With a simple model of two buried bricks, a uniform spatial weighting for the norm of model smoothing recovered more accurate locations for the tomographic images compared to weightings which were a function of parameter Jacobians. We implement joint inversion for static distortion matrices tested using the Dublin secret model 2, for which we are able to reduce nRMS to ˜1.1 while avoiding oscillatory convergence. Finally we test the code on field data by inverting full impedance and tipper MT responses collected around Mount St Helens in the Cascade volcanic chain. Among several prominent structures, the north-south trending, eruption-controlling shear zone is clearly imaged in the inversion.

  5. A Unified Approach to Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Control with Parameter Determination by Eigenvalue Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a unified approach to nonlinear dynamic inversion control algorithm with the parameters for desired dynamics determined by using an eigenvalue assignment method, which may be applied in a very straightforward and convenient way. By using this method, it is not necessary to transform the nonlinear equations into linear equations by feedback linearization before beginning control designs. The applications of this method are not limited to affine nonlinear control systems or limited to minimum phase problems if the eigenvalues of error dynamics are carefully assigned so that the desired dynamics is stable. The control design by using this method is shown to be robust to modeling uncertainties. To validate the theory, the design of a UAV control system is presented as an example. Numerical simulations show the performance of the design to be quite remarkable.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics of rising droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Matthew [Lake Superior State University; Francois, Marianne M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-05

    The main goal of this study is to perform simulations of droplet dynamics using Truchas, a LANL-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, and compare them to a computational study of Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259]. Understanding droplet dynamics is of fundamental importance in liquid-liquid extraction, a process used in the nuclear fuel cycle to separate various components. Simulations of a single droplet rising by buoyancy are conducted in two-dimensions. Multiple parametric studies are carried out to ensure the problem set-up is optimized. An Interface Smoothing Length (ISL) study and mesh resolution study are performed to verify convergence of the calculations. ISL is a parameter for the interface curvature calculation. Further, wall effects are investigated and checked against existing correlations. The ISL study found that the optimal ISL value is 2.5{Delta}x, with {Delta}x being the mesh cell spacing. The mesh resolution study found that the optimal mesh resolution is d/h=40, for d=drop diameter and h={Delta}x. In order for wall effects on terminal velocity to be insignificant, a conservative wall width of 9d or a nonconservative wall width of 7d can be used. The percentage difference between Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259] and Truchas for the velocity profiles vary from 7.9% to 9.9%. The computed droplet velocity and interface profiles are found in agreement with the study. The CFD calculations are performed on multiple cores, using LANL's Institutional High Performance Computing.

  7. Elastic Wave-equation Reflection Traveltime Inversion Using Dynamic Warping and Wave Mode Decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, T.

    2017-05-26

    Elastic full waveform inversion (EFWI) provides high-resolution parameter estimation of the subsurface but requires good initial guess of the true model. The traveltime inversion only minimizes traveltime misfits which are more sensitive and linearly related to the low-wavenumber model perturbation. Therefore, building initial P and S wave velocity models for EFWI by using elastic wave-equation reflections traveltime inversion (WERTI) would be effective and robust, especially for the deeper part. In order to distinguish the reflection travletimes of P or S-waves in elastic media, we decompose the surface multicomponent data into vector P- and S-wave seismogram. We utilize the dynamic image warping to extract the reflected P- or S-wave traveltimes. The P-wave velocity are first inverted using P-wave traveltime followed by the S-wave velocity inversion with S-wave traveltime, during which the wave mode decomposition is applied to the gradients calculation. Synthetic example on the Sigbee2A model proves the validity of our method for recovering the long wavelength components of the model.

  8. Photonic Design: From Fundamental Solar Cell Physics to Computational Inverse Design

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Owen D

    2013-01-01

    Photonic innovation is becoming ever more important in the modern world. Optical systems are dominating shorter and shorter communications distances, LED's are rapidly emerging for a variety of applications, and solar cells show potential to be a mainstream technology in the energy space. The need for novel, energy-efficient photonic and optoelectronic devices will only increase. This work unites fundamental physics and a novel computational inverse design approach towards such innovation. The first half of the dissertation is devoted to the physics of high-efficiency solar cells. As solar cells approach fundamental efficiency limits, their internal physics transforms. Photonic considerations, instead of electronic ones, are the key to reaching the highest voltages and efficiencies. Proper photon management led to Alta Device's recent dramatic increase of the solar cell efficiency record to 28.3%. Moreover, approaching the Shockley-Queisser limit for any solar cell technology will require light extraction to ...

  9. Automatic versus manual model differentiation to compute sensitivities and solve non-linear inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo, D.; Cappelaere, B.; Faure, Ch.

    2002-04-01

    Emerging tools for automatic differentiation (AD) of computer programs should be of great benefit for the implementation of many derivative-based numerical methods such as those used for inverse modeling. The Odyssée software, one such tool for Fortran 77 codes, has been tested on a sample model that solves a 2D non-linear diffusion-type equation. Odyssée offers both the forward and the reverse differentiation modes, that produce the tangent and the cotangent models, respectively. The two modes have been implemented on the sample application. A comparison is made with a manually-produced differentiated code for this model (MD), obtained by solving the adjoint equations associated with the model's discrete state equations. Following a presentation of the methods and tools and of their relative advantages and drawbacks, the performances of the codes produced by the manual and automatic methods are compared, in terms of accuracy and of computing efficiency (CPU and memory needs). The perturbation method (finite-difference approximation of derivatives) is also used as a reference. Based on the test of Taylor, the accuracy of the two AD modes proves to be excellent and as high as machine precision permits, a good indication of Odyssée's capability to produce error-free codes. In comparison, the manually-produced derivatives (MD) sometimes appear to be slightly biased, which is likely due to the fact that a theoretical model (state equations) and a practical model (computer program) do not exactly coincide, while the accuracy of the perturbation method is very uncertain. The MD code largely outperforms all other methods in computing efficiency, a subject of current research for the improvement of AD tools. Yet these tools can already be of considerable help for the computer implementation of many numerical methods, avoiding the tedious task of hand-coding the differentiation of complex algorithms.

  10. New Developments on Inverse Polygon Mapping to Calculate Gravitational Lensing Magnification Maps: Optimized Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, E.; Mediavilla, T.; Muñoz, J. A.; Ariza, O.; Lopez, P.; Gonzalez-Morcillo, C.; Jimenez-Vicente, J.

    2011-11-01

    We derive an exact solution (in the form of a series expansion) to compute gravitational lensing magnification maps. It is based on the backward gravitational lens mapping of a partition of the image plane in polygonal cells (inverse polygon mapping, IPM), not including critical points (except perhaps at the cell boundaries). The zeroth-order term of the series expansion leads to the method described by Mediavilla et al. The first-order term is used to study the error induced by the truncation of the series at zeroth order, explaining the high accuracy of the IPM even at this low order of approximation. Interpreting the Inverse Ray Shooting (IRS) method in terms of IPM, we explain the previously reported N -3/4 dependence of the IRS error with the number of collected rays per pixel. Cells intersected by critical curves (critical cells) transform to non-simply connected regions with topological pathologies like auto-overlapping or non-preservation of the boundary under the transformation. To define a non-critical partition, we use a linear approximation of the critical curve to divide each critical cell into two non-critical subcells. The optimal choice of the cell size depends basically on the curvature of the critical curves. For typical applications in which the pixel of the magnification map is a small fraction of the Einstein radius, a one-to-one relationship between the cell and pixel sizes in the absence of lensing guarantees both the consistence of the method and a very high accuracy. This prescription is simple but very conservative. We show that substantially larger cells can be used to obtain magnification maps with huge savings in computation time.

  11. Dynamical Models for Computer Viruses Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R. C. Piqueira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, digital computer systems and networks are the main engineering tools, being used in planning, design, operation, and control of all sizes of building, transportation, machinery, business, and life maintaining devices. Consequently, computer viruses became one of the most important sources of uncertainty, contributing to decrease the reliability of vital activities. A lot of antivirus programs have been developed, but they are limited to detecting and removing infections, based on previous knowledge of the virus code. In spite of having good adaptation capability, these programs work just as vaccines against diseases and are not able to prevent new infections based on the network state. Here, a trial on modeling computer viruses propagation dynamics relates it to other notable events occurring in the network permitting to establish preventive policies in the network management. Data from three different viruses are collected in the Internet and two different identification techniques, autoregressive and Fourier analyses, are applied showing that it is possible to forecast the dynamics of a new virus propagation by using the data collected from other viruses that formerly infected the network.

  12. Fundamental algorithms in computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pulliam, Thomas H

    2014-01-01

    Intended as a textbook for courses in computational fluid dynamics at the senior undergraduate or graduate level, this book is a follow-up to the book Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics by the same authors, which was published in the series Scientific Computation in 2001. Whereas the earlier book concentrated on the analysis of numerical methods applied to model equations, this new book concentrates on algorithms for the numerical solution of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. It focuses on some classical algorithms as well as the underlying ideas based on the latest methods. A key feature of the book is the inclusion of programming exercises at the end of each chapter based on the numerical solution of the quasi-one-dimensional Euler equations and the shock-tube problem. These exercises can be included in the context of a typical course, and sample solutions are provided in each chapter, so readers can confirm that they have coded the algorithms correctly.

  13. Learning the Inverse Model of the Dynamics of a Robot Leg by Auto-imitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalveram, Karl Theodor; Seyfarth, Andre

    Walking, running and hopping are based on self-stabilizing oscillatory activity. In contrast, aiming movements serve to direct a limb to a desired location and demand a quite different manner of control which also includes learning the physical parameters of that limb. The paper is concerned with the question how reaching a goal can be integrated into locomotion. A prerequisite of piecing together both types of control is the acquisition of a model of the limb’s inverse dynamics. To test whether auto-imitation, a biologically inspired learning algorithm, can solve this problem, we build a motor driven device with a two-segmented arm. A preliminary study revealed that at least the forearm — with the upper arm fixed — can be made controllable by this method we called “auto-imitatively adaptable inverse control”.

  14. Fast Dynamic Meshing Method Based on Delaunay Graph and Inverse Distance Weighting Interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibin; Qin, Ning; Zhao, Ning

    2016-06-01

    A novel mesh deformation technique is developed based on the Delaunay graph mapping method and the inverse distance weighting (IDW) interpolation. The algorithm maintains the advantages of the efficiency of Delaunay-graph-mapping mesh deformation while possess the ability for better controlling the near surface mesh quality. The Delaunay graph is used to divide the mesh domain into a number of sub-domains. On each of the sub-domains, the inverse distance weighting interpolation is applied to build a much smaller sized translation matrix between the original mesh and the deformed mesh, resulting a similar efficiency for the mesh deformation as compared to the fast Delaunay graph mapping method. The paper will show how the near-wall mesh quality is controlled and improved by the new method while the computational time is compared with the original Delaunay graph mapping method.

  15. Carrier dynamics and design optimization of electrolyte-induced inversion layer carbon nanotube-silicon Schottky junction solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenchao; Seol, Gyungseon; Rinzler, Andrew G.; Guo, Jing

    2012-03-01

    Carrier dynamics of the electrolyte-induced inversion layer carbon nanotube-silicon Schottky junction solar cells is explored by numerical simulations. Operation mechanisms of the solar cells with and without the electrolyte-induced inversion layer are presented and compared, which clarifies the current flow mechanisms in a solar cell with an induced inversion layer. A heavily doped back contact layer can behave as a hole block layer. In addition to lowering contact resistance and surface recombination, it is particularly useful for improving carrier separation in an electrolyte-induced inversion layer solar cell or a metal-insulator-semiconductor grating solar cell.

  16. Inertia-independent generalized dynamic inversion feedback control of spacecraft attitude maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajodah, Abdulrahman H.

    2011-06-01

    The generalized dynamic inversion control methodology is applied to the spacecraft attitude trajectory tracking problem. It is shown that the structure of the skew symmetric cross product matrix alleviates the need to include the inertia matrix in the control law. Accordingly, the proposed control law depends solely on attitude and angular velocity measurements, and it neither requires knowledge of the spacecraft's inertia parameters nor it works towards estimating these parameters. A linear time-varying attitude deviation dynamics in the multiplicative error quaternion is inverted for the control variables using the generalized inversion-based Greville formula. The resulting control law is composed of auxiliary and particular parts acting on two orthogonally complement subspaces of the three dimensional Euclidean space. The particular part drives the attitude variables to their desired trajectories. The auxiliary part is affine in a free null-control vector, and is designed by utilizing a semidefinite control Lyapunov function that exploits the geometric structure of the control law to provide closed loop stability. The generalized inversion singularity avoidance is made by augmenting the generalized inverse with an asymptotically stable fast mode that is driven by angular velocity error's norm from reference angular velocity. Asymptotic tracking is achieved for detumbling maneuvers as the stable augmented mode subdues singularity. If the steady state desired quaternion trajectories are time varying, then asymptotic tracking is lost in favor of close ultimately bounded tracking because the stable augmented mode continues to be excited during steady state phase of response. A rest-to-rest slew and a trajectory tracking maneuver examples are provided to illustrate the methodology.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics: Transition to design applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, R. G.; Bhateley, I. C.; Howell, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    The development of aerospace vehicles, over the years, was an evolutionary process in which engineering progress in the aerospace community was based, generally, on prior experience and data bases obtained through wind tunnel and flight testing. Advances in the fundamental understanding of flow physics, wind tunnel and flight test capability, and mathematical insights into the governing flow equations were translated into improved air vehicle design. The modern day field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a continuation of the growth in analytical capability and the digital mathematics needed to solve the more rigorous form of the flow equations. Some of the technical and managerial challenges that result from rapidly developing CFD capabilites, some of the steps being taken by the Fort Worth Division of General Dynamics to meet these challenges, and some of the specific areas of application for high performance air vehicles are presented.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung-Kwon

    2011-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a mechanical engineering field for analyzing fluid flow, heat transfer, and associated phenomena, using computer-based simulation. CFD is a widely adopted methodology for solving complex problems in many modern engineering fields. The merit of CFD is developing new and improved devices and system designs, and optimization is conducted on existing equipment through computational simulations, resulting in enhanced efficiency and lower operating costs. However, in the biomedical field, CFD is still emerging. The main reason why CFD in the biomedical field has lagged behind is the tremendous complexity of human body fluid behavior. Recently, CFD biomedical research is more accessible, because high performance hardware and software are easily available with advances in computer science. All CFD processes contain three main components to provide useful information, such as pre-processing, solving mathematical equations, and post-processing. Initial accurate geometric modeling and boundary conditions are essential to achieve adequate results. Medical imaging, such as ultrasound imaging, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can be used for modeling, and Doppler ultrasound, pressure wire, and non-invasive pressure measurements are used for flow velocity and pressure as a boundary condition. Many simulations and clinical results have been used to study congenital heart disease, heart failure, ventricle function, aortic disease, and carotid and intra-cranial cerebrovascular diseases. With decreasing hardware costs and rapid computing times, researchers and medical scientists may increasingly use this reliable CFD tool to deliver accurate results. A realistic, multidisciplinary approach is essential to accomplish these tasks. Indefinite collaborations between mechanical engineers and clinical and medical scientists are essential. CFD may be an important methodology to understand the pathophysiology of the development and

  19. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry.

  20. Colour in visualisation for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnear, David; Atherton, Mark; Collins, Michael; Dokhan, Jason; Karayiannis, Tassos

    2006-06-01

    Colour is used in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations in two key ways. First it is used to visualise the geometry and allow the engineer to be confident that the model constructed is a good representation of the engineering situation. Once an analysis has been completed, colour is used in post-processing the data from the simulations to illustrate the complex fluid mechanic phenomena under investigation. This paper describes these two uses of colour and provides some examples to illustrate the key visualisation approaches used in CFD.

  1. Domain decomposition algorithms and computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the new domain decomposition algorithms are applied to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics: the two-dimensional convection-diffusion problem and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. First, a brief introduction to the various approaches of domain decomposition is given, and a survey of domain decomposition preconditioners for the operator on the interface separating the subdomains is then presented. For the convection-diffusion problem, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is examined.

  2. Verification of computer users using keystroke dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaidat, M S; Sadoun, B

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents techniques to verify the identity of computer users using the keystroke dynamics of computer user's login string as characteristic patterns using pattern recognition and neural network techniques. This work is a continuation of our previous work where only interkey times were used as features for identifying computer users. In this work we used the key hold times for classification and then compared the performance with the former interkey time-based technique. Then we use the combined interkey and hold times for the identification process. We applied several neural network and pattern recognition algorithms for verifying computer users as they type their password phrases. It was found that hold times are more effective than interkey times and the best identification performance was achieved by using both time measurements. An identification accuracy of 100% was achieved when the combined hold and intekey time-based approach were considered as features using the fuzzy ARTMAP, radial basis function networks (RBFN), and learning vector quantization (LVQ) neural network paradigms. Other neural network and classical pattern algorithms such as backpropagation with a sigmoid transfer function (BP, Sigm), hybrid sum-of-products (HSOP), sum-of-products (SOP), potential function and Bayes' rule algorithms gave moderate performance.

  3. Velocity Control System Design for Leader-Following UAV Using Dynamic Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    榎本, 圭祐; 山崎, 武志; 高野, 博行; 馬場, 順昭

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a velocity control system for a leader-following UAV. For the purpose of our work, we designed a whole guidance and control system; the guidance system using the pure pursuit navigation guidance law, the attitude control system using the dynamic inversion with the two-time scale approach, and the velocity control system considering aircraft and engine dynamics. This paper concentrates on the velocity controller including the stability analysis for the uncertainty of the aerodynamic parameters. Velocity controller gain determination technique adapted for the aircraft and/or engine dynamics are discussed in this paper. Simulation results show that the proposed guidance and control system provides a good performance.

  4. Direct modeling for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun

    2015-06-01

    All fluid dynamic equations are valid under their modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path and mean collision time scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and its aim is to get the accurate solution of these governing equations. Under such a CFD practice, it is hard to develop a unified scheme that covers flow physics from kinetic to hydrodynamic scales continuously because there is no such governing equation which could make a smooth transition from the Boltzmann to the NS modeling. The study of fluid dynamics needs to go beyond the traditional numerical partial differential equations. The emerging engineering applications, such as air-vehicle design for near-space flight and flow and heat transfer in micro-devices, do require further expansion of the concept of gas dynamics to a larger domain of physical reality, rather than the traditional distinguishable governing equations. At the current stage, the non-equilibrium flow physics has not yet been well explored or clearly understood due to the lack of appropriate tools. Unfortunately, under the current numerical PDE approach, it is hard to develop such a meaningful tool due to the absence of valid PDEs. In order to construct multiscale and multiphysics simulation methods similar to the modeling process of constructing the Boltzmann or the NS governing equations, the development of a numerical algorithm should be based on the first principle of physical modeling. In this paper, instead of following the traditional numerical PDE path, we introduce direct modeling as a principle for CFD algorithm development. Since all computations are conducted in a discretized space with limited cell resolution, the flow physics to be modeled has to be done in the mesh size and time step scales. Here, the CFD is more or less a direct

  5. A sparsity regularization and total variation based computational framework for the inverse medium problem in scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgel, Florian; Kazimierski, Kamil S.; Lechleiter, Armin

    2017-06-01

    We present a fast computational framework for the inverse medium problem in scattering, i.e. we look at discretization, reconstruction and numerical performance. The Helmholtz equation in two and three dimensions is used as a physical model of scattering including point sources and plane waves as incident fields as well as near and far field measurements. For the reconstruction of the medium, we set up a rapid variational regularization scheme and indicate favorable choices of the various parameters. The underlying paradigm is, roughly speaking, to minimize the discrepancy between the reconstruction and measured data while, at the same time, taking into account various structural a-priori information via suitable penalty terms. In particular, the involved penalty terms are designed to promote information expected in real-world environments. To this end, a combination of sparsity promoting terms, total variation, and physical bounds of the inhomogeneous medium, e.g. positivity constraints, is employed in the regularization penalty. A primal-dual algorithm is used to solve the minimization problem related to the variational regularization. The computational feasibility, performance and efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated for synthetic as well as experimentally measured data.

  6. Mixed-radix Algorithm for the Computation of Forward and Inverse MDCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiasong; Shu, Huazhong; Senhadji, Lotfi; Luo, Limin

    2008-08-12

    The modified discrete cosine transform (MDCT) and inverse MDCT (IMDCT) are two of the most computational intensive operations in MPEG audio coding standards. A new mixed-radix algorithm for efficient computing the MDCT/IMDCT is presented. The proposed mixed-radix MDCT algorithm is composed of two recursive algorithms. The first algorithm, called the radix-2 decimation in frequency (DIF) algorithm, is obtained by decomposing an N-point MDCT into two MDCTs with the length N/2. The second algorithm, called the radix-3 decimation in time (DIT) algorithm, is obtained by decomposing an N-point MDCT into three MDCTs with the length N/3. Since the proposed MDCT algorithm is also expressed in the form of a simple sparse matrix factorization, the corresponding IMDCT algorithm can be easily derived by simply transposing the matrix factorization. Comparison of the proposed algorithm with some existing ones shows that our proposed algorithm is more suitable for parallel implementation and especially suitable for the layer III of MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 audio encoding and decoding. Moreover, the proposed algorithm can be easily extended to the multidimensional case by using the vector-radix method.

  7. Adaptive Neural Network Dynamic Inversion with Prescribed Performance for Aircraft Flight Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendong Gai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive neural network dynamic inversion with prescribed performance method is proposed for aircraft flight control. The aircraft nonlinear attitude angle model is analyzed. And we propose a new attitude angle controller design method based on prescribed performance which describes the convergence rate and overshoot of the tracking error. Then the model error is compensated by the adaptive neural network. Subsequently, the system stability is analyzed in detail. Finally, the proposed method is applied to the aircraft attitude tracking control system. The nonlinear simulation demonstrates that this method can guarantee the stability and tracking performance in the transient and steady behavior.

  8. Inverse diffraction for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Torre, Gabriele; Benvenuto, Federico; Massone, Anna Maria; Piana, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides full Sun images every 1 seconds in each of 7 Extreme Ultraviolet passbands. However, for a significant amount of these images, saturation affects their most intense core, preventing scientists from a full exploitation of their physical meaning. In this paper we describe a mathematical and automatic procedure for the recovery of information in the primary saturation region based on a correlation/inversion analysis of the diffraction pattern associated to the telescope observations. Further, we suggest an interpolation-based method for determining the image background that allows the recovery of information also in the region of secondary saturation (blooming).

  9. Dark Matter and the elusive $\\mathbf{Z'}$ in a dynamical Inverse Seesaw scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Romeri, Valentina; Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Gehrlein, Julia; Machado, Pedro N.; Niro, Viviana

    2017-07-26

    The Inverse Seesaw naturally explains the smallness of neutrino masses via an approximate $B-L$ symmetry broken only by a correspondingly small parameter. In this work the possible dynamical generation of the Inverse Seesaw neutrino mass mechanism from the spontaneous breaking of a gauged $U(1)$ $B-L$ symmetry is investigated. Interestingly, the Inverse Seesaw pattern requires a chiral content such that anomaly cancellation predicts the existence of extra fermions belonging to a dark sector with large, non-trivial, charges under the $U(1)$ $B-L$. We investigate the phenomenology associated to these new states and find that one of them is a viable dark matter candidate with mass around the TeV scale, whose interaction with the Standard Model is mediated by the $Z'$ boson associated to the gauged $U(1)$ $B-L$ symmetry. Given the large charges required for anomaly cancellation in the dark sector, the $B-L$ $Z'$ interacts preferentially with this dark sector rather than with the Standard Model. This suppresses the rate at direct detection searches and thus alleviates the constraints on $Z'$-mediated dark matter relic abundance. The collider phenomenology of this elusive $Z'$ is also discussed.

  10. Computing dynamic classification images from correlation maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongjing; Liu, Zili

    2006-05-22

    We used Pearson's correlation to compute dynamic classification images of biological motion in a point-light display. Observers discriminated whether a human figure that was embedded in dynamic white Gaussian noise was walking forward or backward. Their responses were correlated with the Gaussian noise fields frame by frame, across trials. The resultant correlation map gave rise to a sequence of dynamic classification images that were clearer than either the standard method of A. J. Ahumada and J. Lovell (1971) or the optimal weighting method of R. F. Murray, P. J. Bennett, and A. B. Sekuler (2002). Further, the correlation coefficients of all the point lights were similar to each other when overlapping pixels between forward and backward walkers were excluded. This pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that the point-light walker is represented in a global manner, as opposed to a fixed subset of point lights being more important than others. We conjecture that the superior performance of the correlation map may reflect inherent nonlinearities in processing biological motion, which are incompatible with the assumptions underlying the previous methods.

  11. Dynamics of thermal inversions on Metropolitan Area of Guadalajara, Jalisco Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, R.; Tereshchenko, I.; Perez, D. A.; Lizarraga, S. J.; Thermal Inversions, Metropolitan Area of Guadalajara

    2013-05-01

    This work attempts an analysis of the dynamics of the meteorological variables in the lower troposphere in the Metropolitan Area of Guadalajara (ZMG), Jalisco, Mexico. It was used the radiosonde database 2000-2012, and a classification of synoptic situations typical for different inversions occurring. Preliminary results indicate that surface temperature inversions dominate the climate of the study area, mainly recorded two times during the year. An investment without matching the rainy season and covers the months of June to September where investments are recorded at a frequency below 41%. And a station with investments in the type of radiation surface which covers the months of January to May and November to December, with a frequency above 86% in October as month leaving transition with a frequency of 64%. As surface temperature inversions which most affect human activity in the ZMG by not allowing the dispersion of pollutants, the results show that these investments have a thickness ranging from 50 to 250 meters high, covering this range for 85% of the investments registered with respect to the temperature difference between the base and the apex of the observed reversal of between 1°C to 12°C, where the average is 5°C and 7 °C. While this shows that during most of the year there are temperature inversions in the ZMG, this does not mean that every day you will have concentration of pollutants above the norm, this is due to the influence of synoptic scale phenomena mainly to a combination of large anticyclonic systems of the Pacific Ocean and Atlantic, affecting mostly Mexico during the months of December to February, alternating with waves of Western middle latitudes.

  12. Design of sensor networks for instantaneous inversion of modally reduced order models in structural dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, K.; Lourens, E.; Van Nimmen, K.; Reynders, E.; De Roeck, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2015-02-01

    In structural dynamics, the forces acting on a structure are often not well known. System inversion techniques may be used to estimate these forces from the measured response of the structure. This paper first derives conditions for the invertibility of linear system models that apply to any instantaneous input estimation or joint input-state estimation algorithm. The conditions ensure the identifiability of the dynamic forces and system states, their stability and uniqueness. The present paper considers the specific case of modally reduced order models, which are generally obtained from a physical, finite element model, or from experimental data. It is shown how in this case the conditions can be directly expressed in terms of the modal properties of the structure. A distinction is made between input estimation and joint input-state estimation. Each of the conditions is illustrated by a conceptual example. The practical implementation is discussed for a case study where a sensor network for a footbridge is designed.

  13. Inverse optimal control for speed-varying path following of marine vessels with actuator dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Xu, Haixiang; Yu, Wenzhao; Feng, Hui; Han, Xin

    2017-06-01

    A controller which is locally optimal near the origin and globally inverse optimal for the nonlinear system is proposed for path following of over actuated marine crafts with actuator dynamics. The motivation is the existence of undesired signals sent to the actuators, which can result in bad behavior in path following. To attenuate the oscillation of the control signal and obtain smooth thrust outputs, the actuator dynamics are added into the ship maneuvering model. Instead of modifying the Line-of-Sight (LOS) guidance law, this proposed controller can easily adjust the vessel speed to minimize the large cross-track error caused by the high vessel speed when it is turning. Numerical simulations demonstrate the validity of this proposed controller.

  14. Identifying the dynamic compressive stiffness of a prospective biomimetic elastomer by an inverse method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mates, Steven P; Forster, Aaron M; Hunston, Donald; Rhorer, Richard; Everett, Richard K; Simmonds, Kirth E; Bagchi, Amit

    2012-10-01

    Soft elastomeric materials that mimic real soft human tissues are sought to provide realistic experimental devices to simulate the human body's response to blast loading to aid the development of more effective protective equipment. The dynamic mechanical behavior of these materials is often measured using a Kolsky bar because it can achieve both the high strain rates (>100s(-1)) and the large strains (>20%) that prevail in blast scenarios. Obtaining valid results is challenging, however, due to poor dynamic equilibrium, friction, and inertial effects. To avoid these difficulties, an inverse method was employed to determine the dynamic response of a soft, prospective biomimetic elastomer using Kolsky bar tests coupled with high-speed 3D digital image correlation. Individual tests were modeled using finite elements, and the dynamic stiffness of the elastomer was identified by matching the simulation results with test data using numerical optimization. Using this method, the average dynamic response was found to be nearly equivalent to the quasi-static response measured with stress-strain curves at compressive strains up to 60%, with an uncertainty of ±18%. Moreover, the behavior was consistent with the results in stress relaxation experiments and oscillatory tests although the latter were performed at lower strain levels.

  15. Dynamics of Tachyon and Phantom Field beyond the Inverse Square Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Wei; 10.1140/epjc/s10052-010-1352-0

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the cosmological evolution of the tachyon and phantom-tachyon scalar field by considering the potential parameter $\\Gamma$($=\\frac{V V"}{V'^2}$) as a function of another potential parameter $\\lambda$($=\\frac{V'}{\\kappa V^{3/2}}$), which correspondingly extends the analysis of the evolution of our universe from two-dimensional autonomous dynamical system to the three-dimension. It allows us to investigate the more general situation where the potential is not restricted to inverse square potential and .One result is that, apart from the inverse square potential, there are a large number of potentials which can give the scaling and dominant solution when the function $\\Gamma(\\lambda)$ equals $3/2$ for one or some values of $\\lambda_{*}$ as well as the parameter $\\lambda_{*}$ satisfies condition Eq.(18) or Eq.(19). We also find that for a class of different potentials the dynamics evolution of the universe are actually the same and therefore undistinguishable.

  16. High Fidelity Adiabatic Quantum Computation via Dynamical Decoupling

    CERN Document Server

    Quiroz, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    We introduce high-order dynamical decoupling strategies for open system adiabatic quantum computation. Our numerical results demonstrate that a judicious choice of high-order dynamical decoupling method, in conjunction with an encoding which allows computation to proceed alongside decoupling, can dramatically enhance the fidelity of adiabatic quantum computation in spite of decoherence.

  17. Domain decomposition algorithms and computation fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    In the past several years, domain decomposition was a very popular topic, partly motivated by the potential of parallelization. While a large body of theory and algorithms were developed for model elliptic problems, they are only recently starting to be tested on realistic applications. The application of some of these methods to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics are investigated. Some examples are two dimensional convection-diffusion problems and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. The construction and analysis of efficient preconditioners for the interface operator to be used in the iterative solution of the interface solution is described. For the convection-diffusion problems, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is discussed.

  18. Artificial Intelligence In Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1991-01-01

    Paper compares four first-generation artificial-intelligence (Al) software systems for computational fluid dynamics. Includes: Expert Cooling Fan Design System (EXFAN), PAN AIR Knowledge System (PAKS), grid-adaptation program MITOSIS, and Expert Zonal Grid Generation (EZGrid). Focuses on knowledge-based ("expert") software systems. Analyzes intended tasks, kinds of knowledge possessed, magnitude of effort required to codify knowledge, how quickly constructed, performances, and return on investment. On basis of comparison, concludes Al most successful when applied to well-formulated problems solved by classifying or selecting preenumerated solutions. In contrast, application of Al to poorly understood or poorly formulated problems generally results in long development time and large investment of effort, with no guarantee of success.

  19. Lectures series in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1987-01-01

    The lecture notes cover the basic principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). They are oriented more toward practical applications than theory, and are intended to serve as a unified source for basic material in the CFD field as well as an introduction to more specialized topics in artificial viscosity and boundary conditions. Each chapter in the test is associated with a videotaped lecture. The basic properties of conservation laws, wave equations, and shock waves are described. The duality of the conservation law and wave representations is investigated, and shock waves are examined in some detail. Finite difference techniques are introduced for the solution of wave equations and conservation laws. Stability analysis for finite difference approximations are presented. A consistent description of artificial viscosity methods are provided. Finally, the problem of nonreflecting boundary conditions are treated.

  20. Artificial Intelligence In Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1991-01-01

    Paper compares four first-generation artificial-intelligence (Al) software systems for computational fluid dynamics. Includes: Expert Cooling Fan Design System (EXFAN), PAN AIR Knowledge System (PAKS), grid-adaptation program MITOSIS, and Expert Zonal Grid Generation (EZGrid). Focuses on knowledge-based ("expert") software systems. Analyzes intended tasks, kinds of knowledge possessed, magnitude of effort required to codify knowledge, how quickly constructed, performances, and return on investment. On basis of comparison, concludes Al most successful when applied to well-formulated problems solved by classifying or selecting preenumerated solutions. In contrast, application of Al to poorly understood or poorly formulated problems generally results in long development time and large investment of effort, with no guarantee of success.

  1. Inversion of the western Pacific subtropical high dynamic model and analysis of dynamic characteristics for its abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on time series data of 500 hPa potential field from NCEP/NCAR (National Center for Environmental Forecast of American/National Center for Atmospheric Research, a novel consideration of empirical orthogonal function (EOF time–space separation and dynamic system reconstruction for time series is introduced. This method consists of two parts: first, the dynamical model inversion and model parameter optimization are carried out on the EOF time coefficient series using the genetic algorithm (GA, and, second, a nonlinear dynamic model representing the subtropical high (SH activity and its abnormality is established. The SH activity and its abnormal mechanism is studied using the developed dynamical model. Results show that the configuration and diversification of the SH equilibriums have good correspondence with the actual short–medium term abnormal activity of the SH. Change of SH potential field brought by the combination of equilibriums is more complex than that by mutation, and their exhibition patterns are different. The mutation behavior from high-value to low-value equilibriums of the SH in summer corresponds with the southward drop of the SH in the observed weather process. The combination behavior of the two steady equilibriums corresponds with disappearance of the "double-ridge" phenomenon of the SH. Dynamical mechanisms of these phenomena are explained.

  2. SU-C-207-01: Four-Dimensional Inverse Geometry Computed Tomography: Concept and Its Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K; Kim, D; Kim, T; Kang, S; Cho, M; Shin, D; Suh, T [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In past few years, the inverse geometry computed tomography (IGCT) system has been developed to overcome shortcomings of a conventional computed tomography (CT) system such as scatter problem induced from large detector size and cone-beam artifact. In this study, we intend to present a concept of a four-dimensional (4D) IGCT system that has positive aspects above all with temporal resolution for dynamic studies and reduction of motion artifact. Methods: Contrary to conventional CT system, projection data at a certain angle in IGCT was a group of fractionated narrow cone-beam projection data, projection group (PG), acquired from multi-source array which have extremely short time gap of sequential operation between each of sources. At this, for 4D IGCT imaging, time-related data acquisition parameters were determined by combining multi-source scanning time for collecting one PG with conventional 4D CBCT data acquisition sequence. Over a gantry rotation, acquired PGs from multi-source array were tagged time and angle for 4D image reconstruction. Acquired PGs were sorted into 10 phase and image reconstructions were independently performed at each phase. Image reconstruction algorithm based upon filtered-backprojection was used in this study. Results: The 4D IGCT had uniform image without cone-beam artifact on the contrary to 4D CBCT image. In addition, the 4D IGCT images of each phase had no significant artifact induced from motion compared with 3D CT. Conclusion: The 4D IGCT image seems to give relatively accurate dynamic information of patient anatomy based on the results were more endurable than 3D CT about motion artifact. From this, it will be useful for dynamic study and respiratory-correlated radiation therapy. This work was supported by the Industrial R&D program of MOTIE/KEIT [10048997, Development of the core technology for integrated therapy devices based on real-time MRI guided tumor tracking] and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A

  3. A behavior-based inverse kinematics algorithm to predict arm prehension postures for computer-aided ergonomic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X

    1999-05-01

    In this paper, the computational problem of inverse kinematics of arm prehension movements was investigated. How motions of each joint involved in arm movements can be used to control the end-effector (hand) position and orientation was first examined. It is shown that the inverse kinematics problem due to the kinematic redundancy in joint space is ill-posed only at the control of hand orientation but not at the control of hand position. Based upon this analysis, a previously proposed inverse kinematics algorithm (Wang et Verriest, 1998a) to predict arm reach postures was extended to a seven-DOF arm model to predict arm prehension postures using a separate control of hand position and orientation. The algorithm can be either in rule-based form or by optimization through appropriate choice of weight coefficients. Compared to the algebraic inverse kinematics algorithm, the proposed algorithm can handle the non-linearity of joint limits in a straightforward way. In addition, no matrix inverse calculation is needed, thus avoiding the stability and convergence problems often occurring near a singularity of the Jacobian. Since an end-effector motion-oriented method is used to describe joint movements, observed behaviors of arm movements can be easily implemented in the algorithm. The proposed algorithm provides a general frame for arm postural control and can be used as an efficient postural manipulation tool for computer-aided ergonomic evaluation.

  4. Accurate and Scalable O(N) Algorithm for First-Principles Molecular-Dynamics Computations on Large Parallel Computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osei-Kuffuor, Daniel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fattebert, Jean-Luc [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We present the first truly scalable first-principles molecular dynamics algorithm with O(N) complexity and controllable accuracy, capable of simulating systems with finite band gaps of sizes that were previously impossible with this degree of accuracy. By avoiding global communications, we provide a practical computational scheme capable of extreme scalability. Accuracy is controlled by the mesh spacing of the finite difference discretization, the size of the localization regions in which the electronic wave functions are confined, and a cutoff beyond which the components of the overlap matrix can be omitted when computing selected elements of its inverse. We demonstrate the algorithm's excellent parallel scaling for up to 101 952 atoms on 23 328 processors, with a wall-clock time of the order of 1 min per molecular dynamics time step and numerical error on the forces of less than 7x10-4 Ha/Bohr.

  5. Accurate and scalable O(N) algorithm for first-principles molecular-dynamics computations on large parallel computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei-Kuffuor, Daniel; Fattebert, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-31

    We present the first truly scalable first-principles molecular dynamics algorithm with O(N) complexity and controllable accuracy, capable of simulating systems with finite band gaps of sizes that were previously impossible with this degree of accuracy. By avoiding global communications, we provide a practical computational scheme capable of extreme scalability. Accuracy is controlled by the mesh spacing of the finite difference discretization, the size of the localization regions in which the electronic wave functions are confined, and a cutoff beyond which the components of the overlap matrix can be omitted when computing selected elements of its inverse. We demonstrate the algorithm's excellent parallel scaling for up to 101,952 atoms on 23,328 processors, with a wall-clock time of the order of 1 min per molecular dynamics time step and numerical error on the forces of less than 7×10(-4)  Ha/Bohr.

  6. Bioreactor Studies and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H.; Hutmacher, D. W.

    The hydrodynamic environment “created” by bioreactors for the culture of a tissue engineered construct (TEC) is known to influence cell migration, proliferation and extra cellular matrix production. However, tissue engineers have looked at bioreactors as black boxes within which TECs are cultured mainly by trial and error, as the complex relationship between the hydrodynamic environment and tissue properties remains elusive, yet is critical to the production of clinically useful tissues. It is well known in the chemical and biotechnology field that a more detailed description of fluid mechanics and nutrient transport within process equipment can be achieved via the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology. Hence, the coupling of experimental methods and computational simulations forms a synergistic relationship that can potentially yield greater and yet, more cohesive data sets for bioreactor studies. This review aims at discussing the rationale of using CFD in bioreactor studies related to tissue engineering, as fluid flow processes and phenomena have direct implications on cellular response such as migration and/or proliferation. We conclude that CFD should be seen by tissue engineers as an invaluable tool allowing us to analyze and visualize the impact of fluidic forces and stresses on cells and TECs.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Hypersonic Aerothermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendu Sinha

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypersonic flows are characterised by high Mach number and high total enthalpy. An elevated temperature often results in thermo-chemical reactions in the gas, which p lay a major role in aerothermodynamic characterisation of high-speed aerospace vehicles. Hypersonic flows in propulsion components are usually turbulent, resulting in additional effects. Computational simulation of such flows, therefore, need to account for a range of physical phenomena. Further, the numerical challenges involved in resolving strong gradients and discontinuities add to the complexity of computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation. In this article, physical modelling and numerical methodology-related issues involved in hypersonic flow simulation are highlighted. State-of-the-art CFD challenges are discussed in the context of two prominent applications-the flow in a scramjet inlet and the flow field around a re-entry capsule.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(6, pp.663-671, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.604

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics - Applications in Manufacturing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beninati, Maria Laura; Kathol, Austin; Ziemian, Constance

    2012-11-01

    A new Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) exercise has been developed for the undergraduate introductory fluid mechanics course at Bucknell University. The goal is to develop a computational exercise that students complete which links the manufacturing processes course and the concurrent fluid mechanics course in a way that reinforces the concepts in both. In general, CFD is used as a tool to increase student understanding of the fundamentals in a virtual world. A ``learning factory,'' which is currently in development at Bucknell seeks to use the laboratory as a means to link courses that previously seemed to have little correlation at first glance. A large part of the manufacturing processes course is a project using an injection molding machine. The flow of pressurized molten polyurethane into the mold cavity can also be an example of fluid motion (a jet of liquid hitting a plate) that is applied in manufacturing. The students will run a CFD process that captures this flow using their virtual mold created with a graphics package, such as SolidWorks. The laboratory structure is currently being implemented and analyzed as a part of the ``learning factory''. Lastly, a survey taken before and after the CFD exercise demonstrate a better understanding of both the CFD and manufacturing process.

  9. Special data base of Informational - Computational System 'INM RAS - Black Sea' for solving inverse and data assimilation problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, Natalia; Piskovatsky, Nicolay; Gusev, Anatoly

    2014-05-01

    Development of Informational-Computational Systems (ICS) for data assimilation procedures is one of multidisciplinary problems. To study and solve these problems one needs to apply modern results from different disciplines and recent developments in: mathematical modeling; theory of adjoint equations and optimal control; inverse problems; numerical methods theory; numerical algebra and scientific computing. The above problems are studied in the Institute of Numerical Mathematics of the Russian Academy of Science (INM RAS) in ICS for personal computers. In this work the results on the Special data base development for ICS "INM RAS - Black Sea" are presented. In the presentation the input information for ICS is discussed, some special data processing procedures are described. In this work the results of forecast using ICS "INM RAS - Black Sea" with operational observation data assimilation are presented. This study was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project No 13-01-00753) and by Presidium Program of Russian Academy of Sciences (project P-23 "Black sea as an imitational ocean model"). References 1. V.I. Agoshkov, M.V. Assovskii, S.A. Lebedev, Numerical simulation of Black Sea hydrothermodynamics taking into account tide-forming forces. Russ. J. Numer. Anal. Math. Modelling (2012) 27, No.1, pp. 5-31. 2. E.I. Parmuzin, V.I. Agoshkov, Numerical solution of the variational assimilation problem for sea surface temperature in the model of the Black Sea dynamics. Russ. J. Numer. Anal. Math. Modelling (2012) 27, No.1, pp. 69-94. 3. V.B. Zalesny, N.A. Diansky, V.V. Fomin, S.N. Moshonkin, S.G. Demyshev, Numerical model of the circulation of Black Sea and Sea of Azov. Russ. J. Numer. Anal. Math. Modelling (2012) 27, No.1, pp. 95-111. 4. Agoshkov V.I.,Assovsky M.B., Giniatulin S. V., Zakharova N.B., Kuimov G.V., Parmuzin E.I., Fomin V.V. Informational Computational system of variational assimilation of observation data "INM RAS - Black sea"// Ecological

  10. Inverse modeling of dynamic nonequilibrium in water flow with an effective approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantopoulos, E.; Iden, S. C.; Durner, W.

    2012-03-01

    Observations of water flow in unsaturated soils often show "dynamic effects," indicated by nonequilibrium between water contents and water potential, a phenomenon that cannot be modeled with the Richards equation. The objective of this article is to formulate an effective process description of dynamic nonequilibrium flow in variably saturated soil which is both flexible enough to match experimental observations and as parsimonious as possible to allow unique parameter estimation by inverse modeling. In the conceptual model, water content is partitioned into two fractions. Water in one fraction is in equilibrium with the pressure head, whereas water in the second fraction is in nonequilibrium, described by the kinetic equilibration approach of Ross and Smettem (2000). Between the two fractions an instantaneous equilibration of the pressure head is assumed. The new model, termed the dual-fraction nonequilibrium model, requires only one additional parameter compared to the nonequilibrium approach of Ross and Smettem. We tested the model with experimental data from multistep outflow experiments conducted on two soils and compared it to the Richards equation, the nonequilibrium model of Ross and Smettem, and the dual-porosity model of Philip (1968). The experimental data were evaluated by inverse modeling using a robust Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler. The results show that the proposed model is superior to the Richards equation and the Ross and Smettem model in describing dynamic nonequilibrium effects occurring in multistep outflow experiments. The three popular model selection criteria (Akaike information criterion, Bayesian information criterion, and deviance information criterion) all favored the new model because of its smaller number of parameters.

  11. A flexible, extendable, modular and computationally efficient approach to scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, F.; Friederich, W.; Lamara, S.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new conceptual approach to scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) that allows a flexible, extendable, modular and both computationally and storage-efficient numerical implementation. To achieve maximum modularity and extendability, interactions between the three fundamental steps carried out sequentially in each iteration of the inversion procedure, namely, solving the forward problem, computing waveform sensitivity kernels and deriving a model update, are kept at an absolute minimum and are implemented by dedicated interfaces. To realize storage efficiency and maximum flexibility, the spatial discretization of the inverted earth model is allowed to be completely independent of the spatial discretization employed by the forward solver. For computational efficiency reasons, the inversion is done in the frequency domain. The benefits of our approach are as follows: (1) Each of the three stages of an iteration is realized by a stand-alone software program. In this way, we avoid the monolithic, unflexible and hard-to-modify codes that have often been written for solving inverse problems. (2) The solution of the forward problem, required for kernel computation, can be obtained by any wave propagation modelling code giving users maximum flexibility in choosing the forward modelling method. Both time-domain and frequency-domain approaches can be used. (3) Forward solvers typically demand spatial discretizations that are significantly denser than actually desired for the inverted model. Exploiting this fact by pre-integrating the kernels allows a dramatic reduction of disk space and makes kernel storage feasible. No assumptions are made on the spatial discretization scheme employed by the forward solver. (4) In addition, working in the frequency domain effectively reduces the amount of data, the number of kernels to be computed and the number of equations to be solved. (5) Updating the model by solving a large equation system can be

  12. Comparative analysis of methods for estimating arm segment parameters and joint torques from inverse dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Davide; Pierobon, Alberto; Dizio, Paul; Lackner, James R

    2011-03-01

    A common problem in the analyses of upper limb unfettered reaching movements is the estimation of joint torques using inverse dynamics. The inaccuracy in the estimation of joint torques can be caused by the inaccuracy in the acquisition of kinematic variables, body segment parameters (BSPs), and approximation in the biomechanical models. The effect of uncertainty in the estimation of body segment parameters can be especially important in the analysis of movements with high acceleration. A sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the relevance of different sources of inaccuracy in inverse dynamics analysis of a planar arm movement. Eight regression models and one water immersion method for the estimation of BSPs were used to quantify the influence of inertial models on the calculation of joint torques during numerical analysis of unfettered forward arm reaching movements. Thirteen subjects performed 72 forward planar reaches between two targets located on the horizontal plane and aligned with the median plane. Using a planar, double link model for the arm with a floating shoulder, we calculated the normalized joint torque peak and a normalized root mean square (rms) of torque at the shoulder and elbow joints. Statistical analyses quantified the influence of different BSP models on the kinetic variable variance for given uncertainty on the estimation of joint kinematics and biomechanical modeling errors. Our analysis revealed that the choice of BSP estimation method had a particular influence on the normalized rms of joint torques. Moreover, the normalization of kinetic variables to BSPs for a comparison among subjects showed that the interaction between the BSP estimation method and the subject specific somatotype and movement kinematics was a significant source of variance in the kinetic variables. The normalized joint torque peak and the normalized root mean square of joint torque represented valuable parameters to compare the effect of BSP estimation methods

  13. Dynamic Figure Eight Chirality: Multifarious Inversions of a Helical Preference Induced by Complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoono, Ryo; Tanaka, Yuki; Kusaka, Keiichi; Fujiwara, Kenshu; Suzuki, Takanori

    2015-08-07

    We demonstrate two types of inversion of a helical preference upon the 1:1 complexation of a dynamic figure eight molecule with a guest molecule through the controlled transmission of point chirality. We designed a series of macrocycles that prefer a nonplanar conformation with figure eight chirality. These macrocycles are composed of a chirality-transferring unit (terephthalamide) and a structure-modifying unit (two o-phenylene rings spaced with a varying number of triple bonds). The former unit provides a binding site for capturing a guest molecule through the formation of hydrogen bonds. The attachment of chiral auxiliaries to the former unit induces a helical preference for a particular sense through the intramolecular transmission of point chirality. For relatively small-sized macrocycles, the preferred sense was reversed upon complexation with an achiral guest. Contrary preferences before and after complexation were both seen for chiral auxiliaries associated with a figure eight host through two-way intramolecular transmission of the single chiral source. Alternatively, the helical preference induced in relatively large-sized macrocycles was reversed only when a figure eight host formed a 1:1 complex with a particular enantiomeric guest through the supramolecular transmission of point chirality in the guest. This stereospecific inversion of a helical preference is rare.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards 'digital patient' or 'virtual physiological human' representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges.

  15. Computational study on full-wave inversion based on the elastic wave-equation; Dansei hado hoteishiki full wave inversion no model keisan ni yoru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesaka, S. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Watanabe, T.; Sassa, K. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Algorithm is constructed and a program developed for a full-wave inversion (FWI) method utilizing the elastic wave equation in seismic exploration. The FWI method is a method for obtaining a physical property distribution using the whole observed waveforms as the data. It is capable of high resolution which is several times smaller than the wavelength since it can handle such phenomena as wave reflection and dispersion. The method for determining the P-wave velocity structure by use of the acoustic wave equation does not provide information about the S-wave velocity since it does not consider S-waves or converted waves. In an analysis using the elastic wave equation, on the other hand, not only P-wave data but also S-wave data can be utilized. In this report, under such circumstances, an inverse analysis algorithm is constructed on the basis of the elastic wave equation, and a basic program is developed. On the basis of the methods of Mora and of Luo and Schuster, the correction factors for P-wave and S-wave velocities are formulated directly from the elastic wave equation. Computations are performed and the effects of the hypocenter frequency and vibration transmission direction are examined. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  17. Inverse dynamics and servomotor parameter estimation of a 2-DOF spherical parallel mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D; G; CHETWYND

    2008-01-01

    A novel reconfigurable 5-DOF hybrid manipulator―TriVariant-B is composed of a 2-DOF spherical parallel mechanism which is serially connected with a 3-DOF open-loop kinematic chain undergoing one translation and two rotations by a prismatic joint. The merit of this design is that a relatively large workspace/limb- stroke ratio can be achieved thanks to the decomposition of the fixed point rotation and the relative translation. In this paper, on the basis of inverse dynamic formula- tion of the 2-DOF spherical parallel mechanism, an approach is proposed for esti- mating the servomotor parameters including moment of inertia, rated speed and the maximum torque in a quick manner. The approach has been employed for the development of a prototype for frame cutting process.

  18. Inverse dynamics and servomotor parameter estimation of a 2-DOF spherical parallel mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU HaiTao; MEI JiangPing; ZHAO XueMan; HUANG Tian; D G CHETWYND

    2008-01-01

    A novel reconfigurable 5-DOF hybrid manipulator - TriVariant-B is composed of a 2-DOF spherical parallel mechanism which is serially connected with a 3-DOF open-loop kinematic chain undergoing one translation and two rotations by a prismatic joint. The merit of this design is that a relatively large workspace/limbstroke ratio can be achieved thanks to the decomposition of the fixed point rotation and the relative translation. In this paper,on the basis of inverse dynamic formulation of the 2-DOF spherical parallel mechanism,an approach is proposed for estimating the servomotor parameters including moment of inertia,rated speed and the maximum torque in a quick manner. The approach has been employed for the development of a prototype for frame cutting process.

  19. Full Dynamic Compound Inverse Method: Extension to General and Rayleigh damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioldi, Fabio; Rizzi, Egidio

    2017-04-01

    The present paper takes from the original output-only identification approach named Full Dynamic Compound Inverse Method (FDCIM), recently published on this journal by the authors, and proposes an innovative, much enhanced version, in the description of more general forms of structural damping, including for classically adopted Rayleigh damping. This has led to an extended FDCIM formulation, which offers superior performance, on all the targeted identification parameters, namely: modal properties, Rayleigh damping coefficients, structural features at the element-level and input seismic excitation time history. Synthetic earthquake-induced structural response signals are adopted as input channels for the FDCIM approach, towards comparison and validation. The identification algorithm is run first on a benchmark 3-storey shear-type frame, and then on a realistic 10-storey frame, also by considering noise added to the response signals. Consistency of the identification results is demonstrated, with definite superiority of this latter FDCIM proposal.

  20. Dynamics of Mount Somma-Vesuvius edifice: from stress field inversion to analogue and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Matteo, Ada; Massa, Bruno; D'Auria, Luca; Castaldo, Raffaele

    2017-04-01

    Geological processes are generally very complex and too slow to be directly observed in their completeness; modelling procedures overcome this limit. The state of stress in the upper lithosphere is the main responsible for driving geodynamical processes; in order to retrieve the active stress field in a rock volume, stress inversion techniques can be applied on both seismological and structural datasets. This approach has been successfully applied to active tectonics as well as volcanic areas. In this context the best approach in managing heterogeneous datasets in volcanic environments consists in the analysis of spatial variations of the stress field by applying robust techniques of inversion. The study of volcanic seismicity is an efficient tool to retrieve spatial and temporal pattern of the pre-, syn- and inter-eruptive stress field: magma migration as well as dynamics of magma chamber and hydrothermal system are directly connected to the volcanic seismicity. Additionally, analysis of the temporal variations of stress field pattern in volcanoes could be a useful monitoring tool. Recently the stress field acting on several active volcanoes has been investigated by using stress inversion techniques on seismological datasets (Massa et al., 2016). The Bayesian Right Trihedra Method (BRTM; D'Auria and Massa, 2015) is able to successfully manage heterogeneous datasets allowing the identification of regional fields locally overcame by the stress field due to volcano specific dynamics. In particular, the analysis of seismicity and stress field inversion at the Somma-Vesuvius highlighted the presence of two superposed volumes characterized by different behaviour and stress field pattern: a top volume dominated by an extensional stress field, in accordance with a gravitational spreading-style of deformation, and a bottom volume related to a regional extensional stress field. In addition, in order to evaluate the dynamics of deformation, both analogue and numerical

  1. Full Dynamic Compound Inverse Method: Extension to General and Rayleigh damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioldi, Fabio; Rizzi, Egidio

    2017-01-01

    The present paper takes from the original output-only identification approach named Full Dynamic Compound Inverse Method (FDCIM), recently published on this journal by the authors, and proposes an innovative, much enhanced version, in the description of more general forms of structural damping, including for classically adopted Rayleigh damping. This has led to an extended FDCIM formulation, which offers superior performance, on all the targeted identification parameters, namely: modal properties, Rayleigh damping coefficients, structural features at the element-level and input seismic excitation time history. Synthetic earthquake-induced structural response signals are adopted as input channels for the FDCIM approach, towards comparison and validation. The identification algorithm is run first on a benchmark 3-storey shear-type frame, and then on a realistic 10-storey frame, also by considering noise added to the response signals. Consistency of the identification results is demonstrated, with definite superiority of this latter FDCIM proposal.

  2. Dynamic Factor Method of Computing Dynamic Mathematical Model for System Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    老大中; 吴娟; 杨策; 蒋滋康

    2003-01-01

    The computational methods of a typical dynamic mathematical model that can describe the differential element and the inertial element for the system simulation are researched. The stability of numerical solutions of the dynamic mathematical model is researched. By means of theoretical analysis, the error formulas, the error sign criteria and the error relationship criterion of the implicit Euler method and the trapezoidal method are given, the dynamic factor affecting the computational accuracy has been found, the formula and the methods of computing the dynamic factor are given. The computational accuracy of the dynamic mathematical model like this can be improved by use of the dynamic factor.

  3. Inversion Free Algorithms for Computing the Principal Square Root of a Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Assimakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New algorithms are presented about the principal square root of an n×n matrix A. In particular, all the classical iterative algorithms require matrix inversion at every iteration. The proposed inversion free iterative algorithms are based on the Schulz iteration or the Bernoulli substitution as a special case of the continuous time Riccati equation. It is certified that the proposed algorithms are equivalent to the classical Newton method. An inversion free algebraic method, which is based on applying the Bernoulli substitution to a special case of the continuous time Riccati equation, is also proposed.

  4. Meshfree methods for computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jícha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the convergence problem of the SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics meshfree method for the solution of fluid dynamics tasks. In the introductory part, fundamental aspects of mesh- free methods, their definition, computational approaches and classification are discussed. In the following part, the methods of local integral representation, where SPH belongs are analyzed and specifically the method RKPM (Reproducing Kernel Particle Method is described. In the contribution, also the influence of boundary conditions on the SPH approximation consistence is analyzed, which has a direct impact on the convergence of the method. A classical boundary condition in the form of virtual particles does not ensure a sufficient order of consistence near the boundary of the definition domain of the task. This problem is solved by using ghost particles as a boundary condition, which was implemented into the SPH code as part of this work. Further, several numerical aspects linked with the SPH method are described. In the concluding part, results are presented of the application of the SPH method with ghost particles to the 2D shock tube example. Also results of tests of several parameters and modifications of the SPH code are shown.

  5. Computational social dynamic modeling of group recruitment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Nina M.; Lee, Marinna; Pickett, Marc; Turnley, Jessica Glicken (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Smrcka, Julianne D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Ko, Teresa H.; Moy, Timothy David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wu, Benjamin C.

    2004-01-01

    The Seldon software toolkit combines concepts from agent-based modeling and social science to create a computationally social dynamic model for group recruitment. The underlying recruitment model is based on a unique three-level hybrid agent-based architecture that contains simple agents (level one), abstract agents (level two), and cognitive agents (level three). This uniqueness of this architecture begins with abstract agents that permit the model to include social concepts (gang) or institutional concepts (school) into a typical software simulation environment. The future addition of cognitive agents to the recruitment model will provide a unique entity that does not exist in any agent-based modeling toolkits to date. We use social networks to provide an integrated mesh within and between the different levels. This Java based toolkit is used to analyze different social concepts based on initialization input from the user. The input alters a set of parameters used to influence the values associated with the simple agents, abstract agents, and the interactions (simple agent-simple agent or simple agent-abstract agent) between these entities. The results of phase-1 Seldon toolkit provide insight into how certain social concepts apply to different scenario development for inner city gang recruitment.

  6. Spatiotemporal computed tomography of dynamic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Anders; Münch, Beat; Trtik, Pavel; Butler, Les

    2011-12-01

    Modern computed tomography (CT) equipment allowing fast 3-D imaging also makes it possible to monitor dynamic processes by 4-D imaging. Because the acquisition time of various 3-D-CT systems is still in the range of at least milliseconds or even hours, depending on the detector system and the source, the balance of the desired temporal and spatial resolution must be adjusted. Furthermore, motion artifacts will occur, especially at high spatial resolution and longer measuring times. We propose two approaches based on nonsequential projection angle sequences allowing a convenient postacquisition balance of temporal and spatial resolution. Both strategies are compatible with existing instruments, needing only a simple reprograming of the angle list used for projection acquisition and care with the projection order list. Both approaches will reduce the impact of artifacts due to motion. The strategies are applied and validated with cold neutron imaging of water desorption from originally saturated particles during natural air-drying experiments and with x-ray tomography of a polymer blend heated during imaging.

  7. A computational toy model for shallow landslides: Molecular dynamics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelloni, Gianluca; Bagnoli, Franco; Massaro, Emanuele

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a 2D computational algorithm for modeling the triggering and propagation of shallow landslides caused by rainfall. We used a molecular dynamics (MD) approach, similar to the discrete element method (DEM), that is suitable to model granular material and to observe the trajectory of a single particle, so to possibly identify its dynamical properties. We consider that the triggering of shallow landslides is caused by the decrease of the static friction along the sliding surface due to water infiltration by rainfall. Thence the triggering is caused by the two following conditions: (a) a threshold speed of the particles and (b) a condition on the static friction, between the particles and the slope surface, based on the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. The latter static condition is used in the geotechnical model to estimate the possibility of landslide triggering. The interaction force between particles is modeled, in the absence of experimental data, by means of a potential similar to the Lennard-Jones one. The viscosity is also introduced in the model and for a large range of values of the model's parameters, we observe a characteristic velocity pattern, with acceleration increments, typical of real landslides. The results of simulations are quite promising: the energy and time triggering distribution of local avalanches show a power law distribution, analogous to the observed Gutenberg-Richter and Omori power law distributions for earthquakes. Finally, it is possible to apply the method of the inverse surface displacement velocity [4] for predicting the failure time.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods and Their Applications in Medical Science

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalewski Wojciech; Roszak Magdalena; Kołodziejczak Barbara; Ren-Kurc Anna; Bręborowicz Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    As defined by the National Institutes of Health: “Biomedical engineering integrates physical, chemical, mathematical, and computational sciences and engineering principles to study biology, medicine, behavior, and health”. Many issues in this area are closely related to fluid dynamics. This paper provides an overview of the basic concepts concerning Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications in medicine.

  9. Improvement of reliability of molecular DNA computing: solution of inverse problem of Raman spectroscopy using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenko, T. A.; Burikov, S. A.; Vervald, E. N.; Efitorov, A. O.; Laptinskiy, K. A.; Sarmanova, O. E.; Dolenko, S. A.

    2017-02-01

    Elaboration of methods for the control of biochemical reactions with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strands is necessary for the solution of one of the basic problems in the creation of biocomputers—improvement in the reliability of molecular DNA computing. In this paper, the results of the solution of the four-parameter inverse problem of laser Raman spectroscopy—the determination of the type and concentration of each of the DNA nitrogenous bases in multi-component solutions—are presented.

  10. Analysis of RAE-1 inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedland, D. A.; Degonia, P. K.

    1974-01-01

    The RAE-1 spacecraft inversion performed October 31, 1972 is described based upon the in-orbit dynamical data in conjunction with results obtained from previously developed computer simulation models. The computer simulations used are predictive of the satellite dynamics, including boom flexing, and are applicable during boom deployment and retraction, inter-phase coast periods, and post-deployment operations. Attitude data, as well as boom tip data, were analyzed in order to obtain a detailed description of the dynamical behavior of the spacecraft during and after the inversion. Runs were made using the computer model and the results were analyzed and compared with the real time data. Close agreement between the actual recorded spacecraft attitude and the computer simulation results was obtained.

  11. Execute Elementary Row and Column Operations on the Partitioned Matrix to Compute M-P Inverse A†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingping Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We first study the complexity of the algorithm presented in Guo and Huang (2010. After that, a new explicit formula for computational of the Moore-Penrose inverse A† of a singular or rectangular matrix A. This new approach is based on a modified Gauss-Jordan elimination process. The complexity of the new method is analyzed and presented and is found to be less computationally demanding than the one presented in Guo and Huang (2010. In the end, an illustrative example is demonstrated to explain the corresponding improvements of the algorithm.

  12. Extracting functional components of neural dynamics with Independent Component Analysis and inverse Current Source Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lęski, Szymon; Kublik, Ewa; Swiejkowski, Daniel A; Wróbel, Andrzej; Wójcik, Daniel K

    2010-12-01

    Local field potentials have good temporal resolution but are blurred due to the slow spatial decay of the electric field. For simultaneous recordings on regular grids one can reconstruct efficiently the current sources (CSD) using the inverse Current Source Density method (iCSD). It is possible to decompose the resultant spatiotemporal information about the current dynamics into functional components using Independent Component Analysis (ICA). We show on test data modeling recordings of evoked potentials on a grid of 4 × 5 × 7 points that meaningful results are obtained with spatial ICA decomposition of reconstructed CSD. The components obtained through decomposition of CSD are better defined and allow easier physiological interpretation than the results of similar analysis of corresponding evoked potentials in the thalamus. We show that spatiotemporal ICA decompositions can perform better for certain types of sources but it does not seem to be the case for the experimental data studied. Having found the appropriate approach to decomposing neural dynamics into functional components we use the technique to study the somatosensory evoked potentials recorded on a grid spanning a large part of the forebrain. We discuss two example components associated with the first waves of activation of the somatosensory thalamus. We show that the proposed method brings up new, more detailed information on the time and spatial location of specific activity conveyed through various parts of the somatosensory thalamus in the rat.

  13. Dynamics computation methodology applied to railcar vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaminck, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The analytical models discussed present typical examples of analyses performed to optimize vehicle parameters and solve specific engineering problems. Subjects investigated include: (1) car body structural dynamics, (2) vehicle dynamic motions and loads, and (3) truck equalization.

  14. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains.

  15. Quantum Computation and Quantum Spin Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Michielsen, Kristel; Hams, Anthony; Miyashita, Seiji; Saito, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the stability of quantum computations on physically realizable quantum computers by simulating quantum spin models representing quantum computer hardware. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation are used to demonstrate that the results of a quantum

  16. Quantum Computation and Quantum Spin Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Michielsen, Kristel; Hams, Anthony; Miyashita, Seiji; Saito, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the stability of quantum computations on physically realizable quantum computers by simulating quantum spin models representing quantum computer hardware. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation are used to demonstrate that the results of a quantum

  17. Time-lapse AVO fluid inversion for dynamic reservoir characterization in Delhi Field, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Indah Hermansyah

    In the development stage, CO2 injection is becoming more widely used in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Delhi Oil Field is part of Phases XIII and XIV of the Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) Colorado School of Mines. The focus of these phases is to monitor the effectiveness of the CO 2 injection in Delhi Field by using multicomponent time-lapse seismic data. In this study, I analyze the amplitude versus offset (AVO) response of the time-lapse P-wave seismic data in order to quantify the fluid probability in the field. RCP acquired four square miles of multicomponent time-lapse seismic in Delhi Field to characterize the field dynamically. RCP's two surveys, monitor 1 and monitor 2, were shot in 2010 and 2011 after the start of CO2 injection in November 2009. Time-lapse AVO modeling was performed. The modeling results show that both the top Tuscaloosa and Paluxy Formations are class III AVO, and change toward class IV AVO by increasing the CO2 saturation in the reservoir. In addition, the Paluxy Formation shows a consistent result between the synthetic and real data, however, the Tuscaloosa Formation is not consistent as it is affected by tuning. AVO fluid inversion (AFI) was performed on both the Tuscaloosa and Paluxy Formations in order to quantify the fluid probability in these formations. The inversion results are confirmed by the pseudo gamma ray model, the porosity model, the permeability model, the pressure model, and the production data. In the Tuscaloosa and Paluxy Formations, oil and CO2 are located in the good quality, high porosity, and high permeability sandstones. The presence of CO2 is also confirmed by the pressure interpretation. Furthermore, production data from both Tuscaloosa and Paluxy Formations confirm the fluid presence in the reservoir.

  18. Dynamic Modeling and Simulation of a Thermoelectric-Solar Hybrid Energy System Using an Inverse Dynamic Analysis Input Shaper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Yusop

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the behavioral model of thermal temperature and power generation of a thermoelectric-solar hybrid energy system exposed to dynamic transient sources. In the development of thermoelectric-solar hybrid energy system, studies have focused on the regulation of both systems separately. In practice, a separate control system affects hardware pricing. In this study, an inverse dynamic analysis shaping technique based on exponential function is applied to a solar array (SA to stabilize output voltage before this technique is combined with a thermoelectric module (TEM. This method can be used to estimate the maximum power point of the hybrid system by initially shaping the input voltage of SA. The behavior of the overall system can be estimated by controlling the behavior of SA, such that SA can follow the output voltage of TEM as the time constant of TEM is greater than that of SA. Moreover, by employing a continuous and differentiable function, the acquired output behavior of the hybrid system can be attained. Data showing the model is obtained from current experiments with predicted values of temperature, internal resistance, and current attributes of TEM. The simulation results show that the proposed input shaper can be used to trigger the output voltage of SA to follow the TEM behavior under transient conditions.

  19. Inversion factor in the comparative analysis of dynamical processes in radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarubin, O.; Zarubina, N. [Institute for Nuclear Researh of National Academy of Science of Ukraine (Ukraine)

    2014-07-01

    We have studied levels of specific activity of radionuclides in fish and fungi of the Kiev region of Ukraine since 1986 till 2013, including 30-km alienation zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) after the accident. The radionuclides specific activity dynamics analysis for 10 species of freshwater fishes of different trophic levels and at 7 species of higher fungi was carried out for this period. Multiple research of specific activity of radionuclides in fish was carried out on the Kanevskoe reservoir and cooling-pond of ChNPP, in fungi - on 6 testing areas, which are situated within the range of 2 to 150 km from ChNPP. The basic attention was given to accumulation of {sup 137}Cs. We have established that dynamics of specific activity of {sup 137}Cs within different species of fish in the same reservoir is not identical. Dynamics of specific activity of {sup 137}Cs within various species of fungi of the same testing area is also not identical. Dynamics of specific activity of {sup 137}Cs with the investigated objects of various testing dry-land and water areas also varies. Authors suggest an inversion factor to be used for comparison of dynamics of specific activity of {sup 137}Cs, which in case of biota is a nonlinear process: K{sub inv} = A{sub 0} / A{sub t}, where A{sub 0} stands for the value of specific activity of the radionuclide at time 0; A{sub t} - specific activity of radionuclide at time t. Therefore, K{sub inv} reflects ratio (inversion) of specific activity of radionuclides to its starting value as a function of time, where K{sub inv} > 1 corresponds to increase in radionuclides' specific activity and K{sub inv} < 1 corresponds to its decrease. For example, K{sub inv} of {sup 137}Cs in fish Rutilus rutilus in the Kanevskoe reservoir was equal to 0.57, and 13.33 in the cooling-pond of ChNPP, at Blicca bjoerkna 0.95 and 29.61 accordingly in 1987 - 1996. In 1987 - 2011 K{sub inv} of {sup 137}Cs at R. rutilus in the Kanevskoe reservoir

  20. 约束动力系统方程的数值解及动态逆问题%Numerical Solution of Constrained Mechanical System Motions Equations and Inverse Problems of Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫哈列莫夫

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the method of design of kinematical and dynamical equations of mechanicalsystems, applied to numerical ealization, is proposed. The corresponding difference equations, whichare obtained, give a guarantee of computations with a given precision. The equations of programmedconstraints and those of constraint perturbations are defined. The stability of the programmedmanifold for numerical solutions of the kinematical and dynamical equations is obtained bycorresponding construction of the constraint perturbation equations. The dynamical equatiors ofsystem with programmed constraints are set up in the form of Lagrange's equations in generalizedcoordinates. Certain inverse problems of rigid body dynamics are examined.

  1. SU-E-T-628: A Cloud Computing Based Multi-Objective Optimization Method for Inverse Treatment Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Y; Suh, T; Xing, L

    2012-06-01

    Multi-objective (MO) plan optimization entails generation of an enormous number of IMRT or VMAT plans constituting the Pareto surface, which presents a computationally challenging task. The purpose of this work is to overcome the hurdle by developing an efficient MO method using emerging cloud computing platform. As a backbone of cloud computing for optimizing inverse treatment planning, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud with a master node (17.1 GB memory, 2 virtual cores, 420 GB instance storage, 64-bit platform) is used. The master node is able to scale seamlessly a number of working group instances, called workers, based on the user-defined setting account for MO functions in clinical setting. Each worker solved the objective function with an efficient sparse decomposition method. The workers are automatically terminated if there are finished tasks. The optimized plans are archived to the master node to generate the Pareto solution set. Three clinical cases have been planned using the developed MO IMRT and VMAT planning tools to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method. The target dose coverage and critical structure sparing of plans are comparable obtained using the cloud computing platform are identical to that obtained using desktop PC (Intel Xeon® CPU 2.33GHz, 8GB memory). It is found that the MO planning speeds up the processing of obtaining the Pareto set substantially for both types of plans. The speedup scales approximately linearly with the number of nodes used for computing. With the use of N nodes, the computational time is reduced by the fitting model, 0.2+2.3/N, with r̂2>0.99, on average of the cases making real-time MO planning possible. A cloud computing infrastructure is developed for MO optimization. The algorithm substantially improves the speed of inverse plan optimization. The platform is valuable for both MO planning and future off- or on-line adaptive re-planning. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. A robust bi-orthogonal/dynamically-orthogonal method using the covariance pseudo-inverse with application to stochastic flow problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaee, Hessam; Choi, Minseok; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-09-01

    We develop a new robust methodology for the stochastic Navier-Stokes equations based on the dynamically-orthogonal (DO) and bi-orthogonal (BO) methods [1-3]. Both approaches are variants of a generalized Karhunen-Loève (KL) expansion in which both the stochastic coefficients and the spatial basis evolve according to system dynamics, hence, capturing the low-dimensional structure of the solution. The DO and BO formulations are mathematically equivalent [3], but they exhibit computationally complimentary properties. Specifically, the BO formulation may fail due to crossing of the eigenvalues of the covariance matrix, while both BO and DO become unstable when there is a high condition number of the covariance matrix or zero eigenvalues. To this end, we combine the two methods into a robust hybrid framework and in addition we employ a pseudo-inverse technique to invert the covariance matrix. The robustness of the proposed method stems from addressing the following issues in the DO/BO formulation: (i) eigenvalue crossing: we resolve the issue of eigenvalue crossing in the BO formulation by switching to the DO near eigenvalue crossing using the equivalence theorem and switching back to BO when the distance between eigenvalues is larger than a threshold value; (ii) ill-conditioned covariance matrix: we utilize a pseudo-inverse strategy to invert the covariance matrix; (iii) adaptivity: we utilize an adaptive strategy to add/remove modes to resolve the covariance matrix up to a threshold value. In particular, we introduce a soft-threshold criterion to allow the system to adapt to the newly added/removed mode and therefore avoid repetitive and unnecessary mode addition/removal. When the total variance approaches zero, we show that the DO/BO formulation becomes equivalent to the evolution equation of the Optimally Time-Dependent modes [4]. We demonstrate the capability of the proposed methodology with several numerical examples, namely (i) stochastic Burgers equation: we

  3. Space Weather Parameters Computed on the Basis of the Magnetogram Inversion Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. M. Mishin; M. F(o)rster; A.D. Bazarzhapov; T.I. Saifudinova; Y.A. Karavaev; P. Stauning; J. Watermann; V. Golovkov; S. Solovyev

    2005-01-01

    In this paper is given short description of the magnetogram inversion technique, MIT2, and of methods of calculation of some parameters of space weather. Are given also examples of new results, obtained using the MIT2 and solar wind data.

  4. Phase-inversion tape casting and synchrotron-radiation computed tomography analysis of porous alumina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, H.; Ren, C.; Liu, Yaoge; Lu, D.; Winnubst, A.J.A.; Chen, Chusheng

    2013-01-01

    A variant of tape casting based on the phase inversion phenomenon was adopted for fabrication of porous ceramic wafer. A slurry was prepared by dispersing alumina powder in an N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solution of the polymers polyethersulfone (PES) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The slurry was

  5. Efficiency of flow-driven adiabatic spin inversion under realistic experimental conditions: A computer simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trampel, R.; Jochimsen, T.H.; Mildner, T.; Norris, D.G.; Moller, H.E.

    2004-01-01

    Continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) using adiabatic inversion is a widely used approach for perfusion imaging. For the quantification of perfusion, a reliable determination of the labeling efficiency is required. A numerical method for predicting the labeling efficiency in CASL experiments unde

  6. Computational Prediction and Biochemical Analyses of New Inverse Agonists for the CB1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Caitlin E; Ahn, Kwang H; Graf, Steven T; Goddard, William A; Kendall, Debra A; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-01-25

    Human cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) G-protein coupled receptor is a potential therapeutic target for obesity. The previously predicted and experimentally validated ensemble of ligand-free conformations of CB1 [Scott, C. E. et al. Protein Sci. 2013 , 22 , 101 - 113 ; Ahn, K. H. et al. Proteins 2013 , 81 , 1304 - 1317] are used here to predict the binding sites for known CB1-selective inverse agonists including rimonabant and its seven known derivatives. This binding pocket, which differs significantly from previously published models, is used to identify 16 novel compounds expected to be CB1 inverse agonists by exploiting potential new interactions. We show experimentally that two of these compounds exhibit inverse agonist properties including inhibition of basal and agonist-induced G-protein coupling activity, as well as an enhanced level of CB1 cell surface localization. This demonstrates the utility of using the predicted binding sites for an ensemble of CB1 receptor structures for designing new CB1 inverse agonists.

  7. Phase-inversion tape casting and synchrotron-radiation computed tomography analysis of porous alumina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Hong; Ren, Chunlei; Liu, Yaoge; Lu, Detang; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; Chen, Chusheng

    2013-01-01

    A variant of tape casting based on the phase inversion phenomenon was adopted for fabrication of porous ceramic wafer. A slurry was prepared by dispersing alumina powder in an N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solution of the polymers polyethersulfone (PES) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The slurry was

  8. Computing Bisectors in a Dynamic Geometry Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botana, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    In this note, an approach combining dynamic geometry and automated deduction techniques is used to study the bisectors between points and curves. Usual teacher constructions for bisectors are discussed, showing that inherent limitations in dynamic geometry software impede their thorough study. We show that the interactive sketching of bisectors…

  9. Dynamic Stall Analysis Utilizing Interactive Computer Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    Blade-Vortex Interaction (BV[) studies. solkes the two-dimen i,)nal, unsteady, compressible Euler and Napier -Stokes equations in strong conservation...requirements, interactive computer graphics workstations have been evolved to complement the super -computer. Workstation capabilities, in terms of

  10. Spatial Dynamic Structures and Mobility in Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Aman, Bogdan

    2011-01-01

    Membrane computing is a well-established and successful research field which belongs to the more general area of molecular computing. Membrane computing aims at defining parallel and non-deterministic computing models, called membrane systems or P Systems, which abstract from the functioning and structure of the cell. A membrane system consists of a spatial structure, a hierarchy of membranes which do not intersect, with a distinguishable membrane called skin surrounding all of them. A membrane without any other membranes inside is elementary, while a non-elementary membrane is a composite membrane. The membranes define demarcations between regions; for each membrane there is a unique associated region. Since we have a one-to-one correspondence, we sometimes use membrane instead of region, and vice-versa. The space outside the skin membrane is called the environment. In this thesis we define and investigate variants of systems of mobile membranes as models for molecular computing and as modelling paradigms fo...

  11. Comparative behaviour of the Dynamically Penalized Likelihood algorithm in inverse radiation therapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llacer, Jorge [EC Engineering Consultants, LLC, Los Gatos, CA (United States)]. E-mail: jllacer@home.com; Solberg, Timothy D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)]. E-mail: Solberg@radonc.ucla.edu; Promberger, Claus [BrainLAB AG, Heimstetten (Germany)]. E-mail: promberg@brainlab.com

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents a description of tests carried out to compare the behaviour of five algorithms in inverse radiation therapy planning: (1) The Dynamically Penalized Likelihood (DPL), an algorithm based on statistical estimation theory; (2) an accelerated version of the same algorithm; (3) a new fast adaptive simulated annealing (ASA) algorithm; (4) a conjugate gradient method; and (5) a Newton gradient method. A three-dimensional mathematical phantom and two clinical cases have been studied in detail. The phantom consisted of a U-shaped tumour with a partially enclosed 'spinal cord'. The clinical examples were a cavernous sinus meningioma and a prostate case. The algorithms have been tested in carefully selected and controlled conditions so as to ensure fairness in the assessment of results. It has been found that all five methods can yield relatively similar optimizations, except when a very demanding optimization is carried out. For the easier cases, the differences are principally in robustness, ease of use and optimization speed. In the more demanding case, there are significant differences in the resulting dose distributions. The accelerated DPL emerges as possibly the algorithm of choice for clinical practice. An appendix describes the differences in behaviour between the new ASA method and the one based on a patent by the Nomos Corporation. (author)

  12. Comparative behaviour of the Dynamically Penalized Likelihood algorithm in inverse radiation therapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llacer, Jorge; Solberg, Timothy D.; Promberger, Claus

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents a description of tests carried out to compare the behaviour of five algorithms in inverse radiation therapy planning: (1) The Dynamically Penalized Likelihood (DPL), an algorithm based on statistical estimation theory; (2) an accelerated version of the same algorithm; (3) a new fast adaptive simulated annealing (ASA) algorithm; (4) a conjugate gradient method; and (5) a Newton gradient method. A three-dimensional mathematical phantom and two clinical cases have been studied in detail. The phantom consisted of a U-shaped tumour with a partially enclosed 'spinal cord'. The clinical examples were a cavernous sinus meningioma and a prostate case. The algorithms have been tested in carefully selected and controlled conditions so as to ensure fairness in the assessment of results. It has been found that all five methods can yield relatively similar optimizations, except when a very demanding optimization is carried out. For the easier cases, the differences are principally in robustness, ease of use and optimization speed. In the more demanding case, there are significant differences in the resulting dose distributions. The accelerated DPL emerges as possibly the algorithm of choice for clinical practice. An appendix describes the differences in behaviour between the new ASA method and the one based on a patent by the Nomos Corporation.

  13. Improving Inverse Dynamics Accuracy in a Planar Walking Model Based on Stable Reference Point

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Abdulrahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically and biomechanically, the human body represents a complicated system with an abundance of degrees of freedom (DOF. When developing mathematical representations of the body, a researcher has to decide on how many of those DOF to include in the model. Though accuracy can be enhanced at the cost of complexity by including more DOF, their necessity must be rigorously examined. In this study a planar seven-segment human body walking model with single DOF joints was developed. A reference point was added to the model to track the body’s global position while moving. Due to the kinematic instability of the pelvis, the top of the head was selected as the reference point, which also assimilates the vestibular sensor position. Inverse dynamics methods were used to formulate and solve the equations of motion based on Newton-Euler formulae. The torques and ground reaction forces generated by the planar model during a regular gait cycle were compared with similar results from a more complex three-dimensional OpenSim model with muscles, which resulted in correlation errors in the range of 0.9–0.98. The close comparison between the two torque outputs supports the use of planar models in gait studies.

  14. A low-computational-cost inverse heat transfer technique for convective heat transfer measurements in hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avallone, F.; Greco, C. S.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; Cardone, G.

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of the convective wall heat flux in hypersonic flows may be particularly challenging in the presence of high-temperature gradients and when using high-thermal-conductivity materials. In this case, the solution of multidimensional problems is necessary, but it considerably increases the computational cost. In this paper, a low-computational-cost inverse data reduction technique is presented. It uses a recursive least-squares approach in combination with the trust-region-reflective algorithm as optimization procedure. The computational cost is reduced by performing the discrete Fourier transform on the discrete convective heat flux function and by identifying the most relevant coefficients as objects of the optimization algorithm. In the paper, the technique is validated by means of both synthetic data, built in order to reproduce physical conditions, and experimental data, carried out in the Hypersonic Test Facility Delft at Mach 7.5 on two wind tunnel models having different thermal properties.

  15. Type II Quantum Computing Algorithm For Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Hall/CRC (2003) 30. Gilbert Strang, Linear Algebra and its Applications. Thompson Learning, Inc (1988) 31. George Arfken and Hans Weber, Mathematical ... method is called ensemble Figure 3. Ensemble measurement averages the measurement results of N identical quantum computers to obtain the magnitude of...the lattice Boltzmann equation. There are two methods of modeling this mesoscopic equation. The first approach is to directly simulate the

  16. Automated Computational Fluid Dynamics Design With Shape Optimization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used as an analysis tool to help the designer gain greater understanding of the fluid flow phenomena involved in the...

  17. Automated Computational Fluid Dynamics Design With Shape Optimization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used as an analysis tool to help the designer gain greater understanding of the fluid flow phenomena involved in the components...

  18. The Computer Simulation of Liquids by Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposes a mathematical computer model for the behavior of liquids using the classical dynamic principles of Sir Isaac Newton and the molecular dynamics method invented by other scientists. Concludes that other applications will be successful using supercomputers to go beyond simple Newtonian physics. (CW)

  19. Prospects for Computational Fluid Dynamics in Room Air Contaminant Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The fluid dynamics research is strongly influenced by the increasing computer power which has been available for the last decades. This development is obvious from the curve in figure 1 which shows the computation cost as a function of years. It is obvious that the cost for a given job...

  20. Unsteady computational fluid dynamics in aeronautics

    CERN Document Server

    Tucker, P G

    2014-01-01

    The field of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and hybrids is a vibrant research area. This book runs through all the potential unsteady modelling fidelity ranges, from low-order to LES. The latter is probably the highest fidelity for practical aerospace systems modelling. Cutting edge new frontiers are defined.  One example of a pressing environmental concern is noise. For the accurate prediction of this, unsteady modelling is needed. Hence computational aeroacoustics is explored. It is also emerging that there is a critical need for coupled simulations. Hence, this area is also considered and the tensions of utilizing such simulations with the already expensive LES.  This work has relevance to the general field of CFD and LES and to a wide variety of non-aerospace aerodynamic systems (e.g. cars, submarines, ships, electronics, buildings). Topics treated include unsteady flow techniques; LES and hybrids; general numerical methods; computational aeroacoustics; computational aeroelasticity; coupled simulations and...

  1. Utilizing High-Performance Computing to Investigate Parameter Sensitivity of an Inversion Model for Vadose Zone Flow and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Z.; Ward, A. L.; Fang, Y.; Yabusaki, S.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution geologic models have proven effective in improving the accuracy of subsurface flow and transport predictions. However, many of the parameters in subsurface flow and transport models cannot be determined directly at the scale of interest and must be estimated through inverse modeling. A major challenge, particularly in vadose zone flow and transport, is the inversion of the highly-nonlinear, high-dimensional problem as current methods are not readily scalable for large-scale, multi-process models. In this paper we describe the implementation of a fully automated approach for addressing complex parameter optimization and sensitivity issues on massively parallel multi- and many-core systems. The approach is based on the integration of PNNL's extreme scale Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (eSTOMP) simulator, which uses the Global Array toolkit, with the Beowulf-Cluster inspired parallel nonlinear parameter estimation software, BeoPEST in the MPI mode. In the eSTOMP/BeoPEST implementation, a pre-processor generates all of the PEST input files based on the eSTOMP input file. Simulation results for comparison with observations are extracted automatically at each time step eliminating the need for post-process data extractions. The inversion framework was tested with three different experimental data sets: one-dimensional water flow at Hanford Grass Site; irrigation and infiltration experiment at the Andelfingen Site; and a three-dimensional injection experiment at Hanford's Sisson and Lu Site. Good agreements are achieved in all three applications between observations and simulations in both parameter estimates and water dynamics reproduction. Results show that eSTOMP/BeoPEST approach is highly scalable and can be run efficiently with hundreds or thousands of processors. BeoPEST is fault tolerant and new nodes can be dynamically added and removed. A major advantage of this approach is the ability to use high-resolution geologic models to preserve

  2. Computational fluid dynamics for sport simulation

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    All over the world sport plays a prominent role in society: as a leisure activity for many, as an ingredient of culture, as a business and as a matter of national prestige in such major events as the World Cup in soccer or the Olympic Games. Hence, it is not surprising that science has entered the realm of sports, and, in particular, that computer simulation has become highly relevant in recent years. This is explored in this book by choosing five different sports as examples, demonstrating that computational science and engineering (CSE) can make essential contributions to research on sports topics on both the fundamental level and, eventually, by supporting athletes’ performance.

  3. Spatiotemporal Dynamics and Reliable Computations in Recurrent Spiking Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Ryan; Rosenbaum, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Randomly connected networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons provide a parsimonious model of neural variability, but are notoriously unreliable for performing computations. We show that this difficulty is overcome by incorporating the well-documented dependence of connection probability on distance. Spatially extended spiking networks exhibit symmetry-breaking bifurcations and generate spatiotemporal patterns that can be trained to perform dynamical computations under a reservoir computing framework.

  4. Dynamic traffic assignment on parallel computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, K.; Frye, R.; Jakob, R.; Rickert, M.; Stretz, P.

    1998-12-01

    The authors describe part of the current framework of the TRANSIMS traffic research project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It includes parallel implementations of a route planner and a microscopic traffic simulation model. They present performance figures and results of an offline load-balancing scheme used in one of the iterative re-planning runs required for dynamic route assignment.

  5. Dynamic grid adaptation for computational magnetohydrodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keppens, R.; Nool, M.; Zegeling, P. A.; Goedbloed, J. P.; Bubak, M.; Williams, R.; Afsarmanesh, H.; Hertzberger, B.

    2000-01-01

    In many plasma physical and astrophysical problems, both linear and nonlinear effects can lead to global dynamics that induce, or occur simultaneously with, local phenomena. For example, a magnetically confined plasma column can potentially posses global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) eigenmodes with an

  6. Computing in Large-Scale Dynamic Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruteanu, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Software applications developed for large-scale systems have always been difficult to de- velop due to problems caused by the large number of computing devices involved. Above a certain network size (roughly one hundred), necessary services such as code updating, topol- ogy discovery and data dissem

  7. GRACE captures basin mass dynamic changes in China based on a multi-basin inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shuang; Wang, Qiuyu; Sun, Wenke

    2016-04-01

    Complex landform, miscellaneous climate and enormous population have enriched China with geophysical phenomena ranging from water depletion in the underground to glaciers retreat on the high mountains and have aroused large scientific interests. This paper, utilizing gravity observations 2003-2014 from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), intends to make a comprehensive estimation of mass status in 16 drainage basins in the whole region. We proposed a multi-basin inversion method, which is featured by resistance to the stripe noise and ability to alleviate signal attenuation due to truncation and smoothing of GRACE data. The results show both positive and negative trends: there is a tremendous mass accumulation spreading from the Tibetan plateau (12.2 ± 0.6 Gt/yr) to the Yangtze River (7.6 ± 1.3 Gt/yr), and further to the southeast coastal areas, which is suggested to involve an increase in the ground water storage, lake and reservoir water volume and likely materials flowed in by tectonic process; a mass loss is occurring in Huang-Huai-Hai-Liao River Basin (-10.5 ± 0.8 Gt/yr), as well as the Brahmaputra-Nujiang-Lancang River Basin (-15.0 ± 0.9 Gt/yr) and Tienshan Mountain (-4.1 ± 0.3 Gt/yr), which is a result of groundwater pumping and glacier melting. The groundwater depletion area is well consistent with the distribution of land subsidence in North China. In the end, we find intensified precipitation can alter the local water supply and GRACE is proficient to capture this dynamics, which could be instructive for the South-to-North Water Diversion - one China's giant hydrologic project.

  8. Basin mass dynamic changes in China from GRACE based on a multibasin inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shuang; Wang, Qiuyu; Sun, Wenke

    2016-05-01

    Complex landforms, miscellaneous climates, and enormous populations have influenced various geophysical phenomena in China, which range from water depletion in the underground to retreating glaciers on high mountains and have attracted abundant scientific interest. This paper, which utilizes gravity observations during 2003-2014 from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), intends to comprehensively estimate the mass status in 16 drainage basins in the region. We propose a multibasin inversion method that features resistance to stripe noise and an ability to alleviate signal attenuation from the truncation and smoothing of GRACE data. The results show both positive and negative trends. Tremendous mass accumulation has occurred from the Tibetan Plateau (12.1 ± 0.6 Gt/yr) to the Yangtze River (7.7 ± 1.3 Gt/yr) and southeastern coastal areas, which is suggested to involve an increase in the groundwater storage, lake and reservoir water volume, and the flow of materials from tectonic processes. Additionally, mass loss has occurred in the Huang-Huai-Hai-Liao River Basin (-10.2 ± 0.9 Gt/yr), the Brahmaputra-Nujiang-Lancang River Basin (-15.0 ± 1.1 Gt/yr), and Tienshan Mountain (-4.1 ± 0.3 Gt/yr), a result of groundwater pumping and glacier melting. Areas with groundwater depletion are consistent with the distribution of cities with land subsidence in North China. We find that intensified precipitation can alter the local water supply and that GRACE can adequately capture these dynamics, which could be instructive for China's South-to-North Water Diversion hydrologic project.

  9. Triangular Dynamic Architecture for Distributed Computing in a LAN Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Hossain, M Shahriar; Fuad, M Muztaba; Deb, Debzani

    2011-01-01

    A computationally intensive large job, granulized to concurrent pieces and operating in a dynamic environment should reduce the total processing time. However, distributing jobs across a networked environment is a tedious and difficult task. Job distribution in a Local Area Network based on Triangular Dynamic Architecture (TDA) is a mechanism that establishes a dynamic environment for job distribution, load balancing and distributed processing with minimum interaction from the user. This paper introduces TDA and discusses its architecture and shows the benefits gained by utilizing such architecture in a distributed computing environment.

  10. Quantum Computing, $NP$-complete Problems and Chaotic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, M; Ohya, Masanori; Volovich, Igor V.

    1999-01-01

    An approach to the solution of NP-complete problems based on quantumcomputing and chaotic dynamics is proposed. We consider the satisfiabilityproblem and argue that the problem, in principle, can be solved in polynomialtime if we combine the quantum computer with the chaotic dynamics amplifierbased on the logistic map. We discuss a possible implementation of such achaotic quantum computation by using the atomic quantum computer with quantumgates described by the Hartree-Fock equations. In this case, in principle, onecan build not only standard linear quantum gates but also nonlinear gates andmoreover they obey to Fermi statistics. This new type of entaglement relatedwith Fermi statistics can be interesting also for quantum communication theory.

  11. Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2004-01-01

    Force and moment measurements from an F-16XL during forced pitch oscillation tests result in dynamic stability derivatives, which are measured in combinations. Initial computational simulations of the motions and combined derivatives are attempted via a low-order, time-dependent panel method computational fluid dynamics code. The code dynamics are shown to be highly questionable for this application and the chosen configuration. However, three methods to computationally separate such combined dynamic stability derivatives are proposed. One of the separation techniques is demonstrated on the measured forced pitch oscillation data. Extensions of the separation techniques to yawing and rolling motions are discussed. In addition, the possibility of considering the angles of attack and sideslip state vector elements as distributed quantities, rather than point quantities, is introduced.

  12. Adaptive Output Feedback Control for a Class of Stochastic Nonlinear Systems with SiISS Inverse Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Duan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive stabilization scheme based on tuning function for stochastic nonlinear systems with stochastic integral input-to-state stability (SiISS inverse dynamics is investigated. By combining the stochastic LaSalle theorem and small-gain type conditions on SiISS, an adaptive output feedback controller is constructively designed. It is shown that all the closed-loop signals are bounded almost surely and the stochastic closed-loop system is globally stable in probability.

  13. A new computational structure for real-time dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izaguirre, A. (New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark (United States)); Hashimoto, Minoru (Univ. of Electrocommunications, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-08-01

    The authors present an efficient structure for the computation of robot dynamics in real time. The fundamental characteristic of this structure is the division of the computation into a high-priority synchronous task and low-priority background tasks, possibly sharing the resources of a conventional computing unit based on commercial microprocessors. The background tasks compute the inertial and gravitational coefficients as well as the forces due to the velocities of the joints. In each control sample period, the high-priority synchronous task computes the product of the inertial coefficients by the accelerations of the joints and performs the summation of the torques due to the velocities and gravitational forces. Kircanski et al. (1986) have shown that the bandwidth of the variation of joint angles and of their velocities is an order of magnitude less than the variation of joint accelerations. This result agrees with the experiments the authors have carried out using a PUMA 260 robot. Two main strategies contribute to reduce the computational burden associated with the evaluation of the dynamic equations. The first involves the use of efficient algorithms for the evaluation of the equations. The second is aimed at reducing the number of dynamic parameters by identifying beforehand the linear dependencies among these parameters, as well as carrying out a significance analysis of the parameters' contribution to the final joint torques. The actual code used to evaluate this dynamic model is entirely computer generated from experimental data, requiring no other manual intervention than performing a campaign of measurements.

  14. Computer simulation of confined liquid crystal dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Webster, R E

    2001-01-01

    are performed of the formation of structures in confined smectic systems where layer tilt is induced by an imposed surface pretilt. Results show that bookshelf, chevron and tilled layer structures are observable in a confined Gay-Berne system. The formation and stability of the chevron structure are shown to be influenced by surface slip. Results are presented from a series of simulations undertaken to determine whether dynamic processes observed in device-scale liquid crystal cells confined between aligning substrates can be simulated in a molecular system using parallel molecular dynamics of the Gay-Berne model. In a nematic cell, on removal of an aligning field, initial near-surface director relaxation can induce flow, termed 'backflow' in the liquid. This, in turn, can cause director rotation, termed 'orientational kickback', in the centre of the cell. Simulations are performed of the relaxation in nematic systems confined between substrates with a common alignment on removal of an aligning field. Results...

  15. Compressive Loads on the Lumbar Spine During Lifting: 4D WATBAK versus Inverse Dynamics Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Cole

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous two- and three-dimensional biomechanical models exist for the purpose of assessing the stresses placed on the lumbar spine during the performance of a manual material handling task. More recently, researchers have utilised their knowledge to develop specific computer-based models that can be applied in an occupational setting; an example of which is 4D WATBAK. The model used by 4D WATBAK bases its predications on static calculations and it is assumed that these static loads reasonably depict the actual dynamic loads acting on the lumbar spine. Consequently, it was the purpose of this research to assess the agreement between the static predictions made by 4D WATBAK and those from a comparable dynamic model. Six individuals were asked to perform a series of five lifting tasks, which ranged from lifting 2.5 kg to 22.5 kg and were designed to replicate the lifting component of the Work Capacity Assessment Test used within Australia. A single perpendicularly placed video camera was used to film each performance in the sagittal plane. The resultant two-dimensional kinematic data were input into the 4D WATBAK software and a dynamic biomechanical model to quantify the compression forces acting at the L4/L5 intervertebral joint. Results of this study indicated that as the mass of the load increased from 2.5 kg to 22.5 kg, the static compression forces calculated by 4D WATBAK became increasingly less than those calculated using the dynamic model (mean difference ranged from 22.0% for 2.5 kg to 42.9% for 22.5 kg. This study suggested that, for research purposes, a validated three-dimensional dynamic model should be employed when a task becomes complex and when a more accurate indication of spinal compression or shear force is required. Additionally, although it is clear that 4D WATBAK is particularly suited to industrial applications, it is suggested that the limitations of such modelling tools be carefully considered when task-risk and employee

  16. Osmosis : a molecular dynamics computer simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, Thomas

    Osmosis is a phenomenon of critical importance in a variety of processes ranging from the transport of ions across cell membranes and the regulation of blood salt levels by the kidneys to the desalination of water and the production of clean energy using potential osmotic power plants. However, despite its importance and over one hundred years of study, there is an ongoing confusion concerning the nature of the microscopic dynamics of the solvent particles in their transfer across the membrane. In this thesis the microscopic dynamical processes underlying osmotic pressure and concentration gradients are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. I first present a new derivation for the local pressure that can be used for determining osmotic pressure gradients. Using this result, the steady-state osmotic pressure is studied in a minimal model for an osmotic system and the steady-state density gradients are explained using a simple mechanistic hopping model for the solvent particles. The simulation setup is then modified, allowing us to explore the timescales involved in the relaxation dynamics of the system in the period preceding the steady state. Further consideration is also given to the relative roles of diffusive and non-diffusive solvent transport in this period. Finally, in a novel modification to the classic osmosis experiment, the solute particles are driven out-of-equilibrium by the input of energy. The effect of this modification on the osmotic pressure and the osmotic ow is studied and we find that active solute particles can cause reverse osmosis to occur. The possibility of defining a new "osmotic effective temperature" is also considered and compared to the results of diffusive and kinetic temperatures..

  17. DYNAMIC TASK PARTITIONING MODEL IN PARALLEL COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Ali

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Parallel computing systems compose task partitioning strategies in a true multiprocessing manner. Such systems share the algorithm and processing unit as computing resources which leads to highly inter process communications capabilities. The main part of the proposed algorithm is resource management unit which performs task partitioning and co-scheduling .In this paper, we present a technique for integrated task partitioning and co-scheduling on the privately owned network. We focus on real-time and non preemptive systems. A large variety of experiments have been conducted on the proposed algorithm using synthetic and real tasks. Goal of computation model is to provide a realistic representation of the costs of programming The results show the benefit of the task partitioning. The main characteristics of our method are optimal scheduling and strong link between partitioning, scheduling and communication. Some important models for task partitioning are also discussed in the paper. We target the algorithm for task partitioning which improve the inter process communication between the tasks and use the recourses of the system in the efficient manner. The proposed algorithm contributes the inter-process communication cost minimization amongst the executing processes.

  18. Low Power Dynamic Scheduling for Computing Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Neely, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers energy-aware control for a computing system with two states: "active" and "idle." In the active state, the controller chooses to perform a single task using one of multiple task processing modes. The controller then saves energy by choosing an amount of time for the system to be idle. These decisions affect processing time, energy expenditure, and an abstract attribute vector that can be used to model other criteria of interest (such as processing quality or distortion). The goal is to optimize time average system performance. Applications of this model include a smart phone that makes energy-efficient computation and transmission decisions, a computer that processes tasks subject to rate, quality, and power constraints, and a smart grid energy manager that allocates resources in reaction to a time varying energy price. The solution methodology of this paper uses the theory of optimization for renewal systems developed in our previous work. This paper is written in tutorial form and devel...

  19. A NEW INVERSION METHOD OF TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Time-Lapse Seismic improves oil recovery ratio by dynamic reservoir monitoring. Because of the large number of seismic explorations in the process of time-lapse seismic inversion, traditional methods need plenty of inversion calculations which cost high computational works. The method is therefore inefficient. In this paper, in order to reduce the repeating computations in traditional, a new time-lapse seismic inversion method is put forward. Firstly a homotopy-regularization method is proposed for the first time inversion. Secondly, with the first time inversion results as the initial value of following model, a model of the second time inversion is rebuilt by analyzing the characters of time-lapse seismic and localized inversion method is designed by using the model. Finally, through simulation, the comparison between traditional method and the new scheme is given. Our simulation results show that the new scheme could save the algorithm computations greatly.

  20. Real-time dynamic MLC tracking for inversely optimized arc radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Marianne; af Rosenschöld, Per Munck; Keall, Paul;

    2010-01-01

    Motion compensation with MLC tracking was tested for inversely optimized arc radiotherapy with special attention to the impact of the size of the target displacements and the angle of the leaf trajectory....

  1. Exponential rise of dynamical complexity in quantum computing through projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgarth, Daniel Klaus; Facchi, Paolo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Pascazio, Saverio; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2014-10-10

    The ability of quantum systems to host exponentially complex dynamics has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to developing of protocols for computation, communication and metrology, which exploit this scaling, despite formidable technical difficulties. Here we show that the mere frequent observation of a small part of a quantum system can turn its dynamics from a very simple one into an exponentially complex one, capable of universal quantum computation. After discussing examples, we go on to show that this effect is generally to be expected: almost any quantum dynamics becomes universal once 'observed' as outlined above. Conversely, we show that any complex quantum dynamics can be 'purified' into a simpler one in larger dimensions. We conclude by demonstrating that even local noise can lead to an exponentially complex dynamics.

  2. Photonic Nonlinear Transient Computing with Multiple-Delay Wavelength Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinenghi, Romain; Rybalko, Sergei; Jacquot, Maxime; Chembo, Yanne K.; Larger, Laurent

    2012-06-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a hybrid optoelectronic neuromorphic computer based on a complex nonlinear wavelength dynamics including multiple delayed feedbacks with randomly defined weights. This neuromorphic approach is based on a new paradigm of a brain-inspired computational unit, intrinsically differing from Turing machines. This recent paradigm consists in expanding the input information to be processed into a higher dimensional phase space, through the nonlinear transient response of a complex dynamics excited by the input information. The computed output is then extracted via a linear separation of the transient trajectory in the complex phase space. The hyperplane separation is derived from a learning phase consisting of the resolution of a regression problem. The processing capability originates from the nonlinear transient, resulting in nonlinear transient computing. The computational performance is successfully evaluated on a standard benchmark test, namely, a spoken digit recognition task.

  3. Nonlinear Damping Identification in Nonlinear Dynamic System Based on Stochastic Inverse Approach

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The nonlinear model is crucial to prepare, supervise, and analyze mechanical system. In this paper, a new nonparametric and output-only identification procedure for nonlinear damping is studied. By introducing the concept of the stochastic state space, we formulate a stochastic inverse problem for a nonlinear damping. The solution of the stochastic inverse problem is designed as probabilistic expression via the hierarchical Bayesian formulation by considering various uncertainties such as the...

  4. Real-time dynamic MLC tracking for inversely optimized arc radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Marianne; af Rosenschöld, Per Munck; Keall, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Motion compensation with MLC tracking was tested for inversely optimized arc radiotherapy with special attention to the impact of the size of the target displacements and the angle of the leaf trajectory.......Motion compensation with MLC tracking was tested for inversely optimized arc radiotherapy with special attention to the impact of the size of the target displacements and the angle of the leaf trajectory....

  5. Mapping soil water dynamics and a moving wetting front by spatiotemporal inversion of electromagnetic induction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Monteiro Santos, F. A.; Triantafilis, J.

    2016-11-01

    Characterization of the spatiotemporal distribution of soil volumetric water content (θ) is fundamental to agriculture, ecology, and earth science. Given the labor intensive and inefficient nature of determining θ, apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) measured by electromagnetic induction has been used as a proxy. A number of previous studies have employed inversion algorithms to convert ECa data to depth-specific electrical conductivity (σ) which could then be correlated to soil θ and other soil properties. The purpose of this study was to develop a spatiotemporal inversion algorithm which accounts for the temporal continuity of ECa. The algorithm was applied to a case study where time-lapse ECa was collected on a 350 m transect on seven different days on an alfalfa farm in the USA. Results showed that the approach was able to map the location of moving wetting front along the transect. Results also showed that the spatiotemporal inversion algorithm was more precise (RMSE = 0.0457 cm3/cm3) and less biased (ME = -0.0023 cm3/cm3) as compared with the nonspatiotemporal inversion approach (0.0483 cm3/cm3 and ME = -0.0030 cm3/cm3, respectively). In addition, the spatiotemporal inversion algorithm allows for a reduced set of ECa surveys to be used when non abrupt changes of soil water content occur with time. To apply this spatiotemporal inversion algorithm beyond low induction number condition, full solution of the EM induction phenomena can be studied in the future.

  6. Finite Element Computational Dynamics of Rotating Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mackerle

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This bibliography lists references to papers, conference proceedings and theses/dissertations dealing with finite element analysis of rotor dynamics problems that were published in 1994–1998. It contains 319 citations. Also included, as separate subsections, are finite element analyses of rotor elements – discs, shafts, spindles, and blades. Topics dealing with fracture mechanics, contact and stability problems of rotating machinery are also considered in specific sections. The last part of the bibliography presents papers dealing with specific industrial applications.

  7. Combinatorial Algorithms for Computing Column Space Bases ThatHave Sparse Inverses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinar, Ali; Chow, Edmond; Pothen, Alex

    2005-03-18

    This paper presents a combinatorial study on the problem ofconstructing a sparse basis forthe null-space of a sparse, underdetermined, full rank matrix, A. Such a null-space is suitable forsolving solving many saddle point problems. Our approach is to form acolumn space basis of A that has a sparse inverse, by selecting suitablecolumns of A. This basis is then used to form a sparse null-space basisin fundamental form. We investigate three different algorithms forcomputing the column space basis: Two greedy approaches that rely onmatching, and a third employing a divide and conquer strategy implementedwith hypergraph partitioning followed by the greedy approach. We alsodiscuss the complexity of selecting a column basis when it is known thata block diagonal basis exists with a small given block size.

  8. Perspective: Computer simulations of long time dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elber, Ron [Department of Chemistry, The Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-02-14

    Atomically detailed computer simulations of complex molecular events attracted the imagination of many researchers in the field as providing comprehensive information on chemical, biological, and physical processes. However, one of the greatest limitations of these simulations is of time scales. The physical time scales accessible to straightforward simulations are too short to address many interesting and important molecular events. In the last decade significant advances were made in different directions (theory, software, and hardware) that significantly expand the capabilities and accuracies of these techniques. This perspective describes and critically examines some of these advances.

  9. Computer simulation of multiple dynamic photorefractive gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben

    1998-01-01

    The benefits of a direct visualization of space-charge grating buildup are described. The visualization is carried out by a simple repetitive computer program, which simulates the basic processes in the band-transport model and displays the result graphically or in the form of numerical data. The....... The simulation sheds light on issues that are not amenable to analytical solutions, such as the spectral content of the wave forms, cross talk in three-beam interaction, and the range of applications of the band-transport model. (C) 1998 Optical Society of America....

  10. A geometric calibration method for inverse geometry computed tomography using P-matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagowski, Jordan M.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Hatt, Charles R.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate and artifact free reconstruction of tomographic images requires precise knowledge of the imaging system geometry. This work proposes a novel projection matrix (P-matrix) based calibration method to enable C-arm inverse geometry CT (IGCT). The method is evaluated for scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX), a C-arm mounted inverse geometry fluoroscopic technology. A helical configuration of fiducials is imaged at each gantry angle in a rotational acquisition. For each gantry angle, digital tomosynthesis is performed at multiple planes and a composite image analogous to a cone-beam projection is generated from the plane stack. The geometry of the C-arm, source array, and detector array is determined at each angle by constructing a parameterized 3D-to-2D projection matrix that minimizes the sum-of-squared deviations between measured and projected fiducial coordinates. Simulations were used to evaluate calibration performance with translations and rotations of the source and detector. In a geometry with 1 mm translation of the central ray relative to the axis-of-rotation and 1 degree yaw of the detector and source arrays, the maximum error in the recovered translational parameters was 0.4 mm and maximum error in the rotation parameter was 0.02 degrees. The relative rootmean- square error in a reconstruction of a numerical thorax phantom was 0.4% using the calibration method, versus 7.7% without calibration. Changes in source-detector-distance were the most challenging to estimate. Reconstruction of experimental SBDX data using the proposed method eliminated double contour artifacts present in a non-calibrated reconstruction. The proposed IGCT geometric calibration method reduces image artifacts when uncertainties exist in system geometry.

  11. Boundary element computations in the forward and inverse problems of electrocardiography: comparison of collocation and Galerkin weightings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenroos, Matti; Haueisen, Jens

    2008-09-01

    In electrocardiographic imaging, epicardial potentials are reconstructed computationally from electrocardiographic measurements. The reconstruction is typically done with the help of the boundary element method (BEM), using the point collocation weighting and constant or linear basis functions. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of constant and linear point collocation and Galerkin BEMs in the epicardial potential problem. The integral equations and discretizations were formulated in terms of the single- and double-layer operators. All inner element integrals were calculated analytically. The computational methods were validated against analytical solutions in a simplified geometry. On the basis of the validation, no method was optimal in all testing scenarios. In the forward computation of the epicardial potential, the linear Galerkin (LG) method produced the smallest errors. The LG method also produced the smallest discretization error on the epicardial surface. In the inverse computation of epicardial potential, the electrode-specific transfer matrix performed better than the full transfer matrix. The Tikhonov 2 regularization outperformed the Tikhonov 0. In the optimal modeling conditions, the best BEM technique depended on electrode positions and chosen error measure. When large modeling errors such as omission of the lungs were present, the choice of the basis and weighting functions was not significant.

  12. SD-CAS: Spin Dynamics by Computer Algebra System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Xenia; Filip, Claudiu

    2010-11-01

    A computer algebra tool for describing the Liouville-space quantum evolution of nuclear 1/2-spins is introduced and implemented within a computational framework named Spin Dynamics by Computer Algebra System (SD-CAS). A distinctive feature compared with numerical and previous computer algebra approaches to solving spin dynamics problems results from the fact that no matrix representation for spin operators is used in SD-CAS, which determines a full symbolic character to the performed computations. Spin correlations are stored in SD-CAS as four-entry nested lists of which size increases linearly with the number of spins into the system and are easily mapped into analytical expressions in terms of spin operator products. For the so defined SD-CAS spin correlations a set of specialized functions and procedures is introduced that are essential for implementing basic spin algebra operations, such as the spin operator products, commutators, and scalar products. They provide results in an abstract algebraic form: specific procedures to quantitatively evaluate such symbolic expressions with respect to the involved spin interaction parameters and experimental conditions are also discussed. Although the main focus in the present work is on laying the foundation for spin dynamics symbolic computation in NMR based on a non-matrix formalism, practical aspects are also considered throughout the theoretical development process. In particular, specific SD-CAS routines have been implemented using the YACAS computer algebra package (http://yacas.sourceforge.net), and their functionality was demonstrated on a few illustrative examples.

  13. Postseismic Deformation Following the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake: Observations, Kinematic Inversions, and Dynamic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Christopher; Barbot, Sylvain; Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Due to its location on a transtensional section of the Pacific-North American plate boundary, the Salton Trough is a region featuring large strike-slip earthquakes within a regime of shallow asthenosphere, high heat flow, and complex faulting, and so postseismic deformation there may feature enhanced viscoelastic relaxation and afterslip that is particularly detectable at the surface. The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake was the largest shock in the Salton Trough since 1892 and occurred close to the US-Mexico border, and so the postseismic deformation recorded by the continuous GPS network of southern California provides an opportunity to study the rheology of this region. Three-year postseismic transients extracted from GPS displacement time-series show four key features: (1) 1-2 cm of cumulative uplift in the Imperial Valley and 1 cm of subsidence in the Peninsular Ranges, (2) relatively large cumulative horizontal displacements 150 km from the rupture in the Peninsular Ranges, (3) rapidly decaying horizontal displacement rates in the first few months after the earthquake in the Imperial Valley, and (4) sustained horizontal velocities, following the rapid early motions, that were still visibly ongoing 3 years after the earthquake. Kinematic inversions show that the cumulative 3-year postseismic displacement field can be well fit by afterslip on and below the coseismic rupture, though these solutions require afterslip with a total moment equivalent to at least a earthquake and higher slip magnitudes than those predicted by coseismic stress changes. Forward modeling shows that stress-driven afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation in various configurations within the lithosphere can reproduce the early and later horizontal velocities in the Imperial Valley, while Newtonian viscoelastic relaxation in the asthenosphere can reproduce the uplift in the Imperial Valley and the subsidence and large westward displacements in the Peninsular Ranges. We present two forward

  14. A modular system for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, D. R.; Foutch, D. W.; Shurtleff, G. E.

    This paper describes the Modular System for Compuational Fluid Dynamics (MOSYS), a software facility for the construction and execution of arbitrary solution procedures on multizone, structured body-fitted grids. It focuses on the structure and capabilities of MOSYS and the philosophy underlying its design. The system offers different levels of capability depending on the objectives of the user. It enables the applications engineer to quickly apply a variety of methods to geometrically complex problems. The methods developer can implement new algorithms in a simple form, and immediately apply them to problems of both theoretical and practical interest. And for the code builder it consitutes a toolkit for fast construction of CFD codes tailored to various purposes. These capabilities are illustrated through applications to a particularly complex problem encountered in aircraft propulsion systems, namely, the analysis of a landing aircraft in reverse thrust.

  15. Computational model of cellular metabolic dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yanjun; Solomon, Thomas; Haus, Jacob M

    2010-01-01

    : intracellular metabolite concentrations and patterns of glucose disposal. Model variations were simulated to investigate three alternative mechanisms to explain insulin enhancements: Model 1 (M.1), simple mass action; M.2, insulin-mediated activation of key metabolic enzymes (i.e., hexokinase, glycogen synthase......Identifying the mechanisms by which insulin regulates glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle is critical to understanding the etiology of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Our knowledge of these mechanisms is limited by the difficulty of obtaining in vivo intracellular data. To quantitatively...... distinguish significant transport and metabolic mechanisms from limited experimental data, we developed a physiologically based, multiscale mathematical model of cellular metabolic dynamics in skeletal muscle. The model describes mass transport and metabolic processes including distinctive processes...

  16. Computational Granular Dynamics Models and Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Pöschel, Thorsten

    2005-01-01

    Computer simulations not only belong to the most important methods for the theoretical investigation of granular materials, but also provide the tools that have enabled much of the expanding research by physicists and engineers. The present book is intended to serve as an introduction to the application of numerical methods to systems of granular particles. Accordingly, emphasis is placed on a general understanding of the subject rather than on the presentation of the latest advances in numerical algorithms. Although a basic knowledge of C++ is needed for the understanding of the numerical methods and algorithms in the book, it avoids usage of elegant but complicated algorithms to remain accessible for those who prefer to use a different programming language. While the book focuses more on models than on the physics of granular material, many applications to real systems are presented.

  17. Time-domain seismic modeling in viscoelastic media for full waveform inversion on heterogeneous computing platforms with OpenCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabien-Ouellet, Gabriel; Gloaguen, Erwan; Giroux, Bernard

    2017-03-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) aims at recovering the elastic parameters of the Earth by matching recordings of the ground motion with the direct solution of the wave equation. Modeling the wave propagation for realistic scenarios is computationally intensive, which limits the applicability of FWI. The current hardware evolution brings increasing parallel computing power that can speed up the computations in FWI. However, to take advantage of the diversity of parallel architectures presently available, new programming approaches are required. In this work, we explore the use of OpenCL to develop a portable code that can take advantage of the many parallel processor architectures now available. We present a program called SeisCL for 2D and 3D viscoelastic FWI in the time domain. The code computes the forward and adjoint wavefields using finite-difference and outputs the gradient of the misfit function given by the adjoint state method. To demonstrate the code portability on different architectures, the performance of SeisCL is tested on three different devices: Intel CPUs, NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon PHI. Results show that the use of GPUs with OpenCL can speed up the computations by nearly two orders of magnitudes over a single threaded application on the CPU. Although OpenCL allows code portability, we show that some device-specific optimization is still required to get the best performance out of a specific architecture. Using OpenCL in conjunction with MPI allows the domain decomposition of large models on several devices located on different nodes of a cluster. For large enough models, the speedup of the domain decomposition varies quasi-linearly with the number of devices. Finally, we investigate two different approaches to compute the gradient by the adjoint state method and show the significant advantages of using OpenCL for FWI.

  18. Dynamics and control of trajectory tubes theory and computation

    CERN Document Server

    Kurzhanski, Alexander B

    2014-01-01

    This monograph presents theoretical methods involving the Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman formalism in conjunction with set-valued techniques of nonlinear analysis to solve significant problems in dynamics and control. The emphasis is on issues of reachability, feedback control  synthesis under complex state constraints, hard or double bounds on controls, and performance in finite time. Guaranteed state estimation, output feedback control, and hybrid dynamics are also discussed. Although the focus is on systems with linear structure, the authors indicate how to apply each approach to nonlinear and nonconvex systems. The main theoretical results lead to computational schemes based on extensions of ellipsoidal calculus that provide complete solutions to the problems. These computational schemes in turn yield software tools that can be applied effectively to high-dimensional systems. Dynamics and Control of Trajectory Tubes: Theory and Computation will interest graduate and senior undergraduate students, as well as...

  19. Dynamic detection for computer virus based on immune system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tao

    2008-01-01

    Inspired by biological immune system,a new dynamic detection model for computer virus based on immune system is proposed.The quantitative description of the model is given.The problem of dynamic description for self and nonself in a computer virus immune system is solved,which reduces the size of self set.The new concept of dynamic tolerance,as well as the new mechanisms of gene evolution and gene coding for immature detectors is presented,improving the generating efficiency of mature detectors,reducing the false-negative and false-positive rates.Therefore,the difficult problem,in which the detector training cost is exponentially related to the size of self-set in a traditional computer immune system,is thus overcome.The theory analysis and experimental results show that the proposed model has better time efficiency and detecting ability than the classic model ARTIS.

  20. A Computational Strategy for Inversion of Correlation Matrices Having Linear Dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, John T.; Kittleson, Howard M.

    1972-01-01

    Copies of a complete multiple regression computer program (incorporating the modified Gauss-Jordan procedure) and instructions for its use may be found in the senior author's recent book, The Funstat Package in Fortran IV,'' Holt, Rinehart and Winston. (Authors/CB)

  1. A theoretical Deduction from the Hubble law based on a Modified Newtonian Dynamics with field of Yukawa inverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, N.

    2017-07-01

    At cosmic scales the dynamics of the Universe are almost exclusively prescribed by the force of gravity; however the assumption of the law of gravitation, depending on the inverse of the distance, leads to the known problems of the rotation curves of galaxies and missing mass (dark matter). The problem of the coupling of gravity to changes in scale and deviations from the law of the inverse square is an old problem (Laplace, 1805; Seeliger 1898), which has motivated alternatives to Newtonian dynamics compatible with observations. The present paper postulates a modified Newtonian dynamics by adding an inverse Yukawa potential: U(r)≡U0(M)(r-r0)e-α/r is the the potential per unit mass (in N/kg) as a function of the barionic mass that causes the field, r0 is of the order of 50h-1 Mpc and alpha is a coupling constant of the order of 2.5 h-1 Mpc. This potential is zero within the solar system, slightly attractive at interstellar distances, very attractive in galactic range and repulsive at cosmic scales. Its origin is the barionic matter, it allows to include the Milgrow MoND theory to explain the rotation curves, it is compatible with the experiments Eovos type, and allows to deduce the law of Hubble to cosmic scales, in the form H0=100h km/s Mpc≍U0(M)/c, where U0(M)≍ 4pi×6.67 10-11m/s2, is obtained from the Laplace's equation, assuming that the gravitational force is the law of the inverse of the square plus a non-linear term type Yukawa inverse. It is concluded that the modification of the law of gravity with nonlinear terms, allows to model the dynamics of the Universe on a large scale and include non-locality without dark matter. (See Falcon et al. 2014, International Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 4, 551-559).

  2. Computational Fluid and Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory System

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2013-01-01

    Traditional research methodologies in the human respiratory system have always been challenging due to their invasive nature. Recent advances in medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have accelerated this research. This book compiles and details recent advances in the modelling of the respiratory system for researchers, engineers, scientists, and health practitioners. It breaks down the complexities of this field and provides both students and scientists with an introduction and starting point to the physiology of the respiratory system, fluid dynamics and advanced CFD modeling tools. In addition to a brief introduction to the physics of the respiratory system and an overview of computational methods, the book contains best-practice guidelines for establishing high-quality computational models and simulations. Inspiration for new simulations can be gained through innovative case studies as well as hands-on practice using pre-made computational code. Last but not least, students and researcher...

  3. A computer code for forward calculation and inversion of the H/V spectral ratio under the diffuse field assumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jerez, Antonio; Piña-Flores, José; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J.; Luzón, Francisco; Perton, Mathieu

    2016-12-01

    During a quarter of a century, the main characteristics of the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio of ambient noise HVSRN have been extensively used for site effect assessment. In spite of the uncertainties about the optimum theoretical model to describe these observations, over the last decade several schemes for inversion of the full HVSRN curve for near surface surveying have been developed. In this work, a computer code for forward calculation of H/V spectra based on the diffuse field assumption (DFA) is presented and tested. It takes advantage of the recently stated connection between the HVSRN and the elastodynamic Green's function which arises from the ambient noise interferometry theory. The algorithm allows for (1) a natural calculation of the Green's functions imaginary parts by using suitable contour integrals in the complex wavenumber plane, and (2) separate calculation of the contributions of Rayleigh, Love, P-SV and SH waves as well. The stability of the algorithm at high frequencies is preserved by means of an adaptation of the Wang's orthonormalization method to the calculation of dispersion curves, surface-waves medium responses and contributions of body waves. This code has been combined with a variety of inversion methods to make up a powerful tool for passive seismic surveying.

  4. Engineering Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics: Volume 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chapter 1: CFD Modeling of Methane Reforming in Compact Reformers. Meng Ni Chapter 2: FEM Based Solution of Thermo Fluid Dynamic Phenomena in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCS. F. Arpino, A. Carotenuto, N. Massarotti, A. Mauro Chapter 3: Computational Fluid Dynamics in the Development of a 3D Simulator for Testing Pollution Monitoring Robotic Fishes. John Oyekan, Bowen Lu, Huosheng Hu Chapter 4: CFD Applications in Electronic Packaging. C.Y. Khor, Chun-Sean Lau, M.Z. Abdullah Chapter 5: CFD Simulation of Savonius Wind Turbine Operation. Jo?o Vicente Akwa, Adriane Prisco Petry Chapter 6: Intermittency Modelling of Transitional Boundary Layer Flows on Steam and Gas Turbine Blades. Erik Dick, Slawomir Kubacki, Koen Lodefier, Witold Elsner Chapter 7: Numerical Analysis of the Flow through Fitting in Air Conditioning Systems. N.C. Uz?rraga-Rodriguez, A. Gallegos-Mu?oz, J.M. Belman-Flores, J.C. Rubio-Arana Chapter 8: Design and Optimization of Food Processing Equipments using Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling. N. Chhanwal and C. Anandharamakrishnan Chapter 9: Fuel and Intake Systems Optimization of a Converted LPG Engine: Steady and Unsteady in-Cylinder Flow CFD Investigations and Experiments Validation. M. A. Jemni, G. Kantchev, Z. Driss, M. S. Abid Chapter 10: Computational Fluid Dynamics Application for Thermal Management in Underground Mines. Agus P. Sasmito, Jundika C. Kurnia, Guan Mengzhao, Erik Birgersson, Arun S. Mujumdar Chapter 11: Computational Fluid Dynamics and its Applications. R.Parthiban, C.Muthuraj, A.Rajakumar

  5. Performance Comparision of Dynamic Load Balancing Algorithm in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita kaushik

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing as a distributed paradigm, it has the latent to make over a large part of the Cooperative industry. In cloud computing it’s automatically describe more technologies like distributed computing, virtualization, software, web services and networking. We review the new cloud computing technologies, and indicate the main challenges for their development in future, among which load balancing problem stands out and attracts our attention Concept of load balancing in networking and in cloud environment both are widely different. Load balancing in networking its complete concern to avoid the problem of overloading and under loading in any sever networking cloud computing its complete different its involves different elements metrics such as security, reliability, throughput, tolerance, on demand services, cost etc. Through these elements we avoiding various node problem of distributing system where many services waiting for request and others are heavily loaded and through these its increase response time and degraded performance optimization. In this paper first we classify algorithms in static and dynamic. Then we analyzed the dynamic algorithms applied in dynamics environments in cloud. Through this paper we have been show compression of various dynamics algorithm in which we include honey bee algorithm, throttled algorithm, Biased random algorithm with different elements and describe how and which is best in cloud environment with different metrics mainly used elements are performance, resource utilization and minimum cost. Our main focus of paper is in the analyze various load balancing algorithms and their applicability in cloud environment.

  6. Amoeba-inspired nanoarchitectonic computing: solving intractable computational problems using nanoscale photoexcitation transfer dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Masashi; Naruse, Makoto; Kim, Song-Ju; Wakabayashi, Masamitsu; Hori, Hirokazu; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Hara, Masahiko

    2013-06-18

    Biologically inspired computing devices and architectures are expected to overcome the limitations of conventional technologies in terms of solving computationally demanding problems, adapting to complex environments, reducing energy consumption, and so on. We previously demonstrated that a primitive single-celled amoeba (a plasmodial slime mold), which exhibits complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics and sophisticated computing capabilities, can be used to search for a solution to a very hard combinatorial optimization problem. We successfully extracted the essential spatiotemporal dynamics by which the amoeba solves the problem. This amoeba-inspired computing paradigm can be implemented by various physical systems that exhibit suitable spatiotemporal dynamics resembling the amoeba's problem-solving process. In this Article, we demonstrate that photoexcitation transfer phenomena in certain quantum nanostructures mediated by optical near-field interactions generate the amoebalike spatiotemporal dynamics and can be used to solve the satisfiability problem (SAT), which is the problem of judging whether a given logical proposition (a Boolean formula) is self-consistent. SAT is related to diverse application problems in artificial intelligence, information security, and bioinformatics and is a crucially important nondeterministic polynomial time (NP)-complete problem, which is believed to become intractable for conventional digital computers when the problem size increases. We show that our amoeba-inspired computing paradigm dramatically outperforms a conventional stochastic search method. These results indicate the potential for developing highly versatile nanoarchitectonic computers that realize powerful solution searching with low energy consumption.

  7. A Wearable Computing System for Dynamic Locating of Parking Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Mrugala

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a dynamic locating system implemented in an autonomous wearable computing system for the automobile warehouse management application. Since the first prototype is developed as jacket [1], this prototype is miniaturized and therefore realized as holster which consists of several modules for identification, communication and localization. It is worn by employees during warehousing of automobiles. The modules collect data, which are used by the operating system to calculate the location of parking spaces dynamically.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics. [numerical methods and algorithm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This collection of papers was presented at the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Conference held at Ames Research Center in California on March 12 through 14, 1991. It is an overview of CFD activities at NASA Lewis Research Center. The main thrust of computational work at Lewis is aimed at propulsion systems. Specific issues related to propulsion CFD and associated modeling will also be presented. Examples of results obtained with the most recent algorithm development will also be presented.

  9. Improved Pyrolysis Micro reactor Design via Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-23

    NUMBER (Include area code) 23 May 2017 Briefing Charts 25 April 2017 - 23 May 2017 Improved Pyrolysis Micro-reactor Design via Computational Fluid... PYROLYSIS MICRO-REACTOR DESIGN VIA COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS Ghanshyam L. Vaghjiani* DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release...Approved for public release, distribution unlimited. PA Clearance 17247 Chen-Source (>240 references from SciFinder as of 5/1/17): Flash pyrolysis

  10. Whole-Body Human Inverse Dynamics with Distributed Micro-Accelerometers, Gyros and Force Sensing †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latella, Claudia; Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Romano, Francesco; Traversaro, Silvio; Nori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Human motion tracking is a powerful tool used in a large range of applications that require human movement analysis. Although it is a well-established technique, its main limitation is the lack of estimation of real-time kinetics information such as forces and torques during the motion capture. In this paper, we present a novel approach for a human soft wearable force tracking for the simultaneous estimation of whole-body forces along with the motion. The early stage of our framework encompasses traditional passive marker based methods, inertial and contact force sensor modalities and harnesses a probabilistic computational technique for estimating dynamic quantities, originally proposed in the domain of humanoid robot control. We present experimental analysis on subjects performing a two degrees-of-freedom bowing task, and we estimate the motion and kinetics quantities. The results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. We discuss the possible use of this technique in the design of a novel soft wearable force tracking device and its potential applications. PMID:27213394

  11. Computing approximate blocking probability of inverse multiplexing and sub-band conversion in the flexible-grid optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yamei; You, Shanhong

    2016-07-01

    With the rapid growth of data rate, the optical network is evolving from fixed-grid to flexible-grid to provide spectrum-efficient and scalable transport of 100 Gb/s services and beyond. Also, the deployment of wavelength converter in the existing network can increase the flexibility of routing and wavelength allocation (RWA) and improve blocking performance of the optical networks. In this paper, we present a methodology for computing approximate blocking probabilities of the provision of multiclass services in the flexible-grid optical networks with sub-band spectrum conversion and inverse multiplexing respectively. Numerical calculation results based on the model are compared to the simulation results for the different cases. It is shown that the calculation results match well with the simulation results for the flexible-grid optical networks at different scenarios.

  12. An Iterative Inversion Technique to Compute Structural Martian Models for Refining Event Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, S.; Khan, A.; van Driel, M.; Clinton, J. F.; Boese, M.; Euchner, F.; Giardini, D.; Garcia, R.; Lognonne, P. H.; Panning, M. P.; Banerdt, W. B.

    2016-12-01

    The InSight mission will deploy a single seismic station on Mars in 2018. The main task of the MarsQuake Service within the project includes detecting and locating quakes on Mars, and managing the event catalog. In preparation for the mission, we continually calibrate single station event location algorithms, employing seismic phase travel times computed for a suite of structural models. However, our knowledge about the interior structure of Mars is limited, which in turn will affect our ability to locate events accurately. Here, we present an iterative method to invert for the interior structure of Mars and revise event locations, consecutively. We first locate seismic events using differential arrival times (with respect to the first phase arrival) of all possible seismic phases, computed for a priori initial structural models. These models are built considering a one-dimensional average crust and current estimates of bulk mantle chemistry and areotherm. Phase picks and uncertainty assignments are done manually. Then, we invert for the interior structure employing the arrival times for the picked phases, and generate an updated suite of models, which are further used to revise the initial phase picks, and relocate events. We repeat this sequence for each additional and new entry in the travel time database to improve event locations and models for average Martian structure. In order to test our approach, we simulate the operational conditions we will encounter in practice: We compute synthetic waveforms for a realistic event catalog of 120 events, with magnitudes between 2.5 and 5.0 and double-couple source mechanisms only. 1-Hz seismograms are computed using AxiSEM and Instaseis, employing two Martian models with a thin (30 km) and thick (80 km) crust, both with and without seismic surface noise. The waveforms are hosted at the ETH servers, and are publicly accessible via FDSN web services.

  13. Progress in Parallel Schur Complement Preconditioning for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Chan, Tony F.; Tang, Wei-Pai; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We consider preconditioning methods for nonself-adjoint advective-diffusive systems based on a non-overlapping Schur complement procedure for arbitrary triangulated domains. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop scalable preconditioning algorithms for fluid flow discretizations on parallel computing architectures. In our implementation of the Schur complement preconditioning technique, the triangulation is first partitioned into a number of subdomains using the METIS multi-level k-way partitioning code. This partitioning induces a natural 2X2 partitioning of the p.d.e. discretization matrix. By considering various inverse approximations of the 2X2 system, we have developed a family of robust preconditioning techniques. A computer code based on these ideas has been developed and tested on the IBM SP2 and the SGI Power Challenge array using MPI message passing protocol. A number of example CFD calculations will be presented to illustrate and assess various Schur complement approximations.

  14. All-electrical detection of spin dynamics in magnetic antidot lattices by the inverse spin Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungfleisch, Matthias B. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Zhang, Wei [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Ding, Junjia [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Jiang, Wanjun [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Sklenar, Joseph [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA; Pearson, John E. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Ketterson, John B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA; Hoffmann, Axel [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA

    2016-02-01

    The understanding of spin dynamics in laterally confined structures on sub-micron length scales has become a significant aspect of the development of novel magnetic storage technologies. Numerous ferromagnetic resonance measurements, optical characterization by Kerr microscopy and Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy and x-ray studies were carried out to detect the dynamics in patterned magnetic antidot lattices. Here, we investigate Oersted-field driven spin dynamics in rectangular Ni80Fe20/Pt antidot lattices with different lattice parameters by electrical means. When the system is driven to resonance, a dc voltage across the length of the sample is detected that changes its sign upon field reversal, which is in agreement with a rectification mechanism based on the inverse spin Hall effect. Furthermore, we show that the voltage output scales linearly with the applied microwave drive in the investigated range of powers. Our findings have direct implications on the development of engineered magnonics applications and devices.

  15. Numerical inversion of the Laplace transform in some problems of granular media dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavich, Nikolay B.

    2004-04-01

    Approximated value for the vertical displacement of a surface bounding a half space and a layer laying on rigid foundation filled with granular medium caused by a vertical symmetric load is received here. The results obtained for Kandaurov standard linear medium model are used. This model takes in account an internal friction. The Papoulis method of numerical inversion of the Laplace transform is applied.

  16. Time-dependent inversion of surface subsidence due to dynamic reservoir compaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntendam-Bos, A.G.; Kroon, I.C.; Fokker, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a novel, time-dependent inversion scheme for resolving temporal reservoir pressure drop from surface subsidence observations (from leveling or GPS data, InSAR, tiltmeter monitoring) in a single procedure. The theory is able to accommodate both the absence of surface subsidence estimates

  17. Dynamic Routing Protocol for Computer Networks with Clustering Topology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a hierarchical dynamic routing protocol (HDRP) based on the discrete dynamic programming principle. The proposed protocol can adapt to the dynamic and large computer networks (DLCN) with clustering topology. The procedures for realizing routing update and decision are presented in this paper. The proof of correctness and complexity analysis of the protocol are also made. The performance measures of the HDRP including throughput and average message delay are evaluated by using of simulation. The study shows that the HDRP provides a new available approach to the routing decision for DLCN or high speed networks with clustering topology.

  18. Dynamic computer simulation of the Fort St. Vrain steam turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    A computer simulation is described for the dynamic response of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear reactor regenerative intermediate- and low-pressure steam turbines. The fundamental computer-modeling assumptions for the turbines and feedwater heaters are developed. A turbine heat balance specifying steam and feedwater conditions at a given generator load and the volumes of the feedwater heaters are all that are necessary as descriptive input parameters. Actual plant data for a generator load reduction from 100 to 50% power (which occurred as part of a plant transient on November 9, 1981) are compared with computer-generated predictions, with reasonably good agreement.

  19. Computational Psychometrics for Modeling System Dynamics during Stressful Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Cipresso

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Disasters can be very stressful events. However, computational models of stress require data that might be very difficult to collect during disasters. Moreover, personal experiences are not repeatable, so it is not possible to collect bottom-up information when building a coherent model. To overcome these problems, we propose the use of computational models and virtual reality integration to recreate disaster situations, while examining possible dynamics in order to understand human behavior and relative consequences. By providing realistic parameters associated with disaster situations, computational scientists can work more closely with emergency responders to improve the quality of interventions in the future.

  20. Advanced computer techniques for inverse modeling of electric current in cardiac tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Romero, L.A.; Diegert, C.F.

    1996-08-01

    For many years, ECG`s and vector cardiograms have been the tools of choice for non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac conduction problems, such as found in reentrant tachycardia or Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Through skillful analysis of these skin-surface measurements of cardiac generated electric currents, a physician can deduce the general location of heart conduction irregularities. Using a combination of high-fidelity geometry modeling, advanced mathematical algorithms and massively parallel computing, Sandia`s approach would provide much more accurate information and thus allow the physician to pinpoint the source of an arrhythmia or abnormal conduction pathway.

  1. Computed radiation imaging physics and mathematics of forward and inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Hussein, Esam M A

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted imaging with radiation (x- and gamma rays) is an integral part of modern medical-diagnostic practice. This imaging technology is also slowly finding its way into industrial applications. Although the technology is well developed, there is a need for further improvement to enhance image quality, reduce artifacts, minimize patient radiation exposure, compete with and complement other imaging methods (such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonics), and accommodate dense and large objects encountered in industrial applications. Scientists and engineers, attempting to pro

  2. Understanding the role of the topology in protein folding by computational inverse folding experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucherino, Antonio; Costantini, Susan; di Serafino, Daniela; D'Apuzzo, Marco; Facchiano, Angelo; Colonna, Giovanni

    2008-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that protein folding should be revisited as the emergent property of a complex system and that the nature allows only a very limited number of folds that seem to be strongly influenced by geometrical properties. In this work we explore the principles underlying this new view and show how helical protein conformations can be obtained starting from simple geometric considerations. We generated a large data set of C-alpha traces made of 65 points, by computationally solving a backbone model that takes into account only topological features of the all-alpha proteins; then, we built corresponding tertiary structures, by using the sequences associated to the crystallographic structures of four small globular all-alpha proteins from PDB, and analysed them in terms of structural and energetic properties. In this way we obtained four poorly populated sets of structures that are reasonably similar to the conformational states typical of the experimental PDB structures. These results show that our computational approach can capture the native topology of all-alpha proteins; furthermore, it generates backbone folds without the influence of the side chains and uses the protein sequence to select a specific fold among the generated folds. This agrees with the recent view that the backbone plays an important role in the protein folding process and that the amino acid sequence chooses its own fold within a limited total number of folds.

  3. Dynamics of number systems computation with arbitrary precision

    CERN Document Server

    Kurka, Petr

    2016-01-01

    This book is a source of valuable and useful information on the topics of dynamics of number systems and scientific computation with arbitrary precision. It is addressed to scholars, scientists and engineers, and graduate students. The treatment is elementary and self-contained with relevance both for theory and applications. The basic prerequisite of the book is linear algebra and matrix calculus. .

  4. Computer-Based Dynamic Assessment of Multidigit Multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Michael M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Design details, operation, and initial field test results are reported for DynaMath, a computer-based dynamic assessment system that provides individually tailored, instructionally useful assessment of students with disabilities. DynaMath organizes and outputs student performance data, graphically shows the "zone of proximal…

  5. Dynamic enhanced computed tomographic findings of a perirenal capillary hemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Min; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Yang, Dal Mo; Ryu, Jung Kyu; Lim, Sung Jig [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Hemangiomas are benign mesenchymal neoplasms that rarely occur in the kidney and perirenal space. Perirenal hemangiomas can mimic the appearance of exophytic renal cell carcinoma or various retroperitoneal tumors. We report a case of perirenal hemangioma detected by dynamic enhanced computed tomography in a 43-year-old female.

  6. Microchannel Emulsification: From Computational Fluid Dynamics to Predictive Analytical Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijke, van K.C.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    Emulsion droplet formation was investigated in terrace-based microchannel systems that generate droplets through spontaneous Laplace pressure driven snap-off. The droplet formation mechanism was investigated through high-speed imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, and we found g

  7. An Assessment of Productive Computational Fluid Dynamics for Aerodynamic Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    PANAIR [7]) to marching techniques (like ZEUS [8] and parabolized Navier-S tokes codes) and full-field, elliptical, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD...undeflected case), but individual representations were required to create each deflection angle for the bent nose configuration. Figure 1. Three

  8. Applied Nonlinear Dynamics Analytical, Computational, and Experimental Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Nayfeh, Ali H

    1995-01-01

    A unified and coherent treatment of analytical, computational and experimental techniques of nonlinear dynamics with numerous illustrative applications. Features a discourse on geometric concepts such as Poincaré maps. Discusses chaos, stability and bifurcation analysis for systems of differential and algebraic equations. Includes scores of examples to facilitate understanding.

  9. Delivering Interactive Multimedia Services in Dynamic Pervasive Computing Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselman, C.; Cesar Garcia, P.S.; Vaishnavi, I.; Boussard, M.; Kernchen, R.; Meissner, S.; Spedalieri, A.; Sinfreu, A.; Raeck, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces a distributed system for next generation multimedia support in dynamically changing pervasive computing environments. The overall goal is to enhance the experience of mobile users by intelligently adapting the way a service is presented, in particular by adapting the way the us

  10. International Conference on Numerical Grid Generation in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-30

    Grun Convex Computer Corporation Brunnenstr. 17 701 Piano Road 8049 Bachenhausen Richardson Germany TX 75081 Chunyuan Gu J. E.Holcomb Dept. of Gas...Lab System Dynamics Inc. L-95, PO Box 808 1211 N.W. 10th Avenue Livermore, CA 94550 Gainesville FL 32601 Bernadette Palmero Azine Renzo Universite de

  11. Modelling Emission from Building Materials with Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Nielsen, Peter V.; Heiselberg, Per

    This paper presents a numerical model that by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is capable of dealing with both pollutant transport across the boundary layer and internal diffusion in the source without prior knowledge of which is the limiting process. The model provides the concentration...

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Tryggvason, T.

    1998-01-01

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...

  13. Computational fluid dynamics applications to improve crop production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), numerical analysis and simulation tools of fluid flow processes have emerged from the development stage and become nowadays a robust design tool. It is widely used to study various transport phenomena which involve fluid flow, heat and mass transfer, providing det...

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Demonstration of Rigid Bodies in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarena, Ernesto; Vu, Bruce T.

    2011-01-01

    The Design Analysis Branch (NE-Ml) at the Kennedy Space Center has not had the ability to accurately couple Rigid Body Dynamics (RBD) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). OVERFLOW-D is a flow solver that has been developed by NASA to have the capability to analyze and simulate dynamic motions with up to six Degrees of Freedom (6-DOF). Two simulations were prepared over the course of the internship to demonstrate 6DOF motion of rigid bodies under aerodynamic loading. The geometries in the simulations were based on a conceptual Space Launch System (SLS). The first simulation that was prepared and computed was the motion of a Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) as it separates from its core stage. To reduce computational time during the development of the simulation, only half of the physical domain with respect to the symmetry plane was simulated. Then a full solution was prepared and computed. The second simulation was a model of the SLS as it departs from a launch pad under a 20 knot crosswind. This simulation was reduced to Two Dimensions (2D) to reduce both preparation and computation time. By allowing 2-DOF for translations and 1-DOF for rotation, the simulation predicted unrealistic rotation. The simulation was then constrained to only allow translations.

  15. Assessing when chromosomal rearrangements affect the dynamics of speciation: implications from computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Jeffrey L; Nosil, Patrik; Flaxman, Samuel M

    2014-01-01

    Many hypotheses have been put forth to explain the origin and spread of inversions, and their significance for speciation. Several recent genic models have proposed that inversions promote speciation with gene flow due to the adaptive significance of the genes contained within them and because of the effects inversions have on suppressing recombination. However, the consequences of inversions for the dynamics of genome wide divergence across the speciation continuum remain unclear, an issue we examine here. We review a framework for the genomics of speciation involving the congealing of the genome into alternate adaptive states representing species ("genome wide congealing"). We then place inversions in this context as examples of how genetic hitchhiking can potentially hasten genome wide congealing. Specifically, we use simulation models to (i) examine the conditions under which inversions may speed genome congealing and (ii) quantify predicted magnitudes of these effects. Effects of inversions on promoting speciation were most common and pronounced when inversions were initially fixed between populations before secondary contact and adaptation involved many genes with small fitness effects. Further work is required on the role of underdominance and epistasis between a few loci of major effect within inversions. The results highlight five important aspects of the roles of inversions in speciation: (i) the geographic context of the origins and spread of inversions, (ii) the conditions under which inversions can facilitate divergence, (iii) the magnitude of that facilitation, (iv) the extent to which the buildup of divergence is likely to be biased within vs. outside of inversions, and (v) the dynamics of the appearance and disappearance of exceptional divergence within inversions. We conclude by discussing the empirical challenges in showing that inversions play a central role in facilitating speciation with gene flow.

  16. Dynamic Distribution Model with Prime Granularity for Parallel Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic distribution model is one of the best schemes for parallel volume rendering. However, in homogeneous cluster system, since the granularity is traditionally identical, all processors communicate almost simultaneously and computation load may lose balance. Due to problems above, a dynamic distribution model with prime granularity for parallel computing is presented.Granularities of each processor are relatively prime, and related theories are introduced. A high parallel performance can be achieved by minimizing network competition and using a load balancing strategy that ensures all processors finish almost simultaneously. Based on Master-Slave-Gleaner (MSG) scheme, the parallel Splatting Algorithm for volume rendering is used to test the model on IBM Cluster 1350 system. The experimental results show that the model can bring a considerable improvement in performance, including computation efficiency, total execution time, speed, and load balancing.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Flows in an Oxidation Ditch Driven by a New Surface Aerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weidong; Li, Kun; Wang, Gan; Wang, Yingzhe

    2013-11-01

    In this article, we present a newly designed inverse umbrella surface aerator, and tested its performance in driving flow of an oxidation ditch. Results show that it has a better performance in driving the oxidation ditch than the original one with higher average velocity and more uniform flow field. We also present a computational fluid dynamics model for predicting the flow field in an oxidation ditch driven by a surface aerator. The improved momentum source term approach to simulate the flow field of the oxidation ditch driven by an inverse umbrella surface aerator was developed and validated through experiments. Four kinds of turbulent models were investigated with the approach, including the standard k-ɛ model, RNG k-ɛ model, realizable k-ɛ model, and Reynolds stress model, and the predicted data were compared with those calculated with the multiple rotating reference frame approach (MRF) and sliding mesh approach (SM). Results of the momentum source term approach are in good agreement with the experimental data, and its prediction accuracy is better than MRF, close to SM. It is also found that the momentum source term approach has lower computational expenses, is simpler to preprocess, and is easier to use.

  18. Nonlinear Damping Identification in Nonlinear Dynamic System Based on Stochastic Inverse Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Han

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear model is crucial to prepare, supervise, and analyze mechanical system. In this paper, a new nonparametric and output-only identification procedure for nonlinear damping is studied. By introducing the concept of the stochastic state space, we formulate a stochastic inverse problem for a nonlinear damping. The solution of the stochastic inverse problem is designed as probabilistic expression via the hierarchical Bayesian formulation by considering various uncertainties such as the information insufficiency in parameter of interests or errors in measurement. The probability space is estimated using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC. The applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical experiment and particular application to a realistic problem related to ship roll motion.

  19. Towards Dynamic Remote Data Auditing in Computational Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Sookhak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a significant shift of computational paradigm where computing as a utility and storing data remotely have a great potential. Enterprise and businesses are now more interested in outsourcing their data to the cloud to lessen the burden of local data storage and maintenance. However, the outsourced data and the computation outcomes are not continuously trustworthy due to the lack of control and physical possession of the data owners. To better streamline this issue, researchers have now focused on designing remote data auditing (RDA techniques. The majority of these techniques, however, are only applicable for static archive data and are not subject to audit the dynamically updated outsourced data. We propose an effectual RDA technique based on algebraic signature properties for cloud storage system and also present a new data structure capable of efficiently supporting dynamic data operations like append, insert, modify, and delete. Moreover, this data structure empowers our method to be applicable for large-scale data with minimum computation cost. The comparative analysis with the state-of-the-art RDA schemes shows that the proposed scheme is secure and highly efficient in terms of the computation and communication overhead on the auditor and server.

  20. Dynamic self-assembly in living systems as computation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2004-06-01

    Biochemical reactions taking place in living systems that map different inputs to specific outputs are intuitively recognized as performing information processing. Conventional wisdom distinguishes such proteins, whose primary function is to transfer and process information, from proteins that perform the vast majority of the construction, maintenance, and actuation tasks of the cell (assembling and disassembling macromolecular structures, producing movement, and synthesizing and degrading molecules). In this paper, we examine the computing capabilities of biological processes in the context of the formal model of computing known as the random access machine (RAM) [Dewdney AK (1993) The New Turing Omnibus. Computer Science Press, New York], which is equivalent to a Turing machine [Minsky ML (1967) Computation: Finite and Infinite Machines. Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ]. When viewed from the RAM perspective, we observe that many of these dynamic self-assembly processes - synthesis, degradation, assembly, movement - do carry out computational operations. We also show that the same computing model is applicable at other hierarchical levels of biological systems (e.g., cellular or organism networks as well as molecular networks). We present stochastic simulations of idealized protein networks designed explicitly to carry out a numeric calculation. We explore the reliability of such computations and discuss error-correction strategies (algorithms) employed by living systems. Finally, we discuss some real examples of dynamic self-assembly processes that occur in living systems, and describe the RAM computer programs they implement. Thus, by viewing the processes of living systems from the RAM perspective, a far greater fraction of these processes can be understood as computing than has been previously recognized.

  1. Integrating aerodynamic surface modeling for computational fluid dynamics with computer aided structural analysis, design, and manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Scott A.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the development of a NASA Geometry Exchange Specification for transferring aerodynamic surface geometry between LeRC systems and grid generation software used for computational fluid dynamics research. The proposed specification is based on a subset of the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES). The presentation will include discussion of how the NASA-IGES standard will accommodate improved computer aided design inspection methods and reverse engineering techniques currently being developed. The presentation is in viewgraph format.

  2. Trajectory Evaluation of Rotor-Flying Robots Using Accurate Inverse Computation Based on Algorithm Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous maneuvering flight control of rotor-flying robots (RFR is a challenging problem due to the highly complicated structure of its model and significant uncertainties regarding many aspects of the field. As a consequence, it is difficult in many cases to decide whether or not a flight maneuver trajectory is feasible. It is necessary to conduct an analysis of the flight maneuvering ability of an RFR prior to test flight. Our aim in this paper is to use a numerical method called algorithm differentiation (AD to solve this problem. The basic idea is to compute the internal state (i.e., attitude angles and angular rates and input profiles based on predetermined maneuvering trajectory information denoted by the outputs (i.e., positions and yaw angle and their higher-order derivatives. For this purpose, we first present a model of the RFR system and show that it is flat. We then cast the procedure for obtaining the required state/input based on the desired outputs as a static optimization problem, which is solved using AD and a derivative based optimization algorithm. Finally, we test our proposed method using a flight maneuver trajectory to verify its performance.

  3. Computational study on full-wave inversion based on the acoustic wave-equation; Onkyoha hado hoteishiki full wave inversion no model keisan ni yoru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T.; Sassa, K. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Uesaka, S. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    The effect of initial models on full-wave inversion (FWI) analysis based on acoustic wave-equation was studied for elastic wave tomography of underground structures. At present, travel time inversion using initial motion travel time is generally used, and inverse analysis is conducted using the concept `ray,` assuming very high wave frequency. Although this method can derive stable solutions relatively unaffected by initial model, it uses only the data of initial motion travel time. FWI calculates theoretical waveform at each receiver using all of observed waveforms as data by wave equation modeling where 2-D underground structure is calculated by difference calculus under the assumption that wave propagation is described by wave equation of P wave. Although it is a weak point that FWI is easily affected by noises in an initial model and data, it is featured by high resolution of solutions. This method offers very excellent convergence as a proper initial model is used, resulting in sufficient performance, however, it is strongly affected by initial model. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Computational dynamics of acoustically-driven microsphere systems

    CERN Document Server

    Glosser, Connor A; Dault, Daniel L; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2015-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the inter-particle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of non-dissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities, and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation ...

  5. Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics: Current Status and Future Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Horst D.; VanDalsem, William R.; Dagum, Leonardo; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    One or the key objectives of the Applied Research Branch in the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division at NASA Allies Research Center is the accelerated introduction of highly parallel machines into a full operational environment. In this report we discuss the performance results obtained from the implementation of some computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications on the Connection Machine CM-2 and the Intel iPSC/860. We summarize some of the experiences made so far with the parallel testbed machines at the NAS Applied Research Branch. Then we discuss the long term computational requirements for accomplishing some of the grand challenge problems in computational aerosciences. We argue that only massively parallel machines will be able to meet these grand challenge requirements, and we outline the computer science and algorithm research challenges ahead.

  6. A Textbook for a First Course in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingg, D. W.; Pulliam, T. H.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the textbook, Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics by Lomax, Pulliam, and Zingg, which is intended for a graduate level first course in computational fluid dynamics. This textbook emphasizes fundamental concepts in developing, analyzing, and understanding numerical methods for the partial differential equations governing the physics of fluid flow. Its underlying philosophy is that the theory of linear algebra and the attendant eigenanalysis of linear systems provides a mathematical framework to describe and unify most numerical methods in common use in the field of fluid dynamics. Two linear model equations, the linear convection and diffusion equations, are used to illustrate concepts throughout. Emphasis is on the semi-discrete approach, in which the governing partial differential equations (PDE's) are reduced to systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) through a discretization of the spatial derivatives. The ordinary differential equations are then reduced to ordinary difference equations (O(Delta)E's) using a time-marching method. This methodology, using the progression from PDE through ODE's to O(Delta)E's, together with the use of the eigensystems of tridiagonal matrices and the theory of O(Delta)E's, gives the book its distinctiveness and provides a sound basis for a deep understanding of fundamental concepts in computational fluid dynamics.

  7. The method of the spatial locating of macroscopic throats based-on the inversion of dynamic interwell connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Aimin; Li, Xuyan; Yu, Miao; Li, Gangzhu; Wang, Shoulong; Peng, Ruigang; Zheng, Yawen

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a practical technique to quantitatively locate macroscopic throats between injector/producer pairs in a reservoir, considering the problems of extensively developed macroscopic throats and the low sweep efficiency of waterflooding on high water cut stage. The method combines dynamic and static data, based on the results of geological research and the inversion of dynamic interwell connectivity. This technique has implemented the spatial locating of macroscopic throats, using the data of injection/production profiles and tracer test over the years, considering the sedimentary facies of each small layer and the permeability of each sand body. The results of this work show that this method is more convenient and less expensive than previous ones. It is able to locate macroscopic throats in a reservoir accurately and quantitatively. Multiple materials ensure the accuracy of results, and this method is convenient to be applied in the oilfield.

  8. A Comparison of Closed-Loop Performance of Multirotor Configurations Using Non-Linear Dynamic Inversion Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray L. Ireland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multirotor is the umbrella term for the family of unmanned aircraft, which include the quadrotor, hexarotor and other vertical take-off and landing (VTOL aircraft that employ multiple main rotors for lift and control. Development and testing of novel multirotor designs has been aided by the proliferation of 3D printing and inexpensive flight controllers and components. Different multirotor configurations exhibit specific strengths, while presenting unique challenges with regards to design and control. This article highlights the primary differences between three multirotor platforms: a quadrotor; a fully-actuated hexarotor; and an octorotor. Each platform is modelled and then controlled using non-linear dynamic inversion. The differences in dynamics, control and performance are then discussed.

  9. Noninvasive investigation of exocrine pancreatic function: Feasibility of cine dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective inversion-recovery pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasokawa, Kazuya; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Akira; Hayashida, Minoru; Tanimoto, Daigo; Higaki, Atsushi; Noda, Yasufumi; Kido, Ayumu

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of noncontrast-enhanced cine dynamic magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) with a spatially selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse for evaluating exocrine pancreatic function in comparison with the N-benzoyl-L-tyrosyl-p-aminobenzoic acid (BT-PABA) test as a pancreatic exocrine function test. Twenty subjects with or without chronic pancreatitis were included. MRCP with a spatially selective IR pulse was repeated every 15 seconds for 5 minutes to acquire a total of 20 images (cine-dynamic MRCP). The median and mean frequency of the observation (the number of times) and the moving distance (mean secretion grading scores) of pancreatic juice inflow on cine-dynamic MRCP were compared with a BT-PABA test. The urinary PABA excretion rate (%) had significant positive correlations with both the mean secretion grade (r = 0.66, P = 0.002) and frequency of secretory inflow (r = 0.62, P = 0.004) in cine dynamic MRCP. Both the mean frequency of observations of pancreatic secretory inflow (1.4 ± 1.6 times vs. 14.3 ± 4.2 times, P Cine dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective IR pulse may have potential for estimating the pancreatic exocrine function noninvasively as a substitute for the BT-PABA test. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics 2007 : Implementations and Experiences on Large Scale and Grid Computing

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    At the 19th Annual Conference on Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics held in Antalya, Turkey, in May 2007, the most recent developments and implementations of large-scale and grid computing were presented. This book, comprised of the invited and selected papers of this conference, details those advances, which are of particular interest to CFD and CFD-related communities. It also offers the results related to applications of various scientific and engineering problems involving flows and flow-related topics. Intended for CFD researchers and graduate students, this book is a state-of-the-art presentation of the relevant methodology and implementation techniques of large-scale computing.

  11. Dynamic integration of remote cloud resources into local computing clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleig, Georg; Erli, Guenther; Giffels, Manuel; Hauth, Thomas; Quast, Guenter; Schnepf, Matthias [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In modern high-energy physics (HEP) experiments enormous amounts of data are analyzed and simulated. Traditionally dedicated HEP computing centers are built or extended to meet this steadily increasing demand for computing resources. Nowadays it is more reasonable and more flexible to utilize computing power at remote data centers providing regular cloud services to users as they can be operated in a more efficient manner. This approach uses virtualization and allows the HEP community to run virtual machines containing a dedicated operating system and transparent access to the required software stack on almost any cloud site. The dynamic management of virtual machines depending on the demand for computing power is essential for cost efficient operation and sharing of resources with other communities. For this purpose the EKP developed the on-demand cloud manager ROCED for dynamic instantiation and integration of virtualized worker nodes into the institute's computing cluster. This contribution will report on the concept of our cloud manager and the implementation utilizing a remote OpenStack cloud site and a shared HPC center (bwForCluster located in Freiburg).

  12. The Efficient Use of Vector Computers with Emphasis on Computational Fluid Dynamics : a GAMM-Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Gentzsch, Wolfgang

    1986-01-01

    The GAMM Committee for Numerical Methods in Fluid Mechanics organizes workshops which should bring together experts of a narrow field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to exchange ideas and experiences in order to speed-up the development in this field. In this sense it was suggested that a workshop should treat the solution of CFD problems on vector computers. Thus we organized a workshop with the title "The efficient use of vector computers with emphasis on computational fluid dynamics". The workshop took place at the Computing Centre of the University of Karlsruhe, March 13-15,1985. The participation had been restricted to 22 people of 7 countries. 18 papers have been presented. In the announcement of the workshop we wrote: "Fluid mechanics has actively stimulated the development of superfast vector computers like the CRAY's or CYBER 205. Now these computers on their turn stimulate the development of new algorithms which result in a high degree of vectorization (sca1ar/vectorized execution-time). But w...

  13. Neural-network-based speed controller for induction motors using inverse dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hassanein S.; Mohamed, Kamel

    2016-08-01

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are excellent tools for controller design. ANNs have many advantages compared to traditional control methods. These advantages include simple architecture, training and generalization and distortion insensitivity to nonlinear approximations and nonexact input data. Induction motors have many excellent features, such as simple and rugged construction, high reliability, high robustness, low cost, minimum maintenance, high efficiency, and good self-starting capabilities. In this paper, we propose a neural-network-based inverse model for speed controllers for induction motors. Simulation results show that the ANNs have a high tracing capability.

  14. Computer generation of robot dynamics equations and the related issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leu, M.C.; Koplik, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two programs have been developed using the computer algebra system REDUCE to generate the dynamics equations of motion for robot manipulators. One of these programs is based on a Lagrange formulation and the other utilizes a recursive Newton-Euler formulation. Both programs produce equivalent scalar symbolic expressions for the generalized actuator forces, but the program based on the recursive Newton-Euler formulation is more efficient for the generation of equations. These programs have been used to generate the dynamics equations of manipulators with as many as six degrees of freedom. 16 references.

  15. An evolutionary computational approach for the dynamic Stackelberg competition problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Arboleda-Castro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stackelberg competition models are an important family of economical decision problems from game theory, in which the main goal is to find optimal strategies between two competitors taking into account their hierarchy relationship. Although these models have been widely studied in the past, it is important to note that very few works deal with uncertainty scenarios, especially those that vary over time. In this regard, the present research studies this topic and proposes a computational method for solving efficiently dynamic Stackelberg competition models. The computational experiments suggest that the proposed approach is effective for problems of this nature.

  16. Computing the Distribution of Pareto Sums Using Laplace Transformation and Stehfest Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C. K.; Bourne, S. J.

    2017-05-01

    that is shared by the sum of an arbitrary number of such variables. The technique involves applying the Laplace transform to the normalized sum (which is simply the product of the Laplace transforms of the densities of the individual variables, with a suitable scaling of the Laplace variable), and then inverting it numerically using the Gaver-Stehfest algorithm. After validating the method using a number of test cases, it was applied to address the distribution of total seismic moment, and the quantiles computed for various numbers of seismic events were compared with those obtained in the literature using Monte Carlo simulation. Excellent agreement was obtained. As an application, the method was applied to the evolution of total seismic moment released by tremors due to gas production in the Groningen gas field in the northeastern Netherlands. The speed, accuracy and ease of implementation of the method allows the development of accurate correlations for constraining statistical seismological models using, for example, the maximum-likelihood method. It should also be of value in other natural processes governed by Pareto distributions with exponent less than unity.

  17. Walking pattern in adults with congenital hip dysplasia: 14 women examined by inverse dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Eva Natalia G.; Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjaer, T

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of the gait dynamics in patients with hip dysplasia may help to understand the consequences of the mechanical changes in the hip.......Knowledge of the gait dynamics in patients with hip dysplasia may help to understand the consequences of the mechanical changes in the hip....

  18. Recurrent Neural Network Approach Based on the Integral Representation of the Drazin Inverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanimirović, Predrag S; Živković, Ivan S; Wei, Yimin

    2015-10-01

    In this letter, we present the dynamical equation and corresponding artificial recurrent neural network for computing the Drazin inverse for arbitrary square real matrix, without any restriction on its eigenvalues. Conditions that ensure the stability of the defined recurrent neural network as well as its convergence toward the Drazin inverse are considered. Several illustrative examples present the results of computer simulations.

  19. Lily Pad: Towards Real-time Interactive Computational Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Weymouth, Gabriel D

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is now (relatively) fast and freely available, it is still amazingly difficult to use. Inaccessible software imposes a significant entry barrier on students and junior engineers, and even senior researchers spend less time developing insights and more time on software issues. Lily Pad was developed as an initial attempt to address some of these problems. The goal of Lily Pad is to lower the barrier to CFD by adopting simple high-speed methods, utilising modern programming features and environments, and giving immediate visual feed-back to the user. The resulting software focuses on the fluid dynamics instead of the computation, making it useful for both education and research. LilyPad is open source and available online at https://github.com/weymouth/lily-pad for all use under the MIT license.

  20. A Wearable Computing System for Dynamic Locating of Parking Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Damian Mrugala; Alexander Dannies; Walter Lang

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a dynamic locating system implemented in an autonomous wearable computing system for the automobile warehouse management application. Since the first prototype is developed as jacket [1], this prototype is miniaturized and therefore realized as holster which consists of several modules for identification, communication and localization. It is worn by employees during warehousing of automobiles. The modules collect data, which are used by the operating system to calculate ...

  1. Gravitation Field Calculations on a Dynamic Lattice by Distributed Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mähönen, Petri; Punkka, Veikko

    A new method of calculating numerically time evolution of a gravitational field in General Relatity is introduced. Vierbein (tetrad) formalism, dynamic lattice and massively parallelized computation are suggested as they are expected to speed up the calculations considerably and facilitate the solution of problems previously considered too hard to be solved, such as the time evolution of a system consisting of two or more black holes or the structure of worm holes.

  2. Gravitational field calculations on a dynamic lattice by distributed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mähönen, P.; Punkka, V.

    A new method of calculating numerically time evolution of a gravitational field in general relativity is introduced. Vierbein (tetrad) formalism, dynamic lattice and massively parallelized computation are suggested as they are expected to speed up the calculations considerably and facilitate the solution of problems previously considered too hard to be solved, such as the time evolution of a system consisting of two or more black holes or the structure of worm holes.

  3. Dynamic 3D computed tomography scanner for vascular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark K.; Holdsworth, David W.; Fenster, Aaron

    2000-04-01

    A 3D dynamic computed-tomography (CT) scanner was developed for imaging objects undergoing periodic motion. The scanner system has high spatial and sufficient temporal resolution to produce quantitative tomographic/volume images of objects such as excised arterial samples perfused under physiological pressure conditions and enables the measurements of the local dynamic elastic modulus (Edyn) of the arteries in the axial and longitudinal directions. The system was comprised of a high resolution modified x-ray image intensifier (XRII) based computed tomographic system and a computer-controlled cardiac flow simulator. A standard NTSC CCD camera with a macro lens was coupled to the electro-optically zoomed XRII to acquire dynamic volumetric images. Through prospective cardiac gating and computer synchronized control, a time-resolved sequence of 20 mm thick high resolution volume images of porcine aortic specimens during one simulated cardiac cycle were obtained. Performance evaluation of the scanners illustrated that tomographic images can be obtained with resolution as high as 3.2 mm-1 with only a 9% decrease in the resolution for objects moving at velocities of 1 cm/s in 2D mode and static spatial resolution of 3.55 mm-1 with only a 14% decrease in the resolution in 3D mode for objects moving at a velocity of 10 cm/s. Application of the system for imaging of intact excised arterial specimens under simulated physiological flow/pressure conditions enabled measurements of the Edyn of the arteries with a precision of +/- kPa for the 3D scanner. Evaluation of the Edyn in the axial and longitudinal direction produced values of 428 +/- 35 kPa and 728 +/- 71 kPa, demonstrating the isotropic and homogeneous viscoelastic nature of the vascular specimens. These values obtained from the Dynamic CT systems were not statistically different (p less than 0.05) from the values obtained by standard uniaxial tensile testing and volumetric measurements.

  4. Understanding the Offender/Environment Dynamic for Computer Crimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willison, Robert Andrew

    2005-01-01

    practices by possiblyhighlighting new areas for safeguard implementation. To help facilitate a greaterunderstanding of the offender/environment dynamic, this paper assesses the feasibilityof applying criminological theory to the IS security context. More specifically, threetheories are advanced, which focus......There is currently a paucity of literature focusing on the relationship between theactions of staff members, who perpetrate some form of computer abuse, and theorganisational environment in which such actions take place. A greater understandingof such a relationship may complement existing security...

  5. Using Soft Computing Technologies for the Simulation of LCAC Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    real-time, time-domain predictions of the vehicle’s dynamics as a function of the control signals given by the driver. Results are presented...free- running LCAC model, faster-than-real-time simulation, soft computing technology 1.0 INTRODUCTION The Maneuvering and Control Division (MCD...like all hovercraft , rides on a cushion of air. The air is supplied to the cushion by four centrifugal fans driven by the craft’s gas turbine

  6. Quality control of computational fluid dynamics in indoor environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Nielsen, P. V.

    2003-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used routinely to predict air movement and distributions of temperature and concentrations in indoor environments. Modelling and numerical errors are inherent in such studies and must be considered when the results are presented. Here, we discuss modelling as...... the quality of CFD calculations, as well as guidelines for the minimum information that should accompany all CFD-related publications to enable a scientific judgment of the quality of the study....

  7. Computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics around cations and anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2016-03-03

    In this paper, we present the first computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics between the first and second solvation shells around different cations and anions. After water, methanol is the most frequently used solvent for ions. Methanol has different structural and dynamical properties than water, so its ion solvation process is different. To this end, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using polarizable potential models to describe methanol-methanol and ion-methanol interactions. In particular, we computed methanol exchange rates by employing the transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux approach, and the Grote-Hynes theory. We observed that methanol exchange occurs at a nanosecond time scale for Na+ and at a picosecond time scale for other ions. We also observed a trend in which, for like charges, the exchange rate is slower for smaller ions because they are more strongly bound to methanol. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  8. A computer code for forward calculation and inversion of the H/V spectral ratio under the diffuse field assumption

    CERN Document Server

    García-Jerez, Antonio; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J; Luzón, Francisco; Perton, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    During a quarter of a century, the main characteristics of the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio of ambient noise HVSRN have been extensively used for site effect assessment. In spite of the uncertainties about the optimum theoretical model to describe these observations, several schemes for inversion of the full HVSRN curve for near surface surveying have been developed over the last decade. In this work, a computer code for forward calculation of H/V spectra based on the diffuse field assumption (DFA) is presented and tested.It takes advantage of the recently stated connection between the HVSRN and the elastodynamic Green's function which arises from the ambient noise interferometry theory. The algorithm allows for (1) a natural calculation of the Green's functions imaginary parts by using suitable contour integrals in the complex wavenumber plane, and (2) separate calculation of the contributions of Rayleigh, Love, P-SV and SH waves as well. The stability of the algorithm at high frequencies is preserv...

  9. Dynamic Source Inversion of an Intraslab Earthquake: a Slow and Inefficient Rupture with Large Stress Drop and Radiated Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Diaz-Mojica, J.; Madariaga, R. I.; Singh, S. K.; Tago Pacheco, J.; Iglesias, A.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a method for imaging the earthquake source dynamics through the inversion of ground motion records based on a parallel genetic algorithm. The source model follows an elliptical patch approach and uses the staggered-grid split-node method to model the earthquake dynamics. A statistical analysis is used to estimate uncertainties in both inverted and derived source parameters. Synthetic inversion tests reveal that the rupture speed (Vr), the rupture area and the stress drop (Δτ) are determined within an error of ~30%, ~12% and ~10%, respectively. In contrast, derived parameters such as the radiated energy (Er), the radiation efficiency (η) and the fracture energy (G) have larger uncertainties, around ~70%, ~40% and ~25%, respectively. We applied the method to the Mw6.5 intermediate-depth (62 km) normal-faulting earthquake of December 11, 2011 in Guerrero, Mexico (Diaz-Mojica et al., JGR, 2014). Inferred values of Δτ = 29.2±6.2 MPa and η = 0.26±0.1 are significantly higher and lower, respectively, than those of typical subduction thrust events. Fracture energy is large, so that more than 73% of the available potential energy for the dynamic process of faulting was deposited in the focal region (i.e., G = (14.4±3.5)x1014J), producing a slow rupture process (Vr/Vs = 0.47±0.09) despite the relatively-high energy radiation (Er = (0.54±0.31)x1015 J) and energy-moment ratio (Er/M0 = 5.7x10-5). It is interesting to point out that such a slow and inefficient rupture along with the large stress drop in a small focal region are features also observed in the 1994 deep Bolivian earthquake.

  10. Adaptive thermo-fluid moving boundary computations for interfacial dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih-Kuang Kuan; Jaeheon Sim; Wei Shyy

    2012-01-01

    In this study,we present adaptive moving boundary computation technique with parallel implementation on a distributed memory multi-processor system for large scale thermo-fluid and interfacial flow computations.The solver utilizes Eulerian-Lagrangian method to track moving (Lagrangian) interfaces explicitly on the stationary (Eulerian)Cartesian grid where the flow fields are computed. We address the domain decomposition strategies of EulerianLagrangian method by illustrating its intricate complexity of the computation involved on two different spaces interactively and consequently,and then propose a trade-off approach aiming for parallel scalability.Spatial domain decomposition is adopted for both Eulerian and Lagrangian domain due to easy load balancing and data locality for minimum communication between processors.In addition,parallel cell-based unstructured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR)technique is implemented for the flexible local refinement and even-distributed computational workload among processors.Selected cases are presented to highlight the computational capabilities,including Faraday type interfacial waves with capillary and gravitational forcing,flows around varied geometric configurations and induced by boundary conditions and/or body forces,and thermo-fluid dynamics with phase change.With the aid of the present techniques,large scale challenging moving boundary problems can be effectively addressed.

  11. Dynamic analysis of spur gears using computer program DANST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Lin, Hsiang H.; Liou, Chuen-Huei; Valco, Mark J.

    1993-06-01

    DANST is a computer program for static and dynamic analysis of spur gear systems. The program can be used for parametric studies to predict the effect on dynamic load and tooth bending stress of spur gears due to operating speed, torque, stiffness, damping, inertia, and tooth profile. DANST performs geometric modeling and dynamic analysis for low- or high-contact-ratio spur gears. DANST can simulate gear systems with contact ratio ranging from one to three. It was designed to be easy to use, and it is extensively documented by comments in the source code. This report describes the installation and use of DANST. It covers input data requirements and presents examples. The report also compares DANST predictions for gear tooth loads and bending stress to experimental and finite element results.

  12. Computational complexity of symbolic dynamics at the onset of chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakdawala, Porus

    1996-05-01

    In a variety of studies of dynamical systems, the edge of order and chaos has been singled out as a region of complexity. It was suggested by Wolfram, on the basis of qualitative behavior of cellular automata, that the computational basis for modeling this region is the universal Turing machine. In this paper, following a suggestion of Crutchfield, we try to show that the Turing machine model may often be too powerful as a computational model to describe the boundary of order and chaos. In particular we study the region of the first accumulation of period doubling in unimodal and bimodal maps of the interval, from the point of view of language theory. We show that in relation to the ``extended'' Chomsky hierarchy, the relevant computational model in the unimodal case is the nested stack automaton or the related indexed languages, while the bimodal case is modeled by the linear bounded automaton or the related context-sensitive languages.

  13. Finite element dynamic analysis on CDC STAR-100 computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K.; Lambiotte, J. J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Computational algorithms are presented for the finite element dynamic analysis of structures on the CDC STAR-100 computer. The spatial behavior is described using higher-order finite elements. The temporal behavior is approximated by using either the central difference explicit scheme or Newmark's implicit scheme. In each case the analysis is broken up into a number of basic macro-operations. Discussion is focused on the organization of the computation and the mode of storage of different arrays to take advantage of the STAR pipeline capability. The potential of the proposed algorithms is discussed and CPU times are given for performing the different macro-operations for a shell modeled by higher order composite shallow shell elements having 80 degrees of freedom.

  14. Dynamical barrier and isotope effects in the simplest substitution reaction via Walden inversion mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Zhaojun; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H

    2017-02-22

    Reactions occurring at a carbon atom through the Walden inversion mechanism are one of the most important and useful classes of reactions in chemistry. Here we report an accurate theoretical study of the simplest reaction of that type: the H+CH4 substitution reaction and its isotope analogues. It is found that the reaction threshold versus collision energy is considerably higher than the barrier height. The reaction exhibits a strong normal secondary isotope effect on the cross-sections measured above the reaction threshold, and a small but reverse secondary kinetic isotope effect at room temperature. Detailed analysis reveals that the reaction proceeds along a path with a higher barrier height instead of the minimum-energy path because the umbrella angle of the non-reacting methyl group cannot change synchronously with the other reaction coordinates during the reaction due to insufficient energy transfer from the translational motion to the umbrella mode.

  15. Leader Follower Formation Control of Ground Vehicles Using Dynamic Pixel Count and Inverse Perspective Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.Vaitheeswarana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with leader-follower formations of non-holonomic mobile robots, introducing a formation control strategy based on pixel counts using a commercial grade electro optics camera. Localization of the leader for motions along line of sight as well as the obliquely inclined directions are considered based on pixel variation of the images by referencing to two arbitrarily designated positions in the image frames. Based on an established relationship between the displacement of the camera movement along the viewing direction and the difference in pixel counts between reference points in the images, the range and the angle estimate between the follower camera and the leader is calculated. The Inverse Perspective Transform is used to account for non linear relationship between the height of vehicle in a forward facing image and its distance from the camera. The formulation is validated with experiments.

  16. The inverse hall-petch relation in nanocrystalline metals: A discrete dislocation dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Siu Sin; Chooi, Zheng Hoe; Wu, Zhaoxuan; Zhang, Yong Wei; Srolovitz, David J.

    2016-03-01

    When the grain size in polycrystalline materials is reduced to the nanometer length scale (nanocrystallinity), observations from experiments and atomistic simulations suggest that the yield strength decreases (softening) as the grain size is decreased. This is in contrast to the Hall-Petch relation observed in larger sized grains. We incorporated grain boundary (GB) sliding and dislocation emission from GB junctions into the classical DDD framework, and recovered the smaller is weaker relationship observed in nanocrystalline materials. This current model shows that the inverse Hall-Petch behavior can be obtained through a relief of stress buildup at GB junctions from GB sliding by emitting dislocations from the junctions. The yield stress is shown to vary with grain size, d, by a d 1 / 2 relationship when grain sizes are very small. However, pure GB sliding alone without further plastic accomodation by dislocation emission is grain size independent.

  17. 基于MATLAB的间接逆子结构动态分析软件实现%Software Implementation of Indirect Inverse Sub-structure Dynamic Analysis Based on MATLAB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周斌; 吕广庆; 江满华

    2013-01-01

    Inverse sub-structure dynamic analysis of structural dynamics is a technical theory and analysis method recently developed,but it requires large amounts of data for analysis and calculation.In order to analysis efficiently,here comes the development of a indirect inverse sub-structure dynamic quality detection software.Calculated based on the the indirect inverse sub-structure theory,based on the indirect inverse sub the discretization packaging coupled dynamic stiffness structural analysis calculation method and mode shapes combined method.Using Matlab graphical user interface (GUI),data importing,processing,mapping and other operations can be easily implemented,while the use of Matlab powerful matrix computing power to quickly calculate the required results for professionals to analyze.%逆子结构动态分析是结构动力学的新近发展的一项技术理论和分析方法,但逆子结构动态分析需要对大量的数据进行分析计算.为了更有效率地分析,开发了间接逆子结构动态质量检测技术软件.基于间接逆子结构理论,依据离散化包装耦合体动刚度的间接逆子结构分析计算方法和振型组合方法进行计算.利用Matlab的图形用户界面(GUI),可以方便地实现对数据的导入、处理、作图等操作,同时利用Matlab强大的矩阵运算能力,快速地计算出所需要的结果以供专业人员分析使用.

  18. Sliding Mode Control for Mass Moment Aerospace Vehicles Using Dynamic Inversion Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The moving mass actuation technique offers significant advantages over conventional aerodynamic control surfaces and reaction control systems, because the actuators are contained entirely within the airframe geometrical envelope. Modeling, control, and simulation of Mass Moment Aerospace Vehicles (MMAV utilizing moving mass actuators are discussed. Dynamics of the MMAV are separated into two parts on the basis of the two time-scale separation theory: the dynamics of fast state and the dynamics of slow state. And then, in order to restrain the system chattering and keep the track performance of the system by considering aerodynamic parameter perturbation, the flight control system is designed for the two subsystems, respectively, utilizing fuzzy sliding mode control approach. The simulation results describe the effectiveness of the proposed autopilot design approach. Meanwhile, the chattering phenomenon that frequently appears in the conventional variable structure systems is also eliminated without deteriorating the system robustness.

  19. Thermal Diagnostics with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory: A Validated Method for Differential Emission Measure Inversions

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Mark C M; Schrijver, C J; Testa, P; Chen, F; Peter, H; Malanushenko, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method for performing differential emission measure (DEM) inversions on narrow-band EUV images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The method yields positive definite DEM solutions by solving a linear program. This method has been validated against a diverse set of thermal models of varying complexity and realism. These include (1) idealized gaussian DEM distributions, (2) 3D models of NOAA Active Region 11158 comprising quasi-steady loop atmospheres in a non-linear force-free field, and (3) thermodynamic models from a fully-compressible, 3D MHD simulation of AR corona formation following magnetic flux emergence. We then present results from the application of the method to AIA observations of Active Region 11158, comparing the region's thermal structure on two successive solar rotations. Additionally, we show how the DEM inversion method can be adapted to simultaneously invert AIA and XRT data, and how supplementing AIA data with the latt...

  20. Applications of multiscale waveform inversion to marine data using a flooding technique and dynamic early-arrival windows

    KAUST Repository

    Boonyasiriwat, Chaiwoot

    2010-11-01

    A recently developed time-domain multiscale waveform tomography (MWT) method is applied to synthetic and field marine data. Although the MWT method was already applied to synthetic data, the synthetic data application leads to a development of a hybrid method between waveform tomography and the salt flooding technique commonly use in subsalt imaging. This hybrid method can overcome a convergence problem encountered by inversion with a traveltime velocity tomogram and successfully provides an accurate and highly resolved velocity tomogram for the 2D SEG/EAGE salt model. In the application of MWT to the field data, the inversion process is carried out using a multiscale method with a dynamic early-arrival muting window to mitigate the local minima problem of waveform tomography and elastic effects. With the modified MWT method, reasonably accurate results as verified by comparison of migration images and common image gathers were obtained. The hybrid method with the salt flooding technique is not used in this field data example because there is no salt in the subsurface according to our interpretation. However, we believe it is applicable to field data applications. © 2010 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  1. All-electrical detection of spin dynamics in magnetic antidot lattices by the inverse spin Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungfleisch, Matthias B., E-mail: jungfleisch@anl.gov; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Junjia; Jiang, Wanjun; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Sklenar, Joseph [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Ketterson, John B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The understanding of spin dynamics in laterally confined structures on sub-micron length scales has become a significant aspect of the development of novel magnetic storage technologies. Numerous ferromagnetic resonance measurements, optical characterization by Kerr microscopy and Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy, and x-ray studies were carried out to detect the dynamics in patterned magnetic antidot lattices. Here, we investigate Oersted-field driven spin dynamics in rectangular Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}/Pt antidot lattices with different lattice parameters by electrical means and compare them to micromagnetic simulations. When the system is driven to resonance, a dc voltage across the length of the sample is detected that changes its sign upon field reversal, which is in agreement with a rectification mechanism based on the inverse spin Hall effect. Furthermore, we show that the voltage output scales linearly with the applied microwave drive in the investigated range of powers. Our findings have direct implications on the development of engineered magnonics applications and devices.

  2. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, Paul

    2012-01-01

    -to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system. The dosimetric results were evaluated using gamma index evaluation with static target measurements as reference. Results: The plan quality......Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced...... on the dosimetric accuracy of MLC tracking delivery. Specifically, the possibility of predicting the accuracy of MLC tracking delivery based on the plan modulation was investigated. Methods: Inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans were created on CT-data of three lung cancer patients. For each case, five plans...

  3. Toroidal Interaction and Propeller Chirality of Hexaarylbenzenes. Dynamic Domino Inversion Revealed by Combined Experimental and Theoretical Circular Dichroism Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Tomoyo; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Mori, Tadashi

    2016-03-01

    Hexaarylbenzenes (HABs) have greatly attracted much attention due to their unique propeller-shaped structure and potential application in materials science, such as liquid crystals, molecular capsules/rotors, redox materials, nonlinear optical materials, as well as molecular wires. Less attention has however been paid to their propeller chirality. By introducing small point-chiral group(s) at the periphery of HABs, propeller chirality was effectively induced, provoking strong Cotton effects in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum. Temperature and solvent polarity manipulate the dynamics of propeller inversion in solution. As such, whizzing toroids become more substantial in polar solvents and at an elevated temperature, where radial aromatic rings (propeller blades) prefer orthogonal alignment against the central benzene ring (C6 core), maximizing toroidal interactions.

  4. Decoupling Jupiter's deep and atmospheric flows using the upcoming Juno gravity measurements and a dynamical inverse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2017-04-01

    Observations of the flow on Jupiter exists essentially only for the cloud-level, which is dominated by strong east-west jet-streams. These have been suggested to result from dynamics in a superficial thin weather-layer, or alternatively be a manifestation of deep interior cylindrical flows. However, it is possible that the observed wind is indeed superficial, yet there exists a completely decoupled deep flow. To date, all models linking the wind, via the induced density anomalies, to the gravity field, to be measured by Juno, consider only flow that is a projection of the observed cloud-level wind. Here we explore the possibility of complex wind dynamics that include both the shallow weather-layer wind, and a deep flow that is decoupled from the flow above it. The upper flow is based on the observed cloud-level flow and is set to decay with depth. The deep flow is constructed to produce cylindrical structures with variable width and magnitude, thus allowing for a wide range of possible scenarios for the unknown deep flow. The combined flow is then related to the density anomalies and gravitational moments via a dynamical model. An adjoint inverse model is used for optimizing the parameters controlling the setup of the deep and surface-bound flows, so that these flows can be reconstructed given a gravity field. We show that the model can be used for examination of various scenarios, including cases in which the deep flow is dominating over the surface wind, and discuss the uncertainties associated with the model solution. The flexibility of the adjoint method allows for a wide range of dynamical setups, so that when new observations and physical understanding will arise, these constraints could be easily implemented and used to better decipher Jupiter flow dynamics.

  5. A computational procedure for the dynamics of flexible beams within multibody systems. Ph.D. Thesis Final Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, Janice Diane

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic analysis of three dimensional elastic beams which experience large rotational and large deformational motions are examined. The beam motion is modeled using an inertial reference for the translational displacements and a body-fixed reference for the rotational quantities. Finite strain rod theories are then defined in conjunction with the beam kinematic description which accounts for the effects of stretching, bending, torsion, and transverse shear deformations. A convected coordinate representation of the Cauchy stress tensor and a conjugate strain definition is introduced to model the beam deformation. To treat the beam dynamics, a two-stage modification of the central difference algorithm is presented to integrate the translational coordinates and the angular velocity vector. The angular orientation is then obtained from the application of an implicit integration algorithm to the Euler parameter/angular velocity kinematical relation. The combined developments of the objective internal force computation with the dynamic solution procedures result in the computational preservation of total energy for undamped systems. The present methodology is also extended to model the dynamics of deployment/retrieval of the flexible members. A moving spatial grid corresponding to the configuration of a deployed rigid beam is employed as a reference for the dynamic variables. A transient integration scheme which accurately accounts for the deforming spatial grid is derived from a space-time finite element discretization of a Hamiltonian variational statement. The computational results of this general deforming finite element beam formulation are compared to reported results for a planar inverse-spaghetti problem.

  6. Insights from molecular dynamics simulations for computational protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Matthew Carter; Daggett, Valerie

    2017-02-01

    A grand challenge in the field of structural biology is to design and engineer proteins that exhibit targeted functions. Although much success on this front has been achieved, design success rates remain low, an ever-present reminder of our limited understanding of the relationship between amino acid sequences and the structures they adopt. In addition to experimental techniques and rational design strategies, computational methods have been employed to aid in the design and engineering of proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) is one such method that simulates the motions of proteins according to classical dynamics. Here, we review how insights into protein dynamics derived from MD simulations have influenced the design of proteins. One of the greatest strengths of MD is its capacity to reveal information beyond what is available in the static structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. In this regard simulations can be used to directly guide protein design by providing atomistic details of the dynamic molecular interactions contributing to protein stability and function. MD simulations can also be used as a virtual screening tool to rank, select, identify, and assess potential designs. MD is uniquely poised to inform protein design efforts where the application requires realistic models of protein dynamics and atomic level descriptions of the relationship between dynamics and function. Here, we review cases where MD simulations was used to modulate protein stability and protein function by providing information regarding the conformation(s), conformational transitions, interactions, and dynamics that govern stability and function. In addition, we discuss cases where conformations from protein folding/unfolding simulations have been exploited for protein design, yielding novel outcomes that could not be obtained from static structures.

  7. Analog computation through high-dimensional physical chaotic neuro-dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horio, Yoshihiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Conventional von Neumann computers have difficulty in solving complex and ill-posed real-world problems. However, living organisms often face such problems in real life, and must quickly obtain suitable solutions through physical, dynamical, and collective computations involving vast assemblies of neurons. These highly parallel computations through high-dimensional dynamics (computation through dynamics) are completely different from the numerical computations on von Neumann computers (computation through algorithms). In this paper, we explore a novel computational mechanism with high-dimensional physical chaotic neuro-dynamics. We physically constructed two hardware prototypes using analog chaotic-neuron integrated circuits. These systems combine analog computations with chaotic neuro-dynamics and digital computation through algorithms. We used quadratic assignment problems (QAPs) as benchmarks. The first prototype utilizes an analog chaotic neural network with 800-dimensional dynamics. An external algorithm constructs a solution for a QAP using the internal dynamics of the network. In the second system, 300-dimensional analog chaotic neuro-dynamics drive a tabu-search algorithm. We demonstrate experimentally that both systems efficiently solve QAPs through physical chaotic dynamics. We also qualitatively analyze the underlying mechanism of the highly parallel and collective analog computations by observing global and local dynamics. Furthermore, we introduce spatial and temporal mutual information to quantitatively evaluate the system dynamics. The experimental results confirm the validity and efficiency of the proposed computational paradigm with the physical analog chaotic neuro-dynamics.

  8. Inverse dynamics of underactuated mechanical systems: A simple case study and experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blajer, W.; Dziewiecki, K.; Kołodziejczyk, K.; Mazur, Z.

    2011-05-01

    Underactuated systems are featured by fewer control inputs than the degrees-of-freedom, m system to complete a set of m specified motion tasks is a challenging task, and the explicit solution existence is conditioned to differential flatness of the problem. The flatness-based solution denotes that all the 2 n states and m control inputs can be algebraically expressed in terms of the m specified outputs and their time derivatives up to a certain order, which is in practice attainable only for simple systems. In this contribution the problem is posed in a more practical way as a set of index-three differential-algebraic equations, and the solution is obtained numerically. The formulation is then illustrated by a two-degree-of-freedom underactuated system composed of two rotating discs connected by a torsional spring, in which the pre-specified motion of one of the discs is actuated by the torque applied to the other disc, n = 2 and m = 1. Experimental verification of the inverse simulation control methodology is reported.

  9. Adaptive Inverse Hyperbolic Tangent Algorithm for Dynamic Contrast Adjustment in Displaying Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chein-I Chang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast has a great influence on the quality of an image in human visual perception. A poorly illuminated environment can significantly affect the contrast ratio, producing an unexpected image. This paper proposes an Adaptive Inverse Hyperbolic Tangent (AIHT algorithm to improve the display quality and contrast of a scene. Because digital cameras must maintain the shadow in a middle range of luminance that includes a main object such as a face, a gamma function is generally used for this purpose. However, this function has a severe weakness in that it decreases highlight contrast. To mitigate this problem, contrast enhancement algorithms have been designed to adjust contrast to tune human visual perception. The proposed AIHT determines the contrast levels of an original image as well as parameter space for different contrast types so that not only the original histogram shape features can be preserved, but also the contrast can be enhanced effectively. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is capable of enhancing the global contrast of the original image adaptively while extruding the details of objects simultaneously.

  10. Adaptive Inverse Hyperbolic Tangent Algorithm for Dynamic Contrast Adjustment in Displaying Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chuin-Mu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Contrast has a great influence on the quality of an image in human visual perception. A poorly illuminated environment can significantly affect the contrast ratio, producing an unexpected image. This paper proposes an Adaptive Inverse Hyperbolic Tangent (AIHT algorithm to improve the display quality and contrast of a scene. Because digital cameras must maintain the shadow in a middle range of luminance that includes a main object such as a face, a gamma function is generally used for this purpose. However, this function has a severe weakness in that it decreases highlight contrast. To mitigate this problem, contrast enhancement algorithms have been designed to adjust contrast to tune human visual perception. The proposed AIHT determines the contrast levels of an original image as well as parameter space for different contrast types so that not only the original histogram shape features can be preserved, but also the contrast can be enhanced effectively. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is capable of enhancing the global contrast of the original image adaptively while extruding the details of objects simultaneously.

  11. Applications of Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.

    2004-01-01

    Initial steps in the application o f a low-order panel method computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code to the calculation of aircraft dynamic stability and control (S&C) derivatives are documented. Several capabilities, unique to CFD but not unique to this particular demonstration, are identified and demonstrated in this paper. These unique capabilities complement conventional S&C techniques and they include the ability to: 1) perform maneuvers without the flow-kinematic restrictions and support interference commonly associated with experimental S&C facilities, 2) easily simulate advanced S&C testing techniques, 3) compute exact S&C derivatives with uncertainty propagation bounds, and 4) alter the flow physics associated with a particular testing technique from those observed in a wind or water tunnel test in order to isolate effects. Also presented are discussions about some computational issues associated with the simulation of S&C tests and selected results from numerous surface grid resolution studies performed during the course of the study.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme 1995- 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haekkinen, R.J.; Hirsch, C.; Krause, E.; Kytoemaa, H.K. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The report is a mid-term evaluation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme started by Technology Development Centre Finland (TEKES) in 1995 as a five-year initiative to be concluded in 1999. The main goal of the programme is to increase the know-how and application of CFD in Finnish industry, to coordinate and thus provide a better basis for co-operation between national CFD activities and encouraging research laboratories and industry to establish co-operation with the international CFD community. The projects of the programme focus on the following areas: (1) studies of modeling the physics and dynamics of the behaviour of fluid material, (2) expressing the physical models in a numerical mode and developing a computer codes, (3) evaluating and testing current physical models and developing new ones, (4) developing new numerical algorithms, solvers, and pre- and post-processing software, and (5) applying the new computational tools to problems relevant to their ultimate industrial use. The report consists of two sections. The first considers issues concerning the whole programme and the second reviews each project

  13. Inversion for Refractivity Parameters Using a Dynamic Adaptive Cuckoo Search with Crossover Operator Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihua; Sheng, Zheng; Shi, Hanqing; Fan, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Using the RFC technique to estimate refractivity parameters is a complex nonlinear optimization problem. In this paper, an improved cuckoo search (CS) algorithm is proposed to deal with this problem. To enhance the performance of the CS algorithm, a parameter dynamic adaptive operation and crossover operation were integrated into the standard CS (DACS-CO). Rechenberg's 1/5 criteria combined with learning factor were used to control the parameter dynamic adaptive adjusting process. The crossover operation of genetic algorithm was utilized to guarantee the population diversity. The new hybrid algorithm has better local search ability and contributes to superior performance. To verify the ability of the DACS-CO algorithm to estimate atmospheric refractivity parameters, the simulation data and real radar clutter data are both implemented. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the DACS-CO algorithm can provide an effective method for near-real-time estimation of the atmospheric refractivity profile from radar clutter.

  14. Inversion for Refractivity Parameters Using a Dynamic Adaptive Cuckoo Search with Crossover Operator Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the RFC technique to estimate refractivity parameters is a complex nonlinear optimization problem. In this paper, an improved cuckoo search (CS algorithm is proposed to deal with this problem. To enhance the performance of the CS algorithm, a parameter dynamic adaptive operation and crossover operation were integrated into the standard CS (DACS-CO. Rechenberg’s 1/5 criteria combined with learning factor were used to control the parameter dynamic adaptive adjusting process. The crossover operation of genetic algorithm was utilized to guarantee the population diversity. The new hybrid algorithm has better local search ability and contributes to superior performance. To verify the ability of the DACS-CO algorithm to estimate atmospheric refractivity parameters, the simulation data and real radar clutter data are both implemented. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the DACS-CO algorithm can provide an effective method for near-real-time estimation of the atmospheric refractivity profile from radar clutter.

  15. Modeling Dynamic Programming Problems over Sequences and Trees with Inverse Coupled Rewrite Systems

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Dynamic programming is a classical algorithmic paradigm, which often allows the evaluation of a search space of exponential size in polynomial time. Recursive problem decomposition, tabulation of intermediate results for re-use, and Bellman's Principle of Optimality are its well-understood ingredients. However, algorithms often lack abstraction and are difficult to implement, tedious to debug, and delicate to modify. The present article proposes a generic framework for...

  16. Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo Simulations, and Langevin Dynamics: A Computational Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Paquet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Macromolecular structures, such as neuraminidases, hemagglutinins, and monoclonal antibodies, are not rigid entities. Rather, they are characterised by their flexibility, which is the result of the interaction and collective motion of their constituent atoms. This conformational diversity has a significant impact on their physicochemical and biological properties. Among these are their structural stability, the transport of ions through the M2 channel, drug resistance, macromolecular docking, binding energy, and rational epitope design. To assess these properties and to calculate the associated thermodynamical observables, the conformational space must be efficiently sampled and the dynamic of the constituent atoms must be simulated. This paper presents algorithms and techniques that address the abovementioned issues. To this end, a computational review of molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, Langevin dynamics, and free energy calculation is presented. The exposition is made from first principles to promote a better understanding of the potentialities, limitations, applications, and interrelations of these computational methods.

  17. SciDAC Advances and Applications in Computational Beam Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryne, R.; Abell, D.; Adelmann, A.; Amundson, J.; Bohn, C.; Cary, J.; Colella, P.; Dechow, D.; Decyk, V.; Dragt, A.; Gerber, R.; Habib, S.; Higdon, D.; Katsouleas, T.; Ma, K.-L.; McCorquodale, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Mitchell, C.; Mori, W.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neri, F.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Samulyak, R.; Serafini, D.; Shalf, J.; Siegerist, C.; Spentzouris, P.; Stoltz, P.; Terzic, B.; Venturini, M.; Walstrom, P.

    2005-06-26

    SciDAC has had a major impact on computational beam dynamics and the design of particle accelerators. Particle accelerators--which account for half of the facilities in the DOE Office of Science Facilities for the Future of Science 20 Year Outlook--are crucial for US scientific, industrial, and economic competitiveness. Thanks to SciDAC, accelerator design calculations that were once thought impossible are now carried routinely, and new challenging and important calculations are within reach. SciDAC accelerator modeling codes are being used to get the most science out of existing facilities, to produce optimal designs for future facilities, and to explore advanced accelerator concepts that may hold the key to qualitatively new ways of accelerating charged particle beams. In this poster we present highlights from the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project Beam Dynamics focus area in regard to algorithm development, software development, and applications.

  18. SciDAC advances and applications in computational beam dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryne, R [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Abell, D [Tech-X Corporation (United States); Adelmann, A [Paul Scherrer Institute, (Switzerland); Amundson, J [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (United States); Bohn, C [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (United States); Cary, J [Tech-X Corporation (United States); Colella, P [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Dechow, D [Tech-X Corporation (United States); Decyk, V [University of California at Los Angeles (United States); Dragt, A [University of Maryland (United States); Gerber, R [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Habib, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Higdon, D [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Katsouleas, T [University of Southern California (United States); Ma, K-L [University of California at Davis (United States); McCorquodale, P [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Mihalcea, D [Northern Illinois University (United States); Mitchell, C [University of Maryland (United States); Mori, W [University of California at Los Angeles (United States); Mottershead, C T [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Neri, F [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Pogorelov, I [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Qiang, J [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Samulyak, R [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Serafini, D [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Shalf, J [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Siegerist, C [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Spentzouris, P [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (United States); Stoltz, P [Tech-X Corporation (United States); Terzic, B [Northern Illinois University (United States); Venturini, M [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Walstrom, P [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

    2005-01-01

    SciDAC has had a major impact on computational beam dynamics and the design of particle accelerators. Particle accelerators-which account for half of the facilities in the DOE Office of Science Facilities for the Future of Science 20 Year Outlook-are crucial for US scientific, industrial, and economic competitiveness. Thanks to SciDAC, accelerator design calculations that were once thought impossible are now carried routinely, and new challenging and important calculations are within reach. SciDAC accelerator modeling codes are being used to get the most science out of existing facilities, to produce optimal designs for future facilities, and to explore advanced accelerator concepts that may hold the key to qualitatively new ways of accelerating charged particle beams. In this paper we present highlights from the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project Beam Dynamics focus area in regard to algorithm development, software development, and applications.

  19. Theoretical and computational dynamics of a compressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Shih-I; Luo, Shijun

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the theoretical and computational fluid dynamics of a compressible fluid is presented. The general topics addressed include: thermodynamics and physical properties of compressible fluids; 1D flow of an inviscid compressible fluid; shock waves; fundamental equations of the dynamics of a compressible inviscid non-heat-conducting and radiating fluid, method of small perturbations, linearized theory; 2D subsonic steady potential flow; hodograph and rheograph methods, exact solutions of 2D insentropic steady flow equations, 2D steady transonic and hypersonic flows, method of characteristics, linearized theory of 3D potential flow, nonlinear theory of 3D compressibe flow, anisentropic (rotational) flow of inviscid compressible fluid, electromagnetogasdynamics, multiphase flows, flows of a compressible fluid with transport phenomena.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Multiphase Flow in Structured Packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Shojaee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A volume of fluid multiphase flow model was used to investigate the effective area and the created liquid film in the structured packings. The computational results revealed that the gas and liquid flow rates play significant roles in the effective interfacial area of the packing. In particular, the effective area increases as the flow rates of both phases increase. Numerical results were compared with the Brunazzi and SRP models, and a good agreement between them was found. Attention was given to the process of liquid film formation in both two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D models. The current study revealed that computational fluid dynamics (CFD can be used as an effective tool to provide information on the details of gas and liquid flows in complex packing geometries.

  1. Computational methods of the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohl, W.R.; Wilhelm, D.; Parker, F.R.; Berthier, J.; Maudlin, P.J.; Schmuck, P.; Goutagny, L.; Ichikawa, S.; Ninokata, H.; Luck, L.B.

    1987-01-01

    To more accurately treat severe accidents in fast reactors, a program has been set up to investigate new computational models and approaches. The product of this effort is a computer code, the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model (AFDM). This paper describes some of the basic features of the numerical algorithm used in AFDM. Aspects receiving particular emphasis are the fractional-step method of time integration, the semi-implicit pressure iteration, the virtual mass inertial terms, the use of three velocity fields, higher order differencing, convection of interfacial area with source and sink terms, multicomponent diffusion processes in heat and mass transfer, the SESAME equation of state, and vectorized programming. A calculated comparison with an isothermal tetralin/ammonia experiment is performed. We conclude that significant improvements are possible in reliably calculating the progression of severe accidents with further development.

  2. Dynamic computing resource allocation in online flood monitoring and prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchar, S.; Podhoranyi, M.; Vavrik, R.; Portero, A.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents tools and methodologies for dynamic allocation of high performance computing resources during operation of the Floreon+ online flood monitoring and prediction system. The resource allocation is done throughout the execution of supported simulations to meet the required service quality levels for system operation. It also ensures flexible reactions to changing weather and flood situations, as it is not economically feasible to operate online flood monitoring systems in the full performance mode during non-flood seasons. Different service quality levels are therefore described for different flooding scenarios, and the runtime manager controls them by allocating only minimal resources currently expected to meet the deadlines. Finally, an experiment covering all presented aspects of computing resource allocation in rainfall-runoff and Monte Carlo uncertainty simulation is performed for the area of the Moravian-Silesian region in the Czech Republic.

  3. Use of computational fluid dynamics in respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Tena, Ana; Casan Clarà, Pere

    2015-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a computer-based tool for simulating fluid movement. The main advantages of CFD over other fluid mechanics studies include: substantial savings in time and cost, the analysis of systems or conditions that are very difficult to simulate experimentally (as is the case of the airways), and a practically unlimited level of detail. We used the Ansys-Fluent CFD program to develop a conducting airway model to simulate different inspiratory flow rates and the deposition of inhaled particles of varying diameters, obtaining results consistent with those reported in the literature using other procedures. We hope this approach will enable clinicians to further individualize the treatment of different respiratory diseases.

  4. Data Point Averaging for Computational Fluid Dynamics Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Jr., David (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system and method for generating fluid flow parameter data for use in aerodynamic heating analysis. Computational fluid dynamics data is generated for a number of points in an area on a surface to be analyzed. Sub-areas corresponding to areas of the surface for which an aerodynamic heating analysis is to be performed are identified. A computer system automatically determines a sub-set of the number of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas and determines a value for each of the number of sub-areas using the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The value is determined as an average of the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The resulting parameter values then may be used to perform an aerodynamic heating analysis.

  5. Dynamic ADI computations of thermoelastic stresses in crystalline laser media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelinas, R.J.; Doss, S.K.; Carlson, N.N.

    1985-01-01

    This article considers thermoelastic effects which influence both the thermal engineering design and optical propagation in solid state high average power laser (HAPL) systems. The methods and computations described here have been developed for applications, ultimately, to crystalline slabs with arbitrary symmetry properties and with arbitrary spatial orientations between crystalline axes and slab configurations. For this, accurate numerical solutions are required simultaneously for the heat equation and Hooke's law in thier most general tensor forms. Prompted by the optical problem requirements in HAPL systems, this work utilizes implementations of Eulerian discretizations and dynamic ADI methods for solving general fourth-order elliptic partial differential equations (PDE's) which describe stress potentials in anisotropic media. These formulations can provide both steady state and transient PDE solutions. This article concludes with computed results for trigonal Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ crystal deformations in various crystal axes/slab orientations.

  6. Adaptive Dynamic Process Scheduling on Distributed Memory Parallel Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shu

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges in programming distributed memory parallel machines is deciding how to allocate work to processors. This problem is particularly important for computations with unpredictable dynamic behaviors or irregular structures. We present a scheme for dynamic scheduling of medium-grained processes that is useful in this context. The adaptive contracting within neighborhood (ACWN is a dynamic, distributed, load-dependent, and scalable scheme. It deals with dynamic and unpredictable creation of processes and adapts to different systems. The scheme is described and contrasted with two other schemes that have been proposed in this context, namely the randomized allocation and the gradient model. The performance of the three schemes on an Intel iPSC/2 hypercube is presented and analyzed. The experimental results show that even though the ACWN algorithm incurs somewhat larger overhead than the randomized allocation, it achieves better performance in most cases due to its adaptiveness. Its feature of quickly spreading the work helps it outperform the gradient model in performance and scalability.

  7. Dynamic computer simulations of electrophoresis: three decades of active research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Wolfgang; Caslavska, Jitka; Breadmore, Michael C; Mosher, Richard A

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic models for electrophoresis are based upon model equations derived from the transport concepts in solution together with user-inputted conditions. They are able to predict theoretically the movement of ions and are as such the most versatile tool to explore the fundamentals of electrokinetic separations. Since its inception three decades ago, the state of dynamic computer simulation software and its use has progressed significantly and Electrophoresis played a pivotal role in that endeavor as a large proportion of the fundamental and application papers were published in this periodical. Software is available that simulates all basic electrophoretic systems, including moving boundary electrophoresis, zone electrophoresis, ITP, IEF and EKC, and their combinations under almost exactly the same conditions used in the laboratory. This has been employed to show the detailed mechanisms of many of the fundamental phenomena that occur in electrophoretic separations. Dynamic electrophoretic simulations are relevant for separations on any scale and instrumental format, including free-fluid preparative, gel, capillary and chip electrophoresis. This review includes a historical overview, a survey of current simulators, simulation examples and a discussion of the applications and achievements of dynamic simulation.

  8. Computer studies of multiple-quantum spin dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdoch, J.B.

    1982-11-01

    The excitation and detection of multiple-quantum (MQ) transitions in Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy is an interesting problem in the quantum mechanical dynamics of spin systems as well as an important new technique for investigation of molecular structure. In particular, multiple-quantum spectroscopy can be used to simplify overly complex spectra or to separate the various interactions between a nucleus and its environment. The emphasis of this work is on computer simulation of spin-system evolution to better relate theory and experiment.

  9. Computer Modeling of Real-Time Dynamic Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, James C.; Pace, J.; Novak, J.; Russo, Dane M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Station tasks involve procedures that are very complex and highly dependent on the availability of visual information. In many situations, cameras are used as tools to help overcome the visual and physical restrictions associated with space flight. However, these cameras are effected by the dynamic lighting conditions of space. Training for these is conditions is necessary. The current project builds on the findings of an earlier NRA funded project, which revealed improved performance by humans when trained with computer graphics and lighting effects such as shadows and glare.

  10. Robust dynamical decoupling for quantum computing and quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Alexandre M; Alvarez, Gonzalo A; Suter, Dieter

    2011-06-17

    Dynamical decoupling (DD) is a popular technique for protecting qubits from the environment. However, unless special care is taken, experimental errors in the control pulses used in this technique can destroy the quantum information instead of preserving it. Here, we investigate techniques for making DD sequences robust against different types of experimental errors while retaining good decoupling efficiency in a fluctuating environment. We present experimental data from solid-state nuclear spin qubits and introduce a new DD sequence that is suitable for quantum computing and quantum memory.

  11. The very local Hubble flow: computer simulations of dynamical history

    CERN Document Server

    Chernin, A D; Valtonen, M J; Dolgachev, V P; Domozhilova, L M; Makarov, D I

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of the very local ($\\le3$ Mpc) Hubble flow is studied on the basis of the data of recent precision observations. A set of computer simulations is performed to trace the trajectories of the flow galaxies back in time to the epoch of the formation of the Local Group. It is found that the `initial conditions' of the flow are drastically different from the linear velocity-distance relation. The simulations enable also to recognize the major trends of the flow evolution and identify the dynamical role of universal antigravity produced by cosmic vacuum.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics in fire engineering theory, modelling and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Yuen, Kwok Kit

    2009-01-01

    Fire and combustion presents a significant engineering challenge to mechanical, civil and dedicated fire engineers, as well as specialists in the process and chemical, safety, buildings and structural fields. We are reminded of the tragic outcomes of 'untenable' fire disasters such as at King's Cross underground station or Switzerland's St Gotthard tunnel. In these and many other cases, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is at the forefront of active research into unravelling the probable causes of fires and helping to design structures and systems to ensure that they are less likely in the f

  13. Continuing Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics for Supersonic Retropropulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauerhamer, Daniel Guy; Trumble, Kerry A.; Kleb, Bil; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Edquist, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    A large step in the validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for Supersonic Retropropulsion (SRP) is shown through the comparison of three Navier-Stokes solvers (DPLR, FUN3D, and OVERFLOW) and wind tunnel test results. The test was designed specifically for CFD validation and was conducted in the Langley supersonic 4 x4 Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel and includes variations in the number of nozzles, Mach and Reynolds numbers, thrust coefficient, and angles of orientation. Code-to-code and code-to-test comparisons are encouraging and possible error sources are discussed.

  14. Computational complexity of ecological and evolutionary spatial dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen-Jensen, Rasmus; Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Nowak, Martin A

    2015-12-22

    There are deep, yet largely unexplored, connections between computer science and biology. Both disciplines examine how information proliferates in time and space. Central results in computer science describe the complexity of algorithms that solve certain classes of problems. An algorithm is deemed efficient if it can solve a problem in polynomial time, which means the running time of the algorithm is a polynomial function of the length of the input. There are classes of harder problems for which the fastest possible algorithm requires exponential time. Another criterion is the space requirement of the algorithm. There is a crucial distinction between algorithms that can find a solution, verify a solution, or list several distinct solutions in given time and space. The complexity hierarchy that is generated in this way is the foundation of theoretical computer science. Precise complexity results can be notoriously difficult. The famous question whether polynomial time equals nondeterministic polynomial time (i.e., P = NP) is one of the hardest open problems in computer science and all of mathematics. Here, we consider simple processes of ecological and evolutionary spatial dynamics. The basic question is: What is the probability that a new invader (or a new mutant) will take over a resident population? We derive precise complexity results for a variety of scenarios. We therefore show that some fundamental questions in this area cannot be answered by simple equations (assuming that P is not equal to NP).

  15. The role of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in hair science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicka, Peter; Grald, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a virtual prototyping tool is widespread in the consumer packaged goods industry. CFD refers to the calculation on a computer of the velocity, pressure, and temperature and chemical species concentrations within a flowing liquid or gas. Because the performance of manufacturing equipment and product designs can be simulated on the computer, the benefit of using CFD is significant time and cost savings when compared to traditional physical testing methods. CFD has been used to design, scale-up and troubleshoot mixing tanks, spray dryers, heat exchangers and other process equipment. Recently, computer models of the capillary wicking process inside fibrous structures have been added to CFD software. These models have been used to gain a better understanding of the absorbent performance of diapers and feminine protection products. The same models can also be used to represent the movement of shampoo, conditioner, colorants and other products through the hair and scalp. In this paper, we provide an introduction to CFD and show some examples of its application to the manufacture of consumer products. We also provide sonic examples to show the potential of CFD for understanding the performance of products applied to the hair and scalp.

  16. Prioritized motion-force control of constrained fully-actuated robots: "Task Space Inverse Dynamics"

    OpenAIRE

    Del Prete, Andrea; Nori, Francesco; Metta, Giorgio; Natale, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    We present a new framework for prioritized multi-task motion-force control of fully-actuated robots. This work is established on a careful review and comparison of the state of the art. Some control frameworks are not optimal, that is they do not find the optimal solution for the secondary tasks. Other frameworks are optimal, but they tackle the control problem at kinematic level, hence they neglect the robot dynamics and they do not allow for force control. Still other frameworks are optimal...

  17. Computational modeling of glow discharge-induced fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Balaji

    Glow discharge at atmospheric pressure using a dielectric barrier discharge can induce fluid flow and operate as an actuator for flow control. The largely isothermal surface plasma generation realized above can modify the near-wall flow structure by means of Lorentzian collisions between the ionized fluid and the neutral fluid. Such an actuator has advantages of no moving parts, performance at atmospheric conditions and devising complex control strategies through the applied voltage. However, the mechanism of the momentum coupling between the plasma and the fluid flow is not yet adequately understood. In the present work, a modeling framework is presented to simulate athermal, non-equilibrium plasma discharges in conjunction with low Mach number fluid dynamics at atmospheric pressure. The plasma and fluid species are treated as a two-fluid system exhibiting a few decades of length and time scales. The effect of the plasma dynamics on the fluid dynamics is devised via a body force treatment in the Navier-Stokes equations. Two different approaches of different degrees of fidelity are presented for modeling the plasma dynamics. The first approach, a phenomenological model, is based on a linearized force distribution approximating the discharge structure, and utilizing experimental guidance to deduce the empirical constants. A high fidelity approach is to model the plasma dynamics in a self-consistent manner using a first principle-based hydrodynamic plasma model. The atmospheric pressure regime of interest here enables us to employ local equilibrium assumptions, signifying efficient collisional energy exchange as against thermal heating from inelastic collision processes. The time scale ratios between convection, diffusion, and reaction/ionization mechanisms are O(107), making the system computationally stiff. To handle the stiffness, a sequential finite-volume operator-splitting algorithm capable of conserving space charge is developed; the approach can handle time

  18. Dynamic Inlet Distortion Prediction with a Combined Computational Fluid Dynamics and Distortion Synthesis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norby, W. P.; Ladd, J. A.; Yuhas, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for predicting peak dynamic inlet distortion. This procedure combines Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and distortion synthesis analysis to obtain a prediction of peak dynamic distortion intensity and the associated instantaneous total pressure pattern. A prediction of the steady state total pressure pattern at the Aerodynamic Interface Plane is first obtained using an appropriate CFD flow solver. A corresponding inlet turbulence pattern is obtained from the CFD solution via a correlation linking root mean square (RMS) inlet turbulence to a formulation of several CFD parameters representative of flow turbulence intensity. This correlation was derived using flight data obtained from the NASA High Alpha Research Vehicle flight test program and several CFD solutions at conditions matching the flight test data. A distortion synthesis analysis is then performed on the predicted steady state total pressure and RMS turbulence patterns to yield a predicted value of dynamic distortion intensity and the associated instantaneous total pressure pattern.

  19. Nano-Modeling and Computation in Bio and Brain Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Di Sia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of brain dynamics currently utilizes the new features of nanobiotechnology and bioengineering. New geometric and analytical approaches appear very promising in all scientific areas, particularly in the study of brain processes. Efforts to engage in deep comprehension lead to a change in the inner brain parameters, in order to mimic the external transformation by the proper use of sensors and effectors. This paper highlights some crossing research areas of natural computing, nanotechnology, and brain modeling and considers two interesting theoretical approaches related to brain dynamics: (a the memory in neural network, not as a passive element for storing information, but integrated in the neural parameters as synaptic conductances; and (b a new transport model based on analytical expressions of the most important transport parameters, which works from sub-pico-level to macro-level, able both to understand existing data and to give new predictions. Complex biological systems are highly dependent on the context, which suggests a “more nature-oriented” computational philosophy.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of High Injection Pressure Blended Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Amir; Jaat, Norrizam; Faisal Hushim, Mohd; Manshoor, Bukhari; Zaman, Izzuddin; Sapit, Azwan; Razali, Azahari

    2017-08-01

    Biodiesel have great potential for substitution with petrol fuel for the purpose of achieving clean energy production and emission reduction. Among the methods that can control the combustion properties, controlling of the fuel injection conditions is one of the successful methods. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of high injection pressure of biodiesel blends on spray characteristics using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Injection pressure was observed at 220 MPa, 250 MPa and 280 MPa. The ambient temperature was kept held at 1050 K and ambient pressure 8 MPa in order to simulate the effect of boost pressure or turbo charger during combustion process. Computational Fluid Dynamics were used to investigate the spray characteristics of biodiesel blends such as spray penetration length, spray angle and mixture formation of fuel-air mixing. The results shows that increases of injection pressure, wider spray angle is produced by biodiesel blends and diesel fuel. The injection pressure strongly affects the mixture formation, characteristics of fuel spray, longer spray penetration length thus promotes the fuel and air mixing.

  1. Issues in computational fluid dynamics code verification and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1997-09-01

    A broad range of mathematical modeling errors of fluid flow physics and numerical approximation errors are addressed in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is strongly believed that if CFD is to have a major impact on the design of engineering hardware and flight systems, the level of confidence in complex simulations must substantially improve. To better understand the present limitations of CFD simulations, a wide variety of physical modeling, discretization, and solution errors are identified and discussed. Here, discretization and solution errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential, or integral, conservation equations representing the physical process, to algebraic equations and their solution on a computer. The impact of boundary conditions on the solution of the partial differential equations and their discrete representation will also be discussed. Throughout the article, clear distinctions are made between the analytical mathematical models of fluid dynamics and the numerical models. Lax`s Equivalence Theorem and its frailties in practical CFD solutions are pointed out. Distinctions are also made between the existence and uniqueness of solutions to the partial differential equations as opposed to the discrete equations. Two techniques are briefly discussed for the detection and quantification of certain types of discretization and grid resolution errors.

  2. Currents in the Luzon Strait during the spring of 2002: observation and computation by modified inverse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Yaochu; LOU Ruyun; LIU Yonggang; SU Jilan; WANG Kangshan; CHEN Hong

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of the current measurements at 200,500 and 800 m from moored current meters with the time series data from March 17 to April 15 at the mooring station (20°49′57″N, 120°48' 12″E ) and the hydrographic data obtained in the Luzon Strait during the spring of 2002 cruise, the circulation in the investigated area is computed by using the modified inverse method. The major observed results are as follows: (1) the average velocity and the flow direction in the observing days are (47.4 cm/s, 346°) at the 200 m level. The aver age velocity in the observing days is (20.3 cm/s, 350°) at the 500 m level. These mean that the Kuroshio intrudes into the South Chin Sea to flow northwestward through the Luzon Strait at 200 and 500 m levels. (2) The average velocity in the observing days is (1.2cm/s, 35°) at the 800 m level, I. E., its direction is northeastward. This means that the flow condition at the 800 m level very differs from that at the 200 and 500 m levels. (3) There is the high density and cold water (HDCW) in the middle of western part of in the investigated region, and its center is located near the hydrological station 3 at Section A. (4) There is the lower density and warm water (LDWW) in the southeastern part of investigated region. (5) The currents in April 2002 are stronger than those in March 2002.The major computed results are as follows: (1) The northwestward and southeastward VTs through Section B are 32.48×106 m3/s (inclusive of VT ofanticyclonic eddy) and 3.34×106m3/s, respectively. The net northwestward VT through Section B in the investigated area is about 29.14×106 m3/s. (2) The eastern and western VTs through Section A are about 16.71× 106 and 8.57×106 m3/s, respectively. Thus,the net eastward VT through Section A is about 8.14×106 m3/s. (3) The net northward VT through Section M is about 24.68×106 m3/s.(4) After about 24.68×106 m3/s flows through Section M, most of it, about 16.54×106 m3/s, flows northward through the

  3. Estimation of external contact loads using an inverse dynamics and optimization approach: general method and application to sit-to-stand maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, T; Causse, J; Monnier, G

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a general method to estimate unmeasured external contact loads (ECLs) acting on a system whose kinematics and inertial properties are known. This method is dedicated to underdetermined problems, e.g. when the system has two or more unmeasured external contact wrenches. It is based on inverse dynamics and a quadratic optimization, and is therefore relatively simple, computationally cost effective and robust. Net joint loads (NJLs) are included as variables of the problem, and thus could be estimated in the same procedure as the ECL and be used within the cost function. The proposed method is tested on human sit-to-stand maneuvers performed holding a handle with one hand, i.e. asymmetrical movements with multiples external contacts. Three sets of measured and unmeasured contact load components and three cost functions are considered and simulated results are compared to experimental data. For the population and movement studied, better results are obtained for a least-square sharing between actuated degrees-of-freedom of the relative motor torques (motor torques normalized by the maximal torque production capacity). Moreover, the number of unknown ECL components does not significantly influence the results. In particular, measuring only the vertical force under the seat lead to a relatively correct estimation of the ECL and NJT: not only the values of R% were small (about 10% for the feet ECL and 20% for the NJT), but the influence of an experimental parameters (the Seat Height) was also correctly predicted.

  4. Inverse modelling of in situ soil water dynamics: investigating the effect of different prior distributions of the soil hydraulic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Scharnagl

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In situ observations of soil water state variables under natural boundary conditions are often used to estimate the soil hydraulic properties. However, many contributions to the soil hydrological literature have demonstrated that the information content of such data is insufficient to accurately and precisely estimate all the soil hydraulic parameters. In this case study, we explored to which degree prior information about the soil hydraulic parameters can help improve parameter identifiability in inverse modelling of in situ soil water dynamics under natural boundary conditions. We used percentages of sand, silt, and clay as input variables to the ROSETTA pedotransfer function that predicts the parameters in the van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM model of the soil hydraulic functions. To derive additional information about the correlation structure of the predicted parameters, which is not readily provided by ROSETTA, we employed a Monte Carlo approach. We formulated three prior distributions that incorporate to different extents the prior information about the VGM parameters derived with ROSETTA. The inverse problem was posed in a formal Bayesian framework and solved using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulation with the DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM algorithm. Synthetic and real-world soil water content data were used to illustrate the approach. The results of this study demonstrated that prior information about the soil hydraulic parameters significantly improved parameter identifiability and that this approach was effective and robust, even in case of biased prior information. To be effective and robust, however, it was essential to use a prior distribution that incorporates information about parameter correlation.

  5. Spatio-temporal dynamics and laterality effects of face inversion, feature presence and configuration, and face outline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija eMarinkovic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although a crucial role of the fusiform gyrus in face processing has been demonstrated with a variety of methods, converging evidence suggests that face processing involves an interactive and overlapping processing cascade in distributed brain areas. Here we examine the spatio-temporal stages and their functional tuning to face inversion, presence and configuration of inner features, and face contour in healthy subjects during passive viewing. Anatomically-constrained magnetoencephalography (aMEG combines high-density whole-head MEG recordings and distributed source modeling with high-resolution structural MRI. Each person's reconstructed cortical surface served to constrain noise-normalized minimum norm inverse source estimates. The earliest activity was estimated to the occipital cortex at ~100 ms after stimulus onset and was sensitive to an initial coarse level visual analysis. Activity in the right-lateralized ventral temporal area (inclusive of the fusiform gyrus peaked at ~160ms and was largest to inverted faces. Images containing facial features in the veridical and rearranged configuration irrespective of the facial outline elicited intermediate level activity. The M160 stage may provide structural representations necessary for downstream distributed areas to process identity and emotional expression. However, inverted faces additionally engaged the left ventral temporal area at ~180 ms and were uniquely subserved by bilateral processing. This observation is consistent with the dual route model and spared processing of inverted faces in prosopagnosia. The subsequent deflection, peaking at ~240ms in the anterior temporal areas bilaterally, was largest to normal, upright faces. It may reflect initial engagement of the distributed network subserving individuation and familiarity. These results support dynamic models suggesting that processing of unfamiliar faces in the absence of a cognitive task is subserved by a distributed and

  6. A paradigm for modeling and computation of gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Liu, Chang

    2017-02-01

    In the continuum flow regime, the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are usually used for the description of gas dynamics. On the other hand, the Boltzmann equation is applied for the rarefied flow. These two equations are based on distinguishable modeling scales for flow physics. Fortunately, due to the scale separation, i.e., the hydrodynamic and kinetic ones, both the Navier-Stokes equations and the Boltzmann equation are applicable in their respective domains. However, in real science and engineering applications, they may not have such a distinctive scale separation. For example, around a hypersonic flying vehicle, the flow physics at different regions may correspond to different regimes, where the local Knudsen number can be changed significantly in several orders of magnitude. With a variation of flow physics, theoretically a continuous governing equation from the kinetic Boltzmann modeling to the hydrodynamic Navier-Stokes dynamics should be used for its efficient description. However, due to the difficulties of a direct modeling of flow physics in the scale between the kinetic and hydrodynamic ones, there is basically no reliable theory or valid governing equations to cover the whole transition regime, except resolving flow physics always down to the mean free path scale, such as the direct Boltzmann solver and the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. In fact, it is an unresolved problem about the exact scale for the validity of the NS equations, especially in the small Reynolds number cases. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is usually based on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and it targets on the recovering of the exact solution of the PDEs as mesh size and time step converging to zero. This methodology can be hardly applied to solve the multiple scale problem efficiently because there is no such a complete PDE for flow physics through a continuous variation of scales. For the non-equilibrium flow study, the direct

  7. Considerations of blood properties, outlet boundary conditions and energy loss approaches in computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji Young; Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Yong Sang; Kim, Young Woo; Lee, Joon Sang

    2014-02-01

    Despite recent development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research, analysis of computational fluid dynamics of cerebral vessels has several limitations. Although blood is a non-Newtonian fluid, velocity and pressure fields were computed under the assumptions of incompressible, laminar, steady-state flows and Newtonian fluid dynamics. The pulsatile nature of blood flow is not properly applied in inlet and outlet boundaries. Therefore, we present these technical limitations and discuss the possible solution by comparing the theoretical and computational studies.

  8. Inverse Kinematics using Quaternions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Knud; Erleben, Kenny; Engell-Nørregård, Morten

    In this project I describe the status of inverse kinematics research, with the focus firmly on the methods that solve the core problem. An overview of the different methods are presented Three common methods used in inverse kinematics computation have been chosen as subject for closer inspection....... suite, developed in this project and in [4]. Source code developed for this project includes the CCD method , improvements on the BFGS method and Jacobian inverse originally developed in [4]....

  9. Towards robust dynamical decoupling and high fidelity adiabatic quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Gregory

    Quantum computation (QC) relies on the ability to implement high-fidelity quantum gate operations and successfully preserve quantum state coherence. One of the most challenging obstacles for reliable QC is overcoming the inevitable interaction between a quantum system and its environment. Unwanted interactions result in decoherence processes that cause quantum states to deviate from a desired evolution, consequently leading to computational errors and loss of coherence. Dynamical decoupling (DD) is one such method, which seeks to attenuate the effects of decoherence by applying strong and expeditious control pulses solely to the system. Provided the pulses are applied over a time duration sufficiently shorter than the correlation time associated with the environment dynamics, DD effectively averages out undesirable interactions and preserves quantum states with a low probability of error, or fidelity loss. In this study various aspects of this approach are studied from sequence construction to applications of DD to protecting QC. First, a comprehensive examination of the error suppression properties of a near-optimal DD approach is given to understand the relationship between error suppression capabilities and the number of required DD control pulses in the case of ideal, instantaneous pulses. While such considerations are instructive for examining DD efficiency, i.e., performance vs the number of control pulses, high-fidelity DD in realizable systems is difficult to achieve due to intrinsic pulse imperfections which further contribute to decoherence. As a second consideration, it is shown how one can overcome this hurdle and achieve robustness and recover high-fidelity DD in the presence of faulty control pulses using Genetic Algorithm optimization and sequence symmetrization. Thirdly, to illustrate the implementation of DD in conjunction with QC, the utilization of DD and quantum error correction codes (QECCs) as a protection method for adiabatic quantum

  10. Computational fluid dynamics of developing avian outflow tract heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Koonal N; Spitz, Cassie; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2012-10-01

    Hemodynamic forces play an important role in sculpting the embryonic heart and its valves. Alteration of blood flow patterns through the hearts of embryonic animal models lead to malformations that resemble some clinical congenital heart defects, but the precise mechanisms are poorly understood. Quantitative understanding of the local fluid forces acting in the heart has been elusive because of the extremely small and rapidly changing anatomy. In this study, we combine multiple imaging modalities with computational simulation to rigorously quantify the hemodynamic environment within the developing outflow tract (OFT) and its eventual aortic and pulmonary valves. In vivo Doppler ultrasound generated velocity profiles were applied to Micro-Computed Tomography generated 3D OFT lumen geometries from Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) stage 16-30 chick embryos. Computational fluid dynamics simulation initial conditions were iterated until local flow profiles converged with in vivo Doppler flow measurements. Results suggested that flow in the early tubular OFT (HH16 and HH23) was best approximated by Poiseuille flow, while later embryonic OFT septation (HH27, HH30) was mimicked by plug flow conditions. Peak wall shear stress (WSS) values increased from 18.16 dynes/cm(2) at HH16 to 671.24 dynes/cm(2) at HH30. Spatiotemporally averaged WSS values also showed a monotonic increase from 3.03 dynes/cm(2) at HH16 to 136.50 dynes/cm(2) at HH30. Simulated velocity streamlines in the early heart suggest a lack of mixing, which differed from classical ink injections. Changes in local flow patterns preceded and correlated with key morphogenetic events such as OFT septation and valve formation. This novel method to quantify local dynamic hemodynamics parameters affords insight into sculpting role of blood flow in the embryonic heart and provides a quantitative baseline dataset for future research.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics framework for aerodynamic model assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallespin, D.; Badcock, K. J.; Da Ronch, A.; White, M. D.; Perfect, P.; Ghoreyshi, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reviews the work carried out at the University of Liverpool to assess the use of CFD methods for aircraft flight dynamics applications. Three test cases are discussed in the paper, namely, the Standard Dynamic Model, the Ranger 2000 jet trainer and the Stability and Control Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle. For each of these, a tabular aerodynamic model based on CFD predictions is generated along with validation against wind tunnel experiments and flight test measurements. The main purpose of the paper is to assess the validity of the tables of aerodynamic data for the force and moment prediction of realistic aircraft manoeuvres. This is done by generating a manoeuvre based on the tables of aerodynamic data, and then replaying the motion through a time-accurate computational fluid dynamics calculation. The resulting forces and moments from these simulations were compared with predictions from the tables. As the latter are based on a set of steady-state predictions, the comparisons showed perfect agreement for slow manoeuvres. As manoeuvres became more aggressive some disagreement was seen, particularly during periods of large rates of change in attitudes. Finally, the Ranger 2000 model was used on a flight simulator.

  12. Modeling behavior dynamics using computational psychometrics within virtual worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipresso, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    In case of fire in a building, how will people behave in the crowd? The behavior of each individual affects the behavior of others and, conversely, each one behaves considering the crowd as a whole and the individual others. In this article, I propose a three-step method to explore a brand new way to study behavior dynamics. The first step relies on the creation of specific situations with standard techniques (such as mental imagery, text, video, and audio) and an advanced technique [Virtual Reality (VR)] to manipulate experimental settings. The second step concerns the measurement of behavior in one, two, or many individuals focusing on parameters extractions to provide information about the behavior dynamics. Finally, the third step, which uses the parameters collected and measured in the previous two steps in order to simulate possible scenarios to forecast through computational models, understand, and explain behavior dynamics at the social level. An experimental study was also included to demonstrate the three-step method and a possible scenario.

  13. Modeling Behavior Dynamics using Computational Psychometrics within Virtual Worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eCipresso

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In case of fire in a building, how will people behave in the crowd? The behavior of each individual affects the behavior of others and, conversely, each one behaves considering the crowd as a whole and the individual others. In this article, I propose a three-step method to explore a brand new way to study behavior dynamics. The first step relies on the creation of specific situations with standard techniques (such as mental imagery, text, video and audio and an advanced technique (Virtual Reality to manipulate experimental settings. The second step concerns the measurement of behavior in one, two or many individuals focusing on parameters extractions to provide information about the behavior dynamics. Finally, the third step, which uses the parameters collected and measured in the previous two steps in order to simulate possible scenarios to forecast through computational models, understand and explain behavior dynamics at the social level. An experimental study was also included to demonstrate the three-step method and a possible scenario.

  14. Fluid Dynamics of Competitive Swimming: A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rajat; Loebbeck, Alfred; Singh, Hersh; Mark, Russell; Wei, Timothy

    2004-11-01

    The dolphin kick is an important component in competitive swimming and is used extensively by swimmers immediately following the starting dive as well as after turns. In this stroke, the swimmer swims about three feet under the water surface and the stroke is executed by performing an undulating wave-like motion of the body that is quite similar to the anguilliform propulsion mode in fish. Despite the relatively simple kinematics of this stoke, considerable variability in style and performance is observed even among Olympic level swimmers. Motivated by this, a joint experimental-numerical study has been initiated to examine the fluid-dynamics of this stroke. The current presentation will describe the computational portion of this study. The computations employ a sharp interface immersed boundary method (IBM) which allows us to simulate flows with complex moving boudnaries on stationary Cartesian grids. 3D body scans of male and female Olympic swimmers have been obtained and these are used in conjuction with high speed videos to recreate a realistic dolphin kick for the IBM solver. Preliminary results from these computations will be presented.

  15. High-Precision Computation: Mathematical Physics and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, D. H.; Barrio, R.; Borwein, J. M.

    2010-04-01

    At the present time, IEEE 64-bit oating-point arithmetic is suficiently accurate for most scientic applications. However, for a rapidly growing body of important scientic computing applications, a higher level of numeric precision is required. Such calculations are facilitated by high-precision software packages that include high-level language translation modules to minimize the conversion e ort. This pa- per presents a survey of recent applications of these techniques and provides someanalysis of their numerical requirements. These applications include supernova simulations, climate modeling, planetary orbit calculations, Coulomb n-body atomic systems, studies of the one structure constant, scattering amplitudes of quarks, glu- ons and bosons, nonlinear oscillator theory, experimental mathematics, evaluation of orthogonal polynomials, numerical integration of ODEs, computation of periodic orbits, studies of the splitting of separatrices, detection of strange nonchaotic at- tractors, Ising theory, quantum held theory, and discrete dynamical systems. We conclude that high-precision arithmetic facilities are now an indispensable compo- nent of a modern large-scale scientic computing environment.

  16. High-Performance Java Codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Christopher; Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational science community is reluctant to write large-scale computationally -intensive applications in Java due to concerns over Java's poor performance, despite the claimed software engineering advantages of its object-oriented features. Naive Java implementations of numerical algorithms can perform poorly compared to corresponding Fortran or C implementations. To achieve high performance, Java applications must be designed with good performance as a primary goal. This paper presents the object-oriented design and implementation of two real-world applications from the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): a finite-volume fluid flow solver (LAURA, from NASA Langley Research Center), and an unstructured mesh adaptation algorithm (2D_TAG, from NASA Ames Research Center). This work builds on our previous experience with the design of high-performance numerical libraries in Java. We examine the performance of the applications using the currently available Java infrastructure and show that the Java version of the flow solver LAURA performs almost within a factor of 2 of the original procedural version. Our Java version of the mesh adaptation algorithm 2D_TAG performs within a factor of 1.5 of its original procedural version on certain platforms. Our results demonstrate that object-oriented software design principles are not necessarily inimical to high performance.

  17. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paulin Florence

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a “Pay as you go” basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption.

  18. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, A Paulin; Shanthi, V; Simon, C B Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a "Pay as you go" basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS) scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption.

  19. Computational solvation dynamics of oxyquinolinium betaine linked to trehalose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Esther; Schröder, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Studying the changed water dynamics in the hydration layers of biomolecules is an important step towards fuller understanding of their function and mechanisms, but has shown to be quite difficult. The measurement of the time-dependent Stokes shift of a chromophore attached to the biomolecule is a promising method to achieve this goal, as published in Sajadi et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 5, 1845 (2014).] where trehalose was used as biomolecule, 1-methyl-6-oxyquinolinium betaine as chromophore, and water as solvent. An overall retardation of solvent molecules is then obtained by comparison of the linked system to the same system without trehalose, but contributions from different subgroups of solvent molecules, for example, molecules close to or far from trehalose, are unknown. The difficulty arising from these unknown contributions of retarded and possibly unretarded solvent molecules is overcome in this work by conducting computer simulations on this system and decomposing the overall signal into the contributions from various molecules at different locations. We performed non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation using a polarizable water model and a non-polarizable solute model and could reproduce the experimental time-dependent Stokes shift accurately for the linked trehalose-oxyquinolinium and the pure oxyquinolinium over a wide temperature range, indicating the correctness of our employed models. Decomposition of the shift into contributions from different solvent subgroups showed that the amplitude of the measured shift is made up only half by the desired retarded solvent molecules in the hydration layer, but to another half by unretarded bulk water, so that measured relaxation times of the overall Stokes shift are only a lower boundary for the true relaxation times in the hydration layer of trehalose. As a side effect, the results on the effect of trehalose on solvation dynamics contribute to the long standing debate on the range of influence of

  20. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness and response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has (CFD) has played an increasing in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-couple equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows. We are now embarking on a development program to incorporate prognostic models to generate, in real-time, the meteorological fields for the dispersion models. In contrast to diagnostic models, prognostic models are physically-based and are capable of incorporating many physical processes to treat highly complex flow scenarios.

  1. Secure Dynamic access control scheme of PHR in cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Liu, Chia-Hui; Chen, Tzer-Long; Chen, Chin-Sheng; Bau, Jian-Guo; Lin, Tzu-Ching

    2012-12-01

    With the development of information technology and medical technology, medical information has been developed from traditional paper records into electronic medical records, which have now been widely applied. The new-style medical information exchange system "personal health records (PHR)" is gradually developed. PHR is a kind of health records maintained and recorded by individuals. An ideal personal health record could integrate personal medical information from different sources and provide complete and correct personal health and medical summary through the Internet or portable media under the requirements of security and privacy. A lot of personal health records are being utilized. The patient-centered PHR information exchange system allows the public autonomously maintain and manage personal health records. Such management is convenient for storing, accessing, and sharing personal medical records. With the emergence of Cloud computing, PHR service has been transferred to storing data into Cloud servers that the resources could be flexibly utilized and the operation cost can be reduced. Nevertheless, patients would face privacy problem when storing PHR data into Cloud. Besides, it requires a secure protection scheme to encrypt the medical records of each patient for storing PHR into Cloud server. In the encryption process, it would be a challenge to achieve accurately accessing to medical records and corresponding to flexibility and efficiency. A new PHR access control scheme under Cloud computing environments is proposed in this study. With Lagrange interpolation polynomial to establish a secure and effective PHR information access scheme, it allows to accurately access to PHR with security and is suitable for enormous multi-users. Moreover, this scheme also dynamically supports multi-users in Cloud computing environments with personal privacy and offers legal authorities to access to PHR. From security and effectiveness analyses, the proposed PHR access

  2. A Dynamic Bayesian Approach to Computational Laban Shape Quality Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Swaminathan

    2009-01-01

    kinesiology. LMA (especially Effort/Shape emphasizes how internal feelings and intentions govern the patterning of movement throughout the whole body. As we argue, a complex understanding of intention via LMA is necessary for human-computer interaction to become embodied in ways that resemble interaction in the physical world. We thus introduce a novel, flexible Bayesian fusion approach for identifying LMA Shape qualities from raw motion capture data in real time. The method uses a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN to fuse movement features across the body and across time and as we discuss can be readily adapted for low-cost video. It has delivered excellent performance in preliminary studies comprising improvisatory movements. Our approach has been incorporated in Response, a mixed-reality environment where users interact via natural, full-body human movement and enhance their bodily-kinesthetic awareness through immersive sound and light feedback, with applications to kinesiology training, Parkinson's patient rehabilitation, interactive dance, and many other areas.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Tryggvason, Tryggvi

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...... simulation program requires a detailed description of the energy flow in the air movement which can be obtained by a CFD program. The paper describes an energy consumption calculation in a large building, where the building energy simulation program is modified by CFD predictions of the flow between three...... program and a building energy performance simulation program will improve both the energy consumption data and the prediction of thermal comfort and air quality in a selected area of the building....

  4. Uncertainty quantification in computational fluid dynamics and aircraft engines

    CERN Document Server

    Montomoli, Francesco; D'Ammaro, Antonio; Massini, Michela; Salvadori, Simone

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces novel design techniques developed to increase the safety of aircraft engines. The authors demonstrate how the application of uncertainty methods can overcome problems in the accurate prediction of engine lift, caused by manufacturing error. This in turn ameliorates the difficulty of achieving required safety margins imposed by limits in current design and manufacturing methods. This text shows that even state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are not able to predict the same performance measured in experiments; CFD methods assume idealised geometries but ideal geometries do not exist, cannot be manufactured and their performance differs from real-world ones. By applying geometrical variations of a few microns, the agreement with experiments improves dramatically, but unfortunately the manufacturing errors in engines or in experiments are unknown. In order to overcome this limitation, uncertainty quantification considers the probability density functions of manufacturing errors...

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of an Evaporative Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapilan N.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of chlorofluorocarbon based refrigerants in the air-conditioning system increases the global warming and causes the climate change. The climate change is expected to present a number of challenges for the built environment and an evaporative cooling system is one of the simplest and environmentally friendly cooling system. The evaporative cooling system is most widely used in summer and in rural and urban areas of India for human comfort. In evaporative cooling system, the addition of water into air reduces the temperature of the air as the energy needed to evaporate the water is taken from the air. Computational fluid dynamics is a numerical analysis and was used to analyse the evaporative cooling system. The CFD results are matches with the experimental results.

  6. Lightweight computational steering of very large scale molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beazley, D.M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Lomdahl, P.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-09-01

    We present a computational steering approach for controlling, analyzing, and visualizing very large scale molecular dynamics simulations involving tens to hundreds of millions of atoms. Our approach relies on extensible scripting languages and an easy to use tool for building extensions and modules. The system is extremely easy to modify, works with existing C code, is memory efficient, and can be used from inexpensive workstations and networks. We demonstrate how we have used this system to manipulate data from production MD simulations involving as many as 104 million atoms running on the CM-5 and Cray T3D. We also show how this approach can be used to build systems that integrate common scripting languages (including Tcl/Tk, Perl, and Python), simulation code, user extensions, and commercial data analysis packages.

  7. Nonequilibrium spin glass dynamics with the Janus computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yllanes, David; Belletti, F.; Cruz, A.; Fernandez, L. A.; Gordillo-Guerrero, A.; Guidetti, M.; Maiorano, A.; Mantovani, F.; Marinari, E.; Martin-Mayor, V.; Monforte, J.; Munoz Sudupe, A.; Navarro, D.; Parisi, G.; Perez-Gaviro, S.; Ruiz-Lorenzo, J. J.; Schifano, S. F.; Sciretti, D.; Tarancon, A.; Tripiccione, R.

    2009-03-01

    The out of equilibrium evolution of the Edwards-Anderson spin glass is followed for a tenth of a second, effectively halving the (logarithmic) temporal gap between previous simulations and experiments. In fact, we have been able to make safe predictions about the behavior at experimental times, using mild extrapolations. This work has been made possible by Janus, a special purpose computer designed by our collaboration. We have thoroughly studied the spin glass correlation functions and the growth of the coherence length for L 0 lattices in 3D,using L 4,40 lattices to check for finite size effects. We present clear evidence for a replicon correlator. Our main conclusion is that these spin glasses follow non-coarsening dynamics, at least up to the experimentally relevant time scales.

  8. Simulating Smoke Filling in Big Halls by Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Chow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many tall halls of big space volume were built and, to be built in many construction projects in the Far East, particularly Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Smoke is identified to be the key hazard to handle. Consequently, smoke exhaust systems are specified in the fire code in those areas. An update on applying Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD in smoke exhaust design will be presented in this paper. Key points to note in CFD simulations on smoke filling due to a fire in a big hall will be discussed. Mathematical aspects concerning of discretization of partial differential equations and algorithms for solving the velocity-pressure linked equations are briefly outlined. Results predicted by CFD with different free boundary conditions are compared with those on room fire tests. Standards on grid size, relaxation factors, convergence criteria, and false diffusion should be set up for numerical experiments with CFD.

  9. Computational Chemotaxis in Ants and Bacteria over Dynamic Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, Vitorino; Rosa, A C; Abraham, A

    2007-01-01

    Chemotaxis can be defined as an innate behavioural response by an organism to a directional stimulus, in which bacteria, and other single-cell or multicellular organisms direct their movements according to certain chemicals in their environment. This is important for bacteria to find food (e.g., glucose) by swimming towards the highest concentration of food molecules, or to flee from poisons. Based on self-organized computational approaches and similar stigmergic concepts we derive a novel swarm intelligent algorithm. What strikes from these observations is that both eusocial insects as ant colonies and bacteria have similar natural mechanisms based on stigmergy in order to emerge coherent and sophisticated patterns of global collective behaviour. Keeping in mind the above characteristics we will present a simple model to tackle the collective adaptation of a social swarm based on real ant colony behaviors (SSA algorithm) for tracking extrema in dynamic environments and highly multimodal complex functions des...

  10. Modeling of a continuous pretreatment reactor using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, R Eric; Dasari, Rajesh K; Hanley, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations are employed to predict flow characteristics in a continuous auger driven reactor designed for the dilute acid pretreatment of biomass. Slurry containing a high concentration of biomass solids exhibits a high viscosity, which poses unique mixing issues within the reactor. The viscosity increases significantly with a small increase in solids concentration and also varies with temperature. A well-mixed slurry is desirable to evenly distribute acid on biomass, prevent buildup on the walls of the reactor, and provides an uniform final product. Simulations provide flow patterns obtained over a wide range of viscosities and pressure distributions, which may affect reaction rates. Results provide a tool for analyzing sources of inconsistencies in product quality and insight into future design and operating parameters.

  11. Teaching an Undergraduate Course on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Reza H.

    2013-11-01

    A new computational fluid dynamics (CFD) course is introduced to Mechanical Engineering undergraduate curriculum at Northeastern University. The main objective is to enable students to make use of CFD in their cooperative-education work, senior capstone project as well as future engineering career. CFD has become an indispensable tool for engineering design & analysis, and it is now available to broad range of users, through commercial software packages. Proper use of these softwares, however, requires basic knowledge of CFD to understand their capabilities and limitations, to be aware of the pitfalls and to interpret the predictions. The course is designed to offer a balanced coverage of essential and applied CFD, with particular emphasis on verification & validation and CFD analysis. Training for a commercial CFD package is an integral part of the course which is facilitated by the use of project-based learning. In this presentation, details of development and implementation of this course will be discussed.

  12. A generalized software executive for multidisciplinary computational structural dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Alex

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to introduce the attendees to the DYSCO program. The emphasis will be on the features which make it multidisciplinary. DYSCO is a very general and versatile software program which couples and solves dynamic systems. It was initiated in the late 1970's in response to a helicopter analysis requirement. The system development, however, resulted in an executive which was completely separated from any particular area of technology, except that of second order ordinary differential equations. During the course of its development, it was funded by the Army Aviation Applied Technology Directorate, the Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories, and by the Kaman Aerospace Corporation. It is completely written in FORTRAN and is operational on IBM and VAX computers.

  13. The Piecewise Cubic Method (PCM) for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwook; Faller, Hugues; Reyes, Adam

    2017-07-01

    We present a new high-order finite volume reconstruction method for hyperbolic conservation laws. The method is based on a piecewise cubic polynomial which provides its solutions a fifth-order accuracy in space. The spatially reconstructed solutions are evolved in time with a fourth-order accuracy by tracing the characteristics of the cubic polynomials. As a result, our temporal update scheme provides a significantly simpler and computationally more efficient approach in achieving fourth order accuracy in time, relative to the comparable fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We demonstrate that the solutions of PCM converges at fifth-order in solving 1D smooth flows described by hyperbolic conservation laws. We test the new scheme on a range of numerical experiments, including both gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics applications in multiple spatial dimensions.

  14. The Piecewise Cubic Method (PCM) for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Dongwook; Reyes, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We present a new high-order finite volume reconstruction method for hyperbolic conservation laws. The method is based on a piecewise cubic polynomial which provides its solutions a fifth-order accuracy in space. The spatially reconstructed solutions are evolved in time with a fourth-order accuracy by tracing the characteristics of the cubic polynomials. As a result, our temporal update scheme provides a significantly simpler and computationally more efficient approach in achieving fourth order accuracy in time, relative to the comparable fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We demonstrate that the solutions of PCM converges in fifth-order in solving 1D smooth flows described by hyperbolic conservation laws. We test the new scheme in a range of numerical experiments, including both gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics applications in multiple spatial dimensions.

  15. Numerical computations of the dynamics of fluidic membranes and vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, John W; Nürnberg, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Vesicles and many biological membranes are made of two monolayers of lipid molecules and form closed lipid bilayers. The dynamical behaviour of vesicles is very complex and a variety of forms and shapes appear. Lipid bilayers can be considered as a surface fluid and hence the governing equations for the evolution include the surface (Navier--)Stokes equations, which in particular take the membrane viscosity into account. The evolution is driven by forces stemming from the curvature elasticity of the membrane. In addition, the surface fluid equations are coupled to bulk (Navier--)Stokes equations. We introduce a parametric finite element method to solve this complex free boundary problem, and present the first three dimensional numerical computations based on the full (Navier--)Stokes system for several different scenarios. For example, the effects of the membrane viscosity, spontaneous curvature and area difference elasticity (ADE) are studied. In particular, it turns out, that even in the case of no viscosit...

  16. Computational and theoretical aspects of biomolecular structure and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.E.; Berendzen, J.; Catasti, P., Chen, X. [and others

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report for a project that sought to evaluate and develop theoretical, and computational bases for designing, performing, and analyzing experimental studies in structural biology. Simulations of large biomolecular systems in solution, hydrophobic interactions, and quantum chemical calculations for large systems have been performed. We have developed a code that implements the Fast Multipole Algorithm (FMA) that scales linearly in the number of particles simulated in a large system. New methods have been developed for the analysis of multidimensional NMR data in order to obtain high resolution atomic structures. These methods have been applied to the study of DNA sequences in the human centromere, sequences linked to genetic diseases, and the dynamics and structure of myoglobin.

  17. Mapping flow distortion on oceanographic platforms using computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O'Sullivan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind speed measurements over the ocean on ships or buoys are affected by flow distortion from the platform and by the anemometer itself. This can lead to errors in direct measurements and the derived parametrisations. Here we computational fluid dynamics (CFD to simulate the errors in wind speed measurements caused by flow distortion on the RV Celtic Explorer. Numerical measurements were obtained from the finite-volume CFD code OpenFOAM, which was used to simulate the velocity fields. This was done over a range of orientations in the test domain from −60 to +60° in increments of 10°. The simulation was also set up for a range of velocities, ranging from 5 to 25 m s−1 in increments of 0.5 m s−1. The numerical analysis showed close agreement to experimental measurements.

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Aerospace Industry in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Singh

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of computational fluid dynamics (CFD in the design of fighter aircraft, transport aircraft, launch vehicle and missiles in India is explained. Indigenous developments of grid generators, 3-D Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers using state-of-the-art numerical techniques and physical models have been described. Applications of these indigenous softwares for the prediction of various complex aerodynamic flows over a wide range of Mach number, angle of attacks, are presented. Emergence of CFD methods as an efficient tool for aerospace vehicle design is highlighted.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(6, pp.639-652, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.582

  19. Visualization and computation of hovering mode vortex dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymuth, Peter; Gustafson, Karl E.; Leben, Robert

    Results from experimental and numerical simulations of the unsteady hovering flight of small birds or insects are presented in extensive photographs and computer graphics and discussed in detail. In the flow-visualization experiments, an airfoil in combined pitching and plunging motion is used to generate a thrusting jet in still air, producing in addition a vortex street with rotation opposite to that of a Karman street. The numerical studies are based on an extension of the robust multigrid method of Gustafson and Leben (1986 and 1988) to hovering-mode vortex dynamics. The derivation of the governing equations is outlined, and it is shown that the numerical and experimental results are in good qualitative agreement.

  20. Evaluation of nacelle drag using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gustavo Trapp

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Thrust and drag components must be defined and properly accounted in order to estimate aircraft performance, and this hard task is particularty essential for propulsion system where drag components are functions of engine operating conditions. The present work describes a numerical method used to calculate the drag in different nacelles, long and short ducted. Two- and three-dimensional calculations were performed, solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations with a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code. It is then possible to obtain four drag components: wave, induced, viscous and spurious drag using a far-field formulation. An expression in terms of entropy variations was shown and drag for different nacelle geometries was estimated.

  1. Simulation of Tailrace Hydrodynamics Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2001-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to investigate hydrodynamic flow fields surrounding the tailrace zone below large hydraulic structures. Previous and ongoing studies using CFD tools to simulate gradually varied flow with multiple constituents and forebay/intake hydrodynamics have shown that CFD tools can provide valuable information for hydraulic and biological evaluation of fish passage near hydraulic structures. These studies however are incapable of simulating the rapidly varying flow fields that involving breakup of the free-surface, such as those through and below high flow outfalls and spillways. Although the use of CFD tools for these types of flow are still an active area of research, initial applications discussed in this report show that these tools are capable of simulating the primary features of these highly transient flow fields.

  2. Development of a Laminar Flow Bioreactor by Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meir Israelowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to improve the design of a bioreactor for growing bone and other three-dimensional tissues using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD software to simulate flow through a porous scaffold, and to recommend design changes based on the results. Basic requirements for CFD modeling were that the flow in the reactor should be laminar and any flow stagnation should be avoided in order to support cellular growth within the scaffold. We simulated three different designs with different permeability values of the scaffold and tissue. Model simulation addressed flow patterns in combination with pressure distribution within the bioreactor. Pressure build-up and turbulent flow within the reactor was solved by introduction of an integrated bypass system for pressure release. The use of CFD afforded direct feedback to optimize the bioreactor design.

  3. Computing Equilibrium Free Energies Using Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Dellago

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As shown by Jarzynski, free energy differences between equilibrium states can be expressed in terms of the statistics of work carried out on a system during non-equilibrium transformations. This exact result, as well as the related Crooks fluctuation theorem, provide the basis for the computation of free energy differences from fast switching molecular dynamics simulations, in which an external parameter is changed at a finite rate, driving the system away from equilibrium. In this article, we first briefly review the Jarzynski identity and the Crooks fluctuation theorem and then survey various algorithms building on these relations. We pay particular attention to the statistical efficiency of these methods and discuss practical issues arising in their implementation and the analysis of the results.

  4. On Computational Fluid Dynamics Tools in Architectural Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Hougaard, Mads; Stærdahl, Jesper Winther

    engineering computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation program ANSYS CFX and a CFD based representative program RealFlow are investigated. These two programs represent two types of CFD based tools available for use during phases of an architectural design process. However, as outlined in two case studies...... the durability of the two program types for simulation of flow is strongly depended of the purpose. One case presents results obtained with the programs with respect to the accuracy and physical behaviour of the flow. Another case deals with wind flow around a complex building design, the roof of the new Utzon...... Centre in Aalborg, Denmark. The obtained results show that detailed and accurate flow predictions can be obtained using a simulation tool like ANSYS CFX. On the other hand RealFlow provides satisfactory flow results for evaluation of a proposed building shape in an early phase of a design process...

  5. The Computation of Global Viscoelastic Co- and Post-seismic Displacement in a Realistic Earth Model by Straightforward Numerical Inverse Laplace Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, H.; Sun, W.

    2016-12-01

    The theoretical computation of dislocation theory in a given earth model is necessary in the explanation of observations of the co- and post-seismic deformation of earthquakes. For this purpose, computation theories based on layered or pure half space [Okada, 1985; Okubo, 1992; Wang et al., 2006] and on spherically symmetric earth [Piersanti et al., 1995; Pollitz, 1997; Sabadini & Vermeersen, 1997; Wang, 1999] have been proposed. It is indicated that the compressibility, curvature and the continuous variation of the radial structure of Earth should be simultaneously taken into account for modern high precision displacement-based observations like GPS. Therefore, Tanaka et al. [2006; 2007] computed global displacement and gravity variation by combining the reciprocity theorem (RPT) [Okubo, 1993] and numerical inverse Laplace integration (NIL) instead of the normal mode method [Peltier, 1974]. Without using RPT, we follow the straightforward numerical integration of co-seismic deformation given by Sun et al. [1996] to present a straightforward numerical inverse Laplace integration method (SNIL). This method is used to compute the co- and post-seismic displacement of point dislocations buried in a spherically symmetric, self-gravitating viscoelastic and multilayered earth model and is easy to extended to the application of geoid and gravity. Comparing with pre-existing method, this method is relatively more straightforward and time-saving, mainly because we sum associated Legendre polynomials and dislocation love numbers before using Riemann-Merlin formula to implement SNIL.

  6. Influence of center of pressure estimation errors on 3D inverse dynamics solutions during gait at different velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo-Junior, Franklin; Ackermann, Marko; Loss, Jefferson F; Sacco, Isabel C N

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of errors in the location of the center of pressure (5 and 10 mm) on lower limb joint moment uncertainties at different gait velocities (1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 m/s). Our hypotheses were that the absolute joint moment uncertainties would be gradually reduced from distal to proximal joints and from higher to lower velocities. Joint moments of five healthy young adults were calculated by inverse dynamics using the bottom-up approach, depending on which estimate the uncertainty propagated. Results indicated that there is a linear relationship between errors in center of pressure and joint moment uncertainties. The absolute moment peak uncertainties expressed on the anatomic reference frames decreased from distal to proximal joints, confirming our first hypothesis, except for the abduction moments. There was an increase in moment uncertainty (up to 0.04 N m/kg for the 10 mm error in the center of pressure) from the lower to higher gait velocity, confirming our second hypothesis, although, once again, not for hip or knee abduction. Finally, depending on the plane of movement and the joint, relative uncertainties experienced variation (between 5 and 31%), and the knee joint moments were the most affected.

  7. Universal Dynamics of Spontaneous Lorentz Violation and a New Spin-Dependent Inverse-Square Law Force

    CERN Document Server

    Arkani-Hamed, N; Luty, M; Thaler, J; Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Luty, Markus; Thaler, Jesse

    2005-01-01

    We study the universal low-energy dynamics associated with the spontaneous breaking of Lorentz invariance down to spatial rotations. The effective Lagrangian for the associated Goldstone field can be uniquely determined by the non-linear realization of a broken time diffeomorphism symmetry, up to some overall mass scales. It has previously been shown that this symmetry breaking pattern gives rise to a Higgs phase of gravity, in which gravity is modified in the infrared. In this paper, we study the effects of direct couplings between the Goldstone boson and standard model fermions, which necessarily accompany Lorentz-violating terms in the theory. The leading interaction is the coupling to the axial vector current, which reduces to spin in the non-relativistic limit. A spin moving relative to the "ether" rest frame will emit Goldstone Cerenkov radiation. The Goldstone also induces a long-range inverse-square law force between spin sources with a striking angular dependence, reflecting the underlying Goldstone ...

  8. Inverse periodic shadowing properties

    CERN Document Server

    Osipov, Alexey V

    2011-01-01

    We consider inverse periodic shadowing properties of discrete dynamical systems generated by diffeomorphisms of closed smooth manifolds. We show that the $C^1$-interior of the set of all diffeomorphisms having so-called inverse periodic shadowing property coincides with the set of $\\Omega$-stable diffeomorphisms. The equivalence of Lipschitz inverse periodic shadowing property and hyperbolicity of the closure of all periodic points is proved. Besides, we prove that the set of all diffeomorphisms that have Lipschitz inverse periodic shadowing property and whose periodic points are dense in the nonwandering set coincides with the set of Axiom A diffeomorphisms.

  9. A computational toy model for shallow landslides: Molecular Dynamics approach

    CERN Document Server

    Martelloni, Gianluca; Massaro, Emanuele

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a 2D computational algorithm for modeling of the trigger and the propagation of shallow landslides caused by rainfall. We used a Molecular Dynamics (MD) inspired model, similar to discrete element method (DEM), that is suitable to model granular material and to observe the trajectory of single particle, so to identify its dynamical properties. We consider that the triggering of shallow landslides is caused by the decrease of the static friction along the sliding surface due to water infiltration by rainfall. Thence the triggering is caused by two following conditions: (a) a threshold speed of the particles and (b) a condition on the static friction, between particles and slope surface, based on the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. The latter static condition is used in the geotechnical model to estimate the possibility of landslide triggering. Finally the interaction force between particles is defined trough a potential that, in the absence of experimental data, we have mode...

  10. Experimental methodology for computational fluid dynamics code validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1997-09-01

    Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. Typically, CFD code validation is accomplished through comparison of computed results to previously published experimental data that were obtained for some other purpose, unrelated to code validation. As a result, it is a near certainty that not all of the information required by the code, particularly the boundary conditions, will be available. The common approach is therefore unsatisfactory, and a different method is required. This paper describes a methodology developed specifically for experimental validation of CFD codes. The methodology requires teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the validation process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. The methodology employs a novel uncertainty analysis technique which helps to define the experimental plan for code validation wind tunnel experiments, and to distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of surface pressure measurements over a model of varying geometrical complexity in laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow.

  11. Dynamic modeling of Tampa Bay urban development using parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.; Steinwand, D.

    2005-01-01

    Urban land use and land cover has changed significantly in the environs of Tampa Bay, Florida, over the past 50 years. Extensive urbanization has created substantial change to the region's landscape and ecosystems. This paper uses a dynamic urban-growth model, SLEUTH, which applies six geospatial data themes (slope, land use, exclusion, urban extent, transportation, hillside), to study the process of urbanization and associated land use and land cover change in the Tampa Bay area. To reduce processing time and complete the modeling process within an acceptable period, the model is recoded and ported to a Beowulf cluster. The parallel-processing computer system accomplishes the massive amount of computation the modeling simulation requires. SLEUTH calibration process for the Tampa Bay urban growth simulation spends only 10 h CPU time. The model predicts future land use/cover change trends for Tampa Bay from 1992 to 2025. Urban extent is predicted to double in the Tampa Bay watershed between 1992 and 2025. Results show an upward trend of urbanization at the expense of a decline of 58% and 80% in agriculture and forested lands, respectively. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulations on High-Performance Reconfigurable Computing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Matt; Herbordt, Martin C

    2010-11-01

    The acceleration of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using high-performance reconfigurable computing (HPRC) has been much studied. Given the intense competition from multicore and GPUs, there is now a question whether MD on HPRC can be competitive. We concentrate here on the MD kernel computation: determining the short-range force between particle pairs. In one part of the study, we systematically explore the design space of the force pipeline with respect to arithmetic algorithm, arithmetic mode, precision, and various other optimizations. We examine simplifications and find that some have little effect on simulation quality. In the other part, we present the first FPGA study of the filtering of particle pairs with nearly zero mutual force, a standard optimization in MD codes. There are several innovations, including a novel partitioning of the particle space, and new methods for filtering and mapping work onto the pipelines. As a consequence, highly efficient filtering can be implemented with only a small fraction of the FPGA's resources. Overall, we find that, for an Altera Stratix-III EP3ES260, 8 force pipelines running at nearly 200 MHz can fit on the FPGA, and that they can perform at 95% efficiency. This results in an 80-fold per core speed-up for the short-range force, which is likely to make FPGAs highly competitive for MD.

  13. DYNAMICS OF DETECTED FIRE FACTORS IN CLOSED COMPARTMENT: COMPUTER SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Nevdakh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer simulation of the initial fire stages in closed compartment with the volume of ≈ 60 m3 and with a burner on a floor and 2 m above floor have been carried using FDS software. Fires with different t 2 –power low heat release rates have been modeled. Fires which growth times to reach 1055 kW were 100 s and 500 s have been considered as fast and slow fires respectively. Dynamics of heat release rates and detected fire factors such as spatial distributions of air temperature, smoke obscuration and variations of indoor pressure have been studied. It has been obtained that dynamics of heat release rates of the initial fire stages in closed compartment consists of two stages. During the first stage the heat release rate is proportional to mass burning rate and flaming occurs only above a burner. At the second stage dynamics of heat release rates has a form of irregular in amplitude and duration pulsations, which are caused by self-ignition in the smoke layer. The compartment air volume may be layered with respect to the height and every layer has its oven temperature, smoke obscuration, self-ignition areas have been shown. The layer thickness, gradients of temperature and obscuration depend on a fire growth rate and on a burner height above floor have been concluded. The spatial distributions of air temperature and pressure variation have the opposite gradients on a height have been obtained. Maximal pressure variation and its gradient occurs under the fast fire with a burner on a floor have been obtained too. 

  14. Turbomachinery computational fluid dynamics: asymptotes and paradigm shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, W N

    2007-10-15

    This paper reviews the development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) specifically for turbomachinery simulations and with a particular focus on application to problems with complex geometry. The review is structured by considering this development as a series of paradigm shifts, followed by asymptotes. The original S1-S2 blade-blade-throughflow model is briefly described, followed by the development of two-dimensional then three-dimensional blade-blade analysis. This in turn evolved from inviscid to viscous analysis and then from steady to unsteady flow simulations. This development trajectory led over a surprisingly small number of years to an accepted approach-a 'CFD orthodoxy'. A very important current area of intense interest and activity in turbomachinery simulation is in accounting for real geometry effects, not just in the secondary air and turbine cooling systems but also associated with the primary path. The requirements here are threefold: capturing and representing these geometries in a computer model; making rapid design changes to these complex geometries; and managing the very large associated computational models on PC clusters. Accordingly, the challenges in the application of the current CFD orthodoxy to complex geometries are described in some detail. The main aim of this paper is to argue that the current CFD orthodoxy is on a new asymptote and is not in fact suited for application to complex geometries and that a paradigm shift must be sought. In particular, the new paradigm must be geometry centric and inherently parallel without serial bottlenecks. The main contribution of this paper is to describe such a potential paradigm shift, inspired by the animation industry, based on a fundamental shift in perspective from explicit to implicit geometry and then illustrate this with a number of applications to turbomachinery.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M.; Coolens, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  16. An Automated High Aspect Ratio Mesher for Computational Fluid Dynamics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are routinely used while designing, analyzing, and optimizing air- and spacecraft. An important component of CFD...

  17. Towards a Population Dynamics Theory for Evolutionary Computing: Learning from Biological Population Dynamics in Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhanshan (Sam)

    In evolutionary computing (EC), population size is one of the critical parameters that a researcher has to deal with. Hence, it was no surprise that the pioneers of EC, such as De Jong (1975) and Holland (1975), had already studied the population sizing from the very beginning of EC. What is perhaps surprising is that more than three decades later, we still largely depend on the experience or ad-hoc trial-and-error approach to set the population size. For example, in a recent monograph, Eiben and Smith (2003) indicated: "In almost all EC applications, the population size is constant and does not change during the evolutionary search." Despite enormous research on this issue in recent years, we still lack a well accepted theory for population sizing. In this paper, I propose to develop a population dynamics theory forEC with the inspiration from the population dynamics theory of biological populations in nature. Essentially, the EC population is considered as a dynamic system over time (generations) and space (search space or fitness landscape), similar to the spatial and temporal dynamics of biological populations in nature. With this conceptual mapping, I propose to 'transplant' the biological population dynamics theory to EC via three steps: (i) experimentally test the feasibility—whether or not emulating natural population dynamics improves the EC performance; (ii) comparatively study the underlying mechanisms—why there are improvements, primarily via statistical modeling analysis; (iii) conduct theoretical analysis with theoretical models such as percolation theory and extended evolutionary game theory that are generally applicable to both EC and natural populations. This article is a summary of a series of studies we have performed to achieve the general goal [27][30]-[32]. In the following, I start with an extremely brief introduction on the theory and models of natural population dynamics (Sections 1 & 2). In Sections 4 to 6, I briefly discuss three

  18. A cortically-inspired model for inverse kinematics computation of a humanoid finger with mechanically coupled joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Rodolphe J; Oh, Hyuk; Kregling, Alissa V; Reggia, James A

    2016-05-19

    The human hand's versatility allows for robust and flexible grasping. To obtain such efficiency, many robotic hands include human biomechanical features such as fingers having their two last joints mechanically coupled. Although such coupling enables human-like grasping, controlling the inverse kinematics of such mechanical systems is challenging. Here we propose a cortical model for fine motor control of a humanoid finger, having its two last joints coupled, that learns the inverse kinematics of the effector. This neural model functionally mimics the population vector coding as well as sensorimotor prediction processes of the brain's motor/premotor and parietal regions, respectively. After learning, this neural architecture could both overtly (actual execution) and covertly (mental execution or motor imagery) perform accurate, robust and flexible finger movements while reproducing the main human finger kinematic states. This work contributes to developing neuro-mimetic controllers for dexterous humanoid robotic/prosthetic upper-extremities, and has the potential to promote human-robot interactions.

  19. Study on Approach for Computer-Aided Design and Machining of General Cylindrical Cam Using Relative Velocity and Inverse Kinematics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Se-Hwan; Park; Byong-Kook; Gu; Joong-Ho; Shin; Geun-Jong; Yoo

    2002-01-01

    Cylindrical Cam Mechanism which is one of the best eq uipments to accomplish an accurate motion transmission is widely used in the fie lds of industries, such as machine tool exchangers, textile machinery and automa tic transfer equipments. This paper proposes a new approach for the shape design and manufacturing of the cylindrical cam. The design approach uses the relative velocity concept and the manufacturing approach uses the inverse kinematics concept. For the shape desig n, the contact points betw...

  20. Distributed computations in a dynamic, heterogeneous Grid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dramlitsch, Thomas

    2003-06-01

    other reasons for low performance - develop new and advanced algorithms for parallelisation that are aware of a Grid environment in order to generelize the traditional parallelization schemes - implement and test these new methods, replace and compare with the classical ones - introduce dynamic strategies that automatically adapt the running code to the nature of the underlying Grid environment. The higher the performance one can achieve for a single application by manual tuning for a Grid environment, the lower the chance that those changes are widely applicable to other programs. In our analysis as well as in our implementation we tried to keep the balance between high performance and generality. None of our changes directly affect code on the application level which makes our algorithms applicable to a whole class of real world applications. The implementation of our work is done within the Cactus framework using the Globus toolkit, since we think that these are the most reliable and advanced programming frameworks for supporting computations in Grid environments. On the other hand, however, we tried to be as general as possible, i.e. all methods and algorithms discussed in this thesis are independent of Cactus or Globus. Die immer dichtere und schnellere Vernetzung von Rechnern und Rechenzentren über Hochgeschwindigkeitsnetzwerke ermöglicht eine neue Art des wissenschaftlich verteilten Rechnens, bei der geographisch weit auseinanderliegende Rechenkapazitäten zu einer Gesamtheit zusammengefasst werden können. Dieser so entstehende virtuelle Superrechner, der selbst aus mehreren Grossrechnern besteht, kann dazu genutzt werden Probleme zu berechnen, für die die einzelnen Grossrechner zu klein sind. Die Probleme, die numerisch mit heutigen Rechenkapazitäten nicht lösbar sind, erstrecken sich durch sämtliche Gebiete der heutigen Wissenschaft, angefangen von Astrophysik, Molekülphysik, Bioinformatik, Meteorologie, bis hin zur Zahlentheorie und Fluiddynamik um nur