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Sample records for dynamic handgrip exercise

  1. Plasma ATP concentration and venous oxygen content in the forearm during dynamic handgrip exercise

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    Askew Christopher D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that adenosine triphosphate (ATP released from red blood cells (RBCs may contribute to the tight coupling between blood flow and oxygen demand in contracting skeletal muscle. To determine whether ATP may contribute to the vasodilatory response to exercise in the forearm, we measured arterialised and venous plasma ATP concentration and venous oxygen content in 10 healthy young males at rest, and at 30 and 180 seconds during dynamic handgrip exercise at 45% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. Results Venous plasma ATP concentration was elevated above rest after 30 seconds of exercise (P Conclusions Collectively these results indicate that ATP in the plasma originated from the muscle microcirculation, and are consistent with the notion that deoxygenation of the blood perfusing the muscle acts as a stimulus for ATP release. That ATP concentration was elevated just 30 seconds after the onset of exercise also suggests that ATP may be a contributing factor to the blood flow response in the transition from rest to steady state exercise.

  2. Role of nitric oxide in coronary vasomotion during handgrip exercise.

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    Nishikawa, Y; Kanki, H; Ogawa, S

    1997-11-01

    Endothelium-dependent modulation of coronary vasomotion during increased sympathetic tone remains unclear in normal and atherosclerotic human coronory arteries. We evaluated the role of endothelium-derived nitric oxide in vasomotion during isometric exercise in normal subjects (n = 7) and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) (n = 10). Coronary blood flow and epicardial coronary artery diameter to the handgrip test were measured before and after intracoronary administration of 100 micromol/min of N(G)-monomethyl L-arginine (L-NMMA). Heart rate and aortic blood pressure increased during handgrip test. Handgrip test caused a significant dilation in the diameter of the epicardial coronary artery in normal subjects (9.9% +/- 3.9%, mean +/- SD) and in the diameter of smooth segments of patients with CAD (5% +/- 3.7%, p < 0.05 vs normal subjects). In contrast, the diameter of irregular segments in patients with CAD decreased during handgrip test (-9.8 +/- 3.9%). After L-NMMA, the epicardial coronary artery significantly increased during handgrip test compared with before L-NMMA in normal subjects. L-NMMA did not have any effect on handgrip test induced vasodilation in the smooth segments and vasoconstriction in the irregular segments in the patients with CAD. Handgrip test-induced increases in coronary blood flow did not change after L-NMMA in both groups. Nitric oxide does not play a major role in HNG-induced vasodilation in epicardial and microcirculatory vessels in normal human coronary circulation. Although the decreased release in nitric oxide may modulate the abnormal response of the epicardial coronary artery to handgrip test, this does not explain the paradoxic constrictive response from the depressed but still dilatory response in the patients with CAD.

  3. Effect of age on the hemodynamic and sympathetic responses at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise.

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    Lalande, Sophie; Sawicki, Carolyn P; Baker, Jacquie R; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2014-01-15

    Cardiac and peripheral vasomotor factors contribute to the rapid pressor response at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise. We tested the hypothesis that age enhances the sympathetic and vasoconstrictor response at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise so that the pressor response is maintained, despite a diminished cardiac function. Twelve young and twelve older (24 ± 3 and 63 ± 8 yr) individuals performed 20-s isometric handgrip exercise at 30, 40, or 50% of maximal voluntary contraction force. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was measured using microneurography. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cardiac output (Q) were assessed continuously by finger plethysmography and total peripheral resistance was calculated. MAP increased with the onset of handgrip; this increase was associated with handgrip intensity and was similar in both groups. Heart rate and Q increased with increasing handgrip intensity in both groups, but increases were greater in young vs. older individuals (age × handgrip intensity interaction, P change in MSNA between baseline and handgrip, for both frequency and incidence, increased with increasing handgrip intensity for both groups. There was no effect of handgrip intensity or age on total peripheral resistance. The smaller heart rate and Q response during the first 20 s of handgrip exercise in older individuals was not accompanied by a greater sympathetic activation or vasoconstrictor response. However, increases in MAP were similar between groups, indicating that the pressor response at the onset of handgrip exercise is preserved with aging.

  4. Static and Dynamic Handgrip Strength Endurance: Test-Retest Reproducibility.

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    Gerodimos, Vassilis; Karatrantou, Konstantina; Psychou, Dimitra; Vasilopoulou, Theodora; Zafeiridis, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the reliability of static and dynamic handgrip strength endurance using different protocols and indicators for the assessment of strength endurance. Forty young, healthy men and women (age, 18-22 years) performed 2 handgrip strength endurance protocols: a static protocol (sustained submaximal contraction at 50% of maximal voluntary contraction) and a dynamic one (8, 10, and 12 maximal repetitions). The participants executed each protocol twice to assess the test-retest reproducibility. Total work and total time were used as indicators of strength endurance in the static protocol; the strength recorded at each maximal repetition, the percentage change, and fatigue index were used as indicators of strength endurance in the dynamic protocol. The static protocol showed high reliability irrespective of sex and hand for total time and work. The 12-repetition dynamic protocol exhibited moderate-high reliability for repeated maximal repetitions and percentage change; the 8- and 10-repetition protocols demonstrated lower reliability irrespective of sex and hand. The fatigue index was not a reliable indicator for the assessment of dynamic handgrip endurance. Static handgrip endurance can be measured reliably using the total time and total work as indicators of strength endurance. For the evaluation of dynamic handgrip endurance, the 12-repetition protocol is recommended, using the repeated maximal repetitions and percentage change as indicators of strength endurance. Practitioners should consider the static (50% maximal voluntary contraction) and dynamic (12 repeated maximal repetitions) protocols as reliable for the assessment of handgrip strength endurance. The evaluation of static endurance in conjunction with dynamic endurance would provide more complete information about hand function. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation changes during sub-maximal handgrip maneuver.

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    Ricardo C Nogueira

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We investigated the effect of handgrip (HG maneuver on time-varying estimates of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA using the autoregressive moving average technique. METHODS: Twelve healthy subjects were recruited to perform HG maneuver during 3 minutes with 30% of maximum contraction force. Cerebral blood flow velocity, end-tidal CO₂ pressure (PETCO₂, and noninvasive arterial blood pressure (ABP were continuously recorded during baseline, HG and recovery. Critical closing pressure (CrCP, resistance area-product (RAP, and time-varying autoregulation index (ARI were obtained. RESULTS: PETCO₂ did not show significant changes during HG maneuver. Whilst ABP increased continuously during the maneuver, to 27% above its baseline value, CBFV raised to a plateau approximately 15% above baseline. This was sustained by a parallel increase in RAP, suggestive of myogenic vasoconstriction, and a reduction in CrCP that could be associated with metabolic vasodilation. The time-varying ARI index dropped at the beginning and end of the maneuver (p<0.005, which could be related to corresponding alert reactions or to different time constants of the myogenic, metabolic and/or neurogenic mechanisms. CONCLUSION: Changes in dynamic CA during HG suggest a complex interplay of regulatory mechanisms during static exercise that should be considered when assessing the determinants of cerebral blood flow and metabolism.

  6. A cholinergic contribution to the circulatory responses evoked at the onset of handgrip exercise in humans.

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    Vianna, Lauro C; Fadel, Paul J; Secher, Niels H; Fisher, James P

    2015-04-01

    A cholinergic (muscarinic) contribution to the initial circulatory response to exercise in humans remains controversial. Herein, we posit that this may be due to exercise mode with a cholinergic contribution being important during isometric handgrip exercise, where the hyperemic response of the muscle is relatively small compared with the onset of leg cycling, where a marked increase in muscle blood flow rapidly occurs as a consequence of multiple redundant mechanisms. We recorded blood pressure (BP; brachial artery), stroke volume (pulse contour analysis), cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) in young healthy males, while performing either 20 s of isometric handgrip contraction at 40% maximum voluntary contraction (protocol 1; n = 9) or 20 s of low-intensity leg cycling exercise (protocol 2; n = 8, 42 ± 8 W). Exercise trials were conducted under control (no drug) conditions and following cholinergic blockade (glycopyrrolate). Under control conditions, isometric handgrip elicited an initial increase in BP (+5 ± 2 mmHg at 3 s and +3 ± 1 mmHg at 10 s, P mechanism is important for the BP and SVR responses at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise in humans.

  7. Neural and non-neural control of skin blood flow during isometric handgrip exercise in the heat stressed human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibasaki, M.; Rasmussen, P.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    During heat stress, isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise causes cutaneous vasoconstriction, but it remains controversial whether neural mechanisms are responsible for this observation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that cutaneous vasoconstriction during IHG exercise in heat ...

  8. Short-Term Effects of Isotonic Handgrip Exercise on Cardiovascular Autonomic Reactivity in Healthy Young Adolescents

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    Nileshkumar H Patel, Hasmukh D Shah, Wasim A Shaikh, Sushil K Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "Background: Exercise is a potent stimulus for sympathetic nervous system activation. But the compliance of people for routine form of exercise for BP control has not been very encouraging. Objective of the study was to determine the short-term effects of isotonic handgrip exercise on cardiovascular autonomic reactivity in healthy adolescents and to find a user friendly exercise which help in reducing blood pressure. Method and Materials: Present study was conducted on 50 young healthy adolescents in the age group of 17–19 years. Isotonic handgrip exercise was performed for 20 minutes at the rate 12 contractions per minute (2 sec contraction/3 sec relaxation at an intensity of 30%MVC using Ball-Squeeze Dynamometer. Vascular sympathetic reactivity and cardiac parasympathetic reactivity were tested at baseline and during recovery period (Immediate- post-exercise and 1 hour–post-exercise. Result: There were no changes in the parameters (Expiration: Inspiration ratio and Valsalva Ratio measuring parasympathetic reactivity. Sympathetic reactivity as evaluated by diastolic blood pressure responses to isometric handgrip test (HGT and cold pressor test (CPT showed no significant decreases. No significant difference was observed in cardiovascular autonomic reactivity during immediate and 1 hr post-exercise recovery in both boys and girls. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the exercise regime under consideration could not produce any short-term beneficial effects with respect to cardiovascular autonomic reactivity."

  9. A cholinergic contribution to the circulatory responses evoked at the onset of handgrip exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vianna, Lauro C; Fadel, Paul J; Secher, Niels H

    2015-01-01

    A cholinergic (muscarinic) contribution to the initial circulatory response to exercise in humans remains controversial. Herein, we posit that this may be due to exercise mode with a cholinergic contribution being important during isometric handgrip exercise, where the hyperemic response...... of the muscle is relatively small compared with the onset of leg cycling, where a marked increase in muscle blood flow rapidly occurs as a consequence of multiple redundant mechanisms. We recorded blood pressure (BP; brachial artery), stroke volume (pulse contour analysis), cardiac output, and systemic vascular...... resistance (SVR) in young healthy males, while performing either 20 s of isometric handgrip contraction at 40% maximum voluntary contraction (protocol 1; n = 9) or 20 s of low-intensity leg cycling exercise (protocol 2; n = 8, 42 ± 8 W). Exercise trials were conducted under control (no drug) conditions...

  10. Middle cerebral artery diameter changes during rhythmic handgrip exercise in humans.

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    Verbree, J; Bronzwaer, Agt; van Buchem, M A; Daemen, Mjap; van Lieshout, J J; van Osch, Mjp

    2017-08-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) sonography is a frequently employed technique for quantifying cerebral blood flow by assuming a constant arterial diameter. Given that exercise increases arterial pressure by sympathetic activation, we hypothesized that exercise might induce a change in the diameter of large cerebral arteries. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) cross-sectional area was assessed in response to handgrip exercise by direct magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) observations. Twenty healthy subjects (11 female) performed three 5 min bouts of rhythmic handgrip exercise at 60% maximum voluntary contraction, alternated with 5 min of rest. High-resolution 7 T MRI scans were acquired perpendicular to the MCA. Two blinded observers manually determined the MCA cross-sectional area. Sufficient image quality was obtained in 101 MCA-scans of 19 subjects (age-range 20-59 years). Mixed effects modelling showed that the MCA cross-sectional area decreased by 2.1 ± 0.8% (p = 0.01) during handgrip, while the heart rate increased by 11 ± 2% (p exercise. This further strengthens the current concept of sympathetic control of large cerebral arteries, showing in vivo vasoconstriction during exercise-induced sympathetic activation. Moreover, care must be taken when interpreting TCD exercise studies as diameter constancy cannot be assumed.

  11. Folic acid ingestion improves skeletal muscle blood flow during graded handgrip and plantar flexion exercise in aged humans.

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    Romero, Steven A; Gagnon, Daniel; Adams, Amy N; Moralez, Gilbert; Kouda, Ken; Jaffery, Manall F; Cramer, Matthew N; Crandall, Craig G

    2017-09-01

    Skeletal muscle blood flow is attenuated in aged humans performing dynamic exercise, which is due, in part, to impaired local vasodilatory mechanisms. Recent evidence suggests that folic acid improves cutaneous vasodilation during localized and whole body heating through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms. However, it is unclear whether folic acid improves vasodilation in other vascular beds during conditions of increased metabolism (i.e., exercise). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that folic acid ingestion improves skeletal muscle blood flow in aged adults performing graded handgrip and plantar flexion exercise via increased vascular conductance. Nine healthy, aged adults (two men and seven women; age: 68 ± 5 yr) performed graded handgrip and plantar flexion exercise before (control), 2 h after (acute, 5 mg), and after 6 wk (chronic, 5 mg/day) folic acid ingestion. Forearm (brachial artery) and leg (superficial femoral artery) blood velocity and diameter were measured via Duplex ultrasonography and used to calculate blood flow. Acute and chronic folic acid ingestion increased serum folate (both P < 0.05 vs. control). During handgrip exercise, acute and chronic folic acid ingestion increased forearm blood flow (both conditions P < 0.05 vs. control) and vascular conductance (both P < 0.05 vs. control). During plantar flexion exercise, acute and chronic folic acid ingestion increased leg blood flow (both P < 0.05 vs. control), but only acute folic acid ingestion increased vascular conductance (P < 0.05 vs. control). Taken together, folic acid ingestion increases blood flow to active skeletal muscle primarily via improved local vasodilation in aged adults.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our findings demonstrate that folic acid ingestion improves blood flow via enhanced vascular conductance in the exercising skeletal muscle of aged humans. These findings provide evidence for the therapeutic use of folic acid to improve skeletal muscle blood flow, and perhaps

  12. Predicting blood flow responses to rhythmic handgrip exercise from one second isometric contractions.

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    Cook, M; Smart, N A; Van der Touw, T

    2016-11-08

    The aim of this work was to predict blood flow responses to rhythmic handgrip exercise from one second isometric contractions. Seven healthy men were studied. Each subject performed a single 1 s handgrip contraction at 10 %, 20 % and 40 % of the maximum handgrip strength. We then repeatedly summed hyperaemic responses from single contractions to predict hyperaemic response to a prolonged bout of rhythmic exercise. There was similarity between steady state brachial blood flow velocity (BBV) extrapolated from single handgrip contractions and during 2 min of rhythmic exercise for 20 % (10.0+/-3.8 cm/s vs. 10.2+/-2.6 cm/s, r=0.93, p=0.003) and 40 % of maximum contractions (14.2+/-5.5 cm/s vs. 15.6+/-3.4 cm/s, r=0.88, p=0.009), but not for 10 % (7.5+/-4.1 cm/s vs. 5.7+/-3.3 cm/s, r=0.94, p=0.018). BBV progressively rose substantially higher during rhythmic contractions than peak BBV observed during single contractions at matched intensity. Respective peak BBV during single contractions and steady state BBV rhythmic contractions were 4.4+/-2.1 and 5.7+/-3.3 cm.s(-1) at 10 % forearm strength (p=0.14), 5.6+/-2.4 and 10.2+/-2.8 cm.s(-1) at 20 % (p=0.002), and 7.0+/-2.5 and 15.6+/-3.6 cm.s(-1) at 40 % (p=0.003). In conclusion, there is similarity between the summated blood flow velocity calculated from a single 1 s muscle contraction and the steady state blood flow velocity response of rhythmic exercise.

  13. Short term control of the cardiovascular system: Assessment with the isometric handgrip exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Médigue, Claire; Papelier, Yves; Bise, Sylvain; Sorine, Michel

    2004-01-01

    This study aims at assessing the short term control of the Cardio Vascular system (CV), through a physiological test which involves strictly autonomic response: the handgrip isometric exercise, under vagal influence during the first minute. CVS parameters are extracted from RR and the arterial blood pressure (ABP) signals, respectively giving frequency and amplitude information on the CVS. Mean time series, spectral values and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), seen as the spectral controller gain...

  14. Handgrip strength does not represent an appropriate measure to evaluate changes in muscle strength during an exercise intervention program in frail elderly people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieland, C.A.B.; Verdijk, L.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Although handgrip strength is considered a strong predictor of negative health outcomes, it is unclear whether handgrip strength represents a useful measure to evaluate changes in muscle strength following resistance-type exercise training in elderly people. We assessed whether measuring handgrip st

  15. Handgrip strength does not represent an appropriate measure to evaluate changes in muscle strength during an exercise intervention program in frail elderly people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieland, C.A.B.; Verdijk, L.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Although handgrip strength is considered a strong predictor of negative health outcomes, it is unclear whether handgrip strength represents a useful measure to evaluate changes in muscle strength following resistance-type exercise training in elderly people. We assessed whether measuring handgrip

  16. ABSENCE OF GENDER DIFFERENCES IN THE FATIGABILITY OF THE FOREARM MUSCLES DURING INTERMITTENT ISOMETRIC HANDGRIP EXERCISE

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    Joaquin U. Gonzales

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported women to have a greater resistance to fatigue than men during sustained handgrip exercise, however, observed gender differences in fatigue has been shown to be a function of contraction type. The purpose of the present study was to determine if gender differences exist in forearm muscle fatigue during intermittent handgrip contractions. Women [n = 11, 23.5 ± 1.5 (SE yr] and men (n = 11, 24.1 ± 1.5 yr performed intermittent isometric handgrip contractions at a target force of 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC for 5 s followed by 5 s rest until task failure. Rate of fatigue was calculated from MVCs taken every 2 min during exercise, and recovery of muscle strength was measured in 5 min increments until 45 min post-task failure. Forearm muscle strength was less for women than men (W: 341.5 ± 11.9 N; M: 480.2 ± 28.0 N; p < 0.05. No gender difference was present in time to task failure (W: 793.3 ± 92.5 s; M: 684.8 ± 76.3 s or in the decrease in muscle force generating capacity at task failure (W: -47.6 ± 1.0%; M: -49.9 ± 1.3%. Rate of muscle fatigue was found to be similar between women and men (W: -3.6 ± 0.5 %·min-1; M: -4.3 ± 0.6 %·min-1 and no gender difference was found in the recovery of muscle strength following task failure. In summary, no gender difference was found in the fatigability of the forearm muscles during intermittent submaximal handgrip contractions, independent of muscle strength

  17. Maximal intermittent handgrip strategy: design and evaluation of an exercise protocol and a grip tool

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    Bentley DC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Danielle Christine Bentley, Scott Gordon Thomas Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Abstract: Handgrip (HG exercise has been prescribed as a lifestyle intervention to successfully reduce resting blood pressure (BP among heterogeneous groups of participants. Current HG protocols have limited accessibility due to complicated exercise prescriptions and sophisticated required equipment. Therefore, this research describes the design and evaluation of the maximal intermittent (MINT HG exercise strategy, consisting of both a novel exercise protocol (32×5 seconds maximal grip squeezes separated by 5 seconds of rest between sets and an original grip tool. This research was a multistep progressive design that included 51 postmenopausal women as participants in three separate research studies. Part 1 of this research focuses on the MINT exercise protocol. A literature-informed rationale for the design of the protocol is described. This includes exercise intensity, work-to-rest ratio, and total exercise duration with reference to the unique physiology (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex of postmenopausal women. Subsequent experimental analyses of acute responses to the MINT protocol revealed that women produced 50% of their maximum grip force with moderate cardiovascular responses (increases of systolic BP: 41.6 mmHg, diastolic BP: 20.1 mmHg, heart rate: 35.1 bpm that remained far below the thresholds of concern identified by the American College of Sports Medicine. Part 2 of this research describes the creation of a novel grip tool, beginning with a mixed-methods assessment of participant opinions regarding two distinct in-laboratory grip tools, leading to the creation of four prototype MINT tools. Structured focus groups revealed a strong preference for MINT prototype 1 for all tool design features, including color, shape, size, and foam grip. Collectively, the result of this multistep

  18. Perbandingan Tekanan Darah Sebelum dan Sewaktu Melakukan Handgrip Isometric Exercise pada Mahasiswa Angkatan 2011 Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Andalas

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    M.Yoga Sefia Nurindra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakHipertensi dapat menyebabkan gangguan jantung yang serius sampai kematian. Handgrip isometric exercise adalah latihan yang melibatkan kontraksi otot lengan bawah dan tangan dengan melakukan cengkraman menggunakan handgrip dynamometer. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui perubahan tekanan darah sewaktu melakukan handgrip isometric exercise. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian eksperimental dengan menggunakan desain randomized crossover study yang melibatkan 24 orang subjek laki-laki dengan usia 20,7 ± 0,6 tahun dan BMI 21,8 ± 2,1 Kg/m2. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan peningkatan tekanan darah baik sistolik maupun diastolik yang signifikan sewaktu melakukan handgrip isometric exercise. Tekanan darah sistolik dari 115,2 ± 5,0 mmHg menjadi 135,0± 6,5 mmHg (p<0,05 dan diastolik 76,3± 5,0 mmHg menjadi 98,3 ± 8,7 mmHg (p<0,05. Pada kontrol terlihat penurunan tekanan darah sistolik yang signifikan dari 113,8 ± 6,1 mmHg menjadi 111,5 ± 7,1 mmHg (p<0,05 dan diastolik penurunan tidak signifikan dari 75,0 ± 5,9 mmHg menjadi 72,9 ± 6,2 mmHg (p>0,05.  Pada penelitian ini disimpulkan bahwa tekanan darah meningkat sewaktu handgrip isometric exercise.Kata kunci: hipertensi, handgrip isometric exercise, tekanan darah AbstractHypertension can cause a serious heart problem and mortality. Handgrip isometric exercise is an activity involving contraction of forearm and hand muscle of one arm by pressing handgrip dynamometer. The objective  of  this study was to investigated blood pressure during handgrip isometric exercise. This research was an experimental study with randomized crossover design that involved 24 male subjects, age of 20,7 ± 0,6 years old and BMI 21,8 ± 2,1 Kg/m2. The results demonstrated significant increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure during handgrip isometric exercise. Systolic blood pressure significantly increased from 115,2 ± 5,0 mmHg to 135,0 ± 6,5 mmHg (p<0,05 and diastolic from 76,3 ± 5,0

  19. Mechanisms of strength gain in a handgrip exercise programme in rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Speed, C A; Campbell, R

    2012-01-01

    In a progressive resistive strengthening programme, healthy individuals gain strength initially through neural adaptation followed by increases in muscle mass. Programmes are designed to maximise these responses. The physiological mechanisms of strength gain in RA are unknown, but their identification will help to develop more effective exercise programmes. The aim of this study was to investigate the responses to a 12-week isometric handgrip strengthening programme in female subjects with RA. Fourteen right-handed female subjects with RA and 14 age-matched female controls participated in a 12-week right handgrip strengthening programme. Maximum grip strength (MGS) and disease activity were measured serially over 12 weeks. Forearm muscle volume was measured using MRI at baseline and 12 weeks. Significant gains in right handgrip strength were noted in both groups, the gains being most marked in those with RA: mean (SD; range) MGS (mmHg) in RA group at baseline 105.1 (48.1; 34-108) and 174.8 (76.4; 50-340) at 12 weeks. Mean (SD; range) MGS in control group at baseline 311.7 (49.6; 220-370) and 357.0 (67.1; 250-540) at 12 weeks. Significant increases in forearm muscle volume occurred in the controls, correlating with gains in strength. No such changes were noted in the RA group, indicating that improvements were solely related to neural adaptation. Response to strength training in RA differs from those of healthy individuals. Significant gains in strength in individuals with RA can occur due to neural adaptation without gains in muscle mass during a strengthening programme. This has implications for the design of rehabilitation programmes for such subjects.

  20. Maximal intermittent handgrip strategy: design and evaluation of an exercise protocol and a grip tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Danielle Christine; Thomas, Scott Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Handgrip (HG) exercise has been prescribed as a lifestyle intervention to successfully reduce resting blood pressure (BP) among heterogeneous groups of participants. Current HG protocols have limited accessibility due to complicated exercise prescriptions and sophisticated required equipment. Therefore, this research describes the design and evaluation of the maximal intermittent (MINT) HG exercise strategy, consisting of both a novel exercise protocol (32×5 seconds maximal grip squeezes separated by 5 seconds of rest between sets) and an original grip tool. This research was a multistep progressive design that included 51 postmenopausal women as participants in three separate research studies. Part 1 of this research focuses on the MINT exercise protocol. A literature-informed rationale for the design of the protocol is described. This includes exercise intensity, work-to-rest ratio, and total exercise duration with reference to the unique physiology (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex) of postmenopausal women. Subsequent experimental analyses of acute responses to the MINT protocol revealed that women produced 50% of their maximum grip force with moderate cardiovascular responses (increases of systolic BP: 41.6 mmHg, diastolic BP: 20.1 mmHg, heart rate: 35.1 bpm) that remained far below the thresholds of concern identified by the American College of Sports Medicine. Part 2 of this research describes the creation of a novel grip tool, beginning with a mixed-methods assessment of participant opinions regarding two distinct in-laboratory grip tools, leading to the creation of four prototype MINT tools. Structured focus groups revealed a strong preference for MINT prototype 1 for all tool design features, including color, shape, size, and foam grip. Collectively, the result of this multistep research is a novel HG exercise strategy with enhanced accessibility by being easy to understand and simple to execute. The long-term training effectiveness of MINT as an exercise

  1. Acute and Chronic Effects of Isometric Handgrip Exercise on Cardiovascular Variables in Hypertensive Patients: A Systematic Review

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    Breno Q. Farah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe, through a systematic review, the acute and chronic effects of isometric handgrip exercise on cardiovascular variables in hypertensive individuals. In this systematic review, we included studies that analyzed whether a single bout or a program with isometric exercises affect cardiovascular variables in hypertensive adults. The electronic database PubMed/Medline was searched for relevant studies published until May 2017. Of the 2927 studies initially identified, 2916 were excluded based on title and abstract and five on the basis of full-text assessment, leaving six studies remaining. In addition, one further study cited in the references of the included articles was included in this review, totaling seven studies included (five studies on the chronic effects of isometric handgrip exercise on cardiovascular parameters. None of the acute studies observed post-exercise hypotension. The majority of the chronic studies found decreases in office blood pressure after isometric handgrip training, with training ranging from 6 to 10 weeks, while heart rate variability parameters were improved in one study and did not change in another. Reduction in oxidative stress was observed; however, this variable was only analyzed in one study. In hypertensives, acute responses to isometric handgrip exercise are very limited due to the small number of studies, therefore more research is required. Furthermore, chronic isometric handgrip training reduces blood pressure; however, there is still a gap in the knowledge on the effects of this modality of exercise on other cardiovascular variables—such as endothelial function, oxidative stress, and cardiac autonomic modulation—which should be addressed in future studies.

  2. Cardiovascular responses to an isometric handgrip exercise in females with prehypertension

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    Vernon Bond

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertensive individuals are known to exhibit greater increases in blood pressure during an isometric handgrip exercise (IHE than their normotensive counterparts. Aim: This study tests the hypothesis that, compared to normotensive individuals, prehypertensive individuals exhibit an exaggerated response to IHE. Materials and Methods: In this study, the effects of IHE were compared in matched prehypertensive vs. normotensive healthy African-American females. Six healthy young adult African-American female university students were screened in a physician′s office for blood pressure in the range of prehypertension, systolic blood pressure (SBP 120-139 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP 80-89 mmHg. Six young adult African-American women were also recruited to serve as a healthy normotensive control group with SBP ≤119 mmHg and DBP ≤79 mmHg. Cardiovascular fitness was determined by peak oxygen uptake (VO 2 peak measured during a progressive exercise test. Results: During the handgrip exercise, the prehypertensive group exhibited greater increases in SBP (from 139 ± 6 to 205 ± 11 mmHg, +48% than the controls (from 132 ± 3 to 145 ± 3 mmHg, +10%; intergroup difference P < 0.001. The prehypertensive group also exhibited greater increases in DBP (from 77 ± 2 to 112 ± 5 mmHg, +46% compared to the controls (from 72 ± 3 to 78 ± 4 mmHg, +8%; intergroup difference P < 0.001. The increase in systemic vascular resistance was also greater in the prehypertensive group (from 1713 ± 91 to 2807 ± 370 dyne.s.cm -5 , +64% than in the controls (from 1668 ± 80 to 1812 ± 169 dyne.s.cm -5 , +9%; intergroup difference P < 0.05. Conclusion: These results suggest that blood pressure measurements performed during IHE may be a useful screening tool in evaluating prehypertensive individuals for antihypertensive treatments.

  3. Arterial blood pressure is inversely associated with vascular sympathetic reactivity (isometric handgrip exercise) in Gujarati Indian adolescents.

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    Shaikh, Wasim A; Patel, Minal; Shah, Hasmukh D; Nimbalkar, Archana S; Patel, Nilesh; Singh, S K

    2014-01-01

    Studies conducted earlier have found that vascular sympathetic reactivity to isometric handgrip exercise is either low or high in adolescents with higher blood pressure (Hypertensives) as compared to adolescents with relatively lower blood pressure (Normotensive). The current study was conducted to determine the correlation of vascular sympathetic reactivity to isometric handgrip exercise with blood pressure in Gujarati Indian adolescents so as to understand the pathogenesis and/consequences of Hypertension in this population. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 651 Gujarati Indian adolescents (285 girls, 366 boys) of age group 13-19 years. Blood pressure was measured by oscillometry and vascular sympathetic reactivity (Percentage rise in Diastolic Blood Pressure, %RDBP) was assessed using isometric handgrip test. Pearson's correlation coefficient was determined to study the correlation between %RDBP and blood pressure. In both girls and boys, %RDBP showed significant negative correlation with resting SBP, DBP and MAP. The study thus indicates that an inverse association exist between arterial blood pressure and vascular sympathetic reactivity to isometric handgrip exercise in Gujarati Indian adolescents.

  4. Isometric handgrip does not elicit cardiovascular overload or post-exercise hypotension in hypertensive older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olher RR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rafael dos Reis Vieira Olher,1,2,* Danilo Sales Bocalini,3,* Reury Frank Bacurau,4 Daniel Rodriguez,5 Aylton Figueira Jr,5 Francisco Luciano Pontes Jr,4 Francisco Navarro,6 Herbert Gustavo Simões,1 Ronaldo Carvalho Araujo,7 Milton Rocha Moraes8 1Universidade Católica de Brasília, Distrito Federal, 2Universidade Gama Filho, Rio de Janeiro, 3Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE, São Paulo, 4Universidade de São Paulo – Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades, São Paulo, 5Universidade São Judas Tadeu (USJT, São Paulo, Brazil, 6Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Maranhão, 7Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, São Paulo, 8Universidade Federal de São Paulo – Escola Paulista de Medicina, São Paulo, Brazil *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Arterial hypertension is a serious health problem affecting mainly the elderly population. Recent studies have considered both aerobic and resistance exercises as a non-pharmacological aid for arterial hypertension treatment. However, the cardiovascular responses of the elderly to isometric resistance exercise (eg, isometric handgrip [IHG] have not yet been documented. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate cardiovascular responses to different intensities of isometric exercise, as well as the occurrence of post-isometric exercise hypotension in hypertensive elderly people under antihypertensive medication treatment. Patients and methods: Twelve women volunteered to participate in the study after a maximal voluntary contraction test (MVC and standardization of the intervention workload consisting of two sessions of IHG exercise performed in four sets of five contractions of a 10-second duration. Sessions were performed both at 30% of the MVC and 50% of the MVC, using a unilateral IHG protocol. Both intensities were compared with a control session without exercise. Systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP at rest

  5. Ascorbic acid improves brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly through a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinity, Joel D; Wray, D Walter; Witman, Melissa A H; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Reese, Van; Zhao, Jia; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-03-15

    The proposed mechanistic link between the age-related attenuation in vascular function and free radicals is an attractive hypothesis; however, direct evidence of free radical attenuation and a concomitant improvement in vascular function in the elderly is lacking. Therefore, this study sought to test the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA), administered intra-arterially during progressive handgrip exercise, improves brachial artery (BA) vasodilation in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner, by mitigating free radical production. BA vasodilation (Doppler ultrasound) and free radical outflow [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy] were measured in seven healthy older adults (69 ± 2 yr) during handgrip exercise at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg (∼13-52% of maximal voluntary contraction) during the control condition and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), AA, and coinfusion of l-NMMA + AA. Baseline BA diameter was not altered by any of the treatments, while L-NMMA and L-NMMA + AA diminished baseline BA blood flow and shear rate. AA improved BA dilation compared with control at 9 kg (control: 6.5 ± 2.2%, AA: 10.9 ± 2.5%, P = 0.01) and 12 kg (control: 9.5 ± 2.7%, AA: 15.9 ± 3.7%, P vasodilation compared with control and when combined with AA eliminated the AA-induced improvement in BA vasodilation. Free radical outflow increased with exercise intensity but, interestingly, was not attenuated by AA. Collectively, these results indicate that AA improves BA vasodilation in the elderly during handgrip exercise through an NO-dependent mechanism; however, this improvement appears not to be the direct consequence of attenuated free radical outflow from the forearm.

  6. Mechanisms regulating regional cerebral activation during dynamic handgrip in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James; Friedman, D B; Mitchell, J H

    1996-01-01

    (muscle spindles). The rCBF increased only during dynamic hand contraction; contralateral MS1 (OM +9) by 15% to 64 +/- 8.6 ml.100 g-1.min-1 (P ... +/- 8.6 ml.100 g-1.min-1 (P muscle spindles or metabolically sensitive nerve fibers, although the involvement of mechanoreceptors (group III or Ib) cannot be excluded....

  7. Time-to-Fatigue and Intramuscular pH measured via NIRS during Handgrip Exercise in Trained and Sedentary Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M. E.; Lee, S. M. C.; Stroud, L.; Scott, P.; Hagan, R. D.; Soller, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    In exercising muscles force production and muscular endurance are impaired by a decrease in intramuscular pH. The effects of aerobic training (AT) on preventing acidosis and prolonging exercise time in muscles not specifically targeted by the training are unknown. Purpose: To compare interstitial pH, measured non-invasively with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) during rhythmic handgrip exercise in sedentary subjects and those who participate in AT activities that target the lower body. Methods: Maximal isometric force (MIF) was measured on three separate days in AT (n=5) and sedentary (n=8) subjects using a handgrip dynamometer (HGD). Isometric muscular endurance (IME) was measured during five trials, each separated by at least 48 hrs. For each IME trial subjects rhythmically squeezed (4 sec at 40% of MVC) and relaxed (2 sec) to fatigue or failure to reach the target force in three consecutive contractions or four non-consecutive contractions. Interstitial pH was derived from spectra collected using a NIRS sensor adhered to the skin over the FDP. The first four IME trials served to familiarize subjects with the protocol; the fifth trial was used for analysis. NIRS-derived pH was averaged in 30 sec increments. Between group differences in MIF and exercise time were tested using paired t-tests. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyze effects of AT and exercise time on pH. Results: MIF was not different between groups (mean SD; aerobic=415.6 95.4 N vs. sedentary =505.1 107.4 N). Time to fatigue was greater in the AT than in the sedentary group (mean SD: 611 173 sec vs. 377 162 sec, pmuscular work, possibly due to psychological familiarization to muscular fatigue and/or systemic physiological benefits.

  8. Acute supplementation of N-acetylcysteine does not affect muscle blood flow and oxygenation characteristics during handgrip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua R; Broxterman, Ryan M; Ade, Carl J; Evans, Kara K; Kurti, Stephanie P; Hammer, Shane M; Barstow, Thomas J; Harms, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC; antioxidant and thiol donor) supplementation has improved exercise performance and delayed fatigue, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. One possibility isNACsupplementation increases limb blood flow during severe-intensity exercise. The purpose was to determine ifNACsupplementation affected exercising arm blood flow and muscle oxygenation characteristics. We hypothesized thatNACwould lead to higher limb blood flow and lower muscle deoxygenation characteristics during severe-intensity exercise. Eight healthy nonendurance trained men (21.8 ± 1.2 years) were recruited and completed two constant power handgrip exercise tests at 80% peak power until exhaustion. Subjects orally consumed either placebo (PLA) orNAC(70 mg/kg) 60 min prior to handgrip exercise. Immediately prior to exercise, venous blood samples were collected for determination of plasma redox balance. Brachial artery blood flow (BABF) was measured via Doppler ultrasound and flexor digitorum superficialis oxygenation characteristics were measured via near-infrared spectroscopy. FollowingNACsupplementaiton, plasma cysteine (NAC: 47.2 ± 20.3 μmol/L vs.PLA: 9.6 ± 1.2 μmol/L;P = 0.001) and total cysteine (NAC: 156.2 ± 33.9 μmol/L vs.PLA: 132.2 ± 16.3 μmol/L;P = 0.048) increased. Time to exhaustion was not significantly different (P = 0.55) betweenNAC(473.0 ± 62.1 sec) andPLA(438.7 ± 58.1 sec). RestingBABFwas not different (P = 0.79) withNAC(99.3 ± 31.1 mL/min) andPLA(108.3 ± 46.0 mL/min).BABFwas not different (P = 0.42) during exercise or at end-exercise (NAC: 413 ± 109 mL/min;PLA: 445 ± 147 mL/min). Deoxy-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] and total-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] were not significantly different (P = 0.73 andP = 0.54, respectively) at rest or during exercise between conditions. We conclude that acuteNACsupplementation does not alter oxygen delivery during exercise in men.

  9. One single bout of low-intensity isometric handgrip exercise reduces blood pressure in healthy pre- and hypertensive individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Assche, Tim; Buys, Roselien; de Jaeger, Mats; Coeckelberghs, Ellen; Cornelissen, Véronique A

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effect of one single session of isometric handgrip exercise (IHG) on blood pressure (BP) during daily life activities in healthy adults. Fifteen healthy adults with pre- or stage 1 hypertension (10 men; mean age 48±7.1 years) completed two experimental sessions in random order: one control (rest for 15 minutes) and one low intensity IHG session (4×2 minutes sustained contractions at 30% of maximal volutional contraction interspersed with 1-minute rest intervals). Blood pressure was recorded before each intervention and following the intervention BP was recorded for one hour in the office and thereafter for 6 hours during their daily activities by means of an ambulatory BP device. Physical activity (number of steps and total energy expenditure) was assessed by means of a SenseWear mini device. Systolic BP was higher the first minute after the isometric handgrip exercise but quickly returned to baseline levels after 15 minutes in the office. Over the 7-hour period, systolic blood pressure was significantly lower (-5.4±7.3 vs. +0.23±6.9; Pblood pressure after IHG compared to control (P=0.09). Physical activity behavior was similar on both days (P>0.05). This study demonstrates that one single bout of IHG can result in an overall reduction in BP during daily activities. More research is needed to confirm these findings and to explain possible mechanisms responsible for these observed changes.

  10. Comparison of intramuscular and venous blood pH, PCO(2) and PO(2) during rhythmic handgrip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Babs R; Hagan, R Donald; Shear, Michael; Walz, J Matthias; Landry, Michelle; Anunciacion, Dulce; Orquiola, Alan; Heard, Stephen O

    2007-06-01

    Oxygen and acid-base status during exercise is well established for the lungs, large arteries and veins. However, values for these parameters in exercising muscle are less frequently reported. In this study we examined the relationship between intramuscular PO(2), pH, PCO(2) and the comparable venous values during rhythmic isometric handgrip exercise at target levels of 15%, 30% and 45% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). A small fiber optic sensor was inserted into the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) muscle for continuous measurement of intramuscular (IM) PO(2), pH and PCO(2). Venous blood samples were taken from the forearm every minute during each exercise bout. IM pH and PCO(2) were similar to their venous counterparts at baseline, but the difference between IM and venous values increased when exercise exceeded 30% MVC. During exercise at 15% MVC and greater, venous PO(2) declined from 40 to 21 Torr (approximately 5.3 to 2.8 kPa). IM PO(2) declined from 24 to 8 Torr with 15% MVC, and approached 0 Torr at 30% MVC and 45% MVC. IM pH declined rapidly when IM PO(2) reached 10 Torr and continued to decrease with increasing exertion, despite an IM PO(2) near 0 Torr.

  11. Time-to-Fatigue and Intramuscular pH measured via NIRS during Handgrip Exercise in Trained and Sedentary Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M. E.; Lee, S. M. C.; Stroud, L.; Scott, P.; Hagan, R. D.; Soller, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    In exercising muscles force production and muscular endurance are impaired by a decrease in intramuscular pH. The effects of aerobic training (AT) on preventing acidosis and prolonging exercise time in muscles not specifically targeted by the training are unknown. Purpose: To compare interstitial pH, measured non-invasively with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) during rhythmic handgrip exercise in sedentary subjects and those who participate in AT activities that target the lower body. Methods: Maximal isometric force (MIF) was measured on three separate days in AT (n=5) and sedentary (n=8) subjects using a handgrip dynamometer (HGD). Isometric muscular endurance (IME) was measured during five trials, each separated by at least 48 hrs. For each IME trial subjects rhythmically squeezed (4 sec at 40% of MVC) and relaxed (2 sec) to fatigue or failure to reach the target force in three consecutive contractions or four non-consecutive contractions. Interstitial pH was derived from spectra collected using a NIRS sensor adhered to the skin over the FDP. The first four IME trials served to familiarize subjects with the protocol; the fifth trial was used for analysis. NIRS-derived pH was averaged in 30 sec increments. Between group differences in MIF and exercise time were tested using paired t-tests. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyze effects of AT and exercise time on pH. Results: MIF was not different between groups (mean SD; aerobic=415.6 95.4 N vs. sedentary =505.1 107.4 N). Time to fatigue was greater in the AT than in the sedentary group (mean SD: 611 173 sec vs. 377 162 sec, p<0.05). pH was not different between groups at any time point. Average pH decreased (p<0.05) in both groups from rest (pH=7.4) through 90 sec of exercise (pH=6.9), but did not decrease further throughout the remainder of exercise. Conclusion: Although between group differences in pH were not detected, differences during the onset of exercise

  12. Sweating responses to isometric hand-grip exercise and forearm muscle metaboreflex in prepubertal children and elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tatsuro; Kai, Seiko; Nakajima, Michi; Ichinose-Kuwahara, Tomoko; Gerrett, Nicola; Kondo, Narihiko; Inoue, Yoshimitsu

    2017-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Non-thermal factors (e.g. muscle metaboreflex) contribute to the sweating response during exercise. Although it is well recognized that the sweating responses caused by core temperature elevation in prepubertal children and the elderly are attenuated compared with young adults, it is unknown whether non-thermal sweating is also attenuated in these populations. What is the main finding and its importance? The non-thermal sweating response during isometric hand-grip exercise and isolated muscle metaboreflex were attenuated in prepubertal children compared with young adults in a non-uniform manner over the body, but only during the muscle metaboreflex in the elderly. This may explain the maturation- and ageing-related decline of sweating during exercise. The purpose of the present study was to investigate sweating responses to isometric hand-grip (IH) exercise and muscle metaboreflex in prepubertal children and the elderly. In hot conditions (ambient temperature, 35°C; relative humidity, 45%), 13 healthy young adults, 10 prepubertal children and 10 elderly subjects (aged 20.4 ± 1.2, 11.4 ± 0.5 and 63.5 ± 3.1 years, respectively) repeated a three hand-grip exercise protocol that consisted of 1 min IH exercise at 15, 30 or 45% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) followed by 2 min postexercise forearm occlusion. Local sweat rates (SRs) on the forehead, chest, forearm, thigh and palm were continuously measured (ventilated capsule method). The forehead SR in prepubertal children during IH exercise at 45% MVC was significantly lower than that of young adults (0.26 ± 0.22 and 0.08 ± 0.15 mg cm(-2)  min(-1) for young adults and children, respectively; P elderly at any exercise intensities. The SR on the chest (0.22 ± 0.22 and -0.01 ± 0.05 mg cm(-2)  min(-1) for young adults and children, respectively), forearm (0.14 ± 0.12 and 0.03 ± 0.04 mg cm(-2)  min(-1) ) and thigh (0.13 ± 0.10 and 0

  13. Relationship between blood lactate and cortical excitability between taekwondo athletes and non-athletes after hand-grip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Petito, Annamaria; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Ciliberti, Michela Anna Pia; Luongo, Livio; Carotenuto, Marco; Esposito, Maria; Messina, Antonietta; Monda, Vincenzo; Monda, Marcellino; Capranica, Laura; Messina, Giovanni; Cibelli, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    In taekwondo competitions, fatigue has a large influence on performance. Recent studies have reported that the excitability in the primary hand motor cortex, investigated with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), is enhanced at the end of a maximal exercise and that this improvement correlates with blood lactate. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between blood lactate and cortical excitability in taekwondo athletes and non-athletes. The excitability of the primary motor cortex was measured before and after fatiguing hand-grip exercise by TMS. Capillary blood lactate was measured at rest (pre-test), at the end (0 min), and at 3 and 10 min after the exercise by using a "Lactate Pro" portable lactate analyzer. Significant differences in cortical excitability between the two groups were found after the exercise (p taekwondo athletes, lactate may delay the onset of fatigue not only by maintaining the excitability of muscle, but also by increasing the excitability of the primary motor cortex more than in non-athletes.

  14. Acute ascorbic acid ingestion increases skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen consumption via local vasodilation during graded handgrip exercise in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jennifer C; Crecelius, Anne R; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2015-07-15

    Human aging is associated with reduced skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise, which may be a result of impaired endothelium-dependent dilation and/or attenuated ability to blunt sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction. Intra-arterial infusion of ascorbic acid (AA) increases nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation and forearm blood flow (FBF) during handgrip exercise in older adults, yet it remains unknown whether an acute oral dose can similarly improve FBF or enhance the ability to blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction during exercise. We hypothesized that 1) acute oral AA would improve FBF (Doppler ultrasound) and oxygen consumption (V̇o2) via local vasodilation during graded rhythmic handgrip exercise in older adults (protocol 1), and 2) AA ingestion would not enhance sympatholysis in older adults during handgrip exercise (protocol 2). In protocol 1 (n = 8; 65 ± 3 yr), AA did not influence FBF or V̇o2 during rest or 5% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) exercise, but increased FBF (199 ± 13 vs. 248 ± 16 ml/min and 343 ± 24 vs. 403 ± 33 ml/min; P vasodilation.

  15. Effects of Pre-Exhausting the Biceps Brachii Muscle on the Performance of the Front Lat Pull-Down Exercise Using Different Handgrip Positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilaça-Alves José

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of pre-exhaustion (PE of the biceps brachii muscle (BB on the number of repetitions and the rate of perceived exertion (RPE in the front lat pull-down (FLPD using different handgrip positions. Additionally, the effect of sex and its interaction with performance and the RPE were also examined. The participants were 19 healthy subjects: 8 men (age: 27.13±2.85 years; body height: 180.63±6.65 cm; body mass: 82.05±8.92 kg; and body fat: 14.67±6.09%; and 11 women (age: 28.81±3.68 years; body height: 162.91±6.51 cm; body mass 59.63±6.47 kg; and body fat: 24.11±4.33%. The number of repetitions and the RPE in the FLPD exercise with different handgrip positions, with and without PE of the BB, was documented. The following main significant effects were seen: i PE of the BB decreased the number of repetitions (p<0.001 and increased the RPE (p<0.001; ii the narrow handgrip width elicited a higher RPE (p<0.001 and iii women performed fewer repetitions than men in all FLPD exercise variations (p=0.023. Significant interactions were also observed between: i PE or sex and the RPE (p=0.024; and ii PE or handgrip width and the number of repetitions (p<0.001. In conclusion, PE of the BB promotes a decreased performance in the FLPD exercise along with a greater RPE, especially when using a narrow handgrip position

  16. Selective α1-adrenergic blockade disturbs the regional distribution of cerebral blood flow during static handgrip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Igor A; Mattos, João D; Campos, Monique O; Machado, Alessandro C; Rocha, Marcos P; Rocha, Natalia G; Vianna, Lauro C; Nobrega, Antonio C L

    2016-06-01

    Handgrip-induced increases in blood flow through the contralateral artery that supplies the cortical representation of the arm have been hypothesized as a consequence of neurovascular coupling and a resultant metabolic attenuation of sympathetic cerebral vasoconstriction. In contrast, sympathetic restraint, in theory, inhibits changes in perfusion of the cerebral ipsilateral blood vessels. To confirm whether sympathetic nerve activity modulates cerebral blood flow distribution during static handgrip (SHG) exercise, beat-to-beat contra- and ipsilateral internal carotid artery blood flow (ICA; Doppler) and mean arterial pressure (MAP; Finometer) were simultaneously assessed in nine healthy men (27 ± 5 yr), both at rest and during a 2-min SHG bout (30% maximal voluntary contraction), under two experimental conditions: 1) control and 2) α1-adrenergic receptor blockade. End-tidal carbon dioxide (rebreathing system) was clamped throughout the study. SHG induced increases in MAP (+31.4 ± 10.7 mmHg, P blood flow (+80.9 ± 62.5 ml/min, P 0.05). The reduction in ipsilateral ICA vascular conductance (VC) was greater compared with contralateral ICA (contralateral: -0.8 ± 0.8 vs. ipsilateral: -2.6 ± 1.3 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), P blood flow (contralateral: +58.4 ± 21.5 vs. ipsilateral: +54.3 ± 46.2 ml/min, P > 0.05) and decreases in VC (contralateral: -0.4 ± 0.7 vs. ipsilateral: -0.4 ± 1.0 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), P > 0.05). These findings indicate a role of sympathetic nerve activity in the regulation of cerebral blood flow distribution during SHG.

  17. Impact of ischemic preconditioning on functional sympatholysis during handgrip exercise in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horiuchi, M.; Endo, J.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated bouts of ischemia followed by reperfusion, known as ischemic preconditioning (IPC), is found to improve exercise performance. As redistribution of blood from the inactive areas to active skeletal muscles during exercise (i.e., functional sympatholysis) is important for exercise performance,

  18. Impact of handgrip exercise intensity on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, C.L.; Carter, H.H.; Dawson, E.A.; Naylor, L.H.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Green, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Previous studies that have examined the impact of exercise intensity on conduit artery endothelial function have involved large muscle group exercise which induces local and systemic effects. The aim of this study was to examine flow-mediated dilation (FMD) before and after incremental

  19. Impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation at rest and during isometric exercise in type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Lauro C; Deo, Shekhar H; Jensen, Areum K; Holwerda, Seth W; Zimmerman, Matthew C; Fadel, Paul J

    2015-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (T2D) have elevated risk of stroke, suggesting that cerebrovascular function is impaired. Herein, we examined dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) at rest and during exercise in T2D patients and determined whether underlying systemic oxidative stress is associated with impairments in CA. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and arterial blood pressure (BP) were measured at rest and during 2-min bouts of low- and high-intensity isometric handgrip performed at 20% and 40% maximum voluntary contraction, respectively, in seven normotensive and eight hypertensive T2D patients and eight healthy controls. Dynamic CA was estimated using the rate of regulation (RoR). Total reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide levels were measured at rest. There were no differences in RoR at rest or during exercise between normotensive and hypertensive T2D patients. However, when compared with controls, T2D patients exhibited lower RoR at rest and during low-intensity handgrip indicating impaired dynamic CA. Moreover, the RoR was further reduced by 29 ± 4% during high-intensity handgrip in T2D patients (0.307 ± 0.012/s rest vs. 0.220 ± 0.014/s high intensity; P < 0.01), although well maintained in controls. T2D patients demonstrated greater baseline total ROS and superoxide compared with controls, both of which were negatively related to RoR during handgrip (e.g., total ROS: r = -0.71, P < 0.05; 40% maximum voluntary contraction). Collectively, these data demonstrate impaired dynamic CA at rest and during isometric handgrip in T2D patients, which may be, in part, related to greater underlying systemic oxidative stress. Additionally, dynamic CA is blunted further with high intensity isometric contractions potentially placing T2D patients at greater risk for cerebral events during such activities. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Sex differences in the modulation of vasomotor sympathetic outflow during static handgrip exercise in healthy young humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarvis, S.S.; Gundy, T.B. Van; Galbreath, M.M.; Shibata, S.; Okazaki, K.; Reelick, M.F; Levine, B.D.; Fu, Q.

    2011-01-01

    Sex differences in sympathetic neural control during static exercise in humans are few and the findings are inconsistent. We hypothesized women would have an attenuated vasomotor sympathetic response to static exercise, which would be further reduced during the high sex hormone [midluteal (ML)] vs.

  1. Handgrip and general muscular strength and endurance during prolonged bedrest with isometric and isotonic leg exercise training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Starr, J. C.; Van Beaumont, W.; Convertino, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of maximal grip strength and endurance at 40 percent max strength were obtained for 7 men 19-21 years of age, 1-2 days before and on the first recovery day during three 2-week bedrest (BR) periods, each separated by a 3-week ambulatory recovery period. The subjects performed isometric exercise (IME) for 1 hr/day, isotonic exercise (ITE) for 1 hr/day, and no exercise (NOE) in the three BR periods. It was found that the mean maximal grip strength was unchanged after all three BR periods. Mean grip endurance was found to be unchanged after IME and ITE training, but was significantly reduced after NOE. These results indicate that IME and ITE training during BR do not increase or decrease maximal grip strength, alghough they prevent loss of grip endurance, while the maximal strength of all other major muscle groups decreases in proportion to the length of BR to 70 days. The maximal strength reduction of the large muscle groups was found to be about twice that of the small muscle groups during BR. In addition, it is shown that changes in maximal strength after spaceflight, BR, or water immersion deconditioning cannot be predicted from changes in submaximal or maximal oxygen uptake values.

  2. Diastolic relaxation and compliance reserve during dynamic exercise in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlaug, Barry A; Jaber, Wissam A; Ommen, Steve R; Lam, Carolyn S P; Redfield, Margaret M; Nishimura, Rick A

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies have examined haemodynamic changes with stressors such as isometric handgrip and rapid atrial pacing in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), but little is known regarding left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume responses during dynamic exercise. To assess LV haemodynamic responses to dynamic exercise in patients with HFpEF. Twenty subjects with normal ejection fraction (EF) and exertional dyspnoea underwent invasive haemodynamic assessment during dynamic exercise to evaluate suspected HFpEF. LV end-diastolic pressure was elevated at rest (>15 mm Hg, n=18) and with exercise (≥20 mm Hg, n=20) in all subjects, consistent with HFpEF. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure, arterial elastance and cardiac output increased with exercise (all pincreased by 43-56% with exercise (both pincreases in HR and the proportion of diastole that elapsed prior to estimated complete relaxation increased (pincreased 50% during exercise (p=0.0003). Exercise increases in LV filling pressures correlated with changes in diastolic relaxation rates, chamber stiffness and arterial afterload but were not related to alterations in preload volume, HR or cardiac output. In patients with newly diagnosed HFpEF, LV filling pressures increase during dynamic exercise in association with inadequate enhancement of relaxation and acute increases in LV chamber stiffness. Therapies that enhance diastolic reserve function may improve symptoms of exertional intolerance in patients with hypertensive heart disease and early HFpEF.

  3. Dynamic exercise in human pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. van Doorn (Marieke)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis represents an effort to obtain a better understanding of the ability of pregnant women to perform aerobic exercise. It consists of four chapters. Chapter 2 describes a longitudinal study of maximal power and oxygen uptake in pregnant and postpartum women. Because only a

  4. Dynamic exercise in human pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. van Doorn (Marieke)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis represents an effort to obtain a better understanding of the ability of pregnant women to perform aerobic exercise. It consists of four chapters. Chapter 2 describes a longitudinal study of maximal power and oxygen uptake in pregnant and postpartum women. Because only a limit

  5. Continuous Assessment of Labour Pain using Handgrip Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Wickboldt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Assessment of dynamic changes in painful experiences, such as labour, using conventional rating scales (eg, numerical rating scale [NRS] has limitations. An alternative for continuous pain evaluation could be a signal generated by voluntary action of the parturient. Remifentanil administration for obstetric analgesia could be improved by these dynamic measures of labour pain. In the present study, handgrip force was measured by a dynamometer to signal labour pain.

  6. Effects of handgrip training with venous restriction on brachial artery vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credeur, Daniel P; Hollis, Brandon C; Welsch, Michael A

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that resistance training with restricted venous blood flow (Kaatsu) results in significant strength gains and muscle hypertrophy. However, few studies have examined the concurrent vascular responses following restrictive venous blood flow training protocols. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 4 wk of handgrip exercise training, with and without venous restriction, on handgrip strength and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (BAFMD). Twelve participants (mean +/- SD: age = 22 +/- 1 yr, men = 5, women = 7) completed 4 wk of bilateral handgrip exercise training (duration = 20 min, intensity = 60% of the maximum voluntary contraction, cadence = 15 grips per minute, frequency = three sessions per week). During each session, venous blood flow was restricted in one arm (experimental (EXP) arm) using a pneumatic cuff placed 4 cm proximal to the antecubital fossa and inflated to 80 mm Hg for the duration of each exercise session. The EXP and the control (CON) arms were randomly selected. Handgrip strength was measured using a hydraulic hand dynamometer. Brachial diameters and blood velocity profiles were assessed, using Doppler ultrasonography, before and after 5 min of forearm occlusion (200 mm Hg) before and at the end of the 4-wk exercise. After exercise training, handgrip strength increased 8.32% (P = 0.05) in the CON arm and 16.17% (P = 0.05) in the EXP arm. BAFMD increased 24.19% (P = 0.0001) in the CON arm and decreased 30.36% (P = 0.0001) in the EXP arm. The data indicate handgrip training combined with venous restriction results in superior strength gains but reduced BAFMD compared with the nonrestricted arm.

  7. Effects of Handgrip Training With Venous Restriction on Brachial Artery Vasodilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credeur, Daniel P.; Hollis, Brandon C.; Welsch, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that resistance training with restricted venous blood flow (Kaatsu) results in significant strength gains and muscle hypertrophy. However, few studies have examined the concurrent vascular responses following restrictive venous blood flow training protocols. Purpose To examine the effects of 4 weeks of handgrip exercise training, with and without venous restriction, on handgrip strength and brachial artery flow mediated dilation (BAFMD). Methods Twelve participants (age=22±1yr; male = 5, female = 7), completed 4 weeks of bilateral handgrip exercise training (Duration: 20 min; Intensity: 60% of the MVC; Cadence: 15 grips*min−1; Frequency: 3 sessions*week−1). During each session venous blood flow was restricted in one arm (Experimental arm = EXP) using a pneumatic cuff placed 4 cm proximal to the antecubital fossa, and inflated to 80 mmHg for the duration of each exercise session. The EXP and control (CON) arm were randomly selected. Handgrip strength was measured using a hydraulic hand dynamometer. Brachial diameters and blood velocity profiles were assessed, using Doppler ultrasonography, before and after 5 min of forearm occlusion (200 mmHg), prior to and at the end of 4 weeks exercise. Results Following exercise training, handgrip strength increased 8.32% (p=0.05) in the CON arm and 16.17% (p=0.05) in the EXP arm. BAFMD increased 24.19% (p=0.0001) in the CON arm, and decreased 30.36% (p=0.0001) in the EXP arm. Conclusion The data indicate handgrip training combined with venous restriction results in superior strength gains, but reduced BAFMD compared to the non-restricted arm. PMID:20019641

  8. Divergent muscle sympathetic responses to dynamic leg exercise in heart failure and age-matched healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarius, Catherine F; Millar, Philip J; Murai, Hisayoshi; Morris, Beverley L; Marzolini, Susan; Oh, Paul; Floras, John S

    2015-02-01

    People with diminished ventricular contraction who develop heart failure have higher sympathetic nerve firing rates at rest compared with healthy individuals of a similar age and this is associated with less exercise capacity. During handgrip exercise, sympathetic nerve activity to muscle is higher in patients with heart failure but the response to leg exercise is unknown because its recording requires stillness. We measured sympathetic activity from one leg while the other leg cycled at a moderate level and observed a decrease in nerve firing rate in healthy subjects but an increase in subjects with heart failure. Because these nerves release noradrenaline, which can restrict muscle blood flow, this observation helps explain the limited exercise capacity of patients with heart failure. Lower nerve traffic during exercise was associated with greater peak oxygen uptake, suggesting that if exercise training attenuated sympathetic outflow functional capacity in heart failure would improve. The reflex fibular muscle sympathetic nerve (MSNA) response to dynamic handgrip exercise is elicited at a lower threshold in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The present aim was to test the hypothesis that the contralateral MSNA response to mild to moderate dynamic one-legged exercise is augmented in HFrEF relative to age- and sex-matched controls. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure and MSNA were recorded in 16 patients with HFrEF (left ventricular ejection fraction = 31 ± 2%; age 62 ± 3 years, mean ± SE) and 13 healthy control subjects (56 ± 2 years) before and during 2 min of upright one-legged unloaded cycling followed by 2 min at 50% of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2,peak). Resting HR and blood pressure were similar between groups whereas MSNA burst frequency was higher (50.0 ± 2.0 vs. 42.3 ± 2.7 bursts min(-1), P = 0.03) and V̇O2,peak lower (18.0 ± 2.0 vs. 32.6 ± 2.8 ml kg(-1) min(-1), P Exercise increased HR (P exercise in the healthy controls but

  9. The use of isometric exercise as a means of evaluating the parasympathetic contribution to the tachycardia induced by dynamic exercise in normal man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, L; Maciel, B C; Marin-Neto, J A; Martins, L E; Lima-Filho, E C; Manço, J C

    1988-07-01

    Fourteen normal subjects were submitted to isometric exercise (IE), dynamic exercise (DE) and a combination of the two (IE + DE). The main purpose of the present study was to use IE as a means of evaluating the mechanism of the heart rate (HR) increase induced by DE. To this end, the magnitude of the IE (handgrip) was standardized so as to cause an elevation of HR almost exclusively by vagal withdrawal: IE was performed using a dynamometer strain-gauge system with a linear response at 75% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) for 10 s, repeated at 1 min intervals. The change in HR evoked by IE under control conditions was compared with that evoked during DE, and during the corresponding recovery period. DE was performed by the legs, with the subject in the seated position for 4 min, at workloads of 55 and 105 watts, separated by a rest period. In the combined protocol, IE was performed at the beginning of DE, as well as at 1, 2 and 3 min during DE, and at 0, 1, 2, 3 and 5 min during recovery period. The following results were obtained: (1) IE associated with DE always induced smaller increase in heart rate than IE alone, and this effect was more marked at 105 than at 55 W; this finding suggested a workload-dependent vagal withdrawal at the very beginning of DE that was sustained until the end of effort.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Investigation of sport rock climbers’ handgrip strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Gürer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate handgrip strengths of elite sportsmen who are involved in sport rock climbing. Study group was composed of 144 sportsmen from 22 countries who participated in Petzl Roc Trip sport rock climbing festival held in Turkey between 14 and 19 October 2014. Data were collected by using Takei Grip-D brand hand dynamometer. The data collected were analyzed and interpreted by statistical package programme (SPSS 16.0. Results show meaningful differences between sportsmen’s right handgrip strength and left handgrip strength. Sportsmen’s right handgrip strength was found to be higher. Results differed based on gender as well. Left and right handgrip strength of males was found to be higher to those of females. No significant relationships were detected based on nationality, age, history of climbing and period of experience in climbing. Relationships were observed between Turkish male and female climbers’ right and left handgrip strengths. As a result, it can be claimed that right hand is used more often in sport rock climbing compared to the left hand. It is also believed that fingers and technique are crucial in sport rock climbing. Practices to develop finger strength and techniques are suggested.

  11. Local Pain Dynamics during Constant Exhaustive Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slapsinskaite, Agne; Razon, Selen; Balagué Serre, Natàlia; Hristovski, Robert; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the topological dynamics of pain and discomfort during constant exercise performed until volitional exhaustion. Eleven physical education students were tested while cycling and running at a "hard" intensity level (e.g., corresponding to Borg's RPE (6-20) = 15). During the tests, participants reported their discomfort and pain on a body map every 15s. "Time on task" for each participant was divided into five equal non-overlapping temporal windows within which their ratings were considered for analysis. The analyses revealed that the number of body locations with perceived pain and discomfort increased throughout the five temporal windows until reaching the mean (± SE) values of 4.2 ± 0.7 and 4.1 ± 0.6 in cycling and running, respectively. The dominant locations included the quadriceps and hamstrings during cycling and quadriceps and chest during running. In conclusion, pain seemed to spread throughout the body during constant cycling and running performed up to volitional exhaustion with differences between cycling and running in the upper body but not in the lower body dynamics.

  12. Local Pain Dynamics during Constant Exhaustive Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agne Slapsinskaite

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to delineate the topological dynamics of pain and discomfort during constant exercise performed until volitional exhaustion. Eleven physical education students were tested while cycling and running at a "hard" intensity level (e.g., corresponding to Borg's RPE (6-20 = 15. During the tests, participants reported their discomfort and pain on a body map every 15s. "Time on task" for each participant was divided into five equal non-overlapping temporal windows within which their ratings were considered for analysis. The analyses revealed that the number of body locations with perceived pain and discomfort increased throughout the five temporal windows until reaching the mean (± SE values of 4.2 ± 0.7 and 4.1 ± 0.6 in cycling and running, respectively. The dominant locations included the quadriceps and hamstrings during cycling and quadriceps and chest during running. In conclusion, pain seemed to spread throughout the body during constant cycling and running performed up to volitional exhaustion with differences between cycling and running in the upper body but not in the lower body dynamics.

  13. Core muscle activation during dynamic upper limb exercises in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnanen, Sami P; Siekkinen, Kirsti M; Häkkinen, Arja H; Mälkiä, Esko A; Kautiainen, Hannu J; Ylinen, Jari J

    2012-12-01

    Although several everyday functions and sporting activities demand controlled use of the abdominal and back muscles while working with the upper limbs, the activity of core muscles during dynamic upper limb exercises in the standing position has not been studied extensively. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine abdominal and back muscle activity during dynamic upper limb exercises while standing and to evaluate whether dynamic exercises are appropriate for strengthening muscles. The activation of the rectus abdominis, obliquus externus abdominis, longissimus, and multifidus muscles during dynamic bilateral or unilateral shoulder exercises with or without fixation of the pelvis was measured in 20 healthy women using surface electromyography. Trunk muscle activation during isometric maximum contraction was used as a comparative reference. With bilateral shoulder extension and unilateral shoulder horizontal adduction, abdominal muscle activity was >60% of activity during reference exercises. With unilateral shoulder horizontal abduction and shoulder extension exercises, back muscle activity was >60% of the activity level reference exercise. Muscle activation levels were 35-64% lower during shoulder horizontal adduction and abduction without fixation compared with exercises with fixation. The results indicate that upper limb exercises performed in the standing position are effective for activating core muscles. Bilateral and unilateral shoulder extension and unilateral shoulder horizontal abduction and adduction with the pelvis fixed elicited the greatest activity of the core muscles.

  14. CORRELATION BETWEEN BODY MASS INDEX AND HANDGRIP STRENGTH AND HANDGRIP ENDURANCE AMONG YOUNG HEALTHY ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physical inactivity has become a serious problem all over the world. Handgrip Strength (a form of isometric static contraction test, is an important test to evaluate the physical fitness and nutritional status of an individua l. A number of factors like a ge, gender, body size, effort, skeletal muscle bulk and contractility may affect the handgrip strength (HGS and handgrip endurance (HGE. AIM: This study was conducted to establish the possible correlation (if any between body mass index and handgrip str ength and endurance among young healthy adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A population based cross - sectional study comprising of 200 students (both male and female, age group - 18 - 22 yrs was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Jorhat Medical College. Anthropometric parameters like height and weight were taken to evaluate the BMI and handgrip strength and handgrip endurance were taken by using handgrip dynamometer. According to WHO classification of BMI, subjects were categorized into three groups as un derweight BMI ≤18.5 kg/m 2 , normal weight BMI 18.5 - 24.9 kg/m 2 and overweight BMI≥ 24.9 kg/m 2 . Gender wise difference was analyzed by unpaired t test. Statistical analysis for correlation was done by using Karl Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient denoted by(r. RESULT: Males had higher handgrip strength and handgrip endurance than females. Statistic ally significant correlation was found between BMI and handgrip strength & endurance in underweight & overweight subjects. Gender differences in correlation were observed in correlation between BMI & HGS and HGE. CONCLUSION: The observed influence of BMI a nd gender differences in correlation between BMI and HGS and HGE indicate that besides BMI several other factors like effort, strength, muscular contractility etc . affect muscular strength & endurance in young males and females.

  15. Handgrip Strength: Indications of Paternal Inheritance in Three European Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cournil, Amandine; Jeune, Bernard; Skytthe, Axel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Handgrip strength is an indicator of overall muscle strength. Poor handgrip strength is a risk factor for disability and mortality. We aimed to investigate the pattern of inheritance of handgrip strength in a sample of parent-offspring pairs from three different European regions in De...

  16. Benefits of exercise training and the correlation between aerobic capacity and functional outcomes and quality of life in elderly patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hsin; Chen, Yi-Jen; Tu, Hung-Pin; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Jhong, Jing-Hui; Lin, Ko-Long

    2014-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise training is beneficial to people with coronary artery disease (CAD). Nevertheless, the correlation between aerobic capacity, and functional mobility and quality of life in elderly CAD patients is less addressed. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the beneficial effects of exercise training in elderly people with CAD, integrating exercise stress testing, functional mobility, handgrip strength, and health-related quality of life. Elderly people with CAD were enrolled from the outpatient clinic of a cardiac rehabilitation unit in a medical center. Participants were assigned to the exercise training group (N = 21) or the usual care group (N = 15). A total of 36 sessions of exercise training, completed in 12 weeks, was prescribed. Echocardiography, exercise stress testing, the 6-minute walking test, Timed Up and Go test, and handgrip strength testing were performed, and the Short-Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) was administered at baseline and at 12-week follow-up. Peak oxygen consumption improved significantly after training. The heart rate recovery improved from 13.90/minute to 16.62/minute after exercise training. Functional mobility and handgrip strength also improved after training. Significant improvements were found in SF-36 physical function, social function, role limitation due to emotional problems, and mental health domains. A significant correlation between dynamic cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters, the 6-minute walking test, Timed Up and Go test, handgrip strength, and SF-36 physical function and general health domains was also detected. Twelve-week, 36-session exercise training, including moderate-intensity cardiopulmonary exercise training, strengthening exercise, and balance training, is beneficial to elderly patients with CAD, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters correlate well with balance and quality of life.

  17. Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linkis, P; Jørgensen, L G; Olesen, H L

    1995-01-01

    a focal response but depended did not demonstrate a focal response but depended on the muscle mass involved during exercise. The data demonstrate a significant increase in Vmean for the artery supplying the cortical projection of the exercising limb. Insignificant and marginally significant increases......Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity. J. Appl. Physiol. 78(1): 12-16, 1995.--Anterior (ACA) and middle (MCA) cerebral artery mean flow velocities (Vmean) and pulsatility indexes were determined using transcranial Doppler in 14 subjects during dynamic exercise after...... assessment of the carbon dioxide reactivity for both arteries. Right hand contractions provoked an elevation in left MCA Vmean [19% (12-28); P increased by 23% (11-37; P

  18. Ammonia metabolism during intense dynamic exercise and recovery in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, T; Bangsbo, Jens; Gollnick, PD

    1990-01-01

     declined immediately on cessation of exercise. Recovery was complete in approximately 20 min. Arterial [NH3] increased less rapidly and reached itsmaximum 2-3 min into recovery. These data demonstrate that NH3 clearance is more sensitive to the cessation of exercise than is NH3 release from skeletal muscle. Muscle [NH......This study examined the dynamics for ammonia (NH3) metabolism in human skeletal muscle during and after intense one-legged exercise. Subjects (n = 8) performed dynamic leg extensor exercise to exhaustion (3.2 min). MuscleNH3 release increased rapidly to a maximum of 314 +/- 42 mumol/min and......3] increased three to fourfold during exercise and represented 74 +/- 8% of the total net NH3 formation. Thus the change in muscle [NH3] alone underestimates the NH3 production. There was no evidence that the muscle-to-venous blood NH3 ratio shifts in accordance with the H+ data. Thus other factors...

  19. Change in blood pressure in recovery phase after combined (static & dynamic) exercise

    OpenAIRE

    桑村, 由美; 志内, 哲也; 野村, 千景; 幸田, 貴美子; 小原, 繁

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that systolic blood pressure (SBP) elevate but diastolic blood pressure (DBP) do not elevate during dynamic exercise and in statlc isometrlc exercise DBP show respectable elevation. However,changes in SBP and DBP in recovery phase after exercise is unclear.In this study we measured SBP and DBP by auscultatory recording method during recovery phase for 10 minutes. Resting blood pressure was determined immediately before exercise. The exercise was a dynamic (p...

  20. Dynamic regulation of circulating microRNA during acute exhaustive exercise and sustained aerobic exercise training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggish, Aaron L; Hale, Andrew; Weiner, Rory B; Lewis, Gregory D; Systrom, David; Wang, Francis; Wang, Thomas J; Chan, Stephen Y

    2011-01-01

    Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are intracellular mediators of essential biological functions. Recently, plasma-based ‘circulating’ miRNAs (c-miRNAs) have been shown to control cellular processes, but the c-miRNA response to human exercise remains unknown. We sought to determine whether c-miRNAs are dynamically regulated in response to acute exhaustive cycling exercise and sustained rowing exercise training using a longitudinal, repeated measures study design. Specifically, c-miRNAs involved in angiogenesis (miR-20a, miR-210, miR-221, miR-222, miR-328), inflammation (miR-21, miR-146a), skeletal and cardiac muscle contractility (miR-21, miR-133a), and hypoxia/ischaemia adaptation (miR-21, miR-146a, and miR-210) were measured at rest and immediately following acute exhaustive cycling exercise in competitive male rowers (n = 10, age = 19.1 ± 0.6 years) before and after a 90 day period of rowing training. Distinct patterns of c-miRNA response to exercise were observed and adhered to four major profiles: (1) c-miRNA up-regulated by acute exercise before and after sustained training (miR-146a and miR-222), (2) c-miRNA responsive to acute exercise before but not after sustained training (miR-21 and miR-221), (3) c-miRNA responsive only to sustained training (miR-20a), and (4) non-responsive c-miRNA (miR-133a, miR-210, miR-328). Linear correlations were observed between peak exercise levels of miR-146a and (r = 0.63, P = 0.003) and between changes in resting miR-20a and changes in (pre-training vs. post-training, r = 0.73; P = 0.02). Although future work is required, these results suggest the potential value of c-miRNAs as exercise biomarkers and their possible roles as physiological mediators of exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptation. PMID:21690193

  1. Autonomic neural control of heart rate during dynamic exercise: revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Daniel W; Raven, Peter B

    2014-06-15

    The accepted model of autonomic control of heart rate (HR) during dynamic exercise indicates that the initial increase is entirely attributable to the withdrawal of parasympathetic nervous system (PSNS) activity and that subsequent increases in HR are entirely attributable to increases in cardiac sympathetic activity. In the present review, we sought to re-evaluate the model of autonomic neural control of HR in humans during progressive increases in dynamic exercise workload. We analysed data from both new and previously published studies involving baroreflex stimulation and pharmacological blockade of the autonomic nervous system. Results indicate that the PSNS remains functionally active throughout exercise and that increases in HR from rest to maximal exercise result from an increasing workload-related transition from a 4 : 1 vagal-sympathetic balance to a 4 : 1 sympatho-vagal balance. Furthermore, the beat-to-beat autonomic reflex control of HR was found to be dependent on the ability of the PSNS to modulate the HR as it was progressively restrained by increasing workload-related sympathetic nerve activity. (i) increases in exercise workload-related HR are not caused by a total withdrawal of the PSNS followed by an increase in sympathetic tone; (ii) reciprocal antagonism is key to the transition from vagal to sympathetic dominance, and (iii) resetting of the arterial baroreflex causes immediate exercise-onset reflexive increases in HR, which are parasympathetically mediated, followed by slower increases in sympathetic tone as workloads are increased. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  2. Registration of hand-grip pattern in smart gun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shang, X.; Veldhuis, R.N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Secure Grip1 focuses on the development of a hand-grip pattern recognition system, as part of a smart gun. It is intended for use by the police. We collected the hand-grip data from police officers in three sessions in a row with time intervals in between. If data for training and testing come from

  3. Establishing Normative Reference Values for Handgrip among Hungarian Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Laurson, Kelly R.; Karsai, István; Kaj, Mónika; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine age- and sex-related variation in handgrip strength and to determine reference values for the Hungarian population. Method: A sample of 1,086 Hungary youth (aged 11-18 years old; 654 boys and 432 girls) completed a handgrip strength assessment using a handheld dynamometer. Quantile regression was…

  4. Handgrip strength and mortality in older Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Snih, Soham; Markides, Kyriakos S; Ray, Laura; Ostir, Glenn V; Goodwin, James S

    2002-07-01

    To examine the association between handgrip strength and mortality in older Mexican American men and women. A 5-year prospective cohort study. Five southwestern states: Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and California. A population-based sample of 2,488 noninstitutionalized Mexican-American men and women aged 65 and older. Maximal handgrip strength, timed walk, and body mass index were assessed at baseline during 1993/94. Self-reports of functional disability, various medical conditions, and status at follow-up were obtained. Of the baseline sample with complete data, 507 persons were confirmed deceased 5 years later. Average handgrip strength +/- standard deviation was significantly higher in men (28.4 kg +/- 9.5) than in women (18.2g +/- 6.5). Of men who had a handgrip strength less than 22.01 kg and women who had a handgrip strength less than 14 kg, 38.2% and 41.5%, respectively, were dead 5 years later. In men in the lowest handgrip strength quartile, the hazard ratio of death was 2.10 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.31-3.38) compared with those in the highest handgrip strength quartile, after controlling for sociodemographic variables, functional disability, timed walk, medical conditions, body mass index, and smoking status at baseline. In women in the lowest handgrip strength quartile, the hazard ratio of death was 1.76 (95%I = 1.05-2.93) compared with those in the highest handgrip strength quartile. Poorer performance in the timed walk and the presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cancer were also significant predictors of mortality 5 years later. Handgrip strength is a strong predictor of mortality in older Mexican Americans, after controlling for relevant risk factors.

  5. From Static Stretching to Dynamic Exercises: Changing the Warm-Up Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Shawna

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, pre-exercise static stretching seems to have become common practice and routine. However, research suggests that it is time for a paradigm shift--that pre-exercise static stretching be replaced with dynamic warm-up exercises. Research indicates that a dynamic warm-up elevates body temperature, decreases muscle and joint…

  6. From Static Stretching to Dynamic Exercises: Changing the Warm-Up Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Shawna

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, pre-exercise static stretching seems to have become common practice and routine. However, research suggests that it is time for a paradigm shift--that pre-exercise static stretching be replaced with dynamic warm-up exercises. Research indicates that a dynamic warm-up elevates body temperature, decreases muscle and joint…

  7. Muscle metabolism from near infrared spectroscopy during rhythmic handgrip in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Pott, F; Madsen, P

    1998-01-01

    The rate of metabolism in forearm flexor muscles (MO2) was derived from near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS-O2) during ischaemia at rest rhythmic handgrip at 15% and 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), post-exercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI), and recovery in seven subjects. The MO2 was compare....... To conclude, NIRS-O2 of forearm flexor muscles closely reflected the exercise intensity and the metabolic rate determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy but not that rate derived from flow and the arterio-venous oxygen difference.......The rate of metabolism in forearm flexor muscles (MO2) was derived from near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS-O2) during ischaemia at rest rhythmic handgrip at 15% and 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), post-exercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI), and recovery in seven subjects. The MO2 was compared...... with forearm oxygen uptake (VO2) [flow x (oxygen saturation in arnterial blood-oxygen saturation in venous blood, SaO2 - SvO2)], and with the 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy-determined ratio of inorganic phosphate to phosphocreatine (P(I):PCr). During ischaemia at rest, the fall in NIRS-O2 was more...

  8. Linear correlation between fractal dimension of EEG signal and handgrip force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J Z; Yang, Q; Yao, B; Brown, R W; Yue, G H

    2005-08-01

    Fractal dimension (FD) has been proved useful in quantifying the complexity of dynamical signals in biology and medicine. In this study, we measured FDs of human electroencephalographic (EEG) signals at different levels of handgrip forces. EEG signals were recorded from five major motor-related cortical areas in eight normal healthy subjects. FDs were calculated using three different methods. The three physiological periods of handgrip (command preparation, movement and holding periods) were analyzed and compared. The results showed that FDs of the EEG signals during the movement and holding periods increased linearly with handgrip force, whereas FD during the preparation period had no correlation with force. The results also demonstrated that one method (Katz's) gave greater changes in FD, and thus, had more power in capturing the dynamic changes in the signal. The linear increase of FD, together with results from other EEG and neuroimaging studies, suggest that under normal conditions the brain recruits motor neurons at a linear progress when increasing the force.

  9. Cortical and brain stem changes in neural activity during static handgrip and postexercise ischemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Mikael; Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2010-01-01

    Static isometric exercise increases muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and mean arterial pressure, both of which can be maintained at the conclusion of the exercise by occlusion of the arterial supply [postexercise ischemia (PEI)]. To identify the cortical and subcortical sites involved......, and to differentiate between central command and reflex inputs, we used blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) of the whole brain (3 T). Subjects performed submaximal static handgrip exercise for 2 min followed by 6 min of PEI; MSNA was recorded on a separate day. During the contraction phase......, parallel increases in BOLD signal intensity occurred in the contralateral primary motor cortex and cerebellar nuclei and cortex; these matched the effort profile and ceased at the conclusion of the contraction. Progressive increases in the contralateral insula and primary and secondary somatosensory...

  10. Biomechanic study of handgrip in athletes of different sportive modalities

    OpenAIRE

    Affonso Celso Kulevicz Silva

    2006-01-01

    Handgrip can be decisive for certain sports in specific situations. This work constitutes an analysis of handgrip biomechanic variables in tests for maintaining continuous isometric and maximum interval strength in athletes that use this movement in their sport and in non-athletes. The intention is to compare the differences in characteristics among the groups, between dominant hand (DH) and non-dominant hand (NDH) in each test, in a way that identifies parameters that supply quantitative inf...

  11. Vascular Function and Handgrip Strength in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Alomari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the relationship of handgrip strength with forearm blood flow (BF and vascular resistance (VR in rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Methods. Forearm BF at rest (RBF and after upper arm occlusion (RHBF, and handgrip strength were examined in 78 individuals (RA=42 and controls (CT=36. Subsequently, VR at rest (RVR and after occlusion (RHVR were calculated. Results. The patients’ RBF (P=0.02 and RHBF (P=0.0001 were less, whereas RVR (P=0.002 and RHVR (P=0.0001 were greater as compared to the CTs. Similarly, handgrip strength was lower in the RAs (P=0.0001. Finally, handgrip strength was directly associated with RBF (r=0.43; P=0.0001, and RHBF (r=0.5; P=0.0001, and inversely related to RVR (r=-0.3; P=0.009 and RHVR (r=-0.3; P=0.007. Conclusion. The present study uniquely identifies an association between regional measures of forearm blood flow and handgrip strength in patients and healthy control. In addition, this study confirms the presence of vascular and muscle dysfunction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, as evidenced by lower forearm blood flow indices, at rest and following occlusion, and lower handgrip strength as compared to healthy individuals.

  12. Vascular function and handgrip strength in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomari, Mahmoud A; Keewan, Esraa F; Shammaa, Rania A; Alawneh, Khaldoon; Khatib, Said Y; Welsch, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    To examine the relationship of handgrip strength with forearm blood flow (BF) and vascular resistance (VR) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Forearm BF at rest (RBF) and after upper arm occlusion (RHBF), and handgrip strength were examined in 78 individuals (RA = 42 and controls (CT) = 36). Subsequently, VR at rest (RVR) and after occlusion (RHVR) were calculated. The patients' RBF (P = 0.02) and RHBF (P = 0.0001) were less, whereas RVR (P = 0.002) and RHVR (P = 0.0001) were greater as compared to the CTs. Similarly, handgrip strength was lower in the RAs (P = 0.0001). Finally, handgrip strength was directly associated with RBF (r = 0.43; P = 0.0001), and RHBF (r = 0.5; P = 0.0001), and inversely related to RVR (r = -0.3; P = 0.009) and RHVR (r = -0.3; P = 0.007). The present study uniquely identifies an association between regional measures of forearm blood flow and handgrip strength in patients and healthy control. In addition, this study confirms the presence of vascular and muscle dysfunction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, as evidenced by lower forearm blood flow indices, at rest and following occlusion, and lower handgrip strength as compared to healthy individuals.

  13. Acute effects of dynamic stretching exercise on power output during concentric dynamic constant external resistance leg extension

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAGUCHI, TAICHI; Ishii, Kojiro; Yamanaka, Masanori; YASUDA, KAZUNORI

    2007-01-01

    AbstractThe purpose of the present study was to clarify the acute effect of dynamic stretching exercise on muscular performance during concentric dynamic constant external resistance (DCER, formally called isotonic) muscle actions under various loads. Concentric DCER leg extension power outputs were measured in 12 healthy male students after 2 types of pretreatment. The pre- treatments were: (a) dynamic stretching treatment including 2 types of dynamic stretching exercises of leg extensors an...

  14. Effects of pelvic stabilization on lumbar muscle activity during dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Juan, Jun G; Yaggie, James A; Levy, Susan S; Mooney, Vert; Udermann, Brian E; Mayer, John M

    2005-11-01

    Many commonly utilized low-back exercise devices offer mechanisms to stabilize the pelvis and to isolate the lumbar spine, but the value of these mechanisms remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of pelvic stabilization on the activity of the lumbar and hip extensor muscles during dynamic back extension exercise. Fifteen volunteers in good general health performed dynamic extension exercise in a seated upright position on a lumbar extension machine with and without pelvic stabilization. During exercise, surface electromyographic activity of the lumbar multifidus and biceps femoris was recorded. The activity of the multifidus was 51% greater during the stabilized condition, whereas there was no difference in the activity of the biceps femoris between conditions. This study demonstrates that pelvic stabilization enhances lumbar muscle recruitment during dynamic exercise on machines. Exercise specialists can use these data when designing exercise programs to develop low back strength.

  15. Hand-grip isometric strength in judo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan G Bonitch-Góngora

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The grip is an important technical and tactical aspect through which the judokas dominate the adversary, hindering the application of appropriate techniques and favoring their own attack. The judokas must have high levels of isometric force and endurance to this type of force on the gripping muscles of the forearms, as one of the key aspects for success. This article reviews the grip muscular strength and endurance profiles of judokas of different groups (gender, age and competitive level. In general, the peak isometric strength of elite judokas has not changed in the last 40 years and is similar to that reached by non-elite judokas or even registered in large populations. This indicate that the evaluation of the isometric hand grip endurance may be a more relevant parameter than the peak isometric force in judokas, as during the bouts the grip must be maintained for relatively long periods of time and the maximum force cannot be maintained for long. However there are few studies on the ability to resist successive isometric handgrip stress in judokas.

  16. Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... COPD: Overview COPD: Lifestyle Management COPD: Exercises COPD: Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... lifelong activity you enjoy. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use inhaled short acting ...

  17. Activation of the insular cortex during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James; Nobrega, A C; McColl, R

    1997-01-01

    role as a site for regulation of autonomic activity. 2. Eight subjects were studied during voluntary active cycling and passively induced cycling. Additionally, four of the subjects underwent passive movement combined with electrical stimulation of the legs. 3. Increases in regional cerebral blood flow...... during active, but not passive cycling. There were no significant changes in rCBF for the right insula. Also, the magnitude of rCBF increase for leg primary motor areas was significantly greater for both active cycling and passive cycling combined with electrical stimulation compared with passive cycling...... alone. 5. These findings provide the first evidence of insular activation during dynamic exercise in humans, suggesting that the left insular cortex may serve as a site for cortical regulation of cardiac autonomic (parasympathetic) activity. Additionally, findings during passive cycling with electrical...

  18. Electromyogram median power frequency in dynamic exercise at medium exercise intensities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, W; Bonga, GJJ; Hof, AL; Verkerke, GJ

    1996-01-01

    The electromyogram (EMG) median power Frequency of the calf muscles was investigated during an exhausting treadmill exercise and a 20-min recovery period. The exercise was an uphill run at a speed of 5 km . h(-1) and a gradient of 20%. During exercise there was no decrease of EMG median power freque

  19. A textbook of belief dynamics solutions to exercises

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Sven Ove

    1999-01-01

    The mid-1980s saw the discovery of logical tools that make it possible to model changes in belief and knowledge in entirely new ways. These logical tools turned out to be applicable to both human beliefs and to the contents of databases. Philosophers, logicians, and computer scientists have contributed to making this interdisciplinary field one of the most exciting in the cognitive scientists - and one that is expanding rapidly. This, the first textbook in the new area, contains both discursive chapters with a minimum of formalism and formal chapters in which proofs and proof methods are presented. Using different selections from the formal sections, according to the author's detailed advice, allows the book to be used at all levels of university education. A supplementary volume contains solutions to the 210 exercises. The volume's unique, comprehensive coverage means that it can also be used by specialists in the field of belief dynamics and related areas, such as non-monotonic reasoning and knowledge repre...

  20. The Development of Even-Aged Plantation Forests: An Exercise in Forest Stand Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E. R.; Leslie, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a field-based practical exercise that allows students in forestry, ecology and natural resources to develop their understanding of forest stand dynamics. The exercise involves measurement of key tree growth parameters in four even-aged, single-species plantation stands of different age but occupying sites with similar soil…

  1. Elasticity improves handgrip performance and user experience during visuomotor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Michael; Rinne, Paul; Liardon, Jean-Luc; Uhomoibhi, Catherine; Bentley, Paul; Burdet, Etienne

    2017-02-01

    Passive rehabilitation devices, providing motivation and feedback, potentially offer an automated and low-cost therapy method, and can be used as simple human-machine interfaces. Here, we ask whether there is any advantage for a hand-training device to be elastic, as opposed to rigid, in terms of performance and preference. To address this question, we have developed a highly sensitive and portable digital handgrip, promoting independent and repetitive rehabilitation of grasp function based around a novel elastic force and position sensing structure. A usability study was performed on 66 healthy subjects to assess the effect of elastic versus rigid handgrip control during various visuomotor tracking tasks. The results indicate that, for tasks relying either on feedforward or on feedback control, novice users perform significantly better with the elastic handgrip, compared with the rigid equivalent (11% relative improvement, 9-14% mean range; p < 0.01). Furthermore, there was a threefold increase in the number of subjects who preferred elastic compared with rigid handgrip interaction. Our results suggest that device compliance is an important design consideration for grip training devices.

  2. Handgrip strength and physical activity in frail elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Lenardt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between handgrip strength (HS and physical activity in physical frailty elderly. METHOD Cross-sectional quantitative study with a sample of 203 elderly calculated based on the population estimated proportion. Tests were applied to detect cognitive impairment and assessment of physical frailty. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis by binary logistic regression were used, and also Student's t-test and Fisher's exact test. RESULTS A total of 99 (64.3% elderly showed decreased handgrip strength and 90 (58.4% elderly presented decrease in physical activity levels. There was a statistically significant difference between these two components (p=0.019, in which elderly who have decreased HS have lower levels of physical activity. For low levels of physical activity and decreased HS, there was no evidence of significant difference in the probability of the classification as frail elderly (p<0.001. CONCLUSION The components handgrip strength and physical activity are associated with the frail elderly. The joint presence of low levels of physical activity and decreased handgrip strength leads to a significantly higher probability of the elderly to be categorized as frailty.

  3. Weight, body composition and handgrip strength among pulmonary tuberculosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praygod, George; Range, Nyagosya; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate deficits in weight, arm fat area (AFA), arm muscle area (AMA) and handgrip strength among smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB+) patients starting treatment. We conducted a cross-sectional study among PTB+ patients and age- and sex-matched neighborhood controls. HIV statu...

  4. Transcranial Doppler-determined change in posterior cerebral artery blood flow velocity does not reflect vertebral artery blood flow during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Takuro; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2017-02-10

    We examined whether a change in posterior cerebral artery flow velocity (PCAv) reflected the posterior cerebral blood flow, in healthy subjects, during both static and dynamic exercise. PCAv and vertebral artery (VA) blood flow, as an index of posterior blood flow, were continuously measured during an exercise trial, using transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography and Doppler ultrasound, respectively. Static handgrip exercise significantly increased both PCAv and VA blood flow. Increasing intensity of dynamic exercise further increased VA blood flow from moderate exercise, while PCAv decreased to almost resting level. During both static and dynamic exercise, the PCA cerebrovascular conductance (CVC) index significantly decreased from rest (static and high intensity dynamic exercise; -11.5 ± 12.2% and -18.0 ± 16.8%; mean ± SD, respectively), despite no change in the CVC of VA. These results indicate that vasoconstriction occurred at PCA but not VA during exercise-induced hypertension. This discrepancy in vascular response to exercise between PCA and VA may be due to different cerebral arterial characteristics. Therefore, to determine the effect of exercise on posterior cerebral circulation, at least, we need to consider carefully which cerebral artery to measure, regardless of exercise mode.

  5. Comparison of two isometric handgrip protocols on sympathetic arousal in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Shawn E; Mather, Mara

    2015-04-01

    Isometric handgrip is commonly used in stress research because the task reliably increases sympathetic arousal. Various handgrip protocols have been used; they vary in handgrip strength, duration of grip, and the number of cycles of handgrip and rest. However, most protocols require the calibration of a maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) prior to the handgrip task, which is not always convenient (i.e., in a functional magnetic resonance imaging study). Here, we wanted to test whether two handgrip protocols with different strength, duration and cycle protocols would reliably elicit sympathetic arousal in the absence of calibrating an MVC. Sixty-two healthy naturally cycling women and women on hormonal contraception participated in one of the two isometric handgrip protocols using a hand therapy ball of medium resistance. Women completed one of the following handgrip protocols: 1) 30% of a perceived maximum voluntary contraction for 3 min or 2) 3 cycles of maximum voluntary contraction for 18s with a one minute rest in between. All handgrip blocks were counterbalanced with a control condition. Sympathetic arousal was measured throughout the session via pupil diameter changes and salivary alpha-amylase. Results indicate that in the absence of calibrating an MVC, the handgrip tasks elicited different changes in sympathetic arousal. Pupil dilation responses increased significantly in the handgrip versus control blocks only in participants in the 18-s protocol. Additionally, more participants exhibited a salivary alpha-amylase response to the handgrip block in the 18-s condition compared to the 3-min condition. Thus, these results suggest that neuroimaging and behavioral studies with isometric handgrip should be able to successfully induce sympathetic nervous activity with the 18-s paradigm, regardless of the handgrip device and the ability to calibrate an MVC. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Electromyographic activity of rectus abdominis muscles during dynamic Pilates abdominal exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gabriela Bueno; Morgan, Mirele Minussi; Gomes de Carvalho, Wellington Roberto; Silva, Elisangela; de Freitas, Wagner Zeferino; da Silva, Fabiano Fernandes; de Souza, Renato Aparecido

    2015-10-01

    To assess the electrical behaviour of the upper rectus abdominis (URA) and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) by electromyography (EMG) during the following dynamic Pilates abdominal exercises: roll up, double leg stretch, coordination, crisscross and foot work. The results were compared with EMG findings of traditional abdominal exercises (sit up and crunch). Seventeen female subjects (with no experience of the Pilates method) were recruited. The URA and LRA were evaluated while 12 isotonic contractions were performed using the Pilates principles or traditional abdominal exercises. The data were normalised by a maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Normality was accepted, and ANOVA followed by Tukey test was used to determine data differences (P Pilates exercises double leg stretch, coordination, crisscross and foot work promoted greater muscle activation than traditional exercises, mainly in URA. Thus, these exercises have the potential to be prescribed for muscle strengthening programmes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Vasoreactivity before and after handgrip training in chronic heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credeur, Daniel P; Mariappan, Nithya; Francis, Joseph; Thomas, David; Moraes, Denzil; Welsch, Michael A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the vasodilatory and vasoconstrictor responses of the brachial artery in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and controls (CON) before and after a period of training and detraining. CHF (n = 10; age = 62 ± 8 yrs) and CON (n = 10; age = 55 ± 5 yrs) subjects completed 4 weeks of bilateral handgrip training (20 min; 60% of maximal handgrip strength; 15 grips*min(-1); 4 days*week(-1)). Handgrip strength was measured using a hand dynamometer. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (BAFMD) and cold pressor test (CPT) responses were determined using ultrasonography prior to training, at the end of 4 weeks of training and following 4 weeks of detraining. Absolute (mm) BAFMD and CPT responses were combined to yield a vascular operating range (VOR). Baseline BAFMD was higher in CON (CHF: 2.98 ± 1.49%; CON: 6.21 ± 1.21%; p = 0.01), while CPT responses were higher in CHF (CHF: 3.38 ± 0.83%; CON: 2.46 ± 0.62%; p = 0.05). Baseline VOR tended to be greater in the CON subjects (CHF: 0.28 ± 0.05 mm; CON: 0.32 ± 0.12 mm; p = 0.06). Training increased handgrip strength (∼5%; p < 0.05, for both groups), BAFMD (CHF: 2.98 ± 1.49% to 3.75 ± 1.56%; CON: 6.21 ± 1.21% - 8.02 ± 1.75%; p = 0.01) and VOR (CHF: 0.28 ± 0.05 mm - 0.3 ± 0.09 mm; CON: 0.32 ± 0.12 mm - 0.42 ± 0.11 mm; p = 0.01). There were no significant changes in CPT responses. All markers approached pre-training values following detraining. Handgrip exercise increases strength, BAFMD and VOR in both CHF and CON subjects. These improvements are transient and return to pre-training values after removal of the training stimulus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. W' expenditure and reconstitution during severe intensity constant power exercise: mechanistic insight into the determinants of W'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxterman, Ryan M; Skiba, Phillip F; Craig, Jesse C; Wilcox, Samuel L; Ade, Carl J; Barstow, Thomas J

    2016-10-01

    The sustainable duration of severe intensity exercise is well-predicted by critical power (CP) and the curvature constant (W'). The development of the W'BAL model allows for the pattern of W' expenditure and reconstitution to be characterized and this model has been applied to intermittent exercise protocols. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the influence of relaxation phase duration and exercise intensity on W' reconstitution during dynamic constant power severe intensity exercise. Six men (24.6 ± 0.9 years, height: 173.5 ± 1.9 cm, body mass: 78.9 ± 5.6 kg) performed severe intensity dynamic handgrip exercise to task failure using 50% and 20% duty cycles. The W'BAL model was fit to each exercise test and the time constant for W' reconstitution (τW') was determined. The τW' was significantly longer for the 50% duty cycle (1640 ± 262 sec) than the 20% duty cycle (863 ± 84 sec, P = 0.02). Additionally, the relationship between τW' and CP was well described as an exponential decay (r(2) = 0.90, P W'BAL model is able to characterize the expenditure and reconstitution of W' across the contraction-relaxation cycles comprising severe intensity constant power handgrip exercise. Moreover, the reconstitution of W' during constant power severe intensity exercise is influenced by the relative exercise intensity, the duration of relaxation between contractions, and CP.

  9. Acute effects of flexible pole exercise on heart rate dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Letícia Santana; Moreira, Patrícia S; Antonio, Ana M; Cardoso, Marco A; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Navega, Marcelo T; Raimundo, Rodrigo D; Valenti, Vitor E

    2015-01-01

    Exercise with flexible poles provides fast eccentric and concentric muscle contractions. Although the literature reports significant muscle chain activity during this exercise, it is not clear if a single bout of exercise induces cardiac changes. In this study we assessed the acute effects of flexible pole exercise on cardiac autonomic regulation. The study was performed on 22 women between 18 and 26 years old. We assessed heart rate variability (HRV) in the time (SDNN, RMSSD and pNN50) and frequency (HF, LF and LF/HF ratio) domains and geometric indices of HRV (RRTri, TINN, SD1, SD2 and SD1/SD2 ratio). The subjects remained at rest for 10 min and then performed the exercises with the flexible poles. Immediately after the exercise protocol, the volunteers remained seated at rest for 60 min and HRV was analyzed. We observed no significant changes in time domain (SDNN: p=0.72; RMSSD: p=0.94 and pNN50: p=0.92) or frequency domain indices (LF [nu]: p=0.98; LF [ms(2)]: p=0.72; HF [nu]: p=0.98; HF [ms(2)]: p=0.82 and LF/HF ratio: p=0.7) or in geometric indices (RRTri: p=0.54; TINN: p=0.77; SD1: p=0.94; SD2: p=0.67 and SD/SD2: p=0.42) before and after a single bout of flexible pole exercise. A single bout of flexible pole exercise did not induce significant changes in cardiac autonomic regulation in healthy women. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute effects of dynamic stretching exercise on power output during concentric dynamic constant external resistance leg extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Taichi; Ishii, Kojiro; Yamanaka, Masanori; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify the acute effect of dynamic stretching exercise on muscular performance during concentric dynamic constant external resistance (DCER, formally called isotonic) muscle actions under various loads. Concentric DCER leg extension power outputs were measured in 12 healthy male students after 2 types of pretreatment. The pretreatments were: (a) dynamic stretching treatment including 2 types of dynamic stretching exercises of leg extensors and the other 2 types of dynamic stretching exercises simulating the leg extension motion (2 sets of 15 times each with 30-second rest periods between sets; total duration: about 8 minutes), and (b) nonstretching treatment by resting for 8 minutes in a sitting position. Loads during measurement of the power output were set to 5, 30, and 60% of the maximum voluntary contractile (MVC) torque with isometric leg extension in each subject. The power output after the dynamic stretching treatment was significantly (p after the nonstretching treatment under each load (5% MVC: 468.4 +/- 102.6 W vs. 430.1 +/- 73.0 W; 30% MVC: 520.4 +/- 108.5 W vs. 491.0 +/- 93.0 W; 60% MVC: 487.1 +/- 100.6 W vs. 450.8 +/- 83.7 W). The present study demonstrated that dynamic stretching routines, such as dynamic stretching exercise of target muscle groups and dynamic stretching exercise simulating the actual motion pattern, significantly improve power output with concentric DCER muscle actions under various loads. These results suggested that dynamic stretching routines in warm-up protocols enhance power performance because common power activities are carried out by DCER muscle actions under various loads.

  11. LOCALISED MUSCLE TISSUE OXYGENATION DURING DYNAMIC EXERCISE WITH WHOLE BODY VIBRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Robbins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing use of whole body vibration during exercise an understanding of the exact role of vibration and the supporting physiological mechanisms is still limited. An important aspect of exercise analysis is the utilisation of oxygen, however, there have been limited studies considering tissue oxygenation parameters, particularly during dynamic whole body vibration (WBV exercise. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of adding WBV during heel raise exercises and assessing changes in tissue oxygenation parameters of the lateral gastrocnemius using Near Infra Red Spectroscopy (NIRS. Twenty healthy subjects completed ten alternating sets of 15 heel raises (vibration vs. no vibration. Synchronous oxygenation and motion data were captured prior to exercise to determine baseline levels, for the duration of the exercise and 20 sec post exercise for the recovery period. Both vibration and no vibration conditions elicited a characteristic increase in deoxyhaemoglobin and decreases in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, tissue oxygenation index and normalised tissue haemoglobin index which are indicative of local tissue hypoxia. However, the addition of vibration elicited significantly lower (p < 0. 001 depletions in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, normalised tissue haemoglobin index but no significant differences in deoxyhaemoglobin. These findings suggest that addition of vibration to exercise does not increase the cost of the exercise for the lateral gastrocnemius muscle, but does decrease the reduction in local muscle oxygenation parameters, potentially resulting from increased blood flow to the calf or a vasospastic response in the feet. However, further studies are needed to establish the mechanisms underlying these findings

  12. Mechanisms to dyspnoea and dynamic hyperinflation related exercise intolerance in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Janos

    2015-06-01

    Expiratory flow limitation can develop in parallel with the progression of COPD, and as a consequence, dynamic hyperinflation and lung mechanical abnormalities can develop. Dynamic hyperinflation can cause increased breathlessness and reduction in exercise tolerance. Achievement of critical inspiratory reserve volume is one of the main factors in exercise intolerance. Obesity has specific lung mechanical effects. There is also a difference concerning gender and dyspnoea. Increased nerve activity is characteristic in hyperinflation. Bronchodilator therapy, lung volume reduction surgery, endurance training at submaximal intensity, and heliox or oxygen breathing can decrease the degree of dynamic hyperinflation.

  13. Pulmonary artery wave propagation and reservoir function in conscious man: impact of pulmonary vascular disease, respiration and dynamic stress tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Junjing; Manisty, Charlotte; Simonsen, Ulf; Howard, Luke S; Parker, Kim H; Hughes, Alun D

    2017-08-17

    Wave travel plays an important role in cardiovascular physiology. However, many aspects of pulmonary arterial wave behaviour remain unclear. Wave intensity and reservoir-excess pressure analyses were applied in the pulmonary artery in subjects with and without pulmonary hypertension during spontaneous respiration and dynamic stress tests. Arterial wave energy decreased during expiration and Valsalva manoeuvre due to decreased ventricular preload. Wave energy also decreased during handgrip exercise due to increased heart rate. In pulmonary hypertension patients, the asymptotic pressure at which the microvascular flow ceases, the reservoir pressure related to arterial compliance and the excess pressure caused by waves increased. The reservoir and excess pressures decreased during Valsalva manoeuvre but remained unchanged during handgrip exercise. This study provides insights into the influence of pulmonary vascular disease, spontaneous respiration and dynamic stress tests on pulmonary artery wave propagation and reservoir function. Detailed haemodynamic analysis may provide novel insights into the pulmonary circulation. Therefore, wave intensity and reservoir-excess pressure analyses were applied in the pulmonary artery to characterize changes in wave propagation and reservoir function during spontaneous respiration and dynamic stress tests. Right heart catheterization was performed using a pressure and Doppler flow sensor tipped guidewire to obtain simultaneous pressure and flow velocity measurements in the pulmonary artery in control subjects and patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) at rest. In controls, recordings were also obtained during Valsalva manoeuvre and handgrip exercise. The asymptotic pressure at which the flow through the microcirculation ceases, the reservoir pressure related to arterial compliance and the excess pressure caused by arterial waves increased in PAH patients compared to controls. The systolic and diastolic rate constants

  14. Resetting of the carotid arterial baroreflex during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norton, K H; Boushel, Robert Christopher; Andersen, Line Strange

    1999-01-01

    alone was performed at 50 and 75% VO(2 max), and L exercise combined with arm (A) exercise (L + A) was performed at 75 and 100% VO(2 max). O(2) consumption and heart rate (HR) increased in direct relation with the increases in exercise intensity. The threshold and saturation pressures of the carotid.......07). Similar changes were observed for the carotid-vasomotor reflex. In addition, as exercise intensity increased, the operating point (the prestimulus blood pressure) of the CBR was significantly relocated further from the centering point (G(max)) of the stimulus-response curve and was at threshold during 100......% VO(2 max). These findings identify the continuous classic rightward and upward resetting of the CBR, without a change in G(max), during increases in dynamic exercise intensity to maximal effort....

  15. Potassium dynamics are attenuated in hyperkalemia and a determinant of QT adaptation in exercising hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Cao Thach; Bundgaard, Henning; Ladefoged, Søren Daustrand;

    2013-01-01

    Disturbances in plasma potassium concentration (pK) are well known risk factors for the development of cardiac arrhythmia. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the effect of hemodialysis on exercise pK dynamics and QT hysteresis, and whether QT hysteresis is associated with the p......K decrease following exercise. Twenty-two end-stage renal disease patients exercised on a cycle ergometer with incremental work load before and after hemodialysis. ECG was recorded and pK was measured during exercise and recovery. During exercise, pK increased from 5.1 ± 0.2 to 6.1 ± 0.2 mM (mean ± SE; P...

  16. Choroidal thickness changes after dynamic exercise as measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat Sayin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To measure the choroidal thickness (CT after dynamic exercise by using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT. Materials and Methods: A total of 19 healthy participants performed 10 min of low-impact, moderate-intensity exercise (i.e., riding a bicycle ergometer and were examined with EDI-OCT. Each participant was scanned before exercise and afterward at 5 min and 15 min. CT measurement was taken at the fovea and 1000 μ away from the fovea in the nasal, temporal, superior, and inferior regions. Retinal thickness, intraocular pressure, ocular perfusion pressure (OPP, heart rate, and mean blood pressure (mBP were also measured. Results: A significant increase occurred in OPP and mBP at 5 min and 15 min following exercise (P ˂ 0.05. The mean subfoveal CT at baseline was 344.00 ± 64.71 μm compared to 370.63 ± 66.87 μm at 5 min and 345.31 ± 63.58 μm at 15 min after exercise. CT measurements at all locations significantly increased at 5 min following exercise compared to the baseline (P ˂ 0.001, while measurements at 15 min following exercise did not significant differ compared to the baseline (P ˃ 0.05. There was no significant difference in retinal thickness at any location before and at 5 min and 15 min following exercise (P ˃ 0.05. Conclusion: Findings revealed that dynamic exercise causes a significant increase in CT for at least 5 min following exercise.

  17. Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Related Conditions Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) Balo’s Disease HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy (HAM) Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) Schilder's ... a Muscle, Too: The Relationship Between Exercise and Cognition - telelearning brought to you by the National MS ...

  18. Handgrip strength test a complementary tool in monitoring asthma in daily clinical practice in children

    OpenAIRE

    Latorre-Rom??n, Pedro ??ngel; Navarro-Mart??nez, Vanesa; Ma??as-Bastidas, Alfonso; Garc?a-Pinillos, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that handgrip strength test can discriminate the presence/absence of asthma and between intermittent and moderate persistent asthma in children. 140 children (70 healthy and 70 with asthma) completed the Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ) and performed the handgrip strength test. Forty-eight hours later, subjects performed spirometry. The results showed Handgrip strength was significantly lower (p

  19. Blood flow and muscle oxygen uptake at the onset and end of moderate and heavy dynamic forearm exercise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekvelt, M.C.P. van; Shoemaker, J.K.; Tschakovsky, M.E.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Hughson, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    We hypothesized that forearm blood flow (FBF) during moderate intensity dynamic exercise would meet the demands of the exercise and that postexercise FBF would quickly recover. In contrast, during heavy exercise, FBF would be inadequate causing a marked postexercise hyperemia and sustained increase

  20. Contribution of pH, diprotonated phosphate and potassium for the reflex increase in blood pressure during handgrip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Madsen, P; Nielsen, H B

    1998-01-01

    The relative importance of pH, diprotonated phosphate (H2PO4-) and potassium (K+) for the reflex increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) during exercise was evaluated in seven subjects during rhythmic handgrip at 15 and 30% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), followed by post-exercise muscle...... ischaemia (PEMI). During 15% MVC, MAP rose from 92 +/- 1 to 103 +/- 2 mmHg, [K+] from 4.1 +/- 0.1 to 5.1 +/- 0.1 mmol L-1, while the intracellular (7.00 +/- 0.01 to 6.80 +/- 0.06) and venous pH fell (7.39 +/- 0.01 to 7.30 +/- 0.01) (P increased 8.4 +/- 2 mmol kg-1...

  1. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and cerebral blood flow and O2 uptake during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Sperling, B K; Warming, T

    1993-01-01

    Results obtained by the 133Xe clearance method with external detectors and by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) suggest that dynamic exercise causes an increase of global average cerebral blood flow (CBF). These data are contradicted by earlier data obtained during less-well-defined conditions....... To investigate this controversy, we applied the Kety-Schmidt technique to measure the global average levels of CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during rest and dynamic exercise. Simultaneously with the determination of CBF and CMRO2, we used TCD to determine mean maximal flow velocity...... in the middle cerebral artery (MCA Vmean). For values of CBF and MCA Vmean a correction for an observed small drop in arterial PCO2 was carried out. Baseline values for global CBF and CMRO2 were 50.7 and 3.63 ml.100 g-1.min-1, respectively. The same values were found during dynamic exercise, whereas a 22% (P

  2. Fourier and wavelet spectral analysis of EMG signals in isometric and dynamic maximal effort exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, José L; Camata, Thiago V; Brunetto, Maria A C; Moraes, Antonio C; Abrão, Taufik; Altimari, Leandro R

    2010-01-01

    Frequency domain analyses of changes in electromyographic (EMG) signals over time are frequently used to assess muscle fatigue. Fourier based approaches are typically used in these analyses, yet Fourier analysis assumes signal stationarity, which is unlikely during dynamic contractions. Wavelet based methods of signal analysis do not assume stationarity and may be more appropriate for joint time-frequency domain analysis. The purpose of this study was to compare Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) and Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) in assessing muscle fatigue in isometric and dynamic exercise. The results of this study indicate that CWT and STFT analyses give similar fatigue estimates (slope of median frequency) in isometric and dynamic exercise (P>0.05). However, the results of the variance was lower for both types of exercise in CWT compared to STFT (P signal analysis using STFT. Thus, the stationarity assumption may not be the sole factor responsible for affecting the Fourier based estimates.

  3. Effects of exercise and bryostatin-1 on serotonin dynamics after cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Kenmei; Sonoda, Shigeru; Wakita, Hideaki; Okazaki, Hideto; Katoh, Yoshimitsu; Chihara, Takeshi; Shimpo, Kan

    2016-06-15

    Although it has been suggested that the combination of exercise and bryostatin-1 administration may induce greater functional recovery than exercise alone, the detailed molecular mechanisms are not well known. Here, we examined the relationship between this combination treatment and monoamine dynamics in the cerebral cortex peri-infarction area to promote our understanding of these molecular mechanisms. Experimental cerebral cortex infarctions were produced by photothrombosis in rats. Voluntary exercise was initiated 2 days after surgery. Motor performance was then measured using the rotarod test. Monoamine concentrations in the perilesional cortex were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. In behavioral evaluations, performance in the rotarod test was significantly increased by exercise. Moreover, performance in the rotarod test after the combination of exercise and bryostatin-1 administration was significantly greater than that after exercise alone. In the analysis of monoamines, serotonin (5-HT) concentrations were significantly higher in the groups treated with exercise and bryostatin-1. In addition, 5-HT turnover was significantly lower in the groups treated with exercise and bryostatin-1. Furthermore, the mean latency in the rotarod test showed a significant positive correlation with 5-HT levels. In immunohistochemical analysis, 5-HT immunoreactivity in the dorsal raphe nucleus was shown to be higher in the groups treated with exercise. In the present study, we detected changes in the levels of monoamines associated with the combined treatment of exercise and bryostatin-1 administration in the perilesional cortex. It has been suggested that this combination of therapies may affect 5-HT turnover and serve to increase local 5-HT concentrations in the perilesional area.

  4. Role of nitric oxide and adenosine in the onset of vasodilation during dynamic forearm exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Darren P; Mohamed, Essa A; Joyner, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) and adenosine contribute to the onset of vasodilation during dynamic forearm exercise. Twenty-two subjects performed rhythmic forearm exercise (20 % of maximum) during control and NO synthase (NOS) inhibition (N (G)-monomethyl-L-arginine; L-NMMA) trials. A subset of subjects performed a third trial of forearm exercise during combined inhibition of NOS and adenosine (aminophylline; n = 9). Additionally, a separate group of subjects (n = 7) performed rhythmic forearm exercise during control, inhibition of adenosine alone and combined inhibition of adenosine and NOS. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; ml min(-1) · 100 mmHg(-1)) was calculated from blood flow and mean arterial pressure (mmHg). The onset of vasodilation was assessed by calculating the slope of the FVC response for every duty cycle between baseline and steady state, and the number of duty cycles (1-s contraction/2-s relaxation) to reach steady state. NOS inhibition blunted vasodilation at the onset of exercise (11.1 ± 0.8 vs. 8.5 ± 0.6 FVC units/duty cycle; P Vasodilation was blunted further with combined inhibition of NOS and adenosine (7.5 ± 0.6 vs. 6.2 ± 0.8 FVC units/duty cycle; P vasodilation during dynamic forearm exercise.

  5. The effects of core stabilization exercise on dynamic balance and gait function in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2013-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of core stabilization exercise on dynamic balance and gait function in stroke patients. [Subjects] The subjects were 16 stroke patients, who were randomly divided into two groups: a core stabilization exercise group of eight subjects and control group of eight subjects. [Methods] Subjects in both groups received general training five times per week. Subjects in the core stabilization exercise group practiced an additional core stabilization exercise program, which was performed for 30 minutes, three times per week, during a period of four weeks. All subjects were evaluated for dynamic balance (Timed Up and Go test, TUG) and gait parameters (velocity, cadence, step length, and stride length). [Results] Following intervention, the core exercise group showed a significant change in TUG, velocity, and cadence. The only significant difference observed between the core group and control group was in velocity. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest the feasibility and suitability of core stabilization exercise for stroke patients.

  6. Blood flow and oxygenation in peritendinous tissue and calf muscle during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, R; Langberg, Henning; Green, Stefan Mathias;

    2000-01-01

    1. Circulation around tendons may act as a shunt for muscle during exercise. The perfusion and oxygenation of Achilles' peritendinous tissue was measured in parallel with that of calf muscle during exercise to determine (1) whether blood flow is restricted in peritendinous tissue during exercise......, and (2) whether blood flow is coupled to oxidative metabolism. 2. Seven individuals performed dynamic plantar flexion from 1 to 9 W. Radial artery and popliteal venous blood were sampled for O2, peritendinous blood flow was determined by 133Xe-washout, calf blood flow by plethysmography, cardiac output...... by dye dilution, arterial pressure by an arterial catheter-transducer, and muscle and peritendinous O2 saturation by spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS). 3. Calf blood flow rose 20-fold with exercise, reaching 44 +/- 7 ml (100 g)-1 min-1 (mean +/- s.e.m. ) at 9 W, while Achilles' peritendinous flow...

  7. Circulatory effects of expiratory flow-limited exercise, dynamic hyperinflation and expiratory muscle pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Macklem

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent research in normal subjects exercising with and without expiratory flow limitation at 1 L·s–1 imposed by a Starling resistor in the expiratory line, and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, using optoelectronic plethysmography to measure respiratory kinematics, combined with mouth, pleural and abdominal pressure measurements, to assess work of breathing and respiratory muscle performance. In normal subjects, flow-limited exercise resulted in the following: 1 Impaired exercise performance due to intolerable dyspnoea; 2 hypercapnia; 3 excessive respiratory muscle recruitment; 4 blood shifts from trunk to extremities; 5 a 10% reduction in cardiac output and a 5% reduction in arterial oxygen saturation, decreasing energy supplies to working respiratory and locomotor muscles. In both normal subjects and in COPD patients, dynamic hyperinflation did not always occur. Those patients that hyperinflated had worse lung function and less work of breathing, but better exercise performance than the others, in whom expiratory muscle recruitment prevented dynamic hyperinflation at the cost of increased work of breathing and excessive oxygen cost of breathing. This established an early competition between respiratory and locomotor muscles for available energy supplies. Dynamic hyperinflation is a better exercise strategy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease than expiratory muscle recruitment, but the benefit it confers is small.

  8. Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; thor Straten, Eivind Per

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that voluntary exercise leads to an influx of immune cells in tumors and a greater than 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across several mouse models. Improved immunological control of tumor progression may have important clinical implications in the prevention...

  9. Dynamic hyperinflation is associated with a poor cardiovascular response to exercise in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzani Panagiota

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary hyperinflation has the potential for significant adverse effects on cardiovascular function in COPD. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between dynamic hyperinflation and cardiovascular response to maximal exercise in COPD patients. Methods We studied 48 patients (16F; age 68 yrs ± 8; BMI 26 ± 4 with COPD. All patients performed spirometry, plethysmography, lung diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (TLco measurement, and symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET. The end-expiratory lung volume (EELV was evaluated during the CPET. Cardiovascular response was assessed by change during exercise in oxygen pulse (ΔO2Pulse and double product, i.e. the product of systolic blood pressure and heart rate (DP reserve, and by the oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES, i.e. the relation between oxygen uptake and ventilation. Results Patients with a peak exercise EELV (%TLC ≥ 75% had a significantly lower resting FEV1/VC, FEF50/FIF50 ratio and IC/TLC ratio, when compared to patients with a peak exercise EELV (%TLC 2Pulse (r = - 0.476, p = 0.001, OUES (r = - 0.452, p = 0.001 and DP reserve (r = - 0.425, p = 0.004. Furthermore, according to the ROC curve method, ΔO2Pulse and DP reserve cut-off points which maximized sensitivity and specificity, with respect to a EELV (% TLC value ≥ 75% as a threshold value, were ≤ 5.5 mL/bpm (0.640 sensitivity and 0.696 specificity and ≤ 10,000 Hg · bpm (0.720 sensitivity and 0.783 specificity, respectively. Conclusion The present study shows that COPD patients with dynamic hyperinflation have a poor cardiovascular response to exercise. This finding supports the view that in COPD patients, dynamic hyperinflation may affect exercise performance not only by affecting ventilation, but also cardiac function.

  10. Muscle fatigue and exhaustion during dynamic leg exercise in normoxia and hypobaric hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulco, C S; Lewis, S F; Frykman, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Using an exercise device that integrates maximal voluntary static contraction (MVC) of knee extensor muscles with dynamic knee extension, we compared progressive muscle fatigue, i.e., rate of decline in force-generating capacity, in normoxia (758 Torr) and hypobaric hypoxia (464 Torr). Eight...... healthy men performed exhaustive constant work rate knee extension (21 +/- 3 W, 79 +/- 2 and 87 +/- 2% of 1-leg knee extension O2 peak uptake for normoxia and hypobaria, respectively) from knee angles of 90-150 degrees at a rate of 1 Hz. MVC (90 degrees knee angle) was performed before dynamic exercise...... and during MVC force was 578 +/- 29 N in normoxia and 569 +/- 29 N in hypobaria before exercise and fell, at exhaustion, to similar levels (265 +/- 10 and 284 +/- 20 N for normoxia and hypobaria, respectively; P > 0.05) that were higher (P

  11. Digit ratio (2D:4D and handgrip strength in Hani ethnicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapeng Zhao

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The ratio of the length of the second finger to the fourth finger (2D:4D in humans is considered as a putative marker of prenatal exposure to testosterone, and has been progressively adopted as one useful tool to evaluate the effect of prenatal hormones in some traits such as physical ability. Handgrip strength is one authentic measure of physical ability and is generally used on the anthropological research within an evolutionary viewpoint. METHODS: Here we present the first evidence on 2D:4D and handgrip strength on adult participants of Hani ethnicity and explore the relationship between digit ratio (2D:4D and handgrip strength. We examined 2D:4D and handgrip strength of 80 males and 60 females at Bubeng village, in the Yunnan province of China. RESULTS: The mean 2D:4D in females was higher than that in males for each hand. Females showed significantly higher 2D:4D than males in the right hand rather than in the left hand. Males displayed significantly higher handgrip strength than females for both hands. Handgrip strength decreased with age for both sexes. A significant negative correlation between 2D:4D and handgrip strength was found in the right hand of males. CONCLUSION: The relationship between 2D:4D and handgrip strength may be attributed to evolutionary drive of sexual selection operating on fetal programming.

  12. Dynamic aerobic exercise induces baroreflex improvement in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Luciana; da Pureza, Demilto Y; da Silva Dias, Danielle; Conti, Filipe Fernandes; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of an acute aerobic exercise on arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control (n = 8) and diabetic (n = 8) groups. AP, HR, and BRS, which were measured by tachycardic and bradycardic (BR) responses to AP changes, were evaluated at rest (R) and postexercise session (PE) on a treadmill. At rest, STZ diabetes induced AP and HR reductions, associated with BR impairment. Attenuation in resting diabetes-induced AP (R: 103 ± 2 versus PE: 111 ± 3 mmHg) and HR (R: 290 ± 7 versus PE: 328 ± 10 bpm) reductions and BR dysfunction (R: -0.70 ± 0.06 versus PE: -1.21 ± 0.09 bpm/mmHg) was observed in the postexercise period. In conclusion, the hemodynamic and arterial baro-mediated control of circulation improvement in the postexercise period reinforces the role of exercise in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes.

  13. A validated model of oxygen uptake and circulatory dynamic interactions at exercise onset in humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alan P. Benson; Bruno Grassi; Harry B. Rossiter

    2013-01-01

    At the onset of muscular exercise, the kinetics of pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2P) reflect the integrated dynamic responses of the ventilatory, circulatory, and neuromuscular systems for O2 transport and utilization. Muscle O2 uptake (V̇o2m...

  14. Exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation and treadmill exercise test responses in individuals without overt heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Rafael Amorim Belo; Giampaoli, Viviana; de Freitas, Humberto Felício Gonçalves; da Costa Pereira, Alexandre; Araújo, Fernando; Correia, Gustavo Ferreira; Rondon, Maria Urbana Pinto Brandão; Negrão, Carlos Eduardo; Mansur, Alfredo José

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effects of exercise on cardiovascular health may be related to the improvement in several physiologic pathways, including peripheral vascular function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between cardiovascular responses during the treadmill exercise test and exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation in individuals without overt heart disease. The study included 796 asymptomatic subjects (431 females and 365 males) without overt heart disease. We evaluated the heart rate (chronotropic reserve and heart rate recovery), blood pressure (maximum systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well as systolic blood pressure recovery) and exercise capacity during symptom-limited treadmill exercise testing. Exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation was studied with venous occlusion plethysmography and estimated by forearm blood flow and vascular conductance responses during a 3-min handgrip maneuver. Forearm blood flow increase during the handgrip exercise was positively associated with heart rate recovery during treadmill exercise testing (p exercise was inversely associated with exercise diastolic blood pressure during exercise treadmill testing (p = 0.038). No significant association was found between exercise capacity and exercise-induced muscle vasodilation. In a sample of individuals without overt heart disease, exercise-induced muscle vasodilatation was associated with heart rate and blood pressure responses during treadmill exercise testing, but was not associated with exercise capacity. These findings suggest that favorable hemodynamic and chronotropic responses are associated with better vasodilator capacity, but exercise capacity does not predict muscle vasodilatation.

  15. Intentional thought dynamics during exercise performed until volitional exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagué, Natàlia; Hristovski, Robert; Garcia, Sergi; Aragonés, Daniel; Razon, Selen; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    Using a non-linear approach, intentional dynamics of thoughts were examined during constant cycling performed until volitional exhaustion. Participants (n = 12) completed two sessions at 80% Wmax. Their (1) intrinsic thought dynamics (i.e., no-imposed thoughts condition) and (2) intentional thought dynamics (i.e., imposed task-unrelated thoughts condition; TUT) were recorded and then classified into four categories: internal and external TUT (TUT-I, TUT-E) and external and internal task-related thoughts (TRT-E, TRT-I). The probability estimates for maintaining each thought category stable, the rate of switching from one category to another, and the entropy dynamics along the testing procedure were assessed and compared through time phase. Friedman ANOVA tests revealed a significant effect of effort increase on thought contents only in the imposed TUT test. While TUT-I probabilities decreased significantly (P < .001) as effort increased, TRT-I probabilities increased (P < .05). Moreover, the entropy to the entire thought dynamics increased at the outset of task performance and decreased upon approaching volitional exhaustion (P < .001). As time spent in constant effort increased, and volitional exhaustion approached, task relatedness (TUT, TRT), direction (internal, external), and entropy of thought contents changed unintentionally providing further evidence for a nonlinear dynamics of attention focus.

  16. The effect of Kinesio Taping on handgrip strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Pereira, Kelice Cristina; Protássio, Carina Celedonio; Lucas, Lorrane Barbosa; Matheus, Joao Paulo C

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to evaluate the change in muscle function induced by a Kinesio Tape application with no or moderate tension, to the dominant and non-dominant arms. [Subjects and Methods] This research was a quantitative study, in which 75 women participated. The subjects, aged 18-30 years, were divided into 3 groups, Kinesio, Kinesio without Tension, and Control, and they were assessed before the taping intervention and after 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours of taping. [Results] The Kinesio group subjects demonstrated an increase in handgrip strength after 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours of tape application compared to control. A statistically significant increase in strength was observed in the Kinesio group comparison to the Control after 24 hours and 48 hours for the right hand, and after 48 hours for the left hand. Improvement in the Kinesio group compared to the Kinesio without Tension was observed only after 24 hours of taping application, and only in the right hand. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping method augmented the handgrip strength of healthy women, and the increase in grip strength was maintained for 48 hours after its application; the dominant hand demonstrated the greatest strength values.

  17. The effect of Kinesio Taping on handgrip strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Pereira, Kelice Cristina; Protássio, Carina Celedonio; Lucas, Lorrane Barbosa; Matheus, Joao Paulo C.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to evaluate the change in muscle function induced by a Kinesio Tape application with no or moderate tension, to the dominant and non-dominant arms. [Subjects and Methods] This research was a quantitative study, in which 75 women participated. The subjects, aged 18–30 years, were divided into 3 groups, Kinesio, Kinesio without Tension, and Control, and they were assessed before the taping intervention and after 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours of taping. [Results] The Kinesio group subjects demonstrated an increase in handgrip strength after 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours of tape application compared to control. A statistically significant increase in strength was observed in the Kinesio group comparison to the Control after 24 hours and 48 hours for the right hand, and after 48 hours for the left hand. Improvement in the Kinesio group compared to the Kinesio without Tension was observed only after 24 hours of taping application, and only in the right hand. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping method augmented the handgrip strength of healthy women, and the increase in grip strength was maintained for 48 hours after its application; the dominant hand demonstrated the greatest strength values. PMID:25931682

  18. Predictors of Handgrip Strength Among the Free Living Elderly in Rural Pahang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KW Kee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reduced handgrip strength is an aging process that significantly influences the living activities of elderly. It is linked to premature mortality, disability and other health complications among elderly. Therefore, we aim to determine the associated predictors with handgrip strength among the free living elderly in Malaysia. Methods: This was a cross sectional study conducted in a rural state in Malaysia. A total of 434 elderly individuals per­formed handgrip assessment. Socio-demographic characteristics, medical conditions, occupational history, functional ability (ADL and depression (GDS were enquired. Anthropometric measurements (weight and height were also obtained.Results: Majority of the respondents were Malays with mean age of 67.9 + 6.3 years. Maximum handgrip strength of males and females were 28.8+9.2 kg and 18.9+6.9 kg respectively (P<0.05. The aborigines had significantly lower handgrip strength (P<0.05 compared to Malays, Chinese and Indians. Handgrip strength was positively correlated (P<0.05 with weight, height and ADL, while negatively associated (P<0.05 with GDS for both gender. In the multivariate linear regres­sion analysis; weight, height and race significantly predicted handgrip strength among both male and female elderly after adjustment for all potential confounders. However, GDS and ADL were only found to significantly predict handgrip strength among the male elderly; while age was only significant among the females. Conclusion: Our sample population has significantly lower handgrip strength than the Western counterpart. Weight, height and race significantly predict handgrip strength among both male and female elderly. GDS, ADL are only found to be sig­nificant in males while age was only significant among the females.

  19. Dynamic DTI (dDTI) shows differing temporal activation patterns in post-exercise skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockel, Conrad; Akbari, Alireza; Kumbhare, Dinesh A; Noseworthy, Michael D

    2017-04-01

    To assess post-exercise recovery of human calf muscles using dynamic diffusion tensor imaging (dDTI). DTI data (6 directions, b = 0 and 400 s/mm(2)) were acquired every 35 s from seven healthy men using a 3T MRI, prior to (4 volumes) and immediately following exercise (13 volumes, ~7.5 min). Exercise consisted of 5-min in-bore repetitive dorsiflexion-eversion foot motion with 0.78 kg resistance. Diffusion tensors calculated at each time point produced maps of mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and signal at b = 0 s/mm(2) (S0). Region-of-interest (ROI) analysis was performed on five calf muscles: tibialis anterior (ATIB), extensor digitorum longus (EDL) peroneus longus (PER), soleus (SOL), and lateral gastrocnemius (LG). Active muscles (ATIB, EDL, PER) showed significantly elevated initial MD post-exercise, while predicted inactive muscles (SOL, LG) did not (p exercise EDL S0 relative to other muscles across the majority of time points (p exercise-induced changes between muscles. These differences are suggested to be related to differences in fiber composition.

  20. Endogenous vasopressin and the central control of heart rate during dynamic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C. Michelini

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The present article contains a brief review on the role of vasopressinergic projections to the nucleus tractus solitarii in the genesis of reflex bradycardia and in the modulation of heart rate control during exercise. The effects of vasopressin on exercise tachycardia are discussed on the basis of both the endogenous peptide content changes and the heart rate response changes observed during running in sedentary and trained rats. Dynamic exercise caused a specific vasopressin content increase in dorsal and ventral brainstem areas. In accordance, rats pretreated with the peptide or the V1 blocker into the nucleus tractus solitarii showed a significant potentiation or a marked blunting of the exercise tachycardia, respectively, without any change in the pressure response to exercise. It is proposed that the long-descending vasopressinergic pathway to the nucleus tractus solitarii serves as one link between the two main neural controllers of circulation, i.e., the central command and feedback control mechanisms driven by the peripheral receptors. Therefore, vasopressinergic input could contribute to the adjustment of heart rate response (and cardiac output to the circulatory demand during exercise.

  1. Metastable Pain-Attention Dynamics during Incremental Exhaustive Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slapšinskaitė, Agnė; Hristovski, Robert; Razon, Selen; Balagué, Natàlia; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pain attracts attention on the bodily regions. Attentional allocation toward pain results from the neural communication across the brain-wide network “connectome” which consists of pain-attention related circuits. Connectome is intrinsically dynamic and spontaneously fluctuating on multiple time-scales. The present study delineates the pain-attention dynamics during incremental cycling performed until volitional exhaustion and investigates the potential presence of nested metastable dynamics. Method: Fifteen young and physically active adults completed a progressive incremental cycling test and reported their discomfort and pain on a body map every 15 s. Results: The analyses revealed that the number of body locations with perceived pain and discomfort increased throughout five temporal windows reaching an average of 4.26 ± 0.59 locations per participant. A total of 37 different locations were reported and marked as painful for all participants throughout the cycling task. Significant differences in entropy were observed between all temporal windows except the fourth and fifth windows. Transient dynamics of bodily locations with perceived discomfort and pain were spanned by three principal components. The metastable dynamics of the body pain locations groupings over time were discerned by three time scales: (1) the time scale of shifts (15 s); (2) the time scale of metastable configurations (100 s), and (3) the observational time scale (1000 s). Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that body locations perceived as painful increase throughout the incremental cycling task following a switching metastable and nested dynamics. These findings support the view that human brain is intrinsically organized into active, mutually interacting complex and nested functional networks, and that subjective experiences inherent in pain perception depict identical dynamical principles to the neural tissue in the brain. PMID:28111563

  2. Metastable Pain-Attention Dynamics during Incremental Exhaustive Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slapšinskaitė, Agnė; Hristovski, Robert; Razon, Selen; Balagué, Natàlia; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain attracts attention on the bodily regions. Attentional allocation toward pain results from the neural communication across the brain-wide network "connectome" which consists of pain-attention related circuits. Connectome is intrinsically dynamic and spontaneously fluctuating on multiple time-scales. The present study delineates the pain-attention dynamics during incremental cycling performed until volitional exhaustion and investigates the potential presence of nested metastable dynamics. Method: Fifteen young and physically active adults completed a progressive incremental cycling test and reported their discomfort and pain on a body map every 15 s. Results: The analyses revealed that the number of body locations with perceived pain and discomfort increased throughout five temporal windows reaching an average of 4.26 ± 0.59 locations per participant. A total of 37 different locations were reported and marked as painful for all participants throughout the cycling task. Significant differences in entropy were observed between all temporal windows except the fourth and fifth windows. Transient dynamics of bodily locations with perceived discomfort and pain were spanned by three principal components. The metastable dynamics of the body pain locations groupings over time were discerned by three time scales: (1) the time scale of shifts (15 s); (2) the time scale of metastable configurations (100 s), and (3) the observational time scale (1000 s). Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that body locations perceived as painful increase throughout the incremental cycling task following a switching metastable and nested dynamics. These findings support the view that human brain is intrinsically organized into active, mutually interacting complex and nested functional networks, and that subjective experiences inherent in pain perception depict identical dynamical principles to the neural tissue in the brain.

  3. Isometric exercise in the denervated heart: a Doppler echocardiographic study.

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, S C; Furniss, S.S.; Heads, A; Boys, R J; McGregor, C.; Bexton, R S

    1989-01-01

    The haemodynamic responses to isometric exercise of eight recipients of orthotopic heart transplants and eight healthy controls were studied. Each performed sustained exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction for three minutes on a handgrip dynamometer. Cardiac output was measured by combined Doppler and cross sectional echocardiography before exercise and every 30 seconds during and after exercise. In the controls cardiac output and blood pressure increased significantly owing to an i...

  4. Isometric handgrip training lowers blood pressure and increases heart rate complexity in medicated hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, P J; Levy, A S; McGowan, C L; McCartney, N; MacDonald, M J

    2013-10-01

    Hypertension is characterized by elevated blood pressure (BP) and autonomic dysfunction, both thought to be improved with exercise training. Isometric handgrip (IHG) training may represent a beneficial, time-effective exercise therapy. We investigated the effects of IHG training on BP and traditional and nonlinear measures of heart rate variability (HRV). Pre- and post-measurements of BP and HRV were determined in 23 medicated hypertensive participants (mean ± SEM, 66 ± 2 years) following either 8 weeks of IHG training (n = 13) or control (n = 10). IHG exercise consisted of four unilateral 2-min isometric contractions at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction, each separated by 4 min of rest. IHG training was performed 3 days/week for 8 weeks. IHG training decreased systolic BP (125 ± 3 mmHg to 120 ± 2 mmHg, P < 0.05) and mean BP (90 ± 2 mmHg to 87 ± 2 mmHg, P < 0.05), while sample entropy was increased (1.07 ± 0.1 to 1.35 ± 0.1, P < 0.05) and the fractal scaling distance score was decreased (0.34 ± 0.1 to 0.19 ± 0.1, P < 0.05). No significant changes were observed in traditional spectral or time-domain measures of HRV or control participants. IHG training improves nonlinear HRV, but not traditional HRV, while reducing systolic and mean BP. These results may highlight the benefits of IHG training for patients with primary hypertension.

  5. Blood flow measurement of human skeletal muscle during various exercise intensity using diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yuya; Ono, Yumie; Ichinose, Masashi

    2017-02-01

    We studied blood flow dynamics of active skeletal muscle using diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), an emerging optical modality that is suitable for noninvasive quantification of microcirculation level in deep tissue. Seven healthy subjects conducted 0.5 Hz dynamic handgrip exercise for 3 minutes at intensities of 10, 20, 30, and 50 % of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). DCS could detect the time-dependent increase of the blood flow response of the forearm muscle for continuous exercises, and the increase ratios of the mean blood flow through the exercise periods showed good correlation with the exercise intensities. We also compared blood flow responses detected from DCS with two different photon sampling rates and found that an appropriate photon sampling rates should be selected to follow the wide-ranged increase in the muscle blood flow with dynamic exercise. Our results demonstrate the possibility for utilizing DCS in a field of sports medicine to noninvasively evaluate the dynamics of blood flow in the active muscles.

  6. Heart rate dynamics after exercise in cardiac patients with and without type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti M Kiviniemi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The incidence of cardiovascular events is higher in coronary artery disease patients with type 2 diabetes (CAD+T2D than in CAD patients without T2D. There is increasing evidence that the recovery phase after exercise is a vulnerable phase for various cardiovascular events. We hypothesized that autonomic regulation differs in CAD patients with and without T2D during post-exercise condition. Methods: A symptom-limited maximal exercise test on a bicycle ergometer was performed for 68 CAD+T2D patients (age 61 ± 5 years, 78% males, ejection fraction 67 ± 8, 100% on β-blockade and 64 CAD patients (age 62 ± 5 years, 80% males, ejection fraction 64 ± 8, 100% on β-blockade. Heart rate (HR recovery after exercise was calculated as the slope of HR during the first 60 sec after cessation of exercise (HRRslope. R-R intervals were measured before (5 min and after exercise from 3 to 8 min, both in a supine position. R-R intervals were analyzed using time and frequency methods and a detrended fluctuation method (α1. Results: BMI was 30 ± 4 vs. 27 ± 3 kg•m2 (p < 0.001; maximal exercise capacity, 6.5 ± 1.7 vs. 7.7 ± 1.9 METs (p < 0.001; maximal HR, 128 ± 19 vs. 132 ± 18 bpm (p = ns; and HRRslope, -0.53 ± 0.17 vs. -0.62 ± 0.15 beats/sec (p = 0.004, for CAD patients with and without T2D, respectively. There was no differences between the groups in HRRslope after adjustment for METs, BMI and medication (ANCOVA, p = 0.228 for T2D and e.g. p = 0.030 for METs. CAD+T2D patients had a higher HR at rest than nondiabetic patients (57 ± 10 vs. 54 ± 6 bpm, p = 0.030, but no other differences were observed in HR dynamics at rest or in post-exercise condition. Conclusion: HR recovery is delayed in CAD+T2D patients, suggesting impairment of vagal activity and/or augmented sympathetic activity after exercise. Blunted HR recovery after exercise in diabetic patients compared with nondiabetic patients is more closely related to low exercise capacity and

  7. Immediate Effects of Smoking on Cardiorespiratory Responses During Dynamic Exercise: Arm Versus Leg Ergometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Liang eChen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study compared the immediate effects of smoking on cardiorespiratory responses to dynamic arm and leg exercises. Methods: This randomized crossover study recruited 14 college students. Each participant underwent 2 sets of arm-cranking (AC and leg-cycling (LC exercise tests. The testing sequences of the control trial (participants refrained from smoking for 8 hours before testing and the experimental trial (participants smoked 2 cigarettes were randomly chosen. We observed immediate changes in pulmonary function and heart rate variability after smoking and before the exercise test. The participants then underwent graded exercise tests of their arms and legs, respectively, until reaching exhaustion. We compared the peak work achieved and the time to exhaustion during the exercise tests with various cardiorespiratory indices [i.e., heart rate, oxygen consumption (VO2, minute ventilation (VE]. The main effects of the time and the trial, as well as their interaction effects on outcome measures, were investigated using repeated measure ANOVA.Results: Five minutes after smoking, the participants exhibited reduced forced vital capacities and forced expiratory volumes in the first second (P < .05, in addition to elevated resting heart rates (P < .001. The high-frequency, low-frequency, and the total power of the heart rate variability were also reduced (P < .05 at rest. For the exercise test periods, smoking reduced the time to exhaustion (P = .005 and the ventilatory threshold (P < .05 in the LC tests, whereas there were no significant effects in the AC tests. A trend analysis revealed a significant (P < .001 trial-by-time interaction effect for heart rate, VO2, and VE during the graded exercise test. Lower VO2 and VE levels were exhibited in the exercise response of the smoking trial than in that of the control LC trials, whereas there was no discernable inter-trial difference in the AC trials. Moreover, the differences in heart rate

  8. Dynamic exercise therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Munneke, M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of dynamic exercixe therapy in improving joint mobility, muscle strength, aerobic capacity and daily functioning in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, possible unwanted effects such as an increase in pain, diseas

  9. Dynamic exercise therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Munneke, M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of dynamic exercixe therapy in improving joint mobility, muscle strength, aerobic capacity and daily functioning in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, possible unwanted effects such as an increase in pain, diseas

  10. Dynamic exercise therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Munneke, M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of dynamic exercixe therapy in improving joint mobility, muscle strength, aerobic capacity and daily functioning in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, possible unwanted effects such as an increase in pain,

  11. Quantitation of progressive muscle fatigue during dynamic leg exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulco, C S; Lewis, S F; Frykman, Peter

    1995-01-01

    to quadriceps femoris. The slope of the linear relationship between O2 uptake and work rate was 13.7 ml O2/W (r = 0.93). This slope and the increase of heart rate relative to increasing work intensity agreed with published values for D leg exercise. Test-retest values for O2 uptake were similar (P > 0...... (*P rates). Virtually identical declines in MVC were observed by the end of graded work rate DKE and submaximal constant work rate DKE tests. Quantitation of progressive muscle fatigue during D leg exercise provides a framework to study the effects of a variety......There is virtually no published information on muscle fatigue, defined as a gradual decline in force-generating capacity, during conventional dynamic (D) leg exercise. To quantitate progression of fatigue, we developed 1) a model featuring integration of maximal voluntary static contraction (MVC...

  12. Comparison of Jamar and Bodygrip Dynamometers for Handgrip Strength Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Rita S; Amaral, Teresa F; Sousa, Ana S; Fonseca, Isabel; Pichel, Fernando; Restivo, Maria T

    2017-07-01

    Guerra, RS, Amaral, TF, Sousa, AS, Fonseca, I, Pichel, F, and Restivo, MT. Comparison of Jamar and Bodygrip dynamometers for handgrip strength measurement. J Strength Cond Res 31(7): 1931-1940, 2017-Studies that compared the agreement between Jamar and other models of dynamometers for handgrip strength (HGS) measurement have exhibited variability in the provided results. The lack of comparability between dynamometers led to the development of the Bodygrip dynamometer. This study aims to examine the reliability of the Bodygrip for HGS measurement, to compare it with the Jamar, and to explore the HGS differences between instruments considering the ergonomic effect of using the Bodygrip with 2 different handles. A cross-sectional study was conducted in free-living (n = 114, 18-89 years) and inpatient (n = 50, 65-93 years) volunteers. Nondominant HGS was tested randomly with the Jamar and Bodygrip, the latter using 2 different handles-curved and straight types. Handgrip strength was obtained for each participant under the same conditions. Each individual performed 2 HGS measurements with each dynamometer, and the maximum HGS value was considered for dynamometers comparison. Differences in the maximum HGS value between the 2 devices (Jamar-Bodygrip), intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), Bland and Altman plots, and limits of agreement were obtained. Correlation between the highest HGS measurement obtained for the nondominant hand with the Jamar and with the Bodygrip using each handle was excellent (ICCs: 0.93-0.95). Mean differences of -0.5 (limits of agreement: -4.6; 3.5) kgf with the curved handle and of 1.0 (-7.7; 9.7) kgf with the straight handle for the free-living participants were obtained, whereas for inpatients these values were -1.0 (-3.8; 1.9) kgf and 2.1 (-3.3; 7.5) kgf, respectively, for the curved and straight handles. The Bodygrip is comparable to the Jamar in free-living adults and in hospitalized older adults, exhibiting excellent interinstrument

  13. Differential glucose uptake in quadriceps and other leg muscles during one-legged dynamic submaximal knee-extension exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Kari eKalliokoski; Robert eBoushel; Henning eLangberg; Celena eScheede-Bergdahl; Ann Kathrine Ryberg; Simon eDoessing; Andreas eKjaer; Michael eKjaer

    2011-01-01

    One-legged dynamic knee-extension exercise (DKE) is a widely used model to study the local cardiovascular and metabolic responses to exercise of the quadriceps muscles. In this study, we explored the extent to which different muscles of the quadriceps are activated during exercise using positron emission tomography (PET) determined uptake of [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (GU) during DKE. Five healthy male subjects performed DKE at 25 W for 35 min and both the contracting and contralateral resti...

  14. Differential glucose uptake in quadriceps and other leg muscles during one-legged dynamic submaximal knee-extension exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Kari eKalliokoski; Robert eBoushel; Henning eLangberg; Celena eScheede-Bergdahl; Ann Kathrine Ryberg; Simon eDoessing; Andreas eKjaer; Michael eKjaer

    2011-01-01

    One-legged dynamic knee-extension exercise (DKE) is a widely used model to study the local cardiovascular and metabolic responses to exercise of the quadriceps muscles. In this study, we explored the extent to which different muscles of the quadriceps are activated during exercise using positron emission tomography (PET) determined uptake of [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (GU) during DKE. Five healthy male subjects performed DKE at 25 W for 35 min and both the contracting and contralateral resti...

  15. Handgrip Strength Predicts Functional Decline at Discharge in Hospitalized Male Elderly: A Hospital Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Peña, Carmen; García-Fabela, Luis C.; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis M.; García-González, Jose J.; Arango-Lopera, Victoria E.; Pérez-Zepeda, Mario U.

    2013-01-01

    Functional decline after hospitalization is a common adverse outcome in elderly. An easy to use, reproducible and accurate tool to identify those at risk would aid focusing interventions in those at higher risk. Handgrip strength has been shown to predict adverse outcomes in other settings. The aim of this study was to determine if handgrip strength measured upon admission to an acute care facility would predict functional decline (either incident or worsening of preexisting) at discharge among older Mexican, stratified by gender. In addition, cutoff points as a function of specificity would be determined. A cohort study was conducted in two hospitals in Mexico City. The primary endpoint was functional decline on discharge, defined as a 30-point reduction in the Barthel Index score from that of the baseline score. Handgrip strength along with other variables was measured at initial assessment, including: instrumental activities of daily living, cognition, depressive symptoms, delirium, hospitalization length and quality of life. All analyses were stratified by gender. Logistic regression to test independent association between handgrip strength and functional decline was performed, along with estimation of handgrip strength test values (specificity, sensitivity, area under the curve, etc.). A total of 223 patients admitted to an acute care facility between 2007 and 2009 were recruited. A total of 55 patients (24.7%) had functional decline, 23.46% in male and 25.6% in women. Multivariate analysis showed that only males with low handgrip strength had an increased risk of functional decline at discharge (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.79–0.98, p = 0.01), with a specificity of 91.3% and a cutoff point of 20.65 kg for handgrip strength. Females had not a significant association between handgrip strength and functional decline. Measurement of handgrip strength on admission to acute care facilities may identify male elderly patients at risk of having functional decline, and

  16. Handgrip strength predicts functional decline at discharge in hospitalized male elderly: a hospital cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen García-Peña

    Full Text Available Functional decline after hospitalization is a common adverse outcome in elderly. An easy to use, reproducible and accurate tool to identify those at risk would aid focusing interventions in those at higher risk. Handgrip strength has been shown to predict adverse outcomes in other settings. The aim of this study was to determine if handgrip strength measured upon admission to an acute care facility would predict functional decline (either incident or worsening of preexisting at discharge among older Mexican, stratified by gender. In addition, cutoff points as a function of specificity would be determined. A cohort study was conducted in two hospitals in Mexico City. The primary endpoint was functional decline on discharge, defined as a 30-point reduction in the Barthel Index score from that of the baseline score. Handgrip strength along with other variables was measured at initial assessment, including: instrumental activities of daily living, cognition, depressive symptoms, delirium, hospitalization length and quality of life. All analyses were stratified by gender. Logistic regression to test independent association between handgrip strength and functional decline was performed, along with estimation of handgrip strength test values (specificity, sensitivity, area under the curve, etc.. A total of 223 patients admitted to an acute care facility between 2007 and 2009 were recruited. A total of 55 patients (24.7% had functional decline, 23.46% in male and 25.6% in women. Multivariate analysis showed that only males with low handgrip strength had an increased risk of functional decline at discharge (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.79-0.98, p = 0.01, with a specificity of 91.3% and a cutoff point of 20.65 kg for handgrip strength. Females had not a significant association between handgrip strength and functional decline. Measurement of handgrip strength on admission to acute care facilities may identify male elderly patients at risk of having functional decline

  17. Hand-grip strength cut points to screen older persons at risk for mobility limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallinen, Janne; Stenholm, Sari; Rantanen, Taina; Heliövaara, Markku; Sainio, Päivi; Koskinen, Seppo

    2010-09-01

    To determine optimal hand-grip strength cut points for likelihood of mobility limitation in older people and to study whether these cut points differ according to body mass index (BMI). Cross-sectional analysis of data. Data collected in the Finnish population-based Health 2000 Survey. One thousand eighty-four men and 1,562 women aged 55 and older with complete data on anthropometry, hand-grip strength and self-reported mobility. Mobility limitation was defined as difficulty walking 0.5 km or climbing stairs. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to estimate hand-grip strength cut points for likelihood of mobility limitation. The overall hand-grip strength cut points for likelihood of mobility limitation were 37 kg (sensitivity 62%; specificity 76%) for men and 21 kg (sensitivity 67%; specificity 73%) for women. The effect of the interaction between hand-grip strength and BMI on mobility limitation was significant in men (P=.02), but no such interaction was observed in women (P=.16). In men, the most-optimal cutoff points were 33 kg (sensitivity 73%; specificity 79%) for normal-weight men, 39 kg (sensitivity 67%; specificity 71%) for overweight men, and 40 kg (sensitivity 57%; specificity 68%) for obese men. In women, BMI-specific hand-grip strength cutoff values was not markedly more accurate than the overall cutoff value. The hand-grip strength test is a useful tool to identify persons at risk of mobility limitation. In men, hand-grip strength cut points for mobility increased with BMI, whereas in women, only one hand-grip strength threshold was identified. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. Evaluation of the left ventricular reserve by dynamic exercise echocardiography after surgery for valvular heart diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sano,shunji

    1989-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic ergometer exercise in a supine position was applied to 64 patients more than 1 year after valvular heart surgery, and the left ventricular reserve was evaluated echocardiographically. The left ventricular reserve declined in the mitral stenosis-mitral valve replacement group, while it was better maintained in the mitral stenosis-mitral commissurotomy, aortic regurgitation and aortic stenosis groups. The patients were divided into 3 groups depending on whether the percentage increase during exercise of stroke index, an index of left ventricular pump function, increased, unchanged, or decreased. The percentage increase of mean velocity of circumferential fibre shortening (y and that of left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (x during exercise were plotted for each group. The increased group was isolated from the unchanged group by the line of y = -5.02x + 30.1; the unchanged group was isolated from the decreased group by that of y = -5.68x-10.0, and the increased and unchanged groups were clearly isolated from the decreased group by that of y = -6.86x-4.76. We conclude that dynamic ergometer exercise echocardiography is useful for evaluating the left ventricular reserve of postoperative patients with valvular heart disease. It was also thought that the subclinical state of cardiac failure can be effectively detected by the present method.

  19. Augmented baroreflex heart rate gain after moderate-intensity, dynamic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwill, J. R.; Taylor, J. A.; Hartwig, T. D.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    The occurrence of a sustained vasodilation and hypotension after acute, dynamic exercise suggests that exercise may alter arterial baroreflex mechanisms. Therefore, we assessed systemic hemodynamics, baroreflex regulation of heart rate, and cardiac vagal tone after 60 min of cycling at 60% peak oxygen consumption in 12 healthy, untrained men and women (ages 21-28 yr). We derived sigmoidal carotid-cardiac baroreflex relations by measurement of R-R interval changes induced by ramped, stepwise, R-wave-triggered changes in external neck pressure from 40 to -65 mmHg. We estimated tonic cardiac vagal control with power spectral analysis of R-R interval variability in the respiratory frequency band (0.2-0.3 Hz) during frequency- and tidal volume-controlled breathing. Both mean arterial pressure and total peripheral resistance were reduced postexercise [pressure: from 86 +/- 2 (mean +/- SE) to 81 +/- 2 mmHg; resistance: from 23 +/- 2 to 16 +/- 1 units; both P exercise, whereas heart rate and plasma norepinephrine levels were elevated. Thus moderate-intensity, dynamic exercise increases heart rate and cardiac output, reduces peripheral vascular resistance, and augments baroreflex responsiveness. Our data suggest that augmented baroreflex heart rate gain restrains rather than contributes to postexercise hypotension, which appears to be mediated predominately by vasodilation.

  20. Adherence and satisfaction of rheumatoid arthritis patients with a long-term intensive dynamic exercise program (RAPIT program).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munneke, M.; Jong, Z. de; Zwinderman, A.H.; Jansen, A.; Ronday, H.K.; Peter, W.F.H.; Boonman, D.C.G.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate adherence and satisfaction of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a long-term intensive dynamic exercise program. METHODS: A total of 146 RA patients started an intensive (strength and endurance training for 75 minutes, twice a week, for 2 years) exercise program (Rheum

  1. Dynamic and Static Exercises Differentially Affect Plasma Cytokine Content in Elite Endurance- and Strength-Trained Athletes and Untrained Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilevich, Leonid V.; Zakharova, Anna N.; Kabachkova, Anastasia V.; Kironenko, Tatyana A.; Orlov, Sergei N.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive exercise increases the plasma content of IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and several other cytokines via their augmented transcription in skeletal muscle cells. However, the relative impact of aerobic and resistant training interventions on cytokine production remains poorly defined. In this study, we compared effects of dynamic and static load on cytokine plasma content in elite strength- and endurance-trained athletes vs. healthy untrained volunteers. The plasma cytokine content was measured before, immediately after, and 30 min post-exercise using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pedaling on a bicycle ergometer increased IL-6 and IL-8 content in the plasma of trained athletes by about 4- and 2-fold, respectively. In contrast to dynamic load, weightlifting had negligible impact on these parameters in strength exercise-trained athletes. Unlike IL-6 and IL-8, dynamic exercise had no impact on IL-15 and LIF, whereas static load increases the content of these cytokines by ~50%. Two-fold increment of IL-8 content seen in athletes subjected to dynamic exercise was absent in untrained individuals, whereas the ~50% increase in IL-15 triggered by static load in the plasma of weightlifting athletes was not registered in the control group. Thus, our results show the distinct impact of static and dynamic exercises on cytokine content in the plasma of trained athletes. They also demonstrate that both types of exercises differentially affect cytokine content in plasma of athletes and untrained persons.

  2. Dynamic and Static Exercises Differentially Affect Plasma Cytokine Content in Elite Endurance- and Strength-Trained Athletes and Untrained Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilevich, Leonid V; Zakharova, Anna N; Kabachkova, Anastasia V; Kironenko, Tatyana A; Orlov, Sergei N

    2017-01-01

    Extensive exercise increases the plasma content of IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and several other cytokines via their augmented transcription in skeletal muscle cells. However, the relative impact of aerobic and resistant training interventions on cytokine production remains poorly defined. In this study, we compared effects of dynamic and static load on cytokine plasma content in elite strength- and endurance-trained athletes vs. healthy untrained volunteers. The plasma cytokine content was measured before, immediately after, and 30 min post-exercise using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pedaling on a bicycle ergometer increased IL-6 and IL-8 content in the plasma of trained athletes by about 4- and 2-fold, respectively. In contrast to dynamic load, weightlifting had negligible impact on these parameters in strength exercise-trained athletes. Unlike IL-6 and IL-8, dynamic exercise had no impact on IL-15 and LIF, whereas static load increases the content of these cytokines by ~50%. Two-fold increment of IL-8 content seen in athletes subjected to dynamic exercise was absent in untrained individuals, whereas the ~50% increase in IL-15 triggered by static load in the plasma of weightlifting athletes was not registered in the control group. Thus, our results show the distinct impact of static and dynamic exercises on cytokine content in the plasma of trained athletes. They also demonstrate that both types of exercises differentially affect cytokine content in plasma of athletes and untrained persons.

  3. Impact of an intensive dynamic exercise program on oxidative stress and on the outcome in patients with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal F Soliman

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Twelve weeks of intensive dynamic exercise program should be recommended to patients with FM as it was effective in decreasing the oxidative stress parameters, increasing the antioxidant parameters, and improving the clinical outcome of this disease.

  4. The effects of neck and trunk stabilization exercises on cerebral palsy children's static and dynamic trunk balance : case series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    JI-WON SHIN; GUI-BIN SONG; JOOYEON KO

    2017-01-01

    [Abstract.] [Purpose] The purpose of this case series was to examination the effects of trunk and neck stabilization exercise on the static, dynamic trunk balance abilities of children with cerebral palsy...

  5. Heart rate variability and blood pressure during dynamic and static exercise at similar heart rate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weippert, Matthias; Behrens, Kristin; Rieger, Annika; Stoll, Regina; Kreuzfeld, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    Aim was to elucidate autonomic responses to dynamic and static (isometric) exercise of the lower limbs eliciting the same moderate heart rate (HR) response. 23 males performed two kinds of voluntary exercise in a supine position at similar heart rates: static exercise (SE) of the lower limbs (static leg press) and dynamic exercise (DE) of the lower limbs (cycling). Subjective effort, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), rate pressure product (RPP) and the time between consecutive heart beats (RR-intervals) were measured. Time-domain (SDNN, RMSSD), frequency-domain (power in the low and high frequency band (LFP, HFP)) and geometric measures (SD1, SD2) as well as non-linear measures of regularity (approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn) and correlation dimension D2) were calculated. Although HR was similar during both exercise conditions (88±10 bpm), subjective effort, SBP, DBP, MAP and RPP were significantly enhanced during SE. HRV indicators representing overall variability (SDNN, SD 2) and vagal modulated variability (RMSSD, HFP, SD 1) were increased. LFP, thought to be modulated by both autonomic branches, tended to be higher during SE. ApEn and SampEn were decreased whereas D2 was enhanced during SE. It can be concluded that autonomic control processes during SE and DE were qualitatively different despite similar heart rate levels. The differences were reflected by blood pressure and HRV indices. HRV-measures indicated a stronger vagal cardiac activity during SE, while blood pressure response indicated a stronger sympathetic efferent activity to the vessels. The elevated vagal cardiac activity during SE might be a response mechanism, compensating a possible co-activation of sympathetic cardiac efferents, as HR and LF/HF was similar and LFP tended to be higher. However, this conclusion must be drawn cautiously as there is no HRV-marker reflecting "pure" sympathetic cardiac activity.

  6. Identification of anaerobic threshold using heart rate response during dynamic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R.F.S. Marães

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to characterize the heart rate (HR patterns of healthy males using the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA model over a power range assumed to correspond to the anaerobic threshold (AT during discontinuous dynamic exercise tests (DDET. Nine young (22.3 ± 1.57 years and 9 middle-aged (MA volunteers (43.2 ± 3.53 years performed three DDET on a cycle ergometer. Protocol I: DDET in steps with progressive power increases of 10 W; protocol II: DDET using the same power values as protocol 1, but applied randomly; protocol III: continuous dynamic exercise protocol with ventilatory and metabolic measurements (10 W/min ramp power, for the measurement of ventilatory AT. HR was recorded and stored beat-to-beat during DDET, and analyzed using the ARIMA (protocols I and II. The DDET experiments showed that the median physical exercise workloads at which AT occurred were similar for protocols I and II, i.e., AT occurred between 75 W (116 bpm and 85 W (116 bpm for the young group and between 60 W (96 bpm and 75 W (107 bpm for group MA in protocols I and II, respectively; in two MA volunteers the ventilatory AT occurred at 90 W (108 bpm and 95 W (111 bpm. This corresponded to the same power values of the positive trend in HR responses. The change in HR response using ARIMA models at submaximal dynamic exercise powers proved to be a promising approach for detecting AT in normal volunteers.

  7. Preoperative muscle weakness as defined by handgrip strength and postoperative outcomes: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Pervez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduced muscle strength- commonly characterized by decreased handgrip strength compared to population norms- is associated with numerous untoward outcomes. Preoperative handgrip strength is a potentially attractive real-time, non-invasive, cheap and easy-to-perform "bedside" assessment tool. Using systematic review procedure, we investigated whether preoperative handgrip strength was associated with postoperative outcomes in adults undergoing surgery. Methods PRISMA and MOOSE consensus guidelines for reporting systematic reviews were followed. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials (1980-2010 were systematically searched by two independent reviewers. The selection criteria were limited to include studies of preoperative handgrip strength in human adults undergoing non-emergency, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Study procedural quality was analysed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment score. The outcomes assessed were postoperative morbidity, mortality and hospital stay. Results Nineteen clinical studies (17 prospective; 4 in urgent surgery comprising 2194 patients were identified between1980-2010. Impaired handgrip strength and postoperative morbidity were defined inconsistently between studies. Only 2 studies explicitly ensured investigators collecting postoperative outcomes data were blinded to preoperative handgrip strength test results. The heterogeneity of study design used and the diversity of surgical procedures precluded formal meta-analysis. Despite the moderate quality of these observational studies, lower handgrip strength was associated with increased morbidity (n = 10 studies, mortality (n = 2/5 studies and length of hospital stay (n = 3/7 studies. Conclusions Impaired preoperative handgrip strength may be associated with poorer postoperative outcomes, but further work exploring its predictive power is warranted using prospectively acquired, objectively defined

  8. Cerebral blood flow during submaximal and maximal dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, S N; Schroeder, T; Secher, N H

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) in humans was measured at rest and during dynamic exercise on a cycle ergometer corresponding to 56% (range 27-85) of maximal O2 uptake (VO2max). Exercise bouts were performed by 16 male and female subjects, lasted 15 min each, and were carried out in a semisupine position....... CBF (133Xe clearance) was expressed as the initial slope index (ISI) and as the first compartment flow (F1). CBF at rest [ISI, 58 (range 45-73); F1, 76 (range 55-98) ml.100 g-1.min-1] increased during exercise [ISI to 79 (57-94) and F1 to 118 (75-164) ml.100 g-1.min-1, P less than 0.01]. CBF did...... not differ significantly between work loads from 32 (24-33) to 86% (74-96) of VO2max (n = 10). During exercise, mean arterial pressure increased from 84 (60-100) to 101 (78-124) Torr (P less than 0.01) and PCO2 remained unchanged [5.1 (4.6-5.6) vs. 5.4 (4.4-6.3) kPa, n = 6]. These results demonstrate...

  9. Function of human eccrine sweat glands during dynamic exercise and passive heat stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, N.; Shibasaki, M.; Aoki, K.; Koga, S.; Inoue, Y.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the pattern of change in the density of activated sweat glands (ASG) and sweat output per gland (SGO) during dynamic constant-workload exercise and passive heat stress. Eight male subjects (22.8 +/- 0.9 yr) exercised at a constant workload (117.5 +/- 4.8 W) and were also passively heated by lower-leg immersion into hot water of 42 degrees C under an ambient temperature of 25 degrees C and relative humidity of 50%. Esophageal temperature, mean skin temperature, sweating rate (SR), and heart rate were measured continuously during both trials. The number of ASG was determined every 4 min after the onset of sweating, whereas SGO was calculated by dividing SR by ASG. During both exercise and passive heating, SR increased abruptly during the first 8 min after onset of sweating, followed by a slower increase. Similarly for both protocols, the number of ASG increased rapidly during the first 8 min after the onset of sweating and then ceased to increase further (P > 0.05). Conversely, SGO increased linearly throughout both perturbations. Our results suggest that changes in forearm sweating rate rely on both ASG and SGO during the initial period of exercise and passive heating, whereas further increases in SR are dependent on increases in SGO.

  10. Can bronchodilators improve exercise tolerance in COPD patients without dynamic hyperinflation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Enedina Aquino Scuarcialupi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the modulatory effects that dynamic hyperinflation (DH, defined as a reduction in inspiratory capacity (IC, has on exercise tolerance after bronchodilator in patients with COPD. METHODS: An experimental, randomized study involving 30 COPD patients without severe hypoxemia. At baseline, the patients underwent clinical assessment, spirometry, and incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET. On two subsequent visits, the patients were randomized to receive a combination of inhaled fenoterol/ipratropium or placebo. All patients then underwent spirometry and submaximal CPET at constant speed up to the limit of tolerance (Tlim. The patients who showed ΔIC(peak-rest 0.05. In addition, both groups showed similar improvements in Tlim after bronchodilator (median [interquartile range]: 22% [3-60%] vs. 10% [3-53%]; p > 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Improvement in TLim was associated with an increase in IC at rest after bronchodilator in HD- patients with COPD. However, even without that improvement, COPD patients can present with greater exercise tolerance after bronchodilator provided that they develop DH during exercise.

  11. Role of right ventricle and dynamic pulmonary hypertension on determining ΔVO2/ΔWork Rate flattening: insights from cardiopulmonary exercise test combined with exercise echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandera, Francesco; Generati, Greta; Pellegrino, Marta; Donghi, Valeria; Alfonzetti, Eleonora; Gaeta, Maddalena; Villani, Simona; Guazzi, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Several cardiovascular diseases are characterized by an impaired O2 kinetic during exercise. The lack of a linear increase of Δoxygen consumption (VO2)/ΔWork Rate (WR) relationship, as assessed by expired gas analysis, is considered an indicator of abnormal cardiovascular efficiency. We aimed at describing the frequency of ΔVO2/ΔWR flattening in a symptomatic population of cardiac patients, characterizing its functional profile, and testing the hypothesis that dynamic pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular contractile reserve play a major role as cardiac determinants. We studied 136 patients, with different cardiovascular diseases, referred for exertional dyspnoea. Cardiopulmonary exercise test combined with simultaneous exercise echocardiography was performed using a symptom-limited protocol. ΔVO2/ΔWR flattening was observed in 36 patients (group A, 26.5% of population) and was associated with a globally worse functional profile (reduced peak VO2, anaerobic threshold, O2 pulse, impaired VE/VCO2). At univariate analysis, exercise ejection fraction, exercise mitral regurgitation, rest and exercise tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, exercise systolic pulmonary artery pressure, and exercise cardiac output were all significantly (Pexercise systolic pulmonary artery pressure (odds ratio, 1.06; confidence interval, 1.01-1.11; P=0.01) and exercise tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (odds ratio, 0.88; confidence interval, 0.80-0.97; P=0.01) as main cardiac determinants of ΔVO2/ΔWR flattening; female sex was strongly associated (odds ratio, 6.10; confidence interval, 2.11-17.7; Pincrease and the reduced peak right ventricular longitudinal systolic function. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. COMPARATIVE EFFECT OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC STRETCHING EXERCISE TO IMPROVE FLEXIBILITY OF HAMSTRING MUSCLES AMONG NON ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibi Paul

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stretching exercises have been routinely used in persons with hamstring tightness and athletes to increase flexibility of muscle and to reduce joint injuries. Many studies have reported effect of static and dynamic stretching on flexibility of this muscle. Finding the best method to improve flexibility of hamstring muscle is important for athletes and individuals to reduce their injuries. Objective of the study was to find out the effect of static stretching exercise and dynamic stretching exercise on flexibility of hamstring muscle and also to compare the effect of static and dynamic stretching exercise on flexibility of hamstring muscle. Methods: This was a comparative experimental study with seventy four female healthy subjects from physiotherapy department of KPJ Healthcare University College, Malaysia. Convenient sampling method used to select the samples. The subjects were selected by inclusion criteria and randomly divided equally in to two with 37 subjects in each group. Static stretching exercise and dynamic stretching exercise were given as intervention program for four weeks respectively for experimental and control group. Pre and post data of restricted range of movement for knee extension was measured using goniometry and documented separately for both group. Result: In experimental and control group, pre-post statistical analysis found significant effect in increase of hamstring flexibility with P<0.0001, for right and left side. Comparative study between experimental and control group found that static stretching exercise have significant effect in increase of hamstring flexibility for right and left side with P<0.04. Conclusion: This study concluded that static stretching exercise is more effective to improve hamstring flexibility compared to dynamic stretching exercise.

  13. Muscle metaboreflex activation during dynamic exercise evokes epinephrine release resulting in β2-mediated vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasdeep; Spranger, Marty D; Hammond, Robert L; Krishnan, Abhinav C; Alvarez, Alberto; Augustyniak, Robert A; O'Leary, Donal S

    2015-03-01

    Muscle metaboreflex-induced increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) during submaximal dynamic exercise are mediated principally by increases in cardiac output. To what extent, if any, the peripheral vasculature contributes to this rise in MAP is debatable. In several studies, we observed that in response to muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA; induced by partial hindlimb ischemia) a small but significant increase in vascular conductance occurred within the nonischemic areas (calculated as cardiac output minus hindlimb blood flow and termed nonischemic vascular conductance; NIVC). We hypothesized that these increases in NIVC may stem from a metaboreflex-induced release of epinephrine, resulting in β2-mediated dilation. We measured NIVC and arterial plasma epinephrine levels in chronically instrumented dogs during rest, mild exercise (3.2 km/h), and MMA before and after β-blockade (propranolol; 2 mg/kg), α1-blockade (prazosin; 50 μg/kg), and α1 + β-blockade. Both epinephrine and NIVC increased significantly from exercise to MMA: 81.9 ± 18.6 to 141.3 ± 22.8 pg/ml and 33.8 ± 1.5 to 37.6 ± 1.6 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), respectively. These metaboreflex-induced increases in NIVC were abolished after β-blockade (27.6 ± 1.8 to 27.5 ± 1.7 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)) and potentiated after α1-blockade (36.6 ± 2.0 to 49.7 ± 2.9 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)), while α1 + β-blockade also abolished any vasodilation (33.7 ± 2.9 to 30.4 ± 1.9 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)). We conclude that MMA during mild dynamic exercise induces epinephrine release causing β2-mediated vasodilation.

  14. Blood flow regulation and oxygen uptake during high intensity forearm exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Stian Kwak; Berg, Ole Kristian; Helgerud, Jan; Wang, Eivind

    2017-01-05

    The vascular strain is very high during heavy handgrip exercise, but the intensity and kinetics to reach peak blood flow, and peak oxygen uptake, are uncertain. We included 9 young (25±2yr) healthy males to evaluate blood flow and oxygen uptake responses during continuous dynamic handgrip exercise with increasing intensity. Blood flow was measured using Doppler-ultrasound and venous blood was drawn from a deep forearm vein to determine arteriovenous oxygen difference (a-vO2diff) during 6-minutes bouts of 60, 80 and 100% of maximal work rate (WRmax), respectively. Blood flow and oxygen uptake increased (pBlood velocity (49.5±11.5 cm∙sec(-1) to 58.1±11.6 cm∙sec(-1)) and brachial diameter (0.49±0.05cm to 0.50±0.06 cm) showed concomitant increases (pblood flow from 60% to 80%WRmax, while no differences were observed in a-vO2diff Shear rate also increased (pblood flow (60%WRmax:50±22s; 80%WRmax:51±20s; 100%WRmax:51±23s) than a-vO2diff (60%WRmax:29±9s; 80%WRmax:29±5s; 100%WRmax:20±5s), but not different from oxygen uptake (60%WRmax:44±25s; 80%WRmax:43±14s; 100%WRmax:41±32s). No differences were observed in MRT for blood flow or oxygen uptake with increased exercise intensity. In conclusion, when approaching maximal intensity, oxygen uptake appeared to reach a critical level at ~80% of WRmax and be regulated by blood flow. This implies that high, but not maximal, exercise intensity may be an optimal stimulus for shear stress-induced small muscle mass training adaptations.

  15. An evidence-based review of hip-focused neuromuscular exercise interventions to address dynamic lower extremity valgus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford KR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kevin R Ford,1 Anh-Dung Nguyen,2 Steven L Dischiavi,1 Eric J Hegedus,1 Emma F Zuk,2 Jeffrey B Taylor11Department of Physical Therapy, High Point University, High Point, NC, USA; 2Department of Athletic Training, School of Health Sciences, High Point University, High Point, NC, USAAbstract: Deficits in proximal hip strength or neuromuscular control may lead to dynamic lower extremity valgus. Measures of dynamic lower extremity valgus have been previously shown to relate to increased risk of several knee pathologies, specifically anterior cruciate ligament ruptures and patellofemoral pain. Therefore, hip-focused interventions have gained considerable attention and been successful in addressing these knee pathologies. The purpose of the review was to identify and discuss hip-focused exercise interventions that aim to address dynamic lower extremity valgus. Previous electromyography, kinematics, and kinetics research support the use of targeted hip exercises with non-weight-bearing, controlled weight-bearing, functional exercise, and, to a lesser extent, dynamic exercises in reducing dynamic lower extremity valgus. Further studies should be developed to identify and understand the mechanistic relationship between optimized biomechanics during sports and hip-focused neuromuscular exercise interventions.Keywords: dynamic lower extremity valgus, hip neuromuscular control, ACL injury rehabilitation, patellofemoral pain, hip muscular activation

  16. Fourier and wavelet spectral analysis of EMG signals in supramaximal constant load dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camata, Thiago V; Dantas, Jose L; Abrao, Taufik; Brunetto, Maria A C; Moraes, Antonio C; Altimari, Leandro R

    2010-01-01

    Frequency domain analyses of changes in electromyographic (EMG) signals over time are frequently used to assess muscle fatigue. Fourier based approaches are typically used in these analyses, yet Fourier analysis assumes signal stationarity, which is unlikely during dynamic contractions. Wavelet based methods of signal analysis do not assume stationarity and may be more appropriate for joint time-frequency domain analysis. The purpose of this study was to compare Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) and Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) in assessing muscle fatigue in supramaximal constant load dynamic exercise (110% VO(2peak)). The results of this study indicate that CWT and STFT analyses give similar fatigue estimates (slope of median frequency) in supramaximal constant load dynamic exercise (P>0.05). However, the results of the variance was significantly lower for at least one of the muscles studied in CWT compared to STFT (P signal analysis using STFT. Thus, the stationarity assumption may not be the sole factor responsible for affecting the Fourier based estimates.

  17. Fourier and wavelet spectral analysis of EMG signals in maximal constant load dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marcelo V; Pereira, Lucas A; Oliveira, Ricardo S; Pedro, Rafael E; Camata, Thiago V; Abrao, Taufik; Brunetto, Maria A C; Altimari, Leandro R

    2010-01-01

    Frequency domain analyses of changes in electromyographic (EMG) signals over time are frequently used to assess muscle fatigue. Fourier based approaches are typically used in these analyses, yet Fourier analysis assumes signal stationarity, which is unlikely during dynamic contractions. Wavelet based methods of signal analysis do not assume stationarity and may be more appropriate for joint time-frequency domain analysis. The purpose of this study was to compare Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) and Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) in assessing muscle fatigue in maximal constant load dynamic exercise (100% W(max)). The results of this study indicate that CWT and STFT analyses give similar fatigue estimates (slope of median frequency) in maximal constant load dynamic exercise (P>0.05). However, the results of the variance was significantly lower for at least one of the muscles studied in CWT compared to STFT (P〈0.05) indicating more variability in the EMG signal analysis using STFT. Thus, the stationarity assumption may not be the sole factor responsible for affecting the Fourier based estimates.

  18. The effects of Pilates exercise training on static and dynamic balance in chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hee Sung; Kim, You Lim; Lee, Suk Min

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of Pilates exercise on static and dynamic balance in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen individuals with unilateral chronic hemiparetic stroke (age, 64.7 ± 6.9 years; height, 161.7 ± 7.9 cm; weight, 67.0 ± 11.1 kg) were randomly allocated to either a Pilates exercise group (PG, n=10) or a control group (CG, n=9). The PG attended 24 exercise sessions conducted over an 8-week period (3 sessions/week). Center of pressure (COP) sway and COP velocity were measured one week before and after the exercise program and compared to assess training effects. [Results] Pilates exercise positively affected both static and dynamic balance in patients with chronic stroke. For static balance, COP sway and velocity in the medial-lateral (M-L) and anterior-posterior (A-P) directions were significantly decreased in the PG after training while no significant differences were found in the CG. For dynamic balance, measured during treadmill walking, the PG showed significantly reduced COP sway and velocity in the M-L and A-P directions for both the paretic and non-paretic leg. [Conclusions] The findings provide initial evidence that Pilates exercise can enhance static and dynamic balance in patients with chronic stroke. PMID:27390424

  19. Chronic diseases, multimorbidity, and handgrip strength among older adults from Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia PESSINI

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the association between various chronic diseases, multimorbidity, and handgrip strength in community dwelling older adults in Southern Brazil. Methods: A cross-sectional study carried out with 477 older adults (60 years and older who resided in Antônio Carlos, Santa Catarina state. Subjects aged 60-79 years were selected by probability sampling (n=343 and all subjects aged 80 years or older (n=134 were evaluated. Chronic diseases were identified by self-report. A mechanical dynamometer verified handgrip strength (i.e., the outcome. Adjustments variables were age, literacy, living arrangement, smoking, body mass index, cognitive function, and comorbid chronic diseases. Sex-stratified analyses were conducted with simple and multiple linear regression. Results: A total of 270 women (73.2±8.8 years and 207 men (73.3±9.0 years were assessed. In the adjustment analysis, cancer (β=-3.69; 95%CI=-6.97 to -0.41 and depression (β=-1.65; 95%CI=-3.20 to -0.10 were associated with lower handgrip strength in women. For men, diabetes (β=-5.30; 95%CI=-9.64 to -0.95, chronic lung disease (β=-4.74; 95%CI=-7.98 to -1.50, and coronary heart disease (β=-3.07; 95%CI=-5.98 to -0.16 were associated with lower handgrip strength values. There was an inverse trend between number of diseases and handgrip strength for men only. Conclusion: The results showed an independent association between chronic diseases and handgrip strength. As such, handgrip strength is a valid measure to use for prevention or intervention in chronic disease and multimorbidity.

  20. DYNAMIC HIP ADDUCTION, ABDUCTION AND ABDOMINAL EXERCISES FROM THE HOLMICH GROIN-INJURY PREVENTION PROGRAM ARE INTENSE ENOUGH TO BE CONSIDERED STRENGTHENING EXERCISES - A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krommes, Kasper; Bandholm, Thomas; Jakobsen, Markus D

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Training intensity is an important variable in strength training and above 80% of one repetition maximum is recommended for promoting strength for athletes. Four dynamic and two isometric on-field exercises are included in the Hölmich groin-injury prevention study that initially failed...... to show a reduction in groin injuries in soccer players. It has been speculated that exercise-intensity in this groin-injury prevention program was too low to induce the strength gains necessary to protect against groin-related injuries. PURPOSE: To estimate the intensity of the six exercises from...... in the Hölmich groin injury prevention program, except cross-county skiing, is sufficient to be considered strength-training for specific muscle groups in and around the groin region. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3....

  1. EFFECTIVENESS OF ECCENTRIC TRAINING, DYNAMIC RANGE OF MOTION EXERCISES AND STATIC STRETCHING ON FLEXIBILITY OF HAMSTRING MUSCLE AMONG FOOTBALL PLAYERS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askar P.V

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hamstring stretch is an important part of treatment programs aimed at decreasing the likelihood of hamstring injury. Few studies have examine the effect of eccentric training, static stretching and dynamic range of motion(DROM exercise in improving hamstring flexibility this study compares the effect of eccentric training and static stretching in improving hamstring flexibility. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Eccentric training, Static stretching and Dynamic range of motion (DROM exercise in improving hamstring flexibility and the second objective is find which technique is more effective in improving hamstring flexibility when compared with a control group. Study design is Experimental pre-test post-test design. Methods: 88 male subjects with limited hamstring flexibility were recruited for this study were assigned to four group. Group1 received eccentric training, group2 received dynamic range of motion exercise, group3 received static stretching and group4 was served as control group. Hamstring length was measured pre intervention and post intervention using a self-monitored active knee extension test. Results: Eccentric training, static stretching and dynamic range of motion exercise showed a significant increase in hamstring length between pre and post intervention. Following a between group analysis done by independent t test revealed a significant difference between group1 group2 and group3 Conclusion: It is concluded that eccentric training, dynamic range of motion (DROM exercise and static stretching groups improved hamstring flexibility.

  2. Comparative Study of the Effect of Aerobic and Resistance Exercise on Static and Dynamic Balance in Elderly Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Banihashemi Emamghisi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stumbling or falling is a major health problem among the elderly which accounts for their majority of physical injuries such as pelvic fractures, disability, loss of independency and even death. The goal of the study was comparison of the effect of aerobic and resistance exercise on static and dynamic balance in old men. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted and thirty elderly males, who were referred to Jahandidegan institute of Borujen, were divided randomly in three empirical groups subdividing aerobic, resistance and control group. 24 hours before the start of and 24 hours after completion of eight weeks -aerobic and resistance exercise, all participants went under static and dynamic balance examination. The results were analysed by SPSS software edition 19. Results: Mean and standard deviation of dynamic balance scores before the exercise for the resistance, aerobic and control groups were 1017.6±212.7, 930.5±238.2, 1119.6±287.3 and after eight weeks exercise were 851.7±155.5, 743.4±130.1, 1220.06±226.9 respectively. On the other hand, Mean and standard deviation of static balance scores before the exercise in resistance, aerobic and control groups were 2280.3±2286.2, 3534.9±4455.4, 1284.1±231.4 and after eight weeks exercise were 5563.4±8014.6, 6089±7888.4, 1297.1±214.4 respectively. ANOVA test revealed that the difference in changes of three groups were not statistically significant (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Despite marginal correlation between static and dynamic balance as the outcomes of aerobic and resistant exercise these activities are proposed because such the exercises reduce incidence of falling events and related-injuries and also risk of independency among older adults.

  3. Assessing autonomic response to repeated bouts of exercise below and above respiratory threshold: insight from dynamic analysis of RR variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucini, Daniela; Vigo, Chiara; Tosi, Fabio; Toninelli, Gianfranco; Badilini, Fabio; Pagani, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    The dynamics of vagal withdrawal and reactivation during pulses of exercise are described by indices computed from heart period (RR) variations, which may be sensitive to duration and load. We sought to assess the consistency over time of these indices, which is not well established. We recorded continuous electrocardiogram during series of five successive bouts (2 min) of submaximal exercise (at 40 and 70% of VO(2peak), different days). Autonomic responsiveness was inferred from quantification of onset and offset of RR dynamics of each individual bout. Consistency of results was assessed with intraclass correlation (ICC). During exercise bouts, indices from tachycardic and bradycardic transients reach lower levels in response to higher exercise loads and progression of exercise. There is a significant effect of load and time (i.e., bout repetition) for all examined variables, with a clear interaction. However, no interaction is observed with the 60 s change in heart rate. ICC analysis demonstrates that various indices are characterized by large differences in stability, which is generally greater within the same day (e.g., tachyspeed ICC at 40% = 0.751, at 70% = 0.704, both days = 0.633; bradyspeed, respectively, = 0.545, 0.666, 0.516). Intensity and duration of exercise modulate vagal withdrawal and reactivation. Analysis of RR variations, during successive brief exercise bouts at lower and higher intensity, ensures a consistency similar to that reported for autonomic cardiac regulation at rest and might guide the choice among multiple indices that are obtained from the tachogram.

  4. Effects of tiotropium and formoterol on dynamic hyperinflation and exercise endurance in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Danilo C; Reis, Michel; Siqueira, Ana Cristina B; Barroco, Adriano C; Takara, Luciana S; Bravo, Daniela M; Andreoni, Solange; Neder, J Alberto

    2010-09-01

    It is currently unclear whether the additive effects of a long-acting beta(2)-agonist (LABA) and the antimuscarinic tiotropium bromide (TIO) on resting lung function are translated into lower operating lung volumes and improved exercise tolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). On a double-blind and cross-over study, 33 patients (FEV(1) = 47.4 +/- 12.9% predicted) were randomly allocated to 2-wk formoterol fumarate 12 microg twice-daily (FOR) plus TIO 18 microg once-daily or FOR plus placebo (PLA). Inspiratory capacity (IC) was obtained on constant-speed treadmill tests to the limit of tolerance (Tlim). FOR-TIO was superior to FOR-PLA in increasing post-treatment FEV(1) and Tlim (1.34 +/- 0.42 L vs. 1.25 +/- 0.39 L and 124 +/- 27% vs. 68 +/- 14%, respectively; p < 0.05). FOR-TIO slowed the rate of decrement in exercise IC compared to FOR-PLA (Deltaisotime-rest = -0.27 +/- 0.40 L vs. -0.45 +/- 0.36 L, p < 0.05). In addition, end-expiratory lung volume (% total lung capacity) was further reduced with FOR-TIO (p < 0.05). Of note, patients showing greater increases in Tlim with FOR-TIO (16/26, 61.6%) had more severe airways obstruction and lower exercise capacity at baseline. Improvement in Tlim with FOR-TIO was also related to larger increases in FEV(1) (p < 0.05). Compared to FOR monotherapy, FOR-TIO further improved effort-induced dynamic hyperinflation and exercise endurance in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. These beneficial consequences were more likely to be found in severely-disabled patients with larger resting functional responses to the combination therapy. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00680056 [ClinicalTrials.gov].

  5. Differential Glucose Uptake in Quadriceps and Other Leg Muscles During One-Legged Dynamic Submaximal Knee-Extension Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Kalliokoski, Kari K.; Boushel, Robert; Langberg, Henning; Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Ryberg, Ann Kathrine; Døssing, Simon; Kjær, Andreas; Kjær, Michael

    2011-01-01

    One-legged dynamic knee-extension exercise (DKE) is a widely used model to study the local cardiovascular and metabolic responses to exercise of the quadriceps muscles. In this study, we explored the extent to which different muscles of the quadriceps are activated during exercise using positron emission tomography (PET) determined uptake of [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (GU) during DKE. Five healthy male subjects performed DKE at 25 W for 35 min and both the contracting and contralateral restin...

  6. Handgrip strength and its relation with anthropometric parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Luís Fischer Eichinger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The handgrip strength (HS is related to ADL, when reduced can lead to significant functional limitations. Its measurement allows estimating the strength general state and is a health indicator. Objective: Analyze the correlation between HS and anthropometry in box genders. Methods: This is a descriptive correlational study with 100 healthy individuals, aged between 17 and 40 years, 50 men, mean age 28.0 years (± 7.0 and 50 women, mean age 23 years (± 4.2. We evaluated HS and forearm, wrist and hand perimeter. Statistical analyzes were obtained using means, standard deviations and Pearson Correlation Test. Results: Compared to women, men had higher HS mean values on both sides. Men showed 49.0 kgf (± 8.3 on the right and 46.0 kgf (± 8.5 on the left side; while women showed 26.0 kgf (± 5.4 on the right side and 24.0 kgf (± 5.3 on the left side. Discussion: The hand perimeter was the only anthropometric data that showed a significant correlation with the HS in both genders. The forearm and wrist perimeter was only significant in men, with a slight difference between the sides; the right side prevails over the left. Although women showed no significant correlations with the HS it was noted discrepancy of force in relation to laterality, with a predominance of HS on the right side. Conclusions: We conclude that there is a correlation between HS and anthropometry, and that laterality and gender are factors influencing HS.

  7. Effects of dynamic exercise on circulating IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatay, Saliha; Yildirim, Kadir; Melikoglu, Meltem Alkan; Akcay, Fatih; Senel, Kazim

    2007-10-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of short-term dynamic exercise on serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) levels in the patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Patients with RA or AS and healthy controls were recruited. Dynamic treadmill exercise therapy was accomplished for 20 min/session with all of the participants. There were five sessions per week for 2 weeks. Morning stiffness duration, body pain, Stanford health assessment questionnaire, Ritchie articular index, Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), and Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI) were evaluated in the RA and AS patients. Laboratory assessments included: erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum C-reactive protein, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3. Clinical and laboratory assessments were recorded at baseline and during exercise treatment on days 7 and 15. Twenty patients with RA, 15 with AS, and 14 healthy controls were included in this study. The pain evaluation, Ritchie, BASDAI, and BASFI scores were significantly improved by the exercise treatment in both patient groups. The important increases were found in circulating IGF-1 in RA (p exercise program in RA and AS patients. The increased IGF-1 may play an important role in the beneficial effects of dynamic exercise therapy in these patients.

  8. Laterality of handgrip strength: age- and physical training-related changes in Lithuanian schoolchildren and conscripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutkuviene, Janina; Schiefenhövel, Wulf

    2013-06-01

    Laterality in handgrip strength was assessed by analyzing dynamometric data of the right and left hand in three samples of Lithuanian boys and girls aged 7-20 years. In addition, the influence of general physical training on the laterality of handgrip strength was explored in a sample of conscripts. A negative secular trend in handgrip strength of schoolchildren has been detected since 1965, and with increasing age, right-handedness has become more pronounced. Children that were ambidextrous (by grip strength) showed negative deviations in physical status more often than their right- or left-handed peers. During one year of physical training, the conscripts had a larger increase in grip strength of the left than in the right hand, and a marked shift in handgrip laterality toward left-handed and ambidextrous individuals was observed. The different impact of schooling and physical training on handgrip strength laterality might partly explain variations in the prevalence of handedness in different societies with divergent cultures and lifestyles (e.g., more or less sedentary). © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Cardiac parasympathetic outflow during dynamic exercise in humans estimated from power spectral analysis of P-P interval variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Makoto; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Matsukawa, Kanji; Ishii, Kei; Watanabe, Tae; Sekikawa, Kiyokazu; Hamada, Hironobu

    2016-03-01

    What is the central question of this study? Should we use the high-frequency (HF) component of P-P interval as an index of cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity during moderate exercise? What is the main finding and its importance? The HF component of P-P interval variability remained even at a heart rate of 120-140 beats min(-1) and was further reduced by atropine, indicating incomplete cardiac vagal withdrawal during moderate exercise. The HF component of R-R interval is invalid as an estimate of cardiac parasympathetic outflow during moderate exercise; instead, the HF component of P-P interval variability should be used. The high-frequency (HF) component of R-R interval variability has been widely used as an indirect estimate of cardiac parasympathetic (vagal) outflow to the sino-atrial node of the heart. However, we have recently found that the variability of the R-R interval becomes much smaller during dynamic exercise than that of the P-P interval above a heart rate (HR) of ∼100 beats min(-1). We hypothesized that cardiac parasympathetic outflow during dynamic exercise with a higher intensity may be better estimated using the HF component of P-P interval variability. To test this hypothesis, the HF components of both P-P and R-R interval variability were analysed using a Wavelet transform during dynamic exercise. Twelve subjects performed ergometer exercise to increase HR from the baseline of 69 ± 3 beats min(-1) to three different levels of 100, 120 and 140 beats min(-1). We also examined the effect of atropine sulfate on the HF components in eight of the 12 subjects during exercise at an HR of 140 beats min(-1) . The HF component of P-P interval variability was significantly greater than that of R-R interval variability during exercise, especially at the HRs of 120 and 140 beats min(-1). The HF component of P-P interval variability was more reduced by atropine than that of R-R interval variability. We conclude that cardiac parasympathetic outflow to the

  10. Dynamics of GH secretion during incremental exercise in obesity, before and after a short period of training at different work-loads

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background. Growth hormone (GH) is normally sensitive to physical exercise. Intensity and duration of exercise, fitness as well as age, all can influence GH response to exercise. In obesity, GH secretion is decreased both in basal conditions and in response to exercise. Objective. To analyse the dynamics of GH response to a progressive cycloergometric test conducted up to exhaustion in adult normal subjects and obese patients, after a reconditioning program at different...

  11. Effect of axillary blockade on regional cerebral blood flow during static handgrip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedman, D B; Friberg, L; Mitchell, J H

    1991-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined at rest and during static handgrip before and after regional blockade with lidocaine. A fast rotating single photon emission computer tomograph system with 133Xe inhalation was used at orbitomeatal plane (OM) +2.5 and +6.5 cm in eight subjects.......min-1 (P less than 0.05) to both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides during handgrip before, but not after, axillary blockade. There was no change in rCBF to other regions of the brain. Regional anesthesia with lidocaine did not alter resting rCBF. However, despite a greater sense of effort during...

  12. Muscle oxygen kinetics at onset of intense dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, J; Krustrup, P; González-Alonso, J;

    2000-01-01

    , and 4.7 +/- 0.5 s at the end of exercise. Arterial venous O(2) difference (a-v(diff) O(2)) of 18 +/- 5 ml/l before the exercise was unchanged after 2 s, but it increased (P ... of exercise. The limited oxygen utilization in the initial phase of intense exercise is not caused by insufficient oxygen availability....

  13. TO STUDY THE EFFECT OF AGILITY AND PERTURBATION EXERCISES VERSUS DYNAMIC RESISTANCE EXERCISES TO IMPROVE KNEE FUNCTION IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeutishree Roy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary osteoarthritis is more commonly found in post menopausal women; Secondary osteoarthritis had an underlying cause such as trauma, obesity or inflammatory arthritis. It is characterized by a progressive degeneration of the articular cartilage with subsequent remodeling and hypertrophy of the bone at the joint margins. Muscle weakness is associated with increased functional limitation, disability. Muscle strengthening through resistance exercises increases physical function; decreases pain due to osteoarthritis and reduces self reported disability. Agility is the ability to change direction and maintain stability and is more often important in changing direction and speed; In order to train muscle to react quickly neuromuscular training is essential; Perturbation enhances the ability of the proprioceptor signals to the muscle and prevent injuries and enhances performance. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of agility training and dynamic resistance training in patients with primary osteoarthritis. Methods: 50 subjects were assigned in two groups 25 each group and subjects were selected by convenient sampling method. Group A with agility training and Group B with dynamic resistance training. The treatment session was performed 3 days a week for 3 weeks lasting for 45minutes. Day 0 is the starting day of the session and Day-21 last day of the session. Each subject performed all the measurement with knee function assessed by Timed up and Go test (TUG and Lower extremity function Scale (LEFS. Both outcomes were tested at starting day and at the end of 21st day. Results: All the analysis was carried out in PASW version 21.0. An alpha level of 0.05 was used to determine statistical significance. The between group analysis of agility training and dynamic strengthening for LEFS and TUG in evaluation of knee function was done using independent ‘t’ test showed statistically very significant (P=0.000. Conclusions

  14. Differential glucose uptake in quadriceps and other leg muscles during one-legged dynamic submaximal knee-extension exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari eKalliokoski

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One-legged dynamic knee-extension exercise (DKE is a widely used model to study the local cardiovascular and metabolic responses to exercise of the quadriceps muscles. In this study, we explored the extent to which different muscles of the quadriceps are activated during exercise using positron emission tomography (PET determined uptake of [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (GU during DKE. Five healthy male subjects performed DKE at 25 W for 35 min and both the contracting and contralateral resting leg were scanned with PET from mid-thigh and distally. On average, exercise GU was the highest in the vastus intermedius (VI and lowest in the vastus lateralis (VL (VI vs VL, p<0.05, whereas the coefficient of variation was highest in VL (VL vs VI, p<0.05. Coefficient of variation between the mean values of the four QF muscles in the exercising leg was 35±9%. Compared to mean GU in QF (=100%, GU was on average 73% in VL, 84% in rectus femoris, 115% in vastus medialis, and 142% in VI. Variable activation of hamstring muscles and muscles of the lower leg was also observed. These results show that GU of different muscles of quadriceps muscle group as well as between individuals vary greatly during DKE, and suggests that muscle activity is not equal between quadriceps muscles in this exercise model. Furthermore, posterior thigh muscles and lower leg muscles are more active than hitherto thought even during this moderate exercise intensity.

  15. Differential glucose uptake in quadriceps and other leg muscles during one-legged dynamic submaximal knee-extension exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Boushel, Robert; Langberg, Henning; Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Ryberg, Ann Kathrine; Døssing, Simon; Kjær, Andreas; Kjær, Michael

    2011-01-01

    One-legged dynamic knee-extension exercise (DKE) is a widely used model to study the local cardiovascular and metabolic responses to exercise of the quadriceps muscles. In this study, we explored the extent to which different muscles of the quadriceps are activated during exercise using positron emission tomography (PET) determined uptake of [(18)F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (GU) during DKE. Five healthy male subjects performed DKE at 25 W for 35 min and both the contracting and contralateral resting leg were scanned with PET from mid-thigh and distally. On average, exercise GU was the highest in the vastus intermedius (VI) and lowest in the vastus lateralis (VL; VI vs VL, p muscles in the exercising leg was 35 ± 9%. Compared to mean GU in QF (=100%), GU was on average 73% in VL, 84% in rectus femoris, 115% in vastus medialis, and 142% in VI. Variable activation of hamstring muscles and muscles of the lower leg was also observed. These results show that GU of different muscles of quadriceps muscle group as well as between individuals vary greatly during DKE, and suggests that muscle activity is not equal between quadriceps muscles in this exercise model. Furthermore, posterior thigh muscles and lower leg muscles are more active than hitherto thought even during this moderate exercise intensity.

  16. Consecutive ultra-short-term heart rate variability to track dynamic changes in autonomic nervous system during and after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Yao, Ruijie; Yin, Gezhen; Li, Jin

    2017-06-22

    Quantitative measurement of the dynamic changes in autonomic nervous system (ANS) during and after exercise has great significance in clinical, sports training and other fields. A consecutive ultra-short-term (30 s, UST) heart rate variability (HRV) method was proposed to track the exercise-induced autonomic control of heart rate (HR). Twenty-three healthy young men participated in the study. The first four stages of the Modified Bruce Protocol (S0-S3) were performed. Six HRV indices, i.e. HF (power of high frequency ranged from 0.15 to 0.4 Hz), LF (power of low frequency ranged from 0.04 to 0.15 Hz), LF/HF, SD1 and SD2 of Poincaré plot, and SD2/SD1, over 30 s were calculated every 5 s over 3 min RR time series during, as well as after, exercise. The results showed that during exercise, SD1, SD2, HF and LF dropped down quickly and tended to stabilize. Particularly, SD1 and HF showed a slight upward trend in the lower three stages while the declining time of SD2 in S3 lasted longer than the other stages. SD2/SD1 increased rapidly first and then decreased slowly. The values of SD2/SD1 in S3 remained higher than those in the other stages. After exercise, SD1, SD2, HF and LF kept increasing first and then declined slowly or fluctuated with decaying amplitudes. SD2/SD1 increased initially, then decreased and fluctuated slightly. Compared with the indices in frequency domain, the Poincaré indices were more sensitive and accurate in UST measurement of ANS during exercise. The results demonstrated that the UST method could characterize the dynamic changing tendency of ANS during and after exercise and quantify the differences of changes in ANS induced by exercise with different intensities. In particular, the vagal branch functioned dominantly in controlling HR in S0 but the effect of the sympathetic branch on HR enhanced with the increase of exercise intensity. In addition, the transient changes of ANS related with the sudden onset of exercise could also be

  17. Glycopyrrolate abolishes the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N

    2010-01-01

    ) (P mean arterial pressure. The central cardiovascular responses to exercise with glycopyrrolate were similar to the control responses, except that cardiac output did not increase during static handgrip with glycopyrrolate....... Glycopyrrolate did not significantly affect cerebral metabolism during static handgrip, but a parallel increase in MCA V(mean) (approximately 16%; P increase in MCA V(mean) during cycling (approximately 15%; P ...Brain blood vessels contain muscarinic receptors that are important for cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, but whether a cholinergic receptor mechanism is involved in the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion or affects cerebral metabolism remains unknown. We evaluated CBF and cerebral...

  18. Differential glucose uptake in quadriceps and other leg muscles during one-legged dynamic submaximal knee-extension exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Boushel, Robert; Langberg, Henning;

    2011-01-01

    One-legged dynamic knee-extension exercise (DKE) is a widely used model to study the local cardiovascular and metabolic responses to exercise of the quadriceps muscles. In this study, we explored the extent to which different muscles of the quadriceps are activated during exercise using positron...... in the vastus intermedius (VI) and lowest in the vastus lateralis (VL; VI vs VL, p muscles in the exercising leg was 35 ± 9%. Compared...... to mean GU in QF (=100%), GU was on average 73% in VL, 84% in rectus femoris, 115% in vastus medialis, and 142% in VI. Variable activation of hamstring muscles and muscles of the lower leg was also observed. These results show that GU of different muscles of quadriceps muscle group as well as between...

  19. Muscle metaboreflex-induced coronary vasoconstriction limits ventricular contractility during dynamic exercise in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutsos, Matthew; Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Ichinose, Masashi; Li, Zhenhua; Dawe, Elizabeth J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2013-04-01

    Muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA) during dynamic exercise increases cardiac work and myocardial O2 demand via increases in heart rate, ventricular contractility, and afterload. This increase in cardiac work should lead to metabolic coronary vasodilation; however, no change in coronary vascular conductance occurs. This indicates that the MMA-induced increase in sympathetic activity to the heart, which raises heart rate, ventricular contractility, and cardiac output, also elicits coronary vasoconstriction. In heart failure, cardiac output does not increase with MMA presumably due to impaired ability to improve left ventricular contractility. In this setting actual coronary vasoconstriction is observed. We tested whether this coronary vasoconstriction could explain, in part, the reduced ability to increase cardiac performance during MMA. In conscious, chronically instrumented dogs before and after pacing-induced heart failure, MMA responses during mild exercise were observed before and after α1-adrenergic blockade (prazosin 20-50 μg/kg). During MMA, the increases in coronary vascular conductance, coronary blood flow, maximal rate of left ventricular pressure change, and cardiac output were significantly greater after α1-adrenergic blockade. We conclude that in subjects with heart failure, coronary vasoconstriction during MMA limits the ability to increase left ventricular contractility.

  20. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neder, J.A. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V{sub CW}) = rib cage (V{sub RC}) + abdomen (V{sub AB})] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) V{sub CW} increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V{sub CW} regulation as EEV{sub CW} increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEV{sub AB} decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) V{sub CW} (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEV{sub CW} in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEV{sub RC} with marked reductions in EEV{sub AB}. These patients showed lower EIV{sub CW} and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV{sub CW} regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  1. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Takara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V CW = rib cage (V RC + abdomen (V AB] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE V CW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V CW regulation as EEV CW increased non-linearly in 17/30 "hyperinflators" and decreased in 13/30 "non-hyperinflators" (P < 0.05. EEV AB decreased slightly in 8 of the "hyperinflators", thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI V CW (P < 0.05. In contrast, decreases in EEV CW in the "non-hyperinflators" were due to the combination of stable EEV RC with marked reductions in EEV AB. These patients showed lower EIV CW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05. Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV CW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  2. Hysteresis of electrocardiographic depolarization-repolarization intervals during dynamic physical exercise and subsequent recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, M J; Short, A L

    2006-02-01

    The post-exercise electrocardiographic QT interval is shortened relative to that at similar heart rates during exercise or pre-exercise rest. This lag in QT adaptation to the recovering heart rate is described as "hysteresis". No previous studies have quantified the influence of ECG electrode placement on hysteresis following physical exercise. Six males and six females of similar age, mass and aerobic fitness undertook progressive sub-maximal bicycle exercise. A three-channel ECG was recorded continuously during pre-exercise, exercise and recovery. Beat-to-beat NN (cardiac interval) and QT(a) interval (Q wave onset to T wave apex) data were measured for each sinus heart beat. QT(a)-NN hysteresis was calculated as the difference in QT(a) magnitude at identical heart rates during the rest/exercise and post-exercise recovery periods. There were some significant (p ECG electrode placement in future investigations.

  3. Physical Exercise Leads to Rapid Adaptations in Hippocampal Vasculature : Temporal Dynamics and Relationship to Cell Proliferation and Neurogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Borght, Karin; Kobor-Nyakas, Dora E.; Klauke, Karin; Eggen, Bart J. L.; Nyakas, Csaba; Van der Zee, Eddy A.; Meerlo, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Increased levels of angiogenesis and neurogenesis possibly mediate the beneficial effects of physical activity on hippocampal plasticity. This study was designed to investigate the temporal dynamics of exercise-induced changes in hippocampal angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Mice were housed with

  4. Hemodynamic Changes After Static and Dynamic Exercises and Treadmill Stress Test; Different Patterns in Patients with Primary Benign Exertional Headache?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Rostami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of primary benign exertional headache (EH is not still clearly defined. Some researchers have suggested an impaired vascular response as the etiology of this disorder. In this study we investigated whether there are any differences in blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR of the subjects in course of the static and dynamic exercises and the treadmill stress test between those with and without EH. From university students, 22 patients with EH (mean age: 19.8 ± 2.10, Female to Male: 7:15 and 20 normal subjects (mean age: 19.3 ± 1.97, Female: Male: 8:12 were recruited. All the subjects performed the static and dynamic exercises at 30 and 20 percent of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC and Bruce treadmill stress test according to the standard protocols. HR and BP of all the cases at the baseline and during and immediately after each test were measured. No significant difference was found between the mean rise of HR, systolic and diastolic BP of the subjects with and without EH in static and dynamic exercises and also treadmill stress test. It seems that between those with and without EH, there is no significant difference in rise of HR and BP response to static and dynamic exercises and treadmill stress test. Further studies are required to find the pathophysiology and risk factors of EH.

  5. Changes in human muscle oxygen saturation and mean fiber conduction velocity during intense dynamic exercise - effect of muscular training status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilen, Anders; Gizzi, Leonardo; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In this study we investigated whether an association exists between muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) and local muscle oxygen saturation (StO(2) ) in the superficial part of the latissimus dorsi muscle of runners and swimmers during exhaustive dynamic exercise. Methods: Partic...

  6. Exercise-mediated vasodilation in human obesity and metabolic syndrome: effect of acute ascorbic acid infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Kellawan, J. Mikhail; Harrell, John W.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Proctor, Lester T.; Sebranek, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that infusion of ascorbic acid (AA), a potent antioxidant, would alter vasodilator responses to exercise in human obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) was measured in lean, obese, and MetSyn adults (n = 39, 32 ± 2 yr). A brachial artery catheter was inserted for blood pressure monitoring and local infusion of AA. FBF was measured during dynamic handgrip exercise (15% maximal effort) with and without AA infusion. To account for group differences in blood pressure and forearm size, and to assess vasodilation, forearm vascular conductance (FVC = FBF/mean arterial blood pressure/lean forearm mass) was calculated. We examined the time to achieve steady-state FVC (mean response time, MRT) and the rise in FVC from rest to steady-state exercise (Δ, exercise − rest) before and during acute AA infusion. The MRT (P = 0.26) and steady-state vasodilator responses to exercise (ΔFVC, P = 0.31) were not different between groups. Intra-arterial infusion of AA resulted in a significant increase in plasma total antioxidant capacity (174 ± 37%). AA infusion did not alter MRT or steady-state FVC in any group (P = 0.90 and P = 0.85, respectively). Interestingly, higher levels of C-reactive protein predicted longer MRT (r = 0.52, P < 0.01) and a greater reduction in MRT with AA infusion (r = −0.43, P = 0.02). We concluded that AA infusion during moderate-intensity, rhythmic forearm exercise does not alter the time course or magnitude of exercise-mediated vasodilation in groups of young lean, obese, or MetSyn adults. However, systemic inflammation may limit the MRT to exercise, which can be improved with AA. PMID:25038148

  7. Hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Lee, Joshua F.; Berbert, Amanda; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Nativi-Nicolau, Jose; Stehlik, Josef; Richardson, Russell S.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms responsible for exercise intolerance in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), the present study sought to evaluate the hemodynamic responses to small muscle mass exercise in this cohort. In 25 HFrEF patients (64 ± 2 yr) and 17 healthy, age-matched control subjects (64 ± 2 yr), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), and limb blood flow were examined during graded static-intermittent handgrip (HG) and dynamic single-leg knee-extensor (KE) exercise. During HG exercise, MAP increased similarly between groups. CO increased significantly (+1.3 ± 0.3 l/min) in the control group, but it remained unchanged across workloads in HFrEF patients. At 15% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), forearm blood flow was similar between groups, while HFrEF patients exhibited an attenuated increase at the two highest intensities compared with controls, with the greatest difference at the highest workload (352 ± 22 vs. 492 ± 48 ml/min, HFrEF vs. control, 45% MVC). During KE exercise, MAP and CO increased similarly across work rates between groups. However, HFrEF patients exhibited a diminished leg hyperemic response across all work rates, with the most substantial decrement at the highest intensity (1,842 ± 64 vs. 2,675 ± 81 ml/min; HFrEF vs. control, 15 W). Together, these findings indicate a marked attenuation in exercising limb perfusion attributable to impairments in peripheral vasodilatory capacity during both arm and leg exercise in patients with HFrEF, which likely plays a role in limiting exercise capacity in this patient population. PMID:25260608

  8. Exercise-mediated vasodilation in human obesity and metabolic syndrome: effect of acute ascorbic acid infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Jacqueline K; Kellawan, J Mikhail; Harrell, John W; Johansson, Rebecca E; Eldridge, Marlowe W; Proctor, Lester T; Sebranek, Joshua J; Schrage, William G

    2014-09-15

    We tested the hypothesis that infusion of ascorbic acid (AA), a potent antioxidant, would alter vasodilator responses to exercise in human obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) was measured in lean, obese, and MetSyn adults (n = 39, 32 ± 2 yr). A brachial artery catheter was inserted for blood pressure monitoring and local infusion of AA. FBF was measured during dynamic handgrip exercise (15% maximal effort) with and without AA infusion. To account for group differences in blood pressure and forearm size, and to assess vasodilation, forearm vascular conductance (FVC = FBF/mean arterial blood pressure/lean forearm mass) was calculated. We examined the time to achieve steady-state FVC (mean response time, MRT) and the rise in FVC from rest to steady-state exercise (Δ, exercise - rest) before and during acute AA infusion. The MRT (P = 0.26) and steady-state vasodilator responses to exercise (ΔFVC, P = 0.31) were not different between groups. Intra-arterial infusion of AA resulted in a significant increase in plasma total antioxidant capacity (174 ± 37%). AA infusion did not alter MRT or steady-state FVC in any group (P = 0.90 and P = 0.85, respectively). Interestingly, higher levels of C-reactive protein predicted longer MRT (r = 0.52, P exercise does not alter the time course or magnitude of exercise-mediated vasodilation in groups of young lean, obese, or MetSyn adults. However, systemic inflammation may limit the MRT to exercise, which can be improved with AA. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Handgrip Dynamometry and Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment in Patients with Nonresectable Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, Ana T; Santos, Carla; Cravo, Marília; Vinhas, Maria do Céu; Morais, Catarina; Carolino, Elisabete; Mendes, Lino; Roldão Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Undernutrition is frequently associated with advanced lung cancer. Accurate nutritional assessment tools are important to provide the proper nutritional therapy. Handgrip dynamometry has already been used in these patients, and the findings suggest that it is a good indicator of nutritional status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between nutritional status and handgrip strength (HGS) in patients with nonresectable lung cancer. Cross-sectional study involving thirty-seven subjects with nonresectable lung cancer. Nutritional status was obtained using Patient Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA), and muscle function was evaluated by HGS using a Jamar® handgrip dynamometer on the nondominant hand. The results of both methods were compared and correlated. According to PG-SGA, 73% (n = 27) of the patients were moderately undernourished, and 8% (n = 3) were severely undernourished. In total, 81% (n = 30) were undernourished. HGS was below the 50th percentile in 57% of the patients (n = 21). We found a significant association between nutritional status according to PG-SGA and HGS (P = 0.026, CI = 95%). Handgrip dynamometry can be a useful tool to evaluate the functional and nutritional status. It can be included in lung cancer patients evaluation, along with other nutritional assessment tools.

  10. Acute effects of partial-body cryotherapy on isometric strength: maximum handgrip strength evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nardi, M; Pizzigalli, L; Benis, R; Caffaro, F; Cremasco, M Micheletti

    2017-01-20

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of a single partial-body cryotherapy (PBC) session on the maximum handgrip strength (JAMAR Hydraulic Hand dynamometer). Two hundred healthy adults were randomized into a PBC group and a control group (50 males and 50 females in each group). After the initial handgrip strength test (T0), the experimental group performed a 150 seconds session of PBC (temperature range between -130 and -160 °C), whilst the control group stayed in a thermo neutral room (22.0 ± 0.5 °C). Immediately after, both groups performed another handgrip strength test (T1). Data underlined that both groups showed an increase in handgrip strength values, especially the experimental group (Control: T0=39.48 kg, T1=40.01 kg; PBC: T0=39.61 kg, T1=41.34 kg). The analysis reported also a statistical effect related to gender (F=491.99, Pstrength values compared with males (females=30.43 kg, males=52.27 kg). Findings provide the first evidence that a single session of PBC leads to the improvement of muscle strength in healthy people. The results of the study implies that PBC could be performed also before a training session or a sport competition, to increase hand isometric strength.

  11. Effect of heliox on heart rate kinetics and dynamic hyperinflation during high-intensity exercise in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Valli, Gabriele; Onorati, Paolo; Paoletti, Patrizia; Ferrazza, Alessandro Maria; Palange, Paolo

    2011-02-01

    Respiratory mechanical abnormalities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may impair cardiodynamic responses and slow down heart rate (HR) kinetics compared with normal resulting in reduced convective oxygen delivery during exercise. We reasoned that heliox breathing (79% helium-21% oxygen) and the attendant reduction of operating lung volumes should accelerate HR kinetics in the transition from rest to high-intensity exercise. Eleven male ambulatory patients with clinically stable COPD undertook constant work-rate cycle testing at 80% of each individuals' maximum work capacity while breathing room air (RA) or heliox (HX), randomly. Mean response time (MRT) for HR and dynamic end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) were measured. Resting EELV was not affected by HX breathing, while exercise EELV decreased significantly by 0.23 L at isotime during HX breathing compared with RA. During HX breathing, MRT for HR significantly accelerated (p = 0.002) by an average of 20 s (i.e., 17%). Speeded MRT for HR correlated with indices of reduced lung hyperinflation, such as EELV at isotime (r = 0.88, p = 0.03), and with improved exercise endurance time (r = -0.64, p = 0.03). The results confirm that HX-induced reduction of dynamic lung hyperinflation is associated with consistent improvement in indices of cardio-circulatory function such as HR kinetics in the rest-to-exercise transition in COPD patients.

  12. Temporal dynamics of the circadian heart rate following low and high volume exercise training in sedentary male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Herbert F; Karmakar, C; Kiviniemi, A M; Hautala, A J; Tulppo, M P; Mäkikallio, T H; Huikuri, H V; Khandoker, A H; Palaniswami, M

    2015-10-01

    Increased risk of arrhythmic events occurs at certain times during the circadian cycle with the highest risk being in the second and fourth quarter of the day. Exercise improves treatment outcome in individuals with cardiovascular disease. How different exercise protocols affect the circadian rhythm and the associated decrease in adverse cardiovascular risk over the circadian cycle has not been shown. Fifty sedentary male participants were randomized into an 8-week high volume and moderate volume training and a control group. Heart rate was recorded using Polar Electronics and investigated with Cosinor analysis and by Poincaré plot derived features of SD1, SD2 and the complex correlation measure (CCM) at 1-h intervals over the 24-h period. Moderate exercise significantly increased vagal modulation and the temporal dynamics of the heart rate in the second quarter of the circadian cycle (p = 0.004 and p = 0.007 respectively). High volume exercise had a similar effect on vagal output (p = 0.003) and temporal dynamics (p = 0.003). Cosinor analysis confirms that the circadian heart rate displays a shift in the acrophage following moderate and high volume exercise from before waking (1st quarter) to after waking (2nd quarter of day). Our results suggest that exercise shifts vagal influence and increases temporal dynamics of the heart rate to the 2nd quarter of the day and suggest that this may be the underlying physiological change leading to a decrease in adverse arrhythmic events during this otherwise high-risk period.

  13. Association Between Orthostatic Hypotension and Handgrip Strength With Successful Rehabilitation in Elderly Hip Fracture Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, L C; Winters, A M; Roijen, H; Kamper, A M; Inia, H; Kleefstra, N; Bilo, H J G; van Hateren, K J J

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between orthostatic hypotension (OH) and muscle strength versus time to successful rehabilitation within elderly patients with hip fracture. A prospective, observational cohort study. Handgrip strength was measured at the day of admission and OH as soon as possible after surgery. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to investigate the relationship between OH or handgrip strength (kg) and time to successful rehabilitation, expressed as hazard ratios (HRs). OH was defined as a decrease in systolic blood pressure of ≥20mmHg or diastolic blood pressure of ≥10mmHg after postural change (dichotomous). Handgrip strength was measured with a hand dynamometer (continuous). General hospital. Patients (N=116) aged ≥70 years with a hip fracture were recruited on the day of hospital admission. Not applicable. Primary outcome was time to successful rehabilitation, which was defined as discharge to patients' own homes. During a median follow-up period of 36 days (interquartile range, 9-57d), 103 patients (89%) were successfully rehabilitated. No statistically significant relationships were found between OH and time to successful rehabilitation (HR=1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], .67-1.66). Also, handgrip strength and successful rehabilitation were not statistically significantly related (HR=1.03; 95% CI, .99-1.06). OH measured during the first days of hospitalization is not related to time to successful rehabilitation in patients with hip fracture who have undergone surgery. Although no significant relationship was seen in the present study, the width of the CIs does not exclude a relevant relationship between handgrip strength and time to successful rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic dyssynchrony and impaired contractile reserve of the left ventricle in beta-thalassaemia major: an exercise echocardiographic study.

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    Yiu-fai Cheung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Performance of the left ventricle during exercise stress in thalassaemia patients is uncertain. We aimed to explore the phenomenon of dynamic dyssynchrony and assess contractile reserve in patients with beta-thalassaemia major and determine their relationships with myocardial iron load. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty-two thalassaemia patients (16 males, aged 26.8 ± 6.9 years, without heart failure and 17 healthy controls were studied. Their left ventricular (LV volumes, ejection fraction, systolic dyssynchrony index (SDI, and myocardial acceleration during isovolumic LV contraction (IVA were determined at rest and during submaximal bicycle exercise testing using 3-dimensional and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Myocardial iron load as assessed by T2* cardiac magnetic resonance in patients were further related to indices of LV dyssynchrony and contractile reserve. At rest, patients had significantly greater LV SDI (p4.6%, control+2SD increased from baseline 25% to 84% in patients. Δ SDI(exercise-baseline correlated with exercise-baseline differences in LV ejection fraction (p<0.001 and stroke volume (p = 0.006. Compared with controls, patients had significantly less exercise-induced increase in LV ejection fraction, cardiac index, and IVA (interaction, all p<0.05 and had impaired contractile reserve as reflected by the gentler IVA-heart rate slope (p = 0.018. Cardiac T2* in patients correlated with baseline LV SDI (r = -0.44, p = 0.011 and IVA-heart rate slope (r = 0.36, p = 0.044. CONCLUSIONS: Resting LV dyssynchrony is associated with myocardial iron load. Exercise stress further unveils LV dynamic dyssynchrony and impaired contractile reserve in patients with beta-thalassaemia major.

  15. Physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics and alters apoptotic, dynamic and auto(mito)phagy markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Aleixo, I; Santos-Alves, E; Balça, M M; Rizo-Roca, D; Moreira, P I; Oliveira, P J; Magalhães, J; Ascensão, A

    2015-08-20

    We here investigate the effects of two exercise modalities (endurance treadmill training-TM and voluntary free-wheel activity-FW) on the brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics, permeability transition pore (mPTP), oxidative stress, as well as on proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, apoptosis, and quality control. Eighteen male rats were assigned to sedentary-SED, TM and FW groups. Behavioral alterations and ex vivo brain mitochondrial function endpoints were assessed. Proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, including the adenine nucleotide translocator), oxidative stress markers and regulatory proteins (SIRT3, p66shc, UCP2, carbonyls, MDA, -SH, aconitase, Mn-SOD), as well as proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC1α, TFAM) were evaluated. Apoptotic signaling was measured through quantifying caspase 3, 8 and 9-like activities, Bax, Bcl2, CypD, and cofilin expression. Mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1/2, OPA1 and DRP1) and auto(mito)phagy (LC3II, Beclin1, Pink1, Parkin, p62)-related proteins were also measured by Western blotting. Only the TM exercise group showed increased spontaneous alternation and exploratory activity. Both exercise regimens improved mitochondrial respiratory activity, increased OXPHOS complexes I, III and V subunits in both brain subareas and decreased oxidative stress markers. Increased resistance to mPTP and decreased apoptotic signaling were observed in the brain cortex from TM and in the cerebellum from TM and FW groups. Also, exercise increased the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and fusion, simultaneous with decreased expression of mitochondrial fission-related protein DRP1. In conclusion, physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial function, decreasing oxidative stress and apoptotic related markers. It is also possible that favorable alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy signaling induced by exercise

  16. Dynamic of arm’s micro movements of elite athlete in Olympic exercises Rapid Fire Pistol and Air Pistol

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    Pyatkov V.T.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to scientifically substantiate the method of contactless determination of athlete hand’s movements in Olympic exercises with pistol. Material: in the research we used the data of 37 elite athletes in exercise Air Pistol (n=32 and in exercise Rapid Fire Pistol (n=5. Registration of pistol projection’s quickness of movement in target area was realized with the help of computer system Scatt. In total we analyzed 3100 space-time parameters of athletes’ technical-tactic actions in finalizing phase of shooting cycle. Results: we tested innovative method of contactless measuring of athlete’s hand’s micro movements in finalizing phase of shooting cycle. We found uncontrolled deviations from optimal pistol pointing position in vertical, horizontal and sagittal planes. Quickness of athlete hand’s movements in shooting process was determined. Conclusions: we scientifically substantiated the method of contactless determination of athlete hand’s movements at a distance in Olympic exercises with pistol. Besides, we determined the dynamic of athlete’s hand micro movements in Olympic exercises Rapid Fire Pistol та Air Pistol.

  17. The Effects of the Disturbance of the Vestibular System on the Dynamic Balance of Idiopathic Scoliotic Subjects with and Without Exercise Therapy Compared to Healthy Subjects

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    N. Farahpour

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the neuromuscular system’s disorders in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS are not well known. The objectives of this study were to assess the dynamic balance of the AIS patients and the influence of exercise therapy on patients' dynamic balance. Eleven teenager scoliotic subjects after three months exercise therapy, nine similar patients without therapy and 13 healthy age matched subjects as control group were studied. Using dynamic stability platform, the deviation of COG of subjects in different positions, including up right standing, standing with head flexion and standing with head hyper extension were measured. The tests were repeated in both lose and stable condition of the foot platform. Results showed that the stability of the foot platform resulted in COG's deviation by 1.13 0.08 in all subjects. Dynamic balance of scoliotic patients without treatment was similar to that of the normal subjects. While, exercised patients had less COG deviation than the other groups. The change in head position increased the COG deviation by 2.5 times in control and non-exercised patients and 1.5 times in exercised patients. The dynamic balance in scoliosis was not affected. Exercise improved the dynamic balance in scoliotic subjects. Exercise therapy is recommended to improve the proprioceptives function.

  18. Dynamic proteome profiling of individual proteins in human skeletal muscle after a high-fat diet and resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Donny M; Burniston, Jatin G; Pogson, Mark A; Smiles, William J; Hawley, John A

    2017-08-30

    It is generally accepted that muscle adaptation to resistance exercise (REX) training is underpinned by contraction-induced, increased rates of protein synthesis and dietary protein availability. By using dynamic proteome profiling (DPP), we investigated the contribution of both synthesis and breakdown to changes in abundance on a protein-by-protein basis in human skeletal muscle. Age-matched, overweight males consumed 9 d of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet during which time they either undertook 3 sessions of REX or performed no exercise. Precursor enrichment and the rate of incorporation of deuterium oxide into newly synthesized muscle proteins were determined by mass spectrometry. Ninety proteins were included in the DPP, with 28 proteins exhibiting significant responses to REX. The most common pattern of response was an increase in turnover, followed by an increase in abundance with no detectable increase in protein synthesis. Here, we provide novel evidence that demonstrates that the contribution of synthesis and breakdown to changes in protein abundance induced by REX differ on a protein-by-protein basis. We also highlight the importance of the degradation of individual muscle proteins after exercise in human skeletal muscle.-Camera, D. M., Burniston, J. G., Pogson, M. A., Smiles, W. J., Hawley, J. A. Dynamic proteome profiling of individual proteins in human skeletal muscle after a high-fat diet and resistance exercise. © FASEB.

  19. Influencia de la fuerza muscular isométrica de las extremidades superiores en el estrés oxidativo en niños. (Influence of handgrip strength in oxidative stress in children.

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    Manuel Guillén-del Castillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl ejercicio físico puede producir estrés oxidativo en el individuo lo que pueden condicionar el riesgo cardiovascular en niños y adolescentes. Este estudio pretende analizar el estrés oxidativo según la fuerza muscular isométrica de las extremidades superiores en la edad pediátrica. Se estudiaron 70 niños sanos con edades entre 10 y 14 años, y se analizaron en saliva los lipoperóxidos (LPO, el glutatión reducido (GSH, la ratio GSH/LPO y la catalasa, como marcadores de estrés oxidativo. La muestra se dividió en dos grupos según una condición física superior o inferior medida a través de dinamometría manual (TKK 5110; se diferenció la serie en sujetos prepuberales y puberales. Se encontraron niveles significativamente inferiores de GSH y GSH/LPO en el grupo de niños con fuerza superior, y en los puberales con la mismas características; estos resultados podrían indicar la existencia de un mayor estrés oxidativo en esta situación. En conclusión, los mayores niveles de fuerza músculo esquelética, medida a través de dinamometría manual, posiblemente pueden estar asociados a un mayor estrés oxidativo en niños púberes con condición física musculoesquelética superior.AbstractPhysical exercise can produce oxidative stress, this situation could contribute cardiovascular risk in children and adolescents. The following study tries to evaluate the oxidative stress produced according to the handgrip strength in infancy. 70 healthy male subjects, ages 10 to 14 years, were studied. In the saliva samples, lipoperoxides (LPO, reduced glutathione (GSH, glutathione/lipoperoxides ratio and catalase were analyzed as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Children were divided into two groups according to their handgrip strength (high or low measured by handgrip strength (TKK 5110. The groups were also divided into prepubertal and pubertal subjects. We found GSH’s significantly low levels and of GSH/LPO in pubertal group with high

  20. Associations between Handgrip Strength and Ultrasound-Measured Muscle Thickness of the Hand and Forearm in Young Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takashi; Counts, Brittany R; Barnett, Brian E; Dankel, Scott J; Lee, Kofan; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2015-08-01

    It is unknown whether muscle size of intrinsic hand muscles is associated with handgrip strength. To investigate the relationships between handgrip strength and flexor muscle size of the hand and forearm, muscle thickness (MT) of 86 young adults (43 men and 43 women) between the ages of 18 and 34 y was measured by ultrasound. Two MTs (forearm radius and forearm ulna MT) in the anterior forearm, two MTs (lumbrical and dorsal interosseous MT) in the anterior hand and handgrip strength were measured on the right side. Linear regression with part (also referred to as semipartial) correlation coefficients revealed that forearm ulna MT positively correlated with handgrip strength in both men (part = 0.379, p = 0.001) and women (part = 0.268, p = 0.002). Dorsal interosseous MT correlated with handgrip strength in women only (part = 0.289, p = 0.001). Our results suggest that the forearm ulna and dorsal interosseous MTs for women and forearm ulna MTs for men are factors contributing to prediction of handgrip strength in young adults. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Semi-LASER localized dynamic 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in exercising muscle at ultra-high magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerspeer, Martin; Scheenen, Tom; Schmid, Albrecht Ingo; Mandl, Thomas; Unger, Ewald; Moser, Ewald

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can benefit from increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of high magnetic fields. In this work, the SNR gain of dynamic 31P MRS at 7 T was invested in temporal and spatial resolution. Using conventional slice selective excitation combined with localization by adiabatic selective refocusing (semi-LASER) with short echo time (TE = 23 ms), phosphocreatine quantification in a 38 mL voxel inside a single exercising muscle becomes possible from single acquisitions, with SNR = 42 ± 4 in resting human medial gastrocnemius. The method was used to quantify the phosphocreatine time course during 5 min of plantar flexion exercise and recovery with a temporal resolution of 6 s (the chosen repetition time for moderate T1 saturation). Quantification of inorganic phosphate and pH required accumulation of consecutively acquired spectra when (resting) Pi concentrations were low. The localization performance was excellent while keeping the chemical shift displacement acceptably small. The SNR and spectral line widths with and without localization were compared between 3T and 7 T systems in phantoms and in vivo. The results demonstrate that increased sensitivity of ultra-high field can be used to dynamically acquire metabolic information from a clearly defined region in a single exercising muscle while reaching a temporal resolution previously available with MRS in non-localizing studies only. The method may improve the interpretation of dynamic muscle MRS data.

  2. Heart Rate Dynamics after Exercise in Cardiac Patients with and without Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Victor R; Kiviniemi, Antti M; Hautala, Arto J; Karjalainen, Jaana; Piira, Olli-Pekka; Catai, Aparecida M; Mäkikallio, Timo H; Huikuri, Heikki Veli; Tulppo, Mikko P

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular events is higher in coronary artery disease patients with type 2 diabetes (CAD + T2D) than in CAD patients without T2D. There is increasing evidence that the recovery phase after exercise is a vulnerable phase for various cardiovascular events. We hypothesized that autonomic regulation differs in CAD patients with and without T2D during post-exercise condition. A symptom-limited maximal exercise test on a bicycle ergometer was performed for 68 CAD + T2D patients (age 61 ± 5 years, 78% males, ejection fraction (EF) 67 ± 8, 100% on β-blockade), and 64 CAD patients (age 62 ± 5 years, 80% males, EF 64 ± 8, 100% on β-blockade). Heart rate (HR) recovery after exercise was calculated as the slope of HR during the first 60 s after cessation of exercise (HRR(slope)). R-R intervals were measured before (5 min) and after exercise from 3 to 8 min, both in a supine position. R-R intervals were analyzed using time and frequency methods and a detrended fluctuation method (α(1)). BMI was 30 ± 4 vs. 27 ± 3 kg m(2) (p exercise capacity, 6.5 ± 1.7 vs. 7.7 ± 1.9 METs (p exercise condition. HR recovery is delayed in CAD + T2D patients, suggesting impairment of vagal activity and/or augmented sympathetic activity after exercise. Blunted HR recovery after exercise in diabetic patients compared with non-diabetic patients is more closely related to low exercise capacity and obesity than to T2D itself.

  3. Primary Motor Cortex Representation of Handgrip Muscles in Patients with Leprosy.

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    Vagner Wilian Batista E Sá

    Full Text Available Leprosy is an endemic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that predominantly attacks the skin and peripheral nerves, leading to progressive impairment of motor, sensory and autonomic function. Little is known about how this peripheral neuropathy affects corticospinal excitability of handgrip muscles. Our purpose was to explore the motor cortex organization after progressive peripheral nerve injury and upper-limb dysfunction induced by leprosy using noninvasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS.In a cross-sectional study design, we mapped bilaterally in the primary motor cortex (M1 the representations of the hand flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS, as well as of the intrinsic hand muscles abductor pollicis brevis (APB, first dorsal interosseous (FDI and abductor digiti minimi (ADM. All participants underwent clinical assessment, handgrip dynamometry and motor and sensory nerve conduction exams 30 days before mapping. Wilcoxon signed rank and Mann-Whitney tests were performed with an alpha-value of p<0.05.Dynamometry performance of the patients' most affected hand (MAH, was worse than that of the less affected hand (LAH and of healthy controls participants (p = 0.031, confirming handgrip impairment. Motor threshold (MT of the FDS muscle was higher in both hemispheres in patients as compared to controls, and lower in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH when compared to that of the LAH. Moreover, motor evoked potential (MEP amplitudes collected in the FDS of the MAH were higher in comparison to those of controls. Strikingly, MEPs in the intrinsic hand muscle FDI had lower amplitudes in the hemisphere contralateral to MAH as compared to those of the LAH and the control group. Taken together, these results are suggestive of a more robust representation of an extrinsic hand flexor and impaired intrinsic hand muscle function in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH due to leprosy.Decreased sensory-motor function induced by

  4. Primary Motor Cortex Representation of Handgrip Muscles in Patients with Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Maria Luíza Sales; Sanchez, Tiago Arruda; Moreira, Filipe Azaline; Hoefle, Sebastian; Souto, Inaiacy Bittencourt; da Cunha, Antônio José Ledo Alves

    2015-01-01

    Background Leprosy is an endemic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that predominantly attacks the skin and peripheral nerves, leading to progressive impairment of motor, sensory and autonomic function. Little is known about how this peripheral neuropathy affects corticospinal excitability of handgrip muscles. Our purpose was to explore the motor cortex organization after progressive peripheral nerve injury and upper-limb dysfunction induced by leprosy using noninvasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods In a cross-sectional study design, we mapped bilaterally in the primary motor cortex (M1) the representations of the hand flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), as well as of the intrinsic hand muscles abductor pollicis brevis (APB), first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM). All participants underwent clinical assessment, handgrip dynamometry and motor and sensory nerve conduction exams 30 days before mapping. Wilcoxon signed rank and Mann-Whitney tests were performed with an alpha-value of p<0.05. Findings Dynamometry performance of the patients’ most affected hand (MAH), was worse than that of the less affected hand (LAH) and of healthy controls participants (p = 0.031), confirming handgrip impairment. Motor threshold (MT) of the FDS muscle was higher in both hemispheres in patients as compared to controls, and lower in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH when compared to that of the LAH. Moreover, motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes collected in the FDS of the MAH were higher in comparison to those of controls. Strikingly, MEPs in the intrinsic hand muscle FDI had lower amplitudes in the hemisphere contralateral to MAH as compared to those of the LAH and the control group. Taken together, these results are suggestive of a more robust representation of an extrinsic hand flexor and impaired intrinsic hand muscle function in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH due to leprosy. Conclusion Decreased

  5. Voice and handgrip strength predict reproductive success in a group of indigenous African females.

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    Jeremy Atkinson

    Full Text Available Evolutionary accounts of human traits are often based on proxies for genetic fitness (e.g., number of sex partners, facial attractiveness. Instead of using proxies, actual differences in reproductive success is a more direct measure of darwinian fitness. Certain voice acoustics such as fundamental frequency and measures of health such as handgrip strength correlate with proxies of fitness, yet there are few studies showing the relation of these traits to reproduction. Here, we explore whether the fundamental frequency of the voice and handgrip strength account for differences in actual reproduction among a population of natural fertility humans. Our results show that both fundamental frequency and handgrip strength predict several measures of reproductive success among a group of indigenous Namibian females, particularly amongst the elderly, with weight also predicting reproductive outcomes among males. These findings demonstrate that both hormonally regulated and phenotypic quality markers can be used as measures of darwinian fitness among humans living under conditions that resemble the evolutionary environment of Homo sapiens. We also argue that these findings provide support for the Grandmother Hypothesis.

  6. Exercise induced capillary growth in human skeletal muscle and the dynamics of VEGF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte; Hellsten, Ylva

    2014-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, growth of capillaries is an important adaptation to exercise training that secures adequate diffusion capacity for oxygen and nutrients even at high intensity exercise when increases in muscle blood flow are profound. Mechanical forces present during muscle activity, such as s...

  7. Interstitial pH in human skeletal muscle during and after dynamic graded exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Street, D; Bangsbo, Jens; Juel, Carsten

    2001-01-01

    In this study a new method has been used to measure interstitial pH continuously in human muscle during graded exercise. Human subjects performed 5 min of one-legged knee-extensor exercise at power outputs of 30, 50 and 70 W. Muscle interstitial pH was measured continuously in microdialysis...

  8. Blood flow and oxygenation in peritendinous tissue and calf muscle during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, H; Green, Sara Marie Ehrenreich

    2000-01-01

    1. Circulation around tendons may act as a shunt for muscle during exercise. The perfusion and oxygenation of Achilles' peritendinous tissue was measured in parallel with that of calf muscle during exercise to determine (1) whether blood flow is restricted in peritendinous tissue during exercise...... with a rise in leg vascular conductance and microvascular haemoglobin volume, despite elevated systemic vascular resistance. 4. The parallel rise in calf muscle and peritendinous blood flow and fall in O2 saturation during exercise indicate that blood flow is coupled to oxidative metabolism in both tissue...... by dye dilution, arterial pressure by an arterial catheter-transducer, and muscle and peritendinous O2 saturation by spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS). 3. Calf blood flow rose 20-fold with exercise, reaching 44 +/- 7 ml (100 g)-1 min-1 (mean +/- s.e.m. ) at 9 W, while Achilles' peritendinous flow...

  9. Exercise of mechanisms of dynamic stability improves the stability state after an unexpected gait perturbation in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Stefanie; Peper, Andreas; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2013-10-01

    Unexpected changes during gait challenge elderly individuals to a greater degree than young adults. However, the adaptive potential of elderly seems to be retained, and therefore, the training of the mechanisms of dynamic stability as well as muscle strength training may improve the dynamic stability after unexpected perturbations. Thirty-eight subjects (65-75 years) participated in the study, divided into two experimental groups (stability training group, ST, n = 14 and mixed training group, MT, n = 14) and a control group (CG, n = 10). Both experimental groups performed exercises which focused on the mechanisms of dynamic stability. Additionally, the MT group executed a training to improve muscle strength. Session volume and duration were equal for both groups (14 weeks, twice a week, ~1.5 h per session). Pre- and post-intervention, subjects performed a gait protocol with an induced unexpected perturbation. Post-intervention, the margin of stability was significantly increased after the unexpected perturbation in the ST group, indicating an improvement in stability state (pre, -30.3 ± 5.9 cm; post, -24.1 ± 5.2 cm). Further, both intervention groups increased their base of support after the intervention to regain balance after gait perturbation, whereas only the ST group showed a statistically significant improvement (STpre, 90.9 ± 6.6 cm, STpost, 98.2 ± 8.5 cm; MTpre, 91.4 ± 6.2 cm; MTpost, 97.9 ± 12.7 cm). The CG showed no differences between pre- and post-measurements. The exercise of the mechanisms of dynamic stability led to a better application of these mechanisms after an unexpected perturbation during gait. We suggest that the repeated exercise of the mechanisms of dynamic stability contributes to significant improvements in postural stability. Additional strength training for healthy elderly individuals, however, shows no further effect on the ability to recover balance after unexpected perturbations during gait.

  10. Localized Semi-LASER Dynamic 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the Soleus During and Following Exercise at 7 T

    CERN Document Server

    Fiedler, Georg B; Schmid, Albrecht I; Goluch, Sigrun; Schewzow, Kiril; Laistler, Elmar; Mirzahosseini, Arash; Niess, Fabian; Unger, Ewald; Wolzt, Michael; Moser, Ewald

    2015-01-01

    Object This study demonstrates the applicability of semi-LASER localized dynamic $^{31}$P MRS to deeper lying areas of the exercising human soleus muscle (SOL). The effect of accurate localization and high temporal resolution on data specificity is investigated. Materials and Methods To achieve high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at a temporal resolution of 6 s, a custom-built calf coil array was used at 7T. The kinetics of phosphocreatine (PCr) and intracellular pH were quantified separately in SOL and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle of 9 volunteers, during rest, plantar flexion exercise and recovery. Results The average SNR of PCr at rest was 64$\\pm$15 in SOL (83$\\pm$12 in GM). End exercise PCr depletion in SOL (19$\\pm$9%) was far lower than in GM (74$\\pm$14%). pH in SOL increased rapidly and, in contrast to GM, remained elevated until the end of exercise. Conclusion $^{31}$P MRS in single-shots every 6 s localized in the deeper lying SOL enabled quantification of PCr recovery times at low depletions and of...

  11. The effects of creatine pyruvate and creatine citrate on performance during high intensity exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purpura Martin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study was performed to evaluate the effect of oral creatine pyruvate (Cr-Pyr and creatine citrate (Cr-Cit supplementation on exercise performance in healthy young athletes. Methods Performance during intermittent handgrip exercise of maximal intensity was evaluated before (pretest and after (posttest 28 days of Cr-Pyr (5 g/d, n = 16, Cr-Cit (5 g/d, n = 16 or placebo (pla, 5 g/d, n = 17 intake. Subjects performed ten 15-sec exercise intervals, each followed by 45 sec rest periods. Results Cr-Pyr (p Conclusion It is concluded that four weeks of Cr-Pyr and Cr-Cit intake significantly improves performance during intermittent handgrip exercise of maximal intensity and that Cr-Pyr might benefit endurance, due to enhanced activity of the aerobic metabolism.

  12. Peak expiratory flow mediates the relationship between handgrip strength and timed up and go performance in elderly women, but not men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; Cucato, Gabriel Grizzo; de Mello Franco, Fábio Gazelato; Cendoroglo, Maysa Seabra; Nasri, Fábio; Monteiro-Costa, Maria Luiza; de Carvalho, José Antonio Maluf; de Matos, Luciana Diniz Nagem Janot

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify if there is sex difference in the associations among handgrip strength, peak expiratory flow (PEF) and timed up and go (TUG) test results. The sample included 288 consecutive elderly men (n=93) and women (n=195). Functional capacity was measured using the TUG test, and muscle strength was measured based on handgrip. Moreover, as a measure of current health status, PEF was evaluated. Linear regression procedures were performed to analyze the relationships between handgrip and both PEF and TUG test results, with adjustment for confounders, and to identify the possible mediating role of PEF in the association between handgrip strength and TUG test results. In men, handgrip strength was associated with both PEF and TUG performance (p<0.01). After adjustment for PEF, the relationship between handgrip strength and TUG performance remained significant. In women, handgrip strength was also associated with both PEF and TUG performance (p<0.01). However, after adjustment for PEF, the relationship between handgrip strength and TUG performance was no longer significant. Mobility in the elderly is sex dependent. In particular, PEF mediates the relationship between handgrip strength and TUG performance in women, but not in men.

  13. Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, S; Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D

    2000-01-01

    little information on the response of [K+]I to exercise in human skeletal muscle. Five young healthy subjects performed plantar flexion exercise for four 5 min periods at increasing power outputs ( approximately 1-6 W) with 10 min intervening recovery periods, as well as for two 5 min periods......Changes in the concentration of interstitial K+ surrounding skeletal muscle fibres ([K+]I) probably play some role in the regulation of cardiovascular adjustments to muscular activity, as well as in the aetiology of muscle pain and fatigue during high-intensity exercise. However, there is very...... with ischaemia at approximately 1 and approximately 3 W. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the gastrocnemius medialis muscle of the right leg to measure [K+]I, and K+ release from the plantar flexors during and after incremental exercise was calculated from plasma flow and arterial-venous differences for K...

  14. Heat stress redistributes blood flow in arteries of the brain during dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kohei; Oue, Anna; Yoneya, Marina; Sadamoto, Tomoko; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that heat stress would decrease anterior and posterior cerebral blood flow (CBF) during exercise, and the reduction in anterior CBF would be partly associated with large increase in extracranial blood flow (BF). Nine subjects performed 40 min of semirecumbent cycling at 60% of the peak oxygen uptake in hot (35°C; Heat) and thermoneutral environments (25°C; Control). We evaluated BF and conductance (COND) in the external carotid artery (ECA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and vertebral artery (VA) using ultrasonography. During the Heat condition, ICA and VA BF were significantly increased 10 min after the start of exercise (P brain arteries to exercise, which resulted in an alteration in the distribution of cardiac output. Moreover, a hyperthermia-induced increase in extracranial BF might compromise anterior CBF during exercise with heat stress.

  15. Effects of dynamic exercise on plasma arachidonic acid epoxides and diols in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Rose M; Newman, John W; Pedersen, Theresa L; Ramos, Marisa I; Stebbins, Charles L

    2011-12-01

    Metabolites of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathway may contribute to vasodilation of the vasculature. However, it is not known whether exercise affects their circulating concentrations. The authors determined effects of exercise intensity and duration on plasma concentrations of epoxy and dihydroxy metabolites of arachidonic acid. Their goal was to delineate the threshold workload, optimal workload, and duration required to produce increases in plasma concentrations of these vasoactive substances. Healthy volunteers (N = 14) performed maximal exercise testing on a bicycle ergometer during Visit 1. On separate days, subjects cycled for 20 min at 30%, 60%, and 80% of their maximal exercise intensity. The last day consisted of 40 min of exercise at 60% of maximal exercise intensity. Venous blood was obtained before, during, and after exercise for analysis. Compared with rest, increases were observed during the 80% workload at 20 min postexercise -14,15-DHET (0.77 ± 0.21 vs. 0.93 ± 0.27 nM) - and at 2 min postexercise: 11,12-DHET (0.64 ± 0.22 vs. 0.71 ± 0.24 nM; p < .05). Also compared with rest, 40-min values during the 60% workload were 14,15-DHET 0.79 ± 0.22 vs. 0.91 ± 0.31 nM and at 2 min post 14,15 EET 0.12 ± 0.06 vs. 0.21 ± 0.16 nM (p < .05). Results suggest the CYP metabolites (i.e., DHETs) are released during short-term high-intensity and long-term moderate-intensity exercise.

  16. Forearm vasoconstriction during dynamic leg exercise in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, J J; Dryburgh, L G; Thomson, H L; Moore, T D; Wright, K N; Muehle, G W; Fitzpatrick, L E; Frenneaux, M P

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies assessing vascular responses in nonexercising beds during exercise in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) have yielded varying results. We proposed that the clinical and hemodynamic severity of heart failure may explain some of the variation. We reasoned that diastolic ventricular interaction (DVI), by limiting the ability of such patients to increase left ventricular (LV) volume and stroke volume during exercise, would attenuate baroreflex activation, resulting in increased sympathetic activation and hence exaggerated vasoconstriction. We hypothesized therefore that vasoconstriction in nonexercising beds would be exaggerated in patients with symptomatic and hemodynamically severe heart failure, particularly if associated with DVI. We measured forearm vascular resistance (FVR) during semierect cycle exercise in 22 CHF patients and 23 control subjects. DVI was assessed by measuring changes in ventricular volumes (radionuclide ventriculography) during volume unloading (-30 mm Hg lower-body negative pressure) in the heart failure patients and was inferred when LV end-diastolic volume paradoxically increased. Patients with symptoms of heart failure developed larger increases in FVR during exercise than did asymptomatic patients. There were significant correlations between the change in FVR during peak exercise and the resting mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. CHF patients with DVI developed exaggerated increases in FVR (median [25th to 75th percentile]) compared with the remaining patients during low-workload exercise (138 [66 to 171] vs 6.4 [-4.3 to 28] units, P = 0.002) and during peak exercise (160 [90 to 384] vs 61 [-7.4 to 75] units, P < 0.02). Vasoconstriction in nonexercising beds is exaggerated in CHF patients with clinically and hemodynamically severe heart failure, particularly if associated with DVI. This may explain some of the reported variation in the degree of sympathetic activation that occurs

  17. Obesity and Prader-Willi Syndrome Affect Heart Rate Recovery from Dynamic Resistance Exercise in Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diobel M. Castner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following exercise, heart rate decline is initially driven by parasympathetic reactivation and later by sympathetic withdrawal. Obesity delays endurance exercise heart rate recovery (HRR in both children and adults. Young people with Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS, a congenital cause for obesity, have shown a slower 60-s endurance exercise HRR compared to lean and obese children, suggesting compromised regulation. This study further evaluated effects of obesity and PWS on resistance exercise HRR at 30 and 60 s in children. PWS (8–18 years and lean and obese controls (8–11 years completed a weighted step-up protocol (six sets x 10 reps per leg, separated by one-minute rest, standardized using participant stature and lean body mass. HRR was evaluated by calculated HRR value (HRRV = difference between HR at test termination and 30 (HRRV30 and 60 (HRRV60 s post-exercise. PWS and obese had a smaller HRRV30 than lean (p < 0.01 for both. Additionally, PWS had a smaller HRRV60 than lean and obese (p = 0.01 for both. Obesity appears to delay early parasympathetic reactivation, which occurs within 30 s following resistance exercise. However, the continued HRR delay at 60 s in PWS may be explained by either blunted parasympathetic nervous system reactivation, delayed sympathetic withdrawal and/or poor cardiovascular fitness.

  18. Dynamics of corticospinal changes during and after high-intensity quadriceps exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruet, Mathieu; Temesi, John; Rupp, Thomas; Levy, Patrick; Verges, Samuel; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2014-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that during fatiguing quadriceps exercise, supraspinal fatigue develops late, is associated with both increased corticospinal excitability and inhibition and recovers quickly. Eight subjects performed 20 s contractions [15 s at 50% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) followed by 5 s MVC] separated by a 10 s rest period until task failure. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrical femoral nerve stimulation (PNS) were delivered ∼ 2 s apart during 50% MVC, during MVC and after MVC in relaxed muscle. Voluntary activation was assessed by TMS (VATMS) immediately before and after exercise and then three times over a 6 min recovery period. During exercise, MVC and twitch force evoked by PNS in relaxed muscle decreased progressively to 48 ± 8 and 36 ± 16% of control values, respectively (both P MVC were observed during the last quarter of exercise only (from 96.4 ± 1.7 to 86 ± 13%, P = 0.03 and from 0.76 ± 0.8 to 4.9 ± 4.7% MVC, P = 0.02, from baseline to task failure, respectively). The TMS-induced silent period increased linearly during both MVC (by ∼ 79 ms) and 50% MVC (by ∼ 63 ms; both P MVC and twitch force evoked by PNS in relaxed muscle recovered to only 84 ± 9 and 73 ± 17% of control values 6 min after exercise, respectively. In conclusion, high-intensity single-joint quadriceps exercise induces supraspinal fatigue near task failure, with increased intracortical inhibition and, in contrast to previous upper-limb results, unchanged corticospinal excitability. These changes recover rapidly after task failure, emphasizing the need to measure corticospinal adaptations immediately at task failure to avoid underestimation of exercise-induced corticospinal changes.

  19. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmento AO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adriana de Oliveira Sarmento,1–3 Amilton da Cruz Santos,1,4 Ivani Credidio Trombetta,2,5 Marciano Moacir Dantas,1 Ana Cristina Oliveira Marques,1,4 Leone Severino do Nascimento,1,4 Bruno Teixeira Barbosa,1,2 Marcelo Rodrigues Dos Santos,2 Maria do Amparo Andrade,3 Anna Myrna Jaguaribe-Lima,3,6 Maria do Socorro Brasileiro-Santos1,3,4 1Laboratory of Physical Training Studies Applied to Health, Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa, Brazil; 2Unit of Cardiovascular Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology – Heart Institute (InCor/HC-FMUSP, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Graduate Program in Physiotherapy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil; 4Associate Graduate Program in Physical Education UPE/UFPB, João Pessoa, Brazil; 5Graduate Program in Medicine, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE, São Paulo, Brazil; 6Department of Morphology and Animal Physiology, Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control and muscle vasodilation response during isometric exercise in sedentary and physically active older adults. Twenty healthy participants, 10 sedentary and 10 physically active older adults, were evaluated and paired by gender, age, and body mass index. Sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac activity (spectral and symbolic heart rate analysis and muscle blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography were measured for 10 minutes at rest (baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric handgrip exercise at 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (sympathetic excitatory maneuver. Variables were analyzed at baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric exercise. Cardiac autonomic parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann–Whitney tests. Muscle vasodilatory response was analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Sedentary older adults had higher cardiac

  20. ACUTE EFFECTS OF STATIC STRETCHING, DYNAMIC EXERCISES, AND HIGH VOLUME UPPER EXTREMITY PLYOMETRIC ACTIVITY ON TENNIS SERVE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertugrul Gelen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of static stretching; dynamic exercises and high volume upper extremity plyometric activity on tennis serve performance. Twenty-six elite young tennis players (15.1 ± 4.2 years, 167.9 ± 5.8 cm and 61.6 ± 8.1 kg performed 4 different warm-up (WU routines in a random order on non-consecutive days. The WU methods consisted of traditional WU (jogging, rally and serve practice (TRAD; traditional WU and static stretching (TRSS; traditional WU and dynamic exercise (TRDE; and traditional WU and high volume upper extremity plyometric activity (TRPLYP. Following each WU session, subjects were tested on a tennis serve ball speed test. TRAD, TRSS, TRDE and TRPLYO were compared by repeated measurement analyses of variance and post-hoc comparisons. In this study a 1 to 3 percent increase in tennis serve ball speed was recorded in TRDE and TRPLYO when compared to TRAD (p 0.05. ICCs for ball speed showed strong reliability (0.82 to 0.93 for the ball speed measurements.The results of this study indicate that dynamic and high volume upper extremity plyometric WU activities are likely beneficial to serve speed of elite junior tennis players.

  1. Cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy elderly after different intensities of dynamic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droguett, Viviane Santos López; Santos, Amilton da Cruz; de Medeiros, Carlos Eduardo; Marques, Douglas Porto; do Nascimento, Leone Severino; Brasileiro-Santos, Maria do Socorro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the heart rate (HR) and its autonomic modulation at baseline and during dynamic postexercise (PEX) with intensities of 40% and 60% of the maximum HR in healthy elderly. Methods This cross-sectional study included ten apparently healthy people who had been submitted to a protocol on a cycle ergometer for 35 minutes. Autonomic modulation was evaluated by spectral analysis of HR variability (HRV). Results A relevant increase in HR response was observed at 15 minutes postexercise with intensities of 60% and 40% of the maximum HR (10±2 bpm versus 5±1 bpm, respectively; P=0.005), and a significant reduction in HRV was also noted with 40% and 60% intensities during the rest period, and significant reduction in HRV (RR variance) was also observed in 40% and 60% intensities when compared to the baseline, as well as between the post-exercise intensities (1032±32 ms versus 905±5 ms) (P<0.001). In the HRV spectral analysis, a significant increase in the low frequency component HRV and autonomic balance at 40% of the maximum HR (68±2 normalized units [nu] versus 55±1 nu and 2.0±0.1 versus 1.2±0.1; P<0.001) and at 60% of the maximum HR (77±1 nu versus 55±1 nu and 3.2±0.1 versus 1.2±0.1 [P<0.001]) in relation to baseline was observed. A significant reduction of high frequency component at 40% and 60% intensities, however, was observed when compared to baseline (31±2 nu and 23±1 nu versus 45±1 nu, respectively; P<0.001). Moreover, significant differences were observed for the low frequency and high frequency components, as well as for the sympathovagal balance between participants who reached 40% and 60% of the maximum HR. Conclusion There was an increase in the HR, sympathetic modulation, and sympathovagal balance, as well as a reduction in vagal modulation in the elderly at both intensities of the PEX. PMID:25653509

  2. Muscarinic antibodies and heart rate responses to dynamic exercise and to the Valsalva maneuver in chronic chagasic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Barbara C das; Bacilio, Mey Lyn; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Salmen, Siham; Peterson, Darrell L; Donis, Jose H; Nuñez, Tulio J; Davila, Diego F

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the cardiac chronotropic responses to the Valsalva maneuver and to dynamic exercise of twenty chronic chagasic patients with normal left ventricular function and no segmental wall abnormalities by two-dimensional echocardiogram. The absolute increase in heart rate of the patients (Δ = 21.5 ± 10 bpm, M±SD) during the maneuver was significantly diminished when compared to controls (Δ = 31.30 ± 70, M±SD, p = 0.03). The minimum heart rate (58.24 ± 8.90 vs. 62.80 ± 10, p = 0.68) and the absolute decrease in heart rate at the end of the maneuver (Δ = 38.30 ± 13 vs. Δ = 31.47 ± 17, p = 0.10) were not different from controls. The initial heart rate acceleration during dynamic exercise (Δ = 12 ± 7.55 vs. Δ = 19 ± 7.27, M±SD, p = 0.01) was also diminished, but the heart rate recovery during the first ten seconds was more prominent in the sero-positive patients (Median: 14, Interquartile range: (9.75-17.50 vs. 5(0-8.75, p = 0.001). The serum levels of muscarinic cardiac auto-antibodies were significantly higher in the chagasic patients (Median: 34.58, Interquartile Range: 17-46.5, Optical Density) than in controls (Median: 0, Interquartile Range: 0-22.25, p = 0.001) and correlated significantly and directly (r = 0.68, p = 0.002) with early heart rate recovery during dynamic exercise. The results of this investigation indirectly suggest that, the cardiac muscarinic auto-antibodies may have positive agonist effects on parasympathetic heart rate control of chagasic patients.

  3. Evidence for a rapid vasodilatory contribution to immediate hyperemia in rest-to-mild and mild-to-moderate forearm exercise transitions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Natasha R; Tschakovsky, Michael E

    2004-09-01

    Controversy exists regarding the contribution of a rapid vasodilatory mechanism(s) to immediate exercise hyperemia. Previous in vivo investigations have exclusively examined rest-to-exercise (R-E) transitions where both the muscle pump and early vasodilator mechanisms may be activated. To isolate vasodilatory onset, the present study investigated the onset of exercise hyperemia in an exercise-to-exercise (E-E) transition, where no further increase in muscle pump contribution would occur. Eleven subjects lay supine and performed a step increase from rest to 3 min of mild (10% maximal voluntary contraction), rhythmic, dynamic forearm handgrip exercise, followed by a further step to moderate exercise (20% maximal voluntary contraction) in each of arm above (condition A) or below (condition B) heart level. Beat-by-beat measures of brachial arterial blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) and blood pressure (arterial tonometry) were performed. We observed an immediate increase in forearm vascular conductance in E-E transitions, and the magnitude of this increase matched that of the R-E transitions within each of the arm positions (condition A: E-E, 52.8 +/- 10.7 vs. R-E, 60.3 +/- 11.7 ml.min(-1).100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.66; condition B: E-E, 43.2 +/- 12.8 vs. R-E, 33.9 +/- 8.2 ml.min(-1).100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.52). Furthermore, changes in forearm vascular conductance were identical between R-E and E-E transitions over the first nine contraction-relaxation cycles in condition A. The immediate and identical increase in forearm vascular conductance in R-E and E-E transitions within arm positions provides strong evidence that rapid vasodilation contributes to immediate exercise hyperemia in humans. Specific vasodilatory mechanisms responsible remain to be determined.

  4. Why Exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... editorial staff Home Prevention and Wellness Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Why Exercise? Why Exercise? Share Print Why Exercise? Exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle. Exercise prevents health problems, builds strength, boosts energy, ...

  5. Physical exercise leads to rapid adaptations in hippocampal vasculature: temporal dynamics and relationship to cell proliferation and neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Borght, Karin; Kóbor-Nyakas, Dóra E; Klauke, Karin; Eggen, Bart J L; Nyakas, Csaba; Van der Zee, Eddy A; Meerlo, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Increased levels of angiogenesis and neurogenesis possibly mediate the beneficial effects of physical activity on hippocampal plasticity. This study was designed to investigate the temporal dynamics of exercise-induced changes in hippocampal angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Mice were housed with a running wheel for 1, 3, or 10 days. Analysis of glucose transporter Glut1-positive vessel density showed a significant increase after 3 days of wheel running. Cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus showed a trend towards an increase after 3 days of running and was significantly elevated after 10 days of physical exercise. Ten days of wheel running resulted in a near-significant increase in the number of immature neurons, as determined by a doublecortin (DCX) staining. In the second part of the study, the persistence of the exercise-induced changes in angiogenesis and cell proliferation was determined. The running wheel was removed from the cage after 10 days of physical activity. Glut-1 positive vessel density and hippocampal cell proliferation were determined 1 and 6 days after removal of the wheel. Both parameters had returned to baseline 24 h after cessation of physical activity. The near-significant increase in the number of DCX-positive immature neurons persisted for at least 6 days, indicating that new neurons formed during the period of increased physical activity had survived. Together these experiments show that the hippocampus displays a remarkable angiogenic and neurogenic plasticity and rapidly responds to changes in physical activity.

  6. Effect of muscle mass on muscle mechanoreflex-mediated heart rate increase at the onset of dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Lauro C; Oliveira, Ricardo B; Ramos, Plínio S; Ricardo, Djalma R; Araújo, Claudio Gil S

    2010-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether the heart rate increase at the onset of passive dynamic exercise is related to the amount of skeletal muscle mass engaged in movement. Fifteen healthy male subjects, 18-30 years old, performed, from the 4th to the 8th second of a 12-s apnea, four different 4-s bouts of passive cycling assigned in a counterbalanced order, each one different from the others by the number of limbs engaged in the movement (i.e., 1 arm, 2 arms, 2 arms + 1 leg and 2 arms + 2 legs), while respiratory movements and limb muscle electromyography were recorded. A repeated-measures ANOVA showed that the RR interval at the end of 4-s passive cycling was reduced in all the four different bouts (P exercise to the end of 4 s of passive cycling) were directly related, in a non-linear trend, to the amount of muscle mass engaged in movement. These variations were more expressive when extremes were compared (110 +/- 16 vs. 184 +/- 24 ms, respectively, 1 limb vs. 4 limbs, P exercise. It was concluded that in healthy subjects, heart rate increase at the onset of passive cycling is directly related to the number of limbs and consequently the amount of muscle mass engaged, which is possibly related to a greater afferent input from stretch-sensitive muscle mechanoreceptors.

  7. Combined heart rate variability and dynamic measures for quantitatively characterizing the cardiac stress status during cycling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szi-Wen; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chang, Ya-Ju; Chuang, Li-Ling; Chien, Chun-Tse

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to seek for different ways of measuring cardiac stress in terms of heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate (HR) dynamics, and to develop a novel index that can effectively summarize the information reflected by these measures to continuously and quantitatively characterize the cardiac stress status during physical exercise. Standard deviation, spectral measure of HRV as well as a nonlinear detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) based fractal-like behavior measure of HR dynamics were all evaluated on the RR time series derived from windowed electrocardiogram (ECG) data for the subjects undergoing cycling exercise. We recruited eleven young healthy subjects in our tests. Each subject was asked to maintain a fixed speed under a constant load during the pedaling test. We obtained the running estimates of the standard deviation of the normal-to-normal interval (SDNN), the high-fidelity power spectral density (PSD) of HRV, and the DFA scaling exponent α, respectively. A trend analysis and a multivariate linear regression analysis of these measures were then performed. Numerical experimental results produced by our analyses showed that a decrease in both SDNN and α was seen during the cycling exercise, while there was no significant correlation between the standard lower frequency to higher frequency (LF-to-HF) spectral power ratio of HRV and the exercise intensity. In addition, while the SDNN and α were both negatively correlated with the Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale value, it seemed that the LF-to-HF power ratio might not have substantial impact on the Borg value, suggesting that the SDNN and α may be further used as features to detect the cardiac stress status during the physical exercise. We further approached this detection problem by applying a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to both feature candidates for the task of cardiac stress stratification. As a result, a time-varying parameter, referred to as the cardiac

  8. Hemodynamic mechanisms of the attenuated blood pressure response to mental stress after a single bout of maximal dynamic exercise in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Neves

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available To determine the hemodynamic mechanisms responsible for the attenuated blood pressure response to mental stress after exercise, 26 healthy sedentary individuals (age 29 ± 8 years underwent the Stroop color-word test before and 60 min after a bout of maximal dynamic exercise on a treadmill. A subgroup (N = 11 underwent a time-control experiment without exercise. Blood pressure was continuously and noninvasively recorded by infrared finger photoplethysmography. Stroke volume was derived from pressure signals, and cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance were calculated. Perceived mental stress scores were comparable between mental stress tests both in the exercise (P = 0.96 and control (P = 0.24 experiments. After exercise, the blood pressure response to mental stress was attenuated (pre: 10 ± 13 vs post: 6 ± 7 mmHg; P 0.05. In conclusion, a single bout of maximal dynamic exercise attenuates the blood pressure response to mental stress in healthy subjects, along with lower stroke volume and cardiac output, denoting an acute modulatory action of exercise on the central hemodynamic response to mental stress.

  9. Let's Make a Deal: A Dynamic Exercise for Practicing Negotiation Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beenen, Gerard; Barbuto, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Because negotiation is among the most important skills for a manager to develop, activities that can foster its development are valuable for educators. The authors present an original exercise that introduces three key concepts in negotiation: best alternative to a negotiated agreement, distributive bargaining, and integrative bargaining. They…

  10. The Mock Trial: A Dynamic Exercise for Thinking Critically about Management Theories, Topics, and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Kevin; Meisel, Steven I.; Seltzer, Joe; Kane, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    The Mock Trial is an experiential exercise adapted from a law school process that encourages students to think critically about theories, topics, and the practice of management in an innovative classroom experience. Playing the role of attorneys and witnesses, learners ask questions and challenge assumptions by playing roles in a trial with…

  11. Cardiovascular responses to exercise in sprinters and distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torok, D J; Duey, W J; Bassett, D R; Howley, E T; Mancuso, P

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cardiovascular responses of sprinters and distance runners to isometric (IE) and dynamic exercise (DE). Normotensive males were selected and grouped according to prior running performance: sprinter (N = 6) or distance runner (N = 6). Each subject completed an incremental DE (cycle ergometry) test (6-min stages) at 20%, 40%, and 60% of VO2peak, and 3 min of isometric handgrip at 30% of MVC. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (Q), oxygen uptake, and blood lactate were measured, while mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), cardiac index (CI), and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) were calculated during each stage of DE. BP and HR were measured during each minute of IE. Muscle biopsies of the vastus lateralis revealed a significant difference in capillary density (capillaries per mm2 and capillaries per fiber) between the sprinters and distance runners (323 +/- 23 vs 409 +/- 27 and 2.2 +/- 0.2 vs 3.2 +/- 0.3, P sprinters, which was associated with a greater HR response. During DE, there were no significant differences in BP or HR between the groups. However, at 60% of VO2peak, the distance runners had a significantly higher cardiac index and a lower systemic vascular resistance than the sprinters (P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Effect of Dietary Pattern on Handgrip Strength in Middle Aged and Elderly People in the Rural Area of Beijing%北京农村中老年人膳食模式对握力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王佳; 洪忠新

    2014-01-01

    energy,measured human indicators and their handgrip strength,recorded their smoking, drinking,sleeping and activities,etc. The subjects were divided,according to handgrip strength,into groups A( handgrip meeting the standards),B( handgrip not meeting the standards). A univariate analysis was performed on general information, living conditions,anthropometric measures,dietary nutrient intake,Logistic regression analysis was used to do multivariate anal-ysis on the influencing factors of handgrip strength. Results The handgrip strength of both hands reached the standards in 20 males(44. 4%),in 55 females(61. 8%). There were 75 cases in group A,59 in group B. There was significant difference in age,lean body mass,waist-hip ratio,arm muscle circumference( AMC),exercise conditions,intakes of carbohydrates, protein and fat between 2 groups(P<0. 05). By Logistic regression analysis,female,AMC,high protein intake were protec-tive factors of handgrip,organization lean body mass was a risk factor(P<0. 05). Conclusion In Zhang Fang Village,the dietary model of the elderly is unbalanced. Their too low protein intake effects their handgrip. Improving villagers' dietary pat-terns and proper increase of protein intake in the proportion of total energy are effective methods for handgrip.

  13. Impact of a Home-Based Physical and Nutritional Intervention Program Conducted by Lay-Volunteers on Handgrip Strength in Prefrail and Frail Older Adults: A Randomized Control Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Sandra; Dorner, Thomas E.; Luger, Eva; Kapan, Ali; Titze, Sylvia; Lackinger, Christian; Schindler, Karin E.

    2017-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the effects of a home-based physical and nutritional intervention program carried out by lay-volunteers to home visits with social support alone. Buddies visited 80 prefrail or frail older persons at home twice a week for 12 weeks. The physical training and nutrition group (PTN, n = 39) performed two sets of six strength exercises, discussed nutritional topics and received social support. The social support group (SoSu, n = 41) received home visits with social support only. In the PTN group, handgrip strength increased significantly by 2.4 kg (95% CI: 1.0–3.8). In the SoSu group we did not see a significant improvement. However, no significant between-group difference was found. Physical performance increased in both groups, although with a higher increase of 1.0 point (95% CI: 0.1–2.0) in the PTN group. In none of the groups muscle mass changed. Further results showed that frail individuals benefit more from the intervention than prefrail individuals (OR: 2.78; 95% CI: 1.01–7.66). Handgrip strength in the intervention group increased by a clinically relevant value and this effect is comparable to that obtained by health-care professionals. Therefore, home visits with a physical training and nutritional program could offer a new perspective in the care of community-dwelling prefrail and frail older persons. PMID:28085913

  14. Impact of a Home-Based Physical and Nutritional Intervention Program Conducted by Lay-Volunteers on Handgrip Strength in Prefrail and Frail Older Adults: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Sandra; Dorner, Thomas E; Luger, Eva; Kapan, Ali; Titze, Sylvia; Lackinger, Christian; Schindler, Karin E

    2017-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the effects of a home-based physical and nutritional intervention program carried out by lay-volunteers to home visits with social support alone. Buddies visited 80 prefrail or frail older persons at home twice a week for 12 weeks. The physical training and nutrition group (PTN, n = 39) performed two sets of six strength exercises, discussed nutritional topics and received social support. The social support group (SoSu, n = 41) received home visits with social support only. In the PTN group, handgrip strength increased significantly by 2.4 kg (95% CI: 1.0-3.8). In the SoSu group we did not see a significant improvement. However, no significant between-group difference was found. Physical performance increased in both groups, although with a higher increase of 1.0 point (95% CI: 0.1-2.0) in the PTN group. In none of the groups muscle mass changed. Further results showed that frail individuals benefit more from the intervention than prefrail individuals (OR: 2.78; 95% CI: 1.01-7.66). Handgrip strength in the intervention group increased by a clinically relevant value and this effect is comparable to that obtained by health-care professionals. Therefore, home visits with a physical training and nutritional program could offer a new perspective in the care of community-dwelling prefrail and frail older persons.

  15. Deoxygenated hemoglobin/myoglobin kinetics of forearm muscles from rest to exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsuzawa, Tomoko; Shioya, Sumie; Kurita, Daisaku; Haida, Munetaka

    2009-01-01

    Exercise capacity is frequently decreased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and muscle dysfunction is one factor in this reduction. Studies using (31)-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS) have shown that phosphocreatine (PCr) and muscle pH (pHi) are significantly decreased in patients with COPD during mild exercise, suggesting the early activation of anaerobic glycolysis in their muscles. Thus, muscle oxygenation states during exercise might differ between patients with COPD and healthy individuals. We simultaneously measured oxygenation state and pHi in the muscles of patients with COPD during the transition from rest to exercise (on-transition) using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and (31)P-MRS. Sixteen patients with COPD (aged 68.6 +/- 7.5 years) and 7 healthy males (controls; aged 63.3 +/- 7.5 years) performed dynamic handgrip exercise (lifting a weight by gripping at a rate of 20 grips per min for 3 min). Patients were classified based on pHi data at the completion of exercise as having a normal (>or= 6.9; n = 8) or a low (< 6.9; n = 8) pHi. The deoxygenated hemoglobin/myoglobin (deoxy-Hb/Mb) in NIRS recordings remained constant or slightly decreased initially (time delay), then increased to reach a plateau. We calculated the time delay and the time constant of deoxy-Hb/Mb kinetics during the on-transition. The time delay was shorter in the group with a low pHi than in the controls. These findings might reflect a slower increase in O(2) delivery in patients with a low pHi, which might partly account for altered muscle energy metabolism.

  16. Impaired Muscle Oxygenation and Elevated Exercise Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients: Links With Vascular Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipla, Konstantina; Triantafyllou, Areti; Koletsos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Stavros; Sachpekidis, Vasileios; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Gkaliagkousi, Eugenia; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Douma, Stella

    2017-08-01

    This study examined in vivo (1) skeletal muscle oxygenation and microvascular function, at rest and during handgrip exercise, and (2) their association with macrovascular function and exercise blood pressure (BP), in newly diagnosed, never-treated patients with hypertension and normotensive individuals. Ninety-one individuals (51 hypertensives and 40 normotensives) underwent office and 24-hour ambulatory BP, arterial stiffness, and central aortic BP assessment, followed by a 5-minute arterial occlusion and a 3-minute submaximal handgrip exercise. Changes in muscle oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and tissue oxygen saturation were continuously monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy and beat-by-beat BP by Finapres. Hypertensives had higher (Pexercising at the same submaximal intensity, hypertensives required a significantly greater (Pexercise. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Handgrip strength cutoff for cardiometabolic risk index among Colombian children and adolescents: The FUPRECOL Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Peña-Ibagon, Jhonatan Camilo; Martínez-Torres, Javier; Tordecilla-Sanders, Alejandra; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Lobelo, Felipe; García-Hermoso, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Evidence shows an association between muscular strength (MS) and health among young people, however low muscular strength cut points for the detection of high metabolic risk in Latin-American populations are scarce. The aim of this study was twofold: to explore potential age- and sex-specific thresholds of MS, for optimal cardiometabolic risk categorization among Colombian children and adolescents; and to investigate whether cardiometabolic risk differed by MS group by applying the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) cut point. MS was estimated by using a handle dynamometer on 1,950 children and adolescents from Colombia, using MS relative to weight (handgrip strength/body mass). A metabolic risk score was computed from the following components: waist circumference, triglycerides, HDL-c, glucose, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. ROC analysis showed a significant discriminatory accuracy of MS in identifying the low/high metabolic risk in children and adolescents and in both genders. In children, the handgrip strength/body mass levels for a low metabolic risk were 0.359 and 0.376 in girls and boys, respectively. In adolescents, these points were 0.440 and 0.447 in girls and boys, respectively. In conclusion, the results suggest an MS level relative to weight for having a low metabolic risk, which could be used to identify youths at risk. PMID:28195167

  18. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  19. Effect of co-contractions on the cardiovascular response to submaximal static handgrip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, J F; Favriou, F; Jouanin, J C; Grucza, R

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of concomitant involuntary contractions of different muscles on heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) during a sustained, submaximal handgrip. Nine male subjects [23.6 (0.4) years, 177.0 (1.5) cm, and 73.0 (2.7) kg, means (SE)] participated in the experiment. The maximal integrated electromyographic activity (IEMG max) of four ipsilateral muscles, flexor digitorum (FD), biceps brachii (BB), rectus abdominalis (RA) and vastus lateralis (VA), was recorded. Then, after 30 min of rest, the subjects maintained a submaximal isometric handgrip for 2 min. Heart rate (HR), systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure and surface electromyography (EMG) of the four muscles were recorded. The amplitude and power spectrum of the EMG were analysed. During the handgrip the force was kept constant at 43 (1)% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) only for 90 (12) s. After that time, the subjects were unable to maintain the target force which decreased continuously up to the end of the contraction (P<0.01) with a residual force of 27 (3)% MVC at t = 120 s. HR increased from 75 (3) beats x min(-1) at rest to 109 (6) beats x min(-1) at t = 120 s (P<0.01). SBP and DBP also increased from 112 (5) and 81 (2) mm Hg to 176 (5) and 133 (7) mm Hg, respectively (P<0.01). The EMG activity rose significantly for both FD and BB with a moderate increase for RA and VL. In fact, the individual contributions of FD and BB to the EMG activity of the four muscles were 52 (2)% and 37 (2)%, respectively, whereas the RA and VL contributed only 9 (1)% and 1.4 (0.1)%. The amplitude ratio of FD's EMG to the total EMG activity of the four muscles from which recordings were made decreased with time from 72% to 33% (P<0.01). The central command's level of activation, as reflected by the increased EMG activity of the four recorded muscles, was probably high enough to stimulate the cardiovascular centres through cortical spread (sometimes known as

  20. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

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    Full Text Available ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You ... activity campaign from the National Institute on Aging. Exercise or Physical Activity? Some people may wonder what ...

  1. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

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    Full Text Available ... please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can ... yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a ...

  2. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z > Exercise: Benefits of Exercise: Health Benefits In This Topic Health Benefits Benefits for Everyday Life ... Try Exercise: How to Stay Active The information in this topic was provided by the National Institute ...

  3. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exercise can improve or maintain some aspects of cognitive function, such as your ability to shift quickly ... activity, and ignore irrelevant information. For more on cognitive function and exercise, see "Do Exercise and Physical ...

  4. The dynamics of brain activity during aerobic exercise until exhaustion : a NIRS study

    OpenAIRE

    Dykesteen, Astrid Kahrs

    2015-01-01

    Aim: the main aim of this study was to investigate how the relation between the cerebral oxygenation (COX) of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and performance on prefrontal-dependent cognitive tasks, changes during prolonged, high intensity (HI) exercise until exhaustion. An additional aim was to see if the changes occuring in the PFC are exclusive to this region or if they are similar in other regions of the brain. Method: Three sessions were conducted on an ergometer bicycle with ...

  5. [A study of cardiac dynamics during multistage exercise tests performed on a bycicle ergometer (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbato, F; Fiorito, A; Cornelio, G

    1977-05-01

    The authors analysed the behaviour of the mechanical systole (electromechanical systole; tension time, left ventricular ejection time), as well as of the diastole (both cardiac and hemodynamic diastole) during exercise tests performed on a bycicle ergometer, with 40, 80, 120 watt workloads. The mechanical systole--as well as its components--duration is influenced, during exercise test, by both heart rate and stroke volume--pulse pressure being assumed as an indirect index of the latter. The study of the correlation between the two above mentioned parameters has a great importance in evaluating the cardiac pump efficiency both in health and disease. The study of the behaviour of diastole is likewise very important, as it provides useful information concerning: a) the length of the cardiac muscle post-exercise recovery phase; b) the coronary available perfusion time; c) the Windkessel (arterial bellows) emptying time. Moreover, the blood pressure fall rate in diastole is an useful indirect measure of the peripheral resistance changes during muscular work. A statistical analysis is made and the correlation coefficients and the regression equations between the various parameters are defined.

  6. Physical exercise in aging human skeletal muscle increases mitochondrial calcium uniporter expression levels and affects mitochondria dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Sandra; Mammucari, Cristina; Romanello, Vanina; Barberi, Laura; Pietrangelo, Laura; Fusella, Aurora; Mosole, Simone; Gherardi, Gaia; Höfer, Christian; Löfler, Stefan; Sarabon, Nejc; Cvecka, Jan; Krenn, Matthias; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Protasi, Feliciano; Musarò, Antonio; Sandri, Marco; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2016-12-01

    Age-related sarcopenia is characterized by a progressive loss of muscle mass with decline in specific force, having dramatic consequences on mobility and quality of life in seniors. The etiology of sarcopenia is multifactorial and underlying mechanisms are currently not fully elucidated. Physical exercise is known to have beneficial effects on muscle trophism and force production. Alterations of mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis regulated by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) have been recently shown to affect muscle trophism in vivo in mice. To understand the relevance of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in aging and to investigate the effect of physical exercise on MCU expression and mitochondria dynamics, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies from 70-year-old subjects 9 weeks trained with either neuromuscular electrical stimulation (ES) or leg press. Here, we demonstrate that improved muscle function and structure induced by both trainings are linked to increased protein levels of MCU Ultrastructural analyses by electron microscopy showed remodeling of mitochondrial apparatus in ES-trained muscles that is consistent with an adaptation to physical exercise, a response likely mediated by an increased expression of mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. Altogether these results indicate that the ES-dependent physiological effects on skeletal muscle size and force are associated with changes in mitochondrial-related proteins involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis and mitochondrial shape. These original findings in aging human skeletal muscle confirm the data obtained in mice and propose MCU and mitochondria-related proteins as potential pharmacological targets to counteract age-related muscle loss. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  7. Effects of ovarian hormones and oral contraceptive pills on cardiac vagal withdrawal at the onset of dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, André L; Ramos, Plinio S; Vianna, Lauro C; Ricardo, Djalma R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the ovarian hormones and the use of oral contraceptive pills (OCP) on cardiac vagal withdrawal at the onset of dynamic exercise. Thirty physically active women aged 19-32 years were divided into two groups: OCP users (n = 17) and non-OCP users (n = 13). Participants were studied randomly at three different phases of the menstrual cycle: early follicular (day 3.6 ± 1.2; range 1-5), ovulatory (day 14.3 ± 0.8; range 13-16) and midluteal (day 21.3 ± 0.8; range 20-24), according to endogenous (in non-OCP users) or exogenous (in OCP users) estradiol and progesterone variations. The cardiac vagal withdrawal was represented by the cardiac vagal index (CVI), which was obtained by the 4-s exercise test. Additionally, resting heart rate, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were obtained. The CVI was not significantly different between the three phases of the menstrual cycle in either the non-OCP users (early follicular: 1.58 ± 0.1; ovulatory: 1.56 ± 0.1; midluteal: 1.58 ± 0.1, P > 0.05) or OCP users (early follicular: 1.47 ± 0.1; ovulatory: 1.49 ± 0.1; midluteal: 1.47 ± 0.1, P > 0.05) (mean ± SEM). Resting cardiovascular responses were not affected by hormonal phase or OCP use, except that the SBP was higher in the OCP users than non-OCP users in all phases of the cycle (P exercise was not impacted by the menstrual cycle or OCP use in physically active women.

  8. Consumption of Chilies, but not Sweet Peppers, Is Positively Related to Handgrip Strength in an Adult Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Wei, M; Zhang, Q; Du, H; Xia, Y; Liu, L; Wang, C; Shi, H; Guo, X; Liu, X; Li, C; Bao, X; Su, Q; Gu, Y; Fang, L; Yang, H; Yu, F; Sun, S; Wang, X; Zhou, M; Jia, Q; Zhao, H; Song, K; Niu, K

    2016-01-01

    Chili consumption may have a beneficial effect on muscle strength in the general population. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between frequency of chili consumption and handgrip strength in adults. Population-based cross-sectional study. This study used baseline data from the Tianjin Chronic Low-grade Systemic Inflammation and Health Cohort Study. A total of 3 717 subjects were recruited to the study. Frequency of chili consumption during the previous month was assessed using a valid self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Analysis of covariance was used to examine the relationship between muscle strength and frequency of chili consumption. Handgrip strength was measured using a handheld digital dynamometer. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, significant relationships were observed between different categories of chili consumption and handgrip strength in males, the means (95% confidence interval) for handgrip strength across chili consumption categories were 44.7 (42.1, 47.2) for pepper consumption. This study reveals a positive correlation between frequency of chili consumption and muscle strength in adult males. Further studies are necessary in order to determine whether there is a causal relationship between chili consumption frequency and muscle strength.

  9. Effects of rumenic acid rich conjugated linoleic acid supplementation on cognitive function and handgrip performance in older men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Housh, Terry J; Miramonti, Amelia A; McKay, Brianna D; Yeo, Noelle M; Smith, Cory M; Hill, Ethan C; Cochrane, Kristen C; Cramer, Joel T

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 8weeks at 6g per day of RAR CLA versus placebo on cognitive function and handgrip performance in older men and women. Sixty-five (43 women, 22 men) participants (mean±SD; age=72.4±5.9yrs; BMI=26.6±4.2kg·m(-2)) were randomly assigned to a RAR CLA (n=30: 10 men, 20 women) or placebo (PLA; high oleic sunflower oil; n=35: 12 men, 23 women) group in double-blind fashion and consumed 6g·d(-1) of their allocated supplement for 8weeks. Before (Visit 1) and after supplementation (Visit 2), subjects completed the Serial Sevens Subtraction Test (S7), Trail Making Test Part A (TMA) and Part B (TMB), and Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) to measure cognitive function. The RAVLT included 5, 15-item auditory word recalls (R1-5), an interference word recall (RB), a 6th word recall (R6), and a 15-item visual word recognition trial (RR). For handgrip performance, subjects completed maximal voluntary isometric handgrip strength (MVIC) testing before (MVICPRE) and after (MVICPOST) a handgrip fatigue test at 50% MVICPRE. Hand joint discomfort was measured during MVICPRE, MVICPOST, and the handgrip fatigue test. There were no treatment differences (p>0.05) for handgrip strength, handgrip fatigue, or cognitive function as measured by the Trail Making Test and Serial Seven's Subtraction Test in men or women. However, RAR CLA supplementation improved cognitive function as indicated by the RAVLT R5 in men. A qualitative examination of the mean change scores suggested that, compared to PLA, RAR CLA supplementation was associated with a small improvement in joint discomfort in both men and women. Longer-term studies are needed to more fully understand the potential impact of RAR CLA on cognitive function and hand joint discomfort in older adults, particularly in those with lower cognitive function.

  10. Sample Entropy and Traditional Measures of Heart Rate Dynamics Reveal Different Modes of Cardiovascular Control During Low Intensity Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Weippert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear parameters of heart rate variability (HRV have proven their prognostic value in clinical settings, but their physiological background is not very well established. We assessed the effects of low intensity isometric (ISO and dynamic (DYN exercise of the lower limbs on heart rate matched intensity on traditional and entropy measures of HRV. Due to changes of afferent feedback under DYN and ISO a distinct autonomic response, mirrored by HRV measures, was hypothesized. Five-minute inter-beat interval measurements of 43 healthy males (26.0 ± 3.1 years were performed during rest, DYN and ISO in a randomized order. Blood pressures and rate pressure product were higher during ISO vs. DYN (p < 0.001. HRV indicators SDNN as well as low and high frequency power were significantly higher during ISO (p < 0.001 for all measures. Compared to DYN, sample entropy (SampEn was lower during ISO (p < 0.001. Concluding, contraction mode itself is a significant modulator of the autonomic cardiovascular response to exercise. Compared to DYN, ISO evokes a stronger blood pressure response and an enhanced interplay between both autonomic branches. Non-linear HRV measures indicate a more regular behavior under ISO. Results support the view of the reciprocal antagonism being only one of many modes of autonomic heart rate control. Under different conditions; the identical “end product” heart rate might be achieved by other modes such as sympathovagal co-activation as well.

  11. THE EFFECT OF DYNAMIC STRETCHING EXERCISES ON FLEXIBILITY DEVELOPMENT AND SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN 10-12 YEAR-OLD MALE SWIMMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şirin KELEŞ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to monitor the effect of 8-week dynamic stretching exercises on flexibility development and swimming performance in male swimmers in 10-12 age group. The study is carried out among 30 boys between ages of 10-12 who regularly do swimming exercises in a variety of sport clubs in Konya. The children taking part in the research is divided in experiment group (EG (age=10,93±0,80 years, height=150,94±0,06 cm, weight=43,07±3,13 kg and control group (CG (age=11,00±0,85years, height=151,7±0,05 cm, weight=47,80±3,61 kg, each of 15. In the course of 8 weeks, experiment group performed dynamic stretching exercises in addition to the swimming exercises while CG only did swimming exercises. In analysing the results Paired Samples T-Test and Independent Sample T-Test has been used. At the end of the study, it was identified that EG made a significant progress in sit-and-stretch, arm flexibility, bridge pose, hip flexion and extension, knee flexion, shoulder flexion, torso flexion and 25-50-200 freestyle and technical swimming tests (p˂0,05. On the other hand, no substantial change was observed in any of CG’s flexibility parameters (p˃0,05. It was revealed that experiment group’s extension values were profoundly higher and its 25 meter swimming and turns in 50-100-150-200 meters were significantly shorter compared to the control group (p˂0,05. Consequently, it is possible to claim that dynamic stretching exercises performed before swimming exercises make substantial contribution to the flexibility and performance development of swimmers who are in the adolescence period.

  12. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or diabetes benefit from regular exercise. Exercise also helps people ... or difficulty walking. To learn about exercise and diabetes, see "Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes" from Go4Life®, ...

  13. Effect of Selected Balance Exercises on the Dynamic Balance of Children with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazi, Shirin Davarpanah; Purrajabi, Fatemeh; Movahedi, Ahmadreza; Jalali, Shahin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Maintaining balance while walking is of utmost importance for individuals with visual impairments because deficits in dynamic balance have been associated with a high risk of falling. Thus, the primary aim of the study presented here was to determine whether balance training effects the dynamic balance of children with visual…

  14. Effect of Selected Balance Exercises on the Dynamic Balance of Children with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazi, Shirin Davarpanah; Purrajabi, Fatemeh; Movahedi, Ahmadreza; Jalali, Shahin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Maintaining balance while walking is of utmost importance for individuals with visual impairments because deficits in dynamic balance have been associated with a high risk of falling. Thus, the primary aim of the study presented here was to determine whether balance training effects the dynamic balance of children with visual…

  15. The Effect of Astaxanthin and Regular Training on Dynamic Pattern of Oxidative Stress on Male under Strenuous Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylviana, N.; Gunawan, H.; Lesmana, R.; Purba, A.; Akbar, I. B.

    2017-03-01

    Strenuous physical activity will induced higher Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) level in human body that can be measured by serum Malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Malondialdehyde is product of lipid peroxidation process that define as oxidative damage of lipid biomolecule by reactivity of reactive oxygen species. Still, the dynamic pattern of Malondialdehyde (MDA) level under strenuous exercise is not fully understood. Potent antioxidant such as Astaxanthin and training may be altered the level of MDA. Thus, purpose of this study is to understand effect of astaxanthin to MDA dynamic pattern on training male after strenuous physical activity. It was a double blind, experimental study, conducted on thirty young male age, divided into untrained and trained groups. Supplement Astaxanthin was given to 15 subject as well as placebo for one week after supplementation, Subjects were tested with anaerobic strenuous physical activity. The values were analyzed with ANOVA test followed by Duncan test showed that in every groups, mean of MDA before test was similar, start increase significantly after tested, begin decrease at 6th hour post test and back to baseline at 24th hour post-test ( poxidative stress condition without altered its dynamic pattern in male after strenuous physical activity

  16. Evaluating Abdominal and Lower-Back Muscle Activity While Performing Core Exercises on a Stability Ball and a Dynamic Office Chair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael W R; De Carvalho, Diana E; Karakolis, Thomas; Callaghan, Jack P

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of a dynamic office chair to activate the core muscles while participants performed exercises sitting on the chair compared to a stability ball. Prolonged sitting has become an accepted part of the modern office. However, epidemiological evidence suggests that sedentary postures are linked to many adverse effects on health. The concept of dynamic or active sitting is intended to promote movement while sitting to reduce the time spent in prolonged, static postures. Sixteen participants performed four pelvic rotation exercises (front-back, side-side, circular, and leg lift) on both a dynamic office chair and a stability ball. Muscle activity from 12 torso muscles were evaluated with surface electromyography. For all exercises, trunk muscle activity on the chair was comparable to that on a stability ball. The right external oblique was the only muscle to produce greater peak activity (p = .019) when using the ball compared to the chair (21.4 ± 14.0 percent maximal voluntary excitations (%MVE) and 14.7 ± 10.8 %MVE for the ball and chair, respectively). The left thoracic erector spinae produced greater average activity (p = .044) on the chair than on the ball. These findings suggest that this dynamic sitting approach could be an effective tool for core muscle activation while promoting movement and exercise while sitting at work. Muscle activations on the dynamic chair are comparable to those on a stability ball, and dynamic office chairs can promote movement and exercise while sitting at work. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  17. Effects of prior dynamic leg exercise on static effort of the elbow flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, J W; Gladden, L B; Cresanta, M K

    1983-09-01

    The isometric endurance of the elbow flexors was determined in a control condition and subsequent to a maximal effort exercise bout on a cycle ergometer in seven subjects. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), peak rate of tension development (+dP/dt), peak rate of tension relaxation (-dP/dt), one-half contraction time, and one-half relaxation time were also measured. Each subject was tested on four occasions: two control and two experimental sessions. During the control sessions each subject held 40% of MVC to exhaustion, whereas the experimental session included a 1-min maximal effort exercise bout on a cycle ergometer 6 min prior to the isometric endurance task. Arterialized blood samples were drawn and analyzed for lactate, pH, PCO2, and PO2. Plasma bicarbonate was calculated from the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Subsequent to the cycle ergometer bout, blood lactate concentration rose from 0.8 to 11 mM, pH decreased from 7.43 to 7.20, PCO2 decreased from 40 to 32 Torr, and plasma bicarbonate decreased from 26 to 12 mM. When compared with the control values, no significant changes were evident for any muscle contractile properties following the cycle ergometer bout. However, isometric endurance was significantly reduced from 115.0 +/- 7.2 to 86.3 +/- 7.3 s.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA-HSA lymphoscintigraphy in lymphedema of the lower extremities. Diagnostic significance of dynamic study and muscular exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Yoji; Hayashi, Kuniaki [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy of lymphoscintigraphy was evaluated in 25 cases to clarify the diagnostic significance of dynamic study and muscular exercise in the diagnosis of lymphedema. {sup 99m}Tc-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-human serum albumin (DTPA-HSA) was injected subcutaneously, and dynamic imaging was performed in 18 cases. Thirteen patients were asked to walk for 3 minutes. Qualitative evaluation of static images had sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 97%. Diagnostic criteria including qualitative evaluation of dynamic images were less specific (sensitivity 95%, specificity 76%). Interpretation of static images obtained at one hour after injection in the patients without muscular exercise had sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 67%, whereas sensitivity was 92% and specificity was 100% in the patients with muscular exercise. Lympho-scintigraphy was reliable in diagnosis of lymphedema. Dynamic study was limited usefulness because of some false-positive cases. Muscular exercise accelerated migration of the tracer in normal extremities, and improved positive predictive value. (author)

  19. The Effects of Dynamic Range of Motion Exercises and Static Stretching on Strength and Range of Motion of the Hip Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanetzke, Carol A.

    The effects of Dynamic Range of Motion (D'ROM) exercises and static stretch on hip flexibility and hip strength were examined. One hundred one male and female college students were divided into three groups: D'ROM, static stretch (ST), and control (C). All subjects were measured before and after treatment for hip flexibility and strength. Two…

  20. Disability predictors in chronic low back pain after aquatic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Beato, Pedro Ángel; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel; Artero, Enrique G; Robles-Fuentes, Alejandro; Gatto-Cardia, María Claudia; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The physical and psychological factors associated with reduction of disability after aquatic exercise are not well understood. Sixty participants (30 men and 30 women; age, 50.60 [9.69] yrs; body mass index, 27.21 [5.20] kg/m²) with chronic low back pain were prospectively recruited. The 8-wk aquatic therapy program was carried out in an indoor pool sized 25 × 6 m, with 140-cm water depth and 30°C (1°C) of water temperature, where patients exercised for 2-5 days a week. Each aquatic exercise session lasted 55-60 mins (10 mins of warm-up, 20-25 mins of aerobic exercise, 15-20 mins of resistance exercise, and 10 mins of cooldown). Demographic information, disability (Oswestry Disability Index), back pain (visual analog scale), quality-of-life (Short Form 36), abdominal muscular endurance (curl-up), handgrip strength, trunk flexion and hamstring length (sit and reach), resting heart rate, and body mass index were outcomes variables. Significant correlations between change in disability and visual analog scale (at rest, flexion, and extension), curl-up and handgrip (r ranged between -0.353 and 0.582, all Ps < 0.01) were found. Changes in pain and abdominal muscular endurance were significant predictors of change in disability after therapy.

  1. Using relative handgrip strength to identify children at risk of sarcopenic obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffl, Michal; Chrudimsky, Jan; Tufano, James J

    2017-01-01

    Identifying children at risk of developing childhood sarcopenic obesity often requires specialized equipment and costly testing procedures, so cheaper and quicker methods would be advantageous, especially in field-based settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between the muscle-to-fat ratio (MFR) and relative handgrip strength, and to determine the ability of handgrip strength relative to body mass index (grip-to-BMI) to identify children who are at risk of developing sarcopenic obesity. Grip-to-BMI was measured in 730 Czech children (4 to 14 yrs). Bioelectrical impedance was used to estimate body fat mass and skeletal muscle mass, from which the MFR was calculated. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.791 (95% CI 0.692-0.890, p ˂ 0.001) in girls 4-9; 0.789 (95% CI 0.688-0.890, p ˂ 0.001) in girls 10-14 years old; 0.719 (95% CI 0.607-0.831, p = 0.001) in boys 4-9; and 0.896 (95% CI 0.823-0.969, p ˂ 0.001) in boys 10-14 years old. Calculated using the grip-to-BMI ratio, the OR (95% CI) for girls to be at risk of sarcopenic obesity identified by MFR was 9.918 (4.243-23.186, p ˂ 0.001) and was 11.515 (4.280-30.982, p ˂ 0.001) for boys. The grip-to-BMI ratio can be used to predict the presence of sarcopenic obesity in children, which can play a role in pediatric health interventions.

  2. Comparing localized and nonlocalized dynamic (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in exercising muscle at 7T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerspeer, M.; Robinson, S.; Nabuurs, C.I.H.C.; Scheenen, T.W.; Schoisengeier, A.; Unger, E.; Kemp, G.J.; Moser, E.

    2012-01-01

    By improving spatial and anatomical specificity, localized spectroscopy can enhance the power and accuracy of the quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. Localized and nonlocalized dynamic (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a surface coil was compared during aerobic

  3. Comparing localized and nonlocalized dynamic (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in exercising muscle at 7T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerspeer, M.; Robinson, S.; Nabuurs, C.I.H.C.; Scheenen, T.W.; Schoisengeier, A.; Unger, E.; Kemp, G.J.; Moser, E.

    2012-01-01

    By improving spatial and anatomical specificity, localized spectroscopy can enhance the power and accuracy of the quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. Localized and nonlocalized dynamic (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a surface coil was compared during aerobic

  4. Unique Testing Capabilities of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, an Exercise in Aeroelastic Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is the world's most capable aeroelastic test facility. Its large size, transonic speed range, variable pressure capability, and use of either air or R-134a heavy gas as a test medium enable unparalleled manipulation of flow-dependent scaling quantities. Matching these scaling quantities enables dynamic similitude of a full-scale vehicle with a sub-scale model, a requirement for proper characterization of any dynamic phenomenon, and many static elastic phenomena. Select scaling parameters are presented in order to quantify the scaling advantages of TDT and the consequence of testing in other facilities. In addition to dynamic testing, the TDT is uniquely well-suited for high risk testing or for those tests that require unusual model mount or support systems. Examples of recently conducted dynamic tests requiring unusual model support are presented. In addition to its unique dynamic test capabilities, the TDT is also evaluated in its capability to conduct aerodynamic performance tests as a result of its flow quality. Results of flow quality studies and a comparison to a many other transonic facilities are presented. Finally, the ability of the TDT to support future NASA research thrusts and likely vehicle designs is discussed.

  5. Endothelial dysfunction correlates with exaggerated exercise pressor response during whole body maximal exercise in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Ryan M; Liao, Peizhou; Millson, Erin C; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Sher, Salman; Park, Jeanie

    2017-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have exercise intolerance associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. Previous studies demonstrate that blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic nerve responses to handgrip exercise are exaggerated in CKD. These patients also have decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and endothelial dysfunction, which could potentially lead to an impaired ability to vasodilate during exercise. We hypothesized that CKD patients have exaggerated BP responses during maximal whole body exercise and that endothelial dysfunction correlates with greater exercise pressor responses in these patients. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was assessed before maximal treadmill exercise in 56 participants: 38 CKD (56.7 ± 1.2 yr old, 38 men) and 21 controls (52.8 ± 1.8 yr old, 20 men). During maximal treadmill exercise, the slope-of-rise in systolic BP (+10.32 vs. +7.75 mmHg/stage, P exercise in CKD, as well as poorer exercise capacity measured as peak oxygen uptake (V̇o2peak; 19.47 ± 1.47 vs. 24.57 ± 1.51 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1), P exercise and lower V̇o2peak, suggesting that endothelial dysfunction may contribute to exaggerated exercise pressor responses and poor exercise capacity in CKD patients.

  6. The Use of Session RPE to Monitor the Intensity of Weight Training in Older Women: Acute Responses to Eccentric, Concentric, and Dynamic Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro S. Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rating of perceived exertion (RPE is ability to detect and interpret organic sensations while performing exercises. This method has been used to measure the level of effort that is felt during weight-training at a given intensity. The purpose of this investigation was to compare session RPE values with those of traditional RPE measurements for different weight-training muscle actions, performed together or separately. Fourteen women with no former weight-training experience were recruited for the investigation. All participants completed five sessions of exercise: familiarization, maximum force, concentric-only (CONC-only, eccentric-only (ECC-only, and dynamic (DYN = CONC + ECC. The traditional RPE method was measured after each series of exercises, and the session RPE was measured 30 min after the end of the training session. The statistical analyses used were the paired t-test, one-way analysis of variance, and repeated measures analysis of variance. Significant differences between traditional RPE and session RPE for DYN, CONC, and ECC exercises were not found. This investigation demonstrated that session RPE is similar to traditional RPE in terms of weight-training involving concentric, eccentric, or dynamic muscle exercises, and that it can be used to prescribe and monitor weight-training sessions in older subjects.

  7. Effect of core muscle thickness and static or dynamic balance on prone bridge exercise with sling by shoulder joint angle in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Hwa; Yu, Jae Ho; Hong, Ji Heon; Kim, Jin Seop; Jung, Sang Woo; Lee, Dong Yeop

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] To date, core muscle activity detected using ultrasonography during prone bridge exercises has not been reported. Here we investigated the effects of core muscle thickness and balance on sling exercise efficacy by shoulder joint angle in healthy individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-three healthy university students were enrolled in this study. Ultrasonography thickness of external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis during sling workouts was investigated. Muscle thickness was measured on ultrasonography imaging before and after the experiment. Dynamic balance was tested using a functional reaching test. Static balance was tested using a Tetrax Interactive Balance System. [Results] Different muscle thicknesses were observed during the prone bridge exercise with the shoulder flexed at 60°, 90° or 120°. Shoulder flexion at 60° and 90° in the prone bridge exercise with a sling generated the greatest thickness of most transversus abdominis muscles. Shoulder flexion at 120° in the prone bridge exercise with a sling generated the greatest thickness of most external oblique muscles. [Conclusion] The results suggest that the prone bridge exercise with shoulder joint angle is an effective method of increasing global and local muscle strength.

  8. Identification of anaerobic threshold by analysis of heart rate variability during discontinuous dynamic and resistance exercise protocols in healthy older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; Castello-Simões, Viviane; Mendes, Renata Gonçalves; Archiza, Bruno; Dos Santos, Daniel Augusto; Bonjorno, José Carlos; de Oliveira, Claudio Ricardo; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2014-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine anaerobic threshold (AT) during discontinuous dynamic and resistive exercise protocols by analysing of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood lactate (BL) in healthy elderly subjects and compare the cardiovascular, metabolic and autonomic variables obtained from these two forms of exercise. Fourteen elderly (70 ± 4 years) apparently healthy males underwent the following tests: (i) incremental ramp test on cycle ergometer, (ii) one repetition maximum (1RM) leg press at 45°, (iii) a discontinuous exercise test on a cycle ergometer (DET-C) protocol and (iv) a resistance exercise leg press (DET-L) protocol. Heart rate, blood pressure and BL were obtained during each increment of exercise intensity. No significant differences (P>0·05) were found between methods of AT determination (BL and HRV) nor the relative intensity corresponding to AT (30% of maximum intensity) between the types of exercise (DET-C and DET-L). Furthermore, no significant differences (P>0·05) were found between the DET-C and DET-L in relation to HRV, however, the DET-L provided higher values of systolic blood pressure and BL (Pexercise protocols were similar when compared at the same relative intensity. However, DET-L resulted in higher values of blood pressure and BL at workloads beyond AT. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Physiological disturbance and recovery dynamics of bonefish (Albula vulpes), a tropical marine fish, in response to variable exercise and exposure to air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suski, Cory D; Cooke, Steven J; Danylchuk, Andy J; O'Connor, Constance M; Gravel, Marie-Ange; Redpath, Tara; Hanson, Kyle C; Gingerich, Andrew J; Murchie, Karen J; Danylchuk, Sascha E; Koppelman, Jeffrey B; Goldberg, Tony L

    2007-11-01

    Current understanding of the stress response in fishes has largely come from studies of freshwater-adapted salmonids, with proportionately few comparative studies having examined marine fishes. The current study sought to quantify the magnitude of physiological disturbances, recovery dynamics, and post-exercise behaviour in bonefish (Albula vulpes; a tropical marine fish) exposed to several different exercise and air exposure regimens. Results showed that metabolic disturbances (lactate production, hyperglycemia) increased following exercise and exposure to air, and that the magnitude of metabolic disturbance was proportional to the duration of the stressful event. Fish required between 2-4 h to return to resting values. Exercise and exposure to air also resulted in significant increases in plasma Ca2+, Cl- and Na+, but the magnitude of these ionic changes did not vary with exercise or exposure to air duration and required over 4-h to return to baseline levels. Mortality following exercise was observed only for fish that had been exposed to air for 3 min and not in fish that had been exposed to air for 1 min. Together, results from this study provide a physiological basis for management strategies that can improve the post-release survival of bonefish that have been caught during a catch-and-release angling event.

  10. The SCEC-USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Comparison Exercise - Simulations of Large Earthquakes and Strong Ground Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.

    2015-12-01

    I summarize the progress by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Dynamic Rupture Code Comparison Group, that examines if the results produced by multiple researchers' earthquake simulation codes agree with each other when computing benchmark scenarios of dynamically propagating earthquake ruptures. These types of computer simulations have no analytical solutions with which to compare, so we use qualitative and quantitative inter-code comparisons to check if they are operating satisfactorily. To date we have tested the codes against benchmark exercises that incorporate a range of features, including single and multiple planar faults, single rough faults, slip-weakening, rate-state, and thermal pressurization friction, elastic and visco-plastic off-fault behavior, complete stress drops that lead to extreme ground motion, heterogeneous initial stresses, and heterogeneous material (rock) structure. Our goal is reproducibility, and we focus on the types of earthquake-simulation assumptions that have been or will be used in basic studies of earthquake physics, or in direct applications to specific earthquake hazard problems. Our group's goals are to make sure that when our earthquake-simulation codes simulate these types of earthquake scenarios along with the resulting simulated strong ground shaking, that the codes are operating as expected. For more introductory information about our group and our work, please see our group's overview papers, Harris et al., Seismological Research Letters, 2009, and Harris et al., Seismological Research Letters, 2011, along with our website, scecdata.usc.edu/cvws.

  11. The effects of intra-articular glucocorticoids and exercise on pain and synovitis assessed on static and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, R G C; Henriksen, M; Klokker, L

    2017-01-01

    before exercise therapy in KOA-patients. PROMs were assessed using the KOOS (knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score). Synovitis was assessed on conventional non-contrast-enhanced, conventional contrast-enhanced (CE) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. PROMs and MRIs were obtained prior......OBJECTIVE: The aims of the present knee osteoarthritis (KOA)-study were to: (1) describe and compare the changes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-measures of synovitis following an exercise program preceded by an intra-articular injection of either corticosteroid or isotonic saline and (2...

  12. Effortful Pitch Glide: A Potential New Exercise Evaluated by Dynamic MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloro, Keri Vasquez; Pearson, William G., Jr.; Langmore, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanics of the effortful pitch glide (EPG) with swallowing using dynamic MRI. The EPG is a combination of a pitch glide and a pharyngeal squeeze maneuver for targeting laryngeal and pharyngeal muscles. The authors hypothesized that the EPG would elicit significantly greater structural…

  13. Exercise and Diet in Obesity Treatment: An Integrative System Dynamics Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hamid, Tarek K.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the utility of System Dynamics modeling as a vehicle for controlled experimentation to study and gain insight into the impacts of physical activity and diet on body weight and composition. Results underscored the significant interaction effects between physical activity, diet, and body composition and demonstrated the utility of…

  14. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do Like most people, ... active on a regular basis is one of the healthiest things you can do for yourself. Studies ...

  15. Effect on Spasticity After Performance of Dynamic-Repeated-Passive Ankle Joint Motion Exercise in Chronic Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Li Wu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity associated with abnormal muscle tone is a common motor disorder following stroke, and the spastic ankle may affect ambulatory function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term effect of dynamic-repeated-passive ankle movements with weight loading on ambulatory function and spastic hypertonia of chronic stroke patients. In this study, 12 chronic stroke patients with ankle spasticity and inefficient ambulatory ability were enrolled. Stretching of the plantar-flexors of the ankle in the standing position for 15 minutes was performed passively by a constant-speed and electrically powered device. The following evaluations were done before and immediately after the dynamic-repeated-passive ankle movements. Spastic hypertonia was assessed by the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS; range, 0–4, Achilles tendon reflexes test (DTR; range, 0–4, and ankle clonus (range, 0–5. Improvement in ambulatory ability was determined by the timed up-and-go test (TUG, the 10-minute walking test, and cadence (steps/minute. In addition, subjective experience of the influence of ankle spasticity on ambulation was scored by visual analog scale (VAS. Subjective satisfaction with the therapeutic effect of spasticity reduction was evaluated by a five-point questionnaire (1 = very poor, 2 = poor, 3 = acceptable, 4 = good, 5 = very good. By comparison of the results before and after intervention, these 12 chronic stroke patients presented significant reduction in MAS and VAS for ankle spasticity, the time for TUG and 10-minute walking speed (p < 0.01. The cadence also increased significantly (p < 0.05. In addition, subjective satisfaction with the short-term therapeutic effect was mainly good (ranging from acceptable to very good. In conclusion, 15 minutes of dynamic-repeated-passive ankle joint motion exercise with weight loading in the standing position by this simple constant-speed machine is effective in reducing ankle spasticity and improving

  16. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do ... can do for yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a lot ...

  17. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You Can Do ... can do for yourself. Studies have shown that exercise provides many health benefits and that older adults can gain a lot ...

  18. Morphological analysis of force/velocity relationship in dynamic exercise at varying loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limonta, Eloisa; Sacchi, Massimiliano

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the force/velocity (F/V) curve morphology among the entire concentric phase of the countermovement squat (CMS). The hypothesis is that F/V curve shape of the lower limb muscles complex is different from F/V isolated muscle curve and that these analyses could be useful in characterizing athletes' muscular capacity and training programs. Squat exercise was performed by 29 subjects (15 men and 14 women, divided into resistance and endurance athletes). The protocol was 6 x 1 CMS at maximal speed with increasing loads: 20, 35, 50, 65, 80, 90% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Displacement, speed, and acceleration of the weight bar, joint knee angles, knee angular speed, and total and normalized forces were collected. F/V relation was obtained by force and velocity values of each 10 degrees angular interval of the concentric phase for any load. Results show that the F/V relationship does not follow a linear shape and an equivalent criterion for all loads. We observed a "second peak force" statistically higher (p men showed a "second peak" higher and larger than that shown by endurance trained men. This indicated a higher ability to produce and maintain greater force at higher relative speed. These results may be helpful to identify the muscle characteristics of the athletes at various speeds and joint positions. With a phase division of the specific move, it will be possible to determine an individualized program to monitor the specific phases of technical moves and to evaluate the training effect in long run.

  19. Association between V̇O2max, handgrip strength, and musculoskeletal pain among construction and health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Lene Lehmann; Lunde, Lars-Kristian; Koch, Markus; Tveter, Anne Therese; Veiersted, Kaj Bo

    2017-03-21

    Construction and health care workers have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders, and they are assumed to have physically demanding jobs. Profession- and gender-specific associations between individual capacity and musculoskeletal pain have not been sufficiently investigated. The main aim of this study was to examine the association between individual capacity (maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max) and handgrip strength) and musculoskeletal pain among construction and health care workers. This cross-sectional study examined 137 construction and health care workers (58 women and 79 men) with a mean age of 41.8 years (standard deviation 12). Aerobic capacity was indirectly assessed by the Åstrand cycle test, and strength was assessed by a handgrip test. Musculoskeletal pain was described by total pain, divided into neck, shoulder, and low back pain, during the last 12 months, and it was dichotomized in below or above 30 days. Logistic regression was used to analyse the associations between V̇O2max, strength, and musculoskeletal pain in the total study sample and separately for construction and health care workers. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and selected mechanical and psychosocial factors. Every second participant (51.8%) reported pain in either neck, shoulders or low back for more than 30 days during the last 12 months. Among the health care workers, a small but significant association was found between a high V̇O2max, high handgrip strength, and a low level of musculoskeletal pain. No association was found for the construction workers. An association between V̇O2max, handgrip strength, and musculoskeletal pain was found for health care workers but not for construction workers. These results indicate that activities promoting individual capacity may reduce musculoskeletal pain for health care workers.

  20. Long-term follow-up of a randomized controlled trial on additional core stability exercises training for improving dynamic sitting balance and trunk control in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanas-Valdés, Rosa; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Caballero-Gómez, Fernanda Mª; du Port de Pontcharra-Serra, Helena; German-Romero, Ana; Urrútia, Gerard

    2017-03-01

    Analyse the effect of core stability exercises in addition to conventional physiotherapy training three months after the intervention ended. A randomized controlled trial. Outpatient services. Seventy-nine stroke survivors. In the intervention period, both groups underwent conventional physiotherapy performed five days/week for five weeks, and in addition the experimental group performed core stability exercises for 15 minutes/day. Afterwards, during a three-month follow-up period, both groups underwent usual care that could eventually include conventional physiotherapy or physical exercise but not in a controlled condition. Primary outcome was trunk control and dynamic sitting balance assessed by the Spanish-Version of Trunk Impairment Scale 2.0 and Function in Sitting Test. Secondary outcomes were standing balance and gait evaluated by the Berg Balance Scale, Tinetti Test, Brunel Balance Assessment, Spanish-Version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke and activities of daily living using the Barthel Index. A total of 68 subjects out of 79 completed the three-month follow-up period. The mean difference (SD) between groups was 0.78 (1.51) points ( p = 0.003) for total score on the Spanish-Version of Trunk Impairment Scale 2.0, 2.52 (6.46) points ( p = 0.009) for Function in Sitting Test, dynamic standing balance was 3.30 (9.21) points ( p= 0.009) on the Berg Balance Scale, gait was 0.82 (1.88) points ( p = 0.002) by Brunel Balance Assessment (stepping), and 1.11 (2.94) points ( p = 0.044) by Tinetti Test (gait), all in favour of core stability exercises. Core stability exercises plus conventional physiotherapy have a positive long-term effect on improving dynamic sitting and standing balance and gait in post-stroke patients.

  1. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise Cervical Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety ...

  2. Correlations of dominant handgrip strength with selected anthropometric and physiological characteristics in inter-university volleyball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamal Koley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to estimate the dominant handgrip strength and its correlations with selected anthropometric and physiological characteristics in inter-university volleyball players. Three anthropometric characteristics, four body composition parameters, two physical and two physiological characteristics were measured on randomly selected 63 inter-university volleyball players (38 males and 25 females aged 18.25 years from six Indian universities, competition was held in Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India. An adequate number of controls (n = 102, 52 males and 50 females were also taken from the same place for comparisons. In results, one way analysis of variance showed significant (p . .004 - .000 differences in all the variables between volleyball players and controls. In volley players, significantly positive correlations were found between right and left handgrip strength and all the variables studied except percent body fat (where the correlations were significantly negative. It may be concluded that dominant handgrip strength had some strong positive correlations with all the variables studied in inter-university volleyball players.

  3. The effects of backpack loads and spinal stabilization exercises on the dynamic foot pressure of elementary school children with idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suemin; Shim, Jemyung

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to measure and observe the changes in dynamic plantar pressures when school children carried specific bag loads, and to determine whether improved physical balance after an eight-week spinal stabilization exercise program can influences plantar pressures. [Subjects] The subjects were 10 school students with Cobb angles of 10° or greater. [Methods] Gait View Pro 1.0 (Alfoots, Korea) was were based on to measure the pressure of the participants' feet. Spinal stabilization exercises used TOGU Multi-roll Functional (TOGU, Germany) training. Dynamic plantar pressures were measured with bag loads of 0% no bag and 15% of subjects' body weight. The independent t test was performed to analyze changes in plantar pressures. [Results] The plantar pressure measurements of bag load of 0% of subjects' body weight before and after the spinal stabilization exercise program were not significantly different, but those of two foot areas with a 15% load were statistically significant (mt5, 67.32±24.25 and 51.77±25.52 kPa; lat heel, 126.00±20.46 and 102.08±23.87 kPa). [Conclusion] After performance of the spinal stabilization exercises subjects' overall plantar pressures were reduced, which may suggest that physical balance improved.

  4. Investigation of the relationship between anthropometric measurements and maximal handgrip strength in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidson, Christopher A; Jenkins, Gavin R; Yuen, Hon K; Abernathy, Anne M; Brannon, Mary Beth; Pung, Anna R; Ward, Kiara D; Weaver, Tara E

    2017-01-01

    To identify physical measures that predict maximal handgrip strength (MHGS) and provide evidence for identifying lack of sincerity of effort when assessing upper extremity weakness. This study investigated anthropometric measurements associated with MHGS of healthy young adults. A convenience sample of 150 healthy adults ages 19 to 34 years old completed the MHGS assessment, which was measured using a Jamar dynamometer according to the protocol of the American Society of Hand Therapists, for both dominant and non-dominant hands. Several anthropometric data were collected, which included height, body weight, forearm length, forearm circumference, hand length, and hand width. Multivariable linear regression analysis indicated gender and hand width were uniquely and significantly associated with participants' MHGS for dominant and non-dominant hand and accounted for more than 60% of the variance, with R2 = 0.60, P < 0.001 for the dominant hand model and R2 = 0.64, P < 0.001 for the non-dominant hand model. Among the forearm and hand anthropometric measures, hand width is the best predictor of MHGS in both the non-dominant and dominant hands for healthy young adults.

  5. The effect of actual and imaginary handgrip on postural stability during different balance conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderHill, M S; Wolf, E E; Langenderfer, J E; Ustinova, K I

    2014-09-01

    The stabilizing effect of holding an object on upright posture has been demonstrated in a variety of settings. The mechanism of this effect is unknown but could be attributed to either additional sensorimotor activity triggered by a hand contact or cognitive efforts related to performance of a supra-postural task. A potential mechanism was investigated by comparing postural stability in young healthy individuals while gripping a custom instrumented wooden stick with a 5N force and while imagining holding the same stick in the hand. Twenty subjects were tested during three standing balance conditions: on a stationary surface, on a freely moving rockerboard, and with an unexpected perturbation of 10° forward rockerboard tipping. Postural stability was evaluated as velocity of the center of mass (COM) and center of pressure (COP) compared across all experimental conditions. COM and COP velocities were equally reduced when subjects gripped the stick and imagined gripping while standing stationary and on the rockerboard. When perturbed, subjects failed to show any postural stability improvements regardless of handgrip task. Results indicate a stabilizing effect of focusing attention on motor task performance. This cognitive strategy does not appear to contribute any additional stabilization when subjects are perturbed. This study adds to the current understanding of postural stabilization strategies.

  6. Effect of yoga training on handgrip, respiratory pressures and pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandanmohan; Jatiya, Lakshmi; Udupa, Kaviraja; Bhavanani, Ananda Balayogi

    2003-10-01

    Although there are a number of reports on the effect of yoga training on pulmonary functions, very few studies have been undertaken on the effect of yoga training on respiratory pressures and handgrip endurance. Hence the present work was planned to study the effect of yoga training on hand grip strength (HGS), hand grip endurance (HGE), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), forced expiratory volume (FEV), forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1) and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). 20 school children in the age group of 12 to 15 years were given yoga training (asans and pranayams) for 6 months. 20 age and gender-matched students formed the control group. Yoga training produced statistically significant (P yoga training. In contrast, the increase in these parameters in the control group was statistically insignificant. Our study shows that yoga training for 6 months improves lung function, strength of inspiratory and expiratory muscles as well as skeletal muscle strength and endurance. It is suggested that yoga be introduced at school level in order to improve physiological functions, overall health and performance of students.

  7. The Effects of Adaptation to a Low Carbohydrate/High Fat Diet and Pre-Exercise Feeding on Exercise Endurance, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Dynamics in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    failure to maintain the treadmill workload despite repeated negative reinforcement . Cardiovascular Effects of Pre-Exercise Feeding. Following catheter...increase -.n external workload and/or fatigue as evidenced by an inability of the animal to maintain the work load despite repeated negative ... reinforcement . The maximal work load was then expressed in watts by the formula: speed(m/min) x (I÷(Z grade/100)) x 8 body veight(kg) divided by 6.12 (6.12 kg

  8. Respostas hemodinâmicas a um protocolo de treinamento isométrico de preensão manual Respuestas hemodinámicas a un protocolo de entrenamiento isométrico de prensión manual Hemodynamic responses to an isometric handgrip training protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Gil Soares de Araújo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: No passado, os exercícios isométricos foram proscritos para cardiopatas. Contudo, evidências recentes sugerem que um protocolo de treinamento isométrico de preensão manual (PTIM - quatro séries de dois minutos a 30% da força máxima - provoca efeitos favoráveis sobre a modulação autonômica e reduz os níveis de pressão arterial sistólica (PAS e diastólica (PAD de repouso. OBJETIVO: Visando obter subsídios para uma ampla aplicabilidade clínica, quantificamos as principais respostas hemodinâmicas durante uma sessão de PTIM em pacientes de um programa de exercício supervisionado. MÉTODOS: Quarenta e um pacientes (36 homens realizaram o PTIM com medidas da frequência cardíaca (FC e da PA antes, durante cada uma das duas séries feitas com o braço esquerdo e um minuto após a finalização. As medidas foram colhidas mediante um sinal de eletrocardiograma em um tensiômetro oscilométrico digital Tango+, previamente validado para condições de exercício físico. RESULTADOS: PTIM foi adequadamente realizado e sem a ocorrência de reações clínicas adversas. Observou-se um pequeno aumento dos níveis de PAS e de PAD, respectivamente, 16 e 7 mm Hg (p BACKGROUND: In the past, isometric exercises were proscribed for heart disease. However, recent evidence suggests that an isometric handgrip training (IHT protocol - four sets of two minutes at 30% of maximum strength - produces favorable effects on the autonomic modulation and reduces resting systolic (SBP and diastolic (DBP blood pressure. OBJECTIVE: Aiming at obtaining support for broad clinical applicability, we quantified the main hemodynamic responses during an IHT session in patients from a supervised physical exercise program. METHODS: Forty-one patients (36 men underwent the IHT with measurements of heart rate (HR and BP before, during each of the two series performed with the left arm and one minute after completion. Measurements were obtained by an

  9. OPPOSING EFFECTS OF SHEAR-MEDIATED DILATION AND MYOGENIC CONSTRICTION ON ARTERY DIAMETER IN RESPONSE TO HANDGRIP EXERCISE IN HUMANS.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, C.L.; Carter, H.H.; Naylor, L.H.; Dawson, E.A.; Marusic, P.; Hering, D.; Schlaich, M.P.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Green, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Whilst the impact of changes in blood flow and shear stress on artery function are well documented, the acute effects of increases in arterial pressure are less well described. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 30-minutes of elevated blood pressure, in the absence of ch

  10. Exercise Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sides of the head in most cases Secondary exercise headaches These headaches may cause: The same symptoms ... exercise dilates blood vessels inside the skull. Secondary exercise headaches Secondary exercise headaches are caused by an ...

  11. Relationships between the extent of apnea-induced bradycardia and the vascular response in the arm and leg during dynamic two-legged knee extension exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Tsukamoto, Rina; Kawai, Katsuhito; Hayashi, Keiji; Koga, Shunsaku; Ichinose, Masashi

    2012-02-01

    Our aim was to test the hypothesis that apnea-induced hemodynamic responses during dynamic exercise in humans differ between those who show strong bradycardia and those who show only mild bradycardia. After apnea-induced changes in heart rate (HR) were evaluated during dynamic exercise, 23 healthy subjects were selected and divided into a large response group (L group; n = 11) and a small response group (S group; n = 12). While subjects performed a two-legged dynamic knee extension exercise at a work load that increased HR by 30 beats/min, apnea-induced changes in HR, cardiac output (CO), mean arterial pressure (MAP), arterial O(2) saturation (Sa(O(2))), forearm blood flow (FBF), and leg blood flow (LBF) were measured. During apnea, HR in the L group (54 ± 2 beats/min) was lower than in the S group (92 ± 3 beats/min, P leg vascular conductance (LVC), and total vascular conductance (TVC) were all reduced, and MAP was increased in both groups, although the changes in CO, TVC, LBF, LVC, and MAP were larger in the L group than in the S group (P muscle regions.

  12. The effect of additional core stability exercises on improving dynamic sitting balance and trunk control for subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanas-Valdés, Rosa; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Caballero-Gómez, Fernanda Mª; Hernández-Valiño, Montserrat; Urrútia Cuchí, Gerard

    2016-10-01

    To examine the effect of core stability exercises on trunk control, dynamic sitting and standing balance, gait, and activities of daily living in subacute stroke patients. A randomized controlled trial. Inpatient rehabilitation hospital in two centres. Eighty patients (mean of 23.25 (±16.7) days post-stroke) were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a control group. Both groups underwent conventional therapy for five days/week for five weeks and the experimental group performed core stability exercises for 15 min/day. The patients were assessed before and after intervention. The Trunk Impairment Scale (Spanish-Version) and Function in Sitting Test were used to measure the primary outcome of dynamic sitting balance. Secondary outcome measures were standing balance and gait as evaluated via Berg Balance Scale, Tinetti Test, Brunel Balance Assessment, Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke (Spanish-Version), and activities of daily living using Barthel Index. The experimental group showed statistically significant differences for all of the total scale scores (PCore stability exercises in addition to conventional therapy improves trunk control, dynamic sitting balance, standing balance, gait and activities of daily living in subacute post-stroke patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Strong or Weak Handgrip? Normative Reference Values for the German Population across the Life Course Stratified by Sex, Age, and Body Height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiber, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Handgrip strength is an important biomarker of healthy ageing and a powerful predictor of future morbidity and mortality both in younger and older populations. Therefore, the measurement of handgrip strength is increasingly used as a simple but efficient screening tool for health vulnerability. This study presents normative reference values for handgrip strength in Germany for use in research and clinical practice. It is the first study to provide normative data across the life course that is stratified by sex, age, and body height. The study used a nationally representative sample of test participants ages 17-90. It was based on pooled data from five waves of the German Socio-Economic Panel (2006-2014) and involved a total of 11,790 persons living in Germany (providing 25,285 observations). Handgrip strength was measured with a Smedley dynamometer. Results showed that peak mean values of handgrip strength are reached in men's and women's 30s and 40s after which handgrip strength declines in linear fashion with age. Following published recommendations, the study used a cut-off at 2 SD below the sex-specific peak mean value across the life course to define a 'weak grip'. Less than 10% of women and men aged 65-69 were classified as weak according to this definition, shares increasing to about half of the population aged 80-90. Based on survival analysis that linked handgrip strength to a relevant outcome, however, a 'critically weak grip' that warrants further examination was estimated to commence already at 1 SD below the group-specific mean value.

  14. Acute exercise has a general facilitative effect on cognitive function: A combined ERP temporal dynamics and BDNF study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Alderman, Brandon L; Chu, Chien-Heng; Wang, Chun-Chih; Song, Tai-Fen; Chen, Feng-Tzu

    2017-02-01

    This study examined whether acute moderate intensity exercise results in a general or selective improvement in cognitive function. In addition, multiple stimulus-locked ERP components and serum BDNF levels were assessed to investigate potential neurobiological mechanisms underlying acute exercise effects on select aspects of cognitive performance. Thirty young adults were recruited and participated in exercise and reading control sessions in a counterbalanced order. Following treatments, the Stroop task was administrated, and N1, N2, P3, and N450 components of the ERP waveform were recorded and analyzed. Additionally, blood samples were withdrawn immediately following exercise or rest conditions prior to administration of the Stroop task. Acute exercise facilitated response times for both Stroop congruent and incongruent task conditions, with a similar magnitude of improvement. Larger P3 and reduced N450 amplitudes as well as decreased N450 latency were observed following exercise, but no effects on N1 and N2 components were found. This dose of exercise also did not influence serum BDNF levels. These findings suggest that moderate intensity acute exercise results in a generalized rather than selective improvement in cognition. The facilitation may be related to an increase in attentional or neural resource allocation and conflict detection processes reflected by longer latency endogenous components (P3, N450), but is not influenced by earlier sensory and monitoring processes revealed by earlier ERP components or by serum levels of BDNF.

  15. Effect of β-blockade on lung function, exercise performance and dynamic hyperinflation in people with arterial vascular disease with and without COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Angela; Parry, Matthew; West, Malcolm A; Asher, Rebecca; Jack, Sandy; Duffy, Nick; Torella, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Introduction β Blockers are important treatment for ischaemic heart disease and heart failure; however, there has long been concern about their use in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to fear of symptomatic worsening of breathlessness. Despite growing evidence of safety and efficacy, they remain underused. We examined the effect of β-blockade on lung function, exercise performance and dynamic hyperinflation in a group of vascular surgical patients, a high proportion of who were expected to have COPD. Methods People undergoing routine abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surveillance were sequentially recruited from vascular surgery clinic. They completed plethysmographically measured lung function and incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing with dynamic measurement of inspiratory capacity while taking and not taking β blocker. Results 48 participants completed tests while taking and not taking β blockers with 38 completing all assessments successfully. 15 participants (39%) were found to have, predominantly mild and undiagnosed, COPD. People with COPD had airflow obstruction, increased airway resistance (Raw) and specific conductance (sGaw), static hyperinflation and dynamically hyperinflated during exercise. In the whole group, β-blockade led to a small fall in FEV1 (0.1 L/2.8% predicted) but did not affect Raw, sGaw, static or dynamic hyperinflation. No difference in response to β-blockade was seen in those with and without COPD. Conclusions In people with AAA, β-blockade has little effect on lung function and dynamic hyperinflation in those with and without COPD. In this population, the prevalence of COPD is high and consideration should be given to case finding with spirometry. Trial registration number NCT02106286.

  16. DYNAMIC HIP ADDUCTION, ABDUCTION AND ABDOMINAL EXERCISES FROM THE HOLMICH GROIN-INJURY PREVENTION PROGRAM ARE INTENSE ENOUGH TO BE CONSIDERED STRENGTHENING EXERCISES - A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krommes, Kasper; Bandholm, Thomas; Jakobsen, Markus D

    2017-01-01

    the Hölmich program using electromyography (EMG) and possibly categorize them as strength-training exercises. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: 21 adult male soccer players training >5 hours weekly were included. Surface-EMG was recorded from adductor longus, gluteus medius, rectus abdominis......% nEMG (95% CI 76-100) in gluteus medius, FK evoked 82% nEMG (95% CI 68-96) rectus abdominis, and 101% nEMG (95% CI 85-118) in external obliques. During CSS 

  17. A system model of the effects of exercise on plasma Interleukin-6 dynamics in healthy individuals: Role of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morettini, Micaela; Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Sacchetti, Massimo; Castiglione, Filippo; Mazzà, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been recently shown to play a central role in glucose homeostasis, since it stimulates the production and secretion of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) from intestinal L-cells and pancreas, leading to an enhanced insulin response. In resting conditions, IL-6 is mainly produced by the adipose tissue whereas, during exercise, skeletal muscle contractions stimulate a marked IL-6 secretion as well. Available mathematical models describing the effects of exercise on glucose homeostasis, however, do not account for this IL-6 contribution. This study aimed at developing and validating a system model of exercise's effects on plasma IL-6 dynamics in healthy humans, combining the contributions of both adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. A two-compartment description was adopted to model plasma IL-6 changes in response to oxygen uptake's variation during an exercise bout. The free parameters of the model were estimated by means of a cross-validation procedure performed on four different datasets. A low coefficient of variation (definition of more tailored interventions for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  18. Cardiovascular control during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela, Flemming; Mohr, Thomas; Jensen, Christina M R

    2003-01-01

    We studied the role of the central nervous system, neural feedback from contracting skeletal muscles, and sympathetic activity to the heart in the control of heart rate and blood pressure during 2 levels of dynamic exercise.......We studied the role of the central nervous system, neural feedback from contracting skeletal muscles, and sympathetic activity to the heart in the control of heart rate and blood pressure during 2 levels of dynamic exercise....

  19. Force time-history affects fatigue accumulation during repetitive handgrip tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Michael W; Hodder, Joanne N; Wells, Ryan; Potvin, Jim R

    2015-02-01

    Muscle fatigue is associated with a higher risk of workplace injury, in particular during repetitive tasks. This study aimed to identify the effect of a complex force-time history (a task with multiple different submaximal effort levels) on fatigue accumulation and recovery during a handgrip task. We measured surface electromyography of the brachioradialis (BRD) and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) of ten right hand dominant females with no history of upper limb injury while they performed a complex submaximal visually targeted gripping task. The task consisted of 15%, 30%, 45%, 30%, and 15% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) plateaus. Each plateau was held for 15s, followed by a 3s MVC and 3s of rest. The "pyramid" was repeated until fatigue criteria were met. Grip force, average EMG and mean power frequency (MnPF) for first cycle and fatigued last cycle, were compared. Post-plateau peak grip force was on average 20.5% MVC lower during the last cycle (pMVC after the first 15% MVC plateau (from baseline), by 5.3% MVC after the 30% MVC plateau and 6.8% MVC after the 45% MVC plateau. Further accumulation of fatigue after the second 30% MVC plateau however was minimal, only decreasing by 1.6% MVC. Recovery appeared to occur during the last 15% MVC plateau with an increase in post plateau grip force of 1.6% MVC. Interestingly, MnPF parameters confirmed significant fatigue accumulation during the back end of a force pyramid. We conclude that in a pattern of contractions with ascending, then descending force intensity, voluntary force recovery was present when the preceding force was of a lower intensity. These findings indicate preceding demands play a role in fatigue accumulation during complex tasks.

  20. Reduced arterial diameter during static exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H L; Mitchell, J H; Friedman, D B

    1995-01-01

    of another limb. Static exercise increased heart rate and mean arterial pressure, which were largest during one-leg knee extension. After exercise heart rate and mean arterial pressure returned to the resting level. No changes were recorded in arterial carbon dioxide tension, and the rate of perceived......In eight subjects luminal diameter of the resting limb radial and dorsalis pedis arteries was determined by high-resolution ultrasound (20 MHz). This measurement was followed during rest and during 2 min of static handgrip or of one-leg knee extension at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction...... exertion was approximately 15 units after both types of exercise. The dorsalis pedis arterial diameter was 1.50 +/- 0.20 mm (mean and SE) and the radial AD 2.45 +/- 0.12 mm. During both types of contractions the luminal diameters decreased approximately 3.5% within the first 30 s (P

  1. Feasibility and benefits of group-based exercise in residential aged care adults: a pilot study for the GrACE programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Fien

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to examine the feasibility and benefits of a group resistance training exercise programme for improving muscle function in institutionalised older adults. A feasibility and acceptability study was designed for a residential aged care (RAC facility, based on the Gold Coast, Australia. Thirty-seven adults, mean age 86.8 ± 6.1 years (30 females living in a RAC facility. Participants were allocated into an exercise (n = 20 or control (n = 17 group. The exercise group, the Group Aged Care Exercise (GrACE programme, performed 12 weeks of twice weekly resistance exercises. Feasibility was measured via recruitment rate, measurement (physiological and surveys completion rate, loss-to-follow-up, exercise session adherence, adverse events, and ratings of burden and acceptability. Muscle function was assessed using gait speed, sit-to-stand and handgrip strength assessments. All intervention participants completed pre- and post-assessments, and the exercise intervention, with 85% (n = 17 of the group attending ≥ 18 of the 24 sessions and 15% (n = 3 attending all sessions. Acceptability was 100% with exercise participants, and staff who had been involved with the programme strongly agreed that the participants “Benefited from the programme.” There were no adverse events reported by any participants during the exercise sessions. When compared to the control group, the exercise group experienced significant improvements in gait speed (F(4.078 = 8.265, p = 0.007, sit to stand performance (F(3.24 = 11.033, p = 0.002 and handgrip strength (F(3.697 = 26.359, p < 0.001. Resistance training via the GrACE programme is feasible, safe and significantly improves gait speed, sit-to-stand performance and handgrip strength in RAC adults.

  2. Validation and reliability of a modified sphygmomanometer for the assessment of handgrip strength in Parkinson´s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia M. Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Handgrip strength is currently considered a predictor of overall muscle strength and functional capacity. Therefore, it is important to find reliable and affordable instruments for this analysis, such as the modified sphygmomanometer test (MST. OBJECTIVES: To assess the concurrent criterion validity of the MST, to compare the MST with the Jamar dynamometer, and to analyze the reproducibility (i.e. reliability and agreement of the MST in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD. METHOD: The authors recruited 50 subjects, 24 with PD (65.5±6.2 years of age and 26 healthy elderly subjects (63.4±7.2 years of age. The handgrip strength was measured using the Jamar dynamometer and modified sphygmomanometer. The concurrent criterion validity was analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient and a simple linear regression test. The reproducibility of the MST was evaluated with the coefficient of intra-class correlation (ICC2,1, the standard error of measurement (SEM, the minimal detectable change (MDC, and the Bland-Altman plot. For all of the analyses, α≤0.05 was considered a risk. RESULTS: There was a significant correlation of moderate magnitude (r≥0.45 between the MST and the Jamar dynamometer. The MST had excellent reliability (ICC2,1≥0.7. The SEM and the MDC were adequate; however, the Bland-Altman plot indicated an unsatisfactory interrater agreement. CONCLUSIONS: The MST exhibited adequate validity and excellent reliability and is, therefore, suitable for monitoring the handgrip strength in PD. However, if the goal is to compare the measurements between examiners, the authors recommend that the data be interpreted with caution.

  3. T-lymphocyte subset dynamics in well-treated HIV-infected men during a bout of exhausting exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, Carsten; Hansen, Birgitte R; Kolte, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    In healthy individuals the substantial lymphocytosis during a bout of exhausting exercise constitutes primarily mature T cells from the peripheral lymphoid organs but naïve T cells are also recruited. This study investigated whether the defective CD4 + T-lymphocyte count in peripheral blood during......-infected patients are also reflected in defective acutely mobilized active immune cells following exhausting exercise. The CD4 + T-lymphocyte count is highly sensitive to physical activity....

  4. Assessing Exercise Limitation Using Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K. Stickland

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET is an important physiological investigation that can aid clinicians in their evaluation of exercise intolerance and dyspnea. Maximal oxygen consumption (V˙O2max is the gold-standard measure of aerobic fitness and is determined by the variables that define oxygen delivery in the Fick equation (V˙O2 = cardiac output × arterial-venous O2 content difference. In healthy subjects, of the variables involved in oxygen delivery, it is the limitations of the cardiovascular system that are most responsible for limiting exercise, as ventilation and gas exchange are sufficient to maintain arterial O2 content up to peak exercise. Patients with lung disease can develop a pulmonary limitation to exercise which can contribute to exercise intolerance and dyspnea. In these patients, ventilation may be insufficient for metabolic demand, as demonstrated by an inadequate breathing reserve, expiratory flow limitation, dynamic hyperinflation, and/or retention of arterial CO2. Lung disease patients can also develop gas exchange impairments with exercise as demonstrated by an increased alveolar-to-arterial O2 pressure difference. CPET testing data, when combined with other clinical/investigation studies, can provide the clinician with an objective method to evaluate cardiopulmonary physiology and determination of exercise intolerance.

  5. Vigorous exercise increases brain lactate and Glx (glutamate+glutamine): a dynamic 1H-MRS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, Richard J; Casazza, Gretchen A; Buonocore, Michael H; Tanase, Costin

    2011-08-15

    Vigorous exercise increases lactate and glucose uptake by the brain in excess of the increase in brain oxygen uptake. The metabolic fate of this non-oxidized carbohydrate entering the brain is poorly understood, but accumulation of lactate in the brain and/or increased net synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters are possible explanations. Previous proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) studies using conventional pulse sequences have not detected changes in brain lactate following exercise. This contrasts with 1H-MRS studies showing increased brain lactate when blood lactate levels are raised by an intravenous infusion of sodium lactate. Using a J-editing 1H-MRS technique for measuring lactate, we demonstrated a significant 19% increase in lactate in the visual cortex following graded exercise to approximately 85% of predicted maximum heart rate. However, the magnitude of the increase was insufficient to account for more than a small fraction of the non-oxidized carbohydrate entering the brain with exercise. We also report a significant 18% increase in Glx (combined signal from glutamate and glutamine) in visual cortex following exercise, which may represent an activity-dependent increase in glutamate. Future studies will be necessary to test the hypothesis that non-oxidized carbohydrate entering the brain during vigorous exercise is directed, in part, toward increased net synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters. The possible relevance of these findings to panic disorder and major depression is discussed.

  6. Effects of maximum dynamic exercise on electrocardiograms Efectos del ejercicio dinámico máximo sobre electrocardiograma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ponce

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

     

    The effects of maximal dynamic exercise (sprint has been studied on the ECG of 100 greyhound who run in programmed 350 m races. Two ECG were taken in each animal: one before the race and the other after the effort. After the race there is a significant increase of the voltage in the waves P, R and T in DII, DIII and aVF, and the T waves are symetrical in 96% of the subjets. The highest voltage and duration of the P wawes represent the efficacy of the atrial function on the maintenance of the cardiac output. The increase of the amplitude of the R and T waves would be a consequence of the systolic volumen increase and the establishment of transitory myocardial ischemia. The average heart rate increases in 21.740"30.109 b.p.m., beeing the difference significant. When we analyse the ECG after exercise with the resting ECG in relation with age, weight, sex, category and rank we deduce that the differences arent related with those groups, except to the heart rate and age, observing that the capacity in increasing it decreases with age.
    KEY WORDS: Oxygen deficit, anaerobic capacity, performance, validity, fitness.

    Se han estudiado los efectos del ejercicio dinámico máximo (sprint sobre el ECG en 100 galgos greyhound que participaban en carreras programadas de 350 m. Se realizaron dos ECG en cada animal: uno antes de la carrera y otro postesfuerzo. Después de la carrera hay un aumento significativo del voltaje de las ondas P, R y T en DII, DIII y aVF, y las ondas T son simétricas en el 96% de los sujetos. El mayor voltaje y duración de las ondas P representan la eficacia de la función auricular para el mantenimiento del volumen minuto. El incremento de la amplitud de las ondas R y T sería consecuencia del aumento del volumen sistólico y de la instauración de isquemia miocárdica relativa transitoria. La

  7. Effects of balance ability and handgrip height on kinematics of the gait, torso, and pelvis in elderly women using a four-wheeled walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyuk-Jae; Ko, Chang-Yong; Kang, Sungjae; Ryu, Jeicheong; Mun, Museong; Jeon, Hye-Seon

    2015-02-01

    Numerous elderly individuals use the four-wheeled walker (FWW) as a gait-assistive device. The walker's handgrip height is important for correct use. However, few clinical studies have investigated the biomechanical effects of the FWW's handgrip height on balance. Therefore, the present study assessed kinematic features of the gait, torso and pelvis during use of the FWW at two levels of handgrip height (48% vs 55% of the subject's height) while assessing balance in older adults. A total of 20 older adults were allocated into two groups according to the Berg Balance Scale (BBS): good balance (GB; BBS≥46) versus poor balance (PB; BBSbalance. Additionally, greater than 48% of the body height might be appropriate for older adults with poor balance. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or delay many diseases and disabilities. In some cases, exercise is an effective treatment for many chronic conditions. For example, studies show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or ...

  9. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of medicines for a variety of illnesses. Prevent or Delay Disease Scientists have found that staying physically active and exercising regularly can help prevent or delay many diseases and disabilities. In some ...

  10. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A SPECIALIST Prevention Strengthening Exercise Committee Exercise Committee Core Strengthening Many popular forms of exercise focus on ... acute pain, you should stop doing it. Transverse Core Strengthening This strengthens the muscles that cross from ...

  11. T(1) measurement of (31)P metabolites at rest and during steady-state dynamic exercise using a clinical nuclear magnetic resonance scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cettolo, V; Piorico, C; Francescato, M P

    2006-03-01

    This article illustrates some problems and possible solutions to determine the apparent spin-lattice relaxation time (T(1)) of the muscular (31)P metabolites at rest and during dynamic steady-state exercise using a clinical 1.5 T NMR scanner and a surface coil. T(1) was first estimated on a phosphates solution (phantom) using four different acquisition protocols, all based on the multiple-point "progressive saturation" method, and by fitting each data set with two different mathematical models. Subsequently, two of the four protocols and both models were used to estimate T(1) both at rest and during exercise on the calf muscles of 10 healthy volunteers. Experimental results obtained on the phantom showed that T(1) is greatly affected by the longest nominal explored repetition time (P<0.001) and by the mathematical model (P<0.001), ranging from 0.65+/-0.10 to 8.4+/-0.8 s. The two acquisition protocols applied on volunteers yielded significantly different T(1) (P<0.001), which were also rather different from the literature values for the same metabolites. Nevertheless, independently of the acquisition protocol and/or the fitting procedure, T(1) of all muscular phosphagens did not change statistically from rest to steady-state aerobic exercise.

  12. Changes in Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Procollagen Type-1 C-Peptide after Static and Dynamic Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Keitaro; Yuki, Kazuhito; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of two types of nonweight-bearing exercise on changes in bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and pro-collagen type 1 C-peptide (P1P). BAP is a specific marker of bone synthesis, whereas P1P reflects synthesis of type 1 collagen in other organs as well as bone. Eight participants performed static and dynamic…

  13. High level swimming performance and its relation to non-specific parameters: a cross-sectional study on maximum handgrip isometric strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Nuno D; Silva, António J; Fernandes, Ricardo J; Barbosa, Tiago M; Costa, Aldo M; Marinho, Daniel A; Marques, Mário C

    2012-06-01

    The relationship between handgrip isometric strength and swimming performance was assessed in the four competitive swimming strokes in swimmers of different age groups and of both sexes. 78 national-level Portuguese swimmers (39 males, 39 females) were selected for this study. Grip strength, previously used as a marker of overall strength to predict future swimming performance, was measured using a hand dynamometer. The best competitive time at 100 and 200 m in all four swimming strokes were converted into 2010 FINA points. Non-parametric tests were used to evaluate differences between groups. Pearson product-moment correlations were computed to verify the association between variables. Handgrip maximum isometric strength was significantly correlated with swimming performance, particularly among female swimmers. Among female age group swimmers, the relationship between handgrip and 100-m freestyle was significant. Handgrip isometric strength seems to be related to swimming performance, especially to 100-m freestyle and in female swimmers. For all other distances and strokes, technique and training probably are more influential than semi-hereditary strength markers such as grip strength.

  14. Evaluating the Relation between Dominant and Non-Dominant Hand Perimeters and Handgrip Strength of Basketball, Volleyball, Badminton and Handball Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Defne Öcal

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it's aimed to evaluate the relation between dominant and non-dominant hand perimeters and handgrip strength of basketball, volleyball, badminton and handball athletes. Totally 101 active athletes (49 females, 52 male), of the average age in female 20±1.42 years, in male 21±1.99 years, joined to this study. Height, body weight, BMI…

  15. Contribution of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor to exercise-induced vasodilation in health and hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkor, Muhiddin A; Hayek, Salim S; Rahman, Ayaz M; Murrow, Jonathan R; Kavtaradze, Nino; Lin, Ji; Manatunga, Amita; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2015-02-01

    The role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in either the healthy circulation or in those with hypercholesterolemia is unknown. In healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF) using strain-gauge plethysmography at rest, during graded handgrip exercise, and after sodium nitroprusside infusion. Measurements were repeated after l-NMMA, tetraethylammonium (TEA), and combined infusions. At rest, l-NMMA infusion reduced FBF in healthy but not hypercholesterolemic subjects. At peak exercise, vasodilation was lower in hypercholesterolemic compared to healthy subjects (274% vs 438% increase in FBF, p=0.017). TEA infusion reduced exercise-induced vasodilation in both healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects (27%, pvasodilation in hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion, exercise-induced vasodilation is impaired and predominantly mediated by EDHF in hypercholesterolemic subjects. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION IDENTIFIER NCT00166166:

  16. Dynamic Energy Balance: An Integrated Framework for Discussing Diet and Physical Activity in Obesity Prevention-Is it More than Eating Less and Exercising More?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manore, Melinda M; Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Lindsay, Anne R; Hongu, Nobuko; Houtkooper, Linda

    2017-08-19

    Understanding the dynamic nature of energy balance, and the interrelated and synergistic roles of diet and physical activity (PA) on body weight, will enable nutrition educators to be more effective in implementing obesity prevention education. Although most educators recognize that diet and PA are important for weight management, they may not fully understand their impact on energy flux and how diet alters energy expenditure and energy expenditure alters diet. Many nutrition educators have little training in exercise science; thus, they may not have the knowledge essential to understanding the benefits of PA for health or weight management beyond burning calories. This paper highlights the importance of advancing nutrition educators' understanding about PA, and its synergistic role with diet, and the value of incorporating a dynamic energy balance approach into obesity-prevention programs. Five key points are highlighted: (1) the concept of dynamic vs. static energy balance; (2) the role of PA in weight management; (3) the role of PA in appetite regulation; (4) the concept of energy flux; and (5) the integration of dynamic energy balance into obesity prevention programs. The rationale for the importance of understanding the physiological relationship between PA and diet for effective obesity prevention programming is also reviewed.

  17. T-lymphocyte subset dynamics in well-treated HIV-infected men during a bout of exhausting exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirksen, Carsten; Hansen, Birgitte R; Kolte, Lilian; Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove

    2015-01-01

    In healthy individuals the substantial lymphocytosis during a bout of exhausting exercise constitutes primarily mature T cells from the peripheral lymphoid organs but naïve T cells are also recruited. This study investigated whether the defective CD4 + T-lymphocyte count in peripheral blood during rest in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients would also be observed following a maximal output ergometer bicycle test. At rest, in 45 well-treated HIV-infected patients, mature and naïve CD4 + T-lymphocyte counts were decreased whereas the less immune active CD8 + T lymphocytes were increased compared with 10 healthy control subjects. In response to exercise mature and naïve CD4 + T lymphocytes increased less and mature and naïve CD8 + T lymphocytes increased most in HIV-infected patients. In conclusion, defective resting mature and naïve CD4 + T lymphocytes in well-treated HIV-infected patients are also reflected in defective acutely mobilized active immune cells following exhausting exercise. The CD4 + T-lymphocyte count is highly sensitive to physical activity.

  18. Glucocorticoids improve high-intensity exercise performance in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casuso, Rafael A; Melskens, Lars; Bruhn, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    It was investigated whether oral dexamethasone (DEX) administration improves exercise performance by reducing the initial rate of muscle fatigue development during dynamic exercise.......It was investigated whether oral dexamethasone (DEX) administration improves exercise performance by reducing the initial rate of muscle fatigue development during dynamic exercise....

  19. Exercise addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtenstein, Mia Beck; Christiansen, Erik; Elklit, Ask

    2014-01-01

    Exercise addiction is characterized by excessive exercise patterns with potential negative consequences such as overuse injuries. The aim of this study was to compare eating disorder symptoms, quality of life, personality traits and attachments styles in exercisers with and without indications...... of exercise addiction. A case-control study with 121 exercisers was conducted. The exercisers were categorized into an addiction group (n=41) or a control group (n=80) on the basis of their responses to the Exercise Addiction Inventory. The participants completed the Eating Disorder Inventory 2, the Short...... of excitement-seeking and achievement striving whereas scores on straightforwardness and compliance were lower than in the exercise control group. The addiction group reported more bodily pain and injuries. This study supports the hypothesis that exercise addiction is separate to an eating disorder, but shares...

  20. Effects of a Pilates exercise program on muscle strength, postural control and body composition: results from a pilot study in a group of post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamin, M; Gobbo, S; Bullo, V; Zanotto, T; Vendramin, B; Duregon, F; Cugusi, L; Camozzi, V; Zaccaria, M; Neunhaeuserer, D; Ermolao, A

    2015-12-01

    Participation in exercise programs is heartily recommended for older adults since the level of physical fitness directly influences functional independence. The aim of this present study was to investigate the effects of supervised Pilates exercise training on the physical function, hypothesizing that a period of Pilates exercise training (PET) can increase overall muscle strength, body composition, and balance, during single and dual-task conditions, in a group of post-menopausal women. Twenty-five subjects, aged 59 to 66 years old, were recruited. Eligible participants were assessed prior and after 3 months of PET performed twice per week. Muscular strength was evaluated with handgrip strength (HGS) test, 30-s chair sit-to-stand test (30CST), and abdominal strength (AST) test. Postural control and dual-task performance were measured through a stabilometric platform while dynamic balance with 8 ft up and go test. Finally, body composition was assessed by means of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Statistically significant improvements were detected on HGS (+8.22%), 30CST (+23.41%), 8 ft up and go test (-5.95%), AST (+30.81%), medio-lateral oscillations in open eyes and dual-task condition (-22.03% and -10.37%). Pilates was effective in increasing upper body, lower body, and abdominal muscle strength. No changes on body composition were detected. Results on this investigation indicated also that 12-week of mat Pilates is not sufficient to determine a clinical meaningful improvement on static balance in single and dual-task conditions.

  1. Effects of Supplemental Citrulline-Malate Ingestion on Blood Lactate, Cardiovascular Dynamics, and Resistance Exercise Performance in Trained Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Benjamin; Kavazis, Andreas N; Luckett, William

    2016-01-01

    Citrulline-malate (CM) has been proposed to provide an ergogenic effect during resistance exercise; however, there is a paucity of research investigating these claims. Therefore, we investigated the impact that CM supplementation would have on repeated bouts of resistance exercise. Fourteen resistance-trained males participated in a randomized, counterbalanced, double-blind study. Subjects were randomly assigned to placebo (PL) or CM (8 g) and performed three sets each of chin-ups, reverse chin-ups, and push-ups to failure. One week later, subjects ingested the other supplement and performed the same protocol. Blood lactate (BLa), heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP) were measured preexercise, with BLa measured a second time immediately following the last set, while HR and BP were measured 5 and 10 min postexercise. Citrulline-malate ingestion significantly increased the amount of repetitions performed for each exercise (chin-ups: PL = 28.4 ± 7.1, CM = 32.2 ± 5.6, p = .003; reverse chin-ups: PL = 26.6 ± 5.6, CM = 32.1 ± 7.1, p = .017; push-ups: PL = 89.1 ± 37.4, CM = 97.7 ± 36.1, p < .001). Blood lactate data indicated a time effect (p < .001), but no treatment differences (p = .935). Systolic BP data did not show differences for time (p = .078) or treatment (p = .119). Diastolic BP data did not show differences for time (p = .069), but indicated treatment differences (p = .014) for subjects ingesting CM. Collectively, these findings suggests that CM increased upper-body resistance performance in trained college-age males.

  2. Simulation Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Pat

    1976-01-01

    Describes five simulation exercises: a problem for a student teacher, an industrial relations game, a series of student problems; an international relations crisis, and a sociological exercise on public and private opinions. (LS)

  3. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provide well-rounded core strengthening programs. Simple exercises can be done at home as well. Some specific ... benefit from this exercise... Sagittal Core Strengthening You can stretch and strengthen the low back muscles that ...

  4. Muscle metabolism from near infrared spectroscopy during rhythmic handgrip in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Pott, F; Madsen, P;

    1998-01-01

    with forearm oxygen uptake (VO2) [flow x (oxygen saturation in arnterial blood-oxygen saturation in venous blood, SaO2 - SvO2)], and with the 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy-determined ratio of inorganic phosphate to phosphocreatine (P(I):PCr). During ischaemia at rest, the fall in NIRS-O2 was more....... To conclude, NIRS-O2 of forearm flexor muscles closely reflected the exercise intensity and the metabolic rate determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy but not that rate derived from flow and the arterio-venous oxygen difference....

  5. Use of diffuse optical spectroscopy to monitor muscle and brain oxygenation dynamics during isometric and isokinetic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Goutham; Cotter, Joshua; Reuland, Warren; Warren, Robert V.; Mirzaei Zarandi, Soroush M.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Galassetti, Pietro

    2013-03-01

    The use of near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS-20, Hamamatsu Corporation) in two resistance type exercise applications in human subjects is described. First, using isometric flexion of the biceps, we compared the magnitude and relevance of tissue hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation (stO2) changes when assuming constant scattering versus continuous measurement of reduced scattering coefficients at three wavelengths. It was found that the assumption of constant scattering resulted in significant errors in hemoglobin concentration assessment during sustained isometric contractions. Secondly, we tested the effect of blood flow restriction (BFR) on oxygenation in a muscle (vastus medialis oblique, VMO) and in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of the brain. The BFR training technique resulted in considerably more fatigability in subjects, and correlated with reduced muscle stO2 between sets of exertion. Additionally, exercise with BFR resulted in greater PFC deoxygenation than a condition with equivalent work performance but no BFR. These experiments demonstrate novel applications for diffuse optical spectroscopy in strength testing and targeted muscle rehabilitation.

  6. Intrinsic heart rate recovery after dynamic exercise is improved with an increased omega-3 index in healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macartney, Michael J; Hingley, Lachlan; Brown, Marc A; Peoples, Gregory E; McLennan, Peter L

    2014-12-28

    Dietary fish consumption contributes to a reduced risk of cardiac mortality. In the present study, the effect of low-dose fish oil (FO) supplementation on heart rate (HR) response to intense exercise and recovery was investigated in physically fit males. The subjects (n 26) were supplemented (double-blind, parallel design) with (2 × 1 g/d) soya bean oil (control) or tuna FO providing the long-chain n-3 PUFA DHA (560 mg) and EPA (140 mg). Erythrocyte omega-3 index (%EPA+DHA), HR, HR variability and HR recovery were analysed during rest, intense exercise and recovery at baseline and after 8 weeks of supplementation. The mean erythrocyte omega-3 index, which did not differ between the groups at baseline (control 4.2 (sem 0.2), n 13; FO 4.7 (sem 0.2), n 13), remained unchanged in the control group (3.9 (sem 0.2)), but increased in the FO group (6.3 (sem 0.3); Pexercise over 5 min, fewer total heart beats were recorded in the FO group (-22 (sem 6) ( = -4.5 beats/min)), but not in the control group (+1 (sem 4)) (Pexercise HR and improved HR recovery without compromising the peak HR. A direct influence of DHA via reductions in the cardiac intrinsic beat rate was balanced by a reciprocal decrease in vagal tone.

  7. Effect of Dynamic Platform Lateral Step-Up versus Stable Platform Lateral Step-Up Weight Bearing Exercise in Hip Abductor Strengthening on Healthy Male Volunteers - Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagatheesan Alagesan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective & Background: To determine the effect of the dynamic platform lateral step-up and stable platform lateral step-up weight bearing standing exercise in strengthening of hip abductor. Many researchers have reported that strengthening of hip muscles as important component especially hip abductors in lower extremity rehabilitation program. Study Design: Single blinded randomized comparative clinical trial. Methodology: Sixty five healthy college going male subjects (Age group of 18 – 24 years volunteered for this study. They were randomly assigned to one of the 2 groups. One group received the dynamic platform lateral step-up and the other received stable platform lateral step-up weight bearing standing exercise. The strength measurements were recorded using hand held dynamometer. Results: The results indicate that both groups had a positive effect on the outcome measures. The strength of hip abductors in dynamic platform group improved from a mean value (SD of 19.47(3.59 to 26.93(3.19 and in stable platform group from 19.07(2.32 to 22.67(2.46. Significant difference is also observed between the two groups at p value .05. Conclusion: The study shows that dynamic platform lateral step-up exercise is more beneficial than stable platform lateral step-up weight bearing standing exercise in improving hip abductor muscle strength.

  8. Use of post-exercise laryngoscopy to evaluate exercise induced dyspnea.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNally, P

    2010-10-01

    We present the case of a child with asthma who continued to have marked exercise induced dyspnea despite appropriate treatment, and in the face of adequate control of all other asthma symptoms. Spirometry showed a marked truncation of inspiratory flow, and laryngoscopy performed immediately after exercise showed laryngomalacia with dynamic, partial inspiratory obstruction. Exercise induced laryngomalacia (EIL) is a rare cause of exercise induced dyspnea which is diagnosed by post exercise flexible laryngoscopy and may require supraglottoplasty.

  9. Heart rate dynamics during a treadmill cardiopulmonary exercise test in optimized beta-blocked heart failure patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vitor Oliveira Carvalho; Guilherme Veiga Guimarães; Emmanuel Gomes Ciolac; Edimar Alcides Bocchi

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calculating the maximum heart rate for age is one method to characterize the maximum effort of an individual. Although this method is commonly used, little is known about heart rate dynamics in optimized beta-blocked heart failure patients. AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate heart rate dynamics (basal, peak and % heart rate increase) in optimized beta-blocked heart failure patients compared to sedentary, normal individuals (controls) during a treadmill cardiopulmonary exer...

  10. Dissolved organic matter dynamics in surface waters affected by oil spill pollution: Results from the Serious Game exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnelli, M.; Galletti, Y.; Marchetti, E.; Mercadante, L.; Retelletti Brogi, S.; Ribotti, A.; Sorgente, R.; Vestri, S.; Santinelli, C.

    2016-11-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (CDOM and FDOM, respectively) surface distribution was studied during the Serious Game exercise carried out in the Eastern Ligurian Sea, where an oil spill was localized by using satellite images and models. This paper reports the first DOC, CDOM and FDOM data for this area together with an evaluation of fluorescence as a fast and inexpensive tool for early oil spill detection in marine waters. The samples collected in the oil spill showed a fluorescence intensity markedly higher ( 5 fold) than all the other samples. The excitation-emission matrixes, coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), allowed for the identification in the FDOM pool of a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, humic-like and protein-like fluorophores.

  11. Exercise addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolfi, Emilio

    2013-02-01

    This article examines the nature of exercise addiction. It presents a broad, congruent and discerning narrative literature review with the aim of providing a deeper understanding of the condition 'exercise addiction', including symptoms and options for treatment. In addition, guidelines are provided with respect to 'healthy' levels of exercise. Criteria used for determining the eligibility of studies evaluated in the review included the provision of relevant information in studies identified using pertinent search terms. The review highlights some of the key distinctions between healthy levels of exercise and exercise addiction. The findings suggest that an individual who is addicted to exercise will continue exercising regardless of physical injury, personal inconvenience or disruption to other areas of life including marital strain, interference with work and lack of time for other activities. 'Addicted' exercisers are more likely to exercise for intrinsic rewards and experience disturbing deprivation sensations when unable to exercise. In contrast, 'committed' exercisers engage in physical activity for extrinsic rewards and do not suffer severe withdrawal symptoms when they cannot exercise. Exercisers must acquire a sense of life-balance while embracing an attitude conducive to sustainable long-term physical, psychological and social health outcomes. Implementation of recommendations by the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, which states that all apparently healthy adults between 18 and 64 years of age should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate (5 or 6 on a scale of 0-10) to vigorous (7 or 8 on a scale of 0-10) intensity aerobic physical activity per week in bouts of 10 minutes or more, also expressed as 30 minutes per day distributed over 5 days per week, would be a good start.

  12. Exercise and age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is never too late to start exercising. Exercise has benefits at any age. Don't worry if you ... to tie your shoes Alternative Names Age and exercise Images Benefit of regular exercise Flexibility exercise Exercise and age ...

  13. Semi-LASER localized dynamic 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in exercising muscle at ultra-high magnetic field.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerspeer, M.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Schmid, A.I.; Mandl, T.; Unger, E.; Moser, E.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can benefit from increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of high magnetic fields. In this work, the SNR gain of dynamic 31P MRS at 7 T was invested in temporal and spatial resolution. Using conventional slice selective excitation combined with localization by adia

  14. A2 Milk Enhances Dynamic Muscle Function Following Repeated Sprint Exercise, a Possible Ergogenic Aid for A1-Protein Intolerant Athletes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Ben; Mitchell, Jade; Jackson, Matthew; Amirabdollahian, Farzad; Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Clifford, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Hyperaminoacidemia following ingestion of cows-milk may stimulate muscle anabolism and attenuate exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). However, as dairy-intolerant athletes do not obtain the reported benefits from milk-based products, A2 milk may offer a suitable alternative as it lacks the A1-protein. This study aimed to determine the effect of A2 milk on recovery from a sports-specific muscle damage model. Twenty-one male team sport players were allocated to three independent groups: A2 milk (n = 7), regular milk (n = 7), and placebo (PLA) (n = 7). Immediately following muscle-damaging exercise, participants consumed either A2 milk, regular milk or PLA (500 mL each). Visual analogue scale (muscle soreness), maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), countermovement jump (CMJ) and 20-m sprint were measured prior to and 24, 48, and 72 h post EIMD. At 48 h post-EIMD, CMJ and 20-m sprint recovered quicker in A2 (33.4 ± 6.6 and 3.3 ± 0.1, respectively) and regular milk (33.1 ± 7.1 and 3.3 ± 0.3, respectively) vs. PLA (29.2 ± 3.6 and 3.6 ± 0.3, respectively) (p < 0.05). Relative to baseline, decrements in 48 h CMJ and 20-m sprint were minimised in A2 (by 7.2 and 5.1%, respectively) and regular milk (by 6.3 and 5.2%, respectively) vs. PLA. There was a trend for milk treatments to attenuate decrements in MVIC, however statistical significance was not reached (p = 0.069). Milk treatments had no apparent effect on muscle soreness (p = 0.152). Following muscle-damaging exercise, ingestion of 500 mL of A2 or regular milk can limit decrements in dynamic muscle function in male athletes, thus hastening recovery and improving subsequent performance. The findings propose A2 milk as an ergogenic aid following EIMD, and may offer an alternative to athletes intolerant to the A1 protein. PMID:28134840

  15. Research on the Dynamics of the Hormonal Status of Athletes in a Series of Vibration and Traditional Training Exercises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander A. Mikheev

    2009-01-01

    The article presents the most important results ot meta bolic (hormonal) study of dosed vibration training (DVT).The author presents vibrating training as an alternative to anabolie steroids on the basis of a comparison of the effective ness of two types of stimulants-forbidden (doping) and non medicinal non-invasive, relating to permitted physical means.The study shows that the level of androgens (testosterone), cortieosteroids (cortisol), thyroid hormones (thyroxine,triiodothyronine) ,hormones of adenohypophysis (prolaetin) increased under the effect of dosed vibration training. At the same time the level of hormones have no changes under traditional strength training with the use of a synthetic anabolie steroid (retabolil). For the duration of a limited period of time (1 mieroeyeles) dosed vibrotraining causes a more powerful secretion of testosterone than the traditional strength training with the use of anabolic steroids. In this case,the overall time spent on the performance of the DVT training program comprises not more than 15% of the time spent on the traditional training exercises.

  16. Excursion of the Sciatic Nerve During Nerve Mobilization Exercises: An In Vivo Cross-sectional Study Using Dynamic Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppieters, Michel W; Andersen, Line S; Johansen, Runar; Giskegjerde, Per K; Høivik, Mona; Vestre, Siv; Nee, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Controlled laboratory cross-sectional study using single-group, within-subject comparisons. To determine whether different types of neurodynamic techniques result in differences in longitudinal sciatic nerve excursion. Large differences in nerve biomechanics have been demonstrated for different neurodynamic techniques for the upper limb (median nerve), but recent findings for the sciatic nerve have only revealed small differences in nerve excursion that may not be clinically meaningful. High-resolution ultrasound imaging was used to quantify longitudinal sciatic nerve movement in the thigh of 15 asymptomatic participants during 6 different mobilization techniques for the sciatic nerve involving the hip and knee. Healthy volunteers were selected to demonstrate normal nerve biomechanics and to eliminate potentially confounding variables associated with dysfunction. Repeated-measures analyses of variance were used to analyze the data. The techniques resulted in markedly different amounts of nerve movement (Pmovements. Consistent with current theories and findings for the median nerve, different neurodynamic exercises for the lower limb resulted in markedly different sciatic nerve excursions. Considering the continuity of the nervous system, the movement and position of adjacent joints have a large impact on nerve biomechanics.

  17. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Exercises Electrothermal Modalities Ergonomic Changes Hydrotherapy Manual Therapy Physical Therapy Postural Training Traction Watchful Waiting and Education Injection Treatments for ...

  18. The single-bout forearm critical force test: a new method to establish forearm aerobic metabolic exercise intensity and capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mikhail Kellawan

    Full Text Available No non-invasive test exists for forearm exercise that allows identification of power-time relationship parameters (W', critical power and thereby identification of the heavy-severe exercise intensity boundary and scaling of aerobic metabolic exercise intensity. The aim of this study was to develop a maximal effort handgrip exercise test to estimate forearm critical force (fCF; force analog of power and establish its repeatability and validity. Ten healthy males (20-43 years completed two maximal effort rhythmic handgrip exercise tests (repeated maximal voluntary contractions (MVC; 1 s contraction-2 s relaxation for 600 s on separate days. Exercise intensity was quantified via peak contraction force and contraction impulse. There was no systematic difference between test 1 and 2 for fCF(peak force (p = 0.11 or fCF(impulse (p = 0.76. Typical error was small for both fCF(peak force (15.3 N, 5.5% and fCF(impulse (15.7 N ⋅ s, 6.8%, and test re-test correlations were strong (fCF(peak force, r = 0.91, ICC = 0.94, pfCF(peak force. TTE predicted by W' showed good agreement with actual TTE during the TTE tests (r = 0.97, ICC = 0.97, P<0.01; typical error 0.98 min, 12%; regression fit slope = 0.99 and y intercept not different from 0, p = 0.31. MVC did not predict fCF(peak force (p = 0.37, fCF(impulse (p = 0.49 or W' (p = 0.15. In conclusion, the poor relationship between MVC and fCF or W' illustrates the serious limitation of MVC in identifying metabolism-based exercise intensity zones. The maximal effort handgrip exercise test provides repeatable and valid estimates of fCF and should be used to normalize forearm aerobic metabolic exercise intensity instead of MVC.

  19. Effectiveness of Selected Fitness Exercises on Stress of Femoral Neck using Musculoskeletal Dynamics Simulations and Finite Element Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jing-Guang; Li, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Hong; Bian, Rong; Zhang, Songning

    2014-06-28

    The purpose of the study was to establish a dynamics model and a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model to analyze loading characteristics of femoral neck during walking, squat, single-leg standing, and forward and lateral lunges. One male volunteer performed three trials of the five movements. The 3D kinematic data were captured and imported into the LifeMOD to establish a musculoskeletal dynamics model to obtain joint reaction and muscle forces of iliacus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, psoas major and adductor magnus. The loading data LfeMOD were imported and transformed into a hip finite-element model. The results of the finite element femur model showed that stress was localized along the compression arc and the tension arc. In addition, the trabecular bone and tension lines of the Ward's triangle also demonstrated high stress. The compact bone received the greatest peak stress in the forward lunge and the least stress in the squat. However, the spongy bone in the femoral neck region had the greatest stress during the walk and the least stress in the squat. The results from this study indicate that the forward lunge may be an effective method to prevent femoral neck fractures. Walking is another effective and simple method that may improve bone mass of the Ward's triangle and prevent osteoporosis and femoral neck fracture.

  20. Effectiveness of Selected Fitness Exercises on Stress of Femoral Neck using Musculoskeletal Dynamics Simulations and Finite Element Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Jing-Guang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to establish a dynamics model and a three-dimensional (3D finite element model to analyze loading characteristics of femoral neck during walking, squat, single-leg standing, and forward and lateral lunges. One male volunteer performed three trials of the five movements. The 3D kinematic data were captured and imported into the LifeMOD to establish a musculoskeletal dynamics model to obtain joint reaction and muscle forces of iliacus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, psoas major and adductor magnus. The loading data LfeMOD were imported and transformed into a hip finite-element model. The results of the finite element femur model showed that stress was localized along the compression arc and the tension arc. In addition, the trabecular bone and tension lines of the Ward's triangle also demonstrated high stress. The compact bone received the greatest peak stress in the forward lunge and the least stress in the squat. However, the spongy bone in the femoral neck region had the greatest stress during the walk and the least stress in the squat. The results from this study indicate that the forward lunge may be an effective method to prevent femoral neck fractures. Walking is another effective and simple method that may improve bone mass of the Ward's triangle and prevent osteoporosis and femoral neck fracture.

  1. ISOMETRIC EXERCISE AND ITS EFFECT ON BLOOD PRESSURE AND HEART RATE, BEFORE AND AFTER TRAINING IN YOUNG HEALTHY MALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Isometric exercise is a normal part of everyday activities and many occupational tasks. Preventive services are important as they give physicians an opportunity and responsibility to promote regular physical activity, reduc e high blood pressure, and help in weight control. Physical inactivity is recognized as a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Regular aerobic physical activity increases exercise capacity and plays a role in both primary and secondary prevention of ca rdiovascular disease. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of isometric handgrip training on Blood pressure and Heart rate in healthy young males in the age group of 18 - 22 years. MATERIALS AND METHOD : Study subjects consisted of 30 healthy adult males in the age group of 18 - 22 yrs. Age and sex matched adults who were not active in sports or in physical activities constituted the control group (n=30. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded and eval uated after a defined protocol of handgrip sustained static (isometric contractions performed with the handgrip dynamometer at Rest and Post Exercise. BP and HR were recorded with the help of automated blood pressure monitor and power lab 8/30 series inst rument available in the Department of Physiology , Navodaya Medical college, Raichur. RESULTS: There was no change in Resting Blood pressure and Heart rate between the subject and control group before the training sessions. There was significant decrease in resting Blood pressure and Heart rate in trained subject group when compared to untrained control group after 5 weeks of training sessions. CONCLUSION : Isometric hand grip training is effective in lowering arterial pressure in normotensive subjects. Isome tric training may be an effective intervention in the prevention and treatment of hypertension

  2. Analog Exercise Hardware to Implement a High Intensity Exercise Program During Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerch, Linda; Newby, Nate; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Background: In order to evaluate novel countermeasure protocols in a space flight analog prior to validation on the International Space Station (ISS), NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is sponsoring a multi-investigator bedrest campaign that utilizes a combination of commercial and custom-made exercise training hardware to conduct daily resistive and aerobic exercise protocols. This paper will describe these pieces of hardware and how they are used to support current bedrest studies at NASA's Flight Analog Research Unit in Galveston, TX. Discussion: To implement candidate exercise countermeasure studies during extended bed rest studies the following analog hardware are being utilized: Stand alone Zero-Gravity Locomotion Simulator (sZLS) -- a custom built device by NASA, the sZLS allows bedrest subjects to remain supine as they run on a vertically-oriented treadmill (0-15 miles/hour). The treadmill includes a pneumatic subject loading device to provide variable body loading (0-100%) and a harness to keep the subject in contact with the motorized treadmill to provide a ground reaction force at their feet that is quantified by a Kistler Force Plate. Supine Cycle Ergometer -- a commercially available supine cycle ergometer (Lode, Groningen, Netherlands) is used for all cycle ergometer sessions. The ergometer has adjustable shoulder supports and handgrips to help stabilize the subject during exercise. Horizontal Squat Device (HSD) -- a custom built device by Quantum Fitness Corp (Stafford, TX), the HSD allows for squat exercises to be performed while lying in a supine position. The HSD can provide 0 to 600 pounds of force in selectable 5 lb increments, and allows hip translation in both the vertical and horizontal planes. Prone Leg Curl -- a commercially available prone leg curl machine (Cybex International Inc., Medway, MA) is used to complete leg curl exercises. Horizontal Leg Press -- a commercially available horizontal leg press (Quantum Fitness Corporation) is

  3. Inhibitory effect of procaterol on exercise dynamic lung hyperinflation during the 6-min walk test in stable patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Masahiro; Takahashi, Hitomi; Sugawara, Keiyu; Kawagoshi, Atsuoshi; Tamaki, Akira; Homma, Mitsunobu; Morita, Ryou; Sato, Kazuhiro; Sano, Masaaki; Shioya, Takanobu

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of procaterol (procaterol hydrochloride, CAS 62929-91-3) on exercise dynamic lung hyperinflation during the 6-min walk test (6MWT) in stable chronic obstructive disease (COPD) patients. Fourteen patients with stable COPD who were referred to our clinic between July 2008 and October 2009 were evaluated in this study. After the inhalation of procaterol, values for the lung function test, including vital capacity, inspiratory capacity, forced vital capacity, and FEV1/FEV1pred showed a significant improvement. Compared to the baseline assessment, the 6-min walk distance increased by a mean of 20.5 m when measured after inhalation of procaterol (512.4 +/- 90.7 m vs. 532.9 +/- 79.8 m, p lung hyperinflation, suggesting the important role of the beta2-receptor agonist procaterol in the treatment of COPD. It is therefore likely that most patients with COPD may derive considerable benefit from bronchodilator therapy with procaterol.

  4. Exercise training improves hemodynamic recovery to isometric exercise in obese men with type 2 diabetes but not in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaley, Jill A; Goulopoulou, Styliani; Franklin, Ruth; Baynard, Tracy; Carhart, Robert L; Weinstock, Ruth S; Fernhall, Bo

    2012-12-01

    Women with type 2 diabetes (T2D) show greater rates of mortality due to ischemic heart disease than men with T2D. We aimed to examine cardiovascular and autonomic function responses to isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise between men and women with T2D, before and after an exercise training program. Hemodynamic responses were measured in 22 men and women with T2D during and following a 3-min IHG test, and before and after 16 wks of aerobic exercise training. Women had a smaller decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systolic blood pressure (BP) during recovery from IHG (ΔMAP(REC)) than men pre- and post-training (Pexercise training improved this response in men but not in women (men, pre-training: -13.9±1.8, post-training: -20.5±5.3 mmHg vs. women, pre-training: -10.7±1.7, post-training: -4.1±4.9 mmHg; Pexercise training in obese men, but not in obese women with T2D which reflects a better adaptive autonomic response to exercise training. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bed rest attenuates sympathetic and pressor responses to isometric exercise in antigravity leg muscles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Atsunori; Michikami, Daisaku; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Iwase, Satoshi; Hayano, Junichiro; Kawada, Toru; Sunagawa, Kenji; Mano, Tadaaki

    2004-05-01

    Although spaceflight and bed rest are known to cause muscular atrophy in the antigravity muscles of the legs, the changes in sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercises using the atrophied muscles remain unknown. We hypothesized that bed rest would augment sympathetic responses to isometric exercise using antigravity leg muscles in humans. Ten healthy male volunteers were subjected to 14-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest. Before and after bed rest, they performed isometric exercises using leg (plantar flexion) and forearm (handgrip) muscles, followed by 2-min postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) that continues to stimulate the muscle metaboreflex. These exercises were sustained to fatigue. We measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in the contralateral resting leg by microneurography. In both pre- and post-bed-rest exercise tests, exercise intensities were set at 30 and 70% of the maximum voluntary force measured before bed rest. Bed rest attenuated the increase in MSNA in response to fatiguing plantar flexion by approximately 70% at both exercise intensities (both P antigravity leg muscles.

  6. Human investigations into the exercise pressor reflex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Niels H; Amann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    During exercise, neural input from skeletal muscles reflexly maintains or elevates blood pressure (BP) despite a maybe fivefold increase in vascular conductance. This exercise pressor reflex is illustrated by similar heart rate (HR) and BP responses to electrically induced and voluntary exercise....... The importance of the exercise pressor reflex for tight cardiovascular regulation during dynamic exercise is supported by studies using pharmacological blockade of lower limb muscle afferent nerves. These experiments show attenuation of the increase in BP and cardiac output when exercise is performed...... of an increase in BP during exercise with paralysed legs manifests, although electrical stimulation of muscles enhances lactate release and reduces muscle glycogen. Thus, the exercise pressor reflex enhances sympathetic activity and maintains perfusion pressure by restraining abdominal blood flow, while brain...

  7. Test-retest reliability of handgrip strength measurement using a hydraulic hand dynamometer in patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savva, Christos; Giakas, Giannis; Efstathiou, Michalis; Karagiannis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of handgrip strength measurement using a hydraulic hand dynamometer in patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR). A convenience sample of 19 participants (14 men and 5 women; mean ± SD age, 50.5 ± 12 years) with CR was measured using a Jamar hydraulic hand dynamometer by the same rater on 2 different testing sessions with an interval of 7 days between sessions. Data collection procedures followed standardized grip strength testing guidelines established by the American Society of Hand Therapists. During the repeated measures, patients were advised to rest their upper limb in the standardized arm position and encouraged to exert 3 maximum gripping efforts. The mean value of the 3 efforts (measured in kilogram force [Kgf]) was used for data analysis. The intraclass correlation coefficient, SEM, and the Bland-Altman plot were used to estimate test-retest reliability and measurement precision. Grip strength measurement in CR demonstrated an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.976, suggesting excellent test-retest reliability. The small SEM in both testing sessions (SEM1, 2.41 Kgf; SEM2, 2.51 Kgf) as well as the narrow width of the 95% limits of agreements (95% limits of agreement, -4.9 to 4.4 Kgf) in the Bland-Altman plot reflected precise measurements of grip strength in both occasions. Excellent test-retest reliability for grip strength measurement was measured in patients with CR, demonstrating that a hydraulic hand dynamometer could be used as an outcome measure for these patients. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 15 repetitions at a slow and controlled pace... Resistance Training Resistance training is exercise done against something providing resistance. It can be done with weights (hand-held ...

  9. Compulsive Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... needs rest. Overexercising can lead to injuries like stress fractures and muscle strains. Are You a Healthy Exerciser? Fitness experts recommend that teens do at least 60 minutes of moderate to ...

  10. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or causes acute pain, you should stop doing it. Transverse Core Strengthening This strengthens the muscles that ... training is exercise done against something providing resistance. It can be done with weights (hand-held or ...

  11. Compulsive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtenstein, Mia Beck; Hinze, Cecilie Juul; Emborg Jannsen, Bolette

    2017-01-01

    with cognitive behavioral therapy. This review summarizes and discusses findings on links/comorbidity, risks/negative consequences, and treatment challenges. We suggest that future studies should pay attention to both prevention and counseling in sports settings, where compulsive exercise appears......Compulsive exercise is a condition described since 1970s. It is characterized by a craving for physical training, resulting in uncontrollable excessive exercise behavior with harmful consequences, such as injuries and impaired social relations. It has not been accepted as a mental disorder...... found that compulsive exercise is associated with eating disorder pathology, perfectionism, neuroticism, narcissism, and obsessive compulsive traits. The most prominent negative consequences were injuries, social impairment, and depression, but more research is needed to uncover the potential...

  12. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disc Replacement (ADR) Bone Graft Alternatives Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMP) Cervical Disc Replacement Cervical Laminoplasty Lumbar (Open) ... home as well. Some specific core strengthening exercises are described below. If any of the following suggested ...

  13. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to side. Repeat 10 times. Check with your physician; if you are able to use progressively heavier ... be used instead of hand weights. Ask your doctor or physical therapist to prescribe an exercise program ...

  14. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pain Other Scoliosis Back Pain and Emotional Distress Muscle Spasms Pinched Nerve Discitis Degenerative Conditions Bulge vs ... exercise focus on core strengthening, or building the muscles that provide support for your body. Pilates, yoga ...

  15. Neural blockade during exercise augments central command's contribution to carotid baroreflex resetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querry, R. G.; Smith, S. A.; Stromstad, M.; Ide, K.; Raven, P. B.; Secher, N. H.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine central command's role on carotid baroreflex (CBR) resetting during exercise. Nine volunteer subjects performed static and rhythmic handgrip exercise at 30 and 40% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), respectively, before and after partial axillary neural blockade. Stimulus-response curves were developed using the neck pressure-neck suction technique and a rapid pulse train protocol (+40 to -80 Torr). Regional anesthesia resulted in a significant reduction in MVC. Heart rate (HR) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were used as indexes of central command and were elevated during exercise at control force intensity after induced muscle weakness. The CBR function curves were reset vertically with a minimal lateral shift during control exercise and exhibited a further parallel resetting during exercise with neural blockade. The operating point was progressively reset to coincide with the centering point of the CBR curve. These data suggest that central command was a primary mechanism in the resetting of the CBR during exercise. However, it appeared that central command modulated the carotid-cardiac reflex proportionately more than the carotid-vasomotor reflex.

  16. The effect of energy-protein supplementation on weight, body composition and handgrip strength among pulmonary tuberculosis HIV-co-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    PrayGod, George; Range, Nyagosya; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Undernutrition is common among smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB+) patients. Micronutrient supplementation may improve treatment outcomes, but it is unclear whether additional energy-protein would be beneficial. The present study aimed to assess the effect of energy-protein supplementation...... and handgrip strength were assessed at baseline and 2 and 5 months. There were no effects on any outcome at 2 months, but energy-protein supplementation was associated with a 1·3 (95 % CI - 0·1, 2·8) kg marginally significant gain in handgrip strength at 5 months. However, after 2 months, energy......-protein supplementation led to a weight gain of 1·9 (95 % CI 0·1, 3·7) kg among patients with cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) counts ≥ 350 cells/μl, but not among patients with low CD4 counts ( - 0·2 kg; 95 % CI - 1·3, 0·8, Pinteraction = 0·03). Similarly, at 5 months, energy-protein supplementation led to a 2·3 (95...

  17. Effects of implicit theories of ability and stereotype-inconsistent information on handgrip strength in older adults: A regulatory fit perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile, Mélanie; Chalabaev, Aina; Colson, Serge S; Vaulerin, Jerome; Falzon, Charlene; D'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne

    2017-03-01

    This study examined whether stereotype-inconsistent information interacts with implicit theories of ability to affect handgrip strength in older adults. Eighty-two retired older adults (13 men and 69 women) from 61 to 89 years old (Mage = 75.8 years; SD = 6.9) performed maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) during a handgrip task in a design manipulating implicit theories of ability and stereotype-inconsistent information related to physical decline with aging. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: incremental condition, entity condition, or control group. The results showed that in the incremental condition the stereotype-inconsistent information improved the peak MVC, the average MVC, the peak rate of force development (RFD), and RFD in the initial 50 ms of the MVC. This study therefore demonstrated that individuals with an incremental mindset who are exposed to stereotype-inconsistent information can boost their physical performance. These findings are discussed from the perspective of regulatory fit (i.e., when task framing is congruent with the individual's goal). © 2016 The Authors. Psychophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  18. Exercise gaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smaerup, M.; Grönvall, E.; Larsen, S. B.;

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to identify possible reasons for a modest level of exercise compliance during computer-assisted training for vestibular rehabilitation. Method Qualitative design and analysis of 14 semi-structured interviews with seven participants before and after a period......, but their knowledge and understanding of the training programme were insufficient. The participants asked for a greater variation in the exercises and asked for closer contact with the physiotherapist. When Mitii is used for vestibular rehabilitation, the system has some limitations. Conclusions The modest level...... understanding of the training programme with supplying information on the parts of the vestibular system addressed by the training. Implications for Rehabilitation Computer-assisted technologies should generate feedback on the quality of user performance and inform the patient of the relevance of the exercise...

  19. [The comparative effectiveness of high-intensity dynamic training with the use of exercise machines and therapeutic gymnastics for the joints in the patients presenting with early rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, E V; Karateev, D E; Kochetkov, A V; Mozhar, T E

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to compare the effectiveness of two therapeutic exercise programs for the patients presenting with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The study included 51 patients. Fifteen of them (group 1) were given conventional medicamental therapy in combination with high-intensity dynamic physical exercises with the use of the Enraf-Nonius training devices (45-60 min). Eighteen patients of group 2 were offered 10 sessions of remedial gymnastics for the joints (45 min each) under the guidance of an instructor that were continued under the domestic conditions (45 min each session thrice weekly for 3 months). Eighteen patients of group 3 were given medicamental therapy alone (control). The parameters estimated in the study included the mean strength of knee joint extension and ankle joint flexion measured with the use of En-TreeM devices, articular pain (100 mm BAHI), DAS28, HAQ, and RAPID3 indices. It was shown that both programs of therapeutic exercises reduced the severity of the disease, improved the functional and motor activity of the patients and their quality of life. The majority of these characteristics were significantly different from those documented in the control group (pexercise machines was higher than without them (articular pain was reduced by 57.9% (pexercises during 3 months was higher (83.3%) than with high-intensity dynamic training with the use of exercise machines (60%). It is concluded that the latter modality should be recommended to the younger patients with RA (below 40 years), a short history of the disease, and its low activity.

  20. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  1. Exercise at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Insights Exercise & Weight Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  2. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... management of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: A practice parameter. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 2010;105:S1. Krafczyk ... up exercise on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2012;44:383. Asthma ...

  3. Exercise during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Exercise During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Exercise During Pregnancy ... Pregnancy FAQ119, May 2016 PDF Format Exercise During Pregnancy Pregnancy Is it safe to exercise during pregnancy? ...

  4. Effect of exercise intensity on exercise and post exercise energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of exercise intensity on exercise and post exercise energy expenditure in ... treadmill at 57% of maximum heart rate, as well as for 4 hours post exercise. ... in order to increase energy expenditure as well as enhance the oxidation of fat ...

  5. Compulsive Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of workouts completed and the effort put into training is never satisfied with his or her own physical achievements It's important, too, to recognize the types of athletes who are more prone to compulsive exercise because their sports place a particular emphasis on being thin. Ice ...

  6. [Exercise addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, A; Lejoyeux, M

    2013-01-01

    Socially valorised, sport like other forms of behaviour, can take on an addictive aspect. A review of the English and French literatures from 1979 to 2012 was conducted, using PubMed, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and PsycInfo, using the following key words alone or combined :sport, dependence, exercise, addiction. Exercise dependence is defined as a craving for physical activity that leads to extreme exercise intensity and generates physiological and psychological symptoms. Measurement scales have been proposed to make the diagnosis. No epidemiological studies have examined the prevalence of exercise dependence in the general population, although some studies suggest a frequency ranging from 10 to 80%. Disorders begin with a search for pleasure in physical effort, which then gives way to an obsession for sport resulting in a need to practice a sport more and more frequently and intensely. This addiction is more common among alcohol and illicit drug addicts than among the general population, while the rate of eating disorders can reach 40%. Personality traits most often associated are perfectionism, extraversion, and sensation seeking, while possible links between sporting activity and intensive doping will be discussed.

  7. Eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Michael; Heinemeier, Katja Maria

    2014-01-01

    Eccentric exercise can influence tendon mechanical properties and matrix protein synthesis. mRNA for collagen and regulatory factors thereof are upregulated in animal tendons, independent of muscular contraction type, supporting the view that tendon, compared with skeletal muscle, is less sensitive...

  8. Core strength training using a combination of home exercises and a dynamic sling system for the management of low back pain in pre-professional ballet dancers: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Jessica Beckmann; Krauss, John R; Maher, Sara F; Qu, Xianggui

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of low back pain prevalence in USA ballet dancers range from 8% to 23%. Lumbar stabilization and extensor muscle training has been shown to act as a hypoalgesic for low back pain. Timing and coordination of multifidi and transverse abdominis muscles are recognized as important factors for spinal stabilization. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of training methods using home exercises and a dynamic sling system on core strength, disability, and low back pain in pre-professional ballet dancers. Five participants were randomly assigned to start a traditional unsupervised lumbar stabilization home exercise program (HEP) or supervised dynamic sling training to strengthen the core and lower extremities. Measurements were taken at baseline and at weeks 3 and 6 for disability using the patient specific functional scale (PSFS), pain using the Numerical Pain Rating System (NPRS), core strength and endurance using timed plank, side-plank, and bridge positions, and sciatic nerve irritability using the straight leg raise (SLR). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. From initial to final measurements, all participants demonstrated an improvement in strength and SLR range, and those with initial pain and disability reported relief of symptoms. These results suggest that dynamic sling training and a HEP may help to increase strength, decrease pain, and improve function in dancers without aggravating sciatic nerve irritation.

  9. Reconstructing Fire History: An Exercise in Dendrochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafon, Charles W.

    2005-01-01

    Dendrochronology is used widely to reconstruct the history of forest disturbances. I created an exercise that introduces the use of dendrochronology to investigate fire history and forest dynamics. The exercise also demonstrates how the dendrochronological technique of crossdating is employed to age dead trees and identify missing rings. I…

  10. The Idea Factory: An Interactive Intergroup Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosh, Lisa; Leach, Evan

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines the Idea Factory exercise, an interactive exercise designed to help participants examine group, individual, and organizational factors that affect intergroup conflict. Specific emphasis is placed on exploring the relationship between intra- and intergroup dynamics and identifying managerial practices that foster effective…

  11. Reconstructing Fire History: An Exercise in Dendrochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafon, Charles W.

    2005-01-01

    Dendrochronology is used widely to reconstruct the history of forest disturbances. I created an exercise that introduces the use of dendrochronology to investigate fire history and forest dynamics. The exercise also demonstrates how the dendrochronological technique of crossdating is employed to age dead trees and identify missing rings. I…

  12. The Idea Factory: An Interactive Intergroup Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosh, Lisa; Leach, Evan

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines the Idea Factory exercise, an interactive exercise designed to help participants examine group, individual, and organizational factors that affect intergroup conflict. Specific emphasis is placed on exploring the relationship between intra- and intergroup dynamics and identifying managerial practices that foster effective…

  13. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is characterized by dynamic impairment of active relaxation and contraction of the left ventricle on exercise and associated with myocardial energy deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thanh T; Abozguia, Khalid; Nallur Shivu, Ganesh; Mahadevan, Gnanadevan; Ahmed, Ibrar; Williams, Lynne; Dwivedi, Girish; Patel, Kiran; Steendijk, Paul; Ashrafian, Houman; Henning, Anke; Frenneaux, Michael

    2009-07-28

    We sought to evaluate the role of exercise-related changes in left ventricular (LV) relaxation and of LV contractile function and vasculoventricular coupling (VVC) in the pathophysiology of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and to assess myocardial energetic status in these patients. To date, no studies have investigated exercise-related changes in LV relaxation and VVC as well as in vivo myocardial energetic status in patients with HFpEF. We studied 37 patients with HFpEF and 20 control subjects. The VVC and time to peak LV filling (nTTPF, a measure of LV active relaxation) were assessed while patients were at rest and during exercise by the use of radionuclide ventriculography. Cardiac energetic status (creatine phosphate/adenosine triphosphate ratio) was assessed by the use of (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3-T. When patients were at rest, nTTPF and VVC were similar in patients with HFpEF and control subjects. The cardiac creatine phosphate/adenosine triphosphate ratio was reduced in patients with HFpEF versus control subjects (1.57 +/- 0.52 vs. 2.14 +/- 0.63; p = 0.003), indicating reduced energy reserves. Peak maximal oxygen uptake and the increase in heart rate during maximal exercise were lower in patients with HFpEF versus control subjects (19 +/- 4 ml/kg/min vs. 36 +/- 8 ml/kg/min, p active relaxation and abnormal VVC during exercise.

  14. Handgrip Strength and Factors Associated in Poor Elderly Assisted at a Primary Care Unit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino, Valéria Teresa Saraiva; Rodrigues, Nádia Cristina Pinheiro; O’Dwyer, Gisele; Andrade, Mônica Kramer de Noronha; Mattos, Inês Echenique; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sarcopenia is a condition diagnosed when the patient presents low muscle mass, plus low muscle strength or low physical performance. Muscle weakness in the oldest (dynapenia) is a major public health concern because it predicts future all-cause mortality and is associated with falls, disability, cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Grip strength is a simple method for assessment of muscle function in clinical practice. Objective To estimate the grip strength and identify factors associated with handgrip strength variation in elderly people with low socioeconomic status. Methods Cross-sectional study based on a multidimensional assessment of primary care users that were 60 years or older. The sample size was calculated using an estimated prevalence of depression in older adults of 20%. A kappa coefficient of 0.6 with a 95% confidence interval was used to generate a conservative sample size of 180 individuals. Procedures: tests and scales to assess humor, cognition (MMSE), basic (ADL) and instrumental activities (IADL) of daily living, mobility (Timed Up and Go), strength, height, Body Mass Index (BMI) and social support were applied. Questions about falls, chronic diseases and self-rated health (SRH) were also included. Statistical Analysis: Mean, standard deviation and statistical tests were used to compare grip strength means by demographic and health factors. A multivariate linear model was used to explain the relationship of the predictors with grip strength. Results The group was composed predominantly by women (73%) with a very low level of education (mean 3 years of schooling), mean age of 73.09 (± 7.05) years old, good mobility and without IADL impairment. Mean grip strength of male and female were 31.86Kg (SD 5.55) and 21.69Kg (SD 4.48) [p- 0.0001], respectively. Low grip strength was present in 27.7% of women and 39.6% of men. As expected, men and younger participants had higher grip strength than women and older individuals. In the

  15. The effects of compression garments on performance of prolonged manual-labour exercise and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Val; Duffield, Rob; Watsford, Mark

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of wearing compression garments during and 24 h following a 4-h exercise protocol simulating manual-labour tasks. Ten physically trained male participants, familiar with labouring activities, undertook 4 h of work tasks characteristic of industrial workplaces. Participants completed 2 testing sessions, separated by at least 1 week. In the experimental condition, participants wore a full-length compression top and compression shorts during the exercise protocol and overnight recovery, with normal work clothes worn in the control condition. Testing for serum creatine kinase and C-reactive protein, handgrip strength, knee flexion and extension torque, muscle stiffness, perceived muscle soreness and fatigue as well as heart rate and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) responses to 4-min cycling were performed before, following, and 24 h after exercise. Creatine kinase, muscle soreness, and rating of perceived fatigue increased following the exercise protocol (p 0.05). Knee extension torque was significantly higher in the control condition at 24 h postexercise (3.1% ± 5.4% change; compression: 2.2% ± 11.1% change), although no other variables were different between conditions at any time. However, compression demonstrated a moderate-large effect (d > 0.60) to reduce perceived muscle soreness, fatigue, and RPE from standardised warm-up at 24 h postexercise. The current findings suggest that compression may assist in perceptual recovery from manual-labour exercise with implications for the ability to perform subsequent work bouts.

  16. Acute dietary nitrate supplementation does not augment submaximal forearm exercise hyperemia in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Kwang; Moore, David J; Maurer, David G; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; Basu, Swati; Flanagan, Michael P; Skulas-Ray, Ann C; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Proctor, David N

    2015-02-01

    Despite the popularity of dietary nitrate supplementation and the growing evidence base of its potential ergogenic and vascular health benefits, there is no direct information about its effects on exercising limb blood flow in humans. We hypothesized that acute dietary nitrate supplementation from beetroot juice would augment the increases in forearm blood flow, as well as the progressive dilation of the brachial artery, during graded handgrip exercise in healthy young men. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, 12 young (22 ± 2 years) healthy men consumed a beetroot juice (140 mL Beet-It Sport, James White Juice Company) that provided 12.9 mmol (0.8 g) of nitrate or placebo (nitrate-depleted Beet-It Sport) on 2 study visits. At 3 h postconsumption, brachial artery diameter, flow, and blood velocity were measured (Doppler ultrasound) at rest and during 6 exercise intensities. Nitrate supplementation raised plasma nitrate (19.5-fold) and nitrite (1.6-fold) concentrations, and lowered resting arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) versus placebo (all p nitrate supplementation had no effect on brachial artery diameter, flow, or shear rates at rest (all p ≥ 0.28) or during any exercise workload (all p ≥ 0.18). These findings suggest that acute dietary nitrate supplementation favorably modifies arterial PWV, but does not augment blood flow or brachial artery vasodilation during nonfatiguing forearm exercise in healthy young men.

  17. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity during cold stress and isometric exercise in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaney, Jody L; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Kenney, W Larry; Alexander, Lacy M

    2014-09-15

    Cardiovascular mortality increases in cold weather in older adults, and physical activity may impart even greater cardiovascular risk than cold exposure alone. Human aging is associated with exaggerated pressor responses to whole body cooling; however, the sympathetic response to cold stress alone and in combination with isometric exercise is unknown. We hypothesized that cold stress would 1) increase muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and 2) augment the MSNA response to isometric handgrip in older adults. Whole body cooling (water-perfused suit) was conducted in 11 young (23 ± 1 yr) and 12 healthy older adults (60 ± 2 yr). Blood pressure (BP; Finometer) and MSNA (microneurography) were measured throughout cooling and during isometric handgrip at 30% maximal voluntary contraction performed at a mean skin temperature (Tsk) of 34 and 30.5°C. MSNA was greater in older adults at Tsk = 34.0°C and throughout cooling (P 0.05) or older adults (Δ12 ± 1 Tsk 34°C vs. Δ8 ± 1 Tsk 30.5°C bursts/min; Δ18 ± 3 Tsk 34°C vs. Δ17 ± 2 Tsk 30.5°C mmHg; both P > 0.05). In summary, MSNA increased during cold stress in older, but not young, adults. Furthermore, concomitant cold stress did not alter the sympathetic responses to isometric exercise in either age group, suggesting preserved sympathetic responsiveness during exercise in the cold in healthy aging. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. "I Just Want to Be 'Me' When I Am Exercising": Adrianna's Construction of a Vulnerable Exercise Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Hilde; Ronglan, Lars-Tore; Scott, Susie

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the social and dynamic aspects of the concept "exercise identity". Previous research, mainly in psychology, has documented a link between exercise identity and exercise behaviour. However, the process of identity formation is not straightforward but rather something that can change with time, context and interaction…

  19. Exercise and Compulsive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivy, Janet; Clendenen, Vanessa

    Although reports on the positive effects of fitness and exercise predominate in the exercise literature, some researchers describe frequent exercise as compulsive or addictive behavior. This paper addresses these "negative addictions" of exercise. As early as 1970, researchers recognized the addictive qualities of exercise. Short-term…

  20. A short-term arm-crank exercise program improved testosterone deficiency in adults with chronic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Rosety-Rodriguez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To determine the influence of arm-crank exercise in reproductive hormone levels in adults with chronic SCI. Further objectives were to assess the influence of arm-crank exercise on muscle strength and body composition. Materials and Methods Seventeen male adults with complete SCI at or below the 5th thoracic level (T5 volunteered for this study. Participants were randomly allocated to the intervention (n = 9 or control group (n = 8 using a concealed method. The participants in the intervention group performed a 12-week arm-crank exercise program, 3 sessions/week, consisting of warming-up (10-15 min followed by a main part in arm-crank (20-30 min [increasing 2 min and 30 seconds each three weeks] at a moderate work intensity of 50-65% of heart rate reserve (HRR (starting at 50% and increasing 5% each three weeks and by a cooling-down period (5-10 min. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, testosterone and estradiol were determined by ELISA. Muscle strength (handgrip and body composition (waist circumference [WC] were assessed. Results After the completion of the training program, testosterone level was significantly increased (p = 0.0166;d = 1.14. Furthermore, maximal handgrip and WC were significantly improved. Lastly, a significant inverse correlation was found between WC and testosterone (r =- 0.35; p = 0.0377. Conclusion The arm-crank exercise improved reproductive hormone profile by increasing testosterone levels in adults with chronic SCI. A secondary finding was that it also significantly improved muscle strength and body composition in this group.

  1. A dynamic view of comorbid depression and generalized anxiety disorder symptom change in chronic heart failure: the discrete effects of cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise, and psychotropic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Phillip J; Selkow, Terina; Bengel, Jürgen; Rafanelli, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    No previous study has reported upon comorbid depression and anxiety disorders and their treatment in heart failure (HF), which the current study has sought to document. Total 29 HF patients under psychiatric management underwent primary depression cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT; n = 15) or primary generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) CBT (n = 14), and participated in a community exercise program and standard physician care. Repeated measures analysis of variance assessed Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and GAD-7 symptom change pre- and post-CBT treatment, and assessed the interaction effects of treatment type, exercise, anti-depressant and anxiolytic. There was a significant time and treatment interaction effect that favored the primary GAD CBT group for reduction in PHQ symptoms (F(1, 24) = 4.52, p = 0.04). Analysis of PHQ-somatic symptoms also showed a significant main effect for participation in the exercise program (F(1, 24) = 4.21, p = 0.05) and a significant time and anxiolytic interaction (F(1, 24) = 3.98, p = 0.05). The average number of cardiac hospital readmissions favored the primary GAD CBT group (p = 0.05). The findings support the use of multifaceted interventions in the rehabilitation of HF patients with comorbid psychiatric needs. Implications for Rehabilitation Comorbid depression and anxiety disorders are a clinical and research focus that deserves more attention in the treatment of heart failure patients. Cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise, and anxiolytic use was associated with significant changes in depression and anxiety though discrete effects were evident. Multifaceted interventions are most likely to be successful in the rehabilitation of HF patients with psychiatric needs.

  2. The dynamics of somatic indicators of basketball players under the influence of the special exercises which are directed to the increase of stability of the vestibular analyzer

    OpenAIRE

    Yevhen Kharchenko

    2016-01-01

    Yevhen KharchenkoPurpose: to determine stability of the vestibular analyzer of basketball players of the team of KhSAPC by indicators of somatic displacements after the standard vestibular irritations on the Barany chair, after the introduction of the special exercises in the educational – training process, which are directed on the increase of stability of the vestibular sensor-based system. Material & Methods: the analysis of references, methods of definition of a functional condition o...

  3. Learn to love exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevention - learn to love exercise; Wellness - learn to love exercise ... With so many options for exercise, there is no need to suffer through a workout you do not like. Be true to yourself. Look for activities that ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease: Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn More > Español In Your Area NPF Shop Exercise Make Text Smaller Make Text Larger You are ... Emory University School of Medicine. Next >> 4th level - Exercise Medications for Motor Symptoms Surgical Treatment Options Exercise ...

  5. Exercise After Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Exercise After Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Exercise After Pregnancy ... Pregnancy FAQ131, June 2015 PDF Format Exercise After Pregnancy Labor, Delivery, and Postpartum Care What are some ...

  6. Rotator Cuff Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Exercise and Fitness, Injury Rehabilitation, Prevention and WellnessTags: Exercise Prescription, prevention, Shoulder Problems, sports medicine, treatment Exercise and Fitness, Injury Rehabilitation, Prevention ...

  7. Why Exercise Is Cool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Puberty Train Your Temper Why Exercise Is Cool KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Exercise Is ... day and your body will thank you later! Exercise Makes Your Heart Happy You may know that ...

  8. Strength and Balance Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Strength and Balance Exercises Updated:Sep 8,2016 If ... Be Safe While Being Active - Stretching & Flexibility Exercises - Strength & Balance Exercises - Problems & Solutions for Being Active - FAQs ...

  9. INTEGRATING PILATES EXERCISE INTO AN EXERCISE PROGRAM FOR 65+ YEAR-OLD WOMEN TO REDUCE FALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonul Babayigit Irez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if Pilates exercise could improve dynamic balance, flexibility, reaction time and muscle strength in order to reduce the number of falls among older women. 60 female volunteers over the age of 65 from a residential home in Ankara participated in this study. Participants joined a 12-week series of 1-hour Pilates sessions three times per week. Dynamic balance, flexibility, reaction time and muscle strength were measured before and after the program. The number of falls before and during the 12-week period was also recorded. Dynamic balance, flexibility, reaction time and muscle strength improved (p < 0. 05 in the exercise group when compared to the non-exercise group. In conclusion, Pilates exercises are effective in improving dynamic balance, flexibility, reaction time, and muscle strength as well as decreasing the propensity to fall in older women.

  10. Can exercise mimetics substitute for exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Kiens, Bente; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Exercise leads to changes in muscle phenotype with important implications for exercise performance and health. A recent paper in Cell by Narkar et al. (2008) shows that many of the adaptations in muscle phenotype elicited by exercise can be mimicked by genetic manipulation and drug treatment...

  11. Long-Term Exercise in Older Adults: 4-Year Outcomes of Music-Based Multitask Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, François R.; Fielding, Roger A.; Reid, Kieran F.; Rizzoli, René; Trombetti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prospective controlled evidence supporting the efficacy of long-term exercise to prevent physical decline and reduce falls in old age is lacking. The present study aimed to assess the effects of long-term music-based multitask exercise (i.e., Jaques-Dalcroze eurhythmics) on physical function and fall risk in older adults. A 3-year follow-up extension of a 1-year randomized controlled trial (NCT01107288) was conducted in Geneva (Switzerland), in which 134 community-dwellers aged ≥65 years at increased risk of falls received a 6-month music-based multitask exercise program. Four years following original trial enrolment, 52 subjects (baseline mean ± SD age, 75 ± 8 years) who (i) have maintained exercise program participation through the 4-year follow-up visit (“long-term intervention group”, n = 23) or (ii) have discontinued participation following original trial completion (“control group”, n = 29) were studied. They were reassessed in a blind fashion, using the same procedures as at baseline. At 4 years, linear mixed-effects models showed significant gait (gait speed, P = 0.006) and balance (one-legged stance time, P = 0.015) improvements in the long-term intervention group, compared with the control group. Also, long-term intervention subjects did better on Timed Up & Go, Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand and handgrip strength tests, than controls (P < 0.05, for all comparisons). Furthermore, the exercise program reduced the risk of falling (relative risk, 0.69; 95 % confidence interval, 0.5–0.9; P = 0.008). These findings suggest that long-term maintenance of a music-based multitask exercise program is a promising strategy to prevent age-related physical decline in older adults. They also highlight the efficacy of sustained long-term adherence to exercise for falls prevention. PMID:25148876

  12. Long-term exercise in older adults: 4-year outcomes of music-based multitask training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hars, Mélany; Herrmann, François R; Fielding, Roger A; Reid, Kieran F; Rizzoli, René; Trombetti, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Prospective controlled evidence supporting the efficacy of long-term exercise to prevent physical decline and reduce falls in old age is lacking. The present study aimed to assess the effects of long-term music-based multitask exercise (i.e., Jaques-Dalcroze eurhythmics) on physical function and fall risk in older adults. A 3-year follow-up extension of a 1-year randomized controlled trial (NCT01107288) was conducted in Geneva (Switzerland), in which 134 community-dwellers aged ≥65 years at increased risk of falls received a 6-month music-based multitask exercise program. Four years following original trial enrolment, 52 subjects (baseline mean ± SD age, 75 ± 8 years) who (i) have maintained exercise program participation through the 4-year follow-up visit ("long-term intervention group", n = 23) or (ii) have discontinued participation following original trial completion ("control group", n = 29) were studied. They were reassessed in a blind fashion, using the same procedures as at baseline. At 4 years, linear mixed-effects models showed significant gait (gait speed, P = 0.006) and balance (one-legged stance time, P = 0.015) improvements in the long-term intervention group, compared with the control group. Also, long-term intervention subjects did better on Timed Up & Go, Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand and handgrip strength tests, than controls (P < 0.05, for all comparisons). Furthermore, the exercise program reduced the risk of falling (relative risk, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.5-0.9; P = 0.008). These findings suggest that long-term maintenance of a music-based multitask exercise program is a promising strategy to prevent age-related physical decline in older adults. They also highlight the efficacy of sustained long-term adherence to exercise for falls prevention.

  13. 动态网页课程设计演示平台的设计与实现%Design and Implementation of Demonstration Platform for Dynamic Webpage Course Exercise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆锡聪

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces to design and implement“dynamic webpage”course exercise experiments platform with sql server as backstage database, Serv-U ftp as ftp server, IIS as web server based on technologies of extensive domain name analysis and virtual host with host header. So that all students have their own sub-domain name and virtual host space to show effects of course exercise.%应用泛域名解析和基于主机头的虚拟主机技术,设计和实现了以SQL Server为后台数据库,以Serv-U FTP为FTP服务器,以IIS(Internet Information System)为WEB服务器的“动态网页”课程设计演示平台。学生使用该平台拥有自己的次级域名和虚拟主机空间,可演示本课程的设计效果。

  14. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (\\Vdot O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and \\Vdot O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (r\\Vdot O2). The rBF and r\\Vdot O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and \\Vdot O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology.

  15. Exercise and Fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, Wim; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J.

    2009-01-01

    Physical exercise affects the equilibrium of the internal environment. During exercise the contracting muscles generate force or power and heat. So physical exercise is in fact a form of mechanical energy. This generated energy will deplete the energy stocks within the body. During exercise, metabol

  16. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Exercise-Induced Asthma A A ... previous continue Tips for Kids With Exercise-Induced Asthma For the most part, kids with exercise-induced ...

  17. Magnesium enhances exercise performance via increasing glucose availability in the blood, muscle, and brain during exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Ying Chen

    Full Text Available Glucose mobilization and utilization in the periphery and central nervous system are important during exercise and are responsible for exercise efficacy. Magnesium (Mg is involved in energy production and plays a role in exercise performance. This study aimed to explore the effects of Mg on the dynamic changes in glucose and lactate levels in the muscle, blood and brain of exercising rats using a combination of auto-blood sampling and microdialysis. Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with saline or magnesium sulfate (MgSO4, 90 mg/kg, i.p. 30 min before treadmill exercise (20 m/min for 60 min. Our results indicated that the muscle, blood, and brain glucose levels immediately increased during exercise, and then gradually decreased to near basal levels in the recovery periods of both groups. These glucose levels were significantly enhanced to approximately two-fold (P<0.05 in the Mg group. Lactate levels in the muscle, blood, and brain rapidly and significantly increased in both groups during exercise, and brain lactate levels in the Mg group further elevated (P<0.05 than those in the control group during exercise. Lactate levels significantly decreased after exercise in both groups. In conclusion, Mg enhanced glucose availability in the peripheral and central systems, and increased lactate clearance in the muscle during exercise.

  18. Giving Devices the Ability to Exercise Reason

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Keeley

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the capabilities that separates humans from computers has been the ability to exercise "reason / judgment". Computers and computerized devices have provided excellent platforms for following rules. Computer programs provide the scripts for processing the rules. The exercise of reason, however, is more of an image processing function than a function composed of a series of rules. The exercise of reason is more right brain than left brain. It involves the interpretation of information and balancing inter-related alternatives. This paper will discuss a new way to define and process information that will give devices the ability to exercise human-like reasoning and judgment. The paper will discuss the characteristics of a "dynamic graphical language" in the context of addressing judgment, since judgment is often required to adjust rules when operating in a dynamic environment. The paper will touch on architecture issues and how judgment is integrated with rule processing.

  19. The relationship between constant work rate exercises and dynamic hyperinflation in patients with stable COPD%慢性阻塞性肺疾病恒定功率运动能力与动态过度充气的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾斌; 张鸣生

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between the constant work rate exercises and dynamic hyperinflation in patients with stable COPD. Methods Routine lung ventilation function and 80%Wmax constant power bicycle ergometer exercises were tested in 30 stable COPD patients. We analyzed the correlation coefficient of Time of tolerant exercise , degree of dyspnea , VO2 max%, VO2 @kgmax% and IC%. Results All COPD patients existed varying degrees of exercise capacity accompaning with dynamic hyperinflation in the bicycle ergometer exercises. By Spearman correlation analysis , the VO2 @kg% of constant power exercises in patients with COPD is correlated with the DH% (r = -0.480, P = 0.007) and ICq% (r = 0.667, P = 0.01). Conclusion Dynamic hyperinflation is probably the prominent factors for the capability of constant work rate exercises in patients with stable COPD. Inhibition of dynamic hyperinflation may help improve exercise capability in patients with constant power exercise.%目的:观察稳定期慢性阻塞性肺疾病(COPD)患者的恒定功率运动表现与动态过度充气间的相互关系.方法:对30例中度以上稳定期COPD患者进行常规肺通气功能、80%Wmax恒定功率自行车运动测试,分析运动耐受时间、呼吸困难程度、最大摄氧量量及最大公斤摄氧量百分比与深吸气量百分比变化值之间的相互关系. 结果:COPD患者均出现不同程度的运动能力下降,且在恒定功率运动中伴随显著的动态过度充气;相关分析提示,恒定功率运动最大公斤摄氧量百分比与动态过度充气百分比呈负相关(r = -0.480, P = 0.007),而与静息深吸气量百分比呈正相关(r=0.667,P=0.01).结论:动态过度充气可能是COPD患者恒定功率运动受限的重要影响因子,抑制动态过度充气可能有助于改善患者的恒定功率运动表现.

  20. Comportamento da hiperinsuflação dinâmica em teste em esteira rolante em pacientes com DPOC moderada a grave Dynamic hyperinflation during treadmill exercise testing in patients with moderate to severe COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Kessar Cordoni

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar a presença, extensão e padrões de hiperinsuflação dinâmica (HD durante teste em esteira rolante em pacientes com DPOC moderada a grave. Métodos: Estudo transversal com 30 pacientes não hipoxêmicos (VEF1= 43 ± 14% do previsto submetidos a teste cardiopulmonar de exercício em esteira rolante em velocidade constante (70-80% da velocidade máxima até o limite da tolerância (Tlim. Manobras seriadas de capacidade inspiratória (CI foram utilizadas para avaliação da HD. RESULTADOS: Dos 30 pacientes estudados, 19 (63,3% apresentaram HD (grupo HD+, que apresentaram maior comprometimento funcional em repouso do que os pacientes sem HD (grupo HD-. Nenhuma das variáveis obtidas relacionou-se com a tolerância ao exercício no grupo HD-, enquanto Tlim, CI e percepção de dispneia ao esforço foram significativamente correlacionados no grupo HD+ (p OBJECTIVE: To characterize the presence, extent, and patterns of dynamic hyperinflation (DH during treadmill exercise testing in patients with moderate to severe COPD. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 30 non-hypoxemic patients (FEV1= 43 ± 14% of predicted who were submitted to a cardiopulmonary exercise test on a treadmill at a constant speed (70-80% of maximum speed to the tolerance limit (Tlim. Serial inspiratory capacity (IC maneuvers were used in order to assess DH. RESULTS: Of the 30 patients studied, 19 (63.3% presented with DH (DH+ group, having greater pulmonary function impairment at rest than did those without DH (DH- group. None of the variables studied correlated with exercise tolerance in the DH- group, whereas Tlim, IC, and perception of dyspnea during exercise did so correlate in the DH+ group (p < 0.05. In the DH+ group, 7 and 12 patients, respectively, presented with a progressive and a stable pattern of DH (ΔIC Tlim,2min = -0.28 ± 0.11 L vs. 0.04 ± 0.10 L; p < 0.01. Patients with a progressive pattern of DH presented with higher

  1. The reproducibility of different metabolic markers for muscle fiber type distributions investigated by functional {sup 31}P-MRS during dynamic exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rzanny, Reinhard; Hiepe, Patrick; Gussew, Alexander; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [Univ. Hospital Jena (Germany). Medical Physics Group, Inst. of Diagnostics and Interventional Radiology; Stutzig, Norman [Univ. of Stuttgart (Germany). Exercise Science, Inst. of Sport and Movement Science; Thorhauer, Hans-Alexander [Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany). Exercise Science, Inst. of Sports Science

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the reproducibility of exercise induced pH-heterogeneity by splitting of the inorganic phosphate (Pi) signal in the corresponding {sup 31}P-MRS spectra and to compare results of this approach with other fiber-type related markers, like phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate (PCr/ATP) ratio, and PCr-recovery parameters. Subjects (N = 3) with different sportive background were tested in 10 test sessions separated by at least 3 days. A MR-compatible pedal ergometer was used to perform the exercise and to induce a pH-based splitting of the Pi-signal in {sup 31}P-MR spectra of the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The PCr recovery was analyzed using a non-negative least square algorithm (NNLS) and multi-exponential regression analysis to estimate the number of non-exponential components as well as their amplitude and time constant. The reproducibility of the estimated metabolic marker and the resulting fiber-type distributions between the 10 test sessions were compared. The reproducibility (standard deviation between measurements) based on (1) Pi components varied from 2% to 4%, (2) PCr recovery time components varied from 10% to 12% and (3) phosphate concentrations at rest varied from 8% to 11% between test sessions. Due to the sportive activity differences between the 3 subjects were expected in view of fiber type distribution. All estimated markers indicate the highest type I percentage for volunteer 3 medium for volunteer 2 and the lowest for volunteer 1. The relative high reproducibility of pH dependent Pi components during exercise indicates a high potential of this method to estimate muscle fiber-type distributions in vivo. To make this method usable not only to detect differences in muscle fiber distributions but also to determine individual fiber-type volume contents it is therefore recommended to validate this marker by histological methods and to reveal the effects of muscle fiber recruitments and fiber-type specific

  2. Airflow obstruction and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher B

    2009-03-01

    The primary abnormality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is chronic airway inflammation which results in airflow limitation. Disease progression is usually depicted as an accelerated decline in FEV(1) over time. However, COPD patients also manifest progressive static hyperinflation due to the combined effects of reduced lung elastic recoil and increased airway resistance. Superimposed on static hyperinflation are further increases in operational lung volumes (dynamic hyperinflation) brought on during exercise, exacerbations or tachypnea. An important consequence of exertional dyspnea is activity limitation. COPD patients have been shown to spend only a third of the day walking or standing compared with age-matched healthy individuals who spend more than half of their time in these activities. Furthermore, the degree of activity limitation measured by an accelerometer worsens with disease progression. COPD patients have been shown to have an accelerated loss of aerobic capacity (VO(2)max) and this correlates with mortality just as is seen with hypertension, diabetes and obesity. Thus physical inactivity is an important therapeutic target in COPD. Summarizing; airflow obstruction leads to progressive hyperinflation, activity limitation, physical deconditioning and other comorbidities that characterize the COPD phenotype. Targeting the airflow obstruction with long-acting bronchodilator therapy in conjunction with a supervised exercise prescription is currently the most effective therapeutic intervention in earlier COPD. Other important manifestations of skeletal muscle dysfunction include muscle atrophy and weakness. These specific problems are best addressed with resistance training with consideration of anabolic supplementation.

  3. Força de preensão palmar em idosos com demência: estudo da confiabilidade Handgrip strength in elderly with dementia: study of reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana A. Alencar

    2012-01-01

    evaluated in different populations. The handgrip strength test is widely used, however little has been investigated about its reliability when used in elderly with dementia and the right stage wich its use should be avoided. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the test-retest reliability of the handgrip strength test in elderly with different ratings of dementia. METHOD: The cognitive function of 76 elderly subjects with dementia was measured, and the caregivers were interviewed to allow classification by the Clinical dementia rating (CDR. For these assessments the Mini-Metal State Examination and the Pfeffer, Lawton, and Katz scales were used. Twenty subjects were classified as borderline (83.4± 5.8 years, 19 as mild (82.4±6.8 years, 19 as moderate (85.8±5.6 years and 18 as severe dementia (84.0±5.1 years. Handgrip strength was assessed with a JAMAR hydraulic dynamometer and after one week it was reevaluated. Reliability was analyzed by Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC. The significance level was set at α=0.05. RESULTS: Test-retest reliability was excellent for groups with borderline (ICC=0.975; p=0.001, mild (ICC=0.968; p=0.002, and moderate (ICC=0.964; p=0.001 dementia. The analysis of the group with a severe CDR showed no statistical significance and a low ICC (ICC=0.415; p=0.376. CONCLUSION: The handgrip strength test has excellent reliability when used in elderly with borderline, mild, and moderate dementia, which enables its use in research. However, its use is not recommended in elderly classified with severe dementia due to the measure’s low reliability and subsequent irrelevance in clinical practice.

  4. Força de preensão palmar em idosos com demência: estudo da confiabilidade Handgrip strength in elderly with dementia: study of reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana A. Alencar

    2012-12-01

    evaluated in different populations. The handgrip strength test is widely used, however little has been investigated about its reliability when used in elderly with dementia and the right stage wich its use should be avoided. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the test-retest reliability of the handgrip strength test in elderly with different ratings of dementia. METHOD: The cognitive function of 76 elderly subjects with dementia was measured, and the caregivers were interviewed to allow classification by the Clinical dementia rating (CDR. For these assessments the Mini-Metal State Examination and the Pfeffer, Lawton, and Katz scales were used. Twenty subjects were classified as borderline (83.4± 5.8 years, 19 as mild (82.4±6.8 years, 19 as moderate (85.8±5.6 years and 18 as severe dementia (84.0±5.1 years. Handgrip strength was assessed with a JAMAR hydraulic dynamometer and after one week it was reevaluated. Reliability was analyzed by Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC. The significance level was set at α=0.05. RESULTS: Test-retest reliability was excellent for groups with borderline (ICC=0.975; p=0.001, mild (ICC=0.968; p=0.002, and moderate (ICC=0.964; p=0.001 dementia. The analysis of the group with a severe CDR showed no statistical significance and a low ICC (ICC=0.415; p=0.376. CONCLUSION: The handgrip strength test has excellent reliability when used in elderly with borderline, mild, and moderate dementia, which enables its use in research. However, its use is not recommended in elderly classified with severe dementia due to the measure’s low reliability and subsequent irrelevance in clinical practice.

  5. Reference ranges of handgrip strength from 125,462 healthy adults in 21 countries: a prospective urban rural epidemiologic (PURE) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Koon K.; Rangarajan, Sumathy; Kutty, V. Raman; Lanas, Fernando; Hui, Chen; Quanyong, Xiang; Zhenzhen, Qian; Jinhua, Tang; Noorhassim, Ismail; AlHabib, Khalid F; Moss, Sarah J.; Rosengren, Annika; Akalin, Ayse Arzu; Rahman, Omar; Chifamba, Jephat; Orlandini, Andrés; Kumar, Rajesh; Yeates, Karen; Gupta, Rajeev; Yusufali, Afzalhussein; Dans, Antonio; Avezum, Álvaro; Lopez‐Jaramillo, Patricio; Poirier, Paul; Heidari, Hosein; Zatonska, Katarzyna; Iqbal, Romaina; Khatib, Rasha; Yusuf, Salim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The measurement of handgrip strength (HGS) has prognostic value with respect to all‐cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and cardiovascular disease, and is an important part of the evaluation of frailty. Published reference ranges for HGS are mostly derived from Caucasian populations in high‐income countries. There is a paucity of information on normative HGS values in non‐Caucasian populations from low‐ or middle‐income countries. The objective of this study was to develop reference HGS ranges for healthy adults from a broad range of ethnicities and socioeconomically diverse geographic regions. Methods HGS was measured using a Jamar dynamometer in 125,462 healthy adults aged 35‐70 years from 21 countries in the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study. Results HGS values differed among individuals from different geographic regions. HGS values were highest among those from Europe/North America, lowest among those from South Asia, South East Asia and Africa, and intermediate among those from China, South America, and the Middle East. Reference ranges stratified by geographic region, age, and sex are presented. These ranges varied from a median (25th–75th percentile) 50 kg (43–56 kg) in men 60 years from South East Asia. Reference ranges by ethnicity and body‐mass index are also reported. Conclusions Individual HGS measurements should be interpreted using region/ethnic‐specific reference ranges. PMID:27104109

  6. A comparison between handgrip strength, upper limb fat free mass by segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis (SBIA) and anthropometric measurements in young males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Correa, C. H.; Caicedo-Eraso, J. C.; Varon-Serna, D. R.

    2013-04-01

    The mechanical function and size of a muscle may be closely linked. Handgrip strength (HGS) has been used as a predictor of functional performing. Anthropometric measurements have been made to estimate arm muscle area (AMA) and physical muscle mass volume of upper limb (ULMMV). Electrical volume estimation is possible by segmental BIA measurements of fat free mass (SBIA-FFM), mainly muscle-mass. Relationship among these variables is not well established. We aimed to determine if physical and electrical muscle mass estimations relate to each other and to what extent HGS is to be related to its size measured by both methods in normal or overweight young males. Regression analysis was used to determine association between these variables. Subjects showed a decreased HGS (65.5%), FFM, (85.5%) and AMA (74.5%). It was found an acceptable association between SBIA-FFM and AMA (r2 = 0.60) and poorer between physical and electrical volume (r2 = 0.55). However, a paired Student t-test and Bland and Altman plot showed that physical and electrical models were not interchangeable (ptanthropometric (r2 = 0.07) and electrical (r2 = 0.192) ULMMV showing that muscle mass quantity does not mean muscle strength. Other factors influencing HGS like physical training or nutrition require more research.

  7. Dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sternberg, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Celebrated mathematician Shlomo Sternberg, a pioneer in the field of dynamical systems, created this modern one-semester introduction to the subject for his classes at Harvard University. Its wide-ranging treatment covers one-dimensional dynamics, differential equations, random walks, iterated function systems, symbolic dynamics, and Markov chains. Supplementary materials offer a variety of online components, including PowerPoint lecture slides for professors and MATLAB exercises.""Even though there are many dynamical systems books on the market, this book is bound to become a classic. The the

  8. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  9. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P type composition, muscle mass, and/or muscle architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  10. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P muscle fiber type composition, muscle mass, and/or muscle architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  11. The Effect of Prior Upper Body Exercise on Subsequent Wingate Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Clare Grant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported previously that the upper body musculature is continually active during high intensity cycle ergometry. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of prior upper body exercise on subsequent Wingate (WAnT performance. Eleven recreationally active males (20.8 ± 2.2 yrs; 77.7 ± 12.0 kg; 1.79 ± 0.04 m completed two trials in a randomised order. In one trial participants completed 2×30 s WAnT tests (WAnT1 and WAnT2 with a 6 min recovery period; in the other trial, this protocol was preceded with 4 sets of biceps curls to induce localised arm fatigue. Prior upper body exercise was found to have a statistically significant detrimental effect on peak power output (PPO during WAnT1 (P0.05. Handgrip (HG strength was also found to be significantly lower following the upper body exercise. These results demonstrate that the upper body is meaningfully involved in the generation of leg power during intense cycling.

  12. Exercise in weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, B M; Szymanski, L

    1997-11-01

    Exercise is integral to successful weight loss and maintenance. When talking to patients about exercise, consider their readiness, and address the barriers that prevent exercise. Physicians can help those patients who already exercise by encouraging them to continue and helping them anticipate, and recover from, lapses. Providing resource material to patients on behavioral strategies for exercise adoption and weight management can supplement the physician's efforts. Overall, patients need to hear that any regular exercise, be it step-aerobics, walking, or taking the stairs, will benefit them.

  13. Neural Mechanisms of Exercise: Effects on Gut Miccrobiota and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Paes, Flávia; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Machado, Sergio; de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza

    2015-01-01

    Microbiota is a set of microorganisms resident in gut ecosystem that reacts to psychological stressful stimuli, and is involved in depressed or anxious status in both animals and human being. Interestingly, a series of studies have shown the effects of physical exercise on gut microbiota dynamics, suggesting that gut microbiota regulation might act as one mediator for the effects of exercise on the brain. Recent studies found that gut microbiota dynamics are also regulated by metabolism changes, such as through physical exercise or diet change. Interestingly, physical exercise modulates different population of gut bacteria in compared to food restriction or rich diet, and alleviates gut syndromes to toxin intake. Gut microbiota could as well contribute to the beneficial effects of exercise on cognition and emotion, either directly through serotonin signaling or indirectly by modulating metabolism and exercise performance.

  14. Teaching Cardiac Electrophysiology Modeling to Undergraduate Students: Laboratory Exercises and GPU Programming for the Study of Arrhythmias and Spiral Wave Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartocci, Ezio; Singh, Rupinder; von Stein, Frederick B.; Amedome, Avessie; Caceres, Alan Joseph J.; Castillo, Juan; Closser, Evan; Deards, Gabriel; Goltsev, Andriy; Ines, Roumwelle Sta.; Isbilir, Cem; Marc, Joan K.; Moore, Diquan; Pardi, Dana; Sadhu, Sandeep; Sanchez, Samuel; Sharma, Pooja; Singh, Anoopa; Rogers, Joshua; Wolinetz, Aron; Grosso-Applewhite, Terri; Zhao, Kai; Filipski, Andrew B.; Gilmour, Robert F., Jr.; Grosu, Radu; Glimm, James; Smolka, Scott A.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Clarke, Edmund M.; Griffeth, Nancy; Fenton, Flavio H.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a 3-wk intersession workshop funded by a National Science Foundation Expeditions in Computing award, 15 undergraduate students from the City University of New York collaborated on a study aimed at characterizing the voltage dynamics and arrhythmogenic behavior of cardiac cells for a broad range of physiologically relevant conditions…

  15. Solved problems in dynamical systems and control

    CERN Document Server

    Tenreiro-Machado, J; Valério, Duarte; Galhano, Alexandra M

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a collection of exercises on dynamical systems, modelling and control. Each topic covered includes a summary of the theoretical background, problems with solutions, and further exercises.

  16. Exercise intolerance in Glycogen Storage Disease Type III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Pradel, Agnès; Husu, Edith

    2013-01-01

    with either a saline or a glucose infusion. VO 2peak was below normal. Glucose improved the work capacity by lowering the heart rate, and increasing the peak work rate by 30% (108 W with glucose vs. 83 W with placebo, p=0.018). The block in muscle glycogenolytic capacity, combined with the liver involvement...... experience exercise intolerance due to insufficient carbohydrate oxidation in skeletal muscle. Six patients aged 17-36-years were studied. We determined VO 2peak (peak oxygen consumption), the response to forearm exercise, and the metabolic and cardiovascular responses to cycle exercise at 70% of VO 2peak...... caused exercise intolerance with dynamic skeletal muscle symptoms (excessive fatigue and muscle pain), and hypoglycemia in 4 subjects. In this study we combined anaerobic and aerobic exercise to systematically study skeletal muscle metabolism and exercise tolerance in patients with GSD IIIa. Exercise...

  17. The dynamics of somatic indicators of basketball players under the influence of the special exercises which are directed to the increase of stability of the vestibular analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevhen Kharchenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine stability of the vestibular analyzer of basketball players of the team of KhSAPC by indicators of somatic displacements after the standard vestibular irritations on the Barany chair, after the introduction of the special exercises in the educational – training process, which are directed on the increase of stability of the vestibular sensor-based system. Material & Methods: the analysis of references, methods of definition of a functional condition of the vestibular analyzer on indicators of somatic displacements before and after the irritation on the Barany chair, methods of mathematical statistics. 12 boys – basketball players of the men's national team of KhSAPC took part in the researches. Results: somatic indicators of a functional condition of the vestibular analyzer of students – basketball players of the team of KhSAPC, and, their changes under the influence of rotary loadings before the pedagogical experiment are given in the article. Conclusions: the analysis of the results which were received after the experiment showed the considerable improvement of indicators, according to the testing of the motive test (4x9 m (s, hand dynamometry of 100% of a maximum and 50% of a maximum of the right and left hands (р0,05.

  18. Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis - exercise; Low bone density - exercise; Osteopenia - exercise ... your bones strong and lower your risk of osteoporosis and fractures as you get older. Before you begin an exercise program, talk with your health care provider if: ...

  19. Exercise-induced asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000036.htm Exercise-induced asthma To use the sharing features on this page, ... such as running, basketball, or soccer. Use Your Asthma Medicine Before you Exercise Take your short-acting, ...

  20. Diet and Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Risk Factors Prevention & Early Detection Diet And Exercise Transplant recipients need to be aware of the ... help arrange for counseling and other support services. Exercise After a Transplant Most people are weak after ...

  1. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regular exercise is one of the best things you can do for your health. It has many benefits, including ... chronic diseases. There are many different types of exercise; it is important that you pick the right ...

  2. Heart-Healthy Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Heart-Healthy Exercise Lauren Healey Mellett , Gisele Bousquet Download PDF https:// ... if you already have heart disease. How Can Exercise Help? There are many modifiable risk factors for ...

  3. Exercise for Seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exercise and physical activity are good for just about everyone, including older adults. There are four main ... jogging, dancing, swimming, and biking are examples. Strength exercises make your muscles stronger. Lifting weights or using ...

  4. Take the (Exercise) Plunge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167533.html Take the (Exercise) Plunge Pool workouts offer a range of health ... the pool. Whether you swim or do aquatic exercises, working out in water improves strength, flexibility and ...

  5. Muscle glycogenolysis during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Gavras, H

    1982-01-01

    glycogenolysis during exercise: contractions principally stimulate glycogenolysis early in exercise, and a direct effect of epinephrine on muscle is needed for continued glycogenolysis. In addition, epinephrine increased oxygen consumption and glucose uptake in both resting and electrically stimulated...

  6. Endocannabinoids and exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, A; McDaniel, WF

    2004-01-01

    Exercise induces changes in mental status, particularly analgesia, sedation, anxiolysis, and a sense of wellbeing. The mechanisms underlying these changes remain unknown. Recent findings show that exercise increases serum concentrations of endocannabinoids, suggesting a possible explanation for a nu

  7. Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well- ...

  8. Kids and Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cold-Weather Sports Strength Training Weight Management: Strength Training Exercises (Video) Advice for Athletes From a Gold-Medal Coach Kickboxing Easy Exercises for Teens Choosing the Right Sport ...

  9. Exercise and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Exercise and Asthma Page Content Article Body Almost every child (and ... of Pediatrics about asthma and exercise. What is asthma Asthma is the most common chronic medical problem ...

  10. Physical Activity (Exercise)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page Subscribe to ePublications email updates. Enter email address Submit Home > ePublications > Our ePublications > Physical activity (exercise) fact sheet ePublications Physical activity (exercise) ...

  11. Benefits of Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... start slowly, and find ways to fit more physical activity into your life. To get the most benefit, ... the health benefits of exercise? Regular exercise and physical activity may Help you control your weight. Along with ...

  12. Exercise and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007165.htm Exercise and immunity To use the sharing features on this page, ... know exactly if or how exercise increases your immunity to certain illnesses. There are several theories. However, ...

  13. Cyber Exercise Playbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    all parties benefit from the exercise experience. Exercises are not performed to make an organization look bad; instead, they help to train and...techniques it utilized to attack a security posture. All parties benefit from an exercise that underscores the RT motto: ”we win, we lose. 23 Appendix...Jason Kick November 2014 Cyber Exercise Playbook The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of The

  14. Exercise in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Context: Health professionals who care for pregnant women should discuss potential health benefits and harms of exercise. Although most pregnant women do not meet minimal exercise recommendations, there are a growing number of physically active women who wish to continue training throughout pregnancy. Evidence Acquisition: A search of the Web of Science database of articles and reviews available in English through 2014. The search terms exercise pregnancy, strenuous exercise pregnancy, and vi...

  15. Prenatal exercise research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2012-06-01

    In this review of recent research on prenatal exercise, studies from several different countries suggest that only approximately 40% of pregnant women exercise, even though about 92% are encouraged by their physicians to exercise, albeit with some 69% of the women being advised to limit their exercise. A moderate exercise regime reputedly increases infant birthweight to within the normal range, but only if exercise is decreased in late pregnancy. Lower intensity exercise such as water aerobics has decreased low back pain more than land-based physical exercise. Heart rate and blood pressure have been lower following yoga than walking, and complications like pregnancy-induced hypertension with associated intrauterine growth retardation and prematurity have been less frequent following yoga. No studies could be found on tai chi with pregnant women even though balance and the risk of falling are great concerns during pregnancy, and tai chi is one of the most effective forms of exercise for balance. Potential underlying mechanisms for exercise effects are that stimulating pressure receptors during exercise increases vagal activity which, in turn, decreases cortisol, increases serotonin and decreases substance P, leading to decreased pain. Decreased cortisol is particularly important inasmuch as cortisol negatively affects immune function and is a significant predictor of prematurity. Larger, more controlled trials are needed before recommendations can be made about the type and amount of pregnancy exercise.

  16. Getting Exercise in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Help Someone Who's Being Bullied? Volunteering Getting Exercise in College KidsHealth > For Teens > Getting Exercise in College Print A A A What's in ... energy, both your body and mind need physical exercise to function at their peak. But with high ...

  17. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  18. Why Exercise Is Wise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... each day. Here are some of the reasons: Exercise benefits every part of the body, including the mind. ... conditions may affect how — and how much — you exercise. Doctors know that most people benefit from regular exercise, even those with disabilities or ...

  19. Sleep, Exercise, and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrelson, Orvis A.; And Others

    The first part of this booklet concerns why sleep and exercise are necessary. It includes a discussion of what occurs during sleep and what dreams are. It also deals with the benefits of exercise, fatigue, posture, and the correlation between exercise and personality. The second part concerns nutrition and the importance of food. This part covers…

  20. Exercise and Your Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet presents information on the effects of physical activity on the heart and practical guidelines for starting and staying on an exercise program. The following topics are discussed: (1) the benefits of getting sufficient exercise; (2) possible risks in exercising compared to benefits; (3) when to seek doctor's advice and prevention of…

  1. Exercise stress test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercise stress test is used to measure the effect of exercise on your heart. How the Test is Performed This test is ... sensation that may feel tight. Baseline measurements of heart rate and blood pressure will be taken before exercise starts. You will start walking on a treadmill ...

  2. Relative Activity of Abdominal Muscles during Commonly Prescribed Strengthening Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Gilbert M.; Hyde, Jennifer E.; Uhrlaub, Michael B.; Wendel, Cara L.; Karst, Gregory M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) and external oblique (EOA) muscles during five abdominal strengthening exercises. Isometric and dynamic EMG data indicated that abdominal strengthening exercises activated various abdominal muscle groups. For the LRA and EOA muscle groups, there were…

  3. Special Physical Preparation of High Schoolers for Performing Parkour Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. М. Кравчук

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to ground and develop a methodology of special physical preparation of high schoolers for performing parkour elements, and to experimentally verify its effectiveness. Materials and methods: Kharkiv secondary school No. 84 served as the grounds for the study. The participants in the study were boys aged 15-17: 10 persons – in the reference group, and 10 persons – in the experimental group. The methods of the study: theoretical analysis and collation of scientific and methodological literature; pedagogical observation; video recording; biomechanical analysis; talks with experts; pedagogical experiment; mathematical and statistical methods of research materials processing. Results: The experimental group showed positive improvement in the balancing technique from 3.5 points before the experiment to 6.3 after the experiment (p < 0.05; a considerable increase in points in the jumping technique, including jumps onto the wall bars hand-gripping its edge, jumps into landing with a roll, and jumps over obstacle – from 2.9, 4.2 and 4.6 points respectively at the beginning of the experiment to 5.9, 6.7 and 7.8 points respectively after the experiment (p < 0.05; positive significant improvement in the wall bars running results – from 3.2 points at the beginning of the experiment to 6.7 after the experiment (p < 0.05. Conclusions: special sets of exercises have been designed to develop and improve these abilities in parkour, and the effectiveness of the designed methodology has been experimentally verified. The study has proved that, when used in physical training of high schoolers, the special sets of exercises intended to develop parkourists’ speed, strength and coordination abilities contribute to a significant increase in the level of the technique of execution of the main parkour elements.

  4. Strengthening exercises improve symptoms and quality of life but do not change autonomic modulation in fibromyalgia: a randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bernadete Renoldi Oliveira Gavi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Autonomic dysfunction is an important mechanism that could explain many symptoms observed in fibromyalgia (FM. Exercise is an effective treatment, with benefits potentially mediated through changes in autonomic modulation. Strengthening is one of the less studied exercises in FM, and the acute and chronic effects of strengthening on the autonomic system remain unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the chronic effects of strengthening exercises (STRE on autonomic modulation, pain perception and the quality of life (QOL of FM patients. METHODS: Eighty sedentary women with FM (ACR 1990 were randomly selected to participate in STRE or flexibility (FLEX exercises in a blinded controlled trial. The intensity of STRE was set at 45% of the estimated load of 1 Repetition Maximum (RM in 12 different exercises. Outcomes were Visual Analog Scale (VAS for pain, Heart Rate Variability (HRV analysis, treadmill test, the sit and reach test (Wells and Dillon's Bench, maximal repetitions test and handgrip dynamometry; and quality of life by the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ, the Beck and Idate Trait-State Inventory (IDATE, a short-form health survey (SF-36. RESULTS: The STRE group was more effective to strength gain for all muscles and pain control after 4 and 16 weeks (p<0.05. The FLEX group showed higher improvements in anxiety (p<0.05. Both groups showed improvements in the QOL, and there was no significant difference observed between the groups. There was no change in the HRV of the STRE and FLEX groups. CONCLUSIONS: Strengthening exercises show greater and more rapid improvements in pain and strength than flexibility exercises. Despite the benefits in fitness, pain, depression, anxiety and quality of life, no effect was observed on the autonomic modulation in both groups. This observation suggests that changes in autonomic modulation are not a target tobe clinically achieved in fibromyalgia. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical

  5. An Interactive Exercise To Learn Eukaryotic Cell Structure and Organelle Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klionsky, Daniel J.; Tomashek, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a cooperative, interactive problem-solving exercise for studying eukaryotic cell structure and function. Highlights the dynamic aspects of movement through the cell. Contains 15 references. (WRM)

  6. Early Option Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heje Pedersen, Lasse; Jensen, Mads Vestergaard

    A classic result by Merton (1973) is that, except just before expiration or dividend payments, one should never exercise a call option and never convert a convertible bond. We show theoretically that this result is overturned when investors face frictions. Early option exercise can be optimal when...... it reduces short-sale costs, transaction costs, or funding costs. We provide consistent empirical evidence, documenting billions of dollars of early exercise for options and convertible bonds using unique data on actual exercise decisions and frictions. Our model can explain as much as 98% of early exercises...

  7. Early Option Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Vestergaard; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    A classic result by Merton (1973) is that, except just before expiration or dividend payments, one should never exercise a call option and never convert a convertible bond. We show theoretically that this result is overturned when investors face frictions. Early option exercise can be optimal when...... it reduces short-sale costs, transaction costs, or funding costs. We provide consistent empirical evidence, documenting billions of dollars of early exercise for options and convertible bonds using unique data on actual exercise decisions and frictions. Our model can explain as much as 98% of early exercises...

  8. Muscle functional MRI analysis of trunk muscle recruitment during extension exercises in asymptomatic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ridder, E M D; Van Oosterwijck, J O; Vleeming, A; Vanderstraeten, G G; Danneels, L A

    2015-04-01

    The present study examined the activity levels of the thoracic and lumbar extensor muscles during different extension exercise modalities in healthy individuals. Therefore, 14 subjects performed four different types of extension exercises in prone position: dynamic trunk extension, dynamic-static trunk extension, dynamic leg extension, and dynamic-static leg extension. Pre- and post-exercise muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging scans from the latissimus dorsi, the thoracic and lumbar parts of the longissimus, iliocostalis, and multifidus were performed. Differences in water relaxation values (T2-relaxation) before and after exercise were calculated (T2-shift) as a measure of muscle activity and compared between extension modalities. Linear mixed-model analysis revealed higher lumbar extensor activity during trunk extension compared with leg extension (T2-shift of 5.01 ms and 3.55 ms, respectively) and during the dynamic-static exercise performance compared with the dynamic exercise performance (T2-shift of 4.77 ms and 3.55 ms, respectively). No significant differences in the thoracic extensor activity between the exercises could be demonstrated. During all extension exercises, the latissimus dorsi was the least activated compared with the paraspinal muscles. While all extension exercises are equivalent effective to train the thoracic muscles, trunk extension exercises performed in a dynamic-static way are the most appropriate to enhance lumbar muscle strength.

  9. High cardiorespiratory fitness in early to late middle age preserves the cortical circuitry associated with brain-heart integration during volitional exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Katelyn N; Luchyshyn, Torri A; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2017-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that high cardiorespiratory fitness (peak oxygen uptake) preserves the cortical circuitry associated with cardiac arousal during exercise in middle- to older-aged individuals. Observations of changes in heart rate (HR) and in cortical blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) images were made in 52 healthy, active individuals (45-73 yr; 16 women, 36 men) across a range of fitness (26-66 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)). Seven repeated bouts of isometric handgrip (IHG) at 40% maximal voluntary contraction force were performed with functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T, with each contraction lasting 20 s and separated by 40 s of rest. HR responses to IHG showed high variability across individuals. Linear regression revealed that cardiorespiratory fitness was not a strong predictor of the HR response (r(2) = 0.09). In a region-of-interest analysis both the IHG task and the HR time course correlated with increased cortical activation in the bilateral insula and decreased activation relative to baseline in the anterior and posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). t-Test results revealed greater deactivation at the MPFC with higher fitness levels beyond that of guideline-based activity. Therefore, whereas high cardiorespiratory fitness failed to affect absolute HR responses to IHG in this age range, a select effect was observed in cortical regions known to be associated with cardiovascular arousal.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our first observation suggests that fitness does not strongly predict the heart rate (HR) response to a volitional handgrip task in middle- to older-aged adults. Second, the BOLD response associated with the handgrip task, and with the HR time course, was associated with response patterns in the cortical autonomic network. Finally, whereas high cardiorespiratory fitness failed to affect absolute HR responses to isometric handgrip in this age range, a select effect was observed in cortical regions known to be

  10. Morning and evening exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Yun Seo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that exercise may contribute to preventing pathological changes, treating multiple chronic diseases, and reducing mortality and morbidity ratios. Scientific evidence moreover shows that exercise plays a key role in improving health-related physical fitness components and hormone function. Regular exercise training is one of the few strategies that has been strictly adapted in healthy individuals and in athletes. However, time-dependent exercise has different outcomes, based on the exercise type, duration, and hormone adaptation. In the present review, we therefore briefly describe the type, duration, and adaptation of exercise performed in the morning and evening. In addition, we discuss the clinical considerations and indications for exercise training.

  11. Diabetes, insulin and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    The metabolic and hormonal adaptations to single exercise sessions and to exercise training in normal man and in patients with insulin-dependent as well as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are reviewed. In insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes good metabolic control is best obtained...... by a regular pattern of life which will lead to a fairly constant demand for insulin from day to day. Exercise is by nature a perturbation that makes treatment of diabetes difficult: Muscle contractions per se tend to decrease the plasma glucose concentration whereas the exercise-induced response of the so......-called counter-regulatory hormones tend to increase plasma glucose by increasing hepatic glucose production and adipose tissue lipolysis. If the pre-exercise plasma insulin level is high, hypoglycaemia may develop during exercise whereas hyperglycaemia and ketosis may develop if pre-exercise plasma insulin...

  12. Exercise prescription in the management of rheumatoid arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients with RA are less physically active than the general population. The types of exercises .... weights or resistance should not cause stress to the finger ..... Stenström C, Arge B, Sundbom A. Dynamic training versus relaxation training as.

  13. Effects of a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component on the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina S. S. Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Sarcopenic obesity is associated with disability in older people, especially in women. Resistance exercises are recommended for this population, but their efficacy is not clear. Objective To evaluate the effects of a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component on the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity. Method Twenty-eight women 65 to 80 years old, with a body mass index ≥30kg/m2 and handgrip strength ≤21kg were randomly allocated to two groups. The experimental group underwent a 10-week resistance exercise program designed to improve strength, power, and endurance of lower-limb muscles, with open chain and closed chain exercises. The control group had their health status monitored through telephone calls. The primary outcomes were lower limb muscle performance measured by knee extensor strength, power and fatigue by isokinetic dynamometry, and mobility measured by the Short Physical Performance Battery and by gait velocity. The secondary outcome was health-related quality of life assessed by the SF-36 Questionnaire. Results The average rate of adherence was 85%, with few mild adverse effects. There were no significant between-group differences for any of the outcomes. Conclusion In this study, a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component was not effective for improving the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity.

  14. Effects of a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component on the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Karina S S; Dias, João M D; Araújo, Marília C; Pinheiro, Ana C; Moreira, Bruno S; Dias, Rosângela C

    2016-07-11

    Sarcopenic obesity is associated with disability in older people, especially in women. Resistance exercises are recommended for this population, but their efficacy is not clear. To evaluate the effects of a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component on the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity. Twenty-eight women 65 to 80 years old, with a body mass index ≥30kg/m2 and handgrip strength ≤21kg were randomly allocated to two groups. The experimental group underwent a 10-week resistance exercise program designed to improve strength, power, and endurance of lower-limb muscles, with open chain and closed chain exercises. The control group had their health status monitored through telephone calls. The primary outcomes were lower limb muscle performance measured by knee extensor strength, power and fatigue by isokinetic dynamometry, and mobility measured by the Short Physical Performance Battery and by gait velocity. The secondary outcome was health-related quality of life assessed by the SF-36 Questionnaire. The average rate of adherence was 85%, with few mild adverse effects. There were no significant between-group differences for any of the outcomes. In this study, a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component was not effective for improving the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity.

  15. Modelling fire-fighter responses to exercise and asymmetric infrared radiation using a dynamic multi-mode model of human physiology and results from the sweating agile thermal manikin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, M G M; Fiala, D

    2004-09-01

    In this study, predicted dynamic physiological responses are compared with wear trials results for firefighter suits: impermeable (A), semi-permeable (B) and permeable (C), and underwear. Wear trials consisted of three rest phases and two moderate work phases, with a frontal infrared (IR) radiation exposure of 500 W/m2 for the last 15 min of each work phase. Simulations were performed by detailed modelling of the experimental boundary conditions, including the inhomogeneous IR radiation combined with clothing properties for still and walking conditions measured using the Sweating Agile thermal Manikin. Accounting for the effect of sweat gland activity suppression with increased skin wettedness, the predicted total moisture loss was insignificantly different (P<0.05) from the wear trial value for suits B and C but was 37% too high for suit A. Predicted evolution of core, mean skin and local skin temperatures agreed well with the wear trial results for all clothing. Root mean square deviations ranged from 0.11 degrees C to 0.26 degrees C for core temperatures and from 0.28 degrees C to 0.38 degrees C for mean skin temperatures, which where typically lower than the experimental error. Transient thermodynamic processes occurring within suit A may account for the delayed/reduced fall in core temperature following exercise.

  16. The impact of cold-water immersion on power production in the vertical jump and the benefits of a dynamic exercise warm-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Patrick G; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S; Howard, Robert L; Gomez, Ana L; Comstock, Brett A; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Fragala, Maren S; Hooper, David R; Häkkinen, Keijo; Maresh, Carl M

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of a cold treatment and a dynamic warm-up on lower body power in the form of a countermovement vertical jump (CMVJ). Nine physically active men, who were either current or ex-National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division 1 athletes, consented to participate in the study. Using a balanced, randomized presentation and a within-subject design, each subject performed 4 environmental and warm-up protocols (i.e., ambient temperature without warm-up, ambient temperature with warm-up, cold without warm-up, or cold with warm-up). Two sets of 3 maximal effort CMVJs were performed on a force plate at each testing time point. For each protocol, the subjects completed a pretest set of CMVJ (pretreatment [PRE]), were then exposed to 1 of the 2 temperature treatments, completed another set of CMVJ (initial [IT]), then either went through a 15-minute warm-up, or were asked to sit in place. Then a final set of CMVJs was completed (posttreatment [PT]). The primary finding in this study was that warm-up was effective in offsetting the negative effects of cold exposure on CMVJ power. There was a significant main effect for Time (PRE > PT > IT), and there was a significant (p ≤ 0.05) main effect for Trial (AMB = AMBWU > COLDWU > COLD). Because athletic competitions happen in various colder climates, it is important to make sure that a proper warm-up be completed to maximize the athlete's power output. The results of this study demonstrate that when athletes are exposed to cold conditions, it is recommended that before practice or play, a dynamic warm-up be employed to optimize performance.

  17. The economics of intense exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, David O; Jena, Anupam B

    2010-05-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of exercise, the time required for exercise is widely understood as a major reason for low levels of exercise in the US. Intensity of exercise can change the time required for a given amount of total exercise but has never been studied from an economic perspective. We present a simple model of exercise behavior which suggests that the intensity of exercise should increase relative to time spent exercising as wages increase, holding other determinants of exercise constant. Our empirical results identify an association between income and exercise intensity that is consistent with the hypothesis that people respond to increased time costs of exercise by increasing intensity. More generally, our results suggest that time costs may be an important determinant of exercise patterns and that factors that can influence the time costs of exercise, such as intensity, may be important concerns in designing interventions to promote exercise.

  18. An Infiltration Exercise for Introductory Soil Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarick, K. A.; Ippolito, J. A.; Butters, G.; Sorge, G. M.

    2005-01-01

    One of the largest challenges in teaching introductory soil science is explaining the dynamics of soil infiltration. To aid students in understanding the concept and to further engage them in active learning in the soils laboratory course, we developed an exercise using Decagon Mini-Disk Infiltrometers with a tension head (h[subscript o]) of 2 cm.…

  19. Supply Chain Sourcing Game: A Negotiation Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Mehmet; Love, Ernie C.

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces an exercise that simulates the negotiation process in a dynamic supply chain. The retailer and wholesaler roles are assigned to student groups who negotiate supply contracts in a number of rounds during a class period. Each group makes pricing, inventory, and ordering decision concurrently, and competes with others to…

  20. Supply Chain Sourcing Game: A Negotiation Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Mehmet; Love, Ernie C.

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces an exercise that simulates the negotiation process in a dynamic supply chain. The retailer and wholesaler roles are assigned to student groups who negotiate supply contracts in a number of rounds during a class period. Each group makes pricing, inventory, and ordering decision concurrently, and competes with others to…

  1. Exercise and cardiovascular risk in patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, James E; La Gerche, Andre; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-02-01

    Evidence for the benefits of regular exercise is irrefutable and increasing physical activity levels should be a major goal at all levels of health care. People with hypertension are less physically active than those without hypertension and there is strong evidence supporting the blood pressure-lowering ability of regular exercise, especially in hypertensive individuals. This narrative review discusses evidence relating to exercise and cardiovascular (CV) risk in people with hypertension. Comparisons between aerobic, dynamic resistance, and static resistance exercise have been made along with the merit of different exercise volumes. High-intensity interval training and isometric resistance training appear to have strong CV protective effects, but with limited data in hypertensive people, more work is needed in this area. Screening recommendations, exercise prescriptions, and special considerations are provided as a guide to decrease CV risk among hypertensive people who exercise or wish to begin. It is recommended that hypertensive individuals should aim to perform moderate intensity aerobic exercise activity for at least 30 minutes on most (preferably all) days of the week in addition to resistance exercises on 2-3 days/week. Professionals with expertise in exercise prescription may provide additional benefit to patients with high CV risk or in whom more intense exercise training is planned. Despite lay and media perceptions, CV events associated with exercise are rare and the benefits of regular exercise far outweigh the risks. In summary, current evidence supports the assertion of exercise being a cornerstone therapy in reducing CV risk and in the prevention, treatment, and control of hypertension. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Measurement of oxygen consumption during muscle flaccidity exercise by near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, K.; Fukawa, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Quantitative measurement oxygen consumption in the muscles is important to evaluate the effect of the exercise. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive method for measuring muscle oxygenation. However, measurement results are affected by blood volume change due to changes in the blood pressure. In order to evaluate changes in blood volume and to improve measurement accuracy, we proposed a calculation method of three-wavelength measurement with considering the scattering factor and the measurement with monitoring blood flow for measuring the temporal change of the oxygen concentration more precisely. We applied three-wavelength light source (680nm, 808nm and 830nm) for the continued wave measurement. Two detectors (targeted detector and the reference detector) were placed near the target muscle and apart from it. We measured the blood flow by controlling the intravascular pressure and the oxygen consumption with the handgrip exercise in the forearm. The measured results show that the scattering factor contains the artifact at the surface and the blood flow in the artery and the vein in the same phase. The artifact and the blood flow in the same phase are reduced from the oxygenated and the deoxygenated hemoglobin densities. Thus our proposed method is effective for reducing the influence of the artifact and the blood flow in the same phase from the oxygen consumption measurement. Further, it is shown that the oxygen consumption is measured more accurately by subtracting the blood flow measured by the reference detector.

  3. Brain mechanisms that underlie the effects of motivational audiovisual stimuli on psychophysiological responses during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigliassi, Marcelo; Silva, Vinícius B; Karageorghis, Costas I; Bird, Jonathan M; Santos, Priscila C; Altimari, Leandro R

    2016-05-01

    Motivational audiovisual stimuli such as music and video have been widely used in the realm of exercise and sport as a means by which to increase situational motivation and enhance performance. The present study addressed the mechanisms that underlie the effects of motivational stimuli on psychophysiological responses and exercise performance. Twenty-two participants completed fatiguing isometric handgrip-squeezing tasks under two experimental conditions (motivational audiovisual condition and neutral audiovisual condition) and a control condition. Electrical activity in the brain and working muscles was analyzed by use of electroencephalography and electromyography, respectively. Participants were asked to squeeze the dynamometer maximally for 30s. A single-item motivation scale was administered after each squeeze. Results indicated that task performance and situational motivational were superior under the influence of motivational stimuli when compared to the other two conditions (~20% and ~25%, respectively). The motivational stimulus downregulated the predominance of low-frequency waves (theta) in the right frontal regions of the cortex (F8), and upregulated high-frequency waves (beta) in the central areas (C3 and C4). It is suggested that motivational sensory cues serve to readjust electrical activity in the brain; a mechanism by which the detrimental effects of fatigue on the efferent control of working muscles is ameliorated.

  4. Telemetric analysis of haemodynamic regulation during voluntary exercise training in mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Adlam, D; De Bono, J. P.; Danson, E. J.; Zhang, M. H.; Casadei, B.; Paterson, D.J.; Channon, K M

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical exercise reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and improves outcome in patients with cardiovascular diseases. The dynamic changes in blood pressure and heart rate with acute exercise are independently predictive of prognosis. Quantification of the haemodynamic response to exercise training in genetically modified mouse models may provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise. We describe, for the first time, the use of radiot...

  5. Diabetes and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, Alistair

    2014-12-01

    Exercise has a beneficial effect on metabolic parameters affecting cardiovascular risk, such as lipids and blood glucose, and is a key component in both the prevention and the management of type 2 diabetes. Glycaemic control improves with both aerobic and resistance exercise in type 2 diabetes, but no glycaemic benefit is seen in type 1 diabetes. This probably results from glucose fluctuations commonly seen with exercise. Low and moderate intensity exercise are generally associated with a fall in blood glucose, and high intensity exercise can be associated with a rise in blood glucose. Trial evidence is suggestive of a reduction in cardiovascular risk with exercise, although evidence from prospective, randomised controlled trials is certainly not conclusive.

  6. Water exercise in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, V L

    1996-08-01

    Exercise in the water offers several physiological advantages to the pregnant woman. The hydrostatic force of water pushes extravascular fluid into the vascular spaces, producing an increase in central blood volume that may lead to increased uterine blood flow. This force is proportional to the depth of immersion. The increase in blood volume is proportional to the woman's edema. A marked diuresis and natriuresis accompanies the fluid shifts. The buoyancy of water supports the pregnant women. Water is thermoregulating. Studies of pregnant women exercising in the water have shown less fetal heart rate changes in the water than on land in response to exertion. Pregnant women's heart rates and blood pressures during water exercise are lower than on land exercise, reflecting the immersion-induced increase in circulating blood volume. The physiology of water exercise offers some compensation for the physiological changes of exercise on land that may beneficially affect pregnancy.

  7. Compliance with physical exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Anne Sofie; Bønnelycke, Julie; Rosenkilde Larsen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    , a moderate (MOD; 300 kcal/day) or a high-dose (HIGH; 600 kcal/day) endurance exercise group for 12 weeks. A sub-set of the subjects were interviewed using pre-determined, qualitative questions to elucidate physical activity and health behaviour. In combination with the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB......Aims: Sixty-one healthy, sedentary, moderately overweight young men participated in a randomised controlled trial to examine the effects of two different doses of endurance exercise on health behaviour and exercise compliance. Methods: Participants were randomised to a sedentary control group...... improved various metabolic health parameters. The MOD group was untroubled by the exercise load and had a positive attitude towards exercise. The HIGH group expressed increased fatigue, less positivity and perceived exercise as time-consuming. The MOD group described themselves as more energetic...

  8. Phase Angle and Handgrip Strength Are Sensitive Early Markers of Energy Intake in Hypophagic, Non-Surgical Patients at Nutritional Risk, with Contraindications to Enteral Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Caccialanza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of nutritional intakes during hospitalization is crucial, as it is known that nutritional status tends to worsen during the hospital stay, and this can lead to the negative consequences of malnutrition. International guidelines recommend the use of parenteral nutrition (PN in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition. However, to date, there are no published data regarding either energy intake or objective measurements associated with it in this patient population. The aim of the present exploratory methodological study was to evaluate whether phase angle (PhA and handgrip strength normalized for skeletal muscle mass (HG/SMM are sensitive early markers of energy intake in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition. We evaluated 30 eligible patients, who were treated with personalized dietary modifications and supplemental PN for at least one week during hospitalization. In a liner regression model adjusted for age, gender, basal protein intake and the basal value of each variable, a trend toward improvement of PhA and preservation of HG/SMM was observed in patients satisfying the estimated calorie requirements (N = 20, while a significant deterioration of these parameters occurred in those who were not able to reach the target (N = 10. The mean adjusted difference and 95% CI were +1.4° (0.5–2.3 (p = 0.005 for PhA and +0.23 (0.20–0.43 (p = 0.033 for HG/SMM. A significant correlation between PhA and HG/SMM variations was also observed (r = 0.56 (95% CI, 0.23–0.77; p = 0.0023. PhA and HG/SMM were able to distinguish between hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk who satisfied their estimated caloric requirements and those who did not after a one-week personalized nutritional support. Clinical studies are warranted, in order to verify these preliminary observations and to validate the role of Ph

  9. Phase angle and handgrip strength are sensitive early markers of energy intake in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccialanza, Riccardo; Cereda, Emanuele; Klersy, Catherine; Bonardi, Chiara; Cappello, Silvia; Quarleri, Lara; Turri, Annalisa; Montagna, Elisabetta; Iacona, Isabella; Valentino, Francesco; Pedrazzoli, Paolo

    2015-03-11

    The assessment of nutritional intakes during hospitalization is crucial, as it is known that nutritional status tends to worsen during the hospital stay, and this can lead to the negative consequences of malnutrition. International guidelines recommend the use of parenteral nutrition (PN) in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition. However, to date, there are no published data regarding either energy intake or objective measurements associated with it in this patient population. The aim of the present exploratory methodological study was to evaluate whether phase angle (PhA) and handgrip strength normalized for skeletal muscle mass (HG/SMM) are sensitive early markers of energy intake in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition. We evaluated 30 eligible patients, who were treated with personalized dietary modifications and supplemental PN for at least one week during hospitalization. In a liner regression model adjusted for age, gender, basal protein intake and the basal value of each variable, a trend toward improvement of PhA and preservation of HG/SMM was observed in patients satisfying the estimated calorie requirements (N = 20), while a significant deterioration of these parameters occurred in those who were not able to reach the target (N = 10). The mean adjusted difference and 95% CI were +1.4° (0.5-2.3) (p = 0.005) for PhA and +0.23 (0.20-0.43) (p = 0.033) for HG/SMM. A significant correlation between PhA and HG/SMM variations was also observed (r = 0.56 (95% CI, 0.23-0.77); p = 0.0023). PhA and HG/SMM were able to distinguish between hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk who satisfied their estimated caloric requirements and those who did not after a one-week personalized nutritional support. Clinical studies are warranted, in order to verify these preliminary observations and to validate the role of PhA variations as early

  10. Absence of parasympathetic reactivation after maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Tiago Peçanha; de Alvarenga Mattos, Raphael; da Silva, Rhenan Bartels Ferreira; Rezende, Rafael Andrade; de Lima, Jorge Roberto Perrout

    2013-03-01

    The ability of the human organism to recover its autonomic balance soon after physical exercise cessation has an important impact on the individual's health status. Although the dynamics of heart rate recovery after maximal exercise has been studied, little is known about heart rate variability after this type of exercise. The aim of this study is to analyse the dynamics of heart rate and heart rate variability recovery after maximal exercise in healthy young men. Fifteen healthy male subjects (21·7 ± 3·4 years; 24·0 ± 2·1 kg m(-2) ) participated in the study. The experimental protocol consisted of an incremental maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer, until maximal voluntary exhaustion. After the test, recovery R-R intervals were recorded for 5 min. From the absolute differences between peak heart rate values and the heart rate values at 1 and 5 min of the recovery, the heart rate recovery was calculated. Postexercise heart rate variability was analysed from calculations of the SDNN and RMSSD indexes, in 30-s windows (SDNN(30s) and RMSSD(30s) ) throughout recovery. One and 5 min after maximal exercise cessation, the heart rate recovered 34·7 (±6·6) and 75·5 (±6·1) bpm, respectively. With regard to HRV recovery, while the SDNN(30s) index had a slight increase, RMSSD(30s) index remained totally suppressed throughout the recovery, suggesting an absence of vagal modulation reactivation and, possibly, a discrete sympathetic withdrawal. Therefore, it is possible that the main mechanism associated with the fall of HR after maximal exercise is sympathetic withdrawal or a vagal tone restoration without vagal modulation recovery. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2012 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  11. Autonomic nervous control of the heart rate during isometric exercise in normal man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, B C; Gallo Júnior, L; Marin Neto, J A; Martins, L E

    1987-02-01

    The relative contribution of the efferent components of the autonomic nervous system to the regulation of tachycardia induced by isometric exercise was assessed in 23 normal males. The isometric exercise (handgrip) was performed at the maximum intensity tolerated by the individual over a period of 10 s (maximal voluntary contraction-MVC) and at levels equivalent to 75, 50 and 25% of MVC for 20, 40 and 10 s, respectively. The study was performed both under control conditions and after pharmacological blockade with atropine (12 individuals) or propranolol (11 individuals). Under control conditions, the heart rate (HR) responses to isometric effort were dependent on the intensity and duration of the exercise, showing a tendency towards progressive elevation with the maintenance of muscular contraction at the levels studied. The tachycardia evoked by this effort was of considerable magnitude and of rapid onset, especially at the more intense levels of activity. Parasympathetic blockade markedly decreased tachycardia, which manifested itself during the first 10 s of exercise at all levels of intensity, whereas sympathetic blockade markedly modified the HR response after 10 s of effort at the 75 and 50% MVC levels. A slight depression of the tachycardiac response could be observed already after 10 s of maximum effort after propranolol. The present results suggest that the autonomic regulation of these responses is based on a biphasic mechanism, with the initial phase depending on the rapid withdrawal of the parasympathetic influence, followed by a marked sympathetic contribution to the induction of tachycardia after 10 s of isometric contraction or even a little before at maximum exertion.

  12. Lower insulin sensitivity is related to lower relative muscle cross-sectional area, lower muscle density and lower handgrip force in young and middle aged non-diabetic men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysel, T.; Tonoli, C.; Pardaens, S.; Cambier, D.; Kaufman, J-M.; Zmierczak, H-G.; Goemaere, S.; Lapauw, B.; Calders, P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated whether an association between insulin resistance (IR) and muscle parameters is appreciable in young healthy men, independent of obesity. Furthermore, markers of muscle metabolism and hormones/possible determinants, were explored. Methods: 358 healthy young men were divided into a less and more insulin sensitive (LIS [age=33.2±5.4, BMI=23.4±2.3] and MIS [age=35.5±5.3, BMI=28.1±3.7]) group based on upper and lower quartile of HOMA-IR. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), -density, handgrip force, serum testosterone, estradiol, SHBG, Vitamin 25(OH)D, creatinine, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and leptin levels were compared between these groups, correcting for differences in age, physical activity and fat mass. Correlations between HOMA-IR and these parameters, and between muscle measures and biochemical parameters, were calculated. Results: LIS is related to lower relative muscle CSA, muscle density, muscle/fat CSA ratio, relative handgrip force and level of physical activity. Furthermore, lower levels in SHBG, testosterone, Vitamin 25(OH)D and higher leptin, IGF-1 & IGFBP-3 levels were observed in LIS. Bio available T, FT, TE2, FE2, bioavailable E2, serum and urinary creatinine levels did not differ between groups. Conclusion: Differences in muscle performance are already present in healthy men with lower insulin sensitivity and could be possibly modifiable risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27973382

  13. Exercise in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajarajeswaran P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise has attracted increased interest in rehabilitation of oncological patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature and summarize the evidence of physical exercise in preventing cancer, its ability in attenuating the effect of cancer and its treatments and to provide guidelines for exercise prescription Review of recent literature by electronic search of MEDline (Pub Med, Cancer lit, Cochrane libraries, CINAHL were done using Keywords and the variables were identified and systematically evaluated. There is strong evidence for reduced risk of colorectal and breast cancer with possible association for prostate, endometrial and lung cancer with increasing physical activity. Exercise helps cancer survivors cope with and recover from treatment; exercise may improve the health of long term cancer survivors and extend survival. Physical exercise will benefit throughout the spectrum of cancer. However, an understanding of the amount, type and intensity of exercise needed has not been fully elucidated. There is sufficient evidence to promote exercise in cancer survivors following careful assessment and tailoring on exercise prescription.

  14. Integrating Pilates Exercise into an Exercise Program for 65+ Year-Old Women to Reduce Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irez, Gonul Babayigit; Ozdemir, Recep Ali; Evin, Ruya; Irez, Salih Gokhan; Korkusuz, Feza

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if Pilates exercise could improve dynamic balance, flexibility, reaction time and muscle strength in order to reduce the number of falls among older women. 60 female volunteers over the age of 65 from a residential home in Ankara participated in this study. Participants joined a 12-week series of 1-hour Pilates sessions three times per week. Dynamic balance, flexibility, reaction time and muscle strength were measured before and after the program. The number of falls before and during the 12-week period was also recorded. Dynamic balance, flexibility, reaction time and muscle strength improved (p Pilates exercises are effective in improving dynamic balance, flexibility, reaction time, and muscle strength as well as decreasing the propensity to fall in older women. Key points Pilates-based exercises improve dynamic balance, reaction time and muscle strength in the elderly. Pilates exercise may reduce the number of falls in elderly women by increasing these fitness parameters. PMID:24149302

  15. Exercise training modalities and strategies to improve exercise performance in patients with respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, P; Rodrigues, F

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary, comprehensive intervention for patients with chronic respiratory diseases who are symptomatic and whose daily living activities are often restricted. Pulmonary rehabilitation programs are designed to improve the physical and emotional condition of people with chronic respiratory disease and to promote long-term adherence to health-enhancing behavior. Exercise training is at the core of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) programs. The benefits of exercise training include decreased dyspnea, improved health-related quality of life, fewer days of hospitalization, and decreased health-care utilization. To gain PR benefits, patients should be able to complete an exercise training program, preferably with high intensity exercise, and it is likely that these benefits will translate into a change from a pattern of a sedentary lifestyle to a physically active lifestyle. Chronic respiratory patients, namely COPD patients, have a low exercise tolerance due to multiple factors, such as dynamic hyperinflation and peripheral muscle dysfunction. In this article, the authors describe a variety of modalities and strategies to overcome exercise limitations and improve the effects of exercise training.

  16. Exercise for Stress and Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Thrive Managing Anxiety Exercise for Stress and Anxiety The physical benefits of exercise — improving physical condition ... stimulate anti-anxiety effects. Relationship of Exercise to Anxiety Disorders Stress and anxiety are a normal part ...

  17. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003975.htm Pelvic floor muscle training exercises To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are a series of exercises ...

  18. How to avoid exercise injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000859.htm How to avoid exercise injuries To use the sharing features on this ... injury and stay safe during exercise. What Causes Exercise Injuries? Some of the most common causes of ...

  19. 急性离心运动后骨骼肌超微结构、钙依赖性蛋白酶和泛素的动态变化%Dynamic Changes in Ultrastructure, Calpains and Ubiquitin in Skeletal Muscle after Acute Eccentric Exercise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金其贯; 刘霞; 李淑艳; 刘瑜

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dynamic changes in ultrastructure, calpains and ubiquitin in skeletal muscle after single bout of eccentric exercise. Methods Thirty male SD rats were randomly divided into control group, immediate post-exercise group, 24-hour post-exercise group and 7-day post-exercise group. Rats in exercise groups performed single bout of downhill running (16 m/ min, -16 degree) for 200 minutes. Quadriceps were drawn immediately 24 hours and 7 days after the eccentric exercise, respectively, and the changes in ultrastructure, serum LDH and CK activity, and calpain-1, calpain-2, and ubiquitin concentration quadriceps were observed. Results ① In quadriceps, mixed arrangement and curled filaments appeared immediately after eccentric exercise; mild dissolution, fracture, Z-line irregular, and partial disappearance of Z lines occurred 24 hours after eccentric exercise; there were no significant changes in control group 7 days aftereccentric exercise; the activities of serum CK and LDH changed consistently with the alteration of ultrastructures. ② As compared with the control group, the concentrations of calpain-1, calpain-2 and ubiquitin in quadriceps decreased immediately after exercise without significant statistical difference. The concentrations of calpain-1, calpain-2 and ubiquitin in quadriceps 24 hours post-exercise were significantly higher than that in control group and immediate post-exercise group. As compared with immediate post-exercise and 24-hour post-exercise, the contents of calpain-1, calpain-2 and ubiquitin in quadriceps significantly decreased 7 days post-exercise, whereas no significant statistical difference was found as compared with the control group. Conclusion ① The skeletal muscle damage induced by eccentric exercise appeared most seriously 24 hours after exercise and restored basically 7 days after exercise; ② The changes in calpain and ubiquitin contents in skeletal muscle were basically the same as the dynamic changes

  20. Exercise through Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhr, Robyn M.

    2002-01-01

    Menopause is associated with many different health effects and symptoms. This paper explains that regular exercise can play a critical role in protecting health and battling the increased risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, pelvic floor atrophy, and joint stiffness associated with menopause. Exercise programs for menopausal women should…

  1. Saliva composition and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicharro, J L; Lucía, A; Pérez, M; Vaquero, A F; Ureña, R

    1998-07-01

    Little attention has been directed toward identifying the changes which occur in salivary composition in response to exercise. To address this, our article first refers to the main aspects of salivary gland physiology. A knowledge of the neural control of salivary secretion is especially important for the understanding of the effects of exertion on salivary secretion. Both salivary output and composition depend on the activity of the autonomic nervous system and any modification of this activity can be observed indirectly by alternations in the salivary excretion. The effects of physical activity (with reference to factors such as exercise intensity and duration, or type of exercise protocol) on salivary composition are then considered. Exercise might indeed induce changes in several salivary components such as immunoglobulins, hormones, lactate, proteins and electrolytes. Saliva composition might therefore be used as an alternative noninvasive indicator of the response of the different body tissues and systems to physical exertion. In this respect, the response of salivary amylase and salivary electrolytes to incremental levels of exercise is of particular interest. Beyond a certain intensity of exercise, and coinciding with the accumulation of blood lactate (anaerobic threshold or AT), a 'saliva threshold' (Tsa) does indeed exist. Tsa is the point during exercise at which the levels of salivary alpha-amylase and electrolytes (especially Na+) also begin to rise above baseline levels. The occurrence of the 2 thresholds (AT and Tsa) might, in turn, be attributable to the same underlying mechanism, that of increased adrenal sympathetic activity at high exercise intensities.

  2. Exercise Against Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artal, Michal; Sherman, Carl

    1998-01-01

    Physical activity is useful for preventing and easing depression symptoms. When prescribing exercise as an adjunct to medication and psychotherapy, physicians must consider each patient's individual circumstances. Hopelessness and fatigue can make physical exercise difficult. A feasible, flexible, and pleasurable program has the best chance for…

  3. Exercises in Computational Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16).......A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16)....

  4. Easy Exercises for Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Easy Exercises for Teens KidsHealth > For Teens > Easy Exercises for Teens A A A en español Ejercicios fáciles para ... not enough.) What more should we do? First, teens should do 60 minutes or more of physical ...

  5. Exercises in Computational Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16).......A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16)....

  6. Cutting Edge Exercises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU FENG'AN

    2010-01-01

    @@ On August 24, a fleet of three guided missile destroyers and several missile-carrying speedboats darted into the South China Sea. They were on the way to a military exercise in "attack and anti-attack maritime maneuvering formations and surface ship formations." The exercise was a component in a military campaign coded "Sword-2010."

  7. Lab Exercises for Kinesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Brett D.; And Others

    This monograph presents descriptions of various exercises and athletic activities with a kinesiological and biomechanical analysis of the muscle systems involved. It is intended as examples of laboratory activities and projects in a college course in kinesiology. A listing of the required laboratory exercises precedes the examples. Specific…

  8. EXERCISE AND REACTION TIMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Physical exercise provides multiple benefits to an individual. It is known that exercising regularly can prevent coronary heart disease, hypertension and obesity and improve flexibility. The effect of exercise on visual reaction time needs to be studied, a s the existing data on the benefit of aerobic exercise on psychomotor functions is insufficient. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Online Visual reaction time is measured before and after exercise. Subjects were instructed to run on the spot with a springy step in ex aggerated motion for 50 to 60 counts at 2 counts per second, maintaining a constant rhythm. RESULTS: We observed that reaction time was significantly lower after performance of exercise. Individuals reported improved mental alertness, feel good factor, bet ter mood and increase circulation. CONCLUSION: Improving reaction times in sports can help the athlete to optimize his performance in making decisions and increasing attention span for example getting off the starting blocks sooner or successfully making c ontact with the ball. In addition this study shows that use of physical exercise helps improve cognitive function. Exercise proves to be a cheap non pharmacological alternative to improve cognitive performance.

  9. Exercise through Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhr, Robyn M.

    2002-01-01

    Menopause is associated with many different health effects and symptoms. This paper explains that regular exercise can play a critical role in protecting health and battling the increased risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, pelvic floor atrophy, and joint stiffness associated with menopause. Exercise programs for menopausal women should…

  10. Ischemic Preconditioning Enhances Muscle Endurance during Sustained Isometric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, D; Suga, T; Tanaka, T; Kido, K; Honjo, T; Fujita, S; Hamaoka, T; Isaka, T

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) enhances whole-body exercise endurance. However, it is poorly understood whether the beneficial effects originate from systemic (e. g., cardiovascular system) or peripheral (e. g., skeletal muscle) adaptations. The present study examined the effects of IPC on local muscle endurance during fatiguing isometric exercise. 12 male subjects performed sustained isometric unilateral knee-extension exercise at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction until failure. Prior to the exercise, subjects completed IPC or control (CON) treatments. During exercise trial, electromyography activity and near-infrared spectroscopy-derived deoxygenation in skeletal muscle were continuously recorded. Endurance time to task failure was significantly longer in IPC than in CON (mean±SE; 233±9 vs. 198±9 s, PIPC and CON. In contrast, deoxygenation dynamics in the quadriceps vastus lateralis muscle was significantly faster in IPC than in CON (27.1±3.4 vs. 35.0±3.6 s, PIPC can enhance muscular endurance during fatiguing isometric exercise. Moreover, IPC accelerated muscle deoxygenation dynamics during the exercise. Therefore, we suggest that the origin of beneficial effects of IPC on exercise performance may be the enhanced mitochondrial metabolism in skeletal muscle.

  11. Physical exercise and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Alberto; Masiá, M Dolores; Galve, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    Regular physical exercise is an established recommendation for preventing and treating the main modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Performing physical activity of moderate intensity for a minimum of 30 min 5 days a week or of high intensity for a minimum of 20 min 3 days a week improves functional capacity and is associated with reductions in the incidence of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Physical exercise induces physiological cardiovascular adaptations that improve physical performance, and only in extreme cases can these adaptations lead to an increased risk of physical exercise-associated complications. The incidence of sudden death or serious complications during physical exercise is very low and is concentrated in people with heart diseases or with pathological cardiac adaptation to exercise. Most of these cases can be detected by cardiology units or well-trained professionals. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Physical Activity and Exercise in Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefa Lok

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a dynamic process that affects many systems in the body. Cognitive function with aging, including memory, intelligence, personality and behavior are affected at different levels. As time passes, durability of individuals and the amount of physical activity and exercise decrease. Apart from normal aging process, accompanying chronic brain syndrome of dementia will further reduce activities. Physical activity can provide opportunities for individuals with dementia in the path to socialize. Therefore, the role of physical activity and exercise in adapting an active lifestyle to protect the health of individuals with dementia is becoming increasingly important. Physical activity and exercise which would help in improvement of cognitive activity in dementia are briefly reviewed in this article. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(3.000: 289-294

  13. Dinâmica não-linear e exercício físico: conceitos e aplicações Non-linear dynamics and physical exercise: concepts and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Pakenas

    2007-10-01

    , biochemists, psychologists and even professionals involved with physical exercise have been recently increasing their interests for the non-linear dynamics, a scientific theory developed mainly by mathematicians, which is generically known as the Complexity Theory. Although few investigations on Physical Education and Sports make use of this paradigm to solve their problems, a growing interest for this very approach has been noticed, mainly concerning the effects of physical exercise on changes in the variability and complexity of physiological temporal series. Usually, such changes appear as the decrease in its temporal behavior, denoting in decrease in the body complexity or in the components specifically involved in its regulation. According to the Complexity Theory, since non-linear interactions existing in biological systems are emphasized, it is observed that not only the increase (overcompensation of the body components with the practice of physical exercises but also those which cause atrophy (decompensation in parallel, once they can compromise the functionality of these systems. Thus, contrary to the emphasis that is given in the physical training to the monotonous repetition of intense physical activity and with emphasis on positive specific effects, that invariably promote the simplification of the body, larger qualitative and quantitative variation is recommended in the exercise practice. The objective is to preserve its natural complexity or neutralize its rapid decrease with aging. The present review has the objective, besides describing the possible complexity loss with physical training, to discuss some concepts of the Complexity Theory in an introductory way, with particular emphasis on issues involving health and physical training.

  14. Muscle strength, physical fitness and well-being in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the effect of an exercise programme: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Decreased muscle strength, fitness and well-being are common in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) compared to healthy peers. Biological drugs have improved health in children with JIA, but despite this pain is still a major symptom and bone health is reported as decreased in the group. The improvement made by the biological drugs makes it possible to more demanding exercises. To jump is an exercise that can improve bone heath, fitness and muscle strength. The aim of the study was to see if an exercise programme with jumps had an effect on muscle strength, physical fitness and well-being and how it was tolerated. Methods Muscle strength and well-being were studied before and after a 12-week exercise programme in 54 children and adolescents with JIA, 9–21 years old. The participants were randomized into an exercise and a control group. Muscle strength, fitness and well-being were documented before and after the training period and at follow-up after 6 months. Physical activity in leisure time was documented in diaries. The fitness/exercise programme was performed at home three times a week and included rope skipping and muscle strength training exercises. Assessment included measurement of muscle strength with a handheld device, and with Grip-it, step-test for fitness with documentation of heart rate and pain perception and two questionnaires (CHAQ, CHQ) on well-being. Results There were no differences between exercise and control group regarding muscle strength, grip strength, fitness or well-being at base line. Muscle weakness was present in hip extensors, hip abductors and handgrip. For the exercise group muscle strength in hip and knee extensors increased after the 12-week exercise programme and was maintained in knee extensors at follow-up. There was no change in fitness tested with the individually adapted step-test. The CHQ questionnaire showed that pain was common in the exercise group and in the control group

  15. 平板运动试验和动态心电图联合检查对评估冠状动脉狭窄程度的预测价值%The Predictive Value in the Assessment of the Degree of Coronary Artery Stenosis through the Joint Inspection of Exercise Treadmill Test and Dynamic Electrocardiogram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜红梅

    2014-01-01

    目的:为了明确活动平板运动试验和动态心电图联合检测对冠状动脉病变的预测价值。方法:选取冠状动脉造影阳性且造影前3个月内做平板运动试验和动态心电图的患者165例,冠状动脉造影用通用直径法确定冠状动脉狭窄程度,并与平板运动试验和动态心电图的结果进行对比观察。结果:平板运动试验中ST段下移出现越早,ST段下移程度越大,持续时间越长,冠状动脉狭窄程度越重。冠状动脉造影阳性而平板运动试验阴性者,多为单支病变或者病变程度较轻;平板运动试验的敏感性为71.8%,特异性为80.5%,动态心电图的敏感性为63.7%,特异性为78.1%。结论:活动平板运动试验和动态心电图联合检测可提高冠心病诊断的准确性。%To define the predictive value of the joint detection of between exercise treadmill test and dynamic electrocardiogram in the diagnosis of coronary artery lesions.Method:165 patients who were found coronary angiography positive and did treadmill exercise test and dynamic electrocardiogram within 3 months before angiography were selected. Coronary angiography employed the general method of diameter to determine the degree of coronary artery stenosis whose results were compared with the results of exercise treadmill test and dynamic electrocardiogram.Result:In the exercise treadmill test,the sooner ST segment depression appeared ,the greater degree ST segment depression showed,the longer duration of ST segment depression lasted,the more severe coronary artery stenosis was. The patient who was found positive in coronary angiography and negative in exercise treadmill test was mostly single lesions or a lesser degree of lesions. The sensitivity of exercise treadmill test was 71.8%,and its specificity was 80.5%. The sensitivity of the dynamic electrocardiogram was 63.7%,and its specificity was 78.1%. Conclusion:The diagnostic accuracy of coronary heart

  16. Crew Exercise Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalik, Kerrie

    2017-01-01

    Johnson Space Center (JSC) provides research, engineering, development, integration, and testing of hardware and software technologies for exercise systems applications in support of human spaceflight. This includes sustaining the current suite of on-orbit exercise devices by reducing maintenance, addressing obsolescence, and increasing reliability through creative engineering solutions. Advanced exercise systems technology development efforts focus on the sustainment of crew's physical condition beyond Low Earth Orbit for extended mission durations with significantly reduced mass, volume, and power consumption when compared to the ISS.

  17. Diabetes, Nutrition, and Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H; Sinclair, Alan J

    2015-08-01

    Aging is associated with body composition changes that lead to glucose intolerance and increased risk of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes increases with aging, and the prevalence has increased because of the increased life expectancy of the population. Lifestyle modifications through nutrition and exercise in combination with medications are the main components of diabetes management. The potential benefits of nutrition and exercise intervention in older people with diabetes are enormous. Nutrition and exercise training are feasible even in frail older people living in care homes and should take into consideration individual circumstances, cultural factors, and ethnic preferences.

  18. Labeling exercise fat-burning increases post-exercise food consumption in self-imposed exercisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenzl, Navina; Bartsch, Katja; Koenigstorfer, Joerg

    2014-10-01

    The goal of the study was to determine whether the label given to an exercise bout affects immediate post-exercise food intake. The authors hypothesized that explicitly labeling an exercise bout 'fat-burning' (vs. labeling an exercise bout 'endurance' exercise) would increase post-exercise food intake in individuals who self-impose physical activity, because they are more likely to see the label as signal of activated fat metabolism and license to reward oneself. No such effect was expected for individuals who do not self-impose physical activity but consider exercise enjoyable. Ninety-six participants took part in an experiment manipulating the label given to an exercise bout (fat-burning exercise or endurance exercise) between participants. They cycled on an ergometer for 20 minutes at a consistent work rate (55-65% of predicted VO2 max) and were offered ad libitum food (i.e., pretzel pieces) after the exercise bout. The results showed that self-imposed exercisers, that is, individuals with low behavioral regulation and individuals with high psychological distress, high fatigue levels, and low positive well-being when exercising, ate more food after exercise when the bout was labeled fat-burning exercise rather than endurance exercise. The results help develop health interventions, indicating that the tendency to compensate for energy expended following physical activity depends on both the label given to the exercise bout and the degree to which individuals self-impose physical activity.

  19. Exercise training in metabolic myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, J

    2016-01-01

    stages of exercise and at high work intensities. Thus, patients with GSDs typically have symptoms early in exercise, have low peak work capacities and develop painful contractures in exercised muscles. Muscle relies on fat oxidation at rest and to a great extent during prolonged exercise, and therefore...

  20. Aquatic Exercise for the Aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Michael; And Others

    The development and implementation of aquatic exercise programs for the aged are discussed in this paper. Program development includes a discussion of training principles, exercise leadership and the setting up of safe water exercise programs for the participants. The advantages of developing water exercise programs and not swimming programs are…