WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamic infrared imaging

  1. Dynamic infrared imaging for skin cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Sebastián E.; Ramirez, David A.; Myers, Stephen A.; von Winckel, Greg; Krishna, Sanchita; Berwick, Marianne; Padilla, R. Steven; Sen, Pradeep; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic thermal imaging (DTI) with infrared cameras is a non-invasive technique with the ability to detect the most common types of skin cancer. We discuss and propose a standardized analysis method for DTI of actual patient data, which achieves high levels of sensitivity and specificity by judiciously selecting pixels with the same initial temperature. This process compensates the intrinsic limitations of the cooling unit and is the key enabling tool in the DTI data analysis. We have extensively tested the methodology on human subjects using thermal infrared image sequences from a pilot study conducted jointly with the University of New Mexico Dermatology Clinic in Albuquerque, New Mexico (ClinicalTrials ID number NCT02154451). All individuals were adult subjects who were scheduled for biopsy or adult volunteers with clinically diagnosed benign condition. The sample size was 102 subjects for the present study. Statistically significant results were obtained that allowed us to distinguish between benign and malignant skin conditions. The sensitivity and specificity was 95% (with a 95% confidence interval of [87.8% 100.0%]) and 83% (with a 95% confidence interval of [73.4% 92.5%]), respectively, and with an area under the curve of 95%. Our results lead us to conclude that the DTI approach in conjunction with the judicious selection of pixels has the potential to provide a fast, accurate, non-contact, and non-invasive way to screen for common types of skin cancer. As such, it has the potential to significantly reduce the number of biopsies performed on suspicious lesions.

  2. Dynamic infrared imaging for the detection of malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, Terry M [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Li, Haifang [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Fisher, Paul [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Rosenblatt, Ruth [Department of Radiology, Strang Cancer Prevention Center, New York, NY 10021 USA (United States); Dulaimy, Khaldoon [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Li, Song [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); O' Hea, Brian [Department of Surgery, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Salvitti, Mathew [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Geronimo, Veronica [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Geronimo, Christine [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Jambawalikar, Sachin [Department Biomedical Engineering, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Carvelli, Paola [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Weiss, Richard [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2004-07-21

    The potential for malignancy detection using dynamic infrared imaging (DIRI) has been investigated in an animal model of human malignancy. Malignancy was apparent in images formed at the vasomotor and cardiogenic frequencies of tumour bearing mice. The observation of malignancy was removed by the administration of an agent that blocks vasodilation caused by nitric oxide (NO). Image patterns similar to those that characterize malignancy could be mimicked in normal mice using an NO producing agent. Apparently DIRI allows for cancer detection in this model through vasodilation caused by malignancy generated NO. Dynamic infrared detection of vasomotor and cardiogenic surface perfusion was validated in human subjects by a comparison with laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Dynamic infrared imaging technology was then applied to breast cancer detection. It is shown that dynamic infrared images formed at the vasomotor and cardiogenic frequencies of the normal and malignant breast have image pattern differences, which may allow for breast cancer detection.

  3. Adaptive fusion of infrared and visible images in dynamic scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Yin, Yafeng; Man, Hong; Desai, Sachi

    2011-11-01

    Multiple modalities sensor fusion has been widely employed in various surveillance and military applications. A variety of image fusion techniques including PCA, wavelet, curvelet and HSV has been proposed in recent years to improve human visual perception for object detection. One of the main challenges for visible and infrared image fusion is to automatically determine an optimal fusion strategy for different input scenes along with an acceptable computational cost. This paper, we propose a fast and adaptive feature selection based image fusion method to obtain high a contrast image from visible and infrared sensors for targets detection. At first, fuzzy c-means clustering is applied on the infrared image to highlight possible hotspot regions, which will be considered as potential targets' locations. After that, the region surrounding the target area is segmented as the background regions. Then image fusion is locally applied on the selected target and background regions by computing different linear combination of color components from registered visible and infrared images. After obtaining different fused images, histogram distributions are computed on these local fusion images as the fusion feature set. The variance ratio which is based on Linear Discriminative Analysis (LDA) measure is employed to sort the feature set and the most discriminative one is selected for the whole image fusion. As the feature selection is performed over time, the process will dynamically determine the most suitable feature for the image fusion in different scenes. Experiment is conducted on the OSU Color-Thermal database, and TNO Human Factor dataset. The fusion results indicate that our proposed method achieved a competitive performance compared with other fusion algorithms at a relatively low computational cost.

  4. Multifractal analysis of dynamic infrared imaging of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, E.; Audit, B.; Roux, S. G.; Khalil, A.; Argoul, F.; Naimark, O.; Arneodo, A.

    2013-12-01

    The wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method was used in a multifractal analysis of skin breast temperature time-series recorded using dynamic infrared (IR) thermography. Multifractal scaling was found for healthy breasts as the signature of a continuous change in the shape of the probability density function (pdf) of temperature fluctuations across time scales from \\sim0.3 to 3 s. In contrast, temperature time-series from breasts with malignant tumors showed homogeneous monofractal temperature fluctuations statistics. These results highlight dynamic IR imaging as a very valuable non-invasive technique for preliminary screening in asymptomatic women to identify those with risk of breast cancer.

  5. Feature-based fusion of infrared and visible dynamic images using target detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Congyi Liu; Zhongliang Jing; Gang Xiao; Bo Yang

    2007-01-01

    We employ the target detection to improve the performance of the feature-based fusion of infrared and visible dynamic images, which forms a novel fusion scheme. First, the target detection is used to segment the source image sequences into target and background regions. Then, the dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DT-CWT) is proposed to decompose all the source image sequences. Different fusion rules are applied respectively in target and background regions to preserve the target information as much as possible. Real world infrared and visible image sequences are used to validate the performance of the proposed novel scheme. Compared with the previous fusion approaches of image sequences, the improvements of shift invariance, temporal stability and consistency, and computation cost are all ensured.

  6. Dynamic infrared imaging of cutaneous melanoma and normal skin in patients treated with BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Cruz, G.A. [Dpto. de Instrumentacion y Control, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250 (1429), Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: santacr@cnea.gov.ar; Bertotti, J.; Marin, J. [Universidad Favaloro, Solis 453 (1078), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gonzalez, S.J. [Dpto. de Instrumentacion y Control, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250 (1429), Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917 (1033), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gossio, S. [FCEyN, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez, D. [Fundacion Favaloro, Av. Belgrano 1746 (1093), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Roth, B.M.C.; Menendez, P. [Instituto de Oncologia Angel H. Roffo, Av. San Martin 5481 (1417), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pereira, M.D. [Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, PAV 22393 (Argentina); Albero, M.; Cubau, L.; Orellano, P. [INVAP S.E., F.P. Moreno 1089 (R8400AMU), S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Liberman, S.J. [Dpto. de Instrumentacion y Control, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250 (1429), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-07-15

    We recently initiated a program aimed to investigate the suitability of dynamic infrared imaging for following-up nodular melanoma patients treated with BNCT. The reason that makes infrared imaging attractive is the fact that it constitutes a functional and non-invasive imaging method, providing information on the normal and abnormal physiologic response of the nervous and vascular systems, as well as the local metabolic rate and inflammatory processes that ultimately appear as differences in the skin temperature. An infrared camera, with a focal plane array of 320x240 uncooled ferroelectric detectors is employed, which provides a video stream of the infrared emission in the 7-14 {mu}m wavelength band. A double blackbody is used as reference for absolute temperature calibration. After following a protocol for patient preparation and acclimatization, a basal study is performed. Subsequently, the anatomic region of interest is subjected to a provocation test (a cold stimulus), which induces an autonomic vasoconstriction reflex in normal structures, thus enhancing the thermal contrast due to the differences in the vasculature of the different skin regions. Radiation erythema reactions and melanoma nodules possess typically a faster temperature recovery than healthy, non-irradiated skin. However, some other non-pathological structures are also detectable by infrared imaging, (e.g. scars, vessels, arteriovenous anastomoses and injuries), thus requiring a multi-study comparison in order to discriminate the tumor signal. Besides the superficial nodules, which are readily noticeable by infrared imaging, we have detected thermal signals that are coincident with the location of non-palpable nodules, which are observable by CT and ultrasound. Diffuse regions of fast temperature recovery after a cold stimulus were observed between the third and sixth weeks post-BNCT, concurrent with the clinical manifestation of radiation erythema. The location of the erythematous visible and

  7. Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchi, W.; Lawson, P.; Absil, O.; Akeson, R.; Bally, J.; Barry, R.; Beichman, C.; Belu, A.; Boyce, M.; Breckinridge, J.; Burrows, A.; Chen, C.; Cole, D.; Crisp, D.; Danner, R.; Deroo, P.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Defrère, D.; Ebbets, D.; Falkowski, P.; Gappinger, R.; Haugabook, I.; Hanot, C.; Henning, T.; Hinz, P.; Hollis, J.; Hunyadi, S.; Hyland, D.; Johnston, K.; Kaltenegger, L.; Kasting, J.; Kenworthy, M.; Ksendzov, A.; Lane, B.; Laughlin, G.; Lay, O.; Liseau, R.; Lopez, B.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Martin, S.; Mawet, D.; Mennesson, B.; Monnier, J.; Murakami, N.; Noecker, C.; Nishikawa, J.; Pesesen, M.; Peters, R.; Quillen, A.; Ragland, S.; Rinehart, S.; Rottgering, H.; Scharf, D.; Serabyn, G.; Tamura, M.; Tehrani, M.; Traub, W.; Unwin, S.; Wilner, D.; Woilliez, J.; Woolf, N.; Zhao, M.

    2009-03-01

    A mid-infrared mission would enable the detection of biosignatures of Earth-like exoplanets around more than 150 nearby stars. The mid-infrared spectral region is attractive for characterizing exoplanets because contrast with the parent star brightness is more favorable than in the visible (10 million vs. 10 billion), and because mid-infrared light probes deep into a planet's troposphere. Furthermore, the mid-infrared offers access to several strong molecular features that are key signs of life, and also provides a measure of the effective temperature and size of a planet. Taken together, an infrared mission plus a visible one would provide a nearly full picture of a planet, including signs of life; with a measure of mass from an astrometric mission, we would have a virtually complete picture. A small infrared mission would have several telescopes that are rigidly connected, with a science return from the detection and characterization of super-Earth sized to larger planets near the HZ, plus a direct measure of the exozodi brightness in the HZ. In a large infrared mission, with formation-flying telescopes, planets from an Earth-twin and upwards in mass could be detected and characterized, as well as the exozodi. If proceeded by an astrometric mission, the detection phase could be skipped and the mission devoted to characterization, as in the visible case; lacking an astrometric mission, an infrared one could proceed alone, as was discussed for a visible coronograph, and with similar caveats. The technology needed for a large formation-flying mission is similar to that for a small connected-element one (e.g., cryogenics and detectors), with the addition of formationflying technology. The technology is now in hand to implement a probe-scale mission; starlight suppression has even been demonstrated to meet the requirements of a flagship mission. However, additional development of formation-flying technology is needed, particularly in-space testing of sensors and

  8. High dynamic range infrared images detail enhancement based on local edge preserving filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qiong; Wang, Yuehuan; Bai, Kun

    2016-07-01

    In the field of infrared (IR) image processing, displaying a high dynamic range (HDR) image on a low dynamic range display equipment with a natural visual effect, clear details on local areas and less artifacts is an important issue. In this paper, we present a new approach to display HDR IR images with contrast enhancement. First, the local edge-preserving filter (LEPF) is utilized to separate the image into a base layer and detail layer(s). After the filtering procedure, we use an adaptive Gamma transformation to adjust the gray distribution of the base layer, and stretch the detail layer based on a human visual effect principle. Then, we recombine the detail layer and base layer to obtain the enhance output. Finally, we adjust the luminance of output by applying multiple exposure fusion method. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method can provide a significant performance in terms of enhancing details and less artifacts than the state of the arts.

  9. First application of dynamic infrared imaging in boron neutron capture therapy for cutaneous malignant melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Cruz, G. A.; Gonzalez, S. J.; Bertotti, J.; Marin, J. [Departamento de Instrumentacion y Control, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Instrumentacion y Control, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina) and CONICET, Avenida Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Favaloro, Solis 453, 1078 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the potential of dynamic infrared imaging (DIRI) as a functional, noninvasive technique for evaluating the skin acute toxicity and tumor control within the framework of the Argentine boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) program for cutaneous malignant melanoma. Methods: Two patients enrolled in the Argentine phase I/II BNCT clinical trial for cutaneous malignant melanoma were studied with DIRI. An uncooled infrared camera, providing a video output signal, was employed to register the temperature evolution of the normal skin and tumor regions in patients subjected to a mild local cooling (cold stimulus). In order to study the spatial correlation between dose and acute skin reactions, three-dimensional representations of the superficial dose delivered to skin were constructed and cameralike projections of the dose distribution were coregistered with visible and infrared images. Results: The main erythematous reaction was observed clinically between the second and fifth week post-BNCT. Concurrently, with its clinical onset, a reactive increase above the basal skin temperature was observed with DIRI in the third week post-BNCT within regions that received therapeutic doses. Melanoma nodules appeared as highly localized hyperthermic regions. 2 min after stimulus, these regions reached a temperature plateau and increased in size. Temperature differences with respect to normal skin up to 10 deg. C were observed in the larger nodules. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that DIRI, enhanced by the application of cold stimuli, may provide useful functional information associated with the metabolism and vasculature of tumors and inflammatory processes related to radiation-induced changes in the skin as well. These capabilities are aimed at complementing the clinical observations and standard imaging techniques, such as CT and Doppler ultrasound.

  10. Visualizing Chemistry with Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Almost all chemical processes release or absorb heat. The heat flow in a chemical system reflects the process it is undergoing. By showing the temperature distribution dynamically, infrared (IR) imaging provides a salient visualization of the process. This paper presents a set of simple experiments based on IR imaging to demonstrate its enormous…

  11. High-sensitivity and cost-effective system for infrared imaging of concealed objects in dynamic mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordiyenko, E.; Yefremenko, V.; Pearson, J.; Bader, S. D.; Novosad, V.

    2005-05-01

    Novel, cost-efficient, and highly-sensitive IR imaging systems play an important role in homeland security functions. Technical limitations in the areas of sensitivity, contrast ratio, bandwidth and cost continue to constrain imaging capabilities. We have designed and prototyped a compact computer-piloted high sensitivity infrared imaging system. The device consists of infrared optics, cryostat, low-noise pre-amplifier, Analog-to-Digital hardware, feedback electronics, and unique image processing software. Important advantages of the developed system are: (i) Eight electronic channels are available for simultaneous registration of IR and visible images in multiple spectral ranges, (ii) Capability of real-time analysis such as comparing the "sensed" image with "reference" images from a database, (iii) High accuracy temperature measurement of multiple points on the image by referencing the radiation intensity from the object to a black body model, (iv) Image generation by real-time integration of images from multiple sensors operating from the visible to the terahertz range. The device was tested with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled, single-pixel HgCdTe detector for imaging in 8-12 microns range. The demonstrated examples of infrared imaging of concealed objects in static and dynamic modes include a hammer (metal head and wooden handle), plastic imitator of handguns hidden under clothes, powder in an envelope, and revealing complex wall structures under decorative plaster.

  12. High dynamic solutions for short-wavelength infrared imaging based on InGaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverchon, Jean-Luc; Decobert, Jean; Djedidi, Anis; Gentner, Jean-Louis; Huet, Odile; Lagay, Nadine; Rouvié, Anne; Robo, Jean-Alexandre; Truffer, Jean-Patrick; Costard, Eric; Ni, Yang; Arion, Bogdan; Zhu, Yiming; Potet, Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Short-wavelength infrared image sensors based on p-i-n photodiode arrays present a tremendous interest in applications such as passive and active imagery for laser detection/warning, hot spot or detection for lasers sensors, enhanced vision systems or low light level sensors. The capability to work at room temperature with dark current equivalent to silicon-based devices is another motivation for the fast development of this technology. This paper presents several modules and camera based on InGaAs photodiode arrays from the III-VLab. First, we describe the electro-optics performance in terms of dark signal, sensitivity, and particularly the visible extension capability. We also present a nucless logarithmic sensor based on a 1/2 video graphics array (VGA) format at a pitch of 25 μm initially designed for visible CMOS camera chip. We will also present the next generation of focal plane arrays based on a VGA format of 640×512 pixels with a pitch of 15 μm. This array will be associated to a CTIA readout circuit and also to an innovative CMOS logarithmic wide dynamic range ROIC, developed by New Imaging Technologies. This VGA logarithmic device developed for automotive safety will involve visible extension capability in a European project named 2Wide_sense.

  13. Dynamic infrared imaging for biological and medical applications in Boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; González, Sara J.; Dagrosa, Alejandra; Schwint, Amanda E.; Carpano, Marina; Trivillin, Verónica A.; Boggio, Esteban F.; Bertotti, José; Marín, Julio; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Molinari, Ana J.; Albero, Miguel

    2011-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality, currently focused on the treatment of cancer, which involves a tumor selective 10B compound and a specially tuned neutron beam to produce a lethal nuclear reaction. BNCT kills target cells with microscopic selectivity while sparing normal tissues from potentially lethal doses of radiation. In the context of the Argentine clinical and research BNCT projects at the National Atomic Energy Commission and in a strong collaboration with INVAP SE, we successfully implemented Dynamic Infrared Imaging (DIRI) in the clinical setting for the observation of cutaneous melanoma patients and included DIRI as a non invasive methodology in several research protocols involving small animals. We were able to characterize melanoma lesions in terms of temperature and temperature rate-of-recovery after applying a mild cold thermal stress, distinguishing melanoma from other skin pigmented lesions. We observed a spatial and temporal correlation between skin acute reactions after irradiation, the temperature pattern and the dose distribution. We studied temperature distribution as a function of tumor growth in mouse xenografts, observing a significant correlation between tumor temperature and drug uptake; we investigated temperature evolution in the limbs of Wistar rats for a protocol of induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA), DIRI being especially sensitive to RA induction even before the development of clinical signs and studied surface characteristics of tumors, precancerous and normal tissues in a model of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch.

  14. Infrared upconversion hyperspectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Louis Martinus; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    2015-01-01

    conversion process. From this, a sequence of monochromatic images in the 3.2-3.4 mu m range is generated. The imaged object consists of a standard United States Air Force resolution target combined with a polystyrene film, resulting in the presence of both spatial and spectral information in the infrared...

  15. Variable waveband infrared imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Scott R.

    2013-06-11

    A waveband imager includes an imaging pixel that utilizes photon tunneling with a thermally actuated bimorph structure to convert infrared radiation to visible radiation. Infrared radiation passes through a transparent substrate and is absorbed by a bimorph structure formed with a pixel plate. The absorption generates heat which deflects the bimorph structure and pixel plate towards the substrate and into an evanescent electric field generated by light propagating through the substrate. Penetration of the bimorph structure and pixel plate into the evanescent electric field allows a portion of the visible wavelengths propagating through the substrate to tunnel through the substrate, bimorph structure, and/or pixel plate as visible radiation that is proportional to the intensity of the incident infrared radiation. This converted visible radiation may be superimposed over visible wavelengths passed through the imaging pixel.

  16. The Dynamic Infrared Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Mansi M.; SPIRITS (Spitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey) Team

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic infrared sky is hitherto largely unexplored. I will present the SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey (SPIRITS) --- a systematic search of 194 nearby galaxies within 30 Mpc, on timescales ranging between a week to a year, to a depth of 20 mag with Spitzer's IRAC camera. SPIRITS has already uncovered over 95 explosive transients and over 1200 strong variables. Of these, 37 infrared transients are especially interesting as they have no optical counterparts whatsoever even with deep limits from Keck and HST. Interpretation of these new discoveries may include (i) the birth of massive binaries that drive shocks in their molecular cloud, (ii) stellar mergers with dusty winds, (iii) 8--10 solar mass stars experiencing e-capture induced collapse in their cores, (iv) enshrouded supernovae, or (v) formation of stellar mass black holes. SPIRITS reveals that the infrared sky is not just as dynamic as the optical sky; it also provides access to unique, elusive signatures in stellar astrophysics.

  17. Infrared Chemical Nano-Imaging: Accessing Structure, Coupling, and Dynamics on Molecular Length Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Eric A.; Pollard, Benjamin; Raschke, Markus Bernd

    2015-04-02

    This Perspective highlights recent advances in infrared vibrational chemical nano-imaging. In its implementations of scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) and photothermal-induced resonance (PTIR), IR nanospectroscopy provides few-nanometer spatial resolution for the investigation of polymer, biomaterial, and related soft-matter surfaces and nanostructures. Broad-band IR s-SNOM with coherent laser and synchrotron sources allows for chemical recognition with small-ensemble sensitivity and the potential for sensitivity reaching the single-molecule limit. Probing selected vibrational marker resonances, it gives access to nanoscale chemical imaging of composition, domain morphologies, order/disorder, molecular orientation, or crystallographic phases. Local intra- and intermolecular coupling can be measured through frequency shifts of a vibrational marker in heterogeneous environments and associated inhomogeneities in vibrational dephasing. In combination with ultrafast spectroscopy, the vibrational coherent evolution of homogeneous sub-ensembles coupled to their environment can be observed. Outstanding challenges are discussed in terms of extensions to coherent and multidimensional spectroscopies, implementation in liquid and in situ environments, general sample limitations, and engineering s-SNOM scanning probes to better control the nano-localized optical excitation and to increase sensitivity.

  18. Bio-Inspired Dynamically Tunable Polymer-Based Filters for Multi-Spectral Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Morse. Plastic Transmissive Infrared Electrochromic Devices , Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics, (07 2010): 0. doi: 10.1002/macp.201000096 2011/10/10...Publication: Holt, A.L., J. G. A. Wehner, A. Hammp and D. E. Morse. 2010. Plastic transmissive infrared electrochromic devices ...Level Device Design ( Electrochromic -Based IR Shutter): The first initiative in the device design work consisted of determining a standard device

  19. Measurement of process dynamics through coaxially aligned high speed near-infrared imaging in laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jason C.; Lane, Brandon M.; Yeung, Ho

    2017-05-01

    For process stability in laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) additive manufacturing (AM), control of melt pool dimensions is imperative. In order to control melt pool dimensions in real time, sampling frequencies in excess of 10 kHz may be required, which presents a challenge for many thermal and optical monitoring systems. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is currently developing the Additive Manufacturing Metrology Testbed (AMMT), which replicates a metal based laser powder bed fusion AM process while providing open architecture for control, sensing, and calibration sources. The system is outfitted with a coaxially aligned, near-infrared (NIR) high speed melt pool monitoring (MPM) system. Similar monitoring systems are incorporated into LPBF research testbeds, and appearing on commercial machines, but at lower available frame rates, which may limit observation of higher frequency events such as spatter or size fluctuations. This paper presents an investigation of the coaxial imaging systems of the AMMT to capture the process dynamics, and quantify the effects of dynamic fluctuations on melt pool size measurements. Analysis is carried out on a baseline experiment with no powder material added, melt pool size measurements collected in-situ are compared to ex-situ measurements, and results are discussed in terms of temporal bandwidth. Findings will show that, even at the frame rate and resolution presented, challenges in relating in-situ video signals to the ex-situ measurement analysis remain.

  20. Infrared imaging of varicose veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordmans, Herke Jan; de Zeeuw, Raymond; Verdaasdonk, Ruud M.; Wittens, Cees H. A.

    2004-06-01

    It has been established that varicose veins are better visualized with infrared photography. As near-infrared films are nowadays hard to get and to develop in the digital world, we investigated the use of digital photography of varicose veins. Topics that are discussed are illumination setup, photography and digital image enhancement and analysis.

  1. An Excursus on Infrared Thermography Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carosena Meola

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work represents an overview of some of the applications of infrared thermography that have been carried out at the University of Naples Federico II over the years. The focus is on four topics: thermo-fluid-dynamics, materials inspection, cultural heritage and preventative maintenance. For each topic, some results are presented as thermal, and/or phase, images with the attention being essentially devoted to the capacity of these images to communicate information. For more details on test apparatuses, procedures and data analyses, the reader is referred to the previous published work, available in the literature.

  2. Longwave infrared snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumiller, Riley

    The goal of this dissertation research is to develop and demonstrate a functioning snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter for the long wavelength infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum (wavelengths from 8-12 microns). Such an optical system will be able to simultaneously measure both the spectral and polarimetric signatures of all the spatial locations/targets in a scene with just a single integration period of a camera. This will be accomplished by combining the use of computed tomographic imaging spectrometry (CTIS) and channeled spectropolarimetry. The proposed system will be the first instrument of this type specifically designed to operate in the long wavelength infrared region, as well as being the first demonstration of such a system using an uncooled infrared focal plane array. In addition to the design and construction of the proof-of-concept snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter LWIR system, the dissertation research will also focus on a variety of methods on improving CTIS system performance. These enhancements will include some newly proposed methods of system design, calibration, and reconstruction aimed at improving the speed of reconstructions allowing for the first demonstration of a CTIS system capable of computing reconstructions in real time.

  3. Detail Enhancement for Infrared Images Based on Propagated Image Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yishu Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For displaying high-dynamic-range images acquired by thermal camera systems, 14-bit raw infrared data should map into 8-bit gray values. This paper presents a new method for detail enhancement of infrared images to display the image with a relatively satisfied contrast and brightness, rich detail information, and no artifacts caused by the image processing. We first adopt a propagated image filter to smooth the input image and separate the image into the base layer and the detail layer. Then, we refine the base layer by using modified histogram projection for compressing. Meanwhile, the adaptive weights derived from the layer decomposition processing are used as the strict gain control for the detail layer. The final display result is obtained by recombining the two modified layers. Experimental results on both cooled and uncooled infrared data verify that the proposed method outperforms the method based on log-power histogram modification and bilateral filter-based detail enhancement in both detail enhancement and visual effect.

  4. High-resolution infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Charles M.

    2010-08-01

    The hands and mind of an artist are intimately involved in the creative process of image formation, intrinsically making paintings significantly more complex than photographs to analyze. In spite of this difficulty, several years ago the artist David Hockney and I identified optical evidence within a number of paintings that demonstrated artists began using optical projections as early as c1425 - nearly 175 years before Galileo - as aids for producing portions of their images. In the course of our work, Hockney and I developed insights that I have been applying to a new approach to computerized image analysis. Recently I developed and characterized a portable high resolution infrared for capturing additional information from paintings. Because many pigments are semi-transparent in the IR, in a number of cases IR photographs ("reflectograms") have revealed marks made by the artists that had been hidden under paint ever since they were made. I have used this IR camera to capture photographs ("reflectograms") of hundreds of paintings in over a dozen museums on three continents and, in some cases, these reflectograms have provided new insights into decisions the artists made in creating the final images that we see in the visible.

  5. Infrared image mosaic using point feature operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhen; Sun, Shaoyuan; Shen, Zhenyi; Hou, Junjie; Zhao, Haitao

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study infrared image mosaic around a single point of rotation, aiming at expanding the narrow view range of infrared images. We propose an infrared image mosaic method using point feature operators including image registration and image synthesis. Traditional mosaic algorithms usually use global image registration methods to extract the feature points in the global image, which cost too much time as well as considerable matching errors. To address this issue, we first roughly calculate the image shift amount using phase correlation and determine the overlap region between images, and then extract image features in overlap region, which shortens the registration time and increases the quality of feature points. We improve the traditional algorithm through increasing constraints of point matching based on prior knowledge of image shift amount based on which the weighted map is computed using fade in-out method. The experimental results verify that the proposed method has better real time performance and robustness.

  6. Nanoantenna-Enhanced Infrared Spectroscopic Chemical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühner, Lucca; Hentschel, Mario; Zschieschang, Ute; Klauk, Hagen; Vogt, Jochen; Huck, Christian; Giessen, Harald; Neubrech, Frank

    2017-05-26

    Spectroscopic infrared chemical imaging is ideally suited for label-free and spatially resolved characterization of molecular species, but often suffers from low infrared absorption cross sections. Here, we overcome this limitation by utilizing confined electromagnetic near-fields of resonantly excited plasmonic nanoantennas, which enhance the molecular absorption by orders of magnitude. In the experiments, we evaporate microstructured chemical patterns of C60 and pentacene with nanometer thickness on top of homogeneous arrays of tailored nanoantennas. Broadband mid-infrared spectra containing plasmonic and vibrational information were acquired with diffraction-limited resolution using a two-dimensional focal plane array detector. Evaluating the enhanced infrared absorption at the respective frequencies, spatially resolved chemical images were obtained. In these chemical images, the microstructured chemical patterns are only visible if nanoantennas are used. This confirms the superior performance of our approach over conventional spectroscopic infrared imaging. In addition to the improved sensitivity, our technique provides chemical selectivity, which would not be available with plasmonic imaging that is based on refractive index sensing. To extend the accessible spectral bandwidth of nanoantenna-enhanced spectroscopic imaging, we employed nanostructures with dual-band resonances, providing broadband plasmonic enhancement and sensitivity. Our results demonstrate the potential of nanoantenna-enhanced spectroscopic infrared chemical imaging for spatially resolved characterization of organic layers with thicknesses of several nanometers. This is of potential interest for medical applications which are currently hampered by state-of-art infrared techniques, e.g., for distinguishing cancerous from healthy tissues.

  7. Neonatal Infrared Thermography Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Bayo Catalan, Lluis

    2009-01-01

    Tesina feta en col.laboració amb RWTH Aachen The temperature changes inside incubator a ect the newborns, who are the most delicate patients. The project proposes an innovative method to monitor the skin temperature of the neonates. The temperature monitoring is carried out by a virtual sensor. This virtual sensor is based in an infrared thermal camera that is placed outside the incubator. In order to obtain the infrared radiation through the incubator Plexiglas, an infrared tr...

  8. Infrared Sky Imager (IRSI) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Victor R [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Infrared Sky Imager (IRSI) deployed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is a Solmirus Corp. All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer. The IRSI is an automatic, continuously operating, digital imaging and software system designed to capture hemispheric sky images and provide time series retrievals of fractional sky cover during both the day and night. The instrument provides diurnal, radiometrically calibrated sky imagery in the mid-infrared atmospheric window and imagery in the visible wavelengths for cloud retrievals during daylight hours. The software automatically identifies cloudy and clear regions at user-defined intervals and calculates fractional sky cover, providing a real-time display of sky conditions.

  9. Ge Quantum Dot Infrared Imaging Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated proposes to develop a high performance Ge quantum dots-based infrared (IR) imaging camera on Si substrate. The high sensitivity, large...

  10. Infrared image enhancement using Cellular Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Han, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lian-fa

    2016-05-01

    Image enhancement is a crucial technique for infrared images. The clear image details are important for improving the quality of infrared images in computer vision. In this paper, we propose a new enhancement method based on two priors via Cellular Automata. First, we directly learn the gradient distribution prior from the images via Cellular Automata. Second, considering the importance of image details, we propose a new gradient distribution error to encode the structure information via Cellular Automata. Finally, an iterative method is applied to remap the original image based on two priors, further improving the quality of enhanced image. Our method is simple in implementation, easy to understand, extensible to accommodate other vision tasks, and produces more accurate results. Experiments show that the proposed method performs better than other methods using qualitative and quantitative measures.

  11. Infrared thermal imaging in connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowski, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Infrared thermal imaging (IRT) is a non-invasive, non-contact technique which allows one to measure and visualize infrared radiation. In medicine, thermal imaging has been used for more than 50 years in various clinical settings, including Raynaud's phenomenon and systemic sclerosis. Imaging and quantification of surface body temperature provides an indirect measure of the microcirculation's overall performance. As such, IRT is capable of confirming the diagnosis of Raynaud's phenomenon, and, with additional cold or heat challenge, of differentiating between the primary and secondary condition. In systemic sclerosis IRT has a potential role in assessing disease activity and monitoring treatment response. Despite certain limitations, thermal imaging can find a place in clinical practice, and with the introduction of small, low-cost infrared cameras, possibly become a part of routine rheumatological evaluation.

  12. MAP-based infrared image expansion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Zhang; Weiqi Jin; Binghua Su; Yangyang Liu; Hua Chen

    2005-01-01

    @@ Image expansion plays a very important role in image analysis. Common methods of image expansion, such as the zero-order hold method, may generate a visual mosaic to the expanded image, linear and cubic spline interpolation may blur the image data at peripheral regions. Since infrared images have the characteristics of low contrast and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the expanded images derived from common methods are not satisfactory. As shown in the analysis of the course from images with low resolution to those with high resolution, the expansion of image is found to be an ill-posed inverse problem. An image interpolation algorithm based on MAP estimation under Bayesian framework is proposed in this paper,which can effectively preserve the discontinuities in the original image. Experimental results demonstrate that the expanded images by this method are visually and quantitatively (analyzed by using the criteria of mean squared error (MSE) and mean absolute error (MAE)) superior to the images expanded by common methods of linear interpolation. Even in expansion of infrared images, this method can also give good results. An analysis about choosing regularization parameter α in this algorithm is given.

  13. Coherent infrared imaging camera (CIRIC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Simpson, M.L.; Bennett, C.A.; Richards, R.K.; Emery, M.S.; Crutcher, R.I.; Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Wachter, E.A.; Huston, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    New developments in 2-D, wide-bandwidth HgCdTe (MCT) and GaAs quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIP) coupled with Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology are now making focal plane array coherent infrared (IR) cameras viable. Unlike conventional IR cameras which provide only thermal data about a scene or target, a coherent camera based on optical heterodyne interferometry will also provide spectral and range information. Each pixel of the camera, consisting of a single photo-sensitive heterodyne mixer followed by an intermediate frequency amplifier and illuminated by a separate local oscillator beam, constitutes a complete optical heterodyne receiver. Applications of coherent IR cameras are numerous and include target surveillance, range detection, chemical plume evolution, monitoring stack plume emissions, and wind shear detection.

  14. Functional near-infrared imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingming; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton

    1997-08-01

    We developed a continuous wave (cw) light imaging probe which includes 9 light sources and four pairs detectors (each pair has one 850 nm filtered detector and one 760 nm filtered detector). The light sources are controlled by a computer and the signals from the detectors are converted and processed in the computer. There are 16 measurement sections and total detection area is 9 cm multiplied by 4 cm which can be scanned every 8 seconds. The detector-source uses 2.5 cm spacing. In this study, we present the noise, drift, detectivity and spatial resolution test results of the imager. Changes of oxygenation and blood volume in about 2 cm depth from the surface of brain model can be detected. The temporal resolution is 8 seconds and spatial resolution is about 2 cm. The detectivity of OD changes can reach 0.008. With this cw imaging probe, we measured motor function in motor cortex area, visual function in occipital area, and cognitive activity in frontal forehead area of the human brian when the subjects are stimulated by moving fingers, viewing a flashing light and doing an analogy test, respectively. The experimental results show that the cw imaging probe can be used for functional images of brain activity, base upon changes of oxygenation and blood volume due to the stimulus.

  15. Far-infrared imaging and spectroscopic instrumentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinyard, B. M.; Wild, Wolfgang; Huber, Martin C.E.; Pauluhn, Anuschka; Culhane, J. Len; Timothy, J. Gethyn; Wilhelm, Klaus; Zehnder, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The subject of the design and implementation of infrared space missions is briefly reviewed and the limitations imposed by the needs of requiring cryogenic instruments and telescopes introduced. We give an introduction to direct detection techniques for imaging and spectroscopy and review the curren

  16. Image upconversion, a low noise infrared sensor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    for detection of infrared images. Silicon cameras have much smaller intrinsic noise than their IR counter part- some models even offer near single photon detection capability. We demonstrate that an ordinary CCD camera combined with a low noise upconversion has superior noise characteristics when compared...

  17. Image upconversion - a low noise infrared sensor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    for detection of infrared images. Silicon cameras have much smaller intrinsic noise than their IR counter part- some models even offer near single photon detection capability. We demonstrate that an ordinary CCD camera combined with a low noise upconversion has superior noise characteristics when compared...

  18. Infrared Imaging Data Reduction Software and Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Sabbey, C N; Lewis, J R; Irwin, M J; Sabbey, Chris N.; Mahon, Richard G. Mc; Lewis, James R.; Irwin, Mike J.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the InfraRed Data Reduction (IRDR) software package, a small ANSI C library of fast image processing routines for automated pipeline reduction of infrared (dithered) observations. We developed the software to satisfy certain design requirements not met in existing packages (e.g., full weight map handling) and to optimize the software for large data sets (non-interactive tasks that are CPU and disk efficient). The software includes stand-alone C programs for tasks such as running sky frame subtraction with object masking, image registration and coaddition with weight maps, dither offset measurement using cross-correlation, and object mask dilation. Although we currently use the software to process data taken with CIRSI (a near-IR mosaic imager), the software is modular and concise and should be easy to adapt/reuse for other work. IRDR is available from anonymous ftp to ftp.ast.cam.ac.uk in pub/sabbey.

  19. The Gemini Near-Infrared Imager (NIRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodapp, Klaus W.; Jensen, Joseph B.; Irwin, Everett M.; Yamada, Hubert; Chung, Randolph; Fletcher, Kent; Robertson, Louis; Hora, Joseph L.; Simons, Douglas A.; Mays, Wendy; Nolan, Robert; Bec, Matthieu; Merrill, Michael; Fowler, Albert M.

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents the basic design of the Gemini Near-Infrared Imager (NIRI) and discusses its capabilities. NIRI offers three different pixel scales to match different operating modes of the Gemini telescope and allows polarimetric and spectroscopic observations. It is equipped with an infrared on-instrument wave-front sensor (OIWFS) to allow tip-tilt and focus correction even in highly obscured regions. The science detector array is an Aladdin II InSb 1024×1024 pixel device sensitive from 1.0 to 5.5 μm.

  20. Infrared single-pixel imaging utilising microscanning

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Ming-Jie; Phillips, David B; Gibson, Graham M; Padgett, Miles J

    2015-01-01

    Since the invention of digital cameras there has been a concerted drive towards detector arrays with higher spatial resolution. Microscanning is a technique that provides a final higher resolution image by combining multiple images of a lower resolution. Each of these low resolution images is subject to a sub-pixel sized lateral displacement. In this work we apply the microscanning approach to an infrared single-pixel camera. For the same final resolution and measurement resource, we show that microscanning improves the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of reconstructed images by approximately 50%. In addition, this strategy also provides access to a stream of low-resolution 'preview' images throughout each high-resolution acquisition. Our work demonstrates an additional degree of flexibility in the trade-off between SNR and spatial resolution in single-pixel imaging techniques.

  1. A Shearlets-based Edge Identification Algorithem for Infrared Image

    OpenAIRE

    Rui-bin ZOU; Cai-cheng SHI

    2013-01-01

    A shearlets-based edge identification algorithem for infrared image is proposed. The algorithem demonstrates the performance of edge detection based on shearlets, combines with the edge hysteresis thresholding, designs steps of edge detection, which is proper to use in infrared images.Simultaneously, with the advantage of edge geometric features provided by the shearlets, infrared image were extracted the direction information of edge of Infrared image, and classified. In computer simulations...

  2. Dynamic programming algorithm for detecting dim infrared moving targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lisha; Mao, Liangjing; Xie, Lijun

    2009-10-01

    Infrared (IR) target detection is a key part of airborne infrared weapon system, especially the detection of poor dim moving IR target embedded in complex context. This paper presents an improved Dynamic Programming (DP) algorithm in allusion to low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) infrared dim moving targets under cluttered context. The algorithm brings the dim target to prominence by accumulating the energy of pixels in the image sequence, after suppressing the background noise with a mathematical morphology preprocessor. As considering the continuity and stabilization of target's energy and forward direction, this algorithm has well solved the energy scattering problem that exists in the original DP algorithm. An effective energy segmentation threshold is given by a Contrast-Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE) filter with a regional peak extraction algorithm. Simulation results show that the improved DP tracking algorithm performs well in detecting poor dim targets.

  3. Location of foot arteries using infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasenor-Mora, Carlos; González-Vega, Arturo; Martín Osmany Falcón, Antonio; Benítez Ferro, Jesús Francisco Guillemo; Córdova Fraga, Teodoro

    2014-11-01

    In this work are presented the results of localization of foot arteries, in a young group of participants by using infrared thermal images, these are the dorsal, posterior tibial and anterior tibial arteries. No inclusion criteria were considered, that causes that no strong statistical data about the influence of the age in the arterial localization. It was achieved to solve the confusion when veins present a heat distribution similar to the artery and in the position of this. it contributes to enhance the rate of location of arteries. In general it is possible to say that the use of infrared thermal images is a good technique to find the foot arteries and can be applied in its characterization in a future. The procedure proposed is a non-invasive technique, and in certain fashion does not requires specialized personnel to achieve locate the arteries. It is portable, safe, and relatively economical.

  4. Active Shape Model-Based Gait Recognition Using Infrared Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehee Kim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a gait recognition system using infra-red (IR images. Since an IR camera is not affected by the intensity of illumination, it is able to provide constant recognition performance regardless of the amount of illumination. Model-based object tracking algorithms enable robust tracking with partial occlusions or dynamic illumination. However, this algorithm often fails in tracking objects if strong edge exists near the object. Replacementof the input image by an IR image guarantees robust object region extraction because background edges do not affect the IR image. In conclusion, the proposed gait recognition algorithm improves accuracy in object extraction by using IR images and the improvementsfinally increase the recognition rate of gaits.

  5. Near Infrared (nir) Imaging for Nde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, G. G.; Pallav, P.; Hutchins, D. A.

    2008-02-01

    A novel application of near infrared (NIR) signals is presented, which can be used to provide images of many different materials and objects. It is effectively a very low cost non-ionising alternative to many applications currently being investigated using electromagnetic waves at other frequencies, such as THz and X-ray imaging. This alternative technique can be realised by very simple and inexpensive electronics and is inherently far more portable and easy to use. Transmission imaging results from this technique are presented from examples industrial quality control, food inspection and various security applications, and the results compared to existing techniques. In addition, this technique can be used in through-transmission mode on biological and medical samples, and images are presented that differentiate between not only flesh and bone, but also various types of soft tissue.

  6. Spacecraft design project: High temperature superconducting infrared imaging satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The High Temperature Superconductor Infrared Imaging Satellite (HTSCIRIS) is designed to perform the space based infrared imaging and surveillance mission. The design of the satellite follows the black box approach. The payload is a stand alone unit, with the spacecraft bus designed to meet the requirements of the payload as listed in the statement of work. Specifications influencing the design of the spacecraft bus were originated by the Naval Research Lab. A description of the following systems is included: spacecraft configuration, orbital dynamics, radio frequency communication subsystem, electrical power system, propulsion, attitude control system, thermal control, and structural design. The issues of testing and cost analysis are also addressed. This design project was part of the course Advanced Spacecraft Design taught at the Naval Postgraduate School.

  7. Uncooled Micro-Cantilever Infrared Imager Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagiotis, Datskos G. [ORNL

    2008-02-05

    We report on the development, fabrication and characterization of microcantilever based uncooled focal plane array (FPA) for infrared imaging. By combining a streamlined design of microcantilever thermal transducers with a highly efficient optical readout, we minimized the fabrication complexity while achieving a competitive level of imaging performance. The microcantilever FPAs were fabricated using a straightforward fabrication process that involved only three photolithographic steps (i.e. three masks). A designed and constructed prototype of an IR imager employed a simple optical readout based on a noncoherent low-power light source. The main figures of merit of the IR imager were found to be comparable to those of uncooled MEMS infrared detectors with substantially higher degree of fabrication complexity. In particular, the NETD and the response time of the implemented MEMS IR detector were measured to be as low as 0.5K and 6 ms, respectively. The potential of the implemented designs can also be concluded from the fact that the constructed prototype enabled IR imaging of close to room temperature objects without the use of any advanced data processing. The most unique and practically valuable feature of the implemented FPAs, however, is their scalability to high resolution formats, such as 2000 x 2000, without progressively growing device complexity and cost. The overall technical objective of the proposed work was to develop uncooled infrared arrays based on micromechanical sensors. Currently used miniature sensors use a number of different readout techniques to accomplish the sensing. The use of optical readout techniques sensing require the deposition of thin coatings on the surface of micromechanical thermal detectors. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is uniquely qualified to perform the required research and development (R&D) services that will assist our ongoing activities. Over the past decade ORNL has developed a number of unique methods and

  8. Cancer risk assessment with a second-generation infrared imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Jonathan F.; Lipari, Charles A.; Wang, Fen; Elliott, Robert L.

    1997-08-01

    Infrared imaging of the breasts for breast cancer risk assessment with a second generation amber indium antimonide focal plane staring array system was found to produce images superior to a first generation Inframetrics scanning mercury cadmium telluride system. The second generation system had greater thermal sensitivity, more elements in the image and greater dynamic range, which resulted in a greater ability to demonstrate asymmetric heat patterns in the breasts of women being screened for breast cancer. Chi-square analysis for independence of the results from 220 patients with both the scanning and focal plane infrared imaging systems demonstrated that the results from the two systems were strongly associated with each other (p equals .0001). However, the improved image from the second generation focal plane infrared imaging system allowed more objective and quantitative visual analysis, compared to the very subjective qualitative results from the first generation infrared imaging system. The improved image also resulted in an increase in the sensitivity for asymmetric heat patterns with the second generation focal plane system and yielded an increase in the percentage of patients with an abnormal asymmetric infrared image of the breasts from 32.7% with the scanning system to 50.5% with the focal plane system. The greater sensitivity and resolution of the digitized images from the second generation infrared imaging system has also allowed computer assisted image analysis of both breasts, breast quadrants and hot spots to produce quantitative measurements (mean, standard deviation, median, minimum and maximum temperatures) of asymmetric infrared abnormalities.

  9. Infrared and visible images fusion based on RPCA and NSCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhizhong; Wang, Xue; Xu, Jin; Zhou, Ning; Zhao, Yufei

    2016-07-01

    Current infrared and visible images fusion algorithms cannot efficiently extract the object information in the infrared image while retaining the background information in visible image. To address this issue, we propose a new infrared and visible image fusion algorithm by taking advantage of robust principal component analysis (RPCA) and non-subsampled Contourlet transform (NSCT). Firstly, RPCA decomposition is performed on the infrared and visible images respectively to obtain their corresponding sparse matrixes, which can well represent the sparse feature of images. Secondly, the infrared and visible images are decomposed into low frequency sub-band and high-frequency sub-band coefficients by using NSCT. Subsequently, the sparse matrixes are used to guide the fusion rule of low frequency sub-band coefficients and high frequency sub-band coefficients. Experimental results demonstrate that our fusion algorithm can highlight the infrared objects as well as retain the background information in visible image.

  10. Using quantum filters as edge detectors in infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños Marín, Daniela

    2014-06-01

    Some new filters inspired in quantum models are used as edge detectors in infrared images. In this case, Bessel, Hermite and Morse filters will be applied to detect edges and fibrillar structures in infrared images. The edge detectors will be built by the Laplacian of the mentioned quantum filters. Furthermore, using curvature operators, curvature detectors and amplifiers of contrast will be constructed to analyze infrared images. The quantum filter prototyping will be done using computer algebra software, specifically Maple and its package, ImageTools. The quantum filters will be applied to infrared images using the technique of convolutions and blurred derivatives. It is expected that designed quantum filters will be useful for analysis and processing of infrared images. As future investigations, we propose to design plugins with the quantum filters that can be incorporated into the program ImageJ, which will facilitate the use of the quantum filters for the infrared image processing.

  11. Infrared Stokes imaging polarimeter using microbolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudenov, Michael W.; Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Dereniak, Eustace L.; Gerhart, Grant R.

    2009-08-01

    A long wave infrared (LWIR) division of amplitude imaging Stokes polarimeter is presented. For the first time, to our knowledge, application of microbolometer focal plane array (FPA) technology to polarimetry is demonstrated. The sensor utilizes a wire-grid beamsplitter with imaging systems positioned at each output to analyze two orthogonal linear polarization states simultaneously. Combined with a form birefringent wave plate, the system is capable of snapshot imaging polarimetry in any one Stokes parameter (S1, S2 or S3). Radiometric and polarimetric calibration procedures for the instrument are provided and data from the instrument are presented, demonstrating the ability to measure intensity variations corresponding to polarized emission in natural environments. As such, emission polarimetry can be exploited at significantly reduced cost, sensor size and power consumption over instruments based on more costly Mercury-Cadmium Telluride (MCT) FPA's.

  12. New enhancement of infrared image based on human visual system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianhe Yu; Qiuming Li; Jingmin Dai

    2009-01-01

    Infrared images are firstly analyzed using the multifractal theory so that the singularity of each pixel can be extracted from the images. The multifractal spectrum is then estimated, which can reflect overall characteristic of an infrared image. Thus the edge and texture of an infrared image can be accurately extracted based on the singularity of each pixel and the multifractal spectrum. Finally the edge pixels are classified and enhanced in accordance with the sensitivity of human visual system to the edge profile of an infrared image. The experimental results obtained by this approach are compared with those obtained by other methods. It is found that the proposed approach can be used to highlight the edge area of an infrared image to make an infrared image more suitable for observation by human eyes.

  13. Galileo infrared imaging spectroscopy measurements at venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R.W.; Baines, K.H.; Encrenaz, Th.; Taylor, F.W.; Drossart, P.; Kamp, L.W.; Pollack, James B.; Lellouch, E.; Collard, A.D.; Calcutt, S.B.; Grinspoon, D.; Weissman, P.R.; Smythe, W.D.; Ocampo, A.C.; Danielson, G.E.; Fanale, F.P.; Johnson, T.V.; Kieffer, H.H.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    During the 1990 Galileo Venus flyby, the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer investigated the night-side atmosphere of Venus in the spectral range 0.7 to 5.2 micrometers. Multispectral images at high spatial resolution indicate substantial cloud opacity variations in the lower cloud levels, centered at 50 kilometers altitude. Zonal and meridional winds were derived for this level and are consistent with motion of the upper branch of a Hadley cell. Northern and southern hemisphere clouds appear to be markedly different. Spectral profiles were used to derive lower atmosphere abundances of water vapor and other species.

  14. Infrared Imaging System for Studying Brain Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Frederick; Mintz, Frederick; Gunapala, Sarath

    2007-01-01

    A proposed special-purpose infrared imaging system would be a compact, portable, less-expensive alternative to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) systems heretofore used to study brain function. Whereas a typical fMRI system fills a large room, and must be magnetically isolated, this system would fit into a bicycle helmet. The system would include an assembly that would be mounted inside the padding in a modified bicycle helmet or other suitable headgear. The assembly would include newly designed infrared photodetectors and data-acquisition circuits on integrated-circuit chips on low-thermal-conductivity supports in evacuated housings (see figure) arranged in multiple rows and columns that would define image coordinates. Each housing would be spring-loaded against the wearer s head. The chips would be cooled by a small Stirling Engine mounted contiguous to, but thermally isolated from, the portions of the assembly in thermal contact with the wearer s head. Flexible wires or cables for transmitting data from the aforementioned chips would be routed to an integrated, multichannel transmitter and thence through the top of the assembly to a patch antenna on the outside of the helmet. The multiple streams of data from the infrared-detector chips would be sent to a remote site, where they would be processed, by software, into a three-dimensional display of evoked potentials that would represent firing neuronal bundles and thereby indicate locations of neuronal activity associated with mental or physical activity. The 3D images will be analogous to current fMRI images. The data would also be made available, in real-time, for comparison with data in local or internationally accessible relational databases that already exist in universities and research centers. Hence, this system could be used in research on, and for the diagnosis of response from the wearer s brain to physiological, psychological, and environmental changes in real time. The images would also be

  15. Dynamic interconnection component using wireless infrared technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Dagong; WANG Guanghui; ZHANG Yimo; ZHANG Yinxin; JING Wencai; ZHOU Ge

    2007-01-01

    An efficient dynamic interconnection model using wireless infrared technology and the theory of optical interconnections was constructed to design a dual-channel interconnection component.There were three conditions between the rotating optical field and the stationary optical field:end separation,angle misalignment and lateral misalignment.The calculation formulas were given for these three conditions.A dual-channel optical interconnection component was designed based on the dynamic interconnection model and the data transmission rate of the component was measured.The experimental result showed that the dualchannel optical interconnection component could transmit optical signals across the rotating interface.The maximum transmission rate can reach 2.14 Mb/s.

  16. Near-Infrared Intraoperative Chemiluminescence Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Büchel, Gabriel E.

    2016-08-03

    Intraoperative imaging technologies recently entered the operating room, and their implementation is revolutionizing how physicians plan, monitor, and perform surgical interventions. In this work, we present a novel surgical imaging reporter system: intraoperative chemiluminescence imaging (ICI). To this end, we have leveraged the ability of a chemiluminescent metal complex to generate near-infrared light upon exposure to an aqueous solution of Ce4+ in the presence of reducing tissue or blood components. An optical camera spatially resolves the resulting photon flux. We describe the construction and application of a prototype imaging setup, which achieves a detection limit as low as 6.9pmolcm-2 of the transition-metal-based ICI agent. As a proof of concept, we use ICI for the invivo detection of our transition metal tracer following both systemic and subdermal injections. The very high signal-to-noise ratios make ICI an interesting candidate for the development of new intraoperative imaging technologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Simulating Kinect Infrared and Depth Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Michael J; Choo, Benjamin Y; Beling, Peter A

    2016-12-01

    With the emergence of the Microsoft Kinect sensor, many developer communities and research groups have found countless uses and have already published a wide variety of papers that utilize the raw depth images for their specific goals. New methods and applications that use the device generally require an appropriately large ensemble of data sets with accompanying ground truth for testing purposes, as well as accurate models that account for the various systematic and stochastic contributors to Kinect errors. Current error models, however, overlook the intermediate infrared (IR) images that directly contribute to noisy depth estimates. We, therefore, propose a high fidelity Kinect IR and depth image predictor and simulator that models the physics of the transmitter/receiver system, unique IR dot pattern, disparity/depth processing technology, and random intensity speckle and IR noise in the detectors. The model accounts for important characteristics of Kinect's stereo triangulation system, including depth shadowing, IR dot splitting, spreading, and occlusions, correlation-based disparity estimation between windows of measured and reference IR images, and subpixel refinement. Results show that the simulator accurately produces axial depth error from imaged flat surfaces with various tilt angles, as well as the bias and standard lateral error of an object's horizontal and vertical edge.

  18. Secure High Dynamic Range Images

    OpenAIRE

    Med Amine Touil; Noureddine Ellouze

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a tone mapping algorithm is proposed to produce LDR (Limited Dynamic Range) images from HDR (High Dynamic Range) images. In the approach, non-linear functions are applied to compress the dynamic range of HDR images. Security tools will be then applied to the resulting LDR images and their effectiveness will be tested on the reconstructed HDR images. Three specific examples of security tools are described in more details: integrity verification using hash function to compute loc...

  19. Human body region enhancement method based on Kinect infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Fan, Yubo; Song, Xiaowei; Cai, Wenjing

    2016-10-01

    To effectively improve the low contrast of human body region in the infrared images, a combing method of several enhancement methods is utilized to enhance the human body region. Firstly, for the infrared images acquired by Kinect, in order to improve the overall contrast of the infrared images, an Optimal Contrast-Tone Mapping (OCTM) method with multi-iterations is applied to balance the contrast of low-luminosity infrared images. Secondly, to enhance the human body region better, a Level Set algorithm is employed to improve the contour edges of human body region. Finally, to further improve the human body region in infrared images, Laplacian Pyramid decomposition is adopted to enhance the contour-improved human body region. Meanwhile, the background area without human body region is processed by bilateral filtering to improve the overall effect. With theoretical analysis and experimental verification, the results show that the proposed method could effectively enhance the human body region of such infrared images.

  20. Infrared imaging of the crime scene: possibilities and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Gerda J; Hoveling, Richelle J M; Roos, Martin; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Aalders, Maurice C G

    2013-09-01

    All objects radiate infrared energy invisible to the human eye, which can be imaged by infrared cameras, visualizing differences in temperature and/or emissivity of objects. Infrared imaging is an emerging technique for forensic investigators. The rapid, nondestructive, and noncontact features of infrared imaging indicate its suitability for many forensic applications, ranging from the estimation of time of death to the detection of blood stains on dark backgrounds. This paper provides an overview of the principles and instrumentation involved in infrared imaging. Difficulties concerning the image interpretation due to different radiation sources and different emissivity values within a scene are addressed. Finally, reported forensic applications are reviewed and supported by practical illustrations. When introduced in forensic casework, infrared imaging can help investigators to detect, to visualize, and to identify useful evidence nondestructively.

  1. Pain related inflammation analysis using infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Bardhan, Shawli; Das, Kakali; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; Nath, Satyabrata

    2016-05-01

    Medical Infrared Thermography (MIT) offers a potential non-invasive, non-contact and radiation free imaging modality for assessment of abnormal inflammation having pain in the human body. The assessment of inflammation mainly depends on the emission of heat from the skin surface. Arthritis is a disease of joint damage that generates inflammation in one or more anatomical joints of the body. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent appearing form of arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most threatening form of them. In this study, the inflammatory analysis has been performed on the infrared images of patients suffering from RA and OA. For the analysis, a dataset of 30 bilateral knee thermograms has been captured from the patient of RA and OA by following a thermogram acquisition standard. The thermograms are pre-processed, and areas of interest are extracted for further processing. The investigation of the spread of inflammation is performed along with the statistical analysis of the pre-processed thermograms. The objectives of the study include: i) Generation of a novel thermogram acquisition standard for inflammatory pain disease ii) Analysis of the spread of the inflammation related to RA and OA using K-means clustering. iii) First and second order statistical analysis of pre-processed thermograms. The conclusion reflects that, in most of the cases, RA oriented inflammation affects bilateral knees whereas inflammation related to OA present in the unilateral knee. Also due to the spread of inflammation in OA, contralateral asymmetries are detected through the statistical analysis.

  2. An infrared image enhancement algorithm based on HVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Rongkun; He, Wei; Liu, Jiahui; Li, Yufeng

    2016-10-01

    Because the infrared images have the disadvantage of low contrast and fuzzy edges, it is not suitable for us to observe them, so it is necessary to first make enhanced processing before recognition. Though the existing enhancement methods do not take into account the characteristics of HVS, the visual effect of the processed images is not good. Therefore, the paper proposes an enhancement algorithm of infrared images that combine multi-resolution wavelet transform with Retinex theory, it blends with the characteristics of HVS in order to make high-frequency details of infrared images strengthen and illumination uniformity strength and the brightness of IR images moderate. Through experimental results and data analysis, it not only improves the infrared images of low contrast and fuzzy detail, but also suppresses the noise in images to strengthen the overall visual effect of the infrared images.

  3. Image Quality Indicator for Infrared Inspections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The quality of images generated during an infrared thermal inspection depends on many system variables, settings, and parameters to include the focal length setting of the IR camera lens. If any relevant parameter is incorrect or sub-optimal, the resulting IR images will usually exhibit inherent unsharpness and lack of resolution. Traditional reference standards and image quality indicators (IQIs) are made of representative hardware samples and contain representative flaws of concern. These standards are used to verify that representative flaws can be detected with the current IR system settings. However, these traditional standards do not enable the operator to quantify the quality limitations of the resulting images, i.e. determine the inherent maximum image sensitivity and image resolution. As a result, the operator does not have the ability to optimize the IR inspection system prior to data acquisition. The innovative IQI described here eliminates this limitation and enables the operator to objectively quantify and optimize the relevant variables of the IR inspection system, resulting in enhanced image quality with consistency and repeatability in the inspection application. The IR IQI consists of various copper foil features of known sizes that are printed on a dielectric non-conductive board. The significant difference in thermal conductivity between the two materials ensures that each appears with a distinct grayscale or brightness in the resulting IR image. Therefore, the IR image of the IQI exhibits high contrast between the copper features and the underlying dielectric board, which is required to detect the edges of the various copper features. The copper features consist of individual elements of various shapes and sizes, or of element-pairs of known shapes and sizes and with known spacing between the elements creating the pair. For example, filled copper circles with various diameters can be used as individual elements to quantify the image sensitivity

  4. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B; Chernov, Mykyta M; Chen, Brenda R; Grosberg, Lauren E; Jansen, E Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain.

  5. The infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: sensitivities and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Shelley A; Larkin, James E; Moore, Anna M; Crampton, David; Simard, Luc

    2010-01-01

    We present sensitivity estimates for point and resolved astronomical sources for the current design of the InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) on the future Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). IRIS, with TMT's adaptive optics system, will achieve unprecedented point source sensitivities in the near-infrared (0.84 - 2.45 {\\mu}m) when compared to systems on current 8-10m ground based telescopes. The IRIS imager, in 5 hours of total integration, will be able to perform a few percent photometry on 26 - 29 magnitude (AB) point sources in the near-infrared broadband filters (Z, Y, J, H, K). The integral field spectrograph, with a range of scales and filters, will achieve good signal-to-noise on 22 - 26 magnitude (AB) point sources with a spectral resolution of R=4,000 in 5 hours of total integration time. We also present simulated 3D IRIS data of resolved high-redshift star forming galaxies (1 < z < 5), illustrating the extraordinary potential of this instrument to probe the dynamics, assembly, and chemical abunda...

  6. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis using infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frize, Monique; Adéa, Cynthia; Payeur, Pierre; Di Primio, Gina; Karsh, Jacob; Ogungbemile, Abiola

    2011-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease causing pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in joints; it is difficult to diagnose in early stages. An early diagnosis and treatment can delay the onset of severe disability. Infrared (IR) imaging offers a potential approach to detect changes in degree of inflammation. In 18 normal subjects and 13 patients diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), thermal images were collected from joints of hands, wrists, palms, and knees. Regions of interest (ROIs) were manually selected from all subjects and all parts imaged. For each subject, values were calculated from the temperature measurements: Mode/Max, Median/Max, Min/Max, Variance, Max-Min, (Mode-Mean), and Mean/Min. The data sets did not have a normal distribution, therefore non parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Ranksum) were applied to assess if the data from the control group and the patient group were significantly different. Results indicate that: (i) thermal images can be detected on patients with the disease; (ii) the best joints to image are the metacarpophalangeal joints of the 2nd and 3rd fingers and the knees; the difference between the two groups was significant at the 0.05 level; (iii) the best calculations to differentiate between normal subjects and patients with RA are the Mode/Max, Variance, and Max-Min. We concluded that it is possible to reliably detect RA in patients using IR imaging. Future work will include a prospective study of normal subjects and patients that will compare IR results with Magnetic Resonance (MR) analysis.

  7. The infrared dynamics of Minimal Walking Technicolor

    CERN Document Server

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Patella, Agostino; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We study the gauge sector of Minimal Walking Technicolor, which is an SU(2) gauge theory with nf=2 flavors of Wilson fermions in the adjoint representation. Numerical simulations are performed on lattices Nt x Ns^3, with Ns ranging from 8 to 16 and Nt=2Ns, at fixed \\beta=2.25, and varying the fermion bare mass m0, so that our numerical results cover the full range of fermion masses from the quenched region to the chiral limit. We present results for the string tension and the glueball spectrum. A comparison of mesonic and gluonic observables leads to the conclusion that the infrared dynamics is given by an SU(2) pure Yang-Mills theory with a typical energy scale for the spectrum sliding to zero with the fermion mass. The typical mesonic mass scale is proportional to, and much larger than this gluonic scale. Our findings are compatible with a scenario in which the massless theory is conformal in the infrared. An analysis of the scaling of the string tension with the fermion mass towards the massless limit allo...

  8. Infrared hyperspectral upconversion imaging using spatial object translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Louis Martinus; Sanders, Nicolai Højer; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper hyperspectral imaging in the mid-infrared wavelength region is realised using nonlinear frequency upconversion. The infrared light is converted to the near-infrared region for detection with a Si-based CCD camera. The object is translated in a predefined grid by motorized actuators...

  9. TIRSPEC : TIFR Near Infrared Spectrometer and Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Ninan, J P; Ghosh, S K; D'Costa, S L A; Naik, M B; Poojary, S S; Sandimani, P R; Meshram, G S; Jadhav, R B; Bhagat, S B; Gharat, S M; Bakalkar, C B; Prabhu, T P; Anupama, G C; Toomey, D W

    2014-01-01

    We describe the TIFR Near Infrared Spectrometer and Imager (TIRSPEC) designed and built in collaboration with M/s. Mauna Kea Infrared LLC, Hawaii, USA, now in operation on the side port of the 2-m Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT), Hanle (Ladakh), India at an altitude of 4500 meters above mean sea level. The TIRSPEC provides for various modes of operation which include photometry with broad and narrow band filters, spectrometry in single order mode with long slits of 300" length and different widths, with order sorter filters in the Y, J, H and K bands and a grism as the dispersing element as well as a cross dispersed mode to give a coverage of 1.0 to 2.5 microns at a resolving power R of ~1200. The TIRSPEC uses a Teledyne 1024 x 1024 pixel Hawaii-1 PACE array detector with a cutoff wavelength of 2.5 microns and on HCT, provides a field of view of 307" x 307" with a plate scale of 0.3"/pixel. The TIRSPEC was successfully commissioned in June 2013 and the subsequent characterization and astronomical observatio...

  10. Arctic Clouds Infrared Imaging Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, J. A. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI), a passive thermal imaging system, was deployed at the North Slope of Alaska site in Barrow, Alaska, from July 2012 to July 2014 for measuring spatial-temporal cloud statistics. Thermal imaging of the sky from the ground provides high radiometric contrast during night and polar winter when visible sensors and downward-viewing thermal sensors experience low contrast. In addition to demonstrating successful operation in the Arctic for an extended period and providing data for Arctic cloud studies, a primary objective of this deployment was to validate novel instrument calibration algorithms that will allow more compact ICI instruments to be deployed without the added expense, weight, size, and operational difficulty of a large-aperture onboard blackbody calibration source. This objective was successfully completed with a comparison of the two-year data set calibrated with and without the onboard blackbody. The two different calibration methods produced daily-average cloud amount data sets with correlation coefficient = 0.99, mean difference = 0.0029 (i.e., 0.29% cloudiness), and a difference standard deviation = 0.054. Finally, the ICI instrument generally detected more thin clouds than reported by other ARM cloud products available as of late 2015.

  11. Infrared imaging of WENSS radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Villani, D

    1999-01-01

    We have performed deep imaging in the IR J- and K-bands for three sub-samples of radio sources extracted from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, a large low-frequency radio survey containing Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS), Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Flat Spectrum (FS) sources. We present the results of these IR observations, carried out with the ARcetri Near Infrared CAmera (ARNICA) at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), providing photometric and morphologic information on high redshift radio galaxies and quasars. We find that the radio galaxies contained in our sample do not show the pronounced radio/IR alignment claimed for 3CR sources. IR photometric measurements of the gravitational lens system 1600+434 are also presented.

  12. Unveiling the dynamic infrared sky with Gattini-IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Anna M.; Kasliwal, Mansi K.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Jencson, Jacob E.; Jones, Mike I.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Lau, Ryan M.; Ofek, Eran; Petrunin, Yuri; Smith, Roger; Terebizh, Valery; Steinbring, Eric; Yan, Lin

    2016-08-01

    While optical and radio transient surveys have enjoyed a renaissance over the past decade, the dynamic infrared sky remains virtually unexplored. The infrared is a powerful tool for probing transient events in dusty regions that have high optical extinction, and for detecting the coolest of stars that are bright only at these wavelengths. The fundamental roadblocks in studying the infrared time-domain have been the overwhelmingly bright sky background (250 times brighter than optical) and the narrow field-of-view of infrared cameras (largest is 0.6 sq deg). To begin to address these challenges and open a new observational window in the infrared, we present Palomar Gattini-IR: a 25 sq degree, 300mm aperture, infrared telescope at Palomar Observatory that surveys the entire accessible sky (20,000 sq deg) to a depth of 16.4 AB mag (J band, 1.25μm) every night. Palomar Gattini-IR is wider in area than every existing infrared camera by more than a factor of 40 and is able to survey large areas of sky multiple times. We anticipate the potential for otherwise infeasible discoveries, including, for example, the elusive electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave detections. With dedicated hardware in hand, and a F/1.44 telescope available commercially and cost-effectively, Palomar Gattini-IR will be on-sky in early 2017 and will survey the entire accessible sky every night for two years. We present an overview of the pathfinder Palomar Gattini-IR project, including the ambitious goal of sub-pixel imaging and ramifications of this goal on the opto-mechanical design and data reduction software. Palomar Gattini-IR will pave the way for a dual hemisphere, infrared-optimized, ultra-wide field high cadence machine called Turbo Gattini-IR. To take advantage of the low sky background at 2.5 μm, two identical systems will be located at the polar sites of the South Pole, Antarctica and near Eureka on Ellesmere Island, Canada. Turbo Gattini-IR will survey 15,000 sq. degrees

  13. Fuzzy Dark Matter from Infrared Confining Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Murphy, Christopher W.

    2017-04-01

    A very light boson of mass O (10-22) eV may potentially be a viable dark matter (DM) candidate, which can avoid phenomenological problems associated with cold DM. Such "fuzzy DM (FDM)" may naturally be an axion with a decay constant fa˜1 016- 1 018 GeV and a mass ma˜μ2/fa with μ ˜1 02 eV . Here, we propose a concrete model, where μ arises as a dynamical scale from infrared confining dynamics, analogous to QCD. Our model is an alternative to the usual approach of generating μ through string theoretic instanton effects. We outline the features of this scenario that result from various cosmological constraints. We find that those constraints are suggestive of a period of mild of inflation, perhaps from a strong first order phase transition, that reheats the standard model (SM) sector only. A typical prediction of our scenario, broadly speaking, is a larger effective number of neutrinos compared to the SM value Neff≈3 , as inferred from precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background. Some of the new degrees of freedom may be identified as "sterile neutrinos," which may be required to explain certain neutrino oscillation anomalies. Hence, aspects of our scenario could be testable in terrestrial experiments, which is a novelty of our FDM model.

  14. A real-time infrared imaging simulation method with physical effects modeling of infrared sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ni; Huai, Wenqing; Wang, Shaodan; Ren, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Infrared imaging simulation technology can provide infrared data sources for the development, improvement and evaluation of infrared imaging systems under different environment, status and weather conditions, which is reusable and more economic than physical experiments. A real-time infrared imaging simulation process is established to reproduce a complete physical imaging process. Our emphasis is put on the modeling of infrared sensors, involving physical effects of both spatial domain and frequency domain. An improved image convolution method is proposed based on GPU parallel processing to enhance the real-time simulation ability with ensuring its simulation accuracy at the same time. Finally the effectiveness of the above methods is validated by simulation analysis and result comparison.

  15. The infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: spectrograph design

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Anna M; Barton, Elizabeth J; Crampton, David; Delacroix, Alex; Larkin, James E; Simard, Luc; Suzuki, Ryuji; Wright, Shelley A

    2010-01-01

    The Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) is one of the three first light instruments for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and is the only one to directly sample the diffraction limit. The instrument consists of a parallel imager and off-axis Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) for optimum use of the near infrared (0.84um-2.4um) Adaptive Optics corrected focal surface. We present an overview of the IRIS spectrograph that is designed to probe a range of scientific targets from the dynamics and morphology of high-z galaxies to studying the atmospheres and surfaces of solar system objects, the latter requiring a narrow field and high Strehl performance. The IRIS spectrograph is a hybrid system consisting of two state of the art IFS technologies providing four plate scales (4mas, 9mas, 25mas, 50mas spaxel sizes). We present the design of the unique hybrid system that combines the power of a lenslet spectrograph and image slicer spectrograph in a configuration where major hardware is shared. The result is a powerful...

  16. Fusing Passive and Active Sensed Images to Gain Infrared-Textured 3d Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmann, M.; Hoegner, L.; Leitloff, J.; Stilla, U.; Hinz, S.; Jutzi, B.

    2012-07-01

    Obtaining a 3D description of man-made and natural environments is a basic task in Computer Vision, Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. New active sensors provide the possibility of capturing range information by images with a single measurement. With this new technique, image-based active ranging is possible which allows for capturing dynamic scenes, e.g. with moving pedestrians or moving vehicles. The currently available range imaging devices usually operate within the close-infrared domain to capture range and furthermore active and passive intensity images. Depending on the application, a 3D description with additional spectral information such as thermal-infrared data can be helpful and offers new opportunities for the detection and interpretation of human subjects and interactions. Therefore, thermal-infrared data combined with range information is promising. In this paper, an approach for mapping thermal-infrared data on range data is proposed. First, a camera calibration is carried out for the range imaging system (PMD[vision] CamCube 2.0) and the thermal-infrared system (InfraTec VarioCAM hr). Subsequently, a registration of close-infrared and thermal infrared intensity images derived from different sensor devices is performed. In this context, wavelength independent properties are selected in order to derive point correspondences between the different spectral domains. Finally, the thermal infrared images are enhanced with information derived from data acquired with the range imaging device and the enhanced IR texture is projected onto the respective 3D point cloud data for gaining appropriate infrared-textured 3D models. The feasibility of the proposed methodology is demonstrated for an experimental setup which is well-suited for investigating these proposed possibilities. Hence, the presented work is a first step towards the development of methods for combined thermal-infrared and range representation.

  17. Exploring infrared neural stimulation with multimodal nonlinear imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Wilson R.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2017-02-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) provides optical control of neural excitability using near to mid-infrared (mid-IR) light, which allows for spatially selective, artifact-free excitation without the introduction of exogenous agents or genetic modification. Although neural excitability is mediated by a transient temperature increase due to water absorption of IR energy, the molecular nature of IR excitability in neural tissue remains unknown. Current research suggests that transient changes in local tissue temperature give rise to a myriad of cellular responses that have been individually attributed to IR mediated excitability. To further elucidate the underlying biophysical mechanisms, we have begun work towards employing a novel multimodal nonlinear imaging platform to probe the molecular underpinnings of INS. Our imaging system performs coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), second-harmonic generation (SHG) and thermal imaging into a single platform that allows for unprecedented co-registration of thermal and biochemical information in real-time. Here, we present our work leveraging CARS and SRS in acute thalamocortical brain slice preparations. We observe the evolution of lipid and protein-specific Raman bands during INS and electrically evoked activity in real-time. Combined with two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation, we offer insight to cellular metabolism and membrane dynamics during INS. Thermal imaging allows for the coregistration of acquired biochemical information with temperature information. Our work previews the versatility and capabilities of coherent Raman imaging combined with multiphoton imaging to observe biophysical phenomena for neuroscience applications.

  18. Determination of Oxygen Saturation and Photoplethysmogram from Near Infrared Scattering Images

    CERN Document Server

    Ri, Yong-U; Sin, Kye-Ryong

    2016-01-01

    The near infrared scattering images of human muscle include some information on bloodstream and hemoglobin concentration according to skin depth and time. This paper addressed a method of determining oxygen saturation and photoplethysmogram from the near infrared (NIR) scattering images of muscle. Depending on the modified Beer-Lambert Law and the diffuse scattering model of muscular tissue, we determined an extinction coefficient matrix of hemoglobin from the near infrared scattering images and analyzed distribution of oxygen saturation of muscle with a depth from the extinction coefficient matrix. And we determined a dynamic attenuation variation curve with respect to fragmentary image frames sensitive to bloodstream from scattering image frames of muscle with time and then obtained the photoplethysmogram and heart rate by Fourier transformation and inverse transformation. This method based on the NIR scattering images can be applied in measurement of an average oxygen saturation and photoplethysmogram even...

  19. Secure High Dynamic Range Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Med Amine Touil

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a tone mapping algorithm is proposed to produce LDR (Limited Dynamic Range images from HDR (High Dynamic Range images. In the approach, non-linear functions are applied to compress the dynamic range of HDR images. Security tools will be then applied to the resulting LDR images and their effectiveness will be tested on the reconstructed HDR images. Three specific examples of security tools are described in more details: integrity verification using hash function to compute local digital signatures, encryption for confidentiality, and scrambling technique.

  20. The method of infrared image simulation based on the measured image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Shuli; Liu, Liang; Ren, Jiancun

    2015-10-01

    The development of infrared imaging guidance technology has promoted the research of infrared imaging simulation technology and the key of infrared imaging simulation is the generation of IR image. The generation of IR image is worthful in military and economy. In order to solve the problem of credibility and economy of infrared scene generation, a method of infrared scene generation based on the measured image is proposed. Through researching on optical properties of ship-target and sea background, ship-target images with various gestures are extracted from recorded images based on digital image processing technology. The ship-target image is zoomed in and out to simulate the relative motion between the viewpoint and the target according to field of view and the distance between the target and the sensor. The gray scale of ship-target image is adjusted to simulate the radiation change of the ship-target according to the distance between the viewpoint and the target and the atmospheric transmission. Frames of recorded infrared images without target are interpolated to simulate high frame rate of missile. Processed ship-target images and sea-background infrared images are synthetized to obtain infrared scenes according to different viewpoints. Experiments proved that this method is flexible and applicable, and the fidelity and the reliability of synthesis infrared images can be guaranteed.

  1. Buildings Research using Infrared Imaging Radiometers with Laboratory Thermal Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Brent; Arasteh, Dariush

    1999-01-12

    Infrared thermal imagers are used at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to study heat transfer through components of building thermal envelopes. Two thermal chambers maintain steady-state heat flow through test specimens under environmental conditions for winter heating design. Infrared thermography is used to map surface temperatures on the specimens' warm side. Features of the quantitative thermography process include use of external reference emitters, complex background corrections, and spatial location markers. Typical uncertainties in the data are {+-} 0.5 C and 3 mm. Temperature controlled and directly measured external reference emitters are used to correct data from each thermal image. Complex background corrections use arrays of values for background thermal radiation in calculating temperatures of self-viewing surfaces. Temperature results are used to validate computer programs that predict heat flow including Finite-Element Analysis (FEA) conduction simulations and conjugate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. Results are also used to study natural convection surface heat transfer. Example data show the distribution of temperatures down the center line of an insulated window.

  2. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging: The Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging seemingly matured as a technology in the mid-2000s, with commercially successful instrumentation and reports in numerous applications. Recent developments, however, have transformed our understanding of the recorded data, provided capability for new instrumentation, and greatly enhanced the ability to extract more useful information in less time. These developments are summarized here in three broad areas— data recording, interpretation of recorded data, and information extraction—and their critical review is employed to project emerging trends. Overall, the convergence of selected components from hardware, theory, algorithms, and applications is one trend. Instead of similar, general-purpose instrumentation, another trend is likely to be diverse and application-targeted designs of instrumentation driven by emerging component technologies. The recent renaissance in both fundamental science and instrumentation will likely spur investigations at the confluence of conventional spectroscopic analyses and optical physics for improved data interpretation. While chemometrics has dominated data processing, a trend will likely lie in the development of signal processing algorithms to optimally extract spectral and spatial information prior to conventional chemometric analyses. Finally, the sum of these recent advances is likely to provide unprecedented capability in measurement and scientific insight, which will present new opportunities for the applied spectroscopist. PMID:23031693

  3. Infrared imaging diagnostics for INTF ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, D.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Pandey, R.; Joshi, J.; Yadav, A.; Rotti, C.; Bhuyan, M.; Bansal, G.; Soni, J.; Tyagi, H.; Pandya, K.; Chakraborty, A.

    2015-04-01

    In India, testing facility named INTF [1] (Indian test facility) is being built in Institute for Plasma Research to characterize ITER-Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB). INTF is expected to deliver 60A negative hydrogen ion beam current of energy 100keV. The beam will be operated with 5Hz modulation having 3s ON/20s OFF duty cycle. To characterize the beam parameters several diagnostics are at different stages of design and development. One of them will be a beam dump, made of carbon fiber composite (CFC) plates placed perpendicular to the beam direction at a distance lm approximately. The beam dump needs to handle ˜ 6MW of beam power with peak power density ˜ 38.5MW/m2. The diagnostic is based on thermal (infra-red - IR) imaging of the footprint of the 1280 beamlets falling on the beam dump using four IR cameras from the rear side of the dump. The beam dump will be able to measure beam uniformity, beamlet divergence. It may give information on relative variation of negative ion stripping losses for different beam pulses. The design of this CFC based beam dump needs to address several physics and engineering issues, including some specific inputs from manufacturers. The manuscript will describe an overview of the diagnostic system and its design methodology highlighting those issues and the present status of its development.

  4. FUSING PASSIVE AND ACTIVE SENSED IMAGES TO GAIN INFRARED-TEXTURED 3D MODELS

    OpenAIRE

    Weinmann, M.; Hoegner, L.; Leitloff, J.; U. Stilla; Hinz, S.; Jutzi, B.

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining a 3D description of man-made and natural environments is a basic task in Computer Vision, Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. New active sensors provide the possibility of capturing range information by images with a single measurement. With this new technique, image-based active ranging is possible which allows for capturing dynamic scenes, e.g. with moving pedestrians or moving vehicles. The currently available range imaging devices usually operate within the close-infrare...

  5. Infrared Images of an Infant Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    understanding of the formation of solar-type stars and planetary systems from the interstellar medium. However, in most cases the large difference of brightness between the young star and its surrounding material makes it impossible to image directly the circumstellar disk. But when the disk is seen nearly edge-on, the light from the central star will be blocked out by the dust grains in the disk. Other grains below and above the disk midplane scatter the stellar light, producing a typical pattern of a dark lane between two reflection nebulae. The first young stellar object (YSO) found to display this typical pattern, HH 30 IRS in the Taurus dark cloud at a distance of about 500 light-years (140 pc), was imaged by the Hubble Space telescope (HST) in 1996. Edge-on disks have since also been observed with ground-based telescopes in the near-infrared region of the spectrum, sometimes by means of adaptive optics techniques or speckle imaging, or under very good sky image quality, cf. ESO PR Photo 03d/01 with a VLT image of such an object in the Orion Nebula. A surprise discovery ESO PR Photo 12a/02 ESO PR Photo 12a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 459 pix - 55k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 918 pix - 352k] Caption : PR Photo 12a/02 shows a three-colour reproduction of the discovery image of strange-looking object (nicknamed the "Flying Saucer" by the astronomers), obtained with the SOFI multi-mode instrument at the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla Observatory. Compared to the unresolved stars in the field, the image of this object appears extended. Two characteristic reflection nebulae are barely visible, together with a marginally resolved dark dust lane in front of the star and oriented East-West. Technical information about the photo is available below. Last year, a group of astronomers [1] carried out follow-up observations of new X-ray sources found by the ESA XMM-Newton and NASA Chandra X-ray satellites. They were looking at the periphery of the so-called Rho

  6. Deep Learning for Intelligent Substation Device Infrared Fault Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ying

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As an important kind of data for device status evaluation, the increasing infrared image data in electrical system puts forward a new challenge to traditional manually processing mode. To overcome this problem, this paper proposes a feasible way to automatically process massive infrared fault images. We take advantage of the imaging characteristics of infrared fault images and detect fault regions together with its belonging device part by our proposed algorithm, which first segment images into superpixels, and then adopt the state-of-the-art convolutional and recursive neural network for intelligent object recognition. In the experiment, we compare several unsupervised pre-training methods considering the importance of a pre-train procedure, and discuss the proper parameters for the proposed network. The experimental results show the good performance of our algorithm, and its efficiency for infrared analysis.

  7. Development of practical thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyu; Li, Chunlai; Lv, Gang; Yuan, Liyin; Liu, Enguang; Jin, Jian; Ji, Hongzhen

    2014-11-01

    As an optical remote sensing equipment, the thermal infrared hyperspectral imager operates in the thermal infrared spectral band and acquires about 180 wavebands in range of 8.0~12.5μm. The field of view of this imager is 13° and the spatial resolution is better than 1mrad. Its noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) is less than 0.2K@300K(average). 1 The influence of background radiation of the thermal infrared hyperspectral imager,and a simulation model of simplified background radiation is builded. 2 The design and implementationof the Cryogenic Optics. 3 Thermal infrared focal plane array (FPA) and special dewar component for the thermal infrared hyperspectral imager. 4 Parts of test results of the thermal infrared hyperspectral imager.The hyperspectral imaging system is China's first success in developing this type of instrument, whose flight validation experiments have already been embarked on. The thermal infrared hyperspectral data acquired will play an important role in fields such as geological exploration and air pollutant identification.

  8. Forensic analysis of bicomponent fibers using infrared chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Katherine; O'Leary, Robyn; Roux, Claude; Reedy, Brian J

    2006-05-01

    The application of infrared chemical imaging to the analysis of bicomponent fibers was evaluated. Eleven nominally bicomponent fibers were examined either side-on or in cross-section. In six of the 11 samples, infrared chemical imaging was able to spatially resolve two spectroscopically distinct regions when the fibers were examined side-on. As well as yielding characteristic infrared spectra of each component, the technique also provided images that clearly illustrated the side-by-side configuration of these components in the fiber. In one case it was possible to prepare and image a cross-section of the fiber, but in general the preparation of fiber cross-sections proved very difficult. In five of the 11 samples, the infrared spectra could be used to identify the overall chemical composition of the fibers, according to a published classification scheme, but the fiber components could not be spatially resolved. Difficulties that are inherent to conventional "single-point" infrared spectroscopy, such as interference fringing and sloping baselines, particularly when analyzing acrylic type fibers, were also encountered in the infrared chemical image analysis of bicomponent fibers. A number of infrared sampling techniques were investigated to overcome these problems, and recommendations for the best sampling technique are given. Chemical imaging results were compared with those obtained using conventional fiber microscopy techniques.

  9. Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsah, Kofi [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N [Knoxville, TN

    2009-10-27

    An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

  10. Near-infrared Mueller matrix imaging for colonic cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Mueller matrix imaging along with polar decomposition method was employed for the colonic cancer detection by polarized light in the near-infrared spectral range (700-1100 nm). A high-speed (colonic tissues (i.e., normal and caner) were acquired. Polar decomposition was further implemented on the 16 images to derive the diattentuation, depolarization, and the retardance images. The decomposed images showed clear margin between the normal and cancerous colon tissue samples. The work shows the potential of near-infrared Mueller matrix imaging for the early diagnosis and detection of malignant lesions in the colon.

  11. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Grande, Nancy K.; Durbin, Philip F.; Dolan, Kenneth W.; Perkins, Dwight E.

    1995-01-01

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features.

  12. Translation of infrared chemical imaging for cardiovascular evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Saumya; Raman, Jai; Reddy, Vijaya; Dawson, Miranda; Bhargava, Rohit

    2016-03-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging has been applied to study histology of cardiovascular tissue, primarily using Fourier transform IR (FTIR) Imaging. Here we describe results for histologic imaging of cardiac biopsies using a fast, discrete frequency IR (DFIR) imaging system. Histologic classification of tissue is understood in terms of the constituent frequencies and speeded up by careful optimization of the data acquired. Results are compared to FTIR imaging in terms of the signal to noise ratio and information content.

  13. A small deployable infrared diffractive membrane imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Jin, Jiangao; Wang, Baohua; Wu, Peng; Jiao, Jianchao; Su, Yun

    2016-10-01

    Diffractive membrane imaging can be widely used in infrared band due to its longer minimum linewidth and loose requirement of RMS to fabricate more easily and reduce production period and manufacturing cost than used in visible band. A deployable infrared diffractive membrane imaging system was designed, consisting of Φ200mm imaging aperture (actual aperture is Φ500mm) and deployable structure that supports the infrared membrane under tension. Its spectral band width is >1.2μm, field of view is >1°, and diffractive efficiency can be >60%. Stowed size is 150mm×150mm×400mm. Research result of this project can promote the application of diffractive membrane imaging in infrared band and provide an effective and feasible means for achieving extremely large optical primary mirror from compact, lightweight payload.

  14. Space imaging infrared optical guidance for autonomous ground vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Akira; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Mutoh, Eiichiro; Kumagai, Hideo; Yamada, Hirofumi; Ishii, Hiromitsu

    2008-08-01

    We have developed the Space Imaging Infrared Optical Guidance for Autonomous Ground Vehicle based on the uncooled infrared camera and focusing technique to detect the objects to be evaded and to set the drive path. For this purpose we made servomotor drive system to control the focus function of the infrared camera lens. To determine the best focus position we use the auto focus image processing of Daubechies wavelet transform technique with 4 terms. From the determined best focus position we transformed it to the distance of the object. We made the aluminum frame ground vehicle to mount the auto focus infrared unit. Its size is 900mm long and 800mm wide. This vehicle mounted Ackerman front steering system and the rear motor drive system. To confirm the guidance ability of the Space Imaging Infrared Optical Guidance for Autonomous Ground Vehicle we had the experiments for the detection ability of the infrared auto focus unit to the actual car on the road and the roadside wall. As a result the auto focus image processing based on the Daubechies wavelet transform technique detects the best focus image clearly and give the depth of the object from the infrared camera unit.

  15. Upconversion imaging using short-wave infrared picosecond pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathez, Morgan David; Rodrigo, Peter John; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, we present the first demonstration of short-wavelength infrared image upconversion that employs intense picosecond signal and pump beams. We use a fiber laser that emits a signal beam at 1877 nm and a pump beam at 1550 nm—both with a pulse width of 1 ps and a pulse...... by an improved model that considers the combined image blurring effect due to finite pump beam size, thick nonlinear crystal, and polychromatic infrared illumination....

  16. Comparison of image deconvolution algorithms on simulated and laboratory infrared images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proctor, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    We compare Maximum Likelihood, Maximum Entropy, Accelerated Lucy-Richardson, Weighted Goodness of Fit, and Pixon reconstructions of simple scenes as a function of signal-to-noise ratio for simulated images with randomly generated noise. Reconstruction results of infrared images taken with the TAISIR (Temperature and Imaging System InfraRed) are also discussed.

  17. Scene recognition and colorization for vehicle infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Junjie; Sun, Shaoyuan; Shen, Zhenyi; Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Haitao

    2016-10-01

    In order to make better use of infrared technology for driving assistance system, a scene recognition and colorization method is proposed in this paper. Various objects in a queried infrared image are detected and labelled with proper categories by a combination of SIFT-Flow and MRF model. The queried image is then colorized by assigning corresponding colors according to the categories of the objects appeared. The results show that the strategy here emphasizes important information of the IR images for human vision and could be used to broaden the application of IR images for vehicle driving.

  18. Stream Temperature Estimation From Thermal Infrared Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handcock, R. N.; Kay, J. E.; Gillespie, A.; Naveh, N.; Cherkauer, K. A.; Burges, S. J.; Booth, D. B.

    2001-12-01

    Stream temperature is an important water quality indicator in the Pacific Northwest where endangered fish populations are sensitive to elevated water temperature. Cold water refugia are essential for the survival of threatened salmon when events such as the removal of riparian vegetation result in elevated stream temperatures. Regional assessment of stream temperatures is limited by sparse sampling of temperatures in both space and time. If critical watersheds are to be properly managed it is necessary to have spatially extensive temperature measurements of known accuracy. Remotely sensed thermal infrared (TIR) imagery can be used to derive spatially distributed estimates of the skin temperature (top 100 nm) of streams. TIR imagery has long been used to estimate skin temperatures of the ocean, where split-window techniques have been used to compensate for atmospheric affects. Streams are a more complex environment because 1) most are unresolved in typical TIR images, and 2) the near-bank environment of stream corridors may consist of tall trees or hot rocks and soils that irradiate the stream surface. As well as compensating for atmospheric effects, key problems to solve in estimating stream temperatures include both subpixel unmixing and multiple scattering. Additionally, fine resolution characteristics of the stream surface such as evaporative cooling due to wind, and water surface roughness, will effect measurements of radiant skin temperatures with TIR devices. We apply these corrections across the Green River and Yakima River watersheds in Washington State to assess the accuracy of remotely sensed stream surface temperature estimates made using fine resolution TIR imagery from a ground-based sensor (FLIR), medium resolution data from the airborne MASTER sensor, and coarse-resolution data from the Terra-ASTER satellite. We use linear spectral mixture analysis to isolate the fraction of land-leaving radiance originating from unresolved streams. To compensate the

  19. Multispectral mid-infrared imaging using frequency upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanders, Nicolai Højer; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin;

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been shown that it is possible to upconvert infrared images to the near infrared region with high quantum efficiency and low noise by three-wave mixing with a laser field [1]. If the mixing laser is single-frequency, the upconverted image is simply a band-pass filtered version......: Infrared imaging, nonlinear frequency conversion, diode lasers, upconversion ] of the nonlinear material. Unfortunately, temperature tuning is slow, and angle tuning typically results in alignment issues. Here we present a novel approach where the wavelength of the mixing field is used as a tuning...... feedback grating. The output from a tunable laser is used as seed for a fiber amplifier system, boosting the power to approx. 3 W over the tuning range from 1025 to 1085 nm. Using a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, the infrared wavelength that can be phase-matched is tunable over more than 200...

  20. Multispectral mid-infrared imaging using frequency upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanders, Nicolai Højer; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2013-01-01

    of the infrared object field, with a bandwidth corresponding given by the acceptance parameter of the conversion process, and a center frequency given by the phase-match condition. Tuning of the phase-matched wavelengths has previously been demonstrated by changing the temperature [2] or angle [3 Keywords......It has recently been shown that it is possible to upconvert infrared images to the near infrared region with high quantum efficiency and low noise by three-wave mixing with a laser field [1]. If the mixing laser is single-frequency, the upconverted image is simply a band-pass filtered version......: Infrared imaging, nonlinear frequency conversion, diode lasers, upconversion ] of the nonlinear material. Unfortunately, temperature tuning is slow, and angle tuning typically results in alignment issues. Here we present a novel approach where the wavelength of the mixing field is used as a tuning...

  1. Waiting Time Dynamics in Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Knoester, Jasper

    We review recent work on the waiting time dynamics of coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. This dynamics can reveal chemical and physical processes that take place on the femto- and picosecond time scale, which is faster than the time scale that may be probed by, for example,

  2. Infrared thermal imaging for automated detection of diabetic foot complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, van Jaap J.; Baal, van Jeff G.; Liu, Chanjuan; Heijden, van der Ferdi; Bus, Sicco A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the ap

  3. Method of Infrared Image Enhancement Based on Stationary Wavelet Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Fei; LI Yan-jun; ZHANG Ke

    2008-01-01

    Aiming at the problem, i.e. infrared images own the characters of bad contrast ratio and fuzzy edges, a method to enhance the contrast of infrared image is given, which is based on stationary wavelet transform. After making stationary wavelet transform to an infrared image, denoising is done by the proposed method of double-threshold shrinkage in detail coefficient matrixes that have high noisy intensity. For the approximation coefficient matrix with low noisy intensity, enhancement is done by the proposed method based on histogram. The enhanced image can be got by wavelet coefficient reconstruction. Furthermore, an evaluation criterion of enhancement performance is introduced. The results show that this algorithm ensures target enhancement and restrains additive Gauss white noise effectively. At the same time, its amount of calculation is small and operation speed is fast.

  4. Infrared medical image visualization and anomalies analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jing; Chen, Zhong; Fan, Jing; Yan, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Infrared medical examination finds the diseases through scanning the overall human body temperature and obtaining the temperature anomalies of the corresponding parts with the infrared thermal equipment. In order to obtain the temperature anomalies and disease parts, Infrared Medical Image Visualization and Anomalies Analysis Method is proposed in this paper. Firstly, visualize the original data into a single channel gray image: secondly, turn the normalized gray image into a pseudo color image; thirdly, a method of background segmentation is taken to filter out background noise; fourthly, cluster those special pixels with the breadth-first search algorithm; lastly, mark the regions of the temperature anomalies or disease parts. The test is shown that it's an efficient and accurate way to intuitively analyze and diagnose body disease parts through the temperature anomalies.

  5. Detection of dual-band infrared small target based on joint dynamic sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinwei; Li, Jicheng; Shi, Zhiguang; Lu, Xiaowei; Ren, Dongwei

    2015-10-01

    Infrared small target detection is a crucial and yet still is a difficult issue in aeronautic and astronautic applications. Sparse representation is an important mathematic tool and has been used extensively in image processing in recent years. Joint sparse representation is applied in dual-band infrared dim target detection in this paper. Firstly, according to the characters of dim targets in dual-band infrared images, 2-dimension Gaussian intensity model was used to construct target dictionary, then the dictionary was classified into different sub-classes according to different positions of Gaussian function's center point in image block; The fact that dual-band small targets detection can use the same dictionary and the sparsity doesn't lie in atom-level but in sub-class level was utilized, hence the detection of targets in dual-band infrared images was converted to be a joint dynamic sparse representation problem. And the dynamic active sets were used to describe the sparse constraint of coefficients. Two modified sparsity concentration index (SCI) criteria was proposed to evaluate whether targets exist in the images. In experiments, it shows that the proposed algorithm can achieve better detecting performance and dual-band detection is much more robust to noise compared with single-band detection. Moreover, the proposed method can be expanded to multi-spectrum small target detection.

  6. Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    techniques such as attenuated total reflectance [6]. The two final papers deal with what seem to be wholly different scientific fields [7, 8]. One paper describes SOFIA, an aeroplane-based astronomical observatory covering the whole IR range [7], while the other represents a small review of the quite new topic of terahertz physics at the upper end of the IR spectral range, from around 30 µm to 3 mm wavelength, and its many applications in science and industry [8]. Although artificially separated, all these fields use similar kinds of detectors, similar kinds of IR sources and similar technologies, while the instruments use the same physical principles. We are convinced that the field of infrared physics will develop over the next decade in the same dynamic way as during the last, and this special issue may serve as starting point for regular submissions on the topic. At any rate, it shines a light on this fascinating and many-faceted subject, which started more than 200 years ago. References [1] Mangold K, Shaw J A and Vollmer M 2013 The physics of near-infrared photography Eur. J. Phys. 34 S51-71 [2] Vollmer M and Möllmann K-P 2013 Characterization of IR cameras in student labs Eur. J. Phys. 34 S73-90 [3] Ibarra-Castanedo C, Tarpani J R and Maldague X P V 2013 Nondestructive testing with thermography Eur. J. Phys. 34 S91-109 [4] Shaw J A and Nugent P W 2013 Physics principles in radiometric infrared imaging of clouds in the atmosphere Eur. J. Phys. 34 S111-21 [5] Möllmann K-P and Vollmer M 2013 Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in physics laboratory courses Eur. J. Phys. 34 S123-37 [6] Heise H M, Fritzsche J, Tkatsch H, Waag F, Karch K, Henze K, Delbeck S and Budde J 2013 Recent advances in mid- and near-infrared spectroscopy with applications for research and teaching, focusing on petrochemistry and biotechnology relevant products Eur. J. Phys. 34 S139-59 [7] Krabbe A, Mehlert D, Röser H-P and Scorza C 2013 SOFIA, an airborne observatory for infrared astronomy

  7. Scene classification of infrared images based on texture feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Bai, Tingzhu; Shang, Fei

    2008-12-01

    Scene Classification refers to as assigning a physical scene into one of a set of predefined categories. Utilizing the method texture feature is good for providing the approach to classify scenes. Texture can be considered to be repeating patterns of local variation of pixel intensities. And texture analysis is important in many applications of computer image analysis for classification or segmentation of images based on local spatial variations of intensity. Texture describes the structural information of images, so it provides another data to classify comparing to the spectrum. Now, infrared thermal imagers are used in different kinds of fields. Since infrared images of the objects reflect their own thermal radiation, there are some shortcomings of infrared images: the poor contrast between the objectives and background, the effects of blurs edges, much noise and so on. Because of these shortcomings, it is difficult to extract to the texture feature of infrared images. In this paper we have developed an infrared image texture feature-based algorithm to classify scenes of infrared images. This paper researches texture extraction using Gabor wavelet transform. The transformation of Gabor has excellent capability in analysis the frequency and direction of the partial district. Gabor wavelets is chosen for its biological relevance and technical properties In the first place, after introducing the Gabor wavelet transform and the texture analysis methods, the infrared images are extracted texture feature by Gabor wavelet transform. It is utilized the multi-scale property of Gabor filter. In the second place, we take multi-dimensional means and standard deviation with different scales and directions as texture parameters. The last stage is classification of scene texture parameters with least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) algorithm. SVM is based on the principle of structural risk minimization (SRM). Compared with SVM, LS-SVM has overcome the shortcoming of

  8. Asymptotic dynamics, large gauge transformations and infrared symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Infrared finite S matrices enjoy an infinite family of symmetries, namely decoupling of asymptotic soft modes with arbitrary direction. The infrared structure of the theory manifests itself in the form of vacuum degeneracy and in nontrivial asymptotic dynamics. These two ingredients are unified in the infrared finite S matrix symmetries and can be disentangled as soft and hard components of corresponding charges. When these two components are disentangled, the nontrivial role of large gauge transformations becomes manifest. The soft decoupling symmetry of the physical S matrix leads to relations between the corresponding soft/hard decompositions for the in and out states that can encode crucial nontrivial information about the scattering process.

  9. Near-Infrared Imaging of Selected Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-07

    Technolog " . J. P. HUCHRA NTIS CRA&I Center for Astrophysics DTIC TAB C. A. BEICHMAN, T. J. CHESTER, T. JARRETT, G. L. KOPAIN and Unannounced C C.J. LONSDALE... Technology J. P. HUCHRA Center for Astrophysics C. A. BEICHMAN, T. J. CHESTER, T. JARRETT, G. L. KOPAN and C. J. LONSDALE .- Infrared Processing and Analysis...DTIC TAB Unannounced 0 Justif Ication- justification ....... ByBE .......... Distribution Availability Codes 1Avail xid lor Dist Sdecial -2 A. Observing

  10. The Infrared Imaging Surveyor (Iris) Project: Astro-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibai, H.

    IRIS (Infrared Imaging Surveyor) is the first Japanese satellite dedicated solely to infrared astronomy. The telescope has 70-cm aperture, and is cooled down to 6 K with super-fluid helium assisted by two-stage Stirling cycle coolers. On the focal plane, the two instruments, the InfraRed Camera (IRC) and the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS), are mounted. IRC is a near- and mid-infrared camera for deep imaging-surveys in the wavelength region from 2 to 25 microns. FIS is a far-infrared instrument for a whole sky survey in the wavelength region from 50 to 200 microns. The diffraction-limited spatial resolution is achieved except in the shortest waveband. The point source sensitivity and the survey coverage are significantly improved compared to previous missions. The primary scientific objective is to investigate birth and evolution of galaxies in the early universe by surveys of young normal galaxies and starburst galaxies. IRIS is thrown by a Japanese M-V rocket into a sun-synchronous orbit, in which the cooled telescope can avoid huge emissions from the Sun and the Earth. The expected holding time of the super-fluid helium is more than one year. After consumption of the helium, the near-infrared observation can be continued by the mechanical coolers

  11. Review on Matching Infrared Face Images to Optical Face Images using LBP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamakhaya Argulewar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In biometric research and many security areas, it is very difficult task to match the images which is captured by different devices. Large gap exist between them because they relates with different classes. Matching optical face images to infrared face images is one of the difficult task in face biometric. Large difference exists between infrared and optical face images because they belong to multiple classes. Converting the samples of multimodality into common feature space is the main objective of this project. Different class of images is relating by coordinating separate feature for classes .It is mainly used in heterogeneous face recognition. The new method has been developing for identification of heterogeneous face identification. Training set contains the images from different modalities. Initially the infrared image is preprocessed by applying Gaussian filter, difference of Gaussian and CSDN filters are apply on infrared face image. After preprocessing next step to extracting the feature by using LBP(local binary pattern feature extraction then relevance machine classifier is used to identify the best matching optical image from the corresponding infrared images from the optical images dataset. By processing this technique our system efficiently match the infrared and optical face images.

  12. ASTRO-F : Infrared Imaging Surveyor (IRIS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaka, T.

    The ASTRO-F (also known as Infrared Imaging Surveyor: IRIS) is the second infrared satellite mission of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan to be launched early 2004 with the M-V rocket and is planned as a second generation infrared sky survey mission. It has a 67-cm aperture telescope and is cooled by 170-liter liquid helium and Stirling-cycle coolers. Two scientific instruments share the focal plane. The infrared camera (IRC) covers 2 to 26 μm range with large two-dimensional arrays in the imaging and low-resolution spectroscopic modes and will perform deep sky surveys of selected areas of the sky with a wide field of view (10' × 10') at unprecedented sensitivity. The far-infrared Surveyor (FIS), consisting of an imaging scanner and a Fourier transform spectrometer, covers 50 to 200 μm range and makes a whole sky survey in four far-infrared bands, which is higher by more than 10 in sensitivity (20 110 mJy), better by several in the spatial resolution (30'' 50''), and longer in the spectral coverage (200 μm) than IRAS. A brief description and the current status of the ASTRO-F mission are presented.

  13. Low-Cost Satellite Infrared Imager Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    2,297.00 10 MATLAB , Simulink , Symbolic Math Toolbox (2 ea @ £894) £1,788.00 11 MATLAB Image Processing Toolbox (2 ea at £192) £384.00 12 MATLAB ...Figure 1: MWIR and TIR satellite imagery. On the left is a BIRD image of forest fires on the Portuguese/ Spanish border3 and the image on right is...space-borne MWIR and TIR imagers, instrument engineers are continually evaluating advances in the miniaturization of detector technology. One

  14. Approach for moving small target detection in infrared image sequence based on reinforcement learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanyun; Qin, Shiyin

    2016-09-01

    Addressing the problems of moving small target detection in infrared image sequence caused by background clutter and target size variation with time, an approach for moving small target detection is proposed under a pipeline framework with an optimization strategy based on reinforcement learning. The pipeline framework is composed by pipeline establishment, target-background images separation, and target confirmation, in which the pipeline is established by designating several successive images with temporal sliding window, target-background images separation is dealt with low-rank and sparse matrix decomposition via robust principal component analysis, and target confirmation is achieved by employing a voting mechanism over more than one separated target images of the same input image. For unremitting optimization of target-background images separation, the weighting parameter of low-rank and sparse matrix decomposition is dynamically regulated by the way of reinforcement learning in consecutive detection, in which the complexity evaluation from sequential infrared images and results assessment of moving small target detection are integrated. The experiment results over four infrared small target image sequences with different cloudy sky backgrounds demonstrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed approach in both background clutter suppression and small target detection.

  15. Super-resolution infrared time measurement method based on target dynamic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Hu, Qiuping; Tang, Zili; Zhang, Sanxi; Zhang, Hua; Yue, Peng; Liu, Biao

    2016-10-01

    High precision time control in the use of weapons and equipment is an important part of product design and development. In order to satisfy the data acquisition requirement of high accuracy and reliability in the rapid flight process, the super-resolution time measurement method based on target dynamic characteristics was put forward and proved by the cabin opening time measurement experiment. First, the changes of explosion pressure wave and image in the cabin opening process were analyzed in detail. The change regulation of explosion flame shape was analyzed by the characteristics of typical pressure wave, and then the high frequency images of the explosion process were shot by high speed camera. The change regulation of the infrared image was obtained through the comparison of visible and infrared image mechanism. Then, combined with the target motion features, and the observed station parameters, the observation model of movement process was built. On the basis of the above research, the infrared characteristic and the movement characteristic were transformed, and the super resolution model was established. For test method, combined with the actual class time measuring process in experimental design, to obtain the special radar for measuring high precision open class time as the true value of the precision appraisal. Experimental results show that the infrared feature and motion feature can realize open class time super resolution measurement, can effectively improve the accuracy and reliability of the data, to achieve specific action of high accuracy measurement that plays an important role by making use of the target dynamic characteristics.

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinsic, Gorazd

    2011-09-01

    Ten years ago, a book with a title like this would be interesting only to a narrow circle of specialists. Thanks to rapid advances in technology, the price of thermal imaging devices has dropped sharply, so they have, almost overnight, become accessible to a wide range of users. As the authors point out in the preface, the growth of this area has led to a paradoxical situation: now there are probably more infrared (IR) cameras sold worldwide than there are people who understand the basic physics behind them and know how to correctly interpret the colourful images that are obtained with these devices. My experience confirms this. When I started using the IR camera during lectures on the didactics of physics, I soon realized that I needed more knowledge, which I later found in this book. A wide range of potential readers and topical areas provides a good motive for writing a book such as this one, but it also represents a major challenge for authors, as compromises in the style of writing and choice of topics are required. The authors of this book have successfully achieved this, and indeed done an excellent job. This book addresses a wide range of readers, from engineers, technicians, and physics and science teachers in schools and universities, to researchers and specialists who are professionally active in the field. As technology in this area has made great progress in recent times, this book is also a valuable guide for those who opt to purchase an infrared camera. Chapters in this book could be divided into three areas: the fundamentals of IR thermal imaging and related physics (two chapters); IR imaging systems and methods (two chapters) and applications, including six chapters on pedagogical applications; IR imaging of buildings and infrastructure, industrial applications, microsystems, selected topics in research and industry, and selected applications from other fields. All chapters contain numerous colour pictures and diagrams, and a rich list of relevant

  17. Infrared Imagery of Crown-Fire Dynamics during FROSTFIRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coen, Janice; Mahalingam, Shankar; Daily, John

    2004-09-01

    A thorough understanding of crown-fire dynamics requires a clear picture of the three-dimensional winds in and near the fire, including the flaming combustion zone and the convective updrafts produced by the fire. These observations and analyses present a unique high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution perspective of the motions within crown fires propagating up a forested 20° slope under light winds of 3 m s-1 during the FROSTFIRE experiment in interior Alaska. The purpose of this work is to calculate combustion-zone winds and examine mechanisms for the rapid propagation of crown fires. An infrared imager was used to detect high-temperature regions produced by incandescent soot particles in and near the fire and to produce a sequence of high-frequency (60 Hz), high-resolution (0.375 m × 0.8 m) two-dimensional images of temperature. An image-flow-analysis technique was applied to these data to derive wind fields in the image plane. Maximum updrafts of 32 60 m s-1 accompany maximum downdrafts of 18 30 m s-1. Horizontal wind speeds of 12 28 m s-1 show strong inflow into the base of the convective updrafts and imply recirculation of air and incomplete combustion products from the fire. Motions were more complex than a single large convective plume or many buoyant tree-scale plumes rising separately. Instead, repeated examples of narrow flaming fingers, representing a scale larger than individual trees, initially burst upslope along the ground for tens of meters at speeds up to 28 48 m s-1 before turning upward. These bursts exceeded ambient environmental winds, those considered to be driving the fire, by a factor of 10 and were low enough to propagate the crown fire actively by both igniting and preheating/ drying canopy fuel ahead of the fire. Average spread rates were 0.75 1.11 m s-1, with a peak 10-s spread rate of 1.26 m s-1. This powerful, dynamic mechanism of fire spread could explain firefighter reports of being overtaken by “fireballs.”

  18. The Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Astrophysics and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Raines

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the design, manufacture, and scientific performance of the Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Astrophysics and Cosmol- ogy (FISICA, a fully cryogenic all-reective image slicing integral _eld unit (IFU for the FLAMINGOS near-infrared spectrograph (Elston et al. 2003. We find that FISICA is capable of delivering excellent scientific re- sults. It now operates as a turnkey instru- ment at the KPNO 4-m telescope via collab- oration with the instrument team, who can assist with the proposal preparation and ob- servations, as well as provide the data reduc- tion tools for integral field spectroscopy.

  19. Nondestructive evaluation technique using infrared thermography and terahertz imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Shiozawa, Daiki; Tamaki, Yoshitaka; Iwama, Tatsuya

    2016-05-01

    Nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques using pulse heating infrared thermography and terahertz (THz) imaging were developed for detecting deterioration of oil tank floor, such as blister and delamination of corrosion protection coating, or corrosion of the bottom steel plate under coating. Experimental studies were conducted to demonstrate the practicability of developed techniques. It was found that the pulse heating infrared thermography was utilized for effective screening inspection and THz-TDS imaging technique performed well for the detailed inspection of coating deterioration and steel corrosion.

  20. Infrared thermal imaging fundamentals, research and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Vollmer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This richly illustrated hands-on guide is designed for researchers, teachers and practitioners. The huge selection of examples taken from science, basic teaching of physics, practical applications in industry and a variety of other disciplines spanning the range from medicine to volcano research allows readers to pick those that come closest to their own individual task at hand. Following a look at the fundamentals of IR thermal imaging, properties of the imaging systems, as well as basic and advanced methods, the book goes on to discuss IR imaging applications in teaching, research and indust

  1. Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlridge, Jeffrey I.; Martin, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for mid-infrared reflectance imaging has been developed as means of inspecting for subsurface damage in thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). The apparatus is designed, more specifically, for imaging the progression of buried delamination cracks in plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings on turbine-engine components. Progression of TBC delamination occurs by the formation of buried cracks that grow and then link together to produce eventual TBC spallation. The mid-infrared reflectance imaging system described here makes it possible to see delamination progression that is invisible to the unaided eye, and therefore give sufficiently advanced warning before delamination progression adversely affects engine performance and safety. The apparatus (see figure) includes a commercial mid-infrared camera that contains a liquid-nitrogen-cooled focal plane indium antimonide photodetector array, and imaging is restricted by a narrow bandpass centered at wavelength of 4 microns. This narrow wavelength range centered at 4 microns was chosen because (1) it enables avoidance of interfering absorptions by atmospheric OH and CO2 at 3 and 4.25 microns, respectively; and (2) the coating material exhibits maximum transparency in this wavelength range. Delamination contrast is produced in the midinfrared reflectance images because the introduction of cracks into the TBC creates an internal TBC/air-gap interface with a high diffuse reflectivity of 0.81, resulting in substantially higher reflectance of mid-infrared radiation in regions that contain buried delamination cracks. The camera is positioned a short distance (.12 cm) from the specimen. The mid-infrared illumination is generated by a 50-watt silicon carbide source positioned to the side of the mid-infrared camera, and the illumination is collimated and reflected onto the specimen by a 6.35-cm-diameter off-axis paraboloidal mirror. Because the collected images are of a steady-state reflected intensity (in

  2. Dynamic Pattern Based Image Steganography

    OpenAIRE

    Thiyagarajan, P.; G. Aghila; Venkatesan, V. Prasanna

    2012-01-01

    Steganography is the art of hiding secret information in media such as image, audio and video. The purpose of steganography is to conceal the existence of the secret information in any given medium. This work aims at strengthening the security in steganography algorithm by generating dynamic pattern in selection of indicator sequence. In addition to this dynamicity is also encompassed in number of bits embedded in data channel. This technique has been implemented and the results have been com...

  3. Visible and infrared reflectance imaging spectroscopy of paintings: pigment mapping and improved infrared reflectography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, John K.; Zeibel, Jason G.; Thoury, Mathieu; Littleton, Roy; Morales, Kathryn M.; Palmer, Michael; de la Rie, E. René

    2009-07-01

    Reflectance imaging spectroscopy, the collection of images in narrow spectral bands, has been developed for remote sensing of the Earth. In this paper we present findings on the use of imaging spectroscopy to identify and map artist pigments as well as to improve the visualization of preparatory sketches. Two novel hyperspectral cameras, one operating from the visible to near-infrared (VNIR) and the other in the shortwave infrared (SWIR), have been used to collect diffuse reflectance spectral image cubes on a variety of paintings. The resulting image cubes (VNIR 417 to 973 nm, 240 bands, and SWIR 970 to 1650 nm, 85 bands) were calibrated to reflectance and the resulting spectra compared with results from a fiber optics reflectance spectrometer (350 to 2500 nm). The results show good agreement between the spectra acquired with the hyperspectral cameras and those from the fiber reflectance spectrometer. For example, the primary blue pigments and their distribution in Picasso's Harlequin Musician (1924) are identified from the reflectance spectra and agree with results from X-ray fluorescence data and dispersed sample analysis. False color infrared reflectograms, obtained from the SWIR hyperspectral images, of extensively reworked paintings such as Picasso's The Tragedy (1903) are found to give improved visualization of changes made by the artist. These results show that including the NIR and SWIR spectral regions along with the visible provides for a more robust identification and mapping of artist pigments than using visible imaging spectroscopy alone.

  4. Unveiling the Dynamic Infrared Sky with Gattini-IR

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Anna M; Gelino, Christopher R; Jencson, Jacob E; Jones, Mike I; Kirkpatrick, J Davy; Lau, Ryan M; Ofek, Eran; Petrunin, Yuri; Smith, Roger; Terebizh, Valery; Steinbring, Eric; Yan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    While optical and radio transient surveys have enjoyed a renaissance over the past decade, the dynamic infrared sky remains virtually unexplored. The infrared is a powerful tool for probing transient events in dusty regions that have high optical extinction, and for detecting the coolest of stars that are bright only at these wavelengths. The fundamental roadblocks in studying the infrared time-domain have been the overwhelmingly bright sky background (250 times brighter than optical) and the narrow field-of-view of infrared cameras (largest is 0.6 sq deg). To begin to address these challenges and open a new observational window in the infrared, we present Palomar Gattini-IR: a 25 sq degree, 300mm aperture, infrared telescope at Palomar Observatory that surveys the entire accessible sky (20,000 sq deg) to a depth of 16.4 AB mag (J band, 1.25um) every night. Palomar Gattini-IR is wider in area than every existing infrared camera by more than a factor of 40 and is able to survey large areas of sky multiple time...

  5. Infrared Thermography for Thermo-Fluid-Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Astarita, Tommaso

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography is a measurement technique that enables to obtain non intrusive measurements of surface temperatures. One of the interesting features of this technique is its ability to measure a full two dimensional map of an object surface temperature and, for this reason, it has been widely used as a surface flow visualization technique. Since the temperature measurements can be extremely accurate, it is possible, by using a heat flux sensor, also to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions on a surface, making the technique de facto quantitative. This book, starting from the basic theory of radiation and heat flux sensors, guides, both the experienced researcher and the young student, in the correct application of this powerful technique to study convective heat transfer problems. A significant number of examples and applications are also examined in detail, often pointing out some relevant aspects.

  6. Near-infrared imaging spectrometer onboard NEXTSat-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woong-Seob; Park, Sung-Joon; Moon, Bongkon; Lee, Dae-Hee; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Park, Won-Kee; Park, Youngsik; Kim, Il-Joong; Ko, Kyeongyeon; Lee, Dukhang; Kim, Min Gyu; Kim, Minjin; Ko, Jongwan; Shin, Goo-Hwan; Chae, Jangsoo; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2016-07-01

    The NISS (Near-infrared Imaging Spectrometer for Star formation history) is the near-infrared instrument optimized to the first next generation of small satellite (NEXTSat-1) in Korea. The spectro-photometric capability in the near-infrared range is a unique function of the NISS. The major scientific mission is to study the cosmic star formation history in local and distant universe. For those purposes, the NISS will perform the large areal imaging spectroscopic survey for astronomical objects and low background regions. We have paid careful attention to reduce the volume and to increase the total throughput. The newly implemented off-axis optics has a wide field of view (2° x 2°) and a wide wavelength range from 0.9 to 3.8μm. The mechanical structure is designed to consider launching conditions and passive cooling of the telescope. The compact dewar after relay-lens module is to operate the infrared detector and spectral filters at 80K stage. The independent integration of relay-lens part and primary-secondary mirror assembly alleviates the complex alignment process. We confirmed that the telescope and the infrared sensor can be cooled down to around 200K and 80K, respectively. The engineering qualification model of the NISS was tested in the space environment including the launch-induced vibration and shock. The NISS will be expected to demonstrate core technologies related to the development of the future infrared space telescope in Korea.

  7. A Simulation Program for Dynamic Infrared (IR) Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoerb, Matthew C.; Harris, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    A free program for the simulation of dynamic infrared (IR) spectra is presented. The program simulates the spectrum of two exchanging IR peaks based on simple input parameters. Larger systems can be simulated with minor modifications. The program is available as an executable program for PCs or can be run in MATLAB on any operating system. Source…

  8. Standoff midwave infrared hyperspectral imaging of ship plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Gagnon, Jean-Philippe; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Guyot, Éric; Lagueux, Philippe; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Frédérick

    2016-05-01

    Characterization of ship plumes is very challenging due to the great variety of ships, fuel, and fuel grades, as well as the extent of a gas plume. In this work, imaging of ship plumes from an operating ferry boat was carried out using standoff midwave (3-5 μm) infrared hyperspectral imaging. Quantitative chemical imaging of combustion gases was achieved by fitting a radiative transfer model. Combustion efficiency maps and mass flow rates are presented for carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2). The results illustrate how valuable information about the combustion process of a ship engine can be successfully obtained using passive hyperspectral remote sensing imaging.

  9. Method of infrared image enhancement based on histogram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; YAN Jie

    2011-01-01

    Aiming at the problem in infrared image enhancement, a new method is given based on histogram. Using the gray character- istics of target, the upper-bouod threshold is selected adaptively and the histogram is processed by the threshold. After choosing the gray transform function based on the gray level distribution of image, the gray transformation is done during histogram equalization. Finally, the enhanced image is obtained. Compared with histogram equalization (HE), histogram double equalization (HDE) and plateau histogram equalization (PE), the simulation results demonstrate that the image enhancement effect of this method has obvious superiority. At the same time, its operation speed is fast and real-time ability is excellent.

  10. Near infrared spectroscopic imaging assessment of cartilage composition: Validation with mid infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukuru, Uday P; Hanifi, Arash; McGoverin, Cushla M; Devlin, Sean; Lelkes, Peter I; Pleshko, Nancy

    2016-07-05

    Disease or injury to articular cartilage results in loss of extracellular matrix components which can lead to the development of osteoarthritis (OA). To better understand the process of disease development, there is a need for evaluation of changes in cartilage composition without the requirement of extensive sample preparation. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a chemical investigative technique based on molecular vibrations that is increasingly used as an assessment tool for studying cartilage composition. However, the assignment of specific molecular vibrations to absorbance bands in the NIR spectrum of cartilage, which arise from overtones and combinations of primary absorbances in the mid infrared (MIR) spectral region, has been challenging. In contrast, MIR spectroscopic assessment of cartilage is well-established, with many studies validating the assignment of specific bands present in MIR spectra to specific molecular vibrations. In the current study, NIR imaging spectroscopic data were obtained for compositional analysis of tissues that served as an in vitro model of OA. MIR spectroscopic data obtained from the identical tissue regions were used as the gold-standard for collagen and proteoglycan (PG) content. MIR spectroscopy in transmittance mode typically requires a much shorter pathlength through the sample (≤10 microns thick) compared to NIR spectroscopy (millimeters). Thus, this study first addressed the linearity of small absorbance bands in the MIR region with increasing tissue thickness, suitable for obtaining a signal in both the MIR and NIR regions. It was found that the linearity of specific, small MIR absorbance bands attributable to the collagen and PG components of cartilage (at 1336 and 856 cm(-1), respectively) are maintained through a thickness of 60 μm, which was also suitable for NIR data collection. MIR and NIR spectral data were then collected from 60 μm thick samples of cartilage degraded with chondroitinase ABC as a model

  11. TIRCAM2: The TIFR Near Infrared Imaging Camera

    CERN Document Server

    Naik, M B; Ghosh, S K; Poojary, S S; Jadhav, R B; Meshram, G S; Sandimani, P R; Bhagat, S B; D'Costa, S L A; Gharat, S M; Bakalkar, C B; Ninan, J P; Joshi, J S

    2012-01-01

    TIRCAM2 (TIFR Near Infrared Imaging Camera - II) is a closed cycle cooled imager that has been developed by the Infrared Astronomy Group at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research for observations in the near infrared band of 1 to 3.7 microns with existing Indian telescopes. In this paper, we describe some of the technical details of TIRCAM2 and report its observing capabilities, measured performance and limiting magnitudes with the 2-m IUCAA Girawali telescope and the 1.2-m PRL Gurushikhar telescope. The main highlight is the camera's capability of observing in the nbL (3.59 microns) band enabling our primary motivation of mapping of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 3.3 microns.

  12. Infrared thermography for thermo-fluid-dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astarita, Tommaso; Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria [Univ. di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy). Dipt. Ingegneria Aerospaziale

    2013-07-01

    Introduction into this very accurate surface temperature measurement method Examines a significant number of examples and applications in detail Guides both, the experienced researcher and the young student Infrared thermography is a measurement technique that enables to obtain non intrusive measurements of surface temperatures. One of the interesting features of this technique is its ability to measure a full two dimensional map of an object surface temperature and, for this reason, it has been widely used as a surface flow visualization technique. Since the temperature measurements can be extremely accurate, it is possible, by using a heat flux sensor, also to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions on a surface, making the technique de facto quantitative. This book, starting from the basic theory of radiation and heat flux sensors, guides, both the experienced researcher and the young student, in the correct application of this powerful technique to study convective heat transfer problems. A significant number of examples and applications are also examined in detail, often pointing out some relevant aspects.

  13. Raman and mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging: applications and advancements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gautam, R.; Samuel, A.; Sil, S.; Chaturvedi, D.; Dutta, A.; Ariese, F.; Umapathy, S.

    2015-01-01

    Using Raman and Mid-Infrared (MIR) spectroscopic imaging techniques one can examine the spatial distribution of various molecular constituents in a heterogeneous sample at a microscopic scale. Raman and MIR spectroscopy techniques provide bond-specific vibrational frequencies to characterize

  14. Affordable, Accessible, Immediate: Capture Stunning Images with Digital Infrared Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Technology educators who teach digital photography should consider incorporating an infrared (IR) photography component into their program. This is an area where digital photography offers significant benefits. Either type of IR imaging is very interesting to explore, but traditional film-based IR photography is difficult and expensive. In…

  15. Affordable, Accessible, Immediate: Capture Stunning Images with Digital Infrared Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Technology educators who teach digital photography should consider incorporating an infrared (IR) photography component into their program. This is an area where digital photography offers significant benefits. Either type of IR imaging is very interesting to explore, but traditional film-based IR photography is difficult and expensive. In…

  16. Geometry model construction in infrared image theory simulation of buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢鸣; 李玉秀; 徐辉; 谈和平

    2004-01-01

    Geometric model construction is the basis of infrared image theory simulation. Taking the construction of the geometric model of one building in Harbin as an example, this paper analyzes the theoretical groundings of simplification and principles of geometric model construction of buildings. It then discusses some particular treatment methods in calculating the radiation transfer coefficient in geometric model construction using the Monte Carlo Method.

  17. Infrared Thermal Imaging as a Tool in University Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollmann, Klaus-Peter; Vollmer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Infrared thermal imaging is a valuable tool in physics education at the university level. It can help to visualize and thereby enhance understanding of physical phenomena from mechanics, thermal physics, electromagnetism, optics and radiation physics, qualitatively as well as quantitatively. We report on its use as lecture demonstrations, student…

  18. A survey of infrared and visual image fusion methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xin; Jiang, Qian; Yao, Shaowen; Zhou, Dongming; Nie, Rencan; Hai, Jinjin; He, Kangjian

    2017-09-01

    Infrared (IR) and visual (VI) image fusion is designed to fuse multiple source images into a comprehensive image to boost imaging quality and reduce redundancy information, which is widely used in various imaging equipment to improve the visual ability of human and robot. The accurate, reliable and complementary descriptions of the scene in fused images make these techniques be widely used in various fields. In recent years, a large number of fusion methods for IR and VI images have been proposed due to the ever-growing demands and the progress of image representation methods; however, there has not been published an integrated survey paper about this field in last several years. Therefore, we make a survey to report the algorithmic developments of IR and VI image fusion. In this paper, we first characterize the IR and VI image fusion based applications to represent an overview of the research status. Then we present a synthesize survey of the state of the art. Thirdly, the frequently-used image fusion quality measures are introduced. Fourthly, we perform some experiments of typical methods and make corresponding analysis. At last, we summarize the corresponding tendencies and challenges in IR and VI image fusion. This survey concludes that although various IR and VI image fusion methods have been proposed, there still exist further improvements or potential research directions in different applications of IR and VI image fusion.

  19. A Combined PMHT and IMM Approach to Multiple-Point Target Tracking in Infrared Image Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh A. Zaveri

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Data association and model selection are important factors for tracking multiple targets in a dense clutter environment. In this paper, we provide an effective solution to the tracking of multiple single-pixel maneuvering targets in a sequence of infrared images by developing an algorithm that combines a sequential probabilistic multiple hypothesis tracking (PMHT and interacting multiple model (IMM. We explicitly model maneuver as a change in the target's motion model and demonstrate its effectiveness in our tracking application discussed in this paper. We show that inclusion of IMM enables tracking of any arbitrary trajectory in a sequence of infrared images without any a priori special information about the target dynamics. IMM allows us to incorporate different dynamic models for the targets and PMHT helps to avoid the uncertainty about the observation origin. It operates in an iterative mode using expectation-maximization (EM algorithm. The proposed algorithm uses observation association as missing data.

  20. A Combined PMHT and IMM Approach to Multiple-Point Target Tracking in Infrared Image Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merchant SN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Data association and model selection are important factors for tracking multiple targets in a dense clutter environment. In this paper, we provide an effective solution to the tracking of multiple single-pixel maneuvering targets in a sequence of infrared images by developing an algorithm that combines a sequential probabilistic multiple hypothesis tracking (PMHT and interacting multiple model (IMM. We explicitly model maneuver as a change in the target's motion model and demonstrate its effectiveness in our tracking application discussed in this paper. We show that inclusion of IMM enables tracking of any arbitrary trajectory in a sequence of infrared images without any a priori special information about the target dynamics. IMM allows us to incorporate different dynamic models for the targets and PMHT helps to avoid the uncertainty about the observation origin. It operates in an iterative mode using expectation-maximization (EM algorithm. The proposed algorithm uses observation association as missing data.

  1. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging for Prostate Pathology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    classifier was reported to be helpful in identifying doubtful classifications. Another study54 reported imaging fibroadenoma , a benign breast tumor. Data...were identified - fibroadenoma (FA), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), connective tissue and adipose tissue. Further, ANNs were developed as an automated...features are clearly different from each other and from tumors as well. Differentiating fibroadenoma from DCIS was more difficult. A toplevel/sublevel

  2. Infrared dynamic polarizability of HD+ rovibrational states

    CERN Document Server

    Koelemeij, J C J

    2011-01-01

    A calculation of dynamic polarizabilities of rovibrational states with vibrational quantum number $v=0-7$ and rotational quantum number $J=0,1$ in the 1s$\\sigma_g$ ground-state potential of HD$^+$ is presented. Polarizability contributions by transitions involving other 1s$\\sigma_g$ rovibrational states are explicitly calculated, whereas contributions by electronic transitions are treated quasi-statically and partially derived from existing data [R.E. Moss and L. Valenzano, \\textit{Molec. Phys.}, 2002, \\textbf{100}, 1527]. Our model is valid for wavelengths $>4~\\mu$m and is used to to assess level shifts due to the blackbody radiation (BBR) electric field encountered in experimental high-resolution laser spectroscopy of trapped HD$^+$ ions. Polarizabilities of 1s$\\sigma_g$ rovibrational states obtained here agree with available existing accurate \\textit{ab initio} results. It is shown that the Stark effect due to BBR is dynamic and cannot be treated quasi-statically, as is often done in the case of atomic ion...

  3. Wrist Hypothermia Related to Continuous Work with a Computer Mouse: A Digital Infrared Imaging Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jelena Reste; Tija Zvagule; Natalja Kurjane; Zanna Martinsone; Inese Martinsone; Anita Seile; Ivars Vanadzins

    2015-01-01

    Computer work is characterized by sedentary static workload with low-intensity energy metabolism. The aim of our study was to evaluate the dynamics of skin surface temperature in the hand during prolonged computer mouse work under different ergonomic setups. Digital infrared imaging of the right forearm and wrist was performed during three hours of continuous computer work (measured at the start and every 15 minutes thereafter) in a laboratory with controlled ambient conditions. Four people p...

  4. IR image quality assessment and real-time optimum seeking method based on dynamic visual characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Liu, Gang; Gao, Yongmin; Lei, Hao; Wu, Haiying; Wang, Yu; Rong, Xiaolong

    2016-10-01

    Image quality is an important factor that influences the dynamic target information perception; it is the key factor of real-time target state analysis and judgment. In order to solve the multi-observation station comparison and video optimum seeking problem in the process of target information perception and recognition, an image quality assessment method based on visual characteristics is proposed for infrared target tracking. First, it analyses the basic infrared target image characteristics and application requirements, analyses the status and problems of the multi station optimum seeking technology. According to the expected research results, the processing flow of image processing is established. Then, the image quality objective assessment index is established, which reflects the basic characteristics of the target image, and the assessment index is integrated into the normalized assessment function. According to the quality assessment function, the infrared image quality assessment based on infrared target recognition and image analysis processing is realized, which is mainly characterized by the region of interest and dynamic visual characteristics. And on the basis of this technology, the real-time optimum seeking of multi station infrared target tracking image is completed. In order to verify the effectiveness of the method and the practical application effect, it designs the quality assessment and comparison of different station infrared images. Example shows that the method proposed in this paper can realize multi-observation station infrared image assessment comparison, image quality sorting, the optimum seeking of the infrared image based on the quality assessment. The results accord with the characteristics of infrared target image and dynamic visual characteristics.

  5. Infrared image enhancement through contrast enhancement by using multiscale new top-hat transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiangzhi; Zhou, Fugen; Xue, Bindang

    2011-03-01

    Infrared imaging sensor is sensitive to the variation of imaging environment, which may affect the quality of the obtained images and blur the regions of interest in infrared image. So, it is very important to enhance infrared image. In infrared image, the gray values of the regions of interest are bright or dim image regions, which are different from the surrounding regions. The new top-hat transform could extract image regions which are different from its surrounding regions. In light of this, an infrared image enhancement algorithm through contrast enhancement is proposed in this paper based on multiscale new top-hat transform. Firstly, the multiscale white and black new top-hat transforms are used to extract the multiscale light and dark infrared image regions. Then, the final light and dark infrared image regions for image enhancement are constructed by using the extracted multiscale light and dark infrared image regions. Finally, the contrast of the infrared image is enhanced through a power strategy. Experimental results on different infrared images show that the proposed algorithm could well enhance infrared image and make the possible interested targets brighter, which is very helpful for target detection and recognition.

  6. Infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Andrew V; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2017-01-16

    Infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, are robust, label free and inherently non-destructive methods with a high chemical specificity and sensitivity that are frequently employed in forensic science research and practices. This review aims to discuss the applications and recent developments of these methodologies in this field. Furthermore, the use of recently emerged Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging in transmission, external reflection and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) modes are summarised with relevance and potential for forensic science applications. This spectroscopic imaging approach provides the opportunity to obtain the chemical composition of fingermarks and information about possible contaminants deposited at a crime scene. Research that demonstrates the great potential of these techniques for analysis of fingerprint residues, explosive materials and counterfeit drugs will be reviewed. The implications of this research for the examination of different materials are considered, along with an outlook of possible future research avenues for the application of vibrational spectroscopic methods to the analysis of forensic samples.

  7. An adaptive multi-feature segmentation model for infrared image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Han, Jin; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2016-04-01

    Active contour models (ACM) have been extensively applied to image segmentation, conventional region-based active contour models only utilize global or local single feature information to minimize the energy functional to drive the contour evolution. Considering the limitations of original ACMs, an adaptive multi-feature segmentation model is proposed to handle infrared images with blurred boundaries and low contrast. In the proposed model, several essential local statistic features are introduced to construct a multi-feature signed pressure function (MFSPF). In addition, we draw upon the adaptive weight coefficient to modify the level set formulation, which is formed by integrating MFSPF with local statistic features and signed pressure function with global information. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can make up for the inadequacy of the original method and get desirable results in segmenting infrared images.

  8. GUI-based Processing of Near Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Dustin; Crews, L. J.; Huard, T. L.; Gutermuth, R. A.

    2007-05-01

    As part of The University of Tennessee at Martin's University Scholars mentored research program, we have developed GUI-based, interactive software to aid in the processing of ground-based, near-infrared images. The software is coded in Perl and Tcl/Tk to maximize cross-platform compatibility. The software reduces the raw images to a final set of flat-fielded, sky-subtracted images, which are then input into PhotVis (Gutermuth et al. 2004) to extract the positions and photometric magnitudes of the sources. The final result is a band-merged catalog of sources ready for scientific analysis. Using near-infrared observations of molecular cloud cores obtained with the Magellan 6.5-meter Baade telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, we demonstrate the capability of this software.

  9. A Near-Infrared Imaging Survey of Coalsack Globule 2

    OpenAIRE

    Racca, German; Gomez, Mercedes; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a near-infrared imaging survey of Globule 2 in the Coalsack. This Bok globule is the highest density region of this southern hemisphere molecular cloud and is the most likely location for young stars in this complex. The survey is complete for K < 14.0, H < 14.5, and J < 15.5, several magnitudes more sensitive than previous observations of this globule. From the large number of background stars, we derive an accurate near-infrared extinction law for the cloud. Our result, E_{J-H}/...

  10. Infrared Image Real-time Enhancement Based on DSP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Shao-sheng; YUAN Xiang-hui; XUE Lian

    2004-01-01

    Since image real- time processing requires vast amount of computation and high- speed hardware,it is difficult to be implemented with general microcomputer system. In order to solve the problem,a powerful digital signal processing (DSP) hardware system is proposed,which is able to meet needs of image real-time processing. There are many approaches to enhance infrared image. But only histogram equalization is discussed because it is the most common and effective way. On the basis of histogram equalization principle, the specific procedures implemented in DSP are shown. At last the experimental results are given.

  11. The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: Instrument Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Larkin, James E; Barton, Elizabeth J; Bauman, Brian; Bui, Khanh; Canfield, John; Crampton, David; Delacroix, Alex; Fletcher, Murray; Hale, David; Loop, David; Niehaus, Cyndie; Phillips, Andrew C; Reshetov, Vladimir; Simard, Luc; Smith, Roger; Suzuki, Ryuji; Usuda, Tomonori; Wright, Shelley A

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of the design of IRIS, an infrared (0.85 - 2.5 micron) integral field spectrograph and imaging camera for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). With extremely low wavefront error (<30 nm) and on-board wavefront sensors, IRIS will take advantage of the high angular resolution of the narrow field infrared adaptive optics system (NFIRAOS) to dissect the sky at the diffraction limit of the 30-meter aperture. With a primary spectral resolution of 4000 and spatial sampling starting at 4 milliarcseconds, the instrument will create an unparalleled ability to explore high redshift galaxies, the Galactic center, star forming regions and virtually any astrophysical object. This paper summarizes the entire design and basic capabilities. Among the design innovations is the combination of lenslet and slicer integral field units, new 4Kx4k detectors, extremely precise atmospheric dispersion correction, infrared wavefront sensors, and a very large vacuum cryogenic system.

  12. The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: Instrument Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Anna M; Wright, Shelley A; Bauman, Brian; Dunn, Jennifer; Ellerbroek, Brent; Phillips, Andrew C; Simard, Luc; Suzuki, Ryuji; Zhang, Kai; Aliado, Ted; Brims, George; Canfield, John; Chen, Shaojie; Dekany, Richard; Delacroix, Alex; Do, Tuan; Herriot, Glen; Ikenoue, Bungo; Johnson, Chris; Meyer, Elliot; Obuchi, Yoshiyuki; Pazder, John; Reshetov, Vladimir; Riddle, Reed; Saito, Sakae; Smith, Roger; Sohn, Ji Man; Uraguchi, Fumihiro; Usuda, Tomonori; Wang, Eric; Wang, Lianqi; Weiss, Jason; Wooff, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the design of IRIS, an infrared (0.84 - 2.4 micron) integral field spectrograph and imaging camera for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). With extremely low wavefront error (<30 nm) and on-board wavefront sensors, IRIS will take advantage of the high angular resolution of the narrow field infrared adaptive optics system (NFIRAOS) to dissect the sky at the diffraction limit of the 30-meter aperture. With a primary spectral resolution of 4000 and spatial sampling starting at 4 milliarcseconds, the instrument will create an unparalleled ability to explore high redshift galaxies, the Galactic center, star forming regions and virtually any astrophysical object. This paper summarizes the entire design and basic capabilities. Among the design innovations is the combination of lenslet and slicer integral field units, new 4Kx4k detectors, extremely precise atmospheric dispersion correction, infrared wavefront sensors, and a very large vacuum cryogenic system.

  13. Degradation of near infrared and shortwave infrared imager performance due to atmospheric scattering of diffuse night illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmerhausen, Richard

    2013-07-20

    On moonless nights, airglow is the primary source of natural ground illumination in the near infrared and shortwave infrared spectral bands. Therefore, night vision imagers operating in these spectral bands view targets that are diffusely illuminated. Aerosol scattering of diffuse airglow illumination causes atmospheric path radiance and that radiance causes increased imager noise. These phenomena and their quantification are described in this paper.

  14. Lossless image compression technique for infrared thermal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Lloyd G.; Kelly, Gary E.

    1992-07-01

    The authors have achieved a 6.5-to-one image compression technique for thermal images (640 X 480, 1024 colors deep). Using a combination of new and more traditional techniques, the combined algorithm is computationally simple, enabling `on-the-fly' compression and storage of an image in less time than it takes to transcribe the original image to or from a magnetic medium. Similar compression has been achieved on visual images by virtue of the feature that all optical devices possess a modulation transfer function. As a consequence of this property, the difference in color between adjacent pixels is a usually small number, often between -1 and +1 graduations for a meaningful color scheme. By differentiating adjacent rows and columns, the original image can be expressed in terms of these small numbers. A simple compression algorithm for these small numbers achieves a four to one image compression. By piggy-backing this technique with a LZW compression or a fixed Huffman coding, an additional 35% image compression is obtained, resulting in a 6.5-to-one lossless image compression. Because traditional noise-removal operators tend to minimize the color graduations between adjacent pixels, an additional 20% reduction can be obtained by preprocessing the image with a noise-removal operator. Although noise removal operators are not lossless, their application may prove crucial in applications requiring high compression, such as the storage or transmission of a large number or images. The authors are working with the Air Force Photonics Technology Application Program Management office to apply this technique to transmission of optical images from satellites.

  15. Broadband infrared imaging spectroscopy for standoff detection of trace explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziora, Christopher A.; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; McGill, R. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    This manuscript describes advancements toward a mobile platform for standoff detection of trace explosives on relevant substrates using broadband infrared spectroscopic imaging. In conjunction with this, we are developing a technology for detection based on photo-thermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). PT-IRIS leverages one or more IR quantum cascade lasers (QCL), tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. Here we describe methods to increase both sensitivity to trace explosives and selectivity between different analyte types by exploiting a broader spectral range than in previous configurations. Previously we demonstrated PT-IRIS at several meters of standoff distance indoors and in field tests, while operating the lasers below the infrared eye-safe intensity limit (100 mW/cm2). Sensitivity to explosive traces as small as a single 10 μm diameter particle (~1 ng) has been demonstrated.

  16. Infrared Thermal Imaging System on a Mobile Phone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Feng Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel concept towards pervasively available low-cost infrared thermal imaging system lunched on a mobile phone (MTIS was proposed and demonstrated in this article. Through digestion on the evolutional development of milestone technologies in the area, it can be found that the portable and low-cost design would become the main stream of thermal imager for civilian purposes. As a representative trial towards this important goal, a MTIS consisting of a thermal infrared module (TIM and mobile phone with embedded exclusive software (IRAPP was presented. The basic strategy for the TIM construction is illustrated, including sensor adoption and optical specification. The user-oriented software was developed in the Android environment by considering its popularity and expandability. Computational algorithms with non-uniformity correction and scene-change detection are established to optimize the imaging quality and efficiency of TIM. The performance experiments and analysis indicated that the currently available detective distance for the MTIS is about 29 m. Furthermore, some family-targeted utilization enabled by MTIS was also outlined, such as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS prevention, etc. This work suggests a ubiquitous way of significantly extending thermal infrared image into rather wide areas especially health care in the coming time.

  17. A Preliminary Model of Infrared Image Generation for Exhaust Plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Mei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the irradiance calculation of all pixels on the focal plane array, a preliminary infrared imaging prediction model of exhaust plume that have considered the geometrical and the thermal resolution of the camera was developed to understanding the infrared characteristics of exhaust plume. In order to compute the irradiance incident on each pixel, the gas radiation transfer path in the plume for the instantaneous field of view corresponds to the pixel was solved by the simultaneous equation of a enclosure cylinder which covers the exhaust plume and the line of sight. Radiance of the transfer path was calculated by radiation transfer equation for nonscattering gas. The radiative properties of combustion needed in the equation was provided by employing Malkmus model with EM2C narrow band database(25cm-1. The pressure, species concentration along the path was determination by CFD analysis. The relative irradiance intensity of each pixel was converted to color in the display according to gray map coding and hot map coding. Infrared image of the exhaust plumes from a subsonic axisymmetric nozzle with different relative position of camera and the plume was predicted with the model. By changing the parameters, such as FOV and space resolution, the image of different imaging system can be predicted.

  18. NIP: the near infrared imaging photometer for Euclid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Mario; Bender, Ralf; Katterloher, Reinhard; Eisenhauer, Frank; Hofmann, Reiner; Saglia, Roberto; Holmes, Rory; Krause, Oliver; Rix, Hans-Walter; Booth, Jeff; Fagrelius, Parker; Rhodes, Jason; Seshadri, Suresh; Refregier, Alexandre; Amiaux, Jerome; Augueres, Jean-Louis; Boulade, Olivier; Cara, Christophe; Amara, Adam; Lilly, Simon; Atad-Ettedgui, Eli; di Giorgio, Anna-Maria; Duvet, Ludovic; Kuehl, Christopher; Syed, Mohsin

    2010-07-01

    The NIP is a near infrared imaging photometer that is currently under investigation for the Euclid space mission in context of ESA's 2015 Cosmic Vision program. Together with the visible camera (VIS) it will form the basis of the weak lensing measurements for Euclid. The NIP channel will perform photometric imaging in 3 near infrared bands (Y, J, H) covering a wavelength range from ~ 0.9 to 2 μm over a field of view (FoV) of ~ 0.5 deg2. With the required limiting point source magnitude of 24 mAB (5 sigma) the NIP channel will be used to determine the photometric redshifts of over 2 billion galaxies collected over a wide survey area of 20 000 deg2. In addition to the photometric measurements, the NIP channel will deliver unique near infrared (NIR) imaging data over the entire extragalactic sky, enabling a wide variety of ancillary astrophysical and cosmological studies. In this paper we will present the results of the study carried out by the Euclid Imaging Consortium (EIC) during the Euclid assessment phase.

  19. Dynamical renormalization group resummation of finite temperature infrared divergences

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, D; Holman, R; Simionato, M

    1999-01-01

    We introduce the method of dynamical renormalization group to study relaxation and damping out of equilibrium directly in real time and applied it to the study of infrared divergences in scalar QED. This method allows a consistent resummation of infrared effects associated with the exchange of quasistatic transverse photons and leads to anomalous logarithmic relaxation of the form $e^{-\\alpha T t \\ln[t/t_0]}$ which prevents a quasiparticle interpretation of charged collective excitations at finite temperature. The hard thermal loop resummation program is incorporated consistently into the dynamical renormalization group yielding a picture of relaxation and damping phenomena in a plasma in real time that trascends the conceptual limitations of the quasiparticle picture and other type of resummation schemes. We derive a simple criterion for establishing the validity of the quasiparticle picture to lowest order.

  20. Study on the MWIR imaging ability of optical readout bimaterial microcantilever FPA uncooled infrared imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bingbing; Feng, Yun; Zhao, Yuejin; Dong, Liquan; Liu, Ming; Chu, Xuhong; Yu, Xiaomei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we analyze and experimentally demonstrate the medium-wave infrared (MWIR) imaging ability based on optical readout bimaterial microcantilever focal plane array (FPA) uncooled infrared imaging system. Multiband infrared imaging technology has been a hotspot in the field of infrared imaging. In the infrared band, medium-wave infrared (3 5 μm) has minimal attenuation of atmospheric infrared window, and it also covers many atomic and molecular absorption peak. Imaging study on MWIR radiation source also appears particularly important. First of all, we introduce the bimaterial microcantilever IR sensing principle and the fabrication of the bimaterial microcantilever FPA. Secondly, the paper introduces the theory of the optical-thermal-mechnical reading based on FPA. Finally, the experimental platform was constructed to conduct the MWIR imaging experiment. The medium-wave infrared radiation source consists of a continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator (OPO) that is pumped by a polarization-maintained, single-mode fiber amplifier. The length of the 50mm periodically polarized LiNbO3 crystal (5%MgO) is used as the nonlinear crystal. The stable cavity of the ring is designed, and the output of the 3 4 μm band is realized by the design of the nonlinear crystal polarization period. And the FPA employed in our experiment contains 256×256 pixels fabricated on a glass substrate, whose working bandwidth is covering the three IR atmospheric windows. The experimental results show that the bimaterial microcantilever FPA has a good imaging ability to the MWIR sources.

  1. Intraoperative near-infrared autofluorescence imaging of parathyroid glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladurner, Roland; Sommerey, Sandra; Arabi, Nora Al; Hallfeldt, Klaus K J; Stepp, Herbert; Gallwas, Julia K S

    2017-08-01

    To identify parathyroid glands intraoperatively by exposing their autofluorescence using near-infrared light. Fluorescence imaging was carried out during minimally invasive and open parathyroid and thyroid surgery. After identification, the parathyroid glands as well as the surrounding tissue were exposed to near-infrared (NIR) light with a wavelength of 690-770 nm using a modified Karl Storz near-infrared/indocyanine green (NIR/ICG) endoscopic system. Parathyroid tissue was expected to show near-infrared autofluorescence, captured in the blue channel of the camera. Whenever possible the visual identification of parathyroid tissue was confirmed histologically. In preliminary investigations, using the original NIR/ICG endoscopic system we noticed considerable interference of light in the blue channel overlying the autofluorescence. Therefore, we modified the light source by interposing additional filters. In a second series, we investigated 35 parathyroid glands from 25 patients. Twenty-seven glands were identified correctly based on NIR autofluorescence. Regarding the extent of autofluorescence, there were no noticeable differences between parathyroid adenomas, hyperplasia and normal parathyroid glands. In contrast, thyroid tissue, lymph nodes and adipose tissue revealed no substantial autofluorescence. Parathyroid tissue is characterized by showing autofluorescence in the near-infrared spectrum. This effect can be used to distinguish parathyroid glands from other cervical tissue entities.

  2. Enhancement system of nighttime infrared video image and visible video image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Piao, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Visibility of Nighttime video image has a great significance for military and medicine areas, but nighttime video image has so poor quality that we can't recognize the target and background. Thus we enhance the nighttime video image by fuse infrared video image and visible video image. According to the characteristics of infrared and visible images, we proposed improved sift algorithm andαβ weighted algorithm to fuse heterologous nighttime images. We would deduced a transfer matrix from improved sift algorithm. The transfer matrix would rapid register heterologous nighttime images. And theαβ weighted algorithm can be applied in any scene. In the video image fusion system, we used the transfer matrix to register every frame and then used αβ weighted method to fuse every frame, which reached the time requirement soft video. The fused video image not only retains the clear target information of infrared video image, but also retains the detail and color information of visible video image and the fused video image can fluency play.

  3. Infrared image acquisition system for vein pattern analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Ortega, R.; Toxqui-Quitl, C.; Padilla-Vivanco, A.; Solís-Villarreal, J.

    2016-09-01

    The physical shape of the hand vascular distribution contains useful information that can be used for identifying and authenticating purposes; which provide a high level of security as a biometric. Furthermore, this pattern can be used widely in health field such as venography and venipuncture. In this paper, we analyze different IR imaging systems in order to obtain high visibility images of the hand vein pattern. The images are acquired in the range of 400 nm to 1300 nm, using infrared and thermal cameras. For the first image acquisition system, we use a CCD camera and a light source with peak emission in the 880 nm obtaining the images by reflection. A second system consists only of a ThermaCAM P65 camera acquiring the naturally emanating infrared light from the hand. A method of digital image analysis is implemented using Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE) to remove noise. Subsequently, adaptive thresholding and mathematical morphology operations are implemented to get the vein pattern distribution.

  4. Exploring process dynamics by near infrared spectroscopy in lactic fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Carina; Cieplak, Tomasz; van der Berg, Franciscus Winfried J

    2016-01-01

    In the industrial production of yoghurt, measurement of pH is normally the only in-line technique applied as a real-time monitoring signalfor following the dynamics during the fermentation process. However, every dairy company would benefit from an in-line technique giving information about...... the chemical composition, physical/textural properties and/or microbial contamination. In this study lactic fermentation batches with the starter bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus are explored by in-line near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. The dynamics obtained...

  5. JIRAM, the image spectrometer in the near infrared on board the Juno mission to Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, Alberto; Coradini, Angioletta; Filacchione, Gianrico; Lunine, Jonathan I; Bini, Alessandro; Pasqui, Claudio; Calamai, Luciano; Colosimo, Fedele; Dinelli, Bianca M; Grassi, Davide; Magni, Gianfranco; Moriconi, Maria L; Orosei, Roberto

    2008-06-01

    The Jovian InfraRed Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) has been accepted by NASA for inclusion in the New Frontiers mission "Juno," which will launch in August 2011. JIRAM will explore the dynamics and the chemistry of Jupiter's auroral regions by high-contrast imaging and spectroscopy. It will also analyze jovian hot spots to determine their vertical structure and infer possible mechanisms for their formation. JIRAM will sound the jovian meteorological layer to map moist convection and determine water abundance and other constituents at depths that correspond to several bars pressure. JIRAM is equipped with a single telescope that accommodates both an infrared camera and a spectrometer to facilitate a large observational flexibility in obtaining simultaneous images in the L and M bands with the spectral radiance over the central zone of the images. Moreover, JIRAM will be able to perform spectral imaging of the planet in the 2.0-5.0 microm interval of wavelengths with a spectral resolution better than 10 nm. Instrument design, modes, and observation strategy will be optimized for operations onboard a spinning satellite in polar orbit around Jupiter. The JIRAM heritage comes from Italian-made, visual-infrared imaging spectrometers dedicated to planetary exploration, such as VIMS-V on Cassini, VIRTIS on Rosetta and Venus Express, and VIR-MS on the Dawn mission.

  6. FISICA: The Florida image slicer for infrared cosmology and astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Elston, Richard; Guzman, Rafael; Raines, S. Nicholas; Julian, J.; Gruel, N.; Boreman, Glenn; Hoffmann, Jeff; Rodgers, Michael; Glenn, Paul; Hull-Allen, Greg; Myrick, Bruce; Flint, Scott; Comstock, Lovell

    2006-06-01

    We report on the design and status of the Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Cosmology and Astrophysics (FISICA) - a fully-cryogenic all-reflective image-slicing integral field unit for the FLAMINGOS near-infrared spectrograph. Designed to accept input beams near f/15, FISICA with FLAMINGOS provides R ˜ 1300 spectra over a 16 × 33″ field-of-view on the Cassegrain f/15 focus of the KPNO 4-m telescope, or a 6 × 12″ field-of-view on the Nasmyth or Bent Cassegrain foci of the Gran Telescopio Canarias 10.4-m telescope. FISICA accomplishes this using three sets of "monolithic" powered mirror arrays, each with 22 mirrored surfaces cut into a single piece of aluminum. We review the optical and opto-mechanical design, fabrication, laboratory test results, and on-telescope performance for FISICA.

  7. Measuring cloud thermodynamic phase with shortwave infrared imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David R.; McCubbin, Ian; Gao, Bo Cai; Green, Robert O.; Matthews, Alyssa A.; Mei, Fan; Meyer, Kerry G.; Platnick, Steven; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason; Wilcox, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Shortwave Infrared imaging spectroscopy enables accurate remote mapping of cloud thermodynamic phase at high spatial resolution. We describe a measurement strategy to exploit signatures of liquid and ice absorption in cloud top apparent reflectance spectra from 1.4 to 1.8 μm. This signal is generally insensitive to confounding factors such as solar angles, view angles, and surface albedo. We first evaluate the approach in simulation and then apply it to airborne data acquired in the Calwater-2/ACAPEX campaign of Winter 2015. Here NASA's "Classic" Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-C) remotely observed diverse cloud formations while the U.S. Department of Energy ARM Aerial Facility G-1 aircraft measured cloud integral and microphysical properties in situ. The coincident measurements demonstrate good separation of the thermodynamic phases for relatively homogeneous clouds.

  8. Measuring cloud thermodynamic phase with shortwave infrared imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; McCubbin, Ian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; Desert Research Institute, Reno Nevada USA; Gao, Bo Cai [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington District of Columbia USA; Green, Robert O. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; Matthews, Alyssa A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Mei, Fan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Meyer, Kerry G. [Goddard Earth Science Technology and Research, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia Maryland USA; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenland Maryland USA; Platnick, Steven [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenland Maryland USA; Schmid, Beat [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Tomlinson, Jason [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Wilcox, Eric [Desert Research Institute, Reno Nevada USA

    2016-08-12

    Shortwave Infrared imaging spectroscopy enables accurate remote mapping of cloud thermodynamic phase at high spatial resolution. We describe a measurement strategy to exploit signatures of liquid and ice absorption in cloud top apparent reflectance spectra from 1.4 to 1.8 μm. This signal is generally insensitive to confounding factors such as solar angles, view angles, and surface albedo. We first evaluate the approach in simulation and then apply it to airborne data acquired in the Calwater-2/ACAPEX campaign of Winter 2015. Here NASA’s “Classic” Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-C) remotely observed diverse cloud formations while the U.S. Department of Energy ARM Aerial Facility G-1 aircraft measured cloud integral and microphysical properties in situ. Finally, the coincident measurements demonstrate good separation of the thermodynamic phases for relatively homogeneous clouds.

  9. An Imaging Infrared (IIR) seeker using a microprogrammed processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, K. V.

    1980-01-01

    A recently developed Imaging Infrared Seeker uses a microprogrammed processor to perform gimbal servo control and system interface while performing the seeker functions of automatic target detection, acquisition, and tracking. The automatic detection mode requires up to 80% of the available capability of a high performance microprogrammed processor. Although system complexity was increased significantly, this approach can be cost effective when the basic computation capacity is already available.

  10. Dual-band infrared remote sensing system with combined long-wave infrared imaging and mid-wave infrared spectral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zheng; Yi, Xinjian; Liu, Xiangyan; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Tianxu

    2013-08-01

    We present a new optical system for infrared (IR) image-spectrum integration remote sensing. The purpose to develop this instrument is to find the key spectral characteristics of typical hot target and to explore a new intelligence fusion method for the recognition. When mounted on a two-dimensional rotation stage, it can track the suspected target by image processing, and then get its spectrum to do recognition. It is a dual-band system with long-wave infrared (LWIR) imaging and mid-wave infrared (MWIR) spectrum. An IR dichroic beamsplitter is used to divide wideband incident infrared into LWIR and MWIR. Compared to traditional infrared combined imaging and spectral-analysis instruments, it yields higher sensitivity for measuring the IR spectrum. The sensors for imaging and spectrum detection are separate, so high spatial resolution, frame rate, and spectrum resolution can all be obtained simultaneously.

  11. Infrared microspectroscopic imaging of benign breast tumor tissue sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, H.; Lasch, P.; Boese, M.; Haensch, W.

    2003-12-01

    We have applied infrared microspectroscopic imaging for the examination of benign breast tumor tissue sections. The IR spectra of the sections were obtained by classical point microscopy with a movable stage and via a microscope equipped with a focal plane array detector. The infrared microscopic data were analysed using functional group mapping techniques and cluster analysis. The output values of the two procedures were reassembled into infrared images of the tissues, and were compared with standard staining images of the corresponding tissue region. The comparative examination of identical tissue sections by the two IR approaches enabled us to assess potential problems associated with tissue microheterogeneity. It was found that in case of fibroadenoma, a benign lesion located in breast ducts, point microscopy with a spot size of ˜30 μm is a useful practical approach which minimizes the possibility of 'contamination' of the spectra because of spectral averaging of all tissue components present in the corresponding microareas. A comparison of the spectra of the benign breast tumor with those of a malignant ductal carcinoma in situ revealed that IR microspectroscopy has the potential to differentiate between these two breast tumor types.

  12. Charge-Injection Device (CID) Infrared Staring Imaging Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, W. D.; Wilson, S. H.; Missman, R. A.; Nuttall, D. E.; Ting, R. N.

    1981-07-01

    A laboratory version of an infrared staring imaging sensor, based on a 32 x 32 indium antimonide CID detector array, has been developed. That sensor serves both as a test bed for array evaluation and as a tool for investigating concepts such as non-uniformity compensation. The system is microprocessor based to provide for flexible array operation as well as for the collection and logging of array operating conditions and data. Design features of the sensor, including the focal plane and the supporting electronics, are described. Operation of the sensor is discussed and some of the imaging data collected with this system is presented.

  13. Optimized Optomechanical Micro-Cantilever Array for Uncooled Infrared Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Feng-Liang; ZHANG Qing-Chuan; CHEN Da-Peng; MIAO Zheng-Yu; XIONG Zhi-Ming; GUO Zhe-Ying; LI Chao-Bo; JIAO Bin-Bin; WU Xiao-Ping

    2007-01-01

    We present a new substrate-free bimaterial cantilever array made of SiNx and Au for an uncooled microoptomechanical infrared imaging device.Each cantilever element has an optimized deformation magnification structure.A 160×160 array with a 120μm×120μm pitch is fabricared and an optical readout is used to collectively measure deflections of all microcantilevers in the array.Tharmal images of room-temperature objects with higher spatial resolution have been obtained and the noise-equivalent temperature difference of the fabricated focal plane arrays is giyen statistically and is measured to be about 270mK.

  14. Infrared and visible image fusion using NSCT and GGD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuqiong; Liu, Cuiyin; Men, Tao; Qin, Hongyin; Wang, Mingrong

    2011-06-01

    In order to fuse the visible and infrared images captured in low visibility conditions, a method based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT) and generalized Gaussian distribution (GGD) is proposed in this paper. The statistical character of the directional coefficients decomposed by NSCT meet the GGD. So, the coefficients are estimated using absolute moment estimation in local neighbor in directional coefficients. The estimated scale parameter is used to measure the saliency and compute the weight. The fused coefficients are obtained by the weighted average and are reconstructed the final fused image. Compared to the DWT and SIDWT, the proposed method has b superior fusion performance.

  15. Near-infrared spectral imaging Michelson interferometer for astronomical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, C. W.; Potter, A. E.; Morgan, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    The design and operation of an imaging Michelson interferometer-spectrometer used for near-infrared (0.8 micron to 2.5 microns) spectral imaging are reported. The system employs a rapid scan interferometer modified for stable low resolution (250/cm) performance and a 42 element PbS linear detector array. A microcomputer system is described which provides data acquisition, coadding, and Fourier transformation for near real-time presentation of the spectra of all 42 scene elements. The electronic and mechanical designs are discussed and telescope performance data presented.

  16. Suppression of fixed pattern noise for infrared image system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changhan; Han, Jungsoo; Bae, Kyung-Hoon

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we propose suppression of fixed pattern noise (FPN) and compensation of soft defect for improvement of object tracking in cooled staring infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) imaging system. FPN appears an observable image which applies to non-uniformity compensation (NUC) by temperature. Soft defect appears glittering black and white point by characteristics of non-uniformity for IR detector by time. This problem is very important because it happen serious problem for object tracking as well as degradation for image quality. Signal processing architecture in cooled staring IRFPA imaging system consists of three tables: low, normal, high temperature for reference gain and offset values. Proposed method operates two offset tables for each table. This is method which operates six term of temperature on the whole. Proposed method of soft defect compensation consists of three stages: (1) separates sub-image for an image, (2) decides a motion distribution of object between each sub-image, (3) analyzes for statistical characteristic from each stationary fixed pixel. Based on experimental results, the proposed method shows an improved image which suppresses FPN by change of temperature distribution from an observational image in real-time.

  17. Infrared imaging-based combat casualty care system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, James E., Sr.

    1997-08-01

    A Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract was recently awarded to a start up company for the development of an infrared (IR) image based combat casualty care system. The company, Medical Thermal Diagnostics, or MTD, is developing a light weight, hands free, energy efficient uncooled IR imaging system based upon a Texas Instruments design which will allow emergency medical treatment of wounded soldiers in complete darkness without any type of light enhancement equipment. The principal investigator for this effort, Dr. Gene Luther, DVM, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, will conduct the development and testing of this system with support from Thermalscan, Inc., a nondestructive testing company experienced in IR thermography applications. Initial research has been done with surgery on a cat for feasibility of the concept as well as forensic research on pigs as a close representation of human physiology to determine time of death. Further such studies will be done later as well as trauma studies. IR images of trauma injuries will be acquired by imaging emergency room patients to create an archive of emergency medical situations seen with an infrared imaging camera. This archived data will then be used to develop training material for medical personnel using the system. This system has potential beyond military applications. Firefighters and emergency medical technicians could directly benefit from the capability to triage and administer medical care to trauma victims in low or no light conditions.

  18. Application of ceramic phosphors for near infrared biomedical imaging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kohei; Tokuzen, Kimikazu; Tsuji, Kosuke; Yamano, Tomoyoshi; Venkatachalam, Nallusamy; Hyodo, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Hidehiro

    2010-02-01

    Near infrared wavelength region between 0.8 and 2 μm is an attractive region for biomedical imaging due to the low loss in biomedical objects in the region. Rare-earth doped ceramic phosphors are known to emit efficient fluorescence in the same wavelength region. The authors have developed micro fluorescence bioimaging system for cellular or tissue imaging and macro one for in vivo imaging. This paper will review the materials synthesis for the near infrared fluorescence probes as well as the system development and demonstrative works. Er-doped or Yb/Er-doped ceramic phosphors were synthesized with required particle size. The phosphors were partly modified with polyethylene glycol to give dispersion and controlled interaction with the biological objects. By using the micro imaging system, nematodes, mouse tissue and M1 cells were observed by detecting 1.5 μm emission from Er doped in the ceramic phosphor. in vivo imaging with the same fluorescence scheme was also performed for the digestive organs of live mouse.

  19. Ash plume properties retrieved from infrared images: a forward and inverse modeling approach

    CERN Document Server

    Cerminara, Matteo; Valade, Sébastien; Harris, Andrew J L

    2014-01-01

    We present a coupled fluid-dynamic and electromagnetic model for volcanic ash plumes. In a forward approach, the model is able to simulate the plume dynamics from prescribed input flow conditions and generate the corresponding synthetic thermal infrared (TIR) image, allowing a comparison with field-based observations. An inversion procedure is then developed to retrieve ash plume properties from TIR images. The adopted fluid-dynamic model is based on a one-dimensional, stationary description of a self-similar (top-hat) turbulent plume, for which an asymptotic analytical solution is obtained. The electromagnetic emission/absorption model is based on the Schwarzschild's equation and on Mie's theory for disperse particles, assuming that particles are coarser than the radiation wavelength and neglecting scattering. [...] Application of the inversion procedure to an ash plume at Santiaguito volcano (Guatemala) has allowed us to retrieve the main plume input parameters, namely the initial radius $b_0$, velocity $U_...

  20. Doubly resonant photonic antenna for single infrared quantum dot imaging at telecommunication wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Zhihua; Mivelle, Mathieu; Salut, Roland; Merolla, Jean-Marc; Grosjean, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal Quantum dots (CQDs) are nowadays one of the cornerstones of modern photonics as they have led to the emergence of new optoelectronic and biomedical technologies. However, the full characterization of these quantum emitters is currently restricted to the visible wavelengths and it remains a key challenge to optically probe single CQDs operating in the infrared spectral domain which is targeted by a growing number of applications. Here, we report the first experimental detection and imaging at room temperature of single infrared CQDs operating at telecommunication wavelengths. Imaging was done with a doubly resonant bowtie nano-aperture antenna (BNA) written at the end of a fiber nanoprobe, whose resonances spectrally fit the CQD absorption and emission wavelengths. Direct near-field characterization of PbS CQDs reveal individual nanocrystals with a spatial resolution of 75 nm (lambda/20) together with their intrinsic 2D dipolar free-space emission properties and exciton dynamics (blinking phenomenon)...

  1. IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF IN VIVOBLOOD VESSELS USING IMAGE FUSION METHODS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Kryger; Savarimuthu, Thiusius Rajeeth; Sørensen, Anders Stengaard

    2009-01-01

    We investigate methods for improving the visual quality of in vivo images of blood vessels in the human forearm. Using a near-infrared light source and a dual CCD chip camera system capable of capturing images at visual and nearinfrared spectra, we evaluate three fusion methods in terms of their ...

  2. Plant species discrimination using emissive thermal infrared imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Gilles; Gerhards, Max; Schlerf, Martin; Hecker, Christoph; Udelhoven, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Discrimination of plant species in the optical reflective domain is somewhat limited by the similarity of their reflectance spectra. Spectral characteristics in the visible to shortwave infrared (VSWIR) consist of combination bands and overtones of primary absorption bands, situated in the Thermal Infrared (TIR) region and therefore resulting in broad spectral features. TIR spectroscopy is assumed to have a large potential for providing complementary information to VSWIR spectroscopy. So far, in the TIR, plants were often considered featureless. Recently and following advances in sensor technology, plant species were discriminated based on specific emissivity signatures by Ullah et al. (2012) using directional-hemispherical reflectance (DHR) measurements in the laboratory. Here we examine if an accurate discrimination of plant species is equally possible using emissive thermal infrared imaging spectroscopy, an explicit spatial technique that is faster and more flexible than non-imaging measurements. Hyperspectral thermal infrared images were acquired in the 7.8⿿11.56 μm range at 40 nm spectral resolution (@10 μm) using a TIR imaging spectrometer (Telops HyperCam-LW) on seven plants each, of eight different species. The images were radiometrically calibrated and subjected to temperature and emissivity separation using a spectral smoothness approach. First, retrieved emissivity spectra were compared to laboratory reference spectra and then subjected to species discrimination using a random forest classifier. Second, classification results obtained with emissivity spectra were compared to those obtained with VSWIR reflectance spectra that had been acquired from the same leaf samples. In general, the mean emissivity spectra measured by the TIR imaging spectrometer showed very good agreement with the reference spectra (average Nash-Sutcliffe-Efficiency Index = 0.64). In species discrimination, the resulting accuracies for emissivity spectra are highly dependent on

  3. The (new) Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager (MIRSI) for the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, Joseph L.; Trilling, David; Mommert, Michael; Smith, Howard A.; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Marscher, Alan P.; Tokunaga, Alan; Bergknut, Lars; Bonnet, Morgan; Bus, Schelte J.; Connelly, Michael; Rayner, John; Watanabe, Darryl

    2015-11-01

    The Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager (MIRSI) was developed at Boston University and has been in use since 2002 on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), making observations of asteroids, planets, and comets in the 2 - 25 μm wavelength range. Recently the instrument has been unavailable due to electronics issues and the high cost of supplying liquid helium on Maunakea. We have begun a project to upgrade MIRSI to a cryocooler-based system with new array readout electronics and a dichroic and optical camera to simultaneously image the science field for image acquisition and optical photometry. The mechanical cryocooler will enable MIRSI to be continuously mounted on the IRTF multiple instrument mount (MIM) along with the other facility instruments, making it available to the entire community for multi-wavelength imaging and spectral observations. We will propose to use the refurbished MIRSI to measure the 10 μm flux from Near Earth Objects (NEOs) and determine their diameters and albedos through the use of a thermal model. We plan to observe up to 750 NEOs over the course of a three year survey, most of whose diameters will be under 300 meters. Here we present an overview of the MIRSI upgrade and give the current status of the project.This work is funded by the NASA Solar System Observations/NEOO program.

  4. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Damiano; Eid, Marwen; Schoepf, U Joseph; Jin, Kwang Nam; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Tesche, Christian; Mangold, Stefanie; Spandorfer, Adam; Laghi, Andrea; De Cecco, Carlo N

    2016-10-01

    Non-invasive cardiac imaging has rapidly evolved during the last decade due to advancements in CT based technologies. Coronary CT angiography has been shown to reliably assess coronary anatomy and detect high risk coronary artery disease. However, this technique is limited to anatomical assessment, thus non-invasive techniques for functional assessment of the heart are necessary. CT myocardial perfusion is a new CT based technique that provides functional assessment of the myocardium and allows for a comprehensive assessment of coronary artery disease with a single modality when combined with CTA. This review aims to discuss dynamic CT myocardial perfusion as a new technique in the assessment of CAD.

  5. Using short-wave infrared imaging for fruit quality evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Lee, Dah-Jye; Desai, Alok

    2013-12-01

    Quality evaluation of agricultural and food products is important for processing, inventory control, and marketing. Fruit size and surface quality are two important quality factors for high-quality fruit such as Medjool dates. Fruit size is usually measured by length that can be done easily by simple image processing techniques. Surface quality evaluation on the other hand requires more complicated design, both in image acquisition and image processing. Skin delamination is considered a major factor that affects fruit quality and its value. This paper presents an efficient histogram analysis and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time surface quality evaluation of Medjool dates. This approach, based on short-wave infrared imaging, provides excellent image contrast between the fruit surface and delaminated skin, which allows significant simplification of image processing algorithm and reduction of computational power requirements. The proposed quality grading method requires very simple training procedure to obtain a gray scale image histogram for each quality level. Using histogram comparison, each date is assigned to one of the four quality levels and an optimal threshold is calculated for segmenting skin delamination areas from the fruit surface. The percentage of the fruit surface that has skin delamination can then be calculated for quality evaluation. This method has been implemented and used for commercial production and proven to be efficient and accurate.

  6. Passive shortwave infrared broadband and hyperspectral imaging in a maritime environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, K. Peter; Nichols, Jonathan M.; Howard, J. Grant; Waterman, James R.; Vilardebo, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    This work offers a comparison of broadband shortwave infrared, defined as the spectral band from 0.9 to 1.7 μm, and hyperspectral shortwave infrared imagers in a marine environment under various daylight conditions. Both imagers are built around a Raytheon Vision Systems large format (1024×1280) indium-gallium-arsenide focal plane array with high dynamic range and low noise electronics. Sample imagery from a variety of objects and scenes indicates roughly the same visual performance between the two systems. However, we show that the more detailed spectral information provided by the hyperspectral system allows for object detection and discrimination. A vessel was equipped with panels coated with a variety of paints that possessed spectral differences in the 0.9 to 1.7 μm waveband. The vessel was imaged at various ranges, states of background clutter, and times of the day. Using a standard correlation receiver, it is demonstrated that image pixels containing the paint can be easily identified. During the exercise, it was also observed that both bow waves and near-field wakes from a wide variety of vessel traffic provide a spectral signature in the shortwave infrared waveband that could potentially be used for object tracking.

  7. Combined use of visible, reflected infrared, and thermal infrared images for mapping Hawaiian lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Michael; Abbott, Elsa; Kahle, Anne

    1991-01-01

    The weathering of Hawaiian basalts is accompanied by chemical and physical changes of the surfaces. These changes have been mapped using remote sensing data from the visible and reflected infrared and thermal infrared wavelength regions. They are related to the physical breakdown of surface chill coats, the development and erosion of silica coatings, the oxidation of mafic minerals, and the development of vegetation cover. These effects show systematic behavior with age and can be mapped using the image data and related to relative ages of pahoehoe and aa flows. The thermal data are sensitive to silica rind development and fine structure of the scene; the reflectance data show the degree of oxidation and differentiate vegetation from aa and cinders. Together, data from the two wavelength regions show more than either separately. The combined data potentially provide a powerful tool for mapping basalt flows in arid to semiarid volcanic environments.

  8. Stochastic Dynamics of Infrared Fluctuations in Accelerating Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Gihyuk; Kitamoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We extend investigations of infrared dynamics in accelerating universes. In the presence of massless and minimally coupled scalar fields, physical quantities may acquire growing time dependences through quantum fluctuations at super-horizon scales. From a semiclassical viewpoint, it was proposed that such infrared effects are described by a Langevin equation. In de Sitter space, the stochastic approach has been proved to be equivalent to resummation of the growing time dependences at the leading power. In this paper, we make the resummation derivation of the Langevin equation in a general accelerating universe. We first consider an accelerating universe whose slow-roll parameter is constant, and then extend the background as the slow-roll parameter becomes time dependent. The resulting Langevin equation contains a white noise term and the coefficient of each term is modified by the slow-roll parameter. Furthermore we find that the semiclassical description of the scalar fields leads to the same stochastic equ...

  9. The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: Data Reduction System

    CERN Document Server

    Walth, Gregory; Weiss, Jason; Larkin, James E; Moore, Anna M; Chapin, Edward L; Do, Tuan; Dunn, Jennifer; Ellerbroek, Brent; Gillies, Kim; Hayano, Yutaka; Johnson, Chris; Marshall, Daniel; Riddle, Reed L; Simard, Luc; Sohn, Ji Man; Suzuki, Ryuji; Wincensten, James

    2016-01-01

    IRIS (InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph) is the diffraction-limited first light instrument for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) that consists of a near-infrared (0.84 to 2.4 $\\mu$m) imager and integral field spectrograph (IFS). The IFS makes use of a lenslet array and slicer for spatial sampling, which will be able to operate in 100's of different modes, including a combination of four plate scales from 4 milliarcseconds (mas) to 50 mas with a large range of filters and gratings. The imager will have a field of view of 34$\\times$34 arcsec$^{2}$ with a plate scale of 4 mas with many selectable filters. We present the preliminary design of the data reduction system (DRS) for IRIS that need to address all of these observing modes. Reduction of IRIS data will have unique challenges since it will provide real-time reduction and analysis of the imaging and spectroscopic data during observational sequences, as well as advanced post-processing algorithms. The DRS will support three basic modes of operation of IRIS; reduc...

  10. Upconversion imaging using short-wave infrared picosecond pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathez, Morgan; Rodrigo, Peter John; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-02-01

    To the best of our knowledge, we present the first demonstration of short-wavelength infrared image upconversion that employs intense picosecond signal and pump beams. We use a fiber laser that emits a signal beam at 1877 nm and a pump beam at 1550 nm-both with a pulse width of 1 ps and a pulse repetition rate of 21.7 MHz. Due to synchronization of high peak-power pulses, efficient upconversion is achieved in a single-pass setup that employs a bulk lithium niobate crystal. Optimizing the temporal overlap of the pulses for high upconversion efficiency enables us to exploit a relatively large pump beam diameter to upconvert a wider range of signal spatial frequencies in the crystal. The 1877 nm signal is converted into 849 nm-enabling an image to be acquired by a silicon CCD camera. The measured size of the smallest resolvable element of this imaging system is consistent with the value predicted by an improved model that considers the combined image blurring effect due to finite pump beam size, thick nonlinear crystal, and polychromatic infrared illumination.

  11. Segmentation of knee injury swelling on infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, John; Langet, Hélène; Herry, Christophe; Frize, Monique

    2011-03-01

    Interpretation of medical infrared images is complex due to thermal noise, absence of texture, and small temperature differences in pathological zones. Acute inflammatory response is a characteristic symptom of some knee injuries like anterior cruciate ligament sprains, muscle or tendons strains, and meniscus tear. Whereas artificial coloring of the original grey level images may allow to visually assess the extent inflammation in the area, their automated segmentation remains a challenging problem. This paper presents a hybrid segmentation algorithm to evaluate the extent of inflammation after knee injury, in terms of temperature variations and surface shape. It is based on the intersection of rapid color segmentation and homogeneous region segmentation, to which a Laplacian of a Gaussian filter is applied. While rapid color segmentation enables to properly detect the observed core of swollen area, homogeneous region segmentation identifies possible inflammation zones, combining homogeneous grey level and hue area segmentation. The hybrid segmentation algorithm compares the potential inflammation regions partially detected by each method to identify overlapping areas. Noise filtering and edge segmentation are then applied to common zones in order to segment the swelling surfaces of the injury. Experimental results on images of a patient with anterior cruciate ligament sprain show the improved performance of the hybrid algorithm with respect to its separated components. The main contribution of this work is a meaningful automatic segmentation of abnormal skin temperature variations on infrared thermography images of knee injury swelling.

  12. Near-Infrared Imaging Using a High-Speed Monitoring Near Infrared Hyperspectral Camera (Compovision)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daitaro Ishikawa; Asako Motomura; Yoko Igarashi; Yukihiro Ozaki

    2015-01-01

    This review paper reports near‐infrared (NIR) imaging studies using a newly‐developed NIR camer‐a ,Compovision .Compovision can measure a significantly wide area of 150 mm × 250 mm at high speed of be‐tween 2 and 5 s .It enables a wide spectral region measurement in the 1 000~2 350 nm range at 6 nm inter‐vals .We investigated the potential of Compovision in the applications to industrial problems such as the evalu‐ation of pharmaceutical tablets and polymers .Our studies have demonstrated that NIR imaging based on Com‐povision can solve several issues such as long acquisition times and relatively low sensitivity of detection .NIR imaging with Compovision is strongly expected to be applied not only to pharmaceutical tablet monitoring and polymer characterization but also to various applications such as those to food products ,biomedical substances and organic and inorganic materials .

  13. Fourier transform infrared imaging and infrared fiber optic probe spectroscopy identify collagen type in connective tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Hanifi

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage and mechanically inferior fibrocartilage consisting of mixed collagen types are frequently found together in repairing articular cartilage. The present study seeks to develop methodology to identify collagen type and other tissue components using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectral evaluation of matrix composition in combination with multivariate analyses. FTIR spectra of the primary molecular components of repair cartilage, types I and II collagen, and aggrecan, were used to develop multivariate spectral models for discrimination of the matrix components of the tissues of interest. Infrared imaging data were collected from bovine bone, tendon, normal cartilage, meniscus and human repair cartilage tissues, and composition predicted using partial least squares analyses. Histology and immunohistochemistry results were used as standards for validation. Infrared fiber optic probe spectral data were also obtained from meniscus (a tissue with mixed collagen types to evaluate the potential of this method for identification of collagen type in a minimally-invasive clinical application. Concentration profiles of the tissue components obtained from multivariate analysis were in excellent agreement with histology and immunohistochemistry results. Bone and tendon showed a uniform distribution of predominantly type I collagen through the tissue. Normal cartilage showed a distribution of type II collagen and proteoglycan similar to the known composition, while in repair cartilage, the spectral distribution of both types I and II collagen were similar to that observed via immunohistochemistry. Using the probe, the outer and inner regions of the meniscus were shown to be primarily composed of type I and II collagen, respectively, in accordance with immunohistochemistry data. In summary, multivariate analysis of infrared spectra can indeed be used to differentiate collagen type I and type II, even in the presence of proteoglycan, in

  14. Design of a Remote Infrared Images and Other Data Acquisition Station for outdoor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béland, M.-A.; Djupkep, F. B. D.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.; Ferrarini, G.; Bison, P.; Grinzato, E.

    2013-05-01

    The Infrared Images and Other Data Acquisition Station enables a user, who is located inside a laboratory, to acquire visible and infrared images and distances in an outdoor environment with the help of an Internet connection. This station can acquire data using an infrared camera, a visible camera, and a rangefinder. The system can be used through a web page or through Python functions.

  15. Infrared traffic image enhancement algorithm based on dark channel prior and gamma correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lintao; Shi, Hengliang; Gu, Ming

    2017-07-01

    The infrared traffic image acquired by the intelligent traffic surveillance equipment has low contrast, little hierarchical differences in perceptions of image and the blurred vision effect. Therefore, infrared traffic image enhancement, being an indispensable key step, is applied to nearly all infrared imaging based traffic engineering applications. In this paper, we propose an infrared traffic image enhancement algorithm that is based on dark channel prior and gamma correction. In existing research dark channel prior, known as a famous image dehazing method, here is used to do infrared image enhancement for the first time. Initially, in the proposed algorithm, the original degraded infrared traffic image is transformed with dark channel prior as the initial enhanced result. A further adjustment based on the gamma curve is needed because initial enhanced result has lower brightness. Comprehensive validation experiments reveal that the proposed algorithm outperforms the current state-of-the-art algorithms.

  16. Exoplanet Community Report on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchi, William C.; Lawson, Peter R.

    2009-01-01

    Direct infrared imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets will allow for detailed characterization of the atmospheric constituents of more than 200 nearby Earth-like planets, more than is possible with any other method under consideration. A flagship mission based on larger passively cooled infrared telescopes and formation flying technologies would have the highest angular resolution of any concept under consideration. The 2008 Exoplanet Forum committee on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets recommends: (1) a vigorous technology program including component development, integrated testbeds, and end-to-end modeling in the areas of formation flying and mid-infrared nulling; (2) a probe-scale mission based on a passively cooled structurally connected interferometer to be started within the next two to five years, for exoplanetary system characterization that is not accessible from the ground, and which would provide transformative science and lay the engineering groundwork for the flagship mission with formation flying elements. Such a mission would enable a complete exozodiacal dust survey (<1 solar system zodi) in the habitable zone of all nearby stars. This information will allow for a more efficient strategy of spectral characterization of Earth-sized planets for the flagship missions, and also will allow for optimization of the search strategy of an astrometric mission if such a mission were delayed due to cost or technology reasons. (3) Both the flagship and probe missions should be pursued with international partners if possible. Fruitful collaboration with international partners on mission concepts and relevant technology should be continued. (4) Research and Analysis (R&A) should be supported for the development of preliminary science and mission designs. Ongoing efforts to characterize the the typical level of exozodiacal light around Sun-like stars with ground-based nulling technology should be continued.

  17. Exoplanet Community Report on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchi, William C.; Lawson, Peter R.

    2009-01-01

    Direct infrared imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets will allow for detailed characterization of the atmospheric constituents of more than 200 nearby Earth-like planets, more than is possible with any other method under consideration. A flagship mission based on larger passively cooled infrared telescopes and formation flying technologies would have the highest angular resolution of any concept under consideration. The 2008 Exoplanet Forum committee on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets recommends: (1) a vigorous technology program including component development, integrated testbeds, and end-to-end modeling in the areas of formation flying and mid-infrared nulling; (2) a probe-scale mission based on a passively cooled structurally connected interferometer to be started within the next two to five years, for exoplanetary system characterization that is not accessible from the ground, and which would provide transformative science and lay the engineering groundwork for the flagship mission with formation flying elements. Such a mission would enable a complete exozodiacal dust survey (<1 solar system zodi) in the habitable zone of all nearby stars. This information will allow for a more efficient strategy of spectral characterization of Earth-sized planets for the flagship missions, and also will allow for optimization of the search strategy of an astrometric mission if such a mission were delayed due to cost or technology reasons. (3) Both the flagship and probe missions should be pursued with international partners if possible. Fruitful collaboration with international partners on mission concepts and relevant technology should be continued. (4) Research and Analysis (R&A) should be supported for the development of preliminary science and mission designs. Ongoing efforts to characterize the the typical level of exozodiacal light around Sun-like stars with ground-based nulling technology should be continued.

  18. The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: data reduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walth, Gregory; Wright, Shelley A.; Weiss, Jason; Larkin, James E.; Moore, Anna M.; Chapin, Edward L.; Do, Tuan; Dunn, Jennifer; Ellerbroek, Brent; Gillies, Kim; Hayano, Yutaka; Johnson, Chris; Marshall, Daniel; Riddle, Reed L.; Simard, Luc; Sohn, Ji Man; Suzuki, Ryuji; Wincentsen, James

    2016-08-01

    IRIS (InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph) is the diffraction-limited first light instrument for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) that consists of a near-infrared (0.84 to 2.4 μm) imager and integral field spectrograph (IFS). The IFS makes use of a lenslet array and slicer for spatial sampling, which will be able to operate in 100's of different modes, including a combination of four plate scales from 4 milliarcseconds (mas) to 50 mas with a large range of filters and gratings. The imager will have a field of view of 34×34 arcsec2 with a plate scale of 4 mas with many selectable filters. We present the preliminary design of the data reduction system (DRS) for IRIS that need to address all of these observing modes. Reduction of IRIS data will have unique challenges since it will provide real-time reduction and analysis of the imaging and spectroscopic data during observational sequences, as well as advanced post-processing algorithms. The DRS will support three basic modes of operation of IRIS; reducing data from the imager, the lenslet IFS, and slicer IFS. The DRS will be written in Python, making use of open-source astronomical packages available. In addition to real-time data reduction, the DRS will utilize real-time visualization tools, providing astronomers with up-to-date evaluation of the target acquisition and data quality. The quick look suite will include visualization tools for 1D, 2D, and 3D raw and reduced images. We discuss the overall requirements of the DRS and visualization tools, as well as necessary calibration data to achieve optimal data quality in order to exploit science cases across all cosmic distance scales.

  19. Recognition of ship types from an infrared image using moment invariants and neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Jorge Amaral

    2001-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Autonomous object recognition is an active area of interest for military and commercial applications: Given an input image from an infrared or range sensor, find interesting objects in those images and then classify those objects. In this work, automatic target recognition of ship types in an infrared image is explored. The first phase segments the original infrared image in order to obtain the ship silhouette. The second phase calcul...

  20. Motion tracking in infrared imaging for quantitative medical diagnostic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tze-Yuan; Herman, Cila

    2014-01-01

    In medical applications, infrared (IR) thermography is used to detect and examine the thermal signature of skin abnormalities by quantitatively analyzing skin temperature in steady state conditions or its evolution over time, captured in an image sequence. However, during the image acquisition period, the involuntary movements of the patient are unavoidable, and such movements will undermine the accuracy of temperature measurement for any particular location on the skin. In this study, a tracking approach using a template-based algorithm is proposed, to follow the involuntary motion of the subject in the IR image sequence. The motion tacking will allow to associate a temperature evolution to each spatial location on the body while the body moves relative to the image frame. The affine transformation model is adopted to estimate the motion parameters of the template image. The Lucas-Kanade algorithm is applied to search for the optimized parameters of the affine transformation. A weighting mask is incorporated into the algorithm to ensure its tracking robustness. To evaluate the feasibility of the tracking approach, two sets of IR image sequences with random in-plane motion were tested in our experiments. A steady-state (no heating or cooling) IR image sequence in which the skin temperature is in equilibrium with the environment was considered first. The thermal recovery IR image sequence, acquired when the skin is recovering from 60-s cooling, was the second case analyzed. By proper selection of the template image along with template update, satisfactory tracking results were obtained for both IR image sequences. The achieved tracking accuracies are promising in terms of satisfying the demands imposed by clinical applications of IR thermography.

  1. New solutions and technologies for uncooled infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joël.; Diaz, Frédéric; Fontaine, Christophe; Loiseaux, Brigitte; Lee, Mane-Si Laure; Clienti, Christophe; Lemonnier, Fabrice; Zhang, Xianghua; Calvez, Laurent

    2013-06-01

    The military uncooled infrared market is driven by the continued cost reduction of the focal plane arrays whilst maintaining high standards of sensitivity and steering towards smaller pixel sizes. As a consequence, new optical solutions are called for. Two approaches can come into play: the bottom up option consists in allocating improvements to each contributor and the top down process rather relies on an overall optimization of the complete image channel. The University of Rennes I with Thales Angénieux alongside has been working over the past decade through French MOD funding's, on low cost alternatives of infrared materials based upon chalcogenide glasses. A special care has been laid on the enhancement of their mechanical properties and their ability to be moulded according to complex shapes. New manufacturing means developments capable of better yields for the raw materials will be addressed, too. Beyond the mere lenses budget cuts, a wave front coding process can ease a global optimization. This technic gives a way of relaxing optical constraints or upgrading thermal device performances through an increase of the focus depths and desensitization against temperature drifts: it combines image processing and the use of smart optical components. Thales achievements in such topics will be enlightened and the trade-off between image quality correction levels and low consumption/ real time processing, as might be required in hand-free night vision devices, will be emphasized. It is worth mentioning that both approaches are deeply leaning on each other.

  2. Systematic infrared image quality improvement using deep learning based techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaizhong; Casaseca-de-la-Higuera, Pablo; Luo, Chunbo; Wang, Qi; Kitchin, Matthew; Parmley, Andrew; Monge-Alvarez, Jesus

    2016-10-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT, or thermal video) uses thermographic cameras to detect and record radiation in the longwavelength infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum. It allows sensing environments beyond the visual perception limitations, and thus has been widely used in many civilian and military applications. Even though current thermal cameras are able to provide high resolution and bit-depth images, there are significant challenges to be addressed in specific applications such as poor contrast, low target signature resolution, etc. This paper addresses quality improvement in IRT images for object recognition. A systematic approach based on image bias correction and deep learning is proposed to increase target signature resolution and optimise the baseline quality of inputs for object recognition. Our main objective is to maximise the useful information on the object to be detected even when the number of pixels on target is adversely small. The experimental results show that our approach can significantly improve target resolution and thus helps making object recognition more efficient in automatic target detection/recognition systems (ATD/R).

  3. TIRCIS: thermal infrared compact imaging spectrometer for small satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robert; Lucey, Paul; Crites, Sarah; Garbeil, Harold; Wood, Mark; Pilger, Eric; Gabrieli, Andrea; Honniball, Casey

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of reflectance or emittance in tens of narrow, contiguous wavebands, allow for the derivation of laboratory quality spectra remotely, from which the chemical composition and physical properties of targets can be determined. Although spaceborne (e.g. EO-1 Hyperion) hyperspectral data in the 0.4-2.5 micron (VSWIR) region are available, the provision of equivalent data in the log-wave infrared has lagged behind, there being no currently operational high spatial resolution LWIR imaging spectrometer on orbit. TIRCIS (Thermal Infra-Red Compact Imaging Spectrometer), uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer, an uncooled microbolometer array, and push-broom scanning to acquire hyperspectral image data. Radiometric calibration is provided by blackbody targets while spectral calibration is achieved using monochromatic light sources. The instrument has a mass of <15 kg and dimensions of 53 cm × 25 cm ♢ 22 cm, and has been designed to be compatible with integration into a micro-satellite platform. (A precursor to this instrument was launched onboard a 55 kg microsatellite in October 2015). The optical design yields a 120 m ground sample size given an orbit of 500 km. Over the wavelength interval of 7.5 to 14 microns up to 50 spectral samples are possible. Measured signal-to-noise ratios range from peak values of 500:1 to 1500:1, for source temperature of 10 to 100°C.

  4. Theranostic reduction-sensitive gemcitabine prodrug micelles for near-infrared imaging and pancreatic cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Haijie; Wang, Haibo; Chen, Yangjun; Li, Zuhong; Wang, Yin; Jin, Qiao; Ji, Jian

    2015-12-01

    A biodegradable and reduction-cleavable gemcitabine (GEM) polymeric prodrug with in vivo near-infrared (NIR) imaging ability was reported. This theranostic GEM prodrug PEG-b-[PLA-co-PMAC-graft-(IR820-co-GEM)] was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization and ``click'' reaction. The as-prepared reduction-sensitive prodrug could self-assemble into prodrug micelles in aqueous solution confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In vitro drug release studies showed that these prodrug micelles were able to release GEM in an intracellular-mimicking reductive environment. These prodrug micelles could be effectively internalized by BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells, which were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Meanwhile, a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay demonstrated that this prodrug exhibited high cytotoxicity against BxPC-3 cells. The in vivo whole-animal near-infrared (NIR) imaging results showed that these prodrug micelles could be effectively accumulated in tumor tissue and had a longer blood circulation time than IR820-COOH. The endogenous reduction-sensitive gemcitabine prodrug micelles with the in vivo NIR imaging ability might have great potential in image-guided pancreatic cancer therapy.A biodegradable and reduction-cleavable gemcitabine (GEM) polymeric prodrug with in vivo near-infrared (NIR) imaging ability was reported. This theranostic GEM prodrug PEG-b-[PLA-co-PMAC-graft-(IR820-co-GEM)] was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization and ``click'' reaction. The as-prepared reduction-sensitive prodrug could self-assemble into prodrug micelles in aqueous solution confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In vitro drug release studies showed that these prodrug micelles were able to release GEM in an intracellular-mimicking reductive environment. These prodrug micelles could be effectively internalized by BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells, which

  5. Hidden infrared image in a uniform CMYK separation hue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Žiljak Stanimirović

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extended colour management is introduced for integrating the colorants visual characteristics in the visual, butalso in the near infrared spectrum (NIR. Many conventional graphic inks are such that their light absorption in thevisual (V and NIR specter can be very well measured, and we are using this for our goal which is the following:firstly to create a double condition of graphic reproduction - invisible graphics to the human eye, but allowing to beregistered by instruments measuring in the NIR area. The second goal is to design graphic elements that are not recognizedin the NIR specter, but are visible so that we can see them. And thirdly: to produce a “double image” withconventional graphic inks, but in such a way that each image is recognized only in the previously set wavelengths.This approach introduces modified learning on graphic arts separation where two independent images are joinedin creating CMYK printing channels. The second image as a gray record is the desired black component (K in thefirst visible spectrum image. The standard colour management ends in the visible space (1 but with the help of inksmanagement, a second hidden image can be developed in the NIR space. Channel K acquires a new meaning. It isthe carrier of its own information in image and text form.

  6. 110 °C range athermalization of wavefront coding infrared imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bin; Shi, Zelin; Chang, Zheng; Liu, Haizheng; Zhao, Yaohong

    2017-09-01

    110 °C range athermalization is significant but difficult for designing infrared imaging systems. Our wavefront coding athermalized infrared imaging system adopts an optical phase mask with less manufacturing errors and a decoding method based on shrinkage function. The qualitative experiments prove that our wavefront coding athermalized infrared imaging system has three prominent merits: (1) working well over a temperature range of 110 °C; (2) extending the focal depth up to 15.2 times; (3) achieving a decoded image being approximate to its corresponding in-focus infrared image, with a mean structural similarity index (MSSIM) value greater than 0.85.

  7. Guest editorial : high dynamic range imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Luís Paulo; Debattista, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) imagery is a step-change in imaging technology that is not limited to the 8-bits per pixel for each color channel that traditional or low-dynamic range digital images have been constrained to. These restrictions have meant that the current and relatively novel imaging technologies including stereoscopic, HD and ultraHD imaging do not provide an accurate representation of the lighting available in a real world environment. HDR technology has enabled the capture, sto...

  8. Infrared super-resolution imaging method based on retina micro-motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xiubao; Gao, Hang; Sun, Yicheng; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua

    2013-09-01

    With the wide application of infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA), military, aerospace, public security and other applications have higher and higher requirements on the spatial resolution of infrared images. However, traditional super-resolution imaging methods have increasingly unable to meet this requirement in technology. In this paper, we adopt the achievement that the human retina micro-motion is the important reason why the human has the hyperacuity ability. Based on the achievement, we bring forward an infrared super-resolution imaging method based on retina micro-motion. In the method, we use the piezoelectric ceramic equipment to control the infrared detector moving variably within a plane parallel to the focal plane. The motion direction is toward each other into a direction of 90°. In the four directions of the movement, we get four sub-images and generate a high spatial resolution infrared image by image interpolation method. In the process of the shifting movement of the detector, we set the threshold of the detector response and record the response time difference when adjacent pixel responses are up to the threshold. By the method, we get the object's edges, enhance them in the high resolution infrared image and get the super-resolution infrared image. The experimental results show that our proposed super-resolution imaging methods can improve the spatial resolution of the infrared image effectively. The method will offer a new idea for the super-resolution reconstruction of infrared images.

  9. Through Skull Fluorescence Imaging of the Brain in a New Near-Infrared Window

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Guosong; Chang, Junlei; Antaris, Alexander L; Chen, Changxin; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Su; Atochin, Dmitriy N; Huang, Paul L; Andreasson, Katrin I; Kuo, Calvin J; Dai, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    To date, brain imaging has largely relied on X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography with limited spatial resolution and long scanning times. Fluorescence-based brain imaging in the visible and traditional near-infrared regions (400-900 nm) is an alternative but currently requires craniotomy, cranial windows and skull thinning techniques, and the penetration depth is limited to 1-2 mm due to light scattering. Here, we report through-scalp and through-skull fluorescence imaging of mouse cerebral vasculature without craniotomy utilizing the intrinsic photoluminescence of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the 1.3-1.4 micrometre near-infrared window. Reduced photon scattering in this spectral region allows fluorescence imaging reaching a depth of >2 mm in mouse brain with sub-10 micrometre resolution. An imaging rate of ~5.3 frames/s allows for dynamic recording of blood perfusion in the cerebral vessels with sufficient temporal resolution, providing real-time assessment of blood flow anomaly...

  10. An infrared image based methodology for breast lesions screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, K. C. C.; Vargas, J. V. C.; Reisemberger, G. G.; Freitas, F. N. P.; Oliari, S. H.; Brioschi, M. L.; Louveira, M. H.; Spautz, C.; Dias, F. G.; Gasperin, P.; Budel, V. M.; Cordeiro, R. A. G.; Schittini, A. P. P.; Neto, C. D.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential of utilizing a structured methodology for breast lesions screening, based on infrared imaging temperature measurements of a healthy control group to establish expected normality ranges, and of breast cancer patients, previously diagnosed through biopsies of the affected regions. An analysis of the systematic error of the infrared camera skin temperature measurements was conducted in several different regions of the body, by direct comparison to high precision thermistor temperature measurements, showing that infrared camera temperatures are consistently around 2 °C above the thermistor temperatures. Therefore, a method of conjugated gradients is proposed to eliminate the infrared camera direct temperature measurement imprecision, by calculating the temperature difference between two points to cancel out the error. The method takes into account the human body approximate bilateral symmetry, and compares measured dimensionless temperature difference values (Δ θ bar) between two symmetric regions of the patient's breast, that takes into account the breast region, the surrounding ambient and the individual core temperatures, and doing so, the results interpretation for different individuals become simple and non subjective. The range of normal whole breast average dimensionless temperature differences for 101 healthy individuals was determined, and admitting that the breasts temperatures exhibit a unimodal normal distribution, the healthy normal range for each region was considered to be the dimensionless temperature difference plus/minus twice the standard deviation of the measurements, Δ θ bar ‾ + 2σ Δ θ bar ‾ , in order to represent 95% of the population. Forty-seven patients with previously diagnosed breast cancer through biopsies were examined with the method, which was capable of detecting breast abnormalities in 45 cases (96%). Therefore, the conjugated gradients method was considered effective

  11. Aeolian system dynamics derived from thermal infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidt, Stephen Paul

    Thermal infrared (TIR) remote-sensing and field-based observations were used to study aeolian systems, specifically sand transport pathways, dust emission sources and Saharan atmospheric dust. A method was developed for generating seamless and radiometrically accurate mosaics of thermal infrared data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument. Using a combination of high resolution thermal emission spectroscopy results of sand samples and mosaic satellite data, surface emissivity was derived to map surface composition, which led to improvement in the understanding of sand accumulation in the Gran Desierto of northern Sonora, Mexico. These methods were also used to map sand transport pathways in the Sahara Desert, where the interaction between sand saltation and dust emission sources was explored. The characteristics and dynamics of dust sources were studied at White Sands, NM and in the Sahara Desert. At White Sands, an application was developed for studying the response of dust sources to surface soil moisture based on the relationship between soil moisture, apparent thermal inertia and the erosion potential of dust sources. The dynamics of dust sources and the interaction with sand transport pathways were also studied, focusing on the Bodele Depression of Chad and large dust sources in Mali and Mauritania. A dust detection algorithm was developed using ASTER data, and the spectral emissivity of observed atmospheric dust was related to the dust source area in the Sahara. At the Atmospheric Observatory (IZO) in Tenerife, Spain where direct measurement of the Saharan Air Layer could be made, the cycle of dust events occurring in July 2009 were examined. From the observation tower at the IZO, measurements of emitted longwave atmospheric radiance in the TIR wavelength region were made using a Forward Looking Infrared Radiometer (FLIR) handheld camera. The use of the FLIR to study atmospheric dust from the Saharan is a

  12. Broadband near-infrared tomography for breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia

    Near-infrared (NIR) light provides potential for a new approach to non-invasive detection, diagnosis and clinical management of breast cancer. Using NIR spectroscopic imaging techniques, the physiological information about breast tissue composition can be quantitatively estimated, including hemoglobin, water and lipid concentrations, together with scattering properties. In this thesis work, strategies to improve the accuracy of NIR imaging have been explored experimentally and numerically. A novel Ti:Sapphire laser-based frequency domain tomography system was developed to achieve maximum spectral information, using intrinsic phase-locked detection of the signal propagation. The improvement in quantification through addition of more wavelengths was demonstrated in simulations and in tissue-phantom experiments. A hybrid NIR tomography system combining frequency domain and continuous wave spectroscopy approaches was implemented for imaging healthy subjects and women with malignant breast tumors. Adding measurements at wavelengths above 850nm with the continuous wave method significantly improved the accuracy of water and lipid estimation. When used in cancer imaging in vivo, the NIR contrast information is consistent with physiological and pathological values expected in tumor as seen by investigational studies with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and pathology analysis.

  13. Imaging infrared spectroscopy for fixation-free liver tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, James V.; Chen, Zhaomin; Li, Ran; Butke, Ryan; Miller, Barrie; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Allen, Heather C.; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.

    2014-03-01

    Infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy of human liver tissue slices has been used to identify and characterize a liver metastasis of breast origin (mucinous carcinoma) which was surgically removed from a consenting patient and frozen without formalin fixation or dehydration procedures, so that lipids and water remain in the tissues. Previously, a set of IR metrics was determined for tumors in fixation-free liver tissues facilitating a k-means cluster analysis differentiating tumor from nontumor. Different and more in depth aspects of these results are examined in this work including three metric color imaging, differencing for lipid identification, and a new technique to simultaneously fit band lineshapes and their 2nd derivatives in order to better characterize protein changes.

  14. Correlative infrared nanospectroscopic and nanomechanical imaging of block copolymer microdomains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Pollard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular interactions and nanoscale phase separation govern the properties of many molecular soft-matter systems. Here, we combine infrared vibrational scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR s-SNOM with force–distance spectroscopy for simultaneous characterization of both nanoscale optical and nanomechanical molecular properties through hybrid imaging. The resulting multichannel images and correlative analysis of chemical composition, spectral IR line shape, modulus, adhesion, deformation, and dissipation acquired for a thin film of a nanophase separated block copolymer (PS-b-PMMA reveal complex structural variations, in particular at domain interfaces, not resolved in any individual signal channel alone. These variations suggest that regions of multicomponent chemical composition, such as the interfacial mixing regions between microdomains, are correlated with high spatial heterogeneity in nanoscale material properties.

  15. Assessment of piano-related injuries using infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Safaa; Frize, Monique; Comeau, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Playing the piano is a repetitive task that involves the use of the hands and the arms. Pain related to piano-playing can result in extending the tissues and ligaments of the hands and arms beyond their mechanical tolerance. Infrared imaging records the skin temperature and produces a thermal map of the imaged body part; small variations in the skin temperature could be a sign of inflammation or stress of the tissues. In this paper, we used statistical analysis to examine the difference in hand and arm temperatures of pianists with pain and pianists without pain related to piano-playing. We found that there is a statistically significant difference in hand temperatures between the two populations, but not in the lower arm and upper arm temperatures.

  16. Nondestructive Inspection of Thin Basalt Fiber Reinforced Composites Using Combined Terahertz Imaging and Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemyslaw Lopato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The inspection of thin basalt fiber reinforced composite materials was carried out using two nondestructive methods: terahertz time domain imaging and infrared thermography. In order to combine the information about the defects arising in examined materials the inspection results were parametrized. In order to acquire more information content, new approximation based features are proposed. Then, a knowledge extraction based multivariate analysis of preselected features’ vector was carried out. Finally, in order to integrate features distributions of representing different dynamic level of information, a multiresolution wavelet based data fusion algorithm was applied. The results are presented and discussed.

  17. A Novel Approach to Fast Image Filtering Algorithm of Infrared Images based on Intro Sort Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Kapil Kumar; Niranjan, Jitendra Kumar

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigate the fast image filtering algorithm based on Intro sort algorithm and fast noise reduction of infrared images. Main feature of the proposed approach is that no prior knowledge of noise required. It is developed based on Stefan- Boltzmann law and the Fourier law. We also investigate the fast noise reduction approach that has advantage of less computation load. In addition, it can retain edges, details, text information even if the size of the window increases. Intro sort algorithm begins with Quick sort and switches to heap sort when the recursion depth exceeds a level based on the number of elements being sorted. This approach has the advantage of fast noise reduction by reducing the comparison time. It also significantly speed up the noise reduction process and can apply to real-time image processing. This approach will extend the Infrared images applications for medicine and video conferencing.

  18. Registration of Airborne Infrared Images using Platform Attitude Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Shankar Chekuri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In current warfare scenario stealth and passive threat detection capabilities are considered as prime requirements to accomplish desired mission by the fighter aircrafts. To improve the stealth of an aircraft, the trend is towards detecting threats with the help of passive sensors (Electro Optic or Infrared. Current situation caters for systems like Infra-red Search and Track (IRST and Passive Missile Warning Systems (PMWS. IRST system is a passive target detection system, used for detecting aerial & ground targets. PMWS is a threat detection system used for detecting missiles approaching towards aircraft. Both of these systems detect targets of interest by processing IR images acquired in mid-IR region. The prime challenge in IRST system or PMWS is detecting a moving target of size typically 1~2 pixels in acquired image sequences. The temporal change caused by moving target in consecutive frames can be considered as one important factor to detect them. The temporal change caused by moving target is identified through absolute frame differencing of successive frames. This principle has limitation in application to IRST & PMWS as the imaging sensor with the aircraft is moving. This motion also imparts temporal change in the acquired images. In this paper authors are proposing a method for removing the temporal change caused by the platform motion in two consequently acquired frames using registration process.  The proposed method uses the platform attitude information at frame sampling times. Authors have analyzed the sensitivity of registration process to noisy platform attitude information.Defence Science Journal, 2014, 64(2, pp. 130-135. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.64.5460

  19. FE design of vibration protective pads for portable cryogenically cooled infrared imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, Michel; Veprik, Alexander; Babitsky, Vladimir

    2008-04-01

    Design of novel, portable and aurally undetectable cryogenically cooled infrared imagers often relies on compliant vibration protective pads for mounting the integrated dewar-detector-cooler assembly upon the imager's enclosure. Extensive analytical study and experimental effort have shown that for the best acoustic performance the visco-elastic properties of such pads need to be matched with the dynamic properties of the typically undamped enclosure, subjected to the tight limitations imposed on the low frequency cooler-induced line of sight jitter resulting from the oscillations of the gasodynamic torque and compliance of the above pads. Unfortunately, the regular approach to a design of the optimal vibration protective pad does not seem to exist. As a result, the development of the suitable vibration protective pad is widely regarded as a purely empirical process and requires a great deal of experimental trial-and-error effort. The authors are attempting to apply the regular finite element modeling approaches to an optimal design of such vibration protective pads. In doing so, they are making use of the full finite elements models of infrared imager enclosure with vibration mounted integrated dewar-detector-cooler assembly. The optimal geometry and dynamic properties of a compliant layer of vibration protective pad are evaluated using the optimisation procedure with purpose of attenuation the volume velocity of the active radiating surface. The theoretical findings are in fair agreement with the outcomes of the full-scale experimentation.

  20. Automatic solar panel recognition and defect detection using infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Munson, Eric; Abousleman, Glen P.; Si, Jennie

    2015-05-01

    Failure-free operation of solar panels is of fundamental importance for modern commercial solar power plants. To achieve higher power generation efficiency and longer panel life, a simple and reliable panel evaluation method is required. By using thermal infrared imaging, anomalies can be detected without having to incorporate expensive electrical detection circuitry. In this paper, we propose a solar panel defect detection system, which automates the inspection process and mitigates the need for manual panel inspection in a large solar farm. Infrared video sequences of each array of solar panels are first collected by an infrared camera mounted to a moving cart, which is driven from array to array in a solar farm. The image processing algorithm segments the solar panels from the background in real time, with only the height of the array (specified as the number of rows of panels in the array) being given as prior information to aid in the segmentation process. In order to "count" the number the panels within any given array, frame-to frame panel association is established using optical flow. Local anomalies in a single panel such as hotspots and cracks will be immediately detected and labeled as soon as the panel is recognized in the field of view. After the data from an entire array is collected, hot panels are detected using DBSCAN clustering. On real-world test data containing over 12,000 solar panels, over 98% of all panels are recognized and correctly counted, with 92% of all types of defects being identified by the system.

  1. FISICA: the Florida imager slicer for infrared cosmology and astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenberry, Stephen; Raines, S. Nicholas; Gruel, Nicolas; Elston, Richard; Guzman, Rafael; Julian, Jeff; Boreman, Glenn; Glenn, Paul; Hull-Allen, Gregory; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Rodgers, Michael; Thompson, Kevin; Flint, Scott; Comstock, Lovell; Myrick, Bruce

    2006-06-01

    We report on the design, fabrication, and on-sky performance of the Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Cosmology and Astrophysics (FISICA) - a fully-cryogenic all-reflective image-slicing integral field unit for the FLAMINGOS near-infrared spectrograph. Designed to accept input beams near f/15, FISICA with FLAMINGOS provides R~1300 spectra over a 16x33-arcsec field-of-view on the Cassegrain f/15 focus of the KPNO 4-meter telescope, or a 6x12-arcsec field-of-view on the Nasmyth or Bent Cassegrain foci of the Gran Telescopio Canarias 10.4-meter telescope. FISICA accomplishes this using three sets of "monolithic" powered mirror arrays, each with 22 mirrored surfaces cut into a single piece of aluminum. We review the optical and opto-mechanical design and fabrication of FISICA, as well as laboratory test results for FISICA integrated with the FLAMINGOS instrument. Finally, we present performance results from observations with FISICA at the KPNO 4-m telescope and comparisons of FISICA performance to other available IFUs on 4-m to 8-m-class telescopes.

  2. Infrared imaging based hyperventilation monitoring through respiration rate estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anushree; Routray, Aurobinda; Mukherjee, Rashmi; Shit, Suprosanna

    2016-07-01

    A change in the skin temperature is used as an indicator of physical illness which can be detected through infrared thermography. Thermograms or thermal images can be used as an effective diagnostic tool for monitoring and diagnosis of various diseases. This paper describes an infrared thermography based approach for detecting hyperventilation caused due to stress and anxiety in human beings by computing their respiration rates. The work employs computer vision techniques for tracking the region of interest from thermal video to compute the breath rate. Experiments have been performed on 30 subjects. Corner feature extraction using Minimum Eigenvalue (Shi-Tomasi) algorithm and registration using Kanade Lucas-Tomasi algorithm has been used here. Thermal signature around the extracted region is detected and subsequently filtered through a band pass filter to compute the respiration profile of an individual. If the respiration profile shows unusual pattern and exceeds the threshold we conclude that the person is stressed and tending to hyperventilate. Results obtained are compared with standard contact based methods which have shown significant correlations. It is envisaged that the thermal image based approach not only will help in detecting hyperventilation but can assist in regular stress monitoring as it is non-invasive method.

  3. Infrared Imaging Bolometer for the HL-2A Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinming; Li, Wei; Lu, Jie; Xia, Zhiwei; Yi, Ping; Liu, Yi; Yang, Qingwei; HL-2A Team

    2016-06-01

    An infrared imaging bolometer diagnostic has been upgraded recently to be adapted for the complications of the signal-to-noise ratio arising from the low level of plasma radiation and high reflectivity of low energy photon (careful calibration of the foil, the incident power density distribution on the foil is determined by solving the heat diffusion equation with a numerical technique. The local plasma radiated power density is reconstructed with a minimum fisher information regularization method by assuming plasma emission toroidal symmetry. Comparisons of the results and the profiles measured by an ordinary bolometric detector demonstrate that this method is good enough to provide the plasma radiated power pattern. The typical plasma radiated power density distribution before and after high mode (H-mode) transition is firstly reconstructed with the infrared imaging bolometer. Moreover, during supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), an enhanced radiation region is observed at the edge of the plasma. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10805016 and 11175061), and the Chinese National Fusion Project for ITER (No. 2014GB109001)

  4. [A review of Dyson optical system in the measure of infrared imaging spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-juan; Tang, Yu-guo; Bayanheshig; Cui, Ji-cheng; Qi, Xiang-dong

    2012-02-01

    It is difficult for the traditional infrared imaging spectrometers to satisfy the requirement of high signal to noise ratio (SNR) and small size simultaneously. The new infrared remote sensing imaging spectrometers based on Dyson concentric optical configuration have the advantages of high aperture, high SNR, simpleness small volume and low weight. The Dyson imaging spectrometers can achieve high SNR, which is difficult for the traditional imaging spectrometers for infrared imaging spectrum. The present review introduces the beginning, the development and the present research of the Dyson imaging spectrometers, especially illustrates the principle of Dyson concentric spectrometer, difficulty during its manufacture and the application in the high-performance infrared remote sensing imaging spectrometers, providing a reference for the high-performance research of infrared remote sensing imaging spectrometers.

  5. Fast approach to infrared image restoration based on shrinkage functions calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengshuo; Shi, Zelin; Xu, Baoshu; Feng, Bin

    2016-05-01

    High-quality image restoration in real time is a challenge for infrared imaging systems. We present a fast approach to infrared image restoration based on shrinkage functions calibration. Rather than directly modeling the prior of sharp images to obtain the shrinkage functions, we calibrate them for restoration directly by using the acquirable sharp and blurred image pairs from the same infrared imaging system. The calibration method is employed to minimize the sum of squared errors between sharp images and restored images from the blurred images. Our restoration algorithm is noniterative and its shrinkage functions are stored in the look-up tables, so an architecture solution of pipeline structure can work in real time. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by testing its quantitative performance from simulation experiments and its qualitative performance from a developed wavefront coding infrared imaging system.

  6. Computational imaging from non-uniform degradation of staggered TDI thermal infrared imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Liu, Jian Guo; Shi, Yan; Chen, Wangli; Qin, Qianqing; Zhang, Zijian

    2015-09-21

    For the Time Delay Integration (TDI) staggered line-scanning thermal infrared imager, a Computational Imaging (CI) approach is developed to achieve higher spatial resolution images. After a thorough analysis of the causes of non-uniform image displacement and degradation for multi-channel staggered TDI arrays, the study aims to approach one-dimensional (1D) sub-pixel displacement estimation and superposition of images from time-division multiplexing scanning lines. Under the assumption that a thermal image is 2D piecewise C(2) smooth, a sparse-and-smooth deconvolution algorithm with L1-norm regularization terms combining the first and second order derivative operators is proposed to restore high frequency components and to suppress aliasing simultaneously. It is theoretically and experimentally demonstrated, with simulation and airborne thermal infrared images, that this is a state-of-the-art practical CI method to reconstruct clear images with higher frequency components from raw thermal images that are subject to instantaneous distortion and blurring.

  7. High definition infrared spectroscopic imaging for lymph node histopathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Suzanne Leslie

    Full Text Available Chemical imaging is a rapidly emerging field in which molecular information within samples can be used to predict biological function and recognize disease without the use of stains or manual identification. In Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging, molecular absorption contrast provides a large signal relative to noise. Due to the long mid-IR wavelengths and sub-optimal instrument design, however, pixel sizes have historically been much larger than cells. This limits both the accuracy of the technique in identifying small regions, as well as the ability to visualize single cells. Here we obtain data with micron-sized sampling using a tabletop FT-IR instrument, and demonstrate that the high-definition (HD data lead to accurate identification of multiple cells in lymph nodes that was not previously possible. Highly accurate recognition of eight distinct classes - naïve and memory B cells, T cells, erythrocytes, connective tissue, fibrovascular network, smooth muscle, and light and dark zone activated B cells was achieved in healthy, reactive, and malignant lymph node biopsies using a random forest classifier. The results demonstrate that cells currently identifiable only through immunohistochemical stains and cumbersome manual recognition of optical microscopy images can now be distinguished to a similar level through a single IR spectroscopic image from a lymph node biopsy.

  8. DIAGNOcam--a Near Infrared Digital Imaging Transillumination (NIDIT) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Marwa; Krejci, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    In developed countries, clinical manifestation of carious lesions is changing: instead of dentists being confronted with wide-open cavities, more and more hidden caries are seen. For a long time, the focus of the research community was on finding a method for the detection of carious lesions without the need for radiographs. The research on Digital Imaging Fiber-Optic Transillumination (DIFOTI) has been an active domain. The scope of the present article is to describe a novel technology for caries diagnostics based on Near Infrared Digital Imaging Transillumination (NIDIT), and to give first examples of its clinical indications. In addition, the coupling of NIDIT with a head-mounted retinal image display (RID) to improve clinical workflow is presented. The novel NIDIT technology was shown to be useful as a diagnostic tool in several indications, including mainly the detection of proximal caries and, less importantly, for occlusal caries, fissures, and secondary decay around amalgam and composite restorations. The coupling of this technology with a head-mounted retinal image system allows for its very efficient implementation into daily practice.

  9. The facial expression of schizophrenic patients applied with infrared thermal facial image sequence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bo-Lin Jian; Chieh-Li Chen; Wen-Lin Chu; Min-Wei Huang

    2017-01-01

    .... Thus, this study used non-contact infrared thermal facial images (ITFIs) to analyze facial temperature changes evoked by different emotions in moderately and markedly ill schizophrenia patients...

  10. Micropolarizing device for long wavelength infrared polarization imaging.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Carter, Tony Ray; Samora, Sally; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Alford, Charles Fred; Boye, Robert R.; Smith, Jody Lynn

    2006-11-01

    The goal of this project is to fabricate a four-state pixelated subwavelength optical device that enables mid-wave infrared (MWIR) or long-wave infrared (LWIR) snapshot polarimetric imaging. The polarization information can help to classify imaged materials and identify objects of interest for numerous remote sensing and military applications. While traditional, sequential polarimetric imaging produces scenes with polarization information through a series of assembled images, snapshot polarimetric imaging collects the spatial distribution of all four Stokes parameters simultaneously. In this way any noise due to scene movement from one frame to the next is eliminated. We fabricated several arrays of subwavelength components for MWIR polarization imaging applications. Each pixel unit of the array consists of four elements. These elements are micropolarizers with three or four different polarizing axis orientations. The fourth element sometimes has a micro birefringent waveplate on the top of one of the micropolarizers. The linear micropolarizers were fabricated by patterning nano-scale metallic grids on a transparent substrate. A large area birefringent waveplate was fabricated by deeply etching a subwavelength structure into a dielectric substrate. The principle of making linear micropolarizers for long wavelengths is based upon strong anisotropic absorption of light in the nano-metallic grid structures. The nano-metallic grid structures are patterned with different orientations; therefore, the micropolarizers have different polarization axes. The birefringent waveplate is a deeply etched dielectric one-dimensional subwavelength grating; therefore two orthogonally polarized waves have different phase delays. Finally, in this project, we investigated the near field and diffractive effects of the subwavelength element apertures upon detection. The fabricated pixelated polarizers had a measured extinction ratios larger than 100:1 for pixel sizes in the order of 15

  11. Quantitative Characterization of Super-Resolution Infrared Imaging Based on Time-Varying Focal Plane Coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.

    2014-10-01

    High resolution infrared image has been the goal of an infrared imaging system. In this paper, a super-resolution infrared imaging method using time-varying coded mask is proposed based on focal plane coding and compressed sensing theory. The basic idea of this method is to set a coded mask on the focal plane of the optical system, and the same scene could be sampled many times repeatedly by using time-varying control coding strategy, the super-resolution image is further reconstructed by sparse optimization algorithm. The results of simulation are quantitatively evaluated by introducing the Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), which illustrate that the effect of compressed measurement coefficient r and coded mask resolution m on the reconstructed image quality. Research results show that the proposed method will promote infrared imaging quality effectively, which will be helpful for the practical design of new type of high resolution ! infrared imaging systems.

  12. Research on hyperspectral dynamic scene and image sequence simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dandan; Liu, Fang; Gao, Jiaobo; Sun, Kefeng; Hu, Yu; Li, Yu; Xie, Junhu; Zhang, Lei

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a simulation method of hyperspectral dynamic scene and image sequence for hyperspectral equipment evaluation and target detection algorithm. Because of high spectral resolution, strong band continuity, anti-interference and other advantages, in recent years, hyperspectral imaging technology has been rapidly developed and is widely used in many areas such as optoelectronic target detection, military defense and remote sensing systems. Digital imaging simulation, as a crucial part of hardware in loop simulation, can be applied to testing and evaluation hyperspectral imaging equipment with lower development cost and shorter development period. Meanwhile, visual simulation can produce a lot of original image data under various conditions for hyperspectral image feature extraction and classification algorithm. Based on radiation physic model and material characteristic parameters this paper proposes a generation method of digital scene. By building multiple sensor models under different bands and different bandwidths, hyperspectral scenes in visible, MWIR, LWIR band, with spectral resolution 0.01μm, 0.05μm and 0.1μm have been simulated in this paper. The final dynamic scenes have high real-time and realistic, with frequency up to 100 HZ. By means of saving all the scene gray data in the same viewpoint image sequence is obtained. The analysis results show whether in the infrared band or the visible band, the grayscale variations of simulated hyperspectral images are consistent with the theoretical analysis results.

  13. Functional assessment of hand vasculature using infrared and laser speckle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbach, A. M.; Wang, H.; Wiedenbeck, B.; Liu, W.; Smith, P. D.; Elster, E.

    2009-02-01

    To assess vascular responses of the human hand to inspiratory gasps and hand cooling, two imaging "remote sensing" instruments were utilized: 1) a high-resolution infrared (IR) imaging camera and 2) a full-field laser perfusion imager (FLPI). Data analysis was performed on the data sets collected simultaneously from both instruments. A non-localized drop of both FLPI and IR signals was observed at ~0.5-2.0 min after gasp onset. Spontaneous oscillations, much below the human cardiac and respiratory frequencies, were observed with both imagers. The dominant oscillations for both imaging modalities centered around 0.01Hz. Spectral frequencies, their power, and the duration of temperature oscillations (bursts) for different hand areas changed in time and were spatially heterogeneous. The highest spatial correlation between the two data sets was found between the mean IR derivative image and the mean original FLPI image for the baseline conditions. Heterogeneous images of the human hand were consistently detected non-invasively by both instruments. After cooling, a temperature elevation of ~0.5ºC was seen as a spotted pattern mainly in the thenar and hypothenar areas. A generalized increase in perfusion over the same areas was observed in FLPI images. Both IR and FLPI imagers sensitively identify vasoconstrictor responses induced by inspiratory gasp and hand cooling maneuvers. The specificity to physiological changes and high imaging rate for both instruments, coupled with the current ease of use of optical cameras in clinical settings, make the described combination of two instruments an ideal imaging approach to studying the dynamics of thermal and perfusion heterogeneity in human skin.

  14. Shadow Attenuation With High Dynamic Range Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadow often interferes with accurate image analysis. To mitigate shadow effects in near-earth imagery (2 m above ground level), we created high dynamic range (HDR) nadir images and used them to measure grassland ground cover. HDR composites were created by merging three differentially-exposed image...

  15. Synegies Between Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrometry and the Thermal Infrared in an Urban Environment: An Evaluation of the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HYSPIRI) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Hulley, Glynn C.; Hook, Simon J.; Green, Robert O.

    2012-01-01

    A majority of the human population lives in urban areas and as such, the quality of urban environments is becoming increasingly important to the human population. Furthermore, these areas are major sources of environmental contaminants and sinks of energy and materials. Remote sensing provides an improved understanding of urban areas and their impacts by mapping urban extent, urban composition (vegetation and impervious cover fractions), and urban radiation balance through measures of albedo, emissivity and land surface temperature (LST). Recently, the National Research Council (NRC) completed an assessment of remote sensing needs for the next decade (NRC, 2007), proposing several missions suitable for urban studies, including a visible, near-infrared and shortwave infrared (VSWIR) imaging spectrometer and a multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) instrument called the Hyperspectral Infrared Imagery (HyspIRI). In this talk, we introduce the HyspIRI mission, focusing on potential synergies between VSWIR and TIR data in an urban area. We evaluate potential synergies using an Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and MODIS-ASTER (MASTER) image pair acquired over Santa Barbara, United States. AVIRIS data were analyzed at their native spatial resolutions (7.5m VSWIR and 15m TIR), and aggregated 60 m spatial resolution similar to HyspIRI. Surface reflectance was calculated using ACORN and a ground reflectance target to remove atmospheric and sensor artifacts. MASTER data were processed to generate estimates of spectral emissivity and LST using Modtran radiative transfer code and the ASTER Temperature Emissivity Separation algorithm. A spectral library of common urban materials, including urban vegetation, roofs and roads was assembled from combined AVIRIS and field-measured reflectance spectra. LST and emissivity were also retrieved from MASTER and reflectance/emissivity spectra for a subset of urban materials were retrieved from co-located MASTER and

  16. Infrared imaging diagnostics for intense pulsed electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiao; Shen, Jie; Liu, Wenbin; Zhong, Haowen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Gaolong; Le, Xiaoyun, E-mail: xyle@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); International Research Center for Nuclei and Particles in the Cosmos, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Qu, Miao; Yan, Sha [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Infrared imaging diagnostic method for two-dimensional calorimetric diagnostics has been developed for intense pulsed electron beam (IPEB). By using a 100-μm-thick tungsten film as the infrared heat sink for IPEB, the emitting uniformity of the electron source can be analyzed to evaluate the efficiency and stability of the diode system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method heat transfer simulation, combined with Monte Carlo calculation, was performed for error estimation and optimization of the method. The test of the method was finished with IPEB generated by explosive emission electron diode with pulse duration (FWHM) of 80 ns, electron energy up to 450 keV, and a total beam current of over 1 kA. The results showed that it is possible to measure the cross-sectional energy density distribution of IPEB with energy sensitivity of 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} and spatial resolution of 1 mm. The technical details, such as irradiation protection of bremsstrahlung γ photons and the functional extensibility of the method were discussed in this work.

  17. Infrared imaging diagnostics for intense pulsed electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Shen, Jie; Qu, Miao; Liu, Wenbin; Zhong, Haowen; Zhang, Jie; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Gaolong; Le, Xiaoyun

    2015-08-01

    Infrared imaging diagnostic method for two-dimensional calorimetric diagnostics has been developed for intense pulsed electron beam (IPEB). By using a 100-μm-thick tungsten film as the infrared heat sink for IPEB, the emitting uniformity of the electron source can be analyzed to evaluate the efficiency and stability of the diode system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method heat transfer simulation, combined with Monte Carlo calculation, was performed for error estimation and optimization of the method. The test of the method was finished with IPEB generated by explosive emission electron diode with pulse duration (FWHM) of 80 ns, electron energy up to 450 keV, and a total beam current of over 1 kA. The results showed that it is possible to measure the cross-sectional energy density distribution of IPEB with energy sensitivity of 0.1 J/cm(2) and spatial resolution of 1 mm. The technical details, such as irradiation protection of bremsstrahlung γ photons and the functional extensibility of the method were discussed in this work.

  18. The Infrared Camera (IRC) for AKARI - Design and Imaging Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Onaka, T; Wada, T; Fujishiro, N; Fujiwara, H; Ishigaki, M; Ishihara, D; Ita, Y; Kataza, H; Kim, W; Matsumoto, T; Murakami, H; Ohyama, Y; Oyabu, S; Sakon, I; Tanabé, T; Takagi, T; Uemizu, K; Ueno, M; Usui, F; Watarai, H; Cohen, M; Enya, K; Ootsubo, T; Pearson, C P; Takeyama, N; Yamamuro, T; Ikeda, Y

    2007-01-01

    The Infrared Camera (IRC) is one of two focal-plane instruments on the AKARI satellite. It is designed for wide-field deep imaging and low-resolution spectroscopy in the near- to mid-infrared (1.8--26.5um) in the pointed observation mode of AKARI. IRC is also operated in the survey mode to make an all-sky survey at 9 and 18um. It comprises three channels. The NIR channel (1.8--5.5um) employs a 512 x 412 InSb array, whereas both the MIR-S (4.6--13.4um) and MIR-L (12.6--26.5um) channels use 256 x 256 Si:As impurity band conduction arrays. Each of the three channels has a field-of-view of about 10' x 10' and are operated simultaneously. The NIR and MIR-S share the same field-of-view by virtue of a beam splitter. The MIR-L observes the sky about $25' away from the NIR/MIR-S field-of-view. IRC gives us deep insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies, the evolution of planetary disks, the process of star-formation, the properties of interstellar matter under various physical conditions, and the nature an...

  19. Infrared imaging of LED lighting tubes and fluorescent tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siikanen, Sami; Kivi, Sini; Kauppinen, Timo; Juuti, Mikko

    2011-05-01

    The low energy efficiency of conventional light sources is mainly caused by generation of waste heat. We used infrared (IR) imaging in order to monitor the heating of both LED tube luminaires and ordinary T8 fluorescent tubes. The IR images showed clearly how the surface temperatures of the fluorescent tube ends quickly rose up to about +50...+70°C, whereas the highest surface temperatures seen on the LED tubes were only about +30...+40°C. The IR images demonstrated how the heat produced by the individual LED chips can be efficiently guided to the supporting structure in order to keep the LED emitters cool and hence maintain efficient operation. The consumed electrical power and produced illuminance were also recorded during 24 hour measurements. In order to assess the total luminous efficacy of the luminaires, separate luminous flux measurements were made in a large integrating sphere. The currently available LED tubes showed efficacies of up to 88 lm/W, whereas a standard "cool white" T8 fluorescent tube produced ca. 75 lm/W. Both lamp types gave ca. 110 - 130 lx right below the ceiling-mounted luminaire, but the LED tubes consume only 40 - 55% of the electric power compared to fluorescent tubes.

  20. Novel silicon lenses for long-wave infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintz, Gregory; Stephanou, Philip; Petersen, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of a novel silicon lens for Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) imaging are presented. The silicon lenses are planar in nature, and are created using standard wafer scale silicon micro-fabrication processes. The silicon batch processes are used to generate subwavelength structures that introduce spatially varying phase shifts in the incident light. We will show that the silicon lens designs can be extended to produce lenses of varying focal lengths and diameters, thus enabling IR imaging at significantly lower cost and reduced weight and form factor. An optical design program and a Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulation software tool are used to model the lens performance. The effects of polarization anisotropy are computed for the resultant subwavelength structures. Test samples with lenses with focal lengths in the range of 10 to 50 mm were fabricated. The test sample also included a prism structure, which is characterized by measuring the deflection of a CO2 laser beam and compared to theoretical beam deflection. The silicon lenses are used to produce an image on a VGA micro-bolometer array.

  1. Erbium luminescence imaging of infrared surface plasmon polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, E.; Tchebotareva, A. L.; Polman, A.

    2006-03-01

    We demonstrate a new technique to spatially map the propagation and damping of infrared surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on metal films using optically active erbium ions as a probe of the SPP field. The bound SPP mode propagating along the Ag/glass interface of a 96nm thick Ag film on glass is excited by illuminating a subwavelength hole array in the metal with 1.49μm light. By imaging the 1.53μm photoluminescence of Er ions positioned in the glass at a distance of 60nm from the Ag/glass interface in a confocal microscope, a SPP beam was observed to propagate along a broad stripe waveguide, with a characteristic propagation length of 76μm. This technique provides a useful tool to study the characteristics of SPP modes at metal-dielectric interfaces in a wide range of geometries.

  2. Near-Infrared Fluorescent NanoGUMBOS for Biomedical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bwambok, David [Louisiana State University; El-Zahab, Bilal [Lousianna State University; Challa, Santhosh [Louisiana State University; Li, Min [Lousianna State University; Chandler, Lin [Horiba Jobin Yvon Inc.; Baker, Gary A [ORNL; Warner, Isiah M [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Herein, we report on near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent nanoparticles generated from an emergent class of materials we refer to as a Group of Uniform Materials Based on Organic Salts (GUMBOS). GUMBOS are largely frozen ionic liquids, although the concept is more general and is also easily applied to solid ionic materials with melting points in excess of 100 C. Nanoparticles based on GUMBOS (nanoGUMBOS) derived from a NIR fluorophore are prepared using a reprecipitation method and evaluated for in vivo fluorescence imaging. Due to their uniformity, single-step preparation, and composite nature, nanoGUMBOS help to resolve issues with dye leakage problems innate to alternate cellular stains and unlock a myriad of applications for these materials, highlighting exciting possibilities for multifunctional nanoGUMBOS.

  3. Advanced Image Processing for Defect Visualization in Infrared Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Winfree, William P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of a defect visualization process based on pulse infrared thermography are presented. Algorithms have been developed to reduce the amount of operator participation required in the process of interpreting thermographic images. The algorithms determine the defect's depth and size from the temporal and spatial thermal distributions that exist on the surface of the investigated object following thermal excitation. A comparison of the results from thermal contrast, time derivative, and phase analysis methods for defect visualization are presented. These comparisons are based on three dimensional simulations of a test case representing a plate with multiple delaminations. Comparisons are also based on experimental data obtained from a specimen with flat bottom holes and a composite panel with delaminations.

  4. High-Throughput Screening Using Fourier-Transform Infrared Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Sasmaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Efficient parallel screening of combinatorial libraries is one of the most challenging aspects of the high-throughput (HT heterogeneous catalysis workflow. Today, a number of methods have been used in HT catalyst studies, including various optical, mass-spectrometry, and gas-chromatography techniques. Of these, rapid-scanning Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR imaging is one of the fastest and most versatile screening techniques. Here, the new design of the 16-channel HT reactor is presented and test results for its accuracy and reproducibility are shown. The performance of the system was evaluated through the oxidation of CO over commercial Pd/Al2O3 and cobalt oxide nanoparticles synthesized with different reducer-reductant molar ratios, surfactant types, metal and surfactant concentrations, synthesis temperatures, and ramp rates.

  5. The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: Instrument Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Larkin, James E; Wright, Shelley A; Wincentsen, James E; Anderson, David; Chisholm, Eric M; Dekany, Richard G; Dunn, Jennifer S; Ellerbroek, Brent L; Hayano, Yutaka; Phillips, Andrew C; Simard, Luc; Smith, Roger; Suzuki, Ryuji; Weber, Robert W; Weiss, Jason L; Zhang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    IRIS is a near-infrared (0.84 to 2.4 microns) integral field spectrograph and wide-field imager being developed for first light with the Thirty Meter (TMT). It mounts to the advanced optics (AO) system NFIRAOS and has integrated on-instrument wavefront sensors (OIWFS) to achieve diffraction-limited spatial resolution at wavelengths longer than 1 micron. With moderate spectral resolution (R ~4,000 - 8,000) and large bandpass over a continuous field of view, IRIS will open new opportunities in virtually every area of astrophysical science. It will be able to resolve surface features tens of kilometers across Titan, while also mapping the distant galaxies at the scale of an individual star forming region. This paper summarizes the entire design and capabilities, and includes the results from the nearly completed preliminary design phase.

  6. The use of thermal infrared images in geologic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A. B.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal infrared image data can be used as an aid to geologic mapping. Broadband thermal data between 8 and 13 microns is used to measure surface temperature, from which surface thermal properties can be inferred. Data from aircraft multispectral scanners at Pisgah, California which include a broadband thermal channel along with several visible and near-IR spectral channels permit better discrimination between rock type units than the same data set without the thermal data. Data from the HCMM satellite and from aircraft thermal scanners also make it possible to monitor moisture changes in Death Valley, California. Multispectral data in the same 8-13 micron wavelength range can be used to discriminate between surface materials with different spectral emission characteristics, as demonstrated with both aircraft scanner and ground spectrometer data.

  7. FISICA: The Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Astrophysics and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, S. N.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Elston, R.; Guzman, R.; Gruel, N.; Julian, J.; Boreman, G.; Hoffman, J.; Rodgers, M.; Glenn, P.; Hull-Allen, G.; Myrick, B.; Flint, S.; Comstock, L.

    2005-12-01

    We report on the design, manufacture, and scientific performance of the Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Astrophysics and Cosmology (FISICA) - a fully cryogenic all-reflective image slicing integral field unit for the FLAMINGOS near-infrared spectrograph. Originally conceived as a bench-top demonstration proof-of-concept instrument, after three productive engineering runs at the KPNO 4-m telescope (as of 15 Oct 2005) we find that FISICA is capable of delivering excellent scientific results. It now operates as a 'turnkey' instrument at the KPNO 4-m telescope. FISICA is now open for community access as a visitor instrument on the KPNO 4-m telescope via collaboration with the instrument team, who can assist with the proposal preparation and observations, as well as provide the data reduction tools for integral field spectroscopy. We review the optical and opto-mechanical design, fabrication, laboratory test results, and on-telescope performance for FISICA. Designed to accept input beams near f/15, FISICA with FLAMINGOS slices a 16x33 arcsec field of view into 22 parallel elements using three sets of monolithic powered mirror arrays, each with 22 mirrored surfaces cut into a single piece of aluminum. However, slight vignetting for some field positions limits the effective field of view to 15x32 arcsec. The effective spatial sampling of 0.70 arcsec delivers 960 spatial resolution elements. Combined with the FLAMINGOS spectrograph, R 1300 spectroscopy over the 1-2.4 micron wavelength range is possible, in either the J+H combined bandpass or the H+K combined bandpass. FISICA was funded by the UCF-UF Space Research Initiative; FLAMINGOS was designed and was constructed by the IR Instrumentation Group (PI: R. Elston) at the University of Florida, Department of Astronomy, with support from NSF grant AST97-31180 and Kitt Peak National Observatory.

  8. A low cost thermal infrared hyperspectral imager for small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crites, S. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Wright, R.; Garbeil, H.; Horton, K. A.

    2011-06-01

    The traditional model for space-based earth observations involves long mission times, high cost, and long development time. Because of the significant time and monetary investment required, riskier instrument development missions or those with very specific scientific goals are unlikely to successfully obtain funding. However, a niche for earth observations exploiting new technologies in focused, short lifetime missions is opening with the growth of the small satellite market and launch opportunities for these satellites. These low-cost, short-lived missions provide an experimental platform for testing new sensor technologies that may transition to larger, more long-lived platforms. The low costs and short lifetimes also increase acceptable risk to sensors, enabling large decreases in cost using commercial off the shelf (COTS) parts and allowing early-career scientists and engineers to gain experience with these projects. We are building a low-cost long-wave infrared spectral sensor, funded by the NASA Experimental Project to Stimulate Competitive Research program (EPSCOR), to demonstrate the ways in which a university's scientific and instrument development programs can fit into this niche. The sensor is a low-mass, power efficient thermal hyperspectral imager with electronics contained in a pressure vessel to enable the use of COTS electronics, and will be compatible with small satellite platforms. The sensor, called Thermal Hyperspectral Imager (THI), is based on a Sagnac interferometer and uses an uncooled 320x256 microbolometer array. The sensor will collect calibrated radiance data at long-wave infrared (LWIR, 8-14 microns) wavelengths in 230-meter pixels with 20 wavenumber spectral resolution from a 400-km orbit.

  9. A low cost thermal infrared hyperspectral imager for small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crites, S. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Wright, R.; Garbeil, H.; Horton, K. A.; Wood, M.

    2012-06-01

    The growth of the small satellite market and launch opportunities for these satellites is creating a new niche for earth observations that contrasts with the long mission durations, high costs, and long development times associated with traditional space-based earth observations. Low-cost, short-lived missions made possible by this new approach provide an experimental platform for testing new sensor technologies that may transition to larger, more long-lived platforms. The low costs and short lifetimes also increase acceptable risk to sensors, enabling large decreases in cost using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts and allowing early-career scientists and engineers to gain experience with these projects. We are building a low-cost long-wave infrared spectral sensor, funded by the NASA Experimental Project to Stimulate Competitive Research program (EPSCoR), to demonstrate ways in which a university's scientific and instrument development programs can fit into this niche. The sensor is a low-mass, power-efficient thermal hyperspectral imager with electronics contained in a pressure vessel to enable use of COTS electronics and will be compatible with small satellite platforms. The sensor, called Thermal Hyperspectral Imager (THI), is based on a Sagnac interferometer and uses an uncooled 320x256 microbolometer array. The sensor will collect calibrated radiance data at long-wave infrared (LWIR, 8-14 microns) wavelengths in 230 meter pixels with 20 wavenumber spectral resolution from a 400 km orbit. We are currently in the laboratory and airborne testing stage in order to demonstrate the spectro-radiometric quality of data that the instrument provides.

  10. Doubly Resonant Photonic Antenna for Single Infrared Quantum Dot Imaging at Telecommunication Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhihua; Lefier, Yannick; Suarez, Miguel Angel; Mivelle, Mathieu; Salut, Roland; Merolla, Jean-Marc; Grosjean, Thierry

    2017-04-01

    Colloidal Quantum dots (CQDs) are nowadays one of the cornerstones of modern photonics as they have led to the emergence of new optoelectronic and biomedical technologies. However, the full characterization of these quantum emitters is currently restricted to the visible wavelengths and it remains a key challenge to optically probe single CQDs operating in the infrared spectral domain which is targeted by a growing number of applications. Here, we report the first experimental detection and imaging at room temperature of single infrared CQDs operating at telecommunication wavelengths. Imaging was done with a doubly resonant bowtie nano-aperture antenna (BNA) written at the end of a fiber nanoprobe, whose resonances spectrally fit the CQD absorption and emission wavelengths. Direct near-field characterization of PbS CQDs reveal individual nanocrystals with a spatial resolution of 75 nm (lambda/20) together with their intrinsic 2D dipolar free-space emission properties and exciton dynamics (blinking phenomenon). Because the doubly resonant BNA is strongly transmissive at both the CQD absorption and emission wavelengths, we are able to perform all-fiber nano-imaging with a standard 20 % efficiency InGaAs avalanche photodiode (APD). Detection efficiency is predicted to be 3000 fold larger than with a conventional circular aperture tip of the same transmission area. Double resonance BNA fiber probes thus offer the possibility of exploring extreme light-matter interaction in low band gap CQDs with current plug-and-play detection techniques, opening up new avenues in the fields of infrared light emitting devices, photodetectors, telecommunications, bio-imaging and quantum information technology.

  11. Near-Infrared Super Resolution Imaging with Metallic Nanoshell Particle Chain Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Weijie; Cao, Penfei; Cheng, Lin; Gong, Li; Zhao, Xining; Yang, Lili

    2012-01-01

    We propose a near-infrared super resolution imaging system without a lens or a mirror but with an array of metallic nanoshell particle chain. The imaging array can plasmonically transfer the near-field components of dipole sources in the incoherent and coherent manners and the super resolution images can be reconstructed in the output plane. By tunning the parameters of the metallic nanoshell particle, the plasmon resonance band of the isolate nanoshell particle red-shifts to the near-infrared region. The near-infrared super resolution images are obtained subsequently. We calculate the field intensity distribution at the different planes of imaging process using the finite element method and find that the array has super resolution imaging capability at near-infrared wavelengths. We also show that the image formation highly depends on the coherence of the dipole sources and the image-array distance.

  12. Improved High Dynamic Range Image Reproduction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Rövid

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available High dynamic range (HDR of illumination may cause serious distortions andother problems in viewing and further processing of digital images. This paper describes anew algorithm for HDR image creation based on merging images taken with differentexposure time. There are many fields, in which HDR images can be used advantageously,with the help of them the accuracy, reliability and many other features of the certain imageprocessing methods can be improved.

  13. A brief history of 25 years (or more) of infrared imaging radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Bernard R., Jr.; Orlove, Gary L.

    2003-04-01

    Modern thermal imaging radiometers are infrared systems usually endowed with some means of making surface temperature measurements of objects, as well as providing an image. These devices have evolved considerably over the past few decades, and are continuing to do so at an accelerating rate. Changes are not confined to merely camera size and user interface, but also include critical parameters, such as sensitivity, accuracy, dynamic range, spectral response, capture rates, storage media, and numerous other features, options, and accessories. Familiarity with this changing technology is much more than an academic topic. A misunderstanding or false assumption concerning system differences, could lead to misinterpretation of data, inaccurate temperature measurements, or disappointing, ambiguous results. Marketing demands have had considerable influence in the design and operation of these systems. In the past, many thermographers were scientists, engineers and researchers. Today, however, the majorities of people using these instruments work in the industrial sector and are involved in highly technical skilled trades. This change of operating personnel has effectively changed the status of these devices from a 'scientific instrument', to an 'essential tool'. Manufacturers have recognized this trend and responded accordingly, as seen in their product designs. This paper explores the history of commercial infrared imaging systems and accessories. Emphasis is placed on, but not confined to, real time systems with video output, capable of temperature measurements.

  14. Thermal interpretation of infrared dynamics in de Sitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigopoulos, Gerasimos

    2016-07-01

    The infrared dynamics of a light, minimally coupled scalar field in de Sitter spacetime with Ricci curvature R = 12H2, averaged over horizon sized regions of physical volume VH = (4π/3)(1/H)3, can be interpreted as Brownian motion in a medium with de Sitter temperature TDS = hbarH/2π. We demonstrate this by directly deriving the effective action of scalar field fluctuations with wavelengths larger than the de Sitter curvature radius and generalizing Starobinsky's seminal results on stochastic inflation. The effective action describes stochastic dynamics and the fluctuating force drives the field to an equilibrium characterized by a thermal Gibbs distribution at temperature TDS which corresponds to a de Sitter invariant state. Hence, approach towards this state can be interpreted as thermalization. We show that the stochastic kinetic energy of the coarse-grained description corresponds to the norm of ∂μphi and takes a well defined value per horizon volume ½langle(∇phi)2rangle = - ½TDS/VH. This approach allows for the non-perturbative computation of the de Sitter invariant stress energy tensor langleTμνrangle for an arbitrary scalar potential.

  15. Thermal Interpretation of Infrared Dynamics in de Sitter

    CERN Document Server

    Rigopoulos, Gerasimos

    2016-01-01

    The infrared dynamics of a light, minimally coupled scalar field in de Sitter spacetime with Ricci curvature $R=12H$, averaged over horizon sized regions of physical volume $V_H=\\frac{4\\pi}{3}\\left(\\frac{1}{H}\\right)^3$, can be interpreted as Brownian motion in a medium with de Sitter temperature $T_{DS}=\\frac{\\hbar H}{2\\pi}$. We demonstrate this by employing path integral techniques, deriving the effective action of scalar field fluctuations with wavelengths larger than the de Sitter curvature radius and generalizing Starobinsky's seminal results on stochastic inflation. The effective action describes stochastic dynamics and the fluctuating force drives the field to an equilibrium characterized by a thermal Gibbs distribution at temperature $T_{DS}$ which corresponds to a de Sitter invariant state. Hence, approach towards this state can be interpreted as thermalization. We show that the stochastic kinetic energy of the coarse-grained description corresponds to the norm of $\\partial_\\mu\\phi$ and takes a well ...

  16. Thermal Infrared Imager on Hayabusa2: Science and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tatsuaki

    2015-04-01

    Thermal Infrared Imager TIR was developed and calibrated for Haya-busa2 asteroid explorer, aiming at the investigation of thermo-physical properties of C-class near-Earth sub-km sized asteroid (162173) 1999JU3. TIR is based on the 2D micro-bolometer array with germani-um lens to image the surface of asteroid in 8 to 12 μm wavelength (1), measuring the thermal emission off the asteroid surface. Its field of view is 16° x 12° with 328 x 248 pixels. At least 40 (up to 100) images will be taken during asteroid rotation once a week, mainly from the Home Position which is about 20km sunward from asteroid surface. Therefore TIR will image the whole asteroid with spatial resolution of scien-tific objectives of TIR include the mapping of asteroid surface condi-tions (regional distribution of thermal inertia), since the surface physical conditions are strongly correlated with thermal inertia. It is so informa-tive on understanding the re-accretion or surface sedimentation process-es of the asteroid to be the current form. TIR data will be used for searching for those sites having the typical particle size of 1mm for best sample collection, and within the proper thermal condition for space-craft safe operation. After launch of Hayabusa2, TIR has been tested successfully, covering from -100 to 150 °C using a single parameter settings (2). This implies that TIR is actually able to map the surface other than the sunlit areas. Performance of TIR was found basically the same as those in the pre-launch test, when the temperature of TIR is well controlled. References: (1) Fukuhara T. et al., (2011) Earth Planet. Space 63, 1009-1018; (2) Okada T. et al., (2015) Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 46, #1331.

  17. Waiting time dynamics in two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Thomas L C; Knoester, Jasper

    2009-09-15

    We review recent work on the waiting time dynamics of coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. This dynamics can reveal chemical and physical processes that take place on the femto- and picosecond time scale, which is faster than the time scale that may be probed by, for example, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A large number of chemically relevant processes take place on this time scale. Such processes range from forming and breaking hydrogen bonds and proton transfer to solvent exchange and vibrational population transfer. In typical 2DIR spectra, multiple processes contribute to the waiting time dynamics and the spectra are often congested. This makes the spectra challenging to interpret, and the aid of theoretical models and simulations is often needed. To be useful, such models need to account for all dynamical processes in the sample simultaneously. The numerical integration of the Schrodinger equation (NISE) method has proven to allow for a very general treatment of the dynamical processes. It accounts for both the motional narrowing resulting from solvent-induced frequency fluctuations and population transfer between coupled vibrations. At the same time, frequency shifts arising from chemical-exchange reactions and changes of the transition dipoles because of either non-Condon effects or molecular reorientation are included in the treatment. This method therefore allows for the disentanglement of all of these processes. The NISE method has thus far been successfully applied to study chemical-exchange processes. It was demonstrated that 2DIR is not only sensitive to reaction kinetics but also to the more detailed reaction dynamics. NISE has also been applied to the study of population transfer within the amide I band (CO stretch) and between the amide I and amide II bands (CN stretch and NH bend) in polypeptides. From the amide I studies, it was found that the population transfer can be used to enhance cross-peaks that act as

  18. Multifunctional in vivo vascular imaging using near-infrared II fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Guosong; Robinson, Joshua T; Raaz, Uwe; Xie, Liming; Huang, Ngan F; Cooke, John P; Dai, Hongjie

    2012-01-01

    In vivo real-time epifluorescence imaging of mouse hindlimb vasculatures in the second near-infrared region (NIR-II, 1.1~1.4 microns) is performed using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as fluorophores. Both high spatial resolution (~30 microns) and temporal resolution (<200 ms/frame) for small vessel imaging are achieved 1-3 mm deep in the tissue owing to the beneficial NIR-II optical window that affords deep anatomical penetration and low scattering. This spatial resolution is unattainable by traditional NIR imaging (NIR-I, 0.75~0.9 microns) or microscopic computed tomography (micro-CT), while the temporal resolution far exceeds scanning microscopic imaging techniques. Arterial and venous vessels are unambiguously differentiated using a dynamic contrast-enhanced NIR-II imaging technique based on their distinct hemodynamics. Further, the deep tissue penetration, high spatial and temporal resolution of NIR-II imaging allow for precise quantifications of blood velocity in both normal and ischemic femo...

  19. High-resolution Image Reconstruction by Neural Network and Its Application in Infrared Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nan; JIN Wei-qi; SU Bing-hua

    2005-01-01

    As digital image techniques have been widely used, the requirements for high-resolution images become increasingly stringent. Traditional single-frame interpolation techniques cannot add new high frequency information to the expanded images, and cannot improve resolution in deed. Multiframe-based techniques are effective ways for high-resolution image reconstruction, but their computation complexities and the difficulties in achieving image sequences limit their applications. An original method using an artificial neural network is proposed in this paper. Using the inherent merits in neural network, we can establish the mapping between high frequency components in low-resolution images and high-resolution images. Example applications and their results demonstrated the images reconstructed by our method are aesthetically and quantitatively (using the criteria of MSE and MAE) superior to the images acquired by common methods. Even for infrared images this method can give satisfactory results with high definition. In addition, a single-layer linear neural network is used in this paper, the computational complexity is very low, and this method can be realized in real time.

  20. Inspection of calandria front area of Wolsung NPP using technique of mapping thermal infrared image into CCD image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Kim, Chang Hoi; Seo, Yong Chil; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Seung Ho [Advance Robotics Teams, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-11-15

    This paper describes the enhanced inspection performance of a thermal infrared camera for monitoring abnormal conditions of calandria reactor area of Wolsung nuclear power plant. Thermal infrared camera have poor image qualities compared to commercial CCD cameras, as in contrast, brightness, and resolution. To compensate the poor image quality problems associated with the thermal infrared camera, the technique of mapping thermal infrared image into real ccd image is proposed. The mobile robot KAEROT/m2, loaded with sensor head system at the mast, is entered to monitor leakage of heavy water and thermal abnormality of the calandria reactor area in overhaul period. The sensor head system is composed of thermal infrared camera and ccd camera in parallel. When thermal abnormality on observation points and areas of calandria reactor area is occurred, unusual hot image taken from thermal infrared camera is superimposed on real CCD image. In this inspection experiment, more accurate positions of thermal abnormalities on calandria reactor area can be estimated by using technique of mapping thermal infrared image into CCD image, which include characters arranged in MPOQ order.

  1. A Novel Gradient Vector Flow Snake Model Based on Convex Function for Infrared Image Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Shiping; Zhou, Qin

    2016-10-21

    Infrared image segmentation is a challenging topic because infrared images are characterized by high noise, low contrast, and weak edges. Active contour models, especially gradient vector flow, have several advantages in terms of infrared image segmentation. However, the GVF (Gradient Vector Flow) model also has some drawbacks including a dilemma between noise smoothing and weak edge protection, which decrease the effect of infrared image segmentation significantly. In order to solve this problem, we propose a novel generalized gradient vector flow snakes model combining GGVF (Generic Gradient Vector Flow) and NBGVF (Normally Biased Gradient Vector Flow) models. We also adopt a new type of coefficients setting in the form of convex function to improve the ability of protecting weak edges while smoothing noises. Experimental results and comparisons against other methods indicate that our proposed snakes model owns better ability in terms of infrared image segmentation than other snakes models.

  2. IRDye78 Conjugates for Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atif Zaheer

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The detection of human malignancies by near-infrared (NIR fluorescence will require the conjugation of cancer-specific ligands to NIR fluorophores that have optimal photoproperties and pharmacokinetics. IRDye78, a tetra-sulfonated heptamethine indocyanine NIR fluorophore, meets most of the criteria for an in vivo imaging agent, and is available as an N-hydroxysuccinimide ester for conjugation to low-molecular-weight ligands. However, IRDye78 has a high charge-to-mass ratio, complicating purification of conjugates. It also has a potentially labile linkage between fluorophore and ligand. We have developed an ion-pairing purification strategy for IRDye78 that can be performed with a standard C18 column under neutral conditions, thus preserving the stability of fluorophore, ligand, and conjugate. By employing parallel evaporative light scatter and absorbance detectors, all reactants and products are identified, and conjugate purity is maximized. We describe reversible and irreversible conversions of IRDye78 that can occur during sample purification, and describe methods for preserving conjugate stability. Using seven ligands, spanning several classes of small molecules and peptides (neutral, charged, and/or hydrophobic, we illustrate the robustness of these methods, and confirm that IRDye78 conjugates so purified retain bioactivity and permit NIR fluorescence imaging of specific targets.

  3. Visible and infrared remote imaging of hazardous waste: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, Terrence; Fisher, Gary B.; Aiello, Danielle P.; Haack, Barry

    2010-01-01

    One of the critical global environmental problems is human and ecological exposure to hazardous wastes from agricultural, industrial, military and mining activities. These wastes often include heavy metals, hydrocarbons and other organic chemicals. Traditional field and laboratory detection and monitoring of these wastes are generally expensive and time consuming. The synoptic perspective of overhead remote imaging can be very useful for the detection and remediation of hazardous wastes. Aerial photography has a long and effective record in waste site evaluations. Aerial photographic archives allow temporal evaluation and change detection by visual interpretation. Multispectral aircraft and satellite systems have been successfully employed in both spectral and morphological analysis of hazardous wastes on the landscape and emerging hyperspectral sensors have permitted determination of the specific contaminants by processing strategies using the tens or hundreds of acquired wavelengths in the solar reflected and/or thermal infrared parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. This paper reviews the literature of remote sensing and overhead imaging in the context of hazardous waste and discusses future monitoring needs and emerging scientific research areas.

  4. Galileo infrared imaging spectrometry measurements at the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccord, Thomas B.; Soderblom, Larry A.; Carlson, Robert W.; Fanale, Fraser P.; Lopes-Gautier, Rosaly; Ocampo, Adriano; Forsythe, Jennifer; Campbell, Bruce; Granahan, James C.; Smythe, W. D.

    1994-01-01

    Imaging spectrometer observations were made of the surface of the Moon during the December 1990 flyby of the Earth-Moon system by the Galileo spacecraft. This article documents this data set and presents analyses of some of the data. The near infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) investigation obtained 17 separate mosaics of the Moon in 408 spectral channels between about 0.7 and 5.2 micrometers. The instrument was originally designed to operate in orbit about Jupiter and therefore saturates at many spectral channels for most measurement situations at 1 AU. However, sufficient measurements were made of the Moon to verify the proper operation of the instrument and to demonstrate its capabilities. Analysis of these data show that the NIMS worked as expected and produced measurements consistent with previous ground-based telescopic studies. These are the first imaging spectrometer measurements of this type from space for the Moon, and they illustrate several major points concerning this type of observation and about the NIMS capabilities specifically. Of major importance are the difference between framing and scanning instruments and the effects of the spacecraft and the scan platform on the performance of such and experiment. The science return of subsequent NIMS and other investigation measurements will be significantly enhanced by the experience and results gained.

  5. Real-time panoramic infrared imaging system based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao-Jun; Shen, Yong-Ge

    2010-11-01

    During the past decades, signal processing architecture, which is based on FPGA, conventional DSP processor and host computer, is popular for infrared or other electro-optical systems. With the increasing processing requirement, the former architecture starts to show its limitation in several respects. This paper elaborates a solution based on FPGA for panoramic imaging system as our first step of upgrading the processing module to System-on-Chip (SoC) solution. Firstly, we compare this new architecture with the traditional to show its superiority mainly in the video processing ability, reduction in the development workload and miniaturization of the system architecture. Afterwards, this paper provides in-depth description of this imaging system, including the system architecture and its function, and addresses several related issues followed by the future development. FPGA has developed so rapidly during the past years, not only in silicon device but also in the design flow and tools. In the end, we briefly present our future system development and introduce those new design tools to make up the limitation of the traditional FPGA design methodology. The advanced design flow through Simulink and Xilinx System Generator (Sysgen) has been elaborated, which enables engineers to develop sophisticated DSP algorithms and implement them in FPGA more efficiently. It is believed that this new design approach can shorten system design cycle by allowing rapid prototyping and refining design process.

  6. Airborne infrared hyperspectral imager for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagueux, Philippe; Puckrin, Eldon; Turcotte, Caroline S.; Gagnon, Marc-André; Bastedo, John; Farley, Vincent; Chamberland, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Persistent surveillance and collection of airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance information is critical in today's warfare against terrorism. High resolution imagery in visible and infrared bands provides valuable detection capabilities based on target shapes and temperatures. However, the spectral resolution provided by a hyperspectral imager adds a spectral dimension to the measurements, leading to additional tools for detection and identification of targets, based on their spectral signature. The Telops Hyper-Cam sensor is an interferometer-based imaging system that enables the spatial and spectral analysis of targets using a single sensor. It is based on the Fourier-transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. It provides datacubes of up to 320×256 pixels at spectral resolutions as fine as 0.25 cm-1. The LWIR version covers the 8.0 to 11.8 μm spectral range. The Hyper-Cam has been recently used for the first time in two compact airborne platforms: a bellymounted gyro-stabilized platform and a gyro-stabilized gimbal ball. Both platforms are described in this paper, and successful results of high-altitude detection and identification of targets, including industrial plumes, and chemical spills are presented.

  7. Monitoring of historical frescoes by timed infrared imaging analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadelano, G.; Bison, P.; Bortolin, A.; Ferrarini, G.; Peron, F.; Girotto, M.; Volinia, M.

    2015-03-01

    The subflorescence and efflorescence phenomena are widely acknowledged as the major causes of permanent damage to fresco wall paintings. They are related to the occurrence of cycles of dry/wet conditions inside the walls. Therefore, it is essential to identify the presence of water on the decorated surfaces and inside the walls. Nondestructive testing in industrial applications have confirmed that active infrared thermography with continuous timed images acquisition can improve the outcomes of thermal analysis aimed to moisture identification. In spite of that, in cultural heritage investigations these techniques have not been yet used extensively on a regular basis. This paper illustrates an application of these principles in order to evaluate the decay of fresco mural paintings in a medieval chapel located in North-West of Italy. One important feature of this study is the use of a robotic system called aIRview that can be utilized to automatically acquire and process thermal images. Multiple accurate thermal views of the inside walls of the building have been produced in a survey that lasted several days. Signal processing algorithms based on Fast Fourier Transform analysis have been applied to the acquired data in order to formulate trustworthy hypotheses about the deterioration mechanisms.

  8. Investigation of Latent Traces Using Infrared Reflectance Hyperspectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Till; Wenzel, Susanne; Roscher, Ribana; Stachniss, Cyrill

    2016-06-01

    The detection of traces is a main task of forensics. Hyperspectral imaging is a potential method from which we expect to capture more fluorescence effects than with common forensic light sources. This paper shows that the use of hyperspectral imaging is suited for the analysis of latent traces and extends the classical concept to the conservation of the crime scene for retrospective laboratory analysis. We examine specimen of blood, semen and saliva traces in several dilution steps, prepared on cardboard substrate. As our key result we successfully make latent traces visible up to dilution factor of 1:8000. We can attribute most of the detectability to interference of electromagnetic light with the water content of the traces in the shortwave infrared region of the spectrum. In a classification task we use several dimensionality reduction methods (PCA and LDA) in combination with a Maximum Likelihood classifier, assuming normally distributed data. Further, we use Random Forest as a competitive approach. The classifiers retrieve the exact positions of labelled trace preparation up to highest dilution and determine posterior probabilities. By modelling the classification task with a Markov Random Field we are able to integrate prior information about the spatial relation of neighboured pixel labels.

  9. Thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging from vehicle-carried instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Laurel E.; Herr, Kenneth C.; Adams, Paul M.; McAfee, John; Salisbury, John

    2002-09-01

    Stand-off identification in the field using thermal infrared spectrometers (hyperspectral) is a maturing technique for gases and aerosols. However, capabilities to identify solid-phase materials on the surface lag substantially, particularly for identification in the field without benefit of ground truth (e.g. for "denied areas"). Spectral signatures of solid phase materials vary in complex and non-intuitive ways, including non-linear variations with surface texture, particle size, and intimate mixing. Also, in contrast to airborne or satellite measurements, reflected downwelling radiance strongly affects the signature measured by field spectrometers. These complex issues can confound interpretations or cause a misidentification in the field. Problems that remain particularly obstinate are (1) low ambiguity identification when there is no accompanying ground truth (e.g. measurements of denied areas, or Mars surface by the 2003 Mars lander spectrometer); (2) real- or near real-time identification, especially when a low ambiguity answer is critical; (3) identification of intimate mixtures (e.g. two fine powders mixed together) and targets composed of very small particles (e.g. aerosol fallout dust, some tailings); and (4) identification of non-diffuse targets (e.g. smooth coatings such as paint and desert varnish), particularly when measured at a high emission angle. In most studies that focus on gas phase targets or specific manmade targets, the solid phase background signatures are called "clutter" and are thrown out. Here we discuss our field spectrometer images measured of test targets that were selected to include a range of particle sizes, diffuse, non-diffuse, high, and low reflectance materials. This study was designed to identify and improve understanding of the issues that complicate stand-off identification in the field, with a focus on developing identification capabilities to proceed without benefit of ground truth. This information allows both improved

  10. Near-surface Thermal Infrared Imaging of a Mixed Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, D. M.; Helliker, B. R.; Richardson, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Measurement of an organism's temperature is of basic physiological importance and therefore necessary for ecosystem modeling, yet most models derive leaf temperature from energy balance arguments or assume it is equal to air temperature. This is because continuous, direct measurement of leaf temperature outside of a controlled environment is difficult and rarely done. Of even greater challenge is measuring leaf temperature with the resolution required to understand the underlying energy balance and regulation of plant processes. To measure leaf temperature through the year, we have mounted a high-resolution, thermal infrared camera overlooking the canopy of a temperate deciduous forest. The camera is co-located with an eddy covariance system and a suite of radiometric sensors. Our camera measures longwave thermal infrared (λ = 7.5-14 microns) using a microbolometer array. Suspended in the canopy within the camera FOV is a matte black copper plate instrumented with fine wire thermocouples that acts as a thermal reference for each image. In this presentation, I will discuss the challenges of continuous, long-term field operation of the camera, as well as measurement sensitivity to physical and environmental parameters. Based on this analysis, I will show that the uncertainties in converting radiometric signal to leaf temperature are well constrained. The key parameter for minimizing uncertainty is the emissivity of the objects being imaged: measuring the emissivity to within 0.01 enables leaf temperature to be calculated to within 0.5°C. Finally, I will present differences in leaf temperature observed amongst species. From our two-year record, we characterize high frequency, daily, and seasonal thermal signatures of leaves and crowns, in relation to environmental conditions. Our images are taken with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to quantify the preferential heating of sunlit portions of the canopy and the cooling effect of wind gusts. Future work will

  11. Infrared image non-rigid registration based on regional information entropy demons algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chaoliang; Ma, Lihua; Yu, Ming; Cui, Shumin; Wu, Qingrong

    2015-02-01

    Infrared imaging fault detection which is treated as an ideal, non-contact, non-destructive testing method is applied to the circuit board fault detection. Since Infrared images obtained by handheld infrared camera with wide-angle lens have both rigid and non-rigid deformations. To solve this problem, a new demons algorithm based on regional information entropy was proposed. The new method overcame the shortcomings of traditional demons algorithm that was sensitive to the intensity. First, the information entropy image was gotten by computing regional information entropy of the image. Then, the deformation between the two images was calculated that was the same as demons algorithm. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed algorithm has better robustness in intensity inconsistent images registration compared with the traditional demons algorithm. Achieving accurate registration between intensity inconsistent infrared images provided strong support for the temperature contrast.

  12. Infrared moving small target detection based on saliency extraction and image sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Ren, Kan; Gao, Jin; Li, Chaowei; Gu, Guohua; Wan, Minjie

    2016-10-01

    Moving small target detection in infrared image is a crucial technique of infrared search and tracking system. This paper present a novel small target detection technique based on frequency-domain saliency extraction and image sparse representation. First, we exploit the features of Fourier spectrum image and magnitude spectrum of Fourier transform to make a rough extract of saliency regions and use a threshold segmentation system to classify the regions which look salient from the background, which gives us a binary image as result. Second, a new patch-image model and over-complete dictionary were introduced to the detection system, then the infrared small target detection was converted into a problem solving and optimization process of patch-image information reconstruction based on sparse representation. More specifically, the test image and binary image can be decomposed into some image patches follow certain rules. We select the target potential area according to the binary patch-image which contains salient region information, then exploit the over-complete infrared small target dictionary to reconstruct the test image blocks which may contain targets. The coefficients of target image patch satisfy sparse features. Finally, for image sequence, Euclidean distance was used to reduce false alarm ratio and increase the detection accuracy of moving small targets in infrared images due to the target position correlation between frames.

  13. Infrared and multi-type images fusion algorithm based on contrast pyramid transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Wang, Yan; Wu, Yujing; Qian, Yunsheng

    2016-09-01

    A fusion algorithm for infrared and multi-type images based on contrast pyramid transform (CPT) combined with Otsu method and morphology is proposed in this paper. Firstly, two sharpened images are combined to the first fused image based on information entropy weighted scheme. Afterwards, two enhanced images and the first fused one are decomposed into a series of images with different dimensions and spatial frequencies. To the low-frequency layer, the Otsu method is applied to calculate the optimal segmentation threshold of the first fused image, which is subsequently used to determine the pixel values in top layer fused image. With respect to the high-frequency layers, the top-bottom hats morphological transform is employed to each layer before maximum selection criterion. Finally, the series of decomposed images are reconstructed and then superposed with the enhanced image processed by morphological gradient operation as a second fusion to get the final fusion image. Infrared and visible images fusion, infrared and low-light-level (LLL) images fusion, infrared intensity and infrared polarization images fusion, and multi-focus images fusion are discussed in this paper. Both experimental results and objective metrics demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed algorithm over the conventional ones used to compare.

  14. Infrared thermal imaging of rat somatosensory cortex with whisker stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Ooi, Yasuhiro; Seki, Junji

    2012-04-01

    The present study aims to validate the applicability of infrared (IR) thermal imaging for the study of brain function through experiments on the rat barrel cortex. Regional changes in neural activity within the brain produce alterations in local thermal equilibrium via increases in metabolic activity and blood flow. We studied the relationship between temperature change and neural activity in anesthetized rats using IR imaging to visualize stimulus-induced changes in the somatosensory cortex of the brain. Sensory stimulation of the vibrissae (whiskers) was given for 10 s using an oscillating whisker vibrator (5-mm deflection at 10, 5, and 1 Hz). The brain temperature in the observational region continued to increase significantly with whisker stimulation. The mean peak recorded temperature changes were 0.048 ± 0.028, 0.054 ± 0.036, and 0.097 ± 0.015°C at 10, 5, and 1 Hz, respectively. We also observed that the temperature increase occurred in a focal spot, radiating to encompass a larger region within the contralateral barrel cortex region during single-whisker stimulation. Whisker stimulation also produced ipsilateral cortex temperature increases, which were localized in the same region as the pial arterioles. Temperature increase in the barrel cortex was also observed in rats treated with a calcium channel blocker (nimodipine), which acts to suppress the hemodynamic response to neural activity. Thus the location and area of temperature increase were found to change in accordance with the region of neural activation. These results indicate that IR thermal imaging is viable as a functional quantitative neuroimaging technique.

  15. Near-infrared dyes for molecular probes and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patonay, Gabor; Beckford, Garfield; Strekowski, Lucjan; Henary, Maged; Kim, Jun Seok; Crow, Sidney

    2009-02-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) fluorescence has been used both as an analytical tool as molecular probes and in in vitro or in vivo imaging of individual cells and organs. The NIR region (700-1100 nm) is ideal with regard to these applications due to the inherently lower background interference and the high molar absorptivities of NIR chromophores. NIR dyes are also useful in studying binding characteristics of large biomolecules, such as proteins. Throughout these studies, different NIR dyes have been evaluated to determine factors that control binding to biomolecules, including serum albumins. Hydrophobic character of NIR dyes were increased by introducing alkyl and aryl groups, and hydrophilic moieties e.g., polyethylene glycols (PEG) were used to increase aqueous solubility. Recently, our research group introduced bis-cyanines as innovative NIR probes. Depending on their microenvironment, bis-cyanines can exist as an intramolecular dimer with the two cyanines either in a stacked form, or in a linear conformation in which the two subunits do not interact with each other. In this intramolecular H-aggregate, the chromophore has a low extinction coefficient and low fluorescence quantum yield. Upon addition of biomolecules, the H-and D- bands are decreased and the monomeric band is increased, with concomitant increase in fluorescence intensity. Introduction of specific moieties into the NIR dye molecules allows for the development of physiological molecular probes to detect pH, metal ions and other parameters. Examples of these applications include imaging and biomolecule characterizations. Water soluble dyes are expected to be excellent candidates for both in vitro and in vivo imaging of cells and organs.

  16. Single camera imaging system for color and near-infrared fluorescence image guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenyue; Zhu, Nan; Pacheco, Shaun; Wang, Xia; Liang, Rongguang

    2014-08-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging systems have been developed for image guided surgery in recent years. However, current systems are typically bulky and work only when surgical light in the operating room (OR) is off. We propose a single camera imaging system that is capable of capturing NIR fluorescence and color images under normal surgical lighting illumination. Using a new RGB-NIR sensor and synchronized NIR excitation illumination, we have demonstrated that the system can acquire both color information and fluorescence signal with high sensitivity under normal surgical lighting illumination. The experimental results show that ICG sample with concentration of 0.13 μM can be detected when the excitation irradiance is 3.92 mW/cm(2) at an exposure time of 10 ms.

  17. Understanding ion association states and molecular dynamics using infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masser, Hanqing

    A molecular level understanding of the ion transport mechanism within polymer electrolytes is crucial to the further development for advanced energy storage applications. This can be achieved by the identification and quantitative measurement of different ion species in the system and further relating them to the ion conductivity. In the first part of this thesis, research is presented towards understanding the ion association states (free ions, ion pairs and ion aggregates) in ionomer systems, and the correlation of ion association states, ion conduction, polymer dynamics, and morphology. Ion conductivity in ionomers can be improved by lowering glass transition temperature, increasing polymer ion solvation ability, and adjusting ionomer structural variables such as ion content, cation type and side chain structure. These effects are studied in three ionomer systems respectively, using a combination of characterization methods. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) identifies and quantifies the ion association states. Dielectric Spectroscopy (DRS) characterizes ion conductivity and polymer and ion dynamics. X-ray scattering reveals changes in morphology. The influence of a cation solvating plasticizer on a polyester ionomer is systematically investigated with respect to ion association states, ion and polymer dynamics and morphology. A decrease in the number ratio of ion aggregates with increased plasticizer content and a slight increase at elevated temperature are observed in FTIR. Similar results are also detected by X-ray scattering. As determined from dielectric spectroscopy, ion conductivity increases with plasticizer content, in accordance with the decrease in glass transition temperature. Research on copolymer of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(tetramethylene oxide) (PTMO) based ionomers further develops an understanding of the trade-off between ion solvation and segmental dynamics. Upon the incorporation of PTMO, the majority of the PTMO

  18. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescent imaging during robotic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Antonio Luiz de Vasconcellos; Schraibman, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The intraoperative identification of certain anatomical structures because they are small or visually occult may be challenging. The development of minimally invasive surgery brought additional difficulties to identify these structures due to the lack of complete tactile sensitivity. A number of different forms of intraoperative mapping have been tried. Recently, the near-infrared fluorescence imaging technology with indocyanine green has been added to robotic platforms. In addition, this technology has been tested in several types of operations, and has advantages such as safety, low cost and good results. Disadvantages are linked to contrast distribution in certain clinical scenarios. The intraoperative near-infrared fluorescent imaging is new and promising addition to robotic surgery. Several reports show the utility of this technology in several different procedures. The ideal dose, time and site for dye injection are not well defined. No high quality evidence-based comparative studies and long-term follow-up outcomes have been published so far. Initial results, however, are good and safe. RESUMO A identificação intraoperatória de certas estruturas anatômicas, por seu tamanho ou por elas serem ocultas à visão, pode ser desafiadora. O desenvolvimento da cirurgia minimamente invasiva trouxe dificuldades adicionais, pela falta da sensibilidade tátil completa. Diversas formas de detecção intraoperatória destas estruturas têm sido tentadas. Recentemente, a tecnologia de fluorescência infravermelha com verde de indocianina foi associada às plataformas robóticas. Além disso, essa tecnologia tem sido testada em uma variedade de cirurgias, e suas vantagens parecem estar ligadas a baixo custo, segurança e bons resultados. As desvantagens estão associadas à má distribuição do contraste em determinados cenários. A imagem intraoperatória por fluorescência infravermelha é uma nova e promissora adição à cirurgia robótica. Diversas séries mostram

  19. An Improved Local Equilibrium Contrast Enhancement Algorithm for Infrared Laser Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Li

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An improved local equilibrium contrast enhancement algorithm based self-adaptive contrast enhancement algorithm is proposed for infrared laser images, in which the image pixel value histogram is divided into three parts: background and noise area, targets area, and uninterested area. The targets parts are highlighted, while the background and noise parts and the uninterested parts are restrained. A comprehensive qualitative and quantitative image enhancement performance evaluation is presented to verify the proposed theory and algorithm validity, efficiency and reasonability. The experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm can greatly improve the global and local contrast for both near infrared images and far infrared laser images while efficiently reducing noise in the infrared laser images,and the visual quality of enhanced image is obviously better than the enhancement of the traditional histogram equalization, double plateaus histogram equalization algorithm, etc.

  20. Investigation into the merits of infrared imaging in the investigation of tattoos postmortem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkie, Alexandra; Birch, Wendy; Ferllini, Roxana; Thompson, Tim J U

    2011-11-01

    Infrared imaging has a history of use in the forensic examination of artwork and documents and is investigated here for its wider use in the detection of tattoos on the human body postmortem. Infrared photographic and reflectographic techniques were tested on 18 living individuals, displaying a total of 30 tattoos. It was observed that neither age, sex, age of the tattoo, nor, most significantly, skin color affected the ability to image the tattoos using infrared imaging techniques. Second, a piglet carcass was tattooed and the impact of the decomposition process on the visibility of the tattoos assessed. Changes were recorded for 17 days and decomposition included partial mummification and skin discoloration. Crucially, the discoloration was recorded as greatly affecting the image quality using conventional photography, but was insignificant to the infrared recording of these tattoos. It was concluded that infrared reflectography was beneficial in the investigation into tattoos postmortem.

  1. Classification of visible and infrared hyperspectral images based on image segmentation and edge-preserving filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Binge; Ma, Xiudan; Xie, Xiaoyun; Ren, Guangbo; Ma, Yi

    2017-03-01

    The classification of hyperspectral images with a few labeled samples is a major challenge which is difficult to meet unless some spatial characteristics can be exploited. In this study, we proposed a novel spectral-spatial hyperspectral image classification method that exploited spatial autocorrelation of hyperspectral images. First, image segmentation is performed on the hyperspectral image to assign each pixel to a homogeneous region. Second, the visible and infrared bands of hyperspectral image are partitioned into multiple subsets of adjacent bands, and each subset is merged into one band. Recursive edge-preserving filtering is performed on each merged band which utilizes the spectral information of neighborhood pixels. Third, the resulting spectral and spatial feature band set is classified using the SVM classifier. Finally, bilateral filtering is performed to remove "salt-and-pepper" noise in the classification result. To preserve the spatial structure of hyperspectral image, edge-preserving filtering is applied independently before and after the classification process. Experimental results on different hyperspectral images prove that the proposed spectral-spatial classification approach is robust and offers more classification accuracy than state-of-the-art methods when the number of labeled samples is small.

  2. Impact of Infrared Lunar Laser Ranging on Lunar Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vishnu; Fienga, Agnès; Manche, Hervé; Gastineau, Mickael; Courde, Clément; Torre, Jean-Marie; Exertier, Pierre; Laskar, Jacques; LLR Observers : Astrogeo-OCA, Apache Point, McDonald Laser Ranging Station, Haleakala Observatory, Matera Laser Ranging Observatory

    2016-10-01

    Since 2015, in addition to the traditional green (532nm), infrared (1064nm) has been the preferred wavelength for lunar laser ranging at the Calern lunar laser ranging (LLR) site in France. Due to the better atmospheric transmission of IR with respect to Green, nearly 3 times the number of normal points have been obtained in IR than in Green [ C.Courde et al 2016 ]. In our study, in addition to the historical data obtained from various other LLR sites, we include the recent IR normal points obtained from Calern over the 1 year time span (2015-2016), constituting about 4.2% of data spread over 46 years of LLR. Near even distribution of data provided by IR on both the spatial and temporal domain, helps us to improve constraints on the internal structure of the Moon modeled within the planetary ephemeris : INPOP [ Fienga et al 2015 ]. IERS recommended models have been used in the data reduction software GINS (GRGS,CNES) [ V.Viswanathan et al 2015 ]. Constraints provided by GRAIL, on the Lunar gravitational potential and Love numbers have been taken into account in the least-square fit procedure. New estimates on the dynamical parameters of the lunar core will be presented.

  3. Remote monitoring of breathing dynamics using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carina Barbosa; Yu, Xinchi; Czaplik, Michael; Rossaint, Rolf; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    An atypical or irregular respiratory frequency is considered to be one of the earliest markers of physiological distress. In addition, monitoring of this vital parameter plays a major role in diagnosis of respiratory disorders, as well as in early detection of sudden infant death syndrome. Nevertheless, the current measurement modalities require attachment of sensors to the patient’s body, leading to discomfort and stress. The current paper presents a new robust algorithm to remotely monitor breathing rate (BR) by using thermal imaging. This approach permits to detect and to track the region of interest (nose) as well as to estimate BR. In order to study the performance of the algorithm, and its robustness against motion and breathing disorders, three different thermal recordings of 11 healthy volunteers were acquired (sequence 1: normal breathing; sequence 2: normal breathing plus arbitrary head movements; and sequence 3: sequence of specific breathing patterns). Thoracic effort (piezoplethysmography) served as “gold standard” for validation of our results. An excellent agreement between estimated BR and ground truth was achieved. Whereas the mean correlation for sequence 1–3 were 0.968, 0.940 and 0.974, the mean absolute BR errors reached 0.33, 0.55 and 0.96 bpm (breaths per minute), respectively. In brief, this work demonstrates that infrared thermography is a promising, clinically relevant alternative for the currently available measuring modalities due to its performance and diverse remarkable advantages. PMID:26601003

  4. Performance characteristics of a submarine panoramic infrared imaging sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J. M.; Waterman, J. R.; Menon, Raghu; Devitt, John

    2010-04-01

    A high-resolution mid-wave infrared panoramic periscope sensor system has been developed. The sensor includes a catadioptric optical system that provides a 360° horizontal azimuth by -10° to +30° elevation field of view without requiring moving components (e.g. rotating mirrors). The focal plane is a 2048 x 2048, 15μm pitch InSb detector operating at 80K. An on-board thermo-electric reference source allows for real-time nonuniformity correction using the two-point correction method. The entire system (detector-dewar assembly, cooler, electronics and optics) is packaged to fit in an 8" high, 6.5" diameter volume. This work describes both the system optics and electronics and presents sample imagery. We also discuss the sensor's radiometric performance, quantified by the NEDT, as a function of key system parameters. The ability of the system to resolve targets as a function of imaged spatial frequency is also presented.

  5. Understanding Synthesis Imaging Dynamic Range

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We develop a general framework for quantifying the many different contributions to the noise budget of an image made with an array of dishes or aperture array stations. Each noise contribution is associated with a relevant correlation timescale and frequency bandwidth so that the net impact in a complete observation can be assessed. All quantities are parameterised as function of observing frequency and the visibility baseline length. We apply the resulting noise budget analysis to a wide range of existing and planned telescope systems that will operate between about 100 MHz and 5 GHz to ascertain their imaging performance and limitations. We conclude that imaging performance is adversely impacted in several respects by small dimensions of the dishes or aperture array stations. It will be more challenging to achieve thermal noise limited performance using 15m class dishes rather than the 25m dishes of current arrays. Some of the performance risks are mitigated by the deployment of phased array feeds and more ...

  6. Doubly Resonant Photonic Antenna for Single Infrared Quantum Dot Imaging at Telecommunication Wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhihua; Lefier, Yannick; Suarez, Miguel Angel; Mivelle, Mathieu; Salut, Roland; Merolla, Jean-Marc; Grosjean, Thierry

    2017-03-24

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have drawn strong interest in the past for their high prospects in scientific, medical, and industrial applications. However, the full characterization of these quantum emitters is currently restricted to the visible wavelengths, and it remains a key challenge to optically probe single CQDs operating in the infrared spectral domain, which is targeted by a growing number of applications. Here, we report the first experimental detection and imaging at room temperature of single infrared CQDs operating at telecommunication wavelengths. Imaging was done with a doubly resonant bowtie nanoaperture antenna (BNA) written at the end of a fiber nanoprobe, whose resonances spectrally fit the CQD absorption and emission wavelengths. Direct near-field characterization of PbS CQDs reveal individual nanocrystals with a spatial resolution of 75 nm (λ/20) together with their intrinsic 2D dipolar free-space emission properties and exciton dynamics (blinking phenomenon). Because the doubly resonant BNA is strongly transmissive at both the CQD absorption and the emission wavelengths, we are able to perform all-fiber nanoimaging with a standard 20% efficiency InGaAs avalanche photodiode (APD). The detection efficiency is predicted to be 3000 fold larger than with a conventional circular aperture tip of the same transmission area. Double resonance BNA fiber probes thus offer the possibility of exploring extreme light-matter interaction in low band gap CQDs with current plug-and-play detection techniques, opening up new avenues in the fields of infrared light-emitting devices, photodetectors, telecommunications, bioimaging, and quantum information technology.

  7. Surface Investigation of Photo-Degraded Wood by Colour Monitoring, Infrared Spectroscopy, and Hyperspectral Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgia Agresti; Giuseppe Bonifazi; Luca Calienno; Giuseppe Capobianco; Angela Lo Monaco; Claudia Pelosi; Rodolfo Picchio; Silvia Serranti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study the changes occurring on the surface of poplar wood exposed to artificial irradiation in a Solar Box. Colour changes were monitored with a reflectance spectrophotometer. Surface chemical modifications were evaluated by measuring the infrared spectra. Hyperspectral imaging was also applied to study the surface wood changes in the visible-near infrared and the short wave infrared wavelength ranges. The data obtained from the different techniques were co...

  8. Evolution of INO Uncooled Infrared Cameras Towards Very High Resolution Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Alain; Jerominek, Hubert; Chevalier, Claude; Le Noc, Loïc; Tremblay, Bruno; Alain, Christine; Martel, Anne; Blanchard, Nathalie; Morissette, Martin; Mercier, Luc; Gagnon, Lucie; Couture, Patrick; Desnoyers, Nichola; Demers, Mathieu; Lamontagne, Frédéric; Lévesque, Frédéric; Verreault, Sonia; Duchesne, François; Lambert, Julie; Girard, Marc; Savard, Maxime; Châteauneuf, François

    2011-02-01

    Along the years INO has been involved in development of various uncooled infrared devices. Todays, the infrared imagers exhibit good resolutions and find their niche in numerous applications. Nevertheless, there is still a trend toward high resolution imaging for demanding applications. At the same time, low-resolution for mass market applications are sought for low-cost imaging solutions. These two opposite requirements reflect the evolution of infrared cameras from the origin, when only few pixel-count FPAs were available, to megapixel-count FPA of the recent years. This paper reviews the evolution of infrared camera technologies at INO from the uncooled bolometer detector capability up to the recent achievement of 1280×960 pixels infrared camera core using INO's patented microscan technology.

  9. Diagnosis potential of near infrared Mueller Matrix imaging for colonic adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Mueller matrix imaging along with polar decomposition method was employed for the colonic adenocarcinoma detection by polarized light in the near-infrared spectral range (700-1100 nm). A high-speed (caner) were acquired. Polar decomposition was further implemented on the 16 images to derive the diattentuation, depolarization, and the retardance images. The decomposed images showed clear margin between the normal and adenocarcinomaous colon tissue samples. The work shows the potential of near-infrared Mueller matrix imaging for the early diagnosis and detection of malignant lesions in the colon.

  10. Wide-Field Infrared Imaging Polarimetry of the NGC 6334 Region: A Nest of Infrared Reflection Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, J; Kandori, R; Kusakabe, N; Nakajima, Y; Kurita, M; Nagata, T; Nagayama, T; Hough, J; Chrysostomou, A

    2008-01-01

    We report the detection of eighteen infrared reflection nebulae (IRNe) in the $J$, $H$, & $Ks$ linear polarimetric observations of the NGC 6334 massive star-formation complex, of which 16 IRNe are new discoveries. Our images cover $\\sim$180 square arcminutes, one of the widest near-infrared polarization data in star-formation regions so far. These IRNe are most likely associated with embedded young OB stars at different evolutionary phases, showing a variety of sizes, morphologies, and polarization properties, which can be divided into four categories. We argue the different nebula characteristics to be a possible evolutionary sequence of circumstellar structures around young massive stars.

  11. Design of the infrared imaging chain for the PRISM hyperspectral imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartois, Thierry; Giordanengo, Muriel; Ribet, Jean-Luc; Del Bello, Umberto

    2000-12-01

    ALCATEL has recently studied an infrared imaging chain, in the frame of phase A studies for the Land Surface Processes and Interactions Mission (LSPIM), which was one of the four candidate Core Missions for the European Space Agency Earth Explorer Program. The LSPIM satellite carries a single optical payload named PRISM (Processes Research by an Imaging Space Mission). PRISM is a multispectral imager based on the push broom imaging principle, operating at approximately 679 km altitude with a NADIR swath of 50 km associated to a 50 m spatial resolution. The paper presented herewith summarizes the results of the IR imaging chains study: composed of two IR focal planes (SWIR and TIR) integrated in dedicated ALCATEL dewars (one for each FPA), two proximity electronic modules and a common analog processing unit delivering digital video data to the one board mass memory unit (MMU). The main specifications of the detectors and electronic units are presented, a baseline of the imaging chain architecture complying with the requirements is then proposed with the main achieved trades off. The concept and associated performances of cutting-edge cooling systems are also introduced in this paper.

  12. Image fusion based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform for infrared and visible light image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu, Jianhua; Gan, Jianhong; Wang, Yan; Huang, Jian

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, a new method based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT) is proposed to fuse the infrared image and the visible light image, which will produce a new fused image by which the target can be identified more easily. Firstly, two original images were decomposed into low frequency subband coefficients and the bandpass direction subband coefficients by using NSCT. Secondly, the selection of the low frequency subband coefficient and the bandpass direction subband coefficient is discussed in detail. The low frequency subband coefficients are selected based on the regional visual characteristics. For the selection of bandpass direction subband coefficients, this paper proposes a minimum regional cross-gradient method, and the cross-gradient is gained by calculating the gradient between the pixel of bandpass subbands and the adjacent pixel in the fused image of the low-frequency components. Comparison experiments have been performed on different image sets, and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method performs better in both subjective and objective qualities.

  13. High dynamic range images for enhancing low dynamic range content

    OpenAIRE

    Banterle, Francesco; Dellepiane, Matteo; Scopigno, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    This poster presents a practical system for enhancing the quality of Low Dynamic Range (LDR) videos using High Dynamic Range (HDR) background images. Our technique relies on the assumption that the HDR information is static in the video footage. This assumption can be valid in many scenarios where moving subjects are the main focus of the footage and do not have to interact with moving light sources or highly reflective objects. Another valid scenario is teleconferencing via webcams, where th...

  14. Understanding synthesis imaging dynamic range

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We develop a general framework for quantifying the many different contributions to the noise budget of an image made with an array of dishes or aperture array stations. Each noise contribution to the visibility data is associated with a relevant correlation timescale and frequency bandwidth so that the net impact on a complete observation can be assessed. All quantities are parameterised as function of observing frequency and the visibility baseline length. We apply the resulting noise budget...

  15. NIR Capturing images with spectral information in the mid-infrared

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    We demonstrate a method to capture images containing spectral information in the infrared. The method is based on sum frequency mixing of light, which allows for transformation of mid-infrared radiation to near visible light, allowing for use of a regular silicon based camera for detection. Combi...

  16. Physical Simulator of Infrared Spectroradiometer with Spatial Resolution Enhancement Using Subpixel Image Registration and Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyalko, V.І.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical and physical models of the new frame infrared spectroradiometer based on microbolometer array sensor with subpixel image registration are presented. It is planned to include the radiometer into onboard instrumentation of the future «Sich» satellite system for the land surface physical characterization by enhanced spatial resolution infrared space imagery.

  17. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  18. Infrared imaging enhances retinal crystals in Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Vikram S; Benson, William H

    2015-01-01

    Infrared imaging dramatically increased the number of crystalline deposits visualized compared with clinical examination, standard color fundus photography, and red free imaging in patients with Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy. We believe that this imaging modality significantly improves the sensitivity with which these lesions are detected, facilitating earlier diagnosis and may potentially serve as a prognostic indicator when examined over time. PMID:25931805

  19. Mako airborne thermal infrared imaging spectrometer: performance update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey L.; Boucher, Richard H.; Buckland, Kerry N.; Gutierrez, David J.; Keim, Eric R.; Tratt, David M.; Warren, David W.

    2016-09-01

    The Aerospace Corporation's sensitive Mako thermal infrared imaging spectrometer, which operates between 7.6 and 13.2 microns at a spectral sampling of 44 nm, and flies in a DeHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otter, has undergone significant changes over the past year that have greatly increased its performance. A comprehensive overhaul of its electronics has enabled frame rates up to 3255 Hz and noise reductions bringing it close to background-limited. A replacement diffraction grating whose peak efficiency was tuned to shorter wavelength, coupled with new AR coatings on certain key optics, has improved the performance at the short wavelength end by a factor of 3, resulting in better sensitivity for methane detection, for example. The faster frame rate has expanded the variety of different scan schemes that are possible, including multi-look scans in which even sizeable target areas can be scanned multiple times during a single overpass. Off-nadir scanning to +/-56.4° degrees has also been demonstrated, providing an area scan rate of 33 km2/minute for a 2-meter ground sampling distance (GSD) at nadir. The sensor achieves a Noise Equivalent Spectral Radiance (NESR) of better than 0.6 microflicks (μf, 10-6 W/sr/cm2/μm) in each of the 128 spectral channels for a typical airborne dataset in which 4 frames are co-added. An additional improvement is the integration of a new commercial 3D stabilization mount which is significantly better at compensating for aircraft motions and thereby maintains scan performance under quite turbulent flying conditions. The new sensor performance and capabilities are illustrated.

  20. Evaluation of Pyro-optic Materials for Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R. K.; Kotru, Sushma; Song, Xiuyu; Donnelly, David

    2004-03-01

    Infrared detectors are needed for a wide range of applications. IR detectors operate either on the principles of photon detection or pyroelectric detection. Both these systems have their respective advantages and disadvantages. However, both of them inherently have difficulties in management of noise to signal ratio and in read-out circuitory. One of the most serious handicaps of photon detectors is requirement of cryogenic cooling for satisfactory operation. In this respect uncooled pyroelectric detectors operating at above room temperature have an advantage. An alternative to these approaches can be pyro-optic based detectors. Only a handful of materials have been found with some satisfactory level of pyro-optic coefficients appropriate for imaginig devices. Some of them are: antimony-sulfo-iodide (SbSI), molybdenum sulfide (MoS2), bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) and Pb-based titanates. Pyrooptic coefficients of these materials have been reported using presumably bulk single crystals. However, no such data are available for their thin films which would be very important for light weight integrated structured devices.In this paper we will describe the parameters and optimization protocol for the growh of thin films of these materials on thermally insulating substrates. We will also discuss their structural, electrical and optical properties. Our investigations suggest that SbSI, BiVO4 and PNZT films are attractive options for advancing the IR detecting technology by utilizing the pyro-optic effect. Integrated thin film structures might lead to the fabrication of light weight, low cost, noise immune and efficient imaging devices based on pyro-optic properties. This research is sponsored by the DEPSCoR program of the U.S. Army Research Office.

  1. Infrared and Visual Image Fusion through Fuzzy Measure and Alternating Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiangzhi

    2015-01-01

    The crucial problem of infrared and visual image fusion is how to effectively extract the image features, including the image regions and details and combine these features into the final fusion result to produce a clear fused image. To obtain an effective fusion result with clear image details, an algorithm for infrared and visual image fusion through the fuzzy measure and alternating operators is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the alternating operators constructed using the opening and closing based toggle operator are analyzed. Secondly, two types of the constructed alternating operators are used to extract the multi-scale features of the original infrared and visual images for fusion. Thirdly, the extracted multi-scale features are combined through the fuzzy measure-based weight strategy to form the final fusion features. Finally, the final fusion features are incorporated with the original infrared and visual images using the contrast enlargement strategy. All the experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm is effective for infrared and visual image fusion. PMID:26184229

  2. Quantum dynamic imaging theoretical and numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Misha

    2011-01-01

    Studying and using light or "photons" to image and then to control and transmit molecular information is among the most challenging and significant research fields to emerge in recent years. One of the fastest growing areas involves research in the temporal imaging of quantum phenomena, ranging from molecular dynamics in the femto (10-15s) time regime for atomic motion to the atto (10-18s) time scale of electron motion. In fact, the attosecond "revolution" is now recognized as one of the most important recent breakthroughs and innovations in the science of the 21st century. A major participant in the development of ultrafast femto and attosecond temporal imaging of molecular quantum phenomena has been theory and numerical simulation of the nonlinear, non-perturbative response of atoms and molecules to ultrashort laser pulses. Therefore, imaging quantum dynamics is a new frontier of science requiring advanced mathematical approaches for analyzing and solving spatial and temporal multidimensional partial differ...

  3. Infrared near-field imaging and spectroscopy based on thermal or synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peragut, Florian; De Wilde, Yannick, E-mail: yannick.dewilde@espci.fr [ESPCI ParisTech, PSL Research University, CNRS, Institut Langevin, 1 rue Jussieu, F-75005, Paris (France); Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale [Société Civile Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, St-Aubin BP48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-06-23

    We demonstrate the coupling of a scattering near-field scanning optical microscope combined with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The set-up operates using either the near-field thermal emission from the sample itself, which is proportional to the electromagnetic local density of states, or with an external infrared synchrotron source, which is broadband and highly brilliant. We perform imaging and spectroscopy measurements with sub-wavelength spatial resolution in the mid-infrared range on surfaces made of silicon carbide and gold and demonstrate the capabilities of the two configurations for super-resolved near-field mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging and that the simple use of a properly chosen bandpass filter on the detector allows one to image the spatial distribution of materials with sub-wavelength resolution by studying the contrast in the near-field images.

  4. Airborne Thematic Thermal InfraRed and Electro-Optical Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is an advanced Airborne Thematic Thermal InfraRed and Electro-Optical Imaging System (ATTIREOIS). ATTIREOIS sensor payload consists of two sets of...

  5. Characterization of porcine skin as a model for human skin studies using infrared spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Rong; Bhargava, Rohit

    2011-06-07

    Porcine skin is often considered a substitute for human skin based on morphological and functional data, for example, for transdermal drug diffusion studies. A chemical, structural and temporal characterization of porcine skin in comparison to human skin is not available but will likely improve our understanding of this porcine skin model. Here, we employ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging to holistically measure chemical species as well as spatial structure as a function of time to characterize porcine skin as a model for human skin. Porcine skin was found to resemble human skin spectroscopically and differences are elucidated. Cryo-prepared fresh porcine skin samples for spectroscopic imaging were found to be stable over time and small variations are observed. Hence, we extended characterization to the use of this model for dynamic processes. In particular, the capacity and stability of this model in transdermal diffusion is examined. The results indicate that porcine skin is likely to be an attractive tool for studying diffusion dynamics of materials in human skin.

  6. Enhanced dynamic range x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidekker, Mark A; Morrison, Logan Dain-Kelley; Sharma, Ajay; Burke, Emily

    2017-03-01

    X-ray images can suffer from excess contrast. Often, image exposure is chosen to visually optimize the region of interest, but at the expense of over- and underexposed regions elsewhere in the image. When image values are interpreted quantitatively as projected absorption, both over- and underexposure leads to the loss of quantitative information. We propose to combine multiple exposures into a composite that uses only pixels from those exposures in which they are neither under- nor overexposed. The composite image is created in analogy to visible-light high dynamic range photography. We present the mathematical framework for the recovery of absorbance from such composite images and demonstrate the method with biological and non-biological samples. We also show with an aluminum step-wedge that accurate recovery of step thickness from the absorbance values is possible, thereby highlighting the quantitative nature of the presented method. Due to the higher amount of detail encoded in an enhanced dynamic range x-ray image, we expect that the number of retaken images can be reduced, and patient exposure overall reduced. We also envision that the method can improve dual energy absorptiometry and even computed tomography by reducing the number of low-exposure ("photon-starved") projections.

  7. An infrared image super-resolution reconstruction method based on compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuxing; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Jintao; Jia, Haiwei

    2016-05-01

    Limited by the properties of infrared detector and camera lens, infrared images are often detail missing and indistinct in vision. The spatial resolution needs to be improved to satisfy the requirements of practical application. Based on compressive sensing (CS) theory, this thesis presents a single image super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) method. With synthetically adopting image degradation model, difference operation-based sparse transformation method and orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm, the image SRR problem is transformed into a sparse signal reconstruction issue in CS theory. In our work, the sparse transformation matrix is obtained through difference operation to image, and, the measurement matrix is achieved analytically from the imaging principle of infrared camera. Therefore, the time consumption can be decreased compared with the redundant dictionary obtained by sample training such as K-SVD. The experimental results show that our method can achieve favorable performance and good stability with low algorithm complexity.

  8. Multi-window visual saliency extraction for fusion of visible and infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jufeng; Gao, Xiumin; Chen, Yueting; Feng, Huajun; Wang, Daodang

    2016-05-01

    Fusion for visible and infrared images aims to combine the source images of the same scene into a single image with more feature information and better visual performance. In this paper, the authors propose a fusion method based on multi-window visual saliency extraction for visible and infrared images. To extract feature information from infrared and visible images, we design local-window-based frequency-tuned method. With this idea, visual saliency maps are calculated for variable feature information under different local window. These maps show the weights of people's attention upon images for each pixel and region. Enhanced fusion is done using simple weight combination way. Compared with the classical and state-of-the-art approaches, the experimental results demonstrate the proposed approach runs efficiently and performs better than other methods, especially in visual performance and details enhancement.

  9. Chemical Imaging of Heterogeneous Muscle Foods Using Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging in Transmission Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, Jens Petter; Kermit, Martin; Segtnan, Vegard Herman

    2016-06-01

    Foods and biomaterials are, in general, heterogeneous and it is often a challenge to obtain spectral data which are representative for the chemical composition and distribution. This paper presents a setup for near-infrared (NIR) transmission imaging where the samples are completely trans-illuminated, probing the entire sample. The system measures falling samples at high speed and consists of an NIR imaging scanner covering the spectral range 760-1040 nm and a powerful line light source. The investigated samples were rather big: whole pork bellies of thickness up to 5 cm, salmon fillets with skin, and 3 cm thick model samples of ground pork meat. Partial least square regression models for fat were developed for ground pork and salmon fillet with high correlations (R = 0.98 and R = 0.95, respectively). The regression models were applied at pixel level in the hyperspectral transmission images and resulted in images of fat distribution where also deeply embedded fat clearly contributed to the result. The results suggest that it is possible to use transmission imaging for rapid, nondestructive, and representative sampling of very heterogeneous foods. The proposed system is suitable for industrial use. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Multicolour single molecule imaging in cells with near infra-red dyes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Tynan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The autofluorescence background of biological samples impedes the detection of single molecules when imaging. The most common method of reducing the background is to use evanescent field excitation, which is incompatible with imaging beyond the surface of biological samples. An alternative would be to use probes that can be excited in the near infra-red region of the spectrum, where autofluorescence is low. Such probes could also increase the number of labels that can be imaged in multicolour single molecule microscopes. Despite being widely used in ensemble imaging, there is a currently a shortage of information available for selecting appropriate commercial near infra-red dyes for single molecule work. It is therefore important to characterise available near infra-red dyes relevant to multicolour single molecule imaging. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A range of commercially available near infra-red dyes compatible with multi-colour imaging was screened to find the brightest and most photostable candidates. Image series of immobilised samples of the brightest dyes (Alexa 700, IRDye 700DX, Alexa 790 and IRDye 800CW were analysed to obtain the mean intensity of single dye molecules, their photobleaching rates and long period blinking kinetics. Using the optimum dye pair, we have demonstrated for the first time widefield, multi-colour, near infra-red single molecule imaging using a supercontinuum light source in MCF-7 cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have demonstrated that near infra-red dyes can be used to avoid autofluorescence background in samples where restricting the illumination volume of visible light fails or is inappropriate. We have also shown that supercontinuum sources are suited to single molecule multicolour imaging throughout the 470-1000 nm range. Our measurements of near infra-red dye properties will enable others to select optimal dyes for single molecule imaging.

  11. Synergies between Visible/Near-Infrared imaging spectrometry and the Thermal Infrared in an urban environment: An evaluation of the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D. A.; Quattrochi, D. A.; Hulley, G. C.; Hook, S.; Green, R. O.

    2011-12-01

    More than half of humanity lives in urban areas, projected to exceed 80% by 2015. Urban areas are major sources of environmental contaminants and sinks of energy and materials. Globally, remote sensing contributes to improved understanding of urban impacts through mapping urban extent, vegetation and impervious cover fractions and urban energy balance including albedo, emissivity and land surface temperature (LST). HyspIRI is a NRC "Decadal Survey" mission combining a visible, near-infrared and shortwave infrared (VSWIR) imaging spectrometer with a multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) instrument . Potential synergies between VSWIR and TIR data were explored using analogous airborne data acquired over Santa Barbara in June, 2008. These data were analyzed at their native spatial resolutions (7.5m VSWIR and 15m TIR), and aggregated 60 m spatial resolution similar to HyspIRI. A spectral library of common urban materials (e.g., grass, trees, soil, roofs, roads) was built from field and airborne-measured spectra . LST and emissivity were also retrieved from the airborne data. Co-located pixels from airborne data were used to generate reflectance/emissivity spectra for a subset of urban materials. Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) was used to map fractions of impervious, soil, green vegetation (GV) and non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) at the different spatial resolutions and to compare the fractional estimates across spatial scales. Surface energy parameters, including albedo, vegetation cover fraction, broadband emissivity and LST were also determined for urban and natural land-cover classes in the region. Fractions were validated using 1m digital photography. GV and NPV Fractions were highly correlated with validation data at all spatial scales, producing a near 1:1 relationship but with a 0.95) including vegetation, water and asphalt, and low emissivity surfaces (types, beach sands and senesced grass. Residential and commercial areas showed a

  12. In vivo imaging of Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum and Escherichiacoli expressing infrared fluorescent protein in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Berlec, Aleš; Štrukelj, Borut; Završnik, Janja; Turk, Boris; Butinar, Miha

    2016-01-01

    Background In vivo imaging of orally administered lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and commensal bacteria in mice is shown to provide information on the spatial and temporal distribution of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. The bacteria can be detected and monitored using bioluminescence or near-infrared fluorescence. Results Fluorescence imaging of bacteria was established by expressing the infrared fluorescent protein IRFP713 in Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum and Escherichia co...

  13. Study of Raynaud’s Phenomenon by Means of Infrared Functional Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Raynaud’s Phenomenon , Infrared Imaging I. INTRODUCTION Raynaud � s phenomenon is usually defined as an episodic vasoconstriction, in...CONCLUSIONS In this paper, we present a novel approach to the estimation of Raynaud � s phenomenon based on infrared functional imaging. The INT...1932. 2. Bukhari E, Herrick AL, Moore T, Manning J and MLV Jayson: Increased nailfold capillary dimensions in primary Raynaud � s phenomenon and

  14. Dynamic metamaterial aperture for microwave imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleasman, Timothy; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Gollub, Jonah N.; Smith, David R. [Center for Metamaterials and Integrated Plasmonics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, 27708 (United States)

    2015-11-16

    We present a dynamic metamaterial aperture for use in computational imaging schemes at microwave frequencies. The aperture consists of an array of complementary, resonant metamaterial elements patterned into the upper conductor of a microstrip line. Each metamaterial element contains two diodes connected to an external control circuit such that the resonance of the metamaterial element can be damped by application of a bias voltage. Through applying different voltages to the control circuit, select subsets of the elements can be switched on to create unique radiation patterns that illuminate the scene. Spatial information of an imaging domain can thus be encoded onto this set of radiation patterns, or measurements, which can be processed to reconstruct the targets in the scene using compressive sensing algorithms. We discuss the design and operation of a metamaterial imaging system and demonstrate reconstructed images with a 10:1 compression ratio. Dynamic metamaterial apertures can potentially be of benefit in microwave or millimeter wave systems such as those used in security screening and through-wall imaging. In addition, feature-specific or adaptive imaging can be facilitated through the use of the dynamic aperture.

  15. Dynamic NMR cardiac imaging in a piglet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, M.; Rzedzian, R.; Mansfield, P. (Nottingham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Coupland, R.E. (Nottingham Univ. (UK). Queen' s Medical Centre)

    1983-12-01

    NMR echo-planar imaging (EPI) has been used in a real-time mode to visualise the thorax of a live piglet. Moving pictures are available on an immediate image display system which demonstrates dynamic cardiac function. Frame rates vary from one per cardiac cycle in a prospective stroboscopic mode with immediate visual output to a maximum of 10 frames per second yielding up to six looks in one piglet heart cycle, but using a visual playback mode. A completely new system has been used to obtain these images, features of which include a probe assembly with 22 cm access and an AP400 array processor for real-time data processing.

  16. Surface Investigation of Photo-Degraded Wood by Colour Monitoring, Infrared Spectroscopy, and Hyperspectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Agresti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to study the changes occurring on the surface of poplar wood exposed to artificial irradiation in a Solar Box. Colour changes were monitored with a reflectance spectrophotometer. Surface chemical modifications were evaluated by measuring the infrared spectra. Hyperspectral imaging was also applied to study the surface wood changes in the visible-near infrared and the short wave infrared wavelength ranges. The data obtained from the different techniques were compared to find the possible correlations in order to evaluate the applicability of the Hyperspectral imaging to investigate wood modifications in a non-invasive modality. The study of colour changes showed an important variation due to photo-irradiation which is the greatest change occurring within the first 24 hours. Infrared spectroscopy revealed that lignin degrades mainly in the first 48 hours. Concerning Hyperspectral imaging, the spectral features in the visible-near infrared range are mainly linked to the spectral shape, whereas in the short wave infrared cellulose and lignin affect shape and reflectance levels. The proposed approach showed that a correlation can be established between colour variation and wood degradation in the visible-near infrared range; furthermore in the short wave infrared region surface chemical changes can be assessed.

  17. Infrared imaging enhances retinal crystals in Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brar VS

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vikram S Brar, William H Benson Department of Ophthalmology, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA Abstract: Infrared imaging dramatically increased the number of crystalline deposits visualized compared with clinical examination, standard color fundus photography, and red free imaging in patients with Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy. We believe that this imaging modality significantly improves the sensitivity with which these lesions are detected, facilitating earlier diagnosis and may potentially serve as a prognostic indicator when examined over time. Keywords: Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy, infrared imaging, spectral domain optical coherence tomography

  18. Infrared Lunar Laser Ranging at Calern : Impact on Lunar Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vishnu; Fienga, Agnes; Manche, Herve; Gastineau, Mickael; Courde, Clement; Torre, Jean Marie; Exertier, Pierre; Laskar, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Introduction: Since 2015, in addition to the traditional green (532nm), infrared (1064nm) has been the preferred wavelength for lunar laser ranging at the Calern lunar laser ranging (LLR) site in France. Due to the better atmospheric transmission of IR with respect to Green, nearly 3 times the number of normal points have been obtained in IR than in Green [1]. Dataset: In our study, in addition to the historical data obtained from various other LLR sites, we include the recent IR normal points obtained from Calern over the 1 year time span (2015-2016), constituting about 4.2% of data spread over 46 years of LLR. Near even distribution of data provided by IR on both the spatial and temporal domain, helps us to improve constraints on the internal structure of the Moon modeled within the planetary ephemeris : INPOP [2]. Data reduction: IERS recommended models have been used in the data reduction software GINS (GRGS,CNES) [3]. Constraints provided by GRAIL [4], on the Lunar gravitational potential and Love numbers have been taken into account in the least-square fit procedure. Earth orientation parameters from KEOF series have been used as per a recent study [5]. Results: New estimates on the dynamical parameters of the lunar core will be presented. Acknowledgements: We thank the lunar laser ranging observers at Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, France, McDonald Observatory, Texas, Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, and Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico for providing LLR observations that made this study possible. The research described in this abstract was carried out at Geoazur-CNRS, France, as a part of a PhD thesis funded by Observatoire de Paris and French Ministry of Education and Research. References: [1] Clement C. et al. (2016) submitted to A&A [2] Fienga A. et al. (2015) Celest Mech Dyn Astr, 123: 325. doi:10.1007/s10569-015-9639-y [3] Viswanathan V. et al. (2015) EGU, Abstract 18, 13995 [4] Konopliv A. S. et al. (2013) J. Geophys. Res. Planets, 118, 1415

  19. Infrared microscopy imaging applied to obtain the index finger pad's thermoregulation curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viafora, Laura A.; Torres, Sergio N.; Ramírez, Wagner; Gutiérrez, Pablo A.; Machuca, Guillermo; Jara, Anselmo

    2017-03-01

    In this work, mid wavelength infrared microscopy imaging videos of several index finger pads, from voluntary people, are recorded to obtain their thermoregulation curves. The proposed non-invasive technique is able to capture spatial and temporal thermal information emitted from blood vessels under-skin, and the irrigation finger pad system, making possible to capture features that a visual-spectrum microscopy cannot detect. Using an infrared laboratory prepared method several voluntary patients exposed theirs fingers to thermal stress while the infrared data is recorded. Using standard infrared imaging and signal processing techniques the thermoregulation curves are estimated. The Cold/Hot Stress experiments have shown infrared data with exponential trend curves, with different recovering slopes for each voluntary person, and sometimes with two steps increasing slope in one person thermoregulation curve response.

  20. Megapixel digital InSb detector for midwave infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkedy, Lior; Markovitz, Tuvy; Calahorra, Zipi; Hirsh, Itay; Shtrichman, Itay

    2011-06-01

    Since the late 1990s Semiconductor devices (SCDs) has developed and manufactured a variety of InSb two-dimensional (2D) focal plane arrays (FPAs) that were implemented in many infrared (IR) systems and applications. SCD routinely manufactures both analog and digital InSb FPAs with array formats of 320×256, 480×384, and 640×512 elements, and pitch size in the range 15 to 30 μm. These FPAs are available in many packaging configurations, including fully integrated detector-Dewar-cooler-assembly, with either closed-cycle Stirling or open-loop Joule-Thomson coolers. In response to a need for very high resolution midwave IR (MWIR) detectors and systems, SCD has developed a large format 2D InSb detector with 1280×1024 elements and pixel size of 15 μm. A digital readout integrated circuit (ROIC) is coupled by flip-chip bonding to the megapixel InSb array. The ROIC is fabricated in CMOS 0.18-μm technology, that enables the small pixel circuitry and relatively low power generation at the focal plane. The digital ROIC has an analog to digital (A/D) converter per-channel and allows for full frame readout at a rate of 100 Hz. Such on-chip A/D conversion eliminates the need for several A/D converters with fairly high power consumption at the system level. The digital readout, together with the InSb detector technology, lead to a wide linear dynamic range and low residual nonuniformity, which is stable over a long period of time following a nonuniformity correction procedure. A special Dewar was designed to withstand harsh environmental conditions while minimizing the contribution to the heat load of the detector. The Dewar together with the low power ROIC, enable a megapixel detector with overall low size, weight, and power with respect to comparable large format detectors. A variety of applications with this detector make use of different cold shields with different f-number and spectral filters. In this paper we present actual performance characteristics of the

  1. Near-infrared autofluorescence imaging for colonic cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xiaozhuo; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2009-11-01

    We explore an NIR autofluorescence imaging technique for cancer diagnosis and detection. A set of tissue images including NIR white light images, autofluorescence (AF) images and fluorescence polarized images (FPI) (parallel-, and perpendicular- polarization) were acquired in tandem on human colonic tissues. The results show that NIR fluorescence intensity of normal tissue is significantly higher than that of cancer tissue. The perpendicular-polarization image yields the highest diagnostic accuracy 93% compared to other imaging modes. This work demonstrates that Fluorescence polarization imaging (FPI) technique has great potential for cancer diagnosis and detection in the colon.

  2. Framework for 2D-3D image fusion of infrared thermography with preoperative MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Nico; Weidner, Florian; Urban, Peter; Meyer, Tobias; Schnabel, Christian; Radev, Yordan; Schackert, Gabriele; Petersohn, Uwe; Koch, Edmund; Gumhold, Stefan; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2017-01-23

    Multimodal medical image fusion combines information of one or more images in order to improve the diagnostic value. While previous applications mainly focus on merging images from computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonic and single-photon emission computed tomography, we propose a novel approach for the registration and fusion of preoperative 3D MRI with intraoperative 2D infrared thermography. Image-guided neurosurgeries are based on neuronavigation systems, which further allow us track the position and orientation of arbitrary cameras. Hereby, we are able to relate the 2D coordinate system of the infrared camera with the 3D MRI coordinate system. The registered image data are now combined by calibration-based image fusion in order to map our intraoperative 2D thermographic images onto the respective brain surface recovered from preoperative MRI. In extensive accuracy measurements, we found that the proposed framework achieves a mean accuracy of 2.46 mm.

  3. Real-time functional near-infrared imager and imaging of human brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Gong, Hui; Chen, Weiguo; Zhang, Zhi; Chance, Britton

    1999-02-01

    A real time functional near infrared imager (fNIRI) was introduced. The imager was controlled by a computer and the signals from the detectors were converted and processed in real time. A user-friendly software was programmed with Visual C++ language. Relative changes of oxy - Hb, Hb, and total blood concentration in 16 channels and the corresponding images can be displayed in real time on the computer. The imager was used as a real time monitor in psychological tests to record the response of the frontal cortex of human subjects. In mental work and pattern recognition tests, we recorded oxygen consumption and blood flow changes of volunteers' frontal cortex. The psychological results showed that the lower part of the left frontal gyres had intensive relation to pattern recognition and has definite boundaries. However, the mental work involved more zones of the frontal gyres and may be a complex conceptual model. The results also suggested that the human brain has an precise and complicated adjustability. The oxygen supplement in the stimulated area increased as the neuron stimulation.

  4. Design of visible/long-wave infrared dual-band imaging optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingzhi; Lai, Jianjun; Huang, Ying

    2016-10-01

    An efficient small size and low weight optical lens system covering the visible and long-wave infrared dual-band is designed. The chromatic aberration caused by the wide bands from visible to long-wave infrared is one of the tough problems though large efforts have been done in the related communities. In this paper, for materials used as the base of the achromatic design, we choose two suitable materials (Zns and Kbr) that allow transmission both of visible and long-wave infrared (LWIR) light. Though the two materials have proved the ability to correct three wavelengths for each spectral range, the correction from the materials compensation is not enough and aspheric even diffractive surface was selected to join this optical system for reducing the aberration. The design results show a good image quality for infrared band imaging while the corresponding visible imaging is acceptable to be used to extract the outline of objects.

  5. Contrast enhancement of mid and far infrared images of subcutaneous veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor-Mora, Carlos; Sanchez-Marin, Francisco J.; Garay-Sevilla, Maria E.

    2008-01-01

    A simple procedure to enhance the contrast of infrared images of subcutaneous veins is presented. This procedure implies the topical application of a substance which modifies the energy transfer process from the veins to the sensor of the infrared camera. After the application of the substance, energy is transferred in such a way that the image contrast is enhanced up to more than 400% of its original value. The duration of the effect spans for more than 11 min which is enough for many practical applications. This effect is shown through a series of infrared images of the hand, the foot and the neck of human subjects. The infrared spectra of the applied substance are presented to explain the related phenomena. The proposed procedure is innocuous, easy to achieve, time efficient, and of low cost.

  6. Evaluation of Mobile Phone Performance for Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Wang, Bohan; Wang, Jianting; Wang, Quanzeng; Chen, Yu; Pfefer, T Joshua

    2016-08-19

    We have investigated the potential for contrast-enhanced near-infrared fluorescence imaging of tissue on a mobile phone platform. CCD- and phone-based cameras were used to image molded and 3Dprinted tissue phantoms, and an ex vivo animal model. Quantitative and qualitative evaluations of image quality demonstrate the viability of this approach and elucidate variations in performance due to wavelength, pixel color and image processing.

  7. Overcoming Dynamic Disturbances in Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eric W.; Dente, Gregory C.; Lyon, Richard G.; Chesters, Dennis; Gong, Qian

    2000-01-01

    We develop and discuss a methodology with the potential to yield a significant reduction in complexity, cost, and risk of space-borne optical systems in the presence of dynamic disturbances. More robust systems almost certainly will be a result as well. Many future space-based and ground-based optical systems will employ optical control systems to enhance imaging performance. The goal of the optical control subsystem is to determine the wavefront aberrations and remove them. Ideally reducing an aberrated image of the object under investigation to a sufficiently clear (usually diffraction-limited) image. Control will likely be distributed over several elements. These elements may include telescope primary segments, telescope secondary, telescope tertiary, deformable mirror(s), fine steering mirror(s), etc. The last two elements, in particular, may have to provide dynamic control. These control subsystems may become elaborate indeed. But robust system performance will require evaluation of the image quality over a substantial range and in a dynamic environment. Candidate systems for improvement in the Earth Sciences Enterprise could include next generation Landsat systems or atmospheric sensors for dynamic imaging of individual, severe storms. The technology developed here could have a substantial impact on the development of new systems in the Space Science Enterprise; such as the Next Generation Space Telescope(NGST) and its follow-on the Next NGST. Large Interferometric Systems of non-zero field, such as Planet Finder and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure, could benefit. These systems most likely will contain large, flexible optormechanical structures subject to dynamic disturbance. Furthermore, large systems for high resolution imaging of planets or the sun from space may also benefit. Tactical and Strategic Defense systems will need to image very small targets as well and could benefit from the technology developed here. We discuss a novel

  8. High resolution near-infrared imaging of submillimeter galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, Paula; Menanteau, Felipe; Lutz, Dieter; Tacconi, Linda J

    2013-01-01

    We present F110W (~J) and F160W (~H) observations of ten submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) NICMOS camera. Our targets have optical redshifts in the range 2.20imaging and/or previous dynamical evidence we identify five SMGs as multiple sources, which we interpret as merging systems. Additionally, we calculate morphological parameters asymmetry (A) and Gini coefficient (G); thanks to our sample's limited redshift range we recover the trend that multiple-component, merger-like morphologies are reflected in high...

  9. Research on MR-SVD based visual and infrared image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yajun; Xiao, Junbo; Yang, Jinbao; Chai, Zhi; Wu, Yuanliang

    2016-10-01

    Transform domain based visual and infrared image fusion method is an important research direction. All kinds of natural images could not be expressed effectively by wavelet transform with only one kind of wavelet basis functions due to the high redundancies of its linear and curve singularity expression. Multi-resolution singular value decomposition (MR-SVD) computed the transformation matrix from the original image. With the computed transformation matrix, the original image is decomposed to unrelated "smooth" and the "detail" components. On each layer of the smooth components, the singular value decomposition (SVD) is used to replace the wavelet filter, realizing the multi-level decomposition. A novel visual and infrared image fusion algorithm is presented because of the better sparsity and adaptability of multi-resolution singular value decomposition (MR-SVD), which could resolve the difficult problem of wavelet function basis selection for different kind of visual and infrared images. The same transformation matrixes computed from original visual or infrared imagery used to decompose the original images with MR-SVD, which could reduce the blurring problem of fusion image got by the average transformation matrixes. Then, cycle spinning is employed to remove the artifacts in the fusion image. experimental results according to both the subjective and objective criteria, including the average, standard deviation and average MI, indicate that the proposed method could get better fusion results compared to methods like wavelet transform.

  10. Dynamic Image Stitching for Panoramic Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Yu Shieh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The design of this paper is based on the Dynamic image titching for panoramic video. By utilizing OpenCV visual function data library and SIFT algorithm as the basis for presentation, this article brings forward Gaussian second differenced MoG which is processed basing on DoG Gaussian Difference Map to reduce order in synthesizing dynamic images and simplify the algorithm of the Gaussian pyramid structure. MSIFT matches with overlapping segmentation method to simplify the scope of feature extraction in order to enhance speed. And through this method traditional image synthesis can be improved without having to take lots of time in calculation and being limited by space and angle. This research uses four normal Webcams and two IPCAM coupled with several-wide angle lenses. By using wide-angle lenses to monitor over a wide range of an area and then by using image stitching panoramic effect is achieved. In terms of overall image application and control interface, Microsoft Visual Studio C# is adopted to a construct software interface. On a personal computer with 2.4-GHz CPU and 2-GB RAM and with the cameras fixed to it, the execution speed is three images per second, which reduces calculation time of the traditional algorithm.

  11. Photothermal Mid-Infrared Microscopy: a new tool for hyperspectral chemical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertiri, Alket; Hong, Mi; Sander, Michelle; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

    2014-03-01

    We describe a method for label free microscopy in the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum based on the photothermal effect. A Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) tuned to an infrared active vibrational molecular normal mode is used as the pump laser. A low-phase noise Erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser (1.5 μm) is used as the probe. We demonstrate the method using a patterned image target with liquid crystal 4-cyano-4-octylbiphenyl (8CB) as the mid-infrared absorber. The QCL is tuned across the C-H scissoring band, with a peak absorption at 1607cm-1. Absorption of the modulated pump beam results in a change in the dielectric function and the refractive index at the probe beam frequency. The resultant scatter of the probe is observed in heterodyne lock-in detection. The combination of heterodyne detection, high brightness mid-infrared QCLs and low-phase noise stable EDF lasers provides an ultra-sensitive method for obtaining mid-infrared microscope images using short-wavelength optical detectors, whose performance far exceeds those of cryogenically cooled broadband mid-infrared detectors. The method provides a powerful new tool for hyperspectral label-free mid-infrared imaging.

  12. Latent evidence detection using a combination of near infrared and high dynamic range photography: an example using bloodstains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, John; Montes, Ronald

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we use bloodstains to illustrate an approach for identifying latent evidence on dark cloth using near infrared (NIR) photography combined with high dynamic range (HDR) photography techniques. NIR photography alone has been used to capture latent evidence that cannot be seen in normal ambient light. HDR techniques combine multiple bracketed photographs of the same image to increase the dynamic range of the photograph which can provide greater contrast. Using NIR photography alone, we were able to detect a bloodstain up to a 1/16 dilution, an improvement over previous studies. Combining NIR photography with the HDR process resulted in a noticeable increase in visibility up to 1/16 dilution when compared to NIR photographs alone. At 1/32 dilution, we were able to detect bloodstains that were not visible using NIR alone. NIR is a useful tool for imaging latent evidence, and combining NIR with HDR consistently provides better results over NIR alone.

  13. Global ENA Imaging of Earth's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between singly charged ions of Earth's magnetosphere and its neutral exosphere and upper atmosphere gives rise to Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs). This has enabled several missions to remotely image the global injection dynamics of the ring current and plasma sheet, the outflow of ions from Earth's polar regions, and the location of the sub-solar magnetopause. In this presentation we review ENA observations by the Astrid, IMAGE, TWINS and IBEX missions. We focus on results from the IMAGE/HENA Camera including observations of proton and oxygen ion injections in to the ring current and their impact on the force-balance and ionospheric coupling in the inner magnetosphere. We report also on the status of inversion techniques for retrieving the ion spatial and pitch-angle distributions from ENA images. The presentation concludes with a discussion of future next steps in ENA instrumentation and analysis capabilities required to deliver the science as recommended by the Heliophysics Decadal Survey.

  14. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Martin O

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation.

  15. On the importance of image formation optics in the design of infrared spectroscopic imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerich, David; van Dijk, Thomas; Walsh, Michael J; Schulmerich, Matthew V; Carney, P Scott; Bhargava, Rohit

    2014-08-21

    Infrared spectroscopic imaging provides micron-scale spatial resolution with molecular contrast. While recent work demonstrates that sample morphology affects the recorded spectrum, considerably less attention has been focused on the effects of the optics, including the condenser and objective. This analysis is extremely important, since it will be possible to understand effects on recorded data and provides insight for reducing optical effects through rigorous microscope design. Here, we present a theoretical description and experimental results that demonstrate the effects of commonly-employed cassegranian optics on recorded spectra. We first combine an explicit model of image formation and a method for quantifying and visualizing the deviations in recorded spectra as a function of microscope optics. We then verify these simulations with measurements obtained from spatially heterogeneous samples. The deviation of the computed spectrum from the ideal case is quantified via a map which we call a deviation map. The deviation map is obtained as a function of optical elements by systematic simulations. Examination of deviation maps demonstrates that the optimal optical configuration for minimal deviation is contrary to prevailing practice in which throughput is maximized for an instrument without a sample. This report should be helpful for understanding recorded spectra as a function of the optics, the analytical limits of recorded data determined by the optical design, and potential routes for optimization of imaging systems.

  16. Research on Gaussian distribution preprocess method of infrared multispectral image background clutter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟; 武春风; 邓盼; 范宁

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a sliding-window mean removal high pass filter by which background clutter of infrared multispectral image is obtained. The method of selecting the optimum size of the sliding-window is based on the skewness-kurtosis test. In the end, a multivariate Gaussian distribution mathematical expression of background clutter image is given.

  17. Fusion of infrared and visible images based on saliency scale-space in frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanfei; Sang, Nong; Dan, Zhiping

    2015-12-01

    A fusion algorithm of infrared and visible images based on saliency scale-space in the frequency domain was proposed. Focus of human attention is directed towards the salient targets which interpret the most important information in the image. For the given registered infrared and visible images, firstly, visual features are extracted to obtain the input hypercomplex matrix. Secondly, the Hypercomplex Fourier Transform (HFT) is used to obtain the salient regions of the infrared and visible images respectively, the convolution of the input hypercomplex matrix amplitude spectrum with a low-pass Gaussian kernel of an appropriate scale which is equivalent to an image saliency detector are done. The saliency maps are obtained by reconstructing the 2D signal using the original phase and the amplitude spectrum, filtered at a scale selected by minimizing saliency map entropy. Thirdly, the salient regions are fused with the adoptive weighting fusion rules, and the nonsalient regions are fused with the rule based on region energy (RE) and region sharpness (RS), then the fused image is obtained. Experimental results show that the presented algorithm can hold high spectrum information of the visual image, and effectively get the thermal targets information at different scales of the infrared image.

  18. Do Infants Recognize the Arcimboldo Images as Faces? Behavioral and Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Megumi; Otsuka, Yumiko; Nakato, Emi; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K.; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2012-01-01

    Arcimboldo images induce the perception of faces when shown upright despite the fact that only nonfacial objects such as vegetables and fruits are painted. In the current study, we examined whether infants recognize a face in the Arcimboldo images by using the preferential looking technique and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). In the first…

  19. A Validation Study of Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Lymphatic Vessels in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groenlund, Jacob Hinnerup; Telinius, Niklas; Skov, Soeren Nielsen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is a new imaging technique that is used to visualize lymphatic vessels in humans. It has a high spatial and temporal resolution, allowing real-time visualization of lymphatic flow. METHODS AND RESULTS: The current study investigated the intra...

  20. High-contrast Near-infrared Imaging Polarimetry of the Protoplanetary Disk around RY TAU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takami, M.; Karr, J.L.; Hashimoto, J.; Kim, H.; Wisniewski, J.; Henning, T.; Grady, C.A.; Kandori, R.; Hodapp, K.W.; Kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Chou, M.-Y.; Itoh, Y.; Momose, M.; Mayama, S.; Currie, T.; Follette, K.B.; Kwon, J.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Brandt, T.D.; Carson, J.; Egner, S.E.; Feldt, M.; Guyon, O.; Hayano, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, S.; Ishii, M.; Iye, M.; Janson, M.; Knapp, G.R.; Kuzuhara, M.; McElwain, M.W.; Matsuo, T.; Miyama, S.; Morino, J.-I.; Moro-Martin, A.; Nishimura, T.; Pyo, T.-S.; Serabyn, E.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Takato, N.; Terada, H.; Thalmann, C.; Tomono, D.; Turner, E.L.; Watanabe, M.; Yamada, T.; Takami, H.; Usuda, T.; Tamura, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present near-infrared coronagraphic imaging polarimetry of RY Tau. The scattered light in the circumstellar environment was imaged at the H band at a high resolution (~0.''05) for the first time, using Subaru/HiCIAO. The observed polarized intensity (PI) distribution shows a butterfly-like distri

  1. Improved pulse-coupled neural network for target segmentation in infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangwei; Huang, Jing; Shi, Hao

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents a new image segmentation algorithm based on the pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) and histogram method for infrared images. The proposed algorithm abandons entirely the mechanism of the time exponential decaying function and uses the results of the gray-level histogram analysis as the interior thresholds of PCNN, meanwhile, it keeps the advantage of briding small spatial gaps and minor intensity variations. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can get more complete region and edge information in infrared images. It is also of much lower complexity and of high speed than the original one.

  2. Characterization of materials for optimal near-infrared and x-ray imaging of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelsen, Kelly; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Pogue, Brian W; Brooks, Ken; Defreitas, Ken; Shaw, Ian; Poplack, Steven P; Paulsen, Keith D

    2012-09-01

    Development of a detector case for complete co-registration of images in a non-fiber-based combined near-infrared spectral tomography and digital breast tomosynthesis, required analysis to find materials that could support a breast under full mammographic compression without affecting the x-ray images or the quality of the near infrared measurements. Several possible solutions were considered, and many types of plastics were tested in the development of the detector case. Light channeling within the detector case changed the data obtained in resin and agarose phantoms, lowering recovered absorption values. Additional developments focusing on blocking stray light were successful and permitted a normal subject imaging exam.

  3. Processing of polarimetric infrared images for landmine detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremer, F.; Jong, W. de; Schutte, K.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared (IR) cameras are often used in a vehicle based multi-sensor platform for landmine detection. Additional to thermal contrasts, an IR polarimetric sensor also measures surface properties and therefore has the potential of increased detection performance. We have developed a polarimetric IR se

  4. Infrared multiphoton microscopy: subcellular-resolved deep tissue imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andresen, V.; Alexander, S.; Heupel, W.M.; Hirschberg, M.; Hoffman, R.M.; Friedl, P.H.A.

    2009-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is the method of choice for investigating cells and cellular functions in deep tissue sections and organs. Here we present the setup and applications of infrared-(IR-)MPM using excitation wavelengths above 1080 nm. IR-MPM enables the use of red fluorophores and

  5. New Frontiers for Applications of Thermal Infrared Imaging Devices: Computational Psychopshysiology in the Neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Daniela; Merla, Arcangelo

    2017-05-05

    Thermal infrared imaging has been proposed, and is now used, as a tool for the non-contact and non-invasive computational assessment of human autonomic nervous activity and psychophysiological states. Thanks to a new generation of high sensitivity infrared thermal detectors and the development of computational models of the autonomic control of the facial cutaneous temperature, several autonomic variables can be computed through thermal infrared imaging, including localized blood perfusion rate, cardiac pulse rate, breath rate, sudomotor and stress responses. In fact, all of these parameters impact on the control of the cutaneous temperature. The physiological information obtained through this approach, could then be used to infer about a variety of psychophysiological or emotional states, as proved by the increasing number of psychophysiology or neurosciences studies that use thermal infrared imaging. This paper presents a review of the principal achievements of thermal infrared imaging in computational psychophysiology, focusing on the capability of the technique for providing ubiquitous and unwired monitoring of psychophysiological activity and affective states. It also presents a summary on the modern, up-to-date infrared sensors technology.

  6. Image Classifying Registration and Dynamic Region Merging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himadri Nath Moulick

    2013-07-01

    account spatial variations of intensity dependencies while keeping a good registration accuracy. And the addresses the automatic image segmentation problem in a region merging style. With an initially over-segmented image, in which the many regions (or super-pixels with homogeneous color aredetected, image segmentation is performed by iteratively merging the regions according to a statistical test. There are two essential issues in a region merging algorithm: order of merging and the stopping criterion. In the proposed algorithm, these two issues are solved by a novel predicate, which is defined by the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT and the minimal cost criterion. Starting from an over-segmented image, neighboring regions are progressively merged if there is an evidence for merging according to this predicate. We show that the merging order follows the principle of dynamic programming. This formulates image segmentation as an inference problem, where the final segmentation is established based on the observed image. We also prove that the produced segmentation satisfies certain global properties. In addition, a faster algorithm is developed to accelerate the region merging process, which maintains a nearest neighbor graph (NNG in each iteration. Experiments on real natural images are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed dynamic region merging algorithm.

  7. HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, Paula [Departamento de Astronomia, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Baker, Andrew J.; Menanteau, Felipe [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Lutz, Dieter; Tacconi, Linda J., E-mail: paguirre@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: ajbaker@physics.rutgers.edu, E-mail: felipe@physics.rutgers.edu, E-mail: lutz@mpe.mpg.de, E-mail: linda@mpe.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2013-05-10

    We present F110W ({approx}J) and F160W ({approx}H) observations of 10 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) NICMOS camera. Our targets have optical redshifts in the range 2.20 {<=} z {<=} 2.81 confirmed by millimeter CO or mid-IR spectroscopy, guaranteeing that the two bands sample the rest-frame optical with the Balmer break falling between them. Eight of ten are detected in both bands, while two are detected in F160W only. We study their F160W morphologies, applying a maximum-deblending detection algorithm to distinguish multiple- from single-component configurations, leading to reassessments for several objects. Based on our NICMOS imaging and/or previous dynamical evidence we identify five SMGs as multiple sources, which we interpret as merging systems. Additionally, we calculate morphological parameter asymmetry (A) and the Gini coefficient (G); thanks to our sample's limited redshift range we recover the trend that multiple-component, merger-like morphologies are reflected in higher asymmetries. We analyze the stellar populations of nine objects with F110W/F160W photometry, using archival HST optical data when available. For multiple systems, we are able to model the individual components that build up an SMG. With the available data we cannot discriminate among star formation histories, but we constrain stellar masses and mass ratios for merger-like SMG systems, obtaining a mean log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) = 10.9 {+-} 0.2 for our full sample, with individual values log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) {approx} 9.6-11.8. The morphologies and mass ratios of the least and most massive systems match the predictions of the major-merger and cold accretion SMG formation scenarios, respectively, suggesting that both channels may have a role in the population's origin.

  8. A Review of Mid-Infrared and Near-Infrared Imaging: Principles, Concepts and Applications in Plant Tissue Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Türker-Kaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cells, tissues and organs are composed of various biomolecules arranged as structurally diverse units, which represent heterogeneity at microscopic levels. Molecular knowledge about those constituents with their localization in such complexity is very crucial for both basic and applied plant sciences. In this context, infrared imaging techniques have advantages over conventional methods to investigate heterogeneous plant structures in providing quantitative and qualitative analyses with spatial distribution of the components. Thus, particularly, with the use of proper analytical approaches and sampling methods, these technologies offer significant information for the studies on plant classification, physiology, ecology, genetics, pathology and other related disciplines. This review aims to present a general perspective about near-infrared and mid-infrared imaging/microspectroscopy in plant research. It is addressed to compare potentialities of these methodologies with their advantages and limitations. With regard to the organization of the document, the first section will introduce the respective underlying principles followed by instrumentation, sampling techniques, sample preparations, measurement, and an overview of spectral pre-processing and multivariate analysis. The last section will review selected applications in the literature.

  9. A Review of Mid-Infrared and Near-Infrared Imaging: Principles, Concepts and Applications in Plant Tissue Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker-Kaya, Sevgi; Huck, Christian W

    2017-01-20

    Plant cells, tissues and organs are composed of various biomolecules arranged as structurally diverse units, which represent heterogeneity at microscopic levels. Molecular knowledge about those constituents with their localization in such complexity is very crucial for both basic and applied plant sciences. In this context, infrared imaging techniques have advantages over conventional methods to investigate heterogeneous plant structures in providing quantitative and qualitative analyses with spatial distribution of the components. Thus, particularly, with the use of proper analytical approaches and sampling methods, these technologies offer significant information for the studies on plant classification, physiology, ecology, genetics, pathology and other related disciplines. This review aims to present a general perspective about near-infrared and mid-infrared imaging/microspectroscopy in plant research. It is addressed to compare potentialities of these methodologies with their advantages and limitations. With regard to the organization of the document, the first section will introduce the respective underlying principles followed by instrumentation, sampling techniques, sample preparations, measurement, and an overview of spectral pre-processing and multivariate analysis. The last section will review selected applications in the literature.

  10. High dynamic range imaging sensors and architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Darmont, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Illumination is a crucial element in many applications, matching the luminance of the scene with the operational range of a camera. When luminance cannot be adequately controlled, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system may be necessary. These systems are being increasingly used in automotive on-board systems, road traffic monitoring, and other industrial, security, and military applications. This book provides readers with an intermediate discussion of HDR image sensors and techniques for industrial and non-industrial applications. It describes various sensor and pixel architectures capable

  11. Airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over disseminated gold deposits, Osgood Mountains, Humboldt County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, M. Dennis

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acquired airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over several disseminated gold deposits in northern Nevada in 1983. The aerial surveys were flown to determine whether TIMS data could depict jasperoids (siliceous replacement bodies) associated with the gold deposits. The TIMS data were collected over the Pinson and Getchell Mines in the Osgood Mountains, the Carlin, Maggie Creek, Bootstrap, and other mines in the Tuscarora Mountains, and the Jerritt Canyon Mine in the Independence Mountains. The TIMS data seem to be a useful supplement to conventional geochemical exploration for disseminated gold deposits in the western United States. Siliceous outcrops are readily separable in the TIMS image from other types of host rocks. Different forms of silicification are not readily separable, yet, due to limitations of spatial resolution and spectral dynamic range. Features associated with the disseminated gold deposits, such as the large intrusive bodies and fault structures, are also resolvable on TIMS data. Inclusion of high-resolution thermal inertia data would be a useful supplement to the TIMS data.

  12. Near-infrared imaging system for detecting small organic foreign substances in foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Hiroto; Genta, Tsuneaki; Ishii, Yuya; Ishiyama, Takeshi; Arai, Shinichi; Fukuda, Mitsuo

    2013-09-01

    Contamination of foodstuffs with foreign substances is a serious problem because it often has negative effects on consumer health. However, detection of small organic substances in foods can be difficult because they are undetectable with traditional inspection apparatus. In this work, we developed new equipment that can detect small organic contaminant substances in food at high speed using a near-infrared (NIR) imaging technique. The absorption spectra of various foods were measured, and the spectra showed low absorbance at wavelengths from 600 nm to 1150 nm. Based on the observable wavelength range of a CMOS camera, which has a high dynamic range, superluminescent diodes (SLDs) with a wavelength of 830 nm were selected as light sources. We arranged 40 SLDs on a flat panel and placed a diffusion panel over them. As a result, uniformly distributed light with an intensity of 0.26 mW/cm2 illuminated an area of 6.0 cm × 6.0 cm. Insects (3 mm wide) and hairs (0.1 mm in diameter) were embedded in stacked ham slices and in chocolate, with a total thickness of 5 mm in each case, and the transmission images were observed. Both insects and hairs were clearly observed as dark shadows with high contrast. We also compensated the images by using software developed in this study to eliminate low spatial frequency components in the images and improve the sharpness and contrast. As a result, the foreign substances were more clearly distinguished in the 5-mm-thick ham.

  13. Infrared-Induced Sluggish Dynamics in the GeSbTe Electron Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadyahu, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The electron-glass dynamics of Anderson-localized GeSbTe films is dramatically slowed down following a brief infrared illumination that increases the system carrier concentration (and thus its conductance). These results demonstrate that the dynamics exhibited by electron glasses is more sensitive to carrier concentration than to disorder. In turn, this seems to imply that many-body effects such as the orthogonality catastrophe must play a role in the sluggish dynamics observed in the intrinsic electron glasses.

  14. The Influence of Chain Dynamics on theFar-Infrared Spectrum of Liquid Methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, K.N.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-07-11

    Far-infrared absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate the low frequency ({center_dot} 100 cm{sup -1}) intermolecular interactions in liquid methanol. Using an intense source of far-infrared radiation, modes are elucidated at approximately 30 cm{sup -1} and 70 cm{sup -1} in the absorption spectrum. These modes are believed to arise from intermolecular bending and librational motions respectively and are successfully reproduced in an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of methanol.

  15. Evidence for Dynamical Changes in a Transitional Protoplanetary Disk with Mid-infrared Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Muzerolle, James; Balog, Zoltan; Furlan, Elise; Smith, Paul S; Allen, Lori; Calvet, Nuria; D'Alessio, Paola; Megeath, S Thomas; Muench, August; Rieke, George H; Sherry, William H

    2009-01-01

    We present multi-epoch Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transitional disk LRLL 31 in the 2-3 Myr-old star forming region IC 348. Our measurements show remarkable mid-infrared variability on timescales as short as one week. The infrared continuum emission exhibits systematic wavelength-dependent changes that suggest corresponding dynamical changes in the inner disk structure and variable shadowing of outer disk material. We propose several possible sources for the structural changes, including a variable accretion rate or a stellar or planetary companion embedded in the disk. Our results indicate that variability studies in the infrared can provide important new constraints on protoplanetary disk behavior.

  16. Novel infrared image enhancement technology based on the frequency compensation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yuhua; He, Rulong; Lin, Haitao

    2016-05-01

    A novel infrared image enhancement method has been proposed in this paper. Our aim is to develop a detail enhancement method which is focused on the frequency feature of the image. The proposed method is following the most popular strategy of enhancing the infrared images nowadays, but concentrating on the frequency domain. Firstly, the original image is separated by a guided image filter into detail layer and the base layer. Quite unlike the traditional methods, we use the guided image filter to eliminate most of the noise and weak signal of the scenario. Then, by a designed iteration process, the higher frequency of the scenario will be calculated back and add to the detail layer. The noise will not be enhanced because the iteration is only focused on the leftover scenario frequency. We run many tests on the raw data captured by the 320 × 256 HgCdTe cooled thermal imager, and make a comparison between our approach with the previous method of bilateral filtering digital detail enhancement and guided image filtering digital detail enhancement. Figures and analytical data show that our method is better than the previous proposed researches. Our method could effectively process the infrared image with less noise and artifacts, which has potential applications in testing, manufacturing, chemical imaging, night vision, and surveillance security.

  17. Detection of subsurface defects in metal materials using infrared thermography; Image processing and finite element modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjit, Shrestha; Kim, Won Tae [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Infrared thermography is an emerging approach to non-contact, non-intrusive, and non-destructive inspection of various solid materials such as metals, composites, and semiconductors for industrial and research interests. In this study, data processing was applied to infrared thermography measurements to detect defects in metals that were widely used in industrial fields. When analyzing experimental data from infrared thermographic testing, raw images were often not appropriate. Thus, various data analysis methods were used at the pre-processing and processing levels in data processing programs for quantitative analysis of defect detection and characterization; these increased the infrared non-destructive testing capabilities since subtle defects signature became apparent. A 3D finite element simulation was performed to verify and analyze the data obtained from both the experiment and the image processing techniques.

  18. The technology of generating infrared image based on electric heating film technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan; Feng, Yun-song; Qiao, Ya

    2011-08-01

    The technology of generating infrared image based on electric heating film technology by its resistance per unit area was studied. A Lifgt-off-road vehicle was used as an object to be simulated. An infrared thermograph was used to photography the light-off-road vehicle from a specific corner. As a result several infrared images of the light-off-road vehicle were obtained and the thermal distribution of the vehicle was also obtained at the same time. A matlab program was used to process the image. The image was divided into several areas according to its grey level. Each area has its own temperature range. The average temperature of each area was calculated. A thermal balance equation was established according to the average temperature of each area and the environment temperature. By solving these equations, the radiant existances of these areas were gotten. The heating power per unit area of these areas was calculated. The electric heating film was preparation accordingly. The power was applied on the film and the infrared thermograph was used to observe it. The infrared image of the film has a high similarity with the true light-off-road vehicle's.

  19. A method to measure internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qijie; Chang, Songtao; Li, Zhou; He, Fengyun; Qiao, Yanfeng

    2017-03-01

    The suppression level of internal stray radiation is a key criterion for infrared imaging systems, especially for high-precision cryogenic infrared imaging systems. To achieve accurate measurement for internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures, a measurement method, which is based on radiometric calibration, is presented in this paper. First of all, the calibration formula is deduced considering the integration time, and the effect of ambient temperature on internal stray radiation is further analyzed in detail. Then, an approach is proposed to measure the internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures. By calibrating the system under two ambient temperatures, the quantitative relation between the internal stray radiation and the ambient temperature can be acquired, and then the internal stray radiation of the cryogenic infrared imaging system under various ambient temperatures can be calculated. Finally, several experiments are performed in a chamber with controllable inside temperatures to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method can be used to measure internal stray radiation with high accuracy at various ambient temperatures and integration times. The proposed method has some advantages, such as simple implementation and the capability of high-precision measurement. The measurement results can be used to guide the stray radiation suppression and to test whether the internal stray radiation suppression performance meets the requirement or not.

  20. Infrared imaging of cotton fiber bundles using a focal plane array detector and a single reflectance accessory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infrared imaging is gaining attention as a technique used in the examination of cotton fibers. This type of imaging combines spectral analysis with spatial resolution to create visual images that examine sample composition and distribution. Herein, we report the use of an infrared instrument equippe...

  1. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Enhanced (NIR-FE) Molecular Imaging of Live Cells on Gold Substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Guosong; Welsher, Kevin; Chen, Zhuo; Robinson, Joshua T; Wang, Hailiang; Zhang, Bo; Dai, Hongjie

    2011-01-01

    Low quantum yields of near infrared (NIR) fluorophores have limited their capabilities as imaging probes in a transparent, low background imaging window. Here for the first time we reported near-infrared fluorescence enhance (NIR-FE) cell imaging using nanostructured Au substrate, which was employed as a general platform for both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and organic fluorescent labels in the NIR region. Fluorescence intensity, as well as cell targeting specificity, was greatly improved by this novel imaging technique. With NIR-FE imaging, we were able to image SWNT-stained cells at short exposure time of 300ms, and push the detectable limit of SWNT staining of cells down to an ultralow concentration of ~50 pM. Further, different degrees of fluorescence enhancement for endocytosed, intracellular SWNTs vs. nanotubes on the cell membrane at the cell/gold interface were observed, suggesting the possibility of using this technique to track the transmembrane behavior of NIR fluorophores.

  2. Infrared spectromicroscopy and magneto-optical imaging stations at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, S; Sada, T; Okuno, M; Matsunami, M; Shinoda, K; Kimura, H; Moriwaki, T; Yamagata, M; Kondo, Y; Yoshimatsu, Y; Takahashi, T; Fukui, K; Kawamoto, T; Ishikawa, T

    2001-01-01

    At the BL43IR of SPring-8, infrared microanalysis on various kinds of solid specimens under multiple environments with a spatial resolution smaller than 10 mu m in diameter is planned in the infrared region. In order to perform such analysis, two different stations, a multipurpose spectromicroscopy apparatus and a magneto-optical imaging one have been constructed. Measurements on the spatial two-dimensional cross-section of the infrared beam at the spectromicroscopy station have proven that the stations have a good prospective feature in the performance.

  3. Near-Infrared Hyper-spectral Image Analysis of Astaxanthin Concentration in Fish Feed Coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungqvist, Martin Georg; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Kobayashi, K.;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of predicting concentration levels of synthetic astaxanthin coating of aquaculture feed pellets by hyper-spectral image analysis in the near infra-red (NIR) range and optical filter design. The imaging devices used were a Videometer...... for prediction of the concentration level. The results show that it is possible to predict the level of synthetic astaxanthin coating using either hyper-spectral imaging or three bandpass filters (BPF)....

  4. Remote sensing for gas plume monitoring using state-of-the-art infrared hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    1999-02-01

    Under contract to the US Air Force and Navy, Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a very sensitive hyperspectral imaging infrared camera that can perform remote imaging spectro-radiometry. One of the most exciting applications for this technology is in the remote monitoring of gas plume emissions. Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) currently has the technology available to detect and identify chemical species in gas plumes using a small light weight infrared camera the size of a camcorder. Using this technology as a remote sensor can give advanced warning of hazardous chemical vapors undetectable by the human eye as well as monitor the species concentrations in a gas plume from smoke stack and fugitive leaks. Some of the gas plumes that have been measured and species detected using an IMSS imaging spectrometer are refinery smoke stacks plumes with emission of CO2, CO, SO2, NOx. Low concentration vapor unseen by the human eye that has been imaged and measured is acetone vapor evaporating at room temperature. The PAT hyperspectral imaging sensor is called 'Image Multi-spectral Sensing or IMSS.' The IMSS instrument uses defractive optic technology and exploits the chromatic aberrations of such lenses. Using diffractive optics for both imaging and dispersion allows for a very low cost light weight robust imaging spectrometer. PAT has developed imaging spectrometers that span the spectral range from the visible, midwave infrared (3 to 5 microns) and longwave infrared (8 to 12 microns) with this technology. This paper will present the imaging spectral data that we have collected on various targets with our hyperspectral imaging instruments as will also describe the IMSS approach to imaging spectroscopy.

  5. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  6. Motility Contrast Imaging and Tissue Dynamics Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, David D.; An, Ran; Turek, John

    Motion is the defining physiological characteristic of living matter. If we are interested in how things function, then the way they move is most informative. Motion provides an endogenous and functional suite of biomarkers that are sensitive to subtle changes that occur under applied pharmacological doses or cellular stresses. This chapter reviews the application of biodynamic imaging to measure cellular dynamics in three-dimensional tissue culture for drug screening applications. Nanoscale and microscale motions are detected through statistical fluctuations in dynamic speckle across an ensemble of cells within each resolution voxel. Tissue dynamics spectroscopy generates drug-response spectrograms that serve as phenotypic fingerprints of drug action and can differentiate responses from heterogeneous regions of tumor tissue.

  7. Natural-color and color-infrared image mosaics of the Colorado River corridor in Arizona derived from the May 2009 airborne image collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    The Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) periodically collects airborne image data for the Colorado River corridor within Arizona (fig. 1) to allow scientists to study the impacts of Glen Canyon Dam water release on the corridor’s natural and cultural resources. These data are collected from just above Glen Canyon Dam (in Lake Powell) down to the entrance of Lake Mead, for a total distance of 450 kilometers (km) and within a 500-meter (m) swath centered on the river’s mainstem and its seven main tributaries (fig. 1). The most recent airborne data collection in 2009 acquired image data in four wavelength bands (blue, green, red, and near infrared) at a spatial resolution of 20 centimeters (cm). The image collection used the latest model of the Leica ADS40 airborne digital sensor (the SH52), which uses a single optic for all four bands and collects and stores band radiance in 12-bits. Davis (2012) reported on the performance of the SH52 sensor and on the processing steps required to produce the nearly flawless four-band image mosaic (sectioned into map tiles) for the river corridor. The final image mosaic has a total of only 3 km of surface defects in addition to some areas of cloud shadow because of persistent inclement weather during data collection. The 2009 four-band image mosaic is perhaps the best image dataset that exists for the entire Arizona part of the Colorado River. Some analyses of these image mosaics do not require the full 12-bit dynamic range or all four bands of the calibrated image database, in which atmospheric scattering (or haze) had not been removed from the four bands. To provide scientists and the general public with image products that are more useful for visual interpretation, the 12-bit image data were converted to 8-bit natural-color and color-infrared images, which also removed atmospheric scattering within each wavelength-band image. The conversion required an evaluation of the

  8. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Kang, Misun [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Cheng, Chu-Lin [ORNL; Horita, Jusuke [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  9. Small-target leak detection for a closed vessel via infrared image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling; Yang, Hongjiu

    2017-03-01

    This paper focus on a leak diagnosis and localization method based on infrared image sequences. Some problems on high probability of false warning and negative affect for marginal information are solved by leak detection. An experimental model is established for leak diagnosis and localization on infrared image sequences. The differential background prediction is presented to eliminate the negative affect of marginal information on test vessel based on a kernel regression method. A pipeline filter based on layering voting is designed to reduce probability of leak point false warning. A synthesize leak diagnosis and localization algorithm is proposed based on infrared image sequences. The effectiveness and potential are shown for developed techniques through experimental results.

  10. Near-infrared imaging survey of faint companions around young dwarfs in the Pleiades cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoichi Itoh; Yumiko Oasa; Hitoshi Funayama; Masahiko Hayashi; Misato Fukagawa; Toshio Hashiguchi; Thayne Currie

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a near-infrared imaging survey of 11 young dwarfs in the Pleiades cluster using the Subaru Telescope and the near-infrared coronagraph imager.We found ten faint point sources, with magnitudes as faint as 20 mag in the K-band,with around seven dwarfs. Comparison with the Spitzer archive images revealed that a pair of the faint sources around V 1171 Tau is very red in infrared wavelengths, which indicates very low-mass young stellar objects. However, the results of our follow-up proper motion measurements implied that the central star and the faint sources do not share common proper motions, suggesting that they are not physically associated.

  11. Detection and Characterization of Package Defects and Integrity Failure using Dynamic Scanning Infrared Thermography (DSIRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Scott A

    2016-02-01

    A dynamic scanning infrared thermography (DSIRT) system developed at the Univ. of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) Packaging Lab relies on variation in transient thermal artifacts to indicate defects, and offers the possibility of characterization of many types of materials and structures. These include newer polymer and laminate-based structures for shelf-stable foods that lack a reliable, nondestructive method for inspection, which is a continuing safety issue. Preliminary trials were conducted on a polyester/aluminum foil/polypropylene retort pouch laminate containing artificially-induced failed seal and insulating inclusion defects ranging from 1 to 10 mm wide in the plane of the seal. The samples were placed in relative motion to a laterally positioned infrared laser, inducing heating through the plane of the seal. The emergent thermal artifact on the obverse side was sensed using either a bolometer camera or a thermopile sensor, with thermal anomalies indicating potential defects and the results of each sensors were compared. The bolometer camera detected defects to the limit of its measured optical resolution-approximately 1 mm at 20 cm-although the lower-resolution thermopile sensors were only capable of detecting 5 mm defects even at closer distances of approximately 5 mm. In addition, a supplementary magnification system was fitted to the bolometer camera which increased resolution but reduced field of view and would require a much higher frame rate to be useful. Automatic processing of the image data rapidly detected the model defects and can lead to development of an automated inspection system.  Much higher material throughput speeds are feasible using faster instruments, and the system is scalable. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Infrared image segmentation based on region of interest extraction with Gaussian mixture modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Seokwon

    2017-05-01

    Infrared (IR) imaging has the capability to detect thermal characteristics of objects under low-light conditions. This paper addresses IR image segmentation with Gaussian mixture modeling. An IR image is segmented with Expectation Maximization (EM) method assuming the image histogram follows the Gaussian mixture distribution. Multi-level segmentation is applied to extract the region of interest (ROI). Each level of the multi-level segmentation is composed of the k-means clustering, the EM algorithm, and a decision process. The foreground objects are individually segmented from the ROI windows. In the experiments, various methods are applied to the IR image capturing several humans at night.

  13. Ralph: A Visible/Infrared Imager for the New Horizons Pluto/Kuiper Belt Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Reuter, Dennis C; Scherrer, John; Jennings, Donald E; Baer, James; Hanley, John; Hardaway, Lisa; Lunsford, Allen; McMuldroch, Stuart; Moore, Jeffrey; Olkin, Cathy; Parizek, Robert; Reitsma, Harold; Sabatke, Derek; Spencer, John; Stone, John; Throop, Henry; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Weigle, Gerald E; Young, Leslie A

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons instrument named Ralph is a visible/near infrared multi-spectral imager and a short wavelength infrared spectral imager. It is one of the core instruments on New Horizons, NASA's first mission to the Pluto/Charon system and the Kuiper Belt. Ralph combines panchromatic and color imaging capabilities with IR imaging spectroscopy. Its primary purpose is to map the surface geology and composition of these objects, but it will also be used for atmospheric studies and to map the surface temperature. It is a compact, low-mass (10.5 kg), power efficient (7.1 W peak), and robust instrument with good sensitivity and excellent imaging characteristics. Other than a door opened once in flight, it has no moving parts. These characteristics and its high degree of redundancy make Ralph ideally suited to this long-duration flyby reconnaissance mission.

  14. Classification of Infrared Monitor Images of Coal Using an Feature Texture Statistics and Improved BP Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It is very important to accurately recognize and locate pulverized and block coal seen in a coal mine's infrared image monitoring system.Infrared monitor images of pulverized and block coal were sampled in the roadway of a coal mine.Texture statistics from the grey level dependence matrix were selected as the criterion for classification.The distributions of the texture statistics were calculated and analysed.A normalizing function was added to the front end of the BP network with one hidden layer.An additional classification layer is joined behind the linear layer.The recognition of pulverized from block coal images was tested using the improved BP network.The results of the experiment show that texture variables from the grey level dependence matrix can act as recognizable features of the image.The innovative improved BP network can then recognize the pulverized and block coal images.

  15. Semiconducting Polymer Nanoparticles with Persistent Near-Infrared Luminescence for In Vivo Optical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palner, Mikael; Pu, Kanyi; Shao, Shirley; Rao, Jianghong

    2015-09-21

    Materials with persistent luminescence are attractive for in vivo optical imaging since they have a long lifetime that allows the separation of excitation of fluorophores and image acquisition for time-delay imaging, thus eliminating tissue autofluorescence associated with fluorescence imaging. Persistently luminescent nanoparticles have previously been fabricated from toxic rare-earth metals. This work reports that nanoparticles made of the conjugated polymer MEH-PPV can generate luminescence persisting for an hour upon single excitation. A near-infrared dye was encapsulated in the conjugated polymer nanoparticle to successfully generate persistent near-infrared luminescence through resonance energy transfer. This new persistent luminescence nanoparticles have been demonstrated for optical imaging applications in living mice.

  16. Directly imaged L-T transition exoplanets in the mid-infrared {sup ,}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Morzinski, Katie M.; Leisenring, Jarron M.; Close, Laird M.; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Defrere, Denis; Follette, Katherine B.; Males, Jared R.; Rodigas, Timothy J. [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Marley, Mark S. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS-245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Skrutskie, Michael F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Saumon, Didier [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop F663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Briguglio, Runa; Esposito, Simone; Puglisi, Alfio; Xompero, Marco [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri Largo E. Fermi 5 50125 Firenze (Italy); Hill, John M. [Large Binocular Telescope Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Gas-giant planets emit a large fraction of their light in the mid-infrared (≳3 μm), where photometry and spectroscopy are critical to our understanding of the bulk properties of extrasolar planets. Of particular importance are the L- and M-band atmospheric windows (3-5 μm), which are the longest wavelengths currently accessible to ground-based, high-contrast imagers. We present binocular LBT adaptive optics (AO) images of the HR 8799 planetary system in six narrow-band filters from 3 to 4 μm, and a Magellan AO image of the 2M1207 planetary system in a broader 3.3 μm band. These systems encompass the five known exoplanets with luminosities consistent with L → T transition brown dwarfs. Our results show that the exoplanets are brighter and have shallower spectral slopes than equivalent temperature brown dwarfs in a wavelength range that contains the methane fundamental absorption feature (spanned by the narrow-band filters and encompassed by the broader 3.3 μm filter). For 2M1207 b, we find that thick clouds and non-equilibrium chemistry caused by vertical mixing can explain the object's appearance. For the HR 8799 planets, we present new models that suggest the atmospheres must have patchy clouds, along with non-equilibrium chemistry. Together, the presence of a heterogeneous surface and vertical mixing presents a picture of dynamic planetary atmospheres in which both horizontal and vertical motions influence the chemical and condensate profiles.

  17. Transrectal Near-Infrared Optical Tomography for Prostate Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    2009. CA Cancer J Clin. 2009;59:225-249. 2. Hodge KK, McNeal JE, Stamey TA. Ultrasound guided transrectal core biopsies of the palpably abnormal...near-infrared spectroscopy: pilot results in the breast," Radiology 218, 261-266 (2001). [4] Tara Yates, Jeremy C Hebden, Adam Gibson, Nick ...digital rectal examination as screening tests for prostate carcinoma,” J Am Board Fam Pract.; 16(2):95- 101 (2003). 3. Hodge KK, McNeal JE, Stamey TA

  18. SAR and Infrared Image Fusion in Complex Contourlet Domain Based on Joint Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yiquan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the problems of the large grayscale difference between infrared and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images and their fusion image not being fit for human visual perception, we propose a fusion method for SAR and infrared images in the complex contourlet domain based on joint sparse representation. First, we perform complex contourlet decomposition of the infrared and SAR images. Then, we employ the KSingular Value Decomposition (K-SVD method to obtain an over-complete dictionary of the low-frequency components of the two source images. Using a joint sparse representation model, we then generate a joint dictionary. We obtain the sparse representation coefficients of the low-frequency components of the source images in the joint dictionary by the Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP method and select them using the selection maximization strategy. We then reconstruct these components to obtain the fused low-frequency components and fuse the high-frequency components using two criteria——the coefficient of visual sensitivity and the degree of energy matching. Finally, we obtain the fusion image by the inverse complex contourlet transform. Compared with the three classical fusion methods and recently presented fusion methods, e.g., that based on the Non-Subsampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT and another based on sparse representation, the method we propose in this paper can effectively highlight the salient features of the two source images and inherit their information to the greatest extent.

  19. Non-invasive estimation of the metabolic heat production of breast tumors using digital infrared imaging

    CERN Document Server

    González, Francisco Javier

    2011-01-01

    In this work the metabolic heat generated by breast tumors was estimated indirectly and noninvasively from digital infrared images and numerically simulating a simplified breast model and a cancerous tumor, this parameter can be of clinical importance since it has been related to the doubling volume's time and malignancy for that particular tumor. The results indicate that digital infrared imaging has the potential to estimate in a non-invasive way the malignancy of a tumor by calculating its metabolic heat generation from bioheat thermal transfer models.

  20. Multi-Sensor Fusion of Infrared and Electro-Optic Signals for High Resolution Night Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Lawrence

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Electro-optic (EO image sensors exhibit the properties of high resolution and low noise level at daytime, but they do not work in dark environments. Infrared (IR image sensors exhibit poor resolution and cannot separate objects with similar temperature. Therefore, we propose a novel framework of IR image enhancement based on the information (e.g., edge from EO images, which improves the resolution of IR images and helps us distinguish objects at night. Our framework superimposing/blending the edges of the EO image onto the corresponding transformed IR image improves their resolution. In this framework, we adopt the theoretical point spread function (PSF proposed by Hardie et al. for the IR image, which has the modulation transfer function (MTF of a uniform detector array and the incoherent optical transfer function (OTF of diffraction-limited optics. In addition, we design an inverse filter for the proposed PSF and use it for the IR image transformation. The framework requires four main steps: (1 inverse filter-based IR image transformation; (2 EO image edge detection; (3 registration; and (4 blending/superimposing of the obtained image pair. Simulation results show both blended and superimposed IR images, and demonstrate that blended IR images have better quality over the superimposed images. Additionally, based on the same steps, simulation result shows a blended IR image of better quality when only the original IR image is available.

  1. Computing dynamic classification images from correlation maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongjing; Liu, Zili

    2006-05-22

    We used Pearson's correlation to compute dynamic classification images of biological motion in a point-light display. Observers discriminated whether a human figure that was embedded in dynamic white Gaussian noise was walking forward or backward. Their responses were correlated with the Gaussian noise fields frame by frame, across trials. The resultant correlation map gave rise to a sequence of dynamic classification images that were clearer than either the standard method of A. J. Ahumada and J. Lovell (1971) or the optimal weighting method of R. F. Murray, P. J. Bennett, and A. B. Sekuler (2002). Further, the correlation coefficients of all the point lights were similar to each other when overlapping pixels between forward and backward walkers were excluded. This pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that the point-light walker is represented in a global manner, as opposed to a fixed subset of point lights being more important than others. We conjecture that the superior performance of the correlation map may reflect inherent nonlinearities in processing biological motion, which are incompatible with the assumptions underlying the previous methods.

  2. A new near-infrared imaging study of AFGL 2688

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latter, William B.; Hora, Joseph L.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Deutsch, Lynne K.; Maloney, Philip R.

    1993-07-01

    The object AFGL 2688 is a bipolar nebula surrounding a post-asymptotic giant branch star and is in transition toward becoming a planetary nebula. We present new NIR images in the I, J, H, and K bandpasses. These images reveal a wealth of structure in the nebula not previously seen. We find that the northern lobe is not smooth, but clumpy. There is evidence in the I-band image for periodic variations in mass-loss rate. In addition, we present narrowband images centered on the V = 1 - 0 S(1) line of molecular hydrogen and nearby continuum. The narrowband images reveal that broadband flux found in the equatorial region is dominated by line emission from vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen. H2 emission is also present in the lobes. Our K-band images show the equatorial emission to be in the form of a ring or torus extending around the object at a distance R about 7 x 10 exp 16 (D/1 kpc) cm. Mechanisms for exciting the equatorial H2 emission are discussed; we conclude that shocks are the only plausible source. We have analyzed the broadband images using models which assume single scattering of photons from the central star. We find that the bipolar axis is inclined to the plane of the sky by i about 5 deg. The images are best reproduced by models in which the density of scattering dust decreases fairly rapidly with increasing stellar latitude, with little or no dust near the poles. Furthermore, the optical depth is found to have very little wavelength dependence, which implies that the dust in AFGL 2688 is different from that in the interstellar medium.

  3. Near-infrared imaging for management of chronic maxillary sinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Joon S.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Kim, James; Ison, Sean; Wong, Brian; Cui, Haotian; Bhandarkar, Naveen

    2015-03-01

    Efficient management of chronic sinusitis remains a great challenge for primary care physicians. Unlike ENT specialists using Computed Tomography scans, they lack an affordable and safe method to accurately screen and monitor sinus diseases in primary care settings. Lack of evidence-based sinusitis management leads to frequent under-treatments and unnecessary over-treatments (i.e. antibiotics). Previously, we reported low-cost optical imaging designs for oral illumination and facial optical imaging setup. It exploits the sensitivity of NIR transmission intensity and their unique patterns to the sinus structures and presence of fluid/mucous-buildup within the sinus cavities. Using the improved NIR system, we have obtained NIR sinus images of 45 subjects with varying degrees of sinusitis symptoms. We made diagnoses of these patients based on two types of evidence: symptoms alone or NIR images along. These diagnostic results were then compared to the gold standard diagnosis using computed tomography through sensitivity and specificity analysis. Our results indicate that diagnosis of mere presence of sinusitis that is, distinguishing between healthy individuals vs. diseased individuals did not improve much when using NIR imaging compared to the diagnosis based on symptoms alone (69% in sensitivity, 75% specificity). However, use of NIR imaging improved the differential diagnosis between mild and severe diseases significantly as the sensitivity improved from 75% for using diagnosis based on symptoms alone up to 95% for using diagnosis based on NIR images. Reported results demonstrate great promise for using NIR imaging system for management of chronic sinusitis patients in primary care settings without resorting to CT.

  4. Infrared chemical imaging: Spatial resolution evaluation and super-resolution concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offroy, Marc [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Roggo, Yves [F. Hoffmann-La Roche A.G., Basel (Switzerland); Milanfar, Peyman [Multi-Dimensional Signal Processing Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, Baskin School of Engineering, University of California, 1156 High Street, Mailcode SOE2, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Duponchel, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.duponchel@univ-lille1.fr [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-08-03

    Chemical imaging systems help to solve many challenges in various scientific fields. Able to deliver rapid spatial and chemical information, modern infrared spectrometers using Focal Plane Array detectors (FPA) are of great interest. Considering conventional infrared spectrometers with a single element detector, we can consider that the diffraction-limited spatial resolution is more or less equal to the wavelength of the light (i.e. 2.5-25 {mu}m). Unfortunately, the spatial resolution of FPA spectroscopic setup is even lower due to the detector pixel size. This becomes a real constraint when micron-sized samples are analysed. New chemometrics methods are thus of great interest to overcome such resolution drawback, while keeping our far-field infrared imaging spectrometers. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the super-resolution concept in order to increase the spatial resolution of infrared imaging spectrometers using FPA detectors. The main idea of super-resolution is the fusion of several low-resolution images of the same sample to obtain a higher-resolution image. Applying the super-resolution concept on a relatively low number of FPA acquisitions, it was possible to observe a 30% decrease in spatial resolution.

  5. Prediction of tomato freshness using infrared thermal imaging and transient step heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen; Tan, Zuojun; Wang, Hongjin; Zhang, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Tomatoes are the world's 8th most valuable agricultural product, valued at $58 billion dollars annually. Nondestructive testing and inspection of tomatoes is challenging and multi-faceted. Optical imaging is used for quality grading and ripeness. Spectral and hyperspectral imaging are used to detect surface detects and cuticle cracks. Infrared thermography has been used to distinguish between different stages of maturity. However, determining the freshness of tomatoes is still an open problem. For this research, infrared thermography was used for freshness prediction. Infrared images were captured at a rate of 1 frame per second during heating (0 to 40 seconds) and cooling (0 to 160 seconds). The absolute temperatures of the acquired images were plotted. Regions with higher temperature differences between fresh and less fresh (rotten within three days) tomatoes of approximately uniform size and shape were used as the input nodes in a three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model. Two-thirds of the data were used for training and one-third was used for testing. Results suggest that by using infrared imaging data as input to an ANN model, tomato freshness can be predicted with 90% accuracy. T-tests and F-tests were conducted based on absolute temperature over time. The results suggest that there is a mean temperature difference between fresh and less fresh tomatoes (α = 0.05). However, there is no statistical difference in terms of temperature variation, which suggests a water concentration difference.

  6. Wavelet-Based Visible and Infrared Image Fusion: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel D. Sappa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates different wavelet-based cross-spectral image fusion strategies adopted to merge visible and infrared images. The objective is to find the best setup independently of the evaluation metric used to measure the performance. Quantitative performance results are obtained with state of the art approaches together with adaptations proposed in the current work. The options evaluated in the current work result from the combination of different setups in the wavelet image decomposition stage together with different fusion strategies for the final merging stage that generates the resulting representation. Most of the approaches evaluate results according to the application for which they are intended for. Sometimes a human observer is selected to judge the quality of the obtained results. In the current work, quantitative values are considered in order to find correlations between setups and performance of obtained results; these correlations can be used to define a criteria for selecting the best fusion strategy for a given pair of cross-spectral images. The whole procedure is evaluated with a large set of correctly registered visible and infrared image pairs, including both Near InfraRed (NIR and Long Wave InfraRed (LWIR.

  7. Real-time functional near-infrared imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Chance, Britton; Nioka, Shoko

    1998-08-01

    A real time functional Near-InfraRed Imager (fNIRI) was presented in this paper. We developed a continuous wave (cw) light imaging probe which includes 9 light sources and 4 pairs detectors (each pair has one 850 nm filtered detector and one 760 nm filtered detector). There are 16 measurement sections and total detection area is 9 cm X 4 cm. The detector- source uses 2.5 cm spacing. The light sources are controlled by a computer and the signals from the detectors are converted and processed in real time by the computer. The user-friendly software was programmed with Visual C++ language. Relative changes of oxy-Hb, Hb, and total blood concentration in 16 channels and the corresponding images combined by 16 channels could be displayed in real time on computer. With this cw imaging probe, we have measured motor function in motor cortex area, visual function in occipital area, and cognitive activity in frontal forehead area of the human brain when the subjects are stimulated by moving fingers, viewing a flashing light and doing an analogy test, respectively. The experimental results show that the cw imaging probe can be used for functional images of brain activity, based upon changes of oxygenation and blood volume due to the stimulus.

  8. Wavelet-based multifractal analysis of dynamic infrared thermograms to assist in early breast cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya eGerasimova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women and despite recent advances in the medical field, there are still some inherent limitations in the currently used screening techniques. The radiological interpretation of screening X-ray mammograms often leads to over-diagnosis and, as a consequence, to unnecessary traumatic and painful biopsies. Here we propose a computer-aided multifractal analysis of dynamic infrared (IR imaging as an efficient method for identifying women with risk of breast cancer. Using a wavelet-based multi-scale method to analyze the temporal fluctuations of breast skin temperature collected from a panel of patients with diagnosed breast cancer and some female volunteers with healthy breasts, we show that the multifractal complexity of temperature fluctuations observed in healthy breasts is lost in mammary glands with malignant tumor. Besides potential clinical impact, these results open new perspectives in the investigation of physiological changes that may precede anatomical alterations in breast cancer development.

  9. Star formation properties and dynamics of Luminous Infrared Galaxies with adaptive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Vaisanen, Petri; Ryder, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Near infrared adaptive optics observations are crucial to be able to interpret kinematic and dynamical data and study star formation properties within the often extremely dusty interacting luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs). NIR AO data are also needed to find supernovae in their bright and dusty central regions and to fully characterize the young stellar clusters found in these kinds of systems. We have used AO in the K-band to survey a sample of LIRGs at 0.1 arcsec (30 to 100 pc) resolution. The data are merged with SALT and AAT spectroscopic follow-up and HST and Spitzer archival imaging. The first AO detected SNe are reported as well as details of the first studied LIRGs. One LIRG showed an unexpected third component in the interaction, which moreover turned out to host the most active star formation. Another target showed evidence in the NIR of a very rare case of leading spiral arms, rotating in the same direction as the arms open.

  10. The Munich Near-Infrared Cluster Survey -- IV. Biases in the Completeness of Near-Infrared Imaging Data

    CERN Document Server

    Snigula, J; Bender, R; Botzler, C S; Feulner, G; Hopp, U

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of completeness simulations for the detection of point sources as well as redshifted elliptical and spiral galaxies in the K'-band images of the Munich Near-Infrared Cluster Survey (MUNICS). The main focus of this work is to quantify the selection effects introduced by threshold-based object detection algorithms used in deep imaging surveys. Therefore, we simulate objects obeying the well-known scaling relations between effective radius and central surface brightness, both for de Vaucouleurs and exponential profiles. The results of these simulations, while presented for the MUNICS project, are applicable in a much wider context to deep optical and near-infrared selected samples. We investigate the detection probability as well as the reliability for recovering the true total magnitude with Kron-like (adaptive) aperture photometry. The results are compared to the predictions of the visibility theory of Disney and Phillipps in terms of the detection rate and the lost-light fraction. Addit...

  11. Finger Vein Segmentation from Infrared Images Based on a Modified Separable Mumford Shah Model and Local Entropy Thresholding

    OpenAIRE

    Marios Vlachos; Evangelos Dermatas

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for finger vein pattern extraction from infrared images is presented. This method involves four steps: preprocessing which performs local normalization of the image intensity, image enhancement, image segmentation, and finally postprocessing for image cleaning. In the image enhancement step, an image which will be both smooth and similar to the original is sought. The enhanced image is obtained by minimizing the objective function of a modified separable Mumford Shah Model. Sin...

  12. Thermal imaging method to visualize a hidden painting thermally excited by far infrared radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davin, T.; Wang, X.; Chabane, A.; Pawelko, R.; Guida, G.; Serio, B.; Hervé, P.

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of hidden painting is a major issue for cultural heritage. In this paper, a non-destructive active infrared thermographic technique was considered to reveal paintings covered by a lime layer. An extended infrared spectral range radiation was used as the excitation source. The external long wave infrared energy source delivered to the surface is then propagated through the material until it encounters a painting zone. Due to several thermal effects, the sample surface then presents non-uniformity patterns. Using a high sensitive infrared camera, the presence of covered pigments can thus be highlighted by the analysis of the non-stationary phenomena. Reconstituted thermal contrast images of mural samples covered by a lime layer are shown.

  13. Imaging electric field dynamics with graphene optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Jason; Balch, Halleh B.; McGuire, Allister F.; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Forrester, Patrick R.; Crommie, Michael F.; Cui, Bianxiao; Wang, Feng

    2016-12-01

    The use of electric fields for signalling and control in liquids is widespread, spanning bioelectric activity in cells to electrical manipulation of microstructures in lab-on-a-chip devices. However, an appropriate tool to resolve the spatio-temporal distribution of electric fields over a large dynamic range has yet to be developed. Here we present a label-free method to image local electric fields in real time and under ambient conditions. Our technique combines the unique gate-variable optical transitions of graphene with a critically coupled planar waveguide platform that enables highly sensitive detection of local electric fields with a voltage sensitivity of a few microvolts, a spatial resolution of tens of micrometres and a frequency response over tens of kilohertz. Our imaging platform enables parallel detection of electric fields over a large field of view and can be tailored to broad applications spanning lab-on-a-chip device engineering to analysis of bioelectric phenomena.

  14. Advances in infrared and imaging fibres for astronomical instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Haynes, R; Marcel, J; Jovanovic, N; Haynes, Roger; Namara, Pam Mc; Marcel, Jackie; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2006-01-01

    Optical fibres have already played a huge part in ground based astronomical instrumentation, however, with the revolution in photonics currently taking place new fibre technologies and integrated optical devices are likely to have a profound impact on the way we manipulate light in the future. The Anglo-Australian Observatory, along with partners at the Optical Fibre Technology Centre of the University of Sydney, is investigating some of the developing technologies as part of our Astrophotonics programme. In this paper we discuss the advances that have been made with infrared transmitting fibre, both conventional and microstructured, in particular those based on flouride glasses. Flouride glasses have a particularly wide transparent region from the UV through to around 7um, whereas silica fibres, commonly used in astronomy, only transmit out to about 2um. We discuss the impact of advances in fibre manufacture that have greatly improved the optical, chemical resistance and physical properties of the flouride f...

  15. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Singh, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  16. Expansion of Smartwatch Touch Interface from Touchscreen to Around Device Interface Using Infrared Line Image Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soo-Chul; Shin, Jungsoon; Kim, Seung-Chan; Park, Joonah

    2015-07-09

    Touchscreen interaction has become a fundamental means of controlling mobile phones and smartwatches. However, the small form factor of a smartwatch limits the available interactive surface area. To overcome this limitation, we propose the expansion of the touch region of the screen to the back of the user's hand. We developed a touch module for sensing the touched finger position on the back of the hand using infrared (IR) line image sensors, based on the calibrated IR intensity and the maximum intensity region of an IR array. For complete touch-sensing solution, a gyroscope installed in the smartwatch is used to read the wrist gestures. The gyroscope incorporates a dynamic time warping gesture recognition algorithm for eliminating unintended touch inputs during the free motion of the wrist while wearing the smartwatch. The prototype of the developed sensing module was implemented in a commercial smartwatch, and it was confirmed that the sensed positional information of the finger when it was used to touch the back of the hand could be used to control the smartwatch graphical user interface. Our system not only affords a novel experience for smartwatch users, but also provides a basis for developing other useful interfaces.

  17. Expansion of Smartwatch Touch Interface from Touchscreen to Around Device Interface Using Infrared Line Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Chul Lim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Touchscreen interaction has become a fundamental means of controlling mobile phones and smartwatches. However, the small form factor of a smartwatch limits the available interactive surface area. To overcome this limitation, we propose the expansion of the touch region of the screen to the back of the user’s hand. We developed a touch module for sensing the touched finger position on the back of the hand using infrared (IR line image sensors, based on the calibrated IR intensity and the maximum intensity region of an IR array. For complete touch-sensing solution, a gyroscope installed in the smartwatch is used to read the wrist gestures. The gyroscope incorporates a dynamic time warping gesture recognition algorithm for eliminating unintended touch inputs during the free motion of the wrist while wearing the smartwatch. The prototype of the developed sensing module was implemented in a commercial smartwatch, and it was confirmed that the sensed positional information of the finger when it was used to touch the back of the hand could be used to control the smartwatch graphical user interface. Our system not only affords a novel experience for smartwatch users, but also provides a basis for developing other useful interfaces.

  18. Near-infrared laparoscopy for real-time intra-operative arterial and lymphatic perfusion imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, R A

    2012-02-01

    Multimodal laparoscopic imaging systems possessing the capability for extended spectrum irradiation and visualization within a unified camera system are now available to provide enhanced intracorporeal operative anatomic and dynamic perfusion assessment and potentially augmented patient outcome. While ultraviolet-range energies have limited penetration and hence are probably more useful for endoscopic mucosal interrogation, the near-infrared (NIR) spectrum is of greater potential utility for the purposes of examining inducible fluorescence in abdominopelvic tissue that can be achieved by administration of specific tracer agents, either directly into the circulation (e.g. for anastomotic perfusion assessment at the time of stapling) or into the lymphatic system (e.g. for lymph basin road-mapping and\\/or focussed target nodal assessment). This technology is also capable of supplementing anatomic recognition of the biliary system while implantable fibres can also be inserted intraoperatively for the purpose of safeguarding vital structures such as the oesphagus and ureters especially in difficult reoperations. It is likely that this technological capability will find a clear and common indication in colorectal specialist and general surgical departments worldwide in the near future.

  19. Turbulence theory and infrared images falsify the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Carl

    2012-11-01

    Turbulence defined by the inertial vortex force explains Planck scale big bang processes as temporary, rendering a permanent Einstein cosmological constant Λ and a positive expansion rate of the universe driven by anti-gravitational dark energy forces unnecessary. Large kinematic viscosity stresses during the plasma epoch from 1011 s to 1013 s cause fragmentation by proto-super-cluster-voids at 1012 s and proto-galaxies at the 1013 s transition to gas. Fragmentation of gas proto-galaxies is at Earth-mass planet viscous scales in Jeans mass clumps of a trillion planets. These Proto-Globular-star-Clusters (PGCs) freeze to form the dark matter of galaxies according to the Gibson (1996) Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics (HGD) theory, and as observed by Schild (1996) by quasar microlensing. White dwarf carbon stars explode as Supernovae Ia events (SNeIa) when their mass increases to 1.44 solar, providing the standard candles used to justify the Nobel Prize claim of a positive expansion rate. However, if all stars form from primordial planet mergers in PGC clumps as claimed by HGD cosmology, the SNeIa become subject to a systematic dimming error depending on the line of sight to the event. New space telescope infrared images strongly support HGD cosmology.

  20. Finding a Cold Needle in a Warm Haystack: Infrared Imaging Applied to Locating Cryocooled Crystals in Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, E. H.; vanderWoerd, M. J.; Miller, M. D.; Deacon, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of inbred imaging to locate crystals mounted in cryoloops and cryopreserved in a nitrogen gas stream at 100K. In the home laboratory crystals are clearly seen in the infrared images with light transmitting through the sample while irradiating the crystal from behind, and with illumination from a direction perpendicular to the direction of view. The crystals transmit and reflect infrared radiation differently from the surrounding mother liquor and loop. Because of differences in contrast between crystals and their surrounding mother liquor, it is possible to clearly identify the crystal position. In use at the synchrotron, with robotically mounted crystals the small depth of field of the lens required the recording of multiple images at different focal points. Image processing techniques were then used to produce a clear image of the crystal. The resulting infrared images and intensity profiles show that infrared imaging can be a powerful complement to visual imaging in locating crystals in cryocooled loops.

  1. A novel lightweight Fizeau infrared interferometric imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Douglas A.; Hart, Michael; Warner, Steve; Durney, Oli; Romeo, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Aperture synthesis imaging techniques using an interferometer provide a means to achieve imagery with spatial resolution equivalent to a conventional filled aperture telescope at a significantly reduced size, weight and cost, an important implication for air- and space-borne persistent observing platforms. These concepts have been realized in SIRII (Space-based IR-imaging interferometer), a new light-weight, compact SWIR and MWIR imaging interferometer designed for space-based surveillance. The sensor design is configured as a six-element Fizeau interferometer; it is scalable, light-weight, and uses structural components and main optics made of carbon fiber replicated polymer (CFRP) that are easy to fabricate and inexpensive. A three-element prototype of the SIRII imager has been constructed. The optics, detectors, and interferometric signal processing principles draw on experience developed in ground-based astronomical applications designed to yield the highest sensitivity and resolution with cost-effective optical solutions. SIRII is being designed for technical intelligence from geo-stationary orbit. It has an instantaneous 6 x 6 mrad FOV and the ability to rapidly scan a 6x6 deg FOV, with a minimal SNR. The interferometric design can be scaled to larger equivalent filled aperture, while minimizing weight and costs when compared to a filled aperture telescope with equivalent resolution. This scalability in SIRII allows it address a range of IR-imaging scenarios.

  2. Dynamic force microscopy imaging of native membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienberger, Ferry; Stroh, Cordula; Kada, Gerald; Moser, Rosita; Baumgartner, Werner; Pastushenko, Vassili; Rankl, Christian; Schmidt, Ute; Mueller, Harald; Orlova, Elena; LeGrimellec, Christian; Drenckhahn, Detlev; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2003-10-15

    We employed magnetic ACmode atomic force microscopy (MACmode AFM) as a novel dynamic force microscopy method to image surfaces of biological membranes in their native environments. The lateral resolution achieved under optimized imaging conditions was in the nanometer range, even when the sample was only weakly attached to the support. Purple membranes (PM) from Halobacterium salinarum were used as a test standard for topographical imaging. The hexagonal arrangement of the bacteriorhodopsin trimers on the cytoplasmic side of PM was resolved with 1.5 nm lateral accuracy, a resolution similar to images obtained in contact and tapping-mode AFM. Human rhinovirus 2 (HRV2) particles were attached to mica surfaces via nonspecific interactions. The capsid structure and 2 nm sized protein loops of HRV2 were routinely obtained without any displacement of the virus. Globular and filamentous structures on living and fixed endothelial cells were observed with a resolution of 5-20 nm. These examples show that MACmode AFM is a favorable method in studying the topography of soft and weakly attached biological samples with high resolution under physiological conditions.

  3. Mid-infrared lasers: Challenges imposed by the population dynamics of the gain system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, Markus

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence of the population dynamics on mid-infrared lasers. Specifically, the typically longer lifetime of the lower compared to the upper laser level has to be addressed in order to achieve highly efficient laser operation in this wavelength range. Examples of different

  4. Exploring streamwater mixing dynamics via handheld thermal infrared imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonelli, Marta; Klaus, Julian; Smettem, Keith; Teuling, Ryan; Pfister, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Stream confluences are important hotspots of aquatic ecological processes. Water mixing dynamics at stream confluences influence physio-chemical characteristics of the stream as well as sediment mobilisation and pollutant dispersal. In this study, we investigated the potential for handheld

  5. Region-based fusion of infrared and visible images using nonsubsampled contourlet transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baolong Guo; Qiang Zhang; Ye Hou

    2008-01-01

    With the nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT), a novel region-segmentation-based fusion algorithm for infrared (IR) and visible images is presented.The IR image is segmented according to the physical features of the target.The source images are decomposed by the NSCT, and then, different fusion rules for the target regions and the background regions are employed to merge the NSCT coefficients respectively.Finally, the fused image is obtained by applying the inverse NSCT.Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the pixel-based methods, including the traditional wavelet-based method and NSCT-based method.

  6. Near-infrared polarization images of the Orion proplyds

    CERN Document Server

    Rost, S; Ott, T

    2008-01-01

    We performed AO-assisted high-resolution imaging polarimetry on selected Orion proplyds close to the Trapezium stars in the J, H, and K bands. Differential polarimetric images of one of the largest and brightest proplyds are interpreted using 3D radiation transfer simulations based on the Monte Carlo method. Although not fully resolvable by ground-based observations, the circumstellar material can be mapped with polarimetry. We present constraints on the disk parameters of the giant proplyd 177-341. We tested whether dust models with different grain size distributions could explain the observed extent of the polarization patterns and find that simple models with larger grains will not reproduce the spectral polarization behavior. The technique of polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) in the NIR provides a good opportunity to study the structure of the Orion proplyds.

  7. Practical optical interferometry imaging at visible and infrared wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Buscher, David F

    2015-01-01

    Optical interferometry is a powerful technique to make images on angular scales hundreds of times smaller than is possible with the largest telescopes. This concise guide provides an introduction to the technique for graduate students and researchers who want to make interferometric observations and acts as a reference for technologists building new instruments. Starting from the principles of interference, the author covers the core concepts of interferometry, showing how the effects of the Earth's atmosphere can be overcome using closure phase, and the complete process of making an observation, from planning to image reconstruction. This rigorous approach emphasizes the use of rules-of-thumb for important parameters such as the signal-to-noise ratios, requirements for sampling the Fourier plane and predicting image quality. The handbook is supported by web resources, including the Python source code used to make many of the graphs, as well as an interferometry simulation framework, available at www.cambridg...

  8. Concurrent Application of TMS and Near-infrared Optical Imaging: Methodological Considerations and Potential Artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan A Parks

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous application of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS with non-invasive neuroimaging provides a powerful method for investigating functional connectivity in the human brain and the causal relationships between areas in distributed brain networks. TMS has been combined with numerous neuroimaging techniques including, electroencephalography (EEG, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, and positron emission tomography (PET. Recent work has also demonstrated the feasibility and utility of combining TMS with non-invasive near-infrared optical imaging techniques, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS and the event-related optical signal (EROS. Simultaneous TMS and optical imaging affords a number of advantages over other neuroimaging methods but also involves a unique set of methodological challenges and considerations. This paper describes the methodology of concurrently performing optical imaging during the administration of TMS, focusing on experimental design, potential artifacts, and approaches to controlling for these artifacts.

  9. Geographic atrophy segmentation in infrared and autofluorescent retina images using supervised learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devisetti, K; Karnowski, T P; Giancardo, L; Li, Y; Chaum, E

    2011-01-01

    Geographic Atrophy (GA) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is an advanced form of atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and is responsible for about 20% of AMD-related legal blindness in the United States. Two different imaging modalities for retinas, infrared imaging and autofluorescence imaging, serve as interesting complimentary technologies for highlighting GA. In this work we explore the use of neural network classifiers in performing segmentation of GA in registered infrared (IR) and autofluorescence (AF) images. Our segmentation achieved a performance level of 82.5% sensitivity and 92.9% specificity on a per-pixel basis using hold-one-out validation testing. The algorithm, feature extraction, data set and experimental results are discussed and shown.

  10. Detection of buried objects by fusing dual-band infrared images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G.A.; Sengupta, S.K.; Sherwood, R.J.; Buhl, M.R.; Schaich, P.C.; Kane, R.J.; Barth, M.J.; Fields, D.J.; Carter, M.R.

    1993-11-01

    We have conducted experiments to demonstrate the enhanced detectability of buried land mines using sensor fusion techniques. Multiple sensors, including visible imagery, infrared imagery, and ground penetrating radar (GPR), have been used to acquire data on a number of buried mines and mine surrogates. Because the visible wavelength and GPR data are currently incomplete. This paper focuses on the fusion of two-band infrared images. We use feature-level fusion and supervised learning with the probabilistic neural network (PNN) to evaluate detection performance. The novelty of the work lies in the application of advanced target recognition algorithms, the fusion of dual-band infrared images and evaluation of the techniques using two real data sets.

  11. Micro- and macro-attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging. Plenary Lecture at the 5th International Conference on Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy, 2009, Melbourne, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarian, Sergei G; Chan, K L Andrew

    2010-05-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging has become a very powerful method in chemical analysis. In this review paper we describe a variety of opportunities for obtaining FT-IR images using the attenuated total reflection (ATR) approach and provide an overview of fundamental aspects, accessories, and applications in both micro- and macro-ATR imaging modes. The advantages and versatility of both ATR imaging modes are discussed and the spatial resolution of micro-ATR imaging is demonstrated. Micro-ATR imaging has opened up many new areas of study that were previously precluded by inadequate spatial resolution (polymer blends, pharmaceutical tablets, cross-sections of blood vessels or hair, surface of skin, single live cells, cancerous tissues). Recent applications of ATR imaging in polymer research, biomedical and forensic sciences, objects of cultural heritage, and other complex materials are outlined. The latest advances include obtaining spatially resolved chemical images from different depths within a sample, and surface-enhanced images for macro-ATR imaging have also been presented. Macro-ATR imaging is a valuable approach for high-throughput analysis of materials under controlled environments. Opportunities exist for chemical imaging of dynamic aqueous systems, such as dissolution, diffusion, microfluidics, or imaging of dynamic processes in live cells.

  12. Near-infrared operating lamp for intraoperative molecular imaging of a mediastinal tumor

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Near-Infrared (NIR) intraoperative molecular imaging is a new diagnostic modality utilized during cancer surgery for the identification of tumors, metastases and lymph nodes. Surgeons typically use headlamps during an operation to increase visible light; however, these light sources are not adapted to function simultaneously with NIR molecular imaging technology. Here, we design a NIR cancelling headlamp and utilize it during surgery to assess whether intraoperative molecular imagi...

  13. Pedestrian Validation in Infrared Images by Means of Active Contours and Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    only if there are hot regions inside the bounding box; a useful side effect, then, is an excessive snake contraction when there are not warm blobs ...algorithm flow for the complete pedestrian system. Different approaches have been developed for the initial detection in the two image domains: warm ...typical scenarios in FIR and visible images. Infrared Visible Warm area Edge FIR VIS Tetra vision Stereo M erge Symmetry Head Probabilistic model Fin

  14. An Approach to Improve the Quality of Infrared Images of Vein-Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Chih-Lung Lin

    2011-01-01

    This study develops an approach to improve the quality of infrared (IR) images of vein-patterns, which usually have noise, low contrast, low brightness and small objects of interest, thus requiring preprocessing to improve their quality. The main characteristics of the proposed approach are that no prior knowledge about the IR image is necessary and no parameters must be preset. Two main goals are sought: impulse noise reduction and adaptive contrast enhancement technologies. In our study, a ...

  15. Near-Infrared Confocal Laser Reflectance Cytoarchitectural Imaging of the Substantia Nigra and Cerebellum in the Fresh Human Cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheyuo, Cletus; Grand, Walter; Balos, Lucia L

    2017-01-01

    Cytoarchitectural neuroimaging remains critical for diagnosis of many brain diseases. Fluorescent dye-enhanced, near-infrared confocal in situ cellular imaging of the brain has been reported. However, impermeability of the blood-brain barrier to most fluorescent dyes limits clinical utility of this modality. The differential degree of reflectance from brain tissue with unenhanced near-infrared imaging may represent an alternative technique for in situ cytoarchitectural neuroimaging. We assessed the utility of unenhanced near-infrared confocal laser reflectance imaging of the cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra in 2 fresh human cadaver brains using a confocal near-infrared laser probe. Cellular images based on near-infrared differential reflectance were captured at depths of 20-180 μm from the brain surface. Parts of the cerebellum and substantia nigra imaged using the probe were subsequently excised and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histologic correlation. Near-infrared reflectance imaging revealed the 3-layered cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum, with Purkinje cells appearing hyperreflectant. In the substantia nigra, neurons appeared hyporeflectant with hyperreflectant neuromelanin cytoplasmic inclusions. Cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra revealed on near-infrared imaging closely correlated with the histology on hematoxylin-eosin staining. We showed that unenhanced near-infrared reflectance imaging of fresh human cadaver brain can reliably identify and distinguish neurons and detailed cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging without Harmful Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the…

  17. Evaluation of Infrared Images by Using a Human Thermal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    thermal environmental history have been recorded. In this case, the thermal environmental history could be estimated from the behavior of a subject... environmental history and physiological condition history. An advantage of the evaluation of IR images using the thermal model is to provide

  18. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging without Harmful Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the…

  19. Infrared tomography for diagnostic imaging of port wine stain blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The objective of this work is the development of Infrared Tomography (IRT) for detecting and characterizing subsurface chromophores in human skin. Characterization of cutaneous chromophores is crucial for advances in the laser treatment of pigmented lesions (e.g., port wine stain birthmarks and tatoos). Infrared tomography (IRT) uses a fast infrared focal plane array (IR-FPA) to detect temperature rises in a substrate induced by pulsed radiation. A pulsed laser is used to produce transient heating of an object. The temperature rise, due to the optical absorption of the pulsed laser light, creates an increase in infrared emission which is measured by the IR-FPA. Although the application of IRT to image subsurface cracks due to metal fatigue is a topic of great interest in the aircraft industry, the application to image subsurface chromophores in biological materials is novel. We present an image recovery method based on a constrained conjugate gradient algorithm that has obtained the first ever high quality images of port wine blood vessels.

  20. Quantitative analysis of melamine in milk powders using near-infrared hyperspectral imaging and band ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 2008, the detection of the adulterant melamine (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine) in food products has become the subject of research due to several food safety scares. Near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging offers great potential for food safety and quality research because it combines the fe...

  1. Research on acupuncture points and cortical functional activation position in cats by infrared imaging detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuwang; Sha, Zhanyou; Wang, Shuhai; Wen, Huanming

    2007-12-01

    The research of the brain cognition is mainly to find out the activation position in brain according to the stimulation at present in the world. The research regards the animals as the experimental objects and explores the stimulation response on the cerebral cortex of acupuncture. It provides a new method, which can detect the activation position on the creatural cerebral cortex directly by middle-far infrared imaging. According to the theory of local temperature situation, the difference of cortical temperature maybe associate with the excitement of cortical nerve cells, the metabolism of local tissue and the local hemal circulation. Direct naked detection of temperature variety on cerebral cortex is applied by middle and far infrared imaging technology. So the activation position is ascertained. The effect of stimulation response is superior to other indirect methods. After removing the skulls on the head, full of cerebral cortex of a cat are exposed. By observing the infrared images and measuring the temperatures of the visual cerebral cortex during the process of acupuncturing, the points are used to judge the activation position. The variety in the cortical functional sections is corresponding to the result of the acupuncture points in terms of infrared images and temperatures. According to experimental results, we know that the variety of a cortical functional section is corresponding to a special acupuncture point exactly.

  2. High-speed imaging and wavefront sensing with an infrared avalanche photodiode array

    CERN Document Server

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Hall, Donald; Jacobson, Shane; Law, Nicholas M; Chun, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Infrared avalanche photodiode arrays represent a panacea for many branches of astronomy by enabling extremely low-noise, high-speed and even photon-counting measurements at near-infrared wavelengths. We recently demonstrated the use of an early engineering-grade infrared avalanche photodiode array that achieves a correlated double sampling read noise of 0.73 e- in the lab, and a total noise of 2.52 e- on sky, and supports simultaneous high-speed imaging and tip-tilt wavefront sensing with the Robo-AO visible-light laser adaptive optics system at the Palomar Observatory 1.5-m telescope. We report here on the improved image quality achieved simultaneously at visible and infrared wavelengths by using the array as part of an image stabilization control-loop with adaptive-optics sharpened guide stars. We also discuss a newly enabled survey of nearby late M-dwarf multiplicity as well as future uses of this technology in other adaptive optics and high-contrast imaging applications.

  3. Feasibility of the optical imaging of thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump by near-infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakota, Daisuke; Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2014-09-01

    Blood coagulation is one of the primary concerns when using mechanical circulatory support devices such as blood pumps. Noninvasive detection and imaging of thrombus formation is useful not only for the development of more hemocompatible devices but also for the management of blood coagulation to avoid risk of infarction. The objective of this study is to investigate the use of near-infrared light for imaging of thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump. The optical properties of a thrombus at wavelengths ranging from 600 to 750 nm were analyzed using a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system. A specially designed hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a visible bottom area was used. In vitro antithrombogenic testing was conducted five times with the pump using bovine whole blood in which the activated blood clotting time was adjusted to 200 s prior to the experiment. Two halogen lights were used for the light sources. The forward scattering through the pump and backward scattering on the pump bottom area were imaged using the HSI system. HSI showed an increase in forward scattering at wavelengths ranging from 670 to 750 nm in the location of thrombus formation. The time at which the thrombus began to form in the impeller rotating at 2780 rpm could be detected. The spectral difference between the whole blood and the thrombus was utilized to image thrombus formation. The results indicate the feasibility of dynamically detecting and imaging thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump.

  4. Deep-Tissue Anatomical Imaging of Mice Using Carbon Nanotube Fluorophores in the Second Near Infrared Window

    CERN Document Server

    Welsher, Kevin; Dai, Hongjie

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent imaging in the second near infrared window (NIR II, 1-1.4 {\\mu}m) holds much promise due to minimal autofluorescence and tissue scattering. Here, using well functionalized biocompatible single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as NIR II fluorescent imaging agents, we performed high frame rate video imaging of mice during intravenous injection of SWNTs and investigated the path of SWNTs through the mouse anatomy. We observed in real-time SWNT circulation through the lungs and kidneys several seconds post-injection, and spleen and liver at slightly later time points. Dynamic contrast enhanced imaging through principal component analysis (PCA) was performed and found to greatly increase the anatomical resolution of organs as a function of time post-injection. Importantly, PCA was able to discriminate organs such as the pancreas which could not be resolved from real-time raw images. Tissue phantom studies were performed to compare imaging in the NIR II region to the traditional NIR I biological transpar...

  5. Time-resolved infrared studies of protein conformational dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W.H.; Causgrove, T.P.; Dyer, R.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Callender, R.H. [Univ. of New York, NY (United States)

    1994-12-01

    We have demonstrated that TRIR in the amide I region gives structural information regarding protein conformational changes in realtime, both on processes involved in the development of the functional structure (protein folding) and on protein structural changes that accompany the functional dynamics of the native structure. Assignment of many of the amide I peaks to specific amide or sidechain structures will require much additional effort. Specifically, the congestion and complexity of the protein vibrational spectra dictate that isotope studies are an absolute requirement for more than a qualitative notion of the structural interpretation of these measurements. It is clear, however, that enormous potential exists for elucidating structural relaxation dynamics and energetics with a high degree of structural specificity using this approach.

  6. Infrared optical properties of $\\alpha$ quartz by molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gangemi, Fabrizio; Carati, Andrea; Maiocchi, Alberto; Galgani, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with theoretical estimates of the refractive--index curves for quartz, obtained by the Kubo formul\\ae\\ in the classical approximation, through MD simulations for the motions of the ions. Two objectives are considered. The first one is to understand the role of nonlinearities in situations where they are very large, as at the $\\alpha$--$\\beta$ structural phase transition. We show that on the one hand they don't play an essential role in connection with the form of the spectra in the infrared. On the other hand they play an essential role in introducing a chaoticity which involves a definite normal mode. This might explain why that mode is Raman active in the $\\alpha$ phase, but not in the $\\beta$ phase. The second objective concerns whether it is possible in a microscopic model to obtain normal mode frequencies, or peak frequencies in the optical spectra, that are in good agreement with the experimental data for quartz. Notwithstanding a lot of effort, we were unable to find results agr...

  7. Near-infrared imaging spectroscopy (NIRIS) and image rank analysis for remote identification of plastics in mixed waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienke, D; Van Den Broek, W; Melssen, W; Buydens, L; Feldhoff, R; Huth-Fehre, T; Kantimm, T; Winter, F; Cammann, K

    1996-03-01

    An infrared camera with focal plane InSb array detector has been applied to the characterization of macroscopic samples of household waste over distances up to two meters. Per waste sample (singelized), a sequence of images was taken at six optical wavelength ranges in the near infrared region (1100 nm - 2500 nm). The obtained three-dimensional data stack served as individual fingerprint per sample. An abstract factor rotation of this stack of six images into a spectroscopical meaningful intermediate six-element vector by Multivariate Image Rank Analysis (MIRA) finally provided a decision limit for the discrimination of plastics and nonplastics. A correct classification of better than 80% has been reached. The experimental NIRIS set-up has been automated so far to allow an on-line identification of a real world waste sample within a few seconds.

  8. The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: optical design of IRIS imager with "Co-axis double TMA"

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuzuki, Toshihiro; Harakawa, Hiroki; Ikenoue, Bungo; Larkin, James; Moore, Anna; Obuchi, Yoshiyuki; Phillips, Andrew C; Saito, Sakae; Uraguchi, Fumihiro; Wincentsen, James; Wright, Shelley; Hayano, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    IRIS (InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph) is one of the first-generation instruments for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). IRIS is composed of a combination of near-infrared (0.84--2.4 $\\mu$m) diffraction limited imager and integral field spectrograph. To achieve near-diffraction limited resolutions in the near-infrared wavelength region, IRIS uses the advanced adaptive optics system NFIRAOS (Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System) and integrated on-instrument wavefront sensors (OIWFS). However, IRIS itself has challenging specifications. First, the overall system wavefront error should be less than 40 nm in Y, z, J, and H-band and 42 nm in K-band over a 34.0 $\\times$ 34.0 arcsecond field of view. Second, the throughput of the imager components should be more than 42 percent. To achieve the extremely low wavefront error and high throughput, all reflective design has been newly proposed. We have adopted a new design policy called "Co-Axis double-TMA", which cancels the asymmetric aberrations generated by "col...

  9. SYSIPHE: focus on SIELETERS, the medium and longwave infrared spectral imaging instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrec, Yann; Rousset-Rouvière, Laurent; Coudrain, Christophe; Primot, Jérôme; Thétas, Sophie; Kattnig, Alain

    2014-05-01

    Sysiphe is an airborne hyperspectral imaging system, result of a cooperation between France (Onera and DGA) and Norway (NEO and FFI). It is a unique system by its spatial sampling -0.5m with a 500m swath at a ground height of 2000m- combined with its wide spectral coverage -from 0.4μm to 11.5μm in the atmospheric transmission bands. Its infrared component, named Sieleters, consists in two high étendue imaging static Fourier transform spectrometers, one for the midwave infrared and one for the longwave infrared. These two imaging spectrometers have very close design, since both are made of a Michelson interferometer, a refractive imaging system, and a large IRFPA (1016x440 pixels). Moreover, both are cryogenic and mounted on their own stabilization platform which allows at once to actively control and independently measure the line of sigh. These data are useful to reconstruct and to georeference the spectral image from the raw interferometric images. Sysiphe first flight occurred in September, 2013.

  10. Altered lymphatic function and architecture in salt-induced hypertension assessed by near-infrared fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Agollah, Germaine D.; Chan, Wenyaw; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-08-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in maintaining the fluid homeostasis between the blood vascular and interstitial tissue compartment and there is recent evidence that its transport capabilities may regulate blood pressure in salt-induced hypertension. Yet, there is little known how the lymphatic contractile function and architecture responds to dietary salt-intake. Thus, we longitudinally characterized lymphatic contractile function and vessel remodeling noninvasively using dynamic near-infrared fluorescence imaging in animal models of salt-induced hypertension. The lymphatics of mice and rats were imaged following intradermal injection of indocyanine green to the ear tip or the base of the tail before and during two weeks of either a high salt diet (HSD) or normal chow. Our noninvasive imaging data demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the skin of mice and rats on a HSD as compared to their baseline levels. In addition, our dynamic imaging results showed increased lymphatic contraction frequency in HSD-fed mice and rats. Lymphatic contractile function and vessel remodeling occurs in response to salt-induced hypertension suggesting a possible role for the lymphatics in the regulation of vascular blood pressure.

  11. WAHRSIS: A Low-cost, High-resolution Whole Sky Imager With Near-Infrared Capabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, Soumyabrata; Lee, Yee Hui; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Cloud imaging using ground-based whole sky imagers is essential for a fine-grained understanding of the effects of cloud formations, which can be useful in many applications. Some such imagers are available commercially, but their cost is relatively high, and their flexibility is limited. Therefore, we built a new daytime Whole Sky Imager (WSI) called Wide Angle High-Resolution Sky Imaging System. The strengths of our new design are its simplicity, low manufacturing cost and high resolution. Our imager captures the entire hemisphere in a single high-resolution picture via a digital camera using a fish-eye lens. The camera was modified to capture light across the visible as well as the near-infrared spectral ranges. This paper describes the design of the device as well as the geometric and radiometric calibration of the imaging system.

  12. Infrared image gray adaptive adjusting enhancement algorithm based on gray redundancy histogram-dealing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zi-long; Liu, Yong; Chen, Ruo-wang

    2016-11-01

    In view of the histogram equalizing algorithm to enhance image in digital image processing, an Infrared Image Gray adaptive adjusting Enhancement Algorithm Based on Gray Redundancy Histogram-dealing Technique is proposed. The algorithm is based on the determination of the entire image gray value, enhanced or lowered the image's overall gray value by increasing appropriate gray points, and then use gray-level redundancy HE method to compress the gray-scale of the image. The algorithm can enhance image detail information. Through MATLAB simulation, this paper compares the algorithm with the histogram equalization method and the algorithm based on gray redundancy histogram-dealing technique , and verifies the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  13. Warping-based co-registration of thermal infrared images: Study of factors influencing its applicability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, D.; Pinti, P.; Di Donato, L.; Merla, A.

    2017-06-01

    A relevant issue for processing biomedical thermal imaging data is the availability of tools for objective and quantitative comparison of images across different conditions or subjects. To this goal, a solution can be offered by projecting the thermal distribution data onto a fictitious template to obtain a common reference for comparison across cases or subjects. In this preliminary study, we tested the feasibility of applying a warping procedure on infrared thermal images. Fifteen thermal images of checkerboard were recorded at three different distances and five different angles in order to evaluate which factor mostly influences the warping accuracy. The accuracy of three different warping transformation models (local weighted mean (LWM), polynomial, affine) was tested by comparing the positioning error between users' selected fiduciary points on each thermal image and their corresponding reference position assigned on the template image. Fifteen users, divided into three groups upon on their experience in thermal imaging processing, participated in this study in order to evaluate the effect of experience in applying a warping procedure to the analysis of thermal infrared images. The most relevant factor influencing the positioning and thermal errors is the acquisition distance, while the users' level of experience and the inclination angle do not seem to play the same importance. Comparing the three transformations, the LWM seems to be the best in terms of minimizing the two categories of errors. This preliminary work helps to understand the limits and the possibilities of applying warping techniques for objective, quantitative and automatic thermal image comparisons.

  14. Maize kernel hardness classification by near infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging and multivariate data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul; Geladi, Paul; Fox, Glen; Manley, Marena

    2009-10-27

    The use of near infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging and hyperspectral image analysis for distinguishing between hard, intermediate and soft maize kernels from inbred lines was evaluated. NIR hyperspectral images of two sets (12 and 24 kernels) of whole maize kernels were acquired using a Spectral Dimensions MatrixNIR camera with a spectral range of 960-1662 nm and a sisuChema SWIR (short wave infrared) hyperspectral pushbroom imaging system with a spectral range of 1000-2498 nm. Exploratory principal component analysis (PCA) was used on absorbance images to remove background, bad pixels and shading. On the cleaned images, PCA could be used effectively to find histological classes including glassy (hard) and floury (soft) endosperm. PCA illustrated a distinct difference between glassy and floury endosperm along principal component (PC) three on the MatrixNIR and PC two on the sisuChema with two distinguishable clusters. Subsequently partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied to build a classification model. The PLS-DA model from the MatrixNIR image (12 kernels) resulted in root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) value of 0.18. This was repeated on the MatrixNIR image of the 24 kernels which resulted in RMSEP of 0.18. The sisuChema image yielded RMSEP value of 0.29. The reproducible results obtained with the different data sets indicate that the method proposed in this paper has a real potential for future classification uses.

  15. Modalities and Clinical Applications of Dynamic Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Sponsoring/Monitoring Agency Name(s) and Address(es) US Army Research, Development & Standardization Group (UK) PSC 802 Box 15 FPO AE 09499-1500 Sponsor...Gratt. “Nitric oxide in the physiopathology of temporomandibular pain,” J Oral Maxillofacial Surg. 56: 872- 882, 1998. [9] M. Anbar, L. Milescu, “Scope

  16. Solidification process and infrared image characteristics of permanent mold castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viets, Roman; Breuer, Markus; Haferkamp, Heinz; Kruessel, Thomas; Niemeyer, Matthias

    1999-03-01

    Interdependence between the development of temperature gradients at the solid-liquid interface during solidification of metals and the formation of local defects demands for thermal investigation. In foundry practice thermocouples are used to control the die's overall cooling-rate, but fluctuations in product quality still occur. Capturing FIR- thermograms after opening the die visualizes the state, when most thermal throughput has already flattened the temperature gradients in the mold. Rapid dissipation of heat from liquid metal to the mold during solidification forces further approach of the process investigation by slowing down the heat flux or the use of transparent mold material. Aluminum gravity casting experiments under technical vacuum conditions lead to decelerated solidification by suppression of convection and image sequences containing explicit characteristics that could be assigned to local shrinkage of the casting. Hence relevant clusters are extracted and thermal profiles are drawn from image series, pointing out correlations between feeding performance from the sink heads and the appearance of local defects. Tracing thermal processes in vacuum casting can scarcely be transferred to image data in foundry practice, since only little analogies exist between atmospheric and vacuum casting. The diagnosis of the casting process requires detection of the still closed mold using a transparent silica- aerogel sheet as part of the die. Hereby thermograms of the initial heat input are recorded by adapting a NIR-camera in addition to the FIR-unit. Thus the entire thermal compensation at the joint face for each casting is visualized. This experimental set-up is used for image sequence analysis related to the intermediate casting phases of mold filling, body formation and solidification shrinkage.

  17. Infrared Imaging of Faculae at the Deepest Photospheric Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-30

    heliostat of the National Solar Observatory McMath telescope at Kitt Peak. In place of the usual image-forming mirror, a 20 cm objective lens of 9 m focal...faculae put forward by Schatten et al. (1986). In that model, the faculae are interpreted as the sites of increased advection of heat from below by...systematic upflows. This increased local heat input is considered to cause heating of the facular subphotospheric layers and to increase their pressure

  18. An Improved Infrared/Visible Fusion for Astronomical Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attiq Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An undecimated dual tree complex wavelet transform (UDTCWT based fusion scheme for astronomical visible/IR images is developed. The UDTCWT reduces noise effects and improves object classification due to its inherited shift invariance property. Local standard deviation and distance transforms are used to extract useful information (especially small objects. Simulation results compared with the state-of-the-art fusion techniques illustrate the superiority of proposed scheme in terms of accuracy for most of the cases.

  19. Static and dynamic thermal infrared signatures measured during the FESTER experiment: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, W. H.; February, F.; Seiffer, D. P.; Eisele, C.

    2016-10-01

    The First European South African Experiment (FESTER) was conducted over about a 10 month period at the Institute of Maritime Technology (IMT) in False Bay, South Africa. One of the principal goals was recording of static and dynamic thermal infrared signatures under different environmental conditions for both validations of existing thermal equilibrium signature prediction codes, but also to aid development of dynamic thermal signature models. A small scientific work boat (called Sea Lab) was used as the principal target and sensor platform. Painted metal plates of different thicknesses were also used as infrared targets on-board Sea Lab to study static/dynamic thermal signatures and were also fitted with pyrgeometers, pyrometers and iButton temperature sensors/loggers. First results focused on the variable of thermal signatures as function of environmental conditions and the accuracy of calculated source temperatures (from measured radiometric temperatures) compared to the physical temperature measurements of the plates.

  20. Shape recovery using high dynamic range images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zuoyong; Ma Lizhuang; Li Zhong

    2008-01-01

    An effective method for object shape recovery using HDRIs (high dynamic range images) is proposed. The radiance values of each point on the reference sphere and target object are firstly calculated, thus the set of candidate normals of each target point are found by comparing its radiance to that of each reference sphere point. In single-image shape recovery, a smoothness operation is applied to the target normals to obtain a stable and reasonable result; while in photometric stereo, radiance vectors of reference and target objects formed due to illuminations under different light source directions are directly compared to get the most suitable target normals. Finally, the height values can be recovered from the resulting normal field. Because diffuse and specular reflection are handled in an unified framework with radiance, our approach eliminates the limitation presented in most recovery strategies, i.e., only Lambertian model can be used. The experiment results from the real and synthesized images show the performance of our approach.

  1. Near-infrared induced charge dynamics of the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, David A.; Grote, Richard R.; Exarhos, Annemarie L.; Bassett, Lee C.

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a key functional element in emerging quantum technologies such as nodes in quantum information processing and nanoscale sensors for condensed matter physics and biology. Recent efforts to optimize the NV's functionality lead to the discovery of photoinduced charge-state switching between the negative (NV-) and neutral (NV0) states which holds great potential to enhance the fidelity of spin readout. While the charge state dynamics under visible illumination have been studied, the effect of infrared light remains unexplored. Here, we use a tunable, pulsed infrared source to illuminate NV centers under various spin and optical states. Precise time-domain control of visible, microwave, and infrared pulses together with single-shot charge readout allows for the direct probing of spin and charge dynamics induced by the infrared light. This new understanding is relevant for the development of advanced protocols to leverage the NV's complete spin, charge, and optical dynamics for quantum control and sensing applications.

  2. Path integral Liouville dynamics: Applications to infrared spectra of OH, water, ammonia, and methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian, E-mail: jianliupku@pku.edu.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Zhijun [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-01-21

    Path integral Liouville dynamics (PILD) is applied to vibrational dynamics of several simple but representative realistic molecular systems (OH, water, ammonia, and methane). The dipole-derivative autocorrelation function is employed to obtain the infrared spectrum as a function of temperature and isotopic substitution. Comparison to the exact vibrational frequency shows that PILD produces a reasonably accurate peak position with a relatively small full width at half maximum. PILD offers a potentially useful trajectory-based quantum dynamics approach to compute vibrational spectra of molecular systems.

  3. A time-resolved infrared vibrational spectroscopic study of the photo-dynamics of crystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towrie, Mike; Parker, Anthony W; Ronayne, Kate L; Bowes, Katharine F; Cole, Jacqueline M; Raithby, Paul R; Warren, John E

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared vibrational spectroscopy is a structurally sensitive probe of the excited-state properties of matter. The technique has found many applications in the study of molecules in dilute solution phase but has rarely been applied to crystalline samples. We report on the use of a sensitive pump-probe time-resolved infrared spectrometer and sample handling techniques for studies of the ultrafast excited-state dynamics of crystalline materials. The charge transfer excited states of crystalline metal carbonyls and the proton transfer of dihydroxyquinones are presented and compared with the solution phase.

  4. Huanglongbing (citrus greening) detection using visible, near infrared and thermal imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Maja, Joe Mari; Buchanon, Sherrie; Ehsani, Reza

    2013-02-06

    This study demonstrates the applicability of visible-near infrared and thermal imaging for detection of Huanglongbing (HLB) disease in citrus trees. Visible-near infrared (440-900 nm) and thermal infrared spectral reflectance data were collected from individual healthy and HLB-infected trees. Data analysis revealed that the average reflectance values of the healthy trees in the visible region were lower than those in the near infrared region, while the opposite was the case for HLB-infected trees. Moreover, 560 nm, 710 nm, and thermal band showed maximum class separability between healthy and HLB-infected groups among the evaluated visible-infrared bands. Similarly, analysis of several vegetation indices indicated that the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), Vogelmann red-edge index (VOG) and modified red-edge simple ratio (mSR) demonstrated good class separability between the two groups. Classification studies using average spectral reflectance values from the visible, near infrared, and thermal bands (13 spectral features) as input features indicated that an average overall classification accuracy of about 87%, with 89% specificity and 85% sensitivity could be achieved with classification models such as support vector machine for trees with symptomatic leaves.

  5. Infrared spectroscopy and nano-imaging of the insulator-to-metal transition in vanadium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazilbash, M. M.; Brehm, M.; Andreev, G. O.; Frenzel, A.; Ho, P.-C.; Chae, Byung-Gyu; Kim, Bong-Jun; Yun, Sun Jin; Kim, Hyun-Tak; Balatsky, A. V.; Shpyrko, O. G.; Maple, M. B.; Keilmann, F.; Basov, D. N.

    2009-02-01

    We present a detailed infrared study of the insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) in vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films. Conventional infrared spectroscopy was employed to investigate the IMT in the far field. Scanning near-field infrared microscopy directly revealed the percolative IMT with increasing temperature. We confirmed that the phase transition is also percolative with cooling across the IMT. We present extensive near-field infrared images of phase coexistence in the IMT regime in VO2 . We find that the coexisting insulating and metallic regions at a fixed temperature are static on the time scale of our measurements. A distinctive approach for analyzing the far-field and near-field infrared data within the Bruggeman effective medium theory was employed to extract the optical constants of the incipient metallic puddles at the onset of the IMT. We found divergent effective carrier mass in the metallic puddles that demonstrates the importance of electronic correlations to the IMT in VO2 . We employ the extended dipole model for a quantitative analysis of the observed near-field infrared amplitude contrast and compare the results with those obtained with the basic dipole model.

  6. Huanglongbing (Citrus Greening Detection Using Visible, Near Infrared and Thermal Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ehsani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the applicability of visible-near infrared and thermal imaging for detection of Huanglongbing (HLB disease in citrus trees. Visible-near infrared (440–900 nm and thermal infrared spectral reflectance data were collected from individual healthy and HLB-infected trees. Data analysis revealed that the average reflectance values of the healthy trees in the visible region were lower than those in the near infrared region, while the opposite was the case for HLB-infected trees. Moreover, 560 nm, 710 nm, and thermal band showed maximum class separability between healthy and HLB-infected groups among the evaluated visible-infrared bands. Similarly, analysis of several vegetation indices indicated that the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, Vogelmann red-edge index (VOG and modified red-edge simple ratio (mSR demonstrated good class separability between the two groups. Classification studies using average spectral reflectance values from the visible, near infrared, and thermal bands (13 spectral features as input features indicated that an average overall classification accuracy of about 87%, with 89% specificity and 85% sensitivity could be achieved with classification models such as support vector machine for trees with symptomatic leaves.

  7. Dynamic PET and Optical Imaging and Compartment Modeling using a Dual-labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu, Ning Guo, Quanzheng Li, Ying Ma, Orit Jacboson, Seulki Lee, Hak Soo Choi, James R. Mansfield, Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine if dynamic optical imaging could provide comparable kinetic parameters to that of dynamic PET imaging by a near-infrared dye/64Cu dual-labeled cyclic RGD peptide.Methods: The integrin αvβ3 binding RGD peptide was conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA for copper labeling and PET imaging and a near-infrared dye ZW-1 for optical imaging. The in vitro biological activity of RGD-C(DOTA-ZW-1 was characterized by cell staining and receptor binding assay. Sixty-min dynamic PET and optical imaging were acquired on a MDA-MB-435 tumor model. Singular value decomposition (SVD method was applied to compute the dynamic optical signal from the two-dimensional optical projection images. Compartment models were used to quantitatively analyze and compare the dynamic optical and PET data.Results: The dual-labeled probe 64Cu-RGD-C(DOTA-ZW-1 showed integrin specific binding in vitro and in vivo. The binding potential (Bp derived from dynamic optical imaging (1.762 ± 0.020 is comparable to that from dynamic PET (1.752 ± 0.026.Conclusion: The signal un-mixing process using SVD improved the accuracy of kinetic modeling of 2D dynamic optical data. Our results demonstrate that 2D dynamic optical imaging with SVD analysis could achieve comparable quantitative results as dynamic PET imaging in preclinical xenograft models.

  8. Provisional maps of thermal areas in Yellowstone National Park, based on satellite thermal infrared imaging and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Heasler, Henry; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2014-01-01

    Maps that define the current distribution of geothermally heated ground are useful toward setting a baseline for thermal activity to better detect and understand future anomalous hydrothermal and (or) volcanic activity. Monitoring changes in the dynamic thermal areas also supports decisions regarding the development of Yellowstone National Park infrastructure, preservation and protection of park resources, and ensuring visitor safety. Because of the challenges associated with field-based monitoring of a large, complex geothermal system that is spread out over a large and remote area, satellite-based thermal infrared images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) were used to map the location and spatial extent of active thermal areas, to generate thermal anomaly maps, and to quantify the radiative component of the total geothermal heat flux. ASTER thermal infrared data acquired during winter nights were used to minimize the contribution of solar heating of the surface. The ASTER thermal infrared mapping results were compared to maps of thermal areas based on field investigations and high-resolution aerial photos. Field validation of the ASTER thermal mapping is an ongoing task. The purpose of this report is to make available ASTER-based maps of Yellowstone’s thermal areas. We include an appendix containing the names and characteristics of Yellowstone’s thermal areas, georeferenced TIFF files containing ASTER thermal imagery, and several spatial data sets in Esri shapefile format.

  9. Fast and Accurate Collocation of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Measurements with Cross-Track Infrared Sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the fact that Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS are currently onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP satellite and will continue to be carried on the same platform as future Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS satellites for the next decade, it is desirable to develop a fast and accurate collocation scheme to collocate VIIRS products and measurements with CrIS for applications that rely on combining measurements from two sensors such as inter-calibration, geolocation assessment, and cloud detection. In this study, an accurate and fast collocation method to collocate VIIRS measurements within CrIS instantaneous field of view (IFOV directly based on line-of-sight (LOS pointing vectors is developed and discussed in detail. We demonstrate that this method is not only accurate and precise from a mathematical perspective, but also easy to implement computationally. More importantly, with optimization, this method is very fast and efficient and thus can meet operational requirements. Finally, this collocation method can be extended to a wide variety of sensors on different satellite platforms.

  10. Intraoperative Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging using indocyanine green in colorectal carcinomatosis surgery: Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabino, G; Klein, J P; Porcheron, J; Grichine, A; Coll, J-L; Cottier, M

    2016-12-01

    This study assesses the value of using Intraoperative Near Infrared Fluorescence Imaging and Indocyanine green to detect colorectal carcinomatosis during oncological surgery. In colorectal carcinomatosis cancer, two of the most important prognostic factors are completeness of staging and completeness of cytoreductive surgery. Presently, intraoperative assessment of tumoral margins relies on palpation and visual inspection. The recent introduction of Near Infrared fluorescence image guidance provides new opportunities for surgical roles, particularly in cancer surgery. The study was a non-randomized, monocentric, pilot "ex vivo" blinded clinical trial validated by the ethical committee of University Hospital of Saint Etienne. Ten patients with colorectal carcinomatosis cancer scheduled for cytoreductive surgery were included. Patients received 0.25 mg/kg of Indocyanine green intravenously 24 h before surgery. A Near Infrared camera was used to detect "ex-vivo" fluorescent lesions. There was no surgical mortality. Each analysis was done blindly. In a total of 88 lesions analyzed, 58 were classified by a pathologist as cancerous and 30 as non-cancerous. Among the 58 cancerous lesions, 42 were correctly classified by the Intraoperative Near-Infrared camera (sensitivity of 72.4%). Among the 30 non-cancerous lesions, 18 were correctly classified by the Intraoperative Near-Infrared camera (specificity of 60.0%). Near Infrared fluorescence imaging is a promising technique for intraoperative tumor identification. It could help the surgeon to determine resection margins and reduce the risk of locoregional recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ the Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  11. Resolved Near-Infrared Image of Inner Cavity in GM Aur Transitional Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, Daehyeon; Carson, Joseph C; Janson, Markus; Kwon, Jungmi; Nakagawa, Takao; Mayama, Satoshi; Uyama, Taichi; Yang, Yi; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Abe, Lyu; Akiyama, Eiji; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D; Currie, Thayne; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Matsuo, Taro; Mcelwain, Michael W; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Turner, Edwin L; Watanabe, Makoto; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2016-01-01

    We present high-contrast H-band polarized intensity images of the transitional disk around the young solar-like star GM Aur. The near-infrared direct imaging of the disk was derived by polarimetric differential imaging using the Subaru 8.2-m Telescope and HiCIAO. An angular resolution and inner working angle of 0.07" and r~0.05", respectively, were obtained. We clearly resolved a large inner cavity, with a measured radius of 18+/-2 au, which is smaller than that of a submillimeter interferometric image (28 au). This discrepancy in the cavity radii at near-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths may be caused by a 3-4M_Jup planet about 20 au away from the star, near the edge of the cavity. The presence of a near-infrared inner is a strong constraint on hypotheses of inner cavity formation in a transitional disk. Dust filtration mechanism has been proposed to explain the large cavity in the submillimeter image, but our results suggest that this mechanism must be combined with an additional process. We found that...

  12. Search for astronomical sites suitable for infrared observations using GOES satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducati, Jorge R.; Feijo, Eleandro S.

    2003-04-01

    Images from GOES satellite were used to develop a method to search for sites suitable to astronomical observations in the infrared. An area of study located in the Peruvian Andes was chosen, with altitudes above 2500 m. Forty-three images from the GOES meteorological satellite in channels 3, 4 and 5 were used. The GOES images, spanning an 11-day period, in each channel, were combined to produced images expressing the surface visibility in each channel. Atmospheric turbulence could be estimated from the variation of visibility over six-hour periods, with one image per hour. As criteria to classify sites on the Andes, we combined information on altitude, visibility of the surface in the infrared, the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere, and atmospheric turbulence. Results of this new method showed that the region of Moquegua, in South Peru, is to be preferred in surveys for astronomical sites. Comparisons with results from other investigators, which used other approaches, indicated that this methodology can produce valid results and can be applied to studies covering larger periods. The general results of this study indicate that the method is valid and can effectively be used as an important resource in surveys for infrared astronomical sites.

  13. Search for astronomical sites suitable for infrared observations using goes satellite images release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducati, J. R.; Feijó, E.

    2003-08-01

    Astronomical sites are traditionally found after studies performed over many years, including preliminary selection of places based in general information on climate, clear skies and logistical adequacy. It follows extensive "in situ" monitoring of seeing and cloudiness. Theses procedures are long and expensive, and alternatives can be looked for. In this study, images from GOES meteorological satellite were used to develop a method to search for sites suitable to astronomical observations in the infrared. An area of study located in the Peruvian Andes was chosen, with altitudes above 2500 m. 43 images from the GOES meteorological satellite in chanels 3, 4 and 5 were used. The GOES images, spanning a 11-day period, in each channel, were combined to produced images expressing the surface visibility in each channel. Atmospheric turbulence could be estimated from the variation of visibility over six-hour periods, with one image per hour. As criteria to classify sites on the Andes, we combined information on altitude, visibility of the surface in the infrared, the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere, and atmospheric turbulence. Results of this new method showed that the region of Moquegua, in South Peru, is to be preferred in surveys for astronomical sites. Comparisons with results from other investigators, which used other approaches, indicated that this methodology produces valid results and can be used to studies spanning larger periods. The general results of this study indicate that the method can efectively be used as an important resource in surveys for infrared astronomical sites

  14. Demonstration of dual-band infrared thermal imaging for bridge inspection. Phase II, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, P.F.; Del Grande, N.K.; Schaich, P.C.

    1996-03-01

    Developing and implementing methods of effective bridge rehabilitation is a major issue for the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The nation spends $5 billion annually to replace, rehabilitate or construct new bridges. According to the National Bridge Inventory, over 100,000 U.S. bridges are structurally deficient. About 40,000 of these bridges have advanced deck deterioration. The most common causes of serious deck deterioration is delamination. Delaminations result when steel reinforcements within the bridge deck corrode, creating gaps that separate the concrete into layers. A reliable inspection technology, capable of identifying delaminations, would represent a power new tool in bridge maintenance. To date, most bridge inspections rely on human interpretation of surface visual features of chain dragging. These methods are slow, disruptive, unreliable and raise serious safety concerns. Infrared thermal imaging detects subsurface delaminations and surface clutter, which is introduced by foreign material on the roadway. Typically, foreign material which is not always evident on a video tape image, produces a unique IR reflectance background unlike the thermal response of a subsurface delamination. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermal imaging to identify and remove nonthermal IR reflectance backgrounds from foreign material on the roadway. DBIR methods improve the performance of IR thermal imaging by a factor of ten, compared to single-band infrared (SBIR) methods. DBIR thermal imaging allows precise temperature measurement to reliably locate bridge deck delaminations and remove wavelength-dependent emissivity variations due to foreign material on the roadway.

  15. Resolved Near-infrared Image of the Inner Cavity in the GM Aur Transitional Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Daehyeon; Hashimoto, Jun; Carson, Joseph C.; Janson, Markus; Kwon, Jungmi; Nakagawa, Takao; Mayama, Satoshi; Uyama, Taichi; Yang, Yi; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Abe, Lyu; Akiyama, Eiji; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Currie, Thayne; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Matsuo, Taro; Mcelwain, Michael W.; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Yamada, Toru; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2016-11-01

    We present high-contrast H-band polarized intensity (PI) images of the transitional disk around the young solar-like star GM Aur. The near-infrared direct imaging of the disk was derived by polarimetric differential imaging using the Subaru 8.2 m Telescope and HiCIAO. An angular resolution and an inner working angle of 0.″07 and r ˜ 0.″05, respectively, were obtained. We clearly resolved a large inner cavity, with a measured radius of 18 ± 2 au, which is smaller than that of a submillimeter interferometric image (28 au). This discrepancy in the cavity radii at near-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths may be caused by a 3-4 M Jup planet about 20 au away from the star, near the edge of the cavity. The presence of a near-infrared inner cavity is a strong constraint on hypotheses for inner cavity formation in a transitional disk. A dust filtration mechanism has been proposed to explain the large cavity in the submillimeter image, but our results suggest that this mechanism must be combined with an additional process. We found that the PI slope of the outer disk is significantly different from the intensity slope obtained from HST/NICMOS, and this difference may indicate the grain growth process in the disk. Based on ircs and hiciao data collected at subaru telescope, operated by the national astro-nomical observatory of japan.

  16. A novel MEMS-based focal plane array for infrared imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chaobo; JIAO Binbin; SHI Shali; YE Tianchun; CHEN Dapeng; ZHANG Qingchuan; GUO Zheying; DONG Fengliang; WU Xiaoping

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of opto-mechanical effect and micro electromechanical system(MEMS)technology,a novel substrate-free focal plane array(FPA)with the thermal isolated structure for uncooled infrared imaging is developed,even as alternate evaporated Au on SiN cantilever is used for thermal isolation.A human thermal image is obtained successfully by using the infrared imaging system composed of the FPA and optical detecting system.The experiment results show that the realization of thermal isolation structure in substrate-free FPA increases the temperature rise of the deflecting leg effectively,whereas the noise equivalent temperature difierence(NETDl is about 200 mK.

  17. The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER): The Wide-Field Imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Bock, J; Arai, T; Battle, J; Cooray, A; Hristov, V; Keating, B; Kim, M G; Lam, A C; Lee, D H; Levenson, L R; Mason, P; Matsumoto, T; Matsuura, S; Mitchell-Wynne, K; Nam, U W; Renbarger, T; Smidt, J; Suzuki, K; Tsumura, K; Wada, T; Zemcov, M

    2012-01-01

    We have developed and characterized an imaging instrument to measure the spatial properties of the diffuse near-infrared extragalactic background light in a search for fluctuations from z > 6 galaxies during the epoch of reionization. The instrument is part of the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER), designed to observe the extragalactic background light above the Earth's atmosphere during a suborbital sounding rocket flight. The imaging instrument incorporates a 2x2 degree field of view, to measure fluctuations over the predicted peak of the spatial power spectrum at 10 arcminutes, and 7"x7" pixels, to remove lower redshift galaxies to a depth sufficient to reduce the low-redshift galaxy clustering foreground below instrumental sensitivity. The imaging instrument employs two cameras with \\Delta \\lambda / \\lambda ~0.5 bandpasses centered at 1.1 and 1.6 microns to spectrally discriminate reionization extragalactic background fluctuations from local foreground fluctuations. CIBER operates at wavelengt...

  18. The InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: latest science cases and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Shelley A; Do, Tuan; Marshall, Daniel; Larkin, James E; Moore, Anna M; Adamkovics, Mate; Andersen, David; Armus, Lee; Barth, Aaron; Cote, Patrick; Cooke, Jeff; Chisholm, Eric M; Davidge, Timothy; Dunn, Jennifer S; Dumas, Christophe; Ellerbroeck, Brent L; Ghez, Andrea M; Hao, Lei; Hayano, Yutaka; Liu, Michael; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique; Lu, Jessica R; Mao, Shude; Marois, Christian; Pandey, Shashi B; Philips, Andrew C; Schoeck, Matthias; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Subramanian, Smitha; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tan, Jonathan C; Terai, Tsuyoshi; Treu, Tommaso; Simard, Luc; Weiss, Jason L; Wincensten, James; Wong, Michael; Zhang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) first light instrument IRIS (Infrared Imaging Spectrograph) will complete its preliminary design phase in 2016. The IRIS instrument design includes a near-infrared (0.85 - 2.4 micron) integral field spectrograph (IFS) and imager that are able to conduct simultaneous diffraction-limited observations behind the advanced adaptive optics system NFIRAOS. The IRIS science cases have continued to be developed and new science studies have been investigated to aid in technical performance and design requirements. In this development phase, the IRIS science team has paid particular attention to the selection of filters, gratings, sensitivities of the entire system, and science cases that will benefit from the parallel mode of the IFS and imaging camera. We present new science cases for IRIS using the latest end-to-end data simulator on the following topics: Solar System bodies, the Galactic center, active galactic nuclei (AGN), and distant gravitationally-lensed galaxies. We then briefl...

  19. Investigation of near infrared autofluorescence imaging for the detection of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Bold, R; White, R d; Ramsamooj, R

    2005-08-19

    Detection of breast cancer in fresh tissue obtained from surgery is investigated using Near-infrared autofluorescence imaging under laser excitation at 532-nm and 632.8-nm. The differences in intensity between the three main components of breast tissue (cancer, fibrous and adipose) are estimated and compared to those obtained from cross-polarized light scattering images recorded under polarized illumination at 700-nm. The optical spectroscopic images for each tissue sample were subsequently compared with the histopathology slides. The experimental results indicate that the intensity of the near-infrared emission is considerably different in breast cancer compared to that of the adjacent non-neoplastic tissues (adipose and fibrous tissue). The experimental results suggest that 632.8-nm excitation offers key advantages compared to 532-nm excitation.

  20. Imaging Collective Dynamics in the Neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Sonya

    2005-03-01

    Central to understanding collective neural dynamics is the problem of obtaining spatiotemporal data which reveals the collective behavior of neural ensembles; this can be done either through multi-contact recordings or through various imaging modalities. As an example of both the power and limitations of imaging techniques, we consider the onset, spread, and termination of focal seizures, imaged using the intrinsic optical signal (IOS). The IOS is a change in light reflectance from neural tissue that correlates with the underlying electrophysiological activity. With incident light in the green range, the IOS reflects changes in blood volume (CBV signal); for incident light in the orange range, the IOS shows a change in the oxygenation state of hemoglobin (Hbr signal), and can be correlated with the BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) fMRI signal; for incident red light, the IOS reflects changes in cell volume and/or light scattering (LS signal). Using the IOS to image the spread of focal neocortical seizures induced by 4-aminopyridine in the rat, we found that the CBV, Hbr and LS signals were equally useful in localizing the ictal onset. We found a focal, profound dip in hemoglobin oxygenation (Hbr signal) during the entire seizure duration, implying that brain perfusion is inadequate to meet the metabolic demands of an epileptic focus. We observed significant variability in the spatial distribution of the active region during seizure termination. However, the IOS was unable to resolve electrophysiologically distinct patterns of seizure onset and the signal, at all incident wavelengths, persisted long after seizure termination.

  1. The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: optical design of IRIS imager with "co-axis double TMA"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Ryuji; Harakawa, Hiroki; Ikenoue, Bungo; Larkin, James; Moore, Anna; Obuchi, Yoshiyuki; Phillips, Andrew C.; Saito, Sakae; Uraguchi, Fumihiro; Wincentsen, James; Wright, Shelley; Hayano, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    IRIS (InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph) is one of the first-generation instruments for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). IRIS is composed of a combination of near-infrared (0.84-2.4 μm) diffraction limited imager and integral field spectrograph. To achieve near-diffraction limited resolutions in the near-infrared wavelength region, IRIS uses the advanced adaptive optics system NFIRAOS (Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System) and integrated on-instrument wavefront sensors (OIWFS). However, IRIS itself has challenging specifications. First, the overall system wavefront error should be less than 40 nm in Y, z, J, and H-band and 42 nm in K-band over a 34.0 × 34.0 arcsecond field of view. Second, the throughput of the imager components should be more than 42 percent. To achieve the extremely low wavefront error and high throughput, all reflective design has been newly proposed. We have adopted a new design policy called "Co-Axis double-TMA", which cancels the asymmetric aberrations generated by "collimator/TMA" and "camera/TMA" efficiently. The latest imager design meets all specifications, and, in particular, the wavefront error is less than 17.3 nm and throughput is more than 50.8 percent. However, to meet the specification of wavefront error and throughput as built performance, the IRIS imager requires both mirrors with low surface irregularity after high-reflection coating in cryogenic and high-level Assembly Integration and Verification (AIV). To deal with these technical challenges, we have done the tolerance analysis and found that total pass rate is almost 99 percent in the case of gauss distribution and more than 90 percent in the case of parabolic distribution using four compensators. We also have made an AIV plan and feasibility check of the optical elements. In this paper, we will present the details of this optical system.

  2. Quantified infrared imaging of ignition and combustion in a supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombrello, Timothy; Blunck, David L.; Resor, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The utility of quantified infrared radiation imaging was evaluated through interrogating ignition and burning processes within a cavity-based flameholder in supersonic flows. Two ignition techniques, spark discharge and pulse detonation, along with quasi-steady cavity burning were used to assess the sensitivities of measurements of radiation intensities in the infrared. The shedding of ignition kernels from the spark discharge was imaged, showing that sufficient signal-to-noise ratios can be achieved even with weak radiation emission levels. The ignition events using a pulse detonator were captured with time-resolved measurements of the plume evolution, including the barrel shock, Mach disk, and shock diamonds. Radiation emissions from subsequent firings of the pulse detonator increased, indicating that heat loss to the tube walls occurred in the early pulses. Imaging of the quasi-steady burning within the cavity demonstrated that the highest burning flux (visible broadband chemiluminescence) and radiation from hydrocarbons (3.4 µm) do not coincide with each other for the fueling strategy used. Numerical simulations provided insight into the species distributions that caused the infrared emissions. Overall, infrared radiation measurements have been shown to be feasible through combustor windows in the harsh combustion environments that were interrogated, and offer a new avenue for rapid and quantitative measurements of reactive flow.

  3. Optical assembly of a visible through thermal infrared multispectral imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bender, S.; Byrd, D. [Los Alamos National Labs., NM (United States). NIS Div.; Rappoport, W.; Shen, G.Y. [Raytheon Optical Systems, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The Optical Assembly (OA) for the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) program has been fabricated, assembled, and successfully tested for its performance. It represents a major milestone achieved towards completion of this earth observing E-O imaging sensor that is to be operated in low earth orbit. Along with its wide-field-of-view (WFOV), 1.82{degree} along-track and 1.38{degree} cross-track, and comprehensive on-board calibration system, the pushbroom imaging sensor employs a single mechanically cooled focal plane with 15 spectral bands covering a wavelength range from 0.45 to 10.7 {micro}m. The OA has an off-axis three-mirror anastigmatic (TMA) telescope with a 36-cm unobscured clear aperture. The two key performance criteria, 80% enpixeled energy in the visible and radiometric stability of 1% 1{sigma} in the visible/near-infrared (VNIR) and short wavelength infrared (SWIR), of 1.45% 1{sigma} in the medium wavelength infrared (MWIR), and of 0.53% 1{sigma} long wavelength infrared (LWIR), as well as its low weight (less than 49 kg) and volume constraint (89 cm x 44 cm x 127 cm) drive the overall design configuration of the OA and fabrication requirements.

  4. Detection of leaks in buried rural water pipelines using thermal infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidenshink, Jeffery C.

    1985-01-01

    Leakage is a major problem in many pipelines. Minor leaks called 'seeper leaks', which generally range from 2 to 10 m3 per day, are common and are difficult to detect using conventional ground surveys. The objective of this research was to determine whether airborne thermal-infrared remote sensing could be used in detecting leaks and monitoring rural water pipelines. This study indicates that such leaks can be detected using low-altitude 8.7- to 11.5. micrometer wavelength, thermal infrared images collected under proper conditions.

  5. Near-Infrared Imaging Polarimetry of HD142527

    CERN Document Server

    Canovas, H; Hales, A; Jordan, A; Schreiber, M R; Casassus, S; Gledhill, T M; Pinte, C

    2013-01-01

    HD 142527 is a pre-transition disk with strong evidence for on-going planet formation. Recent observations show a disrupted disk with spiral arms, a dust-depleted inner cavity and the possible presence of gas streams driving gas from the outer disk towards the central star. We aim to derive the morphology of the disk, as well as the distribution and properties of the dust at its surface. We have obtained polarized differential images of HD 142527 at $H$ and $Ks$ bands with NaCo at the VLT. Combining these images with classical PSF-subtraction, we are able to derive the polarization degree of this disk. At $H$ band the polarization degree of the disk varies between 10% and 25%. This result cannot be reproduced by dust distributions containing highly porous material. The polarization is better matched by distributions of compact particles, with maximum sizes at least up to a few microns, in agreement with previous observations. We also observe two regions of low emission (nulls) in total and in polarized intens...

  6. Design of a portable imager for near-infrared visualization of cutaneous wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhaoqiang; Zhou, Jun; Dacy, Ashley; Zhao, Deyin; Kearney, Vasant; Zhou, Weidong; Tang, Liping; Hu, Wenjing

    2017-01-01

    A portable imager developed for real-time imaging of cutaneous wounds in research settings is described. The imager consists of a high-resolution near-infrared CCD camera capable of detecting both bioluminescence and fluorescence illuminated by an LED ring with a rotatable filter wheel. All external components are integrated into a compact camera attachment. The device is demonstrated to have competitive performance with a commercial animal imaging enclosure box setup in beam uniformity and sensitivity. Specifically, the device was used to visualize the bioluminescence associated with increased reactive oxygen species activity during the wound healing process in a cutaneous wound inflammation model. In addition, this device was employed to observe the fluorescence associated with the activity of matrix metalloproteinases in a mouse lipopolysaccharide-induced infection model. Our results support the use of the portable imager design as a noninvasive and real-time imaging tool to assess the extent of wound inflammation and infection.

  7. Optical readout uncooled infrared imaging detector using knife-edge filter operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Q; MIAO Z; GUO Z; DONG F; XIONG Z; WU X; CHEN D; LI C; JIAO B

    2007-01-01

    An optical readout uncooled infrared (IR) imaging detector of bimaterial cantilever array using knife-edge filter operation(KEFO) is demonstrated. The angle change of each cantilever in a focal plane array (FPA) can be simultaneously detected with a resolution of 10-5 degree. A deformation magnifying substrate-free micro-cantilever unit with multi-fold interval metallized legs is specially designed and modeled. A FPA with 160× 160 pixels is fabricated and thermal images with noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 400 mK are obtained by this imaging detector.

  8. Visualization of Anatomical Information in Near-Infrared Imaging for Robotic Urological Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savarimuthu, Thiusius Rajeeth; Minnillo, Brian; Taylor, Russels

    2011-01-01

    it may not relate to the surface visible in the visual endoscopic images. As critical surfaces as well as surgical targets often lie subsurface, a range of techniques (e.g. ultrasound and near-infrared imaging) and registration methods have been investigated as robotic surgery gains popularity. While......Commercial telerobotic surgery systems for soft tissue surgery are generally limited to visual imaging, though it is possible to simultaneously view picture-in-picture visualization of another workstation. However, it is not easy to correlate such information with the primary endoscopic view since...

  9. The Application of the Edge Sharpening Operator to the Breast Near-Infrared Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The principles of Gradient operator, Laplacian operator, LOG operator and Sobel operator are discussed. Certain features of breast can be extracted in different degrees and aspects from original images by applying four edge sharpening operators to the breast near-infrared imaging. A great number of cases prove that compared with the other three operators, the improved Sobel operator can effectively extract the structural features of the breast from an original image. It can be concluded that the improved Sobel operator can assist in diagnosing breast diseases.

  10. Design and fabrication of Si-HDPE hybrid Fresnel lenses for infrared imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaf, Ahmad Rosli Abdul; Sugiyama, Tsunetoshi; Yan, Jiwang

    2017-01-23

    In this work, novel hybrid Fresnel lenses for infrared (IR) optical applications were designed and fabricated. The Fresnel structures were replicated from an ultraprecision diamond-turned aluminum mold to an extremely thin layer (tens of microns) of high-density polyethylene polymer, which was directly bonded onto a flat single-crystal silicon wafer by press molding without using adhesives. Night mode imaging results showed that the fabricated lenses were able to visualize objects in dark fields with acceptable image quality. The capability of the lenses for thermography imaging was also demonstrated. This research provides a cost-effective method for fabricating ultrathin IR optical components.

  11. Breast cancer detection using Ktrans MRI imaging to guide near infrared spectroscopy tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinchao; Jiang, Shudong; Xu, Junqing; Zhao, Yan; Gui, Jiang; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2017-02-01

    The parametric image of Volume Transfer Coefficient (Ktrans) in MRI has been used to guide image reconstruction of Near-Infrared Spectral Tomography (NIRST). The image reconstruction used direct regularization, in which no segmentation has been involved. A total of 24 patients were involved in this study and the reconstructed results show that the tumor total hemoglobin (HbT) contrast could be used to differentiate the malignant from the benign cases (p-value= 0.018). The addition of the MRI information allows more accurate and definitive HbT values from the NIRST.

  12. Image quality improvement by the structured light illumination method in an optical readout cantilever array infrared imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yun; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Yu, Xiaomei; Kong, Lingqin; Ma, Wei; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-04-01

    The structured light illumination method is applied in an optical readout uncooled infrared imaging system to improve the IR image quality. The unavoidable nonuniform distribution of the initial bending angles of the bimaterial cantilever pixels in the focal plane array (FPA) can be well compensated by this method. An ordinary projector is used to generate structured lights of different intensity distribution. The projected light is divided into patches of rectangular regions, and the brightness of each region can be set automatically according to the deflection angles of the FPA and the light intensity focused on the imaging plane. By this method, the FPA image on the CCD plane can be much more uniform and the image quality of the IR target improved significantly. A comparative experiment is designed to verify the effectiveness. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed structured light illumination method outperforms the conventional one, especially when it is difficult to perfect the FPA fabrication.

  13. Noise estimation in infrared image sequences: a tool for the quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness of registration algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Valentina; Delsanto, Silvia; Knaflitz, Marco; Molinari, Filippo

    2008-07-01

    Dynamic infrared imaging has been proposed in literature as an adjunctive technique to mammography in breast cancer diagnosis. It is based on the acquisition of hundreds of consecutive thermal images with a frame rate ranging from 50 to 200 frames/s, followed by the harmonic analysis of temperature time series at each image pixel. However, the temperature fluctuation due to blood perfusion, which is the signal of interest, is small compared to the signal fluctuation due to subject movements. Hence, before extracting the time series describing temperature fluctuations, it is fundamental to realign the thermal images to attenuate motion artifacts. In this paper, we describe a method for the quantitative evaluation of any kind of feature-based registration algorithm on thermal image sequences, provided that an estimation of local velocities of reference points on the skin is available. As an example of evaluation of a registration algorithm, we report the evaluation of the SNR improvement obtained by applying a nonrigid piecewise linear algorithm.

  14. Adaptive grid-based confidence assessment for synthetic optoelectronic images by Physical Reasonable Infrared Scene Simulation Engine (PRISSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Sun, Hao; Ma, Xiangchao; Wang, Yucheng; Han, Yiping

    2017-09-01

    Like visible spectrum, synthetic infrared scenes reflect the invisible world of infrared features. Propagation of a typical infrared radiation involves a variety of sources of different sizes, shapes, intensities, roughness, temperature, etc., all of which would impose impacts on the fidelity of the synthetic images. Assessing the confidence of a synthetic infrared scene is therefore not so intuitive as evaluating the quality of a visible image. An adaptive grid-based method is proposed in this paper for similarity assessments between synthetic infrared images and the corresponding real infrared images, which is on a grid-by-grid basis. Different from many traditional methods, each grid in our work is weighted by a value that is simulated by a 2D Gamma distribution. Introducing adaptive grids and exerting a weighting value on each grid are the aspects of our method. To investigate the effectiveness of our method, an experiment was conducted for taking real mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) images, and the corresponding synthetic MWIR images were simulated by Physical Reasonable Infrared Scene Simulation Engine (PRISSE). The confidence of similarity assessments evaluated by our method is then compared to some popularly-used traditional assessment methods.

  15. Imaging telescope-spectrometer for infrared sky surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, Igor A.; Sholomitskii, Gennadii B.; Kuznetsov, Arkadii E.; Patrashin, Michail A.; Olejnikov, Leonid S.

    1995-06-01

    A new type of imaging telescope-spectrometer for surviving the sky aboard a satellite is described. A static Michelson interferometer in front of an objective with 2D-arrays in its focal plane is capable of providing interferograms both for point and extended sources. As an example, the telescope-spectrometer based on the 15-cm telescope of the IKON project and a plane-parallel Ge plate as a beamsplitter may have approximately equals 30 cm(superscript -1 spectral resolution in the range 3 - 20 micrometers . For higher resolution, such an objective interferometer has advantage over a dispersion spectrometer in the signal-to-noise ratio and is free from the disadvantage of an objective prism not providing spectra of extended sources.

  16. Piecewise Filter of Infrared Image Based on Moment Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yang; LI Yan-jun; ZHANG Ke

    2007-01-01

    The disadvantages of IR images mostly include high noise, blurry edge and so on. The characteristics make the existent smoothing methods ineffective in preserving edge. To solve this problem, a piecewise moment filter (PMF) is put forward. By using moment and piecewise linear theory, the filter can preserve edge. Based on the statistical model of random noise, a related-coefficient method is presented to estimate the variance of noise. The edge region and model are then detected by the estimated variance. The expectation of first-order derivatives is used in getting the reliable offset of edge.At last, a fast moment filter of double-stair edge model is used to gain the piecewise smoothing results and reduce the calculation. The experimental result shows that the new method has a better capability than other methods in suppressing noise and preserving edge.

  17. Dualband infrared imaging spectrometer: observations of the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVan, Paul D.; Beecken, Brian P.; Lindh, Cory

    2008-08-01

    We reported previously on full-disk observations of the sun through a layer of black polymer, used to protect the entrance aperture of a novel dualband spectrometer while transmitting discrete wavelength regions in the MWIR & LWIR1. More recently, the spectrometer was used to assess the accuracy of recovery of unknown blackbody temperatures2. Here, we briefly describe MWIR observations of the full Moon made in Jan 2008. As was the case for the solar observations, the Moon was allowed to drift across the spectrometer slit by Earth's rotation. A detailed sensor calibration performed prior to the observations accounts for sensor non-uniformities; the spectral images of the Moon therefore include atmospheric transmission features. Our plans are to repeat the observations at liquid helium temperatures, thereby allowing both MWIR & LWIR spectral coverage.

  18. Infrared imaging of normal and diseased cervical tissue sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bayden R.; Bambery, Keith R.; Miller, Lisa M.; Quinn, Michael; Chiriboga, Luis; Diem, Max; McNaughton, Don

    2005-02-01

    Synchrotron FTIR maps, focal plane array and linear array images recorded of 4 μm cervical biopsy sections from the surface epithelium and glandular endometrium are compared in terms of spatial resolution and applicability to the clinical environment. Synchrotron FTIR maps using a 10 μm aperture appear to provide a better spatial resolution capable of discerning single nuclei in the tissue matrix. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis performed on the synchrotron, focal plane array and linear array data in the 1700-1400 cm-1 region show very similar clusters and mean-extracted spectra, demonstrating the robustness of FTIR microscopy and UHCA in the analysis of tissue sections. Maps recorded with the focal plane array using a conventional globar source take one-fortieth of the time but the spatial resolution precludes true single cell analysis in the tissue matrix. The high spatial resolution achieved with the synchrotron shows potential as a gold standard for FTIR diagnosis of cervical samples.

  19. Operational Cloud-Motion Winds from Meteosat Infrared Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmetz, Johannes; Holmlund, Kenneth; Hoffman, Joel; Strauss, Bernard; Mason, Brian; Gaertner, Volker; Koch, Arno; van de Berg, Leo

    1993-07-01

    The displacement of clouds in successive satellite images reflects the atmospheric circulation at various scales. The main application of the satellite-derived cloud-motion vectors is their use as winds in the data analysis for numerical weather prediction. At low latitudes in particular they constitute an indispensible data source for numerical weather prediction.This paper describes the operational method of deriving cloud-motion winds (CMW) from the IR image (10.5 12.5 µm) of the European geostationary Meteostat satellites. The method is automatic, that is, the cloud tracking uses cross correlation and the height assignment is based on satellite observed brightness temperature and a forecast temperature profile. Semitransparent clouds undergo a height correction based on radiative forward calculations and simultaneous radiance observations in both the IR and water vapor (5.7 7.1 µm) channel. Cloud-motion winds are subject to various quality checks that include manual quality control as the last step. Typically about 3000 wind vectors are produced per day over four production cycles.This paper documents algorithm changes and improvements made to the operational CMWs over the last five years. The improvements are shown by long-term comparisons with both collocated radiosondes and the first guess of the forecast model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. In particular, the height assignment of a wind vector and radiance filtering techniques preceding the cloud tracking have ameliorated the errors in Meteostat winds. The slow speed bias of high-level CMWs (winds have been reduced from about 4 to 1.3 m s1 for a mean wind speed of 24 m s1. Correspondingly, the rms vectors error of Meteosat high-level CMWs decreased from about 7.8 to 5 m s1. Medium- and low-level CMWs were also significantly improved.

  20. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: general dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  1. Near-infrared microscopy imaging for quantitative analysis of active component in counterfeit imidacloprid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue; Cao, Jinli; Ye, Shengfeng; Duan, Jia; Wu, Lijun; Li, Qianqian; Min, Shungeng

    2012-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) imaging systems simultaneously record spectral and spatial information. Near-infrared imaging was applied to the identification of imidacloprid in both artificially mixed samples and commercial formulation in this study. The distributions of technical imidacloprid and additive in the heterogeneous counterfeit were obtained by the relationship imaging (RI) mode. Furthermore a series of samples which consisted of different contents of uniformly distributed imidacloprid were prepared and three data cubes were generated at each content. Extracted spectra from those images were imported to establish the partial least squares model. The model's results were: R2 99.21%, RMSEC 0.0306, RMSECV 0.0183, RMSECV/mean value 0.0348 and RSEP 0.0784. The prediction relative error of commercial formulation is 0.0680, indicating the predicted value was correlated to the real content. Lastly the chemical value reconstruction image of imidacloprid formulation products was calculated by MATLAB program. NIR microscopy imaging manifests herein its potential in qualitatively identifying the active component in counterfeit pesticide and quantifying the active component in scanned image.

  2. Near-infrared fluorescent probes in cancer imaging and therapy: an emerging field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi XM

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaomin Yi, Fuli Wang, Weijun Qin, Xiaojian Yang, Jianlin Yuan Department of Urology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, People's Republic of China Abstract: Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF imaging is an attractive modality for early cancer detection with high sensitivity and multi-detection capability. Due to convenient modification by conjugating with moieties of interests, NIRF probes are ideal candidates for cancer targeted imaging. Additionally, the combinatory application of NIRF imaging and other imaging modalities that can delineate anatomical structures extends fluorometric determination of biomedical information. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with NIRF dyes and anticancer agents contribute to the synergistic management of cancer, which integrates the advantage of imaging and therapeutic functions to achieve the ultimate goal of simultaneous diagnosis and treatment. Appropriate probe design with targeting moieties can retain the original properties of NIRF and pharmacokinetics. In recent years, great efforts have been made to develop new NIRF probes with better photostability and strong fluorescence emission, leading to the discovery of numerous novel NIRF probes with fine photophysical properties. Some of these probes exhibit tumoricidal activities upon light radiation, which holds great promise in photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and photoimmunotherapy. This review aims to provide a timely and concise update on emerging NIRF dyes and multifunctional agents. Their potential uses as agents for cancer specific imaging, lymph node mapping, and therapeutics are included. Recent advances of NIRF dyes in clinical use are also summarized. Keywords: near infrared dyes, nanoparticles, imaging, cancer targeting, cancer therapy

  3. Evaluating the health of compromised tissues using a near-infrared spectroscopic imaging system in clinical settings: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Lorenzo; Sowa, Michael G.; Hewko, Mark D.; Schattka, Bernhard J.; Payette, Jeri R.; Hastings, Michelle; Posthumus, Trevor B.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    2003-07-01

    The present and accepted standard for determining the status of tissue relies on visual inspection of the tissue. Based on the surface appearance of the tissue, medical personnel will make an assessment of the tissue and proceed to a course of action or treatment. Visual inspection of tissue is central to many areas of clinical medicine, and remains a cornerstone of dermatology, reconstructive plastic surgery, and in the management of chronic wounds, and burn injuries. Near infrared spectroscopic imaging holds the promise of being able to monitor the dynamics of tissue physiology in real-time and detect pathology in living tissue. The continuous measurement of metabolic, physiological, or structural changes in tissue is of primary concern in many clinical and biomedical domains. A near infrared hyperspectral imaging system was constructed for the assessment of burn injuries and skin flaps or skin grafts. This device merged basic science with engineering and integrated manufacturing to develop a device suitable to detect ischemic tissue. This device has the potential of providing measures of tissue physiology, oxygen delivery and tissue hydration during patient screening, in the operating room or during therapy and post-operative/treatment monitoring. Results from a pre-clinical burn injury study will be presented.

  4. Towards low-cost infrared imagers: how to leverage Si IC ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Dorota S.; Hilton, Allan; Klem, Ethan J. D.

    2016-10-01

    Although performance remains paramount, especially in defense and security applications, cost increasingly drives the implementation strategy for existing and emerging infrared imaging systems. In this paper, we review two technologies that leverage mainstream Si IC technology and infrastructure to increase manufacturability and throughput and decrease the cost of infrared focal plane arrays. In the first example, we review a wafer-level vacuum packaging approach which replaces die-at-a-time serial approaches with a parallel process in which vacuum enclosures for hundreds of microbolometer arrays are formed simultaneously. The second example is a novel nanostructured short-wave infrared sensor developed at RTI International that can be monolithically integrated with Si CMOS at wafer scale.

  5. AFM-IR: Technology and Applications in Nanoscale Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzi, Alexandre; Prater, Craig B

    2016-12-13

    Atomic force microscopy-based infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) is a rapidly emerging technique that provides chemical analysis and compositional mapping with spatial resolution far below conventional optical diffraction limits. AFM-IR works by using the tip of an AFM probe to locally detect thermal expansion in a sample resulting from absorption of infrared radiation. AFM-IR thus can provide the spatial resolution of AFM in combination with the chemical analysis and compositional imaging capabilities of infrared spectroscopy. This article briefly reviews the development and underlying technology of AFM-IR, including recent advances, and then surveys a wide range of applications and investigations using AFM-IR. AFM-IR applications that will be discussed include those in polymers, life sciences, photonics, solar cells, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, and cultural heritage. In the Supporting Information , the authors provide a theoretical section that reviews the physics underlying the AFM-IR measurement and detection mechanisms.

  6. Gas structure and dynamics towards bipolar infrared bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin-Long; Yu, Naiping; Zhang, Chuan-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Lan

    2017-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength analysis for four bipolar bubbles (G045.386-0.726, G049.998-0.125, G050.489+0.993, and G051.610-0.357) to probe the structure and dynamics of their surrounding gas. The 12CO J=1-0, 13CO J=1-0 and C18O J=1-0 observations are made with the Purple Mountain Observation (PMO) 13.7 m radio telescope. For the four bipolar bubbles, the bright 8.0 μm emission shows the bipolar structure. Each bipolar bubble is associated with an H ii region. From CO observations we find that G045.386-0.726 is composed of two bubbles with different distances, not a bipolar bubble. Each of G049.998-0.125 and G051.610-0.357 is associated with a filament. The filaments in CO emission divide G049.998-0.125 and G051.610-0.357 into two lobes. We suggest that the exciting stars of both G049.998-0.125 and G051.610-0.357 form in a sheet-like structure clouds. Furthermore, G050.489+0.993 is associated with a clump, which shows a triangle-like shape with a steep integrated intensity gradient towards the two lobes of G050.489+0.993. We suggest that the two lobes of G050.489+0.993 have simultaneously expanded into the clump.

  7. Non-linear Dynamics in $QED_{3}$ and Non-trivial Infrared Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nikolaos E

    1999-01-01

    In this work we consider a coupled system of Schwinger-Dyson equations for self-energy and vertex functions in QED_3. Using the concept of a semi-amputated vertex function, we manage to decouple the vertex equation and transform it in the infrared into a non-linear differential equation of Emden-Fowler type. Its solution suggests the following picture: in the absence of infrared cut-offs there is only a trivial infrared fixed-point structure in the theory. However, the presence of masses, for either fermions or photons, changes the situation drastically, leading to a mass-dependent non-trivial infrared fixed point. In this picture a dynamical mass for the fermions is found to be generated consistently. The non-linearity of the equations gives rise to highly non-trivial constraints among the mass and effective (`running') gauge coupling, which impose lower and upper bounds on the latter for dynamical mass generation to occur. Possible implications of this to the theory of high-temperature superconductivity are...

  8. Pattern recognition applied to infrared images for early alerts in fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Vincent; Marchetti, Mario; Dumoulin, Jean; Cord, Aurélien

    2014-09-01

    Fog conditions are the cause of severe car accidents in western countries because of the poor induced visibility. Its forecast and intensity are still very difficult to predict by weather services. Infrared cameras allow to detect and to identify objects in fog while visibility is too low for eye detection. Over the past years, the implementation of cost effective infrared cameras on some vehicles has enabled such detection. On the other hand pattern recognition algorithms based on Canny filters and Hough transformation are a common tool applied to images. Based on these facts, a joint research program between IFSTTAR and Cerema has been developed to study the benefit of infrared images obtained in a fog tunnel during its natural dissipation. Pattern recognition algorithms have been applied, specifically on road signs which shape is usually associated to a specific meaning (circular for a speed limit, triangle for an alert, …). It has been shown that road signs were detected early enough in images, with respect to images in the visible spectrum, to trigger useful alerts for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems.

  9. Detecting defective electrical components in heterogeneous infra-red images by spatial control charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidieini, Bahman; Fazaee, Reza

    2016-05-01

    Distribution network components connect machines and other loads to electrical sources. If resistance or current of any component is more than specified range, its temperature may exceed the operational limit which can cause major problems. Therefore, these defects should be found and eliminated according to their severity. Although infra-red cameras have been used for inspection of electrical components, maintenance prioritization of distribution cubicles is mostly based on personal perception and lack of training data prevents engineers from developing image processing methods. New research on the spatial control chart encouraged us to use statistical approaches instead of the pattern recognition for the image processing. In the present study, a new scanning pattern which can tolerate heavy autocorrelation among adjacent pixels within infra-red image was developed and for the first time combination of kernel smoothing, spatial control charts and local robust regression were used for finding defects within heterogeneous infra-red images of old distribution cubicles. This method does not need training data and this advantage is crucially important when the training data is not available.

  10. Objective assessment of biomagnetic devices and alternative clinical therapies using infrared thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockley, Graham J.

    2001-03-01

    The overwhelming introduction of magnetic devices and other alternative therapies into the health care market prompts the need for objective evaluation of these techniques through the use of infrared thermal imaging. Many of these therapies are reported to promote the stimulation of blood flow or the relief of pain conditions. Infrared imaging is an efficient tool to assess such changes in the physiological state. Therefore, a thermal imager can help document and substantiate whether these therapies are in fact providing an effective change to the local circulation. Thermal images may also indicate whether the change is temporary or sustained. As a specific case example, preliminary findings will be presented concerning the use of magnets and the effect they have on peripheral circulation. This will include a discussion of the recommended protocols for this type of infrared testing. This test model can be applied to the evaluation of other devices and therapeutic procedures which are reputed to affect circulation such as electro acupuncture, orthopedic footwear and topical ointments designed to relieve pain or inflammation.

  11. In vivo visualization and quantification of collecting lymphatic vessel contractility using near-infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Chloé; Scholkmann, Felix; Bachmann, Samia B.; Luciani, Paola; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Detmar, Michael; Proulx, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to image lymphatic vessel function in either animal models or in the clinic are limited. In particular, imaging methods that can provide robust outcome measures for collecting lymphatic vessel function are sorely needed. In this study, we aimed to develop a method to visualize and quantify collecting lymphatic vessel function in mice, and to establish an in vivo system for evaluation of contractile agonists and antagonists using near-infrared fluorescence imaging. The flank collecting lymphatic vessel in mice was exposed using a surgical technique and a near-infrared tracer was infused into the inguinal lymph node. Collecting lymphatic vessel contractility and valve function could be easily visualized after the infusion. A diameter tracking method was established and the diameter of the vessel was found to closely correlate to near-infrared fluorescence signal. Phasic contractility measures of frequency and amplitude were established using an automated algorithm. The methods were validated by tracking the vessel response to topical application of a contractile agonist, prostaglandin F2α, and by demonstrating the potential of the technique for non-invasive evaluation of modifiers of lymphatic function. These new methods will enable high-resolution imaging and quantification of collecting lymphatic vessel function in animal models and may have future clinical applications. PMID:26960708

  12. Improvement in dynamic magnetic resonance imaging thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun-Yu

    This dissertation is focused on improving MRI Thermometry (MRIT) techniques. The application of the spin-lattice relaxation constant is investigated in which T1 is used as indicator to measure the temperature of flowing fluid such as blood. Problems associated with this technique are evaluated, and a new method to improve the consistency and repeatability of T1 measurements is presented. The new method combines curve fitting with a measure of the curve null point to acquire more accurate and consistent T1 values. A novel method called K-space Inherited Parallel Acquisition (KIPA) is developed to achieve faster dynamic temperature measurements. Localized reconstruction coefficients are used to achieve higher reduction factors, and lower noise and artifact levels compared to that of GeneRalized Autocalibrating Partially Parallel Acquisition (GRAPPA) reconstruction. Artifacts in KIPA images are significantly reduced, and SNR is largely improved in comparison with that in GRAPPA images. The Root-Mean-Square (RMS) error of temperature for GRAPPA is 2 to 5 times larger than that for KIPA. Finally, the accuracy and comparison of the effects of motion on three parallel imaging methods: SENSE (SENSitivity Encoding), VSENSE (Variable-density SENSE) and KIPA are estimated. According to the investigation, KIPA is the most accurate and robust method among all three methods for studies with or without motion. The ratio of the normalized RMS (NRMS) error for SENSE to that for KIPA is within the range from 1 to 3.7. The ratio of the NRMS error for VSENSE to that for KIPA is about 1 to 2. These factors change with the reduction factor, motion and subject. In summary, the new strategy and method for the fast noninvasive measurement of T1 of flowing blood are proposed to improve stability and precision. The novel parallel reconstruction algorithm, KIPA, is developed to improve the temporal and spatial resolution for the PRF method. The motion effects on the KIPA method are also

  13. Multisensor Network System for Wildfire Detection Using Infrared Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bosch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the next step in the evolution of multi-sensor wireless network systems in the early automatic detection of forest fires. This network allows remote monitoring of each of the locations as well as communication between each of the sensors and with the control stations. The result is an increased coverage area, with quicker and safer responses. To determine the presence of a forest wildfire, the system employs decision fusion in thermal imaging, which can exploit various expected characteristics of a real fire, including short-term persistence and long-term increases over time. Results from testing in the laboratory and in a real environment are presented to authenticate and verify the accuracy of the operation of the proposed system. The system performance is gauged by the number of alarms and the time to the first alarm (corresponding to a real fire, for different probability of false alarm (PFA. The necessity of including decision fusion is thereby demonstrated.

  14. High Accuracy Near-infrared Imaging Polarimetry with NICMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Batcheldor, D; Hines, D C; Schmidt, G D; Axon, D J; Robinson, A; Sparks, W; Tadhunter, C

    2008-01-01

    The findings of a nine orbit calibration plan carried out during HST Cycle 15, to fully determine the NICMOS camera 2 (2.0 micron) polarization calibration to high accuracy, are reported. Recently Ueta et al. and Batcheldor et al. have suggested that NICMOS possesses a residual instrumental polarization at a level of 1.2-1.5%. This would completely inhibit the data reduction in a number of GO programs, and hamper the ability of the instrument to perform high accuracy polarimetry. We obtained polarimetric calibration observations of three polarimetric standards at three spacecraft roll angles separated by ~60deg. Combined with archival data, these observations were used to characterize the residual instrumental polarization in order for NICMOS to reach its full potential of accurate imaging polarimetry at p~1%. Using these data, we place an 0.6% upper limit on the instrumental polarization and calculate values of the parallel transmission coefficients that reproduce the ground-based results for the polarimetri...

  15. Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Angelo Manoel G; Tambara, Elizabeth Milla; Colman, Daniel; Carstens, Márcio G; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, checking the maximum and average differences of temperatures between groups. Thermographic and clinical observations were performed for each experiment, and the times in which the signs of intoxication occurred were recorded. In the thermal analysis, the thermograms corresponding to the times of interest were sought and relevant data sheets extracted for statistical analysis. Basal and experimental: the display of the thermal images at times was possible. It was possible to calculate the heat transfer rate in all cases. At baseline it was possible to see the physiology of microcirculation, characterized by thermal distribution in the craniocaudal direction. It was possible to visualize the pathophysiological changes or thermal dysautonomias caused by intoxication before clinical signs occur, characterized by areas of hyper-radiation, translating autonomic nervous system pathophysiological disorders. In animals poisoned by ropivacaine, there was no statistically significant difference in heat transfer rate at the experimental time. The maximum temperature, medium temperature, and heat transfer rate were different from the statistical point of view between groups at the experimental time, thus confirming the systemic thermographic predictive value. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Manoel G. Carstens

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Methods: Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, checking the maximum and average differences of temperatures between groups. Thermographic and clinical observations were performed for each experiment, and the times in which the signs of intoxication occurred were recorded. In the thermal analysis, the thermograms corresponding to the times of interest were sought and relevant data sheets extracted for statistical analysis. Results: Basal and experimental: the display of the thermal images at times was possible. It was possible to calculate the heat transfer rate in all cases. At baseline it was possible to see the physiology of microcirculation, characterized by thermal distribution in the craniocaudal direction. It was possible to visualize the pathophysiological changes or thermal dysautonomias caused by intoxication before clinical signs occur, characterized by areas of hyper-radiation, translating autonomic nervous system pathophysiological disorders. In animals poisoned by ropivacaine, there was no statistically significant difference in heat transfer rate at the experimental time. Conclusions: The maximum temperature, medium temperature, and heat transfer rate were different from the statistical point of view between groups at the experimental time, thus confirming the systemic thermographic predictive value.

  17. [Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Angelo Manoel G; Tambara, Elizabeth Milla; Colman, Daniel; Carstens, Márcio G; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, checking the maximum and average differences of temperatures between groups. Thermographic and clinical observations were performed for each experiment, and the times in which the signs of intoxication occurred were recorded. In the thermal analysis, the thermograms corresponding to the times of interest were sought and relevant data sheets extracted for statistical analysis. Basal and experimental: the display of the thermal images at times was possible. It was possible to calculate the heat transfer rate in all cases. At baseline it was possible to see the physiology of microcirculation, characterized by thermal distribution in the craniocaudal direction. It was possible to visualize the pathophysiological changes or thermal dysautonomias caused by intoxication before clinical signs occur, characterized by areas of hyper-radiation, translating Autonomic Nervous System pathophysiological disorders. In animals poisoned by ropivacaine, there was no statistically significant difference in heat transfer rate at the experimental time. The maximum temperature, medium temperature, and heat transfer rate were different from the statistical point of view between groups at the experimental time, thus confirming the systemic thermographic predictive value. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Airborne Infrared and Visible Image Fusion for Target Perception Based on Target Region Segmentation and Discrete Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Niu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrared and visible image fusion is an important precondition of realizing target perception for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, then UAV can perform various given missions. Information of texture and color in visible images are abundant, while target information in infrared images is more outstanding. The conventional fusion methods are mostly based on region segmentation; as a result, the fused image for target recognition could not be actually acquired. In this paper, a novel fusion method of airborne infrared and visible image based on target region segmentation and discrete wavelet transform (DWT is proposed, which can gain more target information and preserve more background information. The fusion experiments are done on condition that the target is unmoving and observable both in visible and infrared images, targets are moving and observable both in visible and infrared images, and the target is observable only in an infrared image. Experimental results show that the proposed method can generate better fused image for airborne target perception.

  19. Image deblurring applied to infrared tongue position imaging: Initial simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poots, J. Kent

    2013-10-01

    Paper describes development work for a new biomedical application of image deblurring. Optical imaging is not currently used to assess tongue position during speech, nor is optical imaging the modality of choice for imaging tissue of moderate thickness. Tongue position assessment is important during rehabilitation. Optical imaging of biological tissue provides good contrast, but incident light is scattered, seriously restricting clinical usefulness. Paper describes simulation results for scattering correction and suggests possible directions for future work. Images are represented by sparse matrices.

  20. Thermal Infrared Imaging Experiments of C-Type Asteroid 162173 Ryugu on Hayabusa2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tatsuaki; Fukuhara, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Taguchi, Makoto; Imamura, Takeshi; Arai, Takehiko; Senshu, Hiroki; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Demura, Hirohide; Kitazato, Kohei; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kouyama, Toru; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Wada, Takehiko; Takita, Jun; Sakatani, Naoya; Horikawa, Yamato; Endo, Ken; Helbert, Jörn; Müller, Thomas G.; Hagermann, Axel

    2016-09-01

    The thermal infrared imager TIR onboard Hayabusa2 has been developed to investigate thermo-physical properties of C-type, near-Earth asteroid 162173 Ryugu. TIR is one of the remote science instruments on Hayabusa2 designed to understand the nature of a volatile-rich solar system small body, but it also has significant mission objectives to provide information on surface physical properties and conditions for sampling site selection as well as the assessment of safe landing operations. TIR is based on a two-dimensional uncooled micro-bolometer array inherited from the Longwave Infrared Camera LIR on Akatsuki (Fukuhara et al., 2011). TIR takes images of thermal infrared emission in 8 to 12 μm with a field of view of 16 × 12° and a spatial resolution of 0.05° per pixel. TIR covers the temperature range from 150 to 460 K, including the well calibrated range from 230 to 420 K. Temperature accuracy is within 2 K or better for summed images, and the relative accuracy or noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) at each of pixels is 0.4 K or lower for the well-calibrated temperature range. TIR takes a couple of images with shutter open and closed, the corresponding dark frame, and provides a true thermal image by dark frame subtraction. Data processing involves summation of multiple images, image processing including the StarPixel compression (Hihara et al., 2014), and transfer to the data recorder in the spacecraft digital electronics (DE). We report the scientific and mission objectives of TIR, the requirements and constraints for the instrument specifications, the designed instrumentation and the pre-flight and in-flight performances of TIR, as well as its observation plan during the Hayabusa2 mission.