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Sample records for dynamic force spectroscopy

  1. Nonlinear Dynamic Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Björnham, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) is an experimental technique that is commonly used to assess information of the strength, energy landscape, and lifetime of noncovalent bio-molecular interactions. DFS traditionally requires an applied force that increases linearly with time so that the bio-complex under investigation is exposed to a constant loading rate. However, tethers or polymers can modulate the applied force in a nonlinear regime. For example, bacterial adhesion pili and polymers with worm-like chain properties are examples of structures that show nonlinear force responses. In these situations, the theory for traditional DFS cannot be readily applied. In this work we expand the theory for DFS to also include nonlinear external forces while still maintaining compatibility with the linear DFS theory. To validate the theory we modeled a bio-complex expressed on a stiff, an elastic and a worm-like chain polymer, using Monte Carlo methods, and assessed the corresponding rupture force spectra. It was found th...

  2. Dynamic force spectroscopy on multiple bonds: experiments and model

    CERN Document Server

    Erdmann, T; Nassoy, P; Schwarz, U S

    2007-01-01

    We probe the dynamic strength of multiple biotin-streptavidin adhesion bonds under linear loading using the biomembrane force probe setup for dynamic force spectroscopy. Measured rupture force histograms are compared to results from a master equation model for the stochastic dynamics of bond rupture under load. This allows us to extract the distribution of the number of initially closed bonds. We also extract the molecular parameters of the adhesion bonds, in good agreement with earlier results from single bond experiments. Our analysis shows that the peaks in the measured histograms are not simple multiples of the single bond values, but follow from a superposition procedure which generates different peak positions.

  3. Wavelet transforms to probe long- and short-range forces by thermally excited dynamic force spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malegori, Giovanna; Ferrini, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele@dmf.unicatt.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Universita Cattolica, I-25121 Brescia (Italy)

    2011-05-13

    The use of wavelet transforms in thermally excited dynamic force spectroscopy allows us to gain insight into the fundamental thermodynamical properties of a cantilever's Brownian motion as well as giving a meaningful and intuitive representation of the cantilever dynamics in time and frequency caused by the interaction with long- and short-range forces. The possibility of carrying out measurements across the jump-to-contact transition without interruption, providing information on both van der Waals forces and short-range adhesion surface forces, is remarkable.

  4. Dynamic force spectroscopy of parallel individual mucin1-antibody bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulchek, T A; Friddle, R W; Langry, K; Lau, E; Albrecht, H; Ratto, T; DeNardo, S; Colvin, M E; Noy, A

    2005-05-02

    We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure the binding forces between Mucin1 (MUC1) peptide and a single chain antibody fragment (scFv) selected from a scFv library screened against MUC1. This binding interaction is central to the design of the molecules for targeted delivery of radioimmunotherapeutic agents for prostate and breast cancer treatment. Our experiments separated the specific binding interaction from non-specific interactions by tethering the antibody and MUC1 molecules to the AFM tip and sample surface with flexible polymer spacers. Rupture force magnitude and elastic characteristics of the spacers allowed identification of the bond rupture events corresponding to different number of interacting proteins. We used dynamic force spectroscopy to estimate the intermolecular potential widths and equivalent thermodynamic off rates for mono-, bi-, and tri-valent interactions. Measured interaction potential parameters agree with the results of molecular docking simulation. Our results demonstrate that an increase of the interaction valency leads to a precipitous decline in the dissociation rate. Binding forces measured for mono and multivalent interactions match the predictions of a Markovian model for the strength of multiple uncorrelated bonds in parallel configuration. Our approach is promising for comparison of the specific effects of molecular modifications as well as for determination of the best configuration of antibody-based multivalent targeting agents.

  5. Effects of nonlinear forces on dynamic mode atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Soma; Sreeram, P A; Raychaudhuri, A K

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the effects of nonlinear tip-sample forces on dynamic mode atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy. The jumps and hysteresis observed in the vibration amplitude (A) versus tip-sample distance (h) curves have been traced to bistability in the resonance curve. A numerical analysis of the basic dynamic equation was used to explain the hysteresis in the experimental curve. It has been found that the location of the hysteresis in the A-h curve depends on the frequency of the forced oscillation relative to the natural frequency of the cantilever.

  6. Application of dynamic impedance spectroscopy to atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Darowicki, Artur Zieliński and Krzysztof J Kurzydłowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM is a universal imaging technique, while impedance spectroscopy is a fundamental method of determining the electrical properties of materials. It is useful to combine those techniques to obtain the spatial distribution of an impedance vector. This paper proposes a new combining approach utilizing multifrequency scanning and simultaneous AFM scanning of an investigated surface.

  7. Cell Adhesion on Dynamic Supramolecular Surfaces Probed by Fluid Force Microscopy-Based Single-Cell Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan; Jaatinen, Leena; Brinkmann, Jenny; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vörös, Janos; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2017-04-25

    Biomimetic and stimuli-responsive cell-material interfaces are actively being developed to study and control various cell-dynamics phenomena. Since cells naturally reside in the highly dynamic and complex environment of the extracellular matrix, attempts are being made to replicate these conditions in synthetic biomaterials. Supramolecular chemistry, dealing with noncovalent interactions, has recently provided possibilities to incorporate such dynamicity and responsiveness in various types of architectures. Using a cucurbit[8]uril-based host-guest system, we have successfully established a dynamic and electrochemically responsive interface for the display of the integrin-specific ligand, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), to promote cell adhesion. Due to the weak nature of the noncovalent forces by which the components at the interface are held together, we expected that cell adhesion would also be weaker in comparison to traditional interfaces where ligands are usually immobilized by covalent linkages. To assess the stability and limitations of our noncovalent interfaces, we performed single-cell force spectroscopy studies using fluid force microscopy. This technique enabled us to measure rupture forces of multiple cells that were allowed to adhere for several hours on individual substrates. We found that the rupture forces of cells adhered to both the noncovalent and covalent interfaces were nearly identical for up to several hours. We have analyzed and elucidated the reasons behind this result as a combination of factors including the weak rupture force between linear Arg-Gly-Asp and integrin, high surface density of the ligand, and increase in effective concentration of the supramolecular components under spread cells. These characteristics enable the construction of highly dynamic biointerfaces without compromising cell-adhesive properties.

  8. Theory of dynamic force spectroscopy for kinetochore-microtubule attachments: rupture force distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Ghanti, Dipanwita

    2016-01-01

    Application of pulling force, under force-clamp conditions, to kinetochore-microtubule attachments {\\it in-vitro} revealed a catch-bond-like behavior. In an earlier paper ({\\it Sharma et al. Phys. Biol. (2014)} the physical origin of this apparently counter-intuitive phenomenon was traced to the nature of the force-dependence of the (de-)polymerization kinetics of the microtubules. In this brief communication that work is extended to situations where the external forced is ramped up till the attachment gets ruptured. In spite of the fundamental differences in the underlying mechanisms, the trend of variation of the rupture force distribution observed in our model kinetochore-microtubule attachment with the increasing loading rate is qualitatively similar to that displayed by the catch bonds formed in some other ligand-receptor systems. Our theoretical predictions can be tested experimentally by a straightforward modification of the protocol for controlling the force in the optical trap set up that was used in...

  9. Investigations of the intermolecular forces between RDX and polyethylene by force-distance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D E; Strawhecker, K E; Shanholtz, E R; Sorescu, D C; Sausa, R C

    2014-07-10

    The development of novel nanoenergetic materials with enhanced bulk properties requires an understanding of the intermolecular interactions occurring between molecular components. We investigate the surface interactions between 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) and polyethylene (PE) crystals on the basis of combined use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and force-distance spectroscopy, in conjunction with Lifshitz macroscopic theory of van der Waals forces between continuous materials. The binding energy in the RDX-PE system depends both on the degree of PE crystallinity and on the RDX crystal face. Our MD simulations yield binding energies of approximately 132 and 120 mJ/m(2) for 100% amorphous and 100% crystalline PE on RDX (210), respectively. The average value is about 36% greater than our experimental value of 81 ± 15 mJ/m(2) for PE (∼48% amorphous) on RDX (210). By comparison, Liftshitz theory predicts a value of about 79 mJ/m(2) for PE interacting with RDX. Our MD simulations also predict larger binding energies for both amorphous and crystalline PE on RDX (210) compared to the RDX (001) surface. Analysis of the interaction potential indicates that about 60% of the binding energy in the PE-RDX system is due to attractive interactions between HPE-ORDX and CPE-NRDX pairs of atoms. Further, amorphous PE shows a much longer interaction distance than crystalline PE with the (210) and (001) RDX surfaces due to the possibility of larger polymer elongations in the case of amorphous PE as strain is applied. Also, we report estimates of the binding energies of energetic materials RDX and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) with PE, propylene, polystyrene, and several fluorine-containing polymers using Lifshitz theory and compare these with reported MD calculations.

  10. Deciphering the energy landscape of the interaction uranyl-DCP with antibodies using dynamic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Odorico, Michael; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2008-11-15

    Previous studies on molecular recognition of uranyl-DCP (dicarboxy-phenanthroline chelator) compound by two distinct monoclonal antibodies (Mabs U04S and U08S) clearly showed the presence of a biphasic shape in Bell-Evans' plots and an accentuated difference in slopes at the high loading rates. To further explore the basis in the slope difference, we have performed complementary experiments using antibody PHE03S, raised against uranyl-DCP but, presenting a strong cross-reactivity toward the DCP chelator. This work allowed us to obtain a reallocation of the respective contributions of the metal ion itself and that of the chelator. Results led us to propose a 2D schematic model representing two energy barriers observed in the systems Mabs U04S- and U08S-[UO(2)-DCP] where the outer barrier characterizes the interaction between UO(2) and Mab whereas the inner barrier characterizes the interaction between DCP and Mab. Using dynamic force spectroscopy, it is thus possible to dissect molecular interactions during the unbinding between proteins and ligands.

  11. Force spectroscopy in studying infection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zhaokun

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools - for example optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, - have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design.

  12. Numerical analysis of dynamic force spectroscopy using the torsional harmonic cantilever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solares, Santiago D [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, 2181 Glenn L. Martin Hall, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Hoelscher, Hendrik, E-mail: ssolares@umd.edu [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology (KIT), Institute for Microstructure Technology (IMT), Hermann-von Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2010-02-19

    A spectral analysis method has been recently introduced by Stark et al (2002 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 99 8473-8) and implemented by Sahin et al (2007 Nat. Nanotechnol. 2 507-14) using a T-shaped cantilever design, the torsional harmonic cantilever (THC), which is capable of performing simultaneous tapping-mode atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy. Here we report on numerical simulations of the THC system using a simple dual-mass flexural-torsional model, which is applied in combination with Fourier data processing software to illustrate the spectroscopy process for quality factors corresponding to liquid, air and vacuum environments. We also illustrate the acquisition of enhanced topographical images and deformed surface contours under the application of uniform forces, and compare the results to those obtained with a previously reported linear dual-spring-mass model.

  13. Two barriers or not? Dynamic force spectroscopy on the integrin α7β1 invasin complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boye, Kristian; Ligezowska, Agnieszka; Eble, Johannes A.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy was used to test force-induced dissociation of the complex between the integrin α7β1 and the bacterial protein invasin. Both proteins were used in truncated forms comprising the respective binding sites. Using the biomembrane force-probe, the bond system was exposed to ...

  14. Study of the interactions between endolysin and bacterial peptidoglycan on S. aureus by dynamic force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianli; Zhang, Xuejie; Yang, Hang; Yuan, Jinghe; Wei, Hongping; Yu, Junping; Fang, Xiaohong

    2015-09-01

    The cell wall binding domain (CBD) of bacteriophage lysins can recognize target bacteria with extraordinary specificity through binding to bacterial peptidoglycan, thus it is a promising new probe to identify the corresponding bacterial pathogen. In this work, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single-molecule force spectroscopy to investigate the interaction between the CBD of lysin PlyV12 (PlyV12C) and pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The binding forces of PlyV12C with S. aureus have been measured, and the dissociation process of their binding complex has been characterized. Furthermore, we compared the interactions of PlyV12C-S. aureus and antibody-S. aureus. It is revealed that PlyV12C has a comparable affinity to bacterial peptidoglycans as that of the S. aureus antibody. The results provide new information on the binding properties of lysin CBD with bacterium, and the application of lysin CBD in bacterium detection.

  15. Study of the interactions between endolysin and bacterial peptidoglycan on S. aureus by dynamic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianli; Zhang, Xuejie; Yang, Hang; Yuan, Jinghe; Wei, Hongping; Yu, Junping; Fang, Xiaohong

    2015-10-07

    The cell wall binding domain (CBD) of bacteriophage lysins can recognize target bacteria with extraordinary specificity through binding to bacterial peptidoglycan, thus it is a promising new probe to identify the corresponding bacterial pathogen. In this work, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single-molecule force spectroscopy to investigate the interaction between the CBD of lysin PlyV12 (PlyV12C) and pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The binding forces of PlyV12C with S. aureus have been measured, and the dissociation process of their binding complex has been characterized. Furthermore, we compared the interactions of PlyV12C-S. aureus and antibody-S. aureus. It is revealed that PlyV12C has a comparable affinity to bacterial peptidoglycans as that of the S. aureus antibody. The results provide new information on the binding properties of lysin CBD with bacterium, and the application of lysin CBD in bacterium detection.

  16. Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2008-01-01

    "...Noy's Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy is both a timely and useful summary of fundamental aspects of molecular force spectroscopy, and I believe it would make a worthwhile addition to any good scientific library. New research groups that are entering this field would be well advisedto study this handbook in detail before venturing into the exciting and challenging world of molecular force spectroscopy." Matthew F. Paige, University of Saskatchewan, Journal of the American Chemical Society Modern materials science and biophysics are increasingly focused on studying and controlling intermolecular interactions on the single-molecule level. Molecular force spectroscopy was developed in the past decade as the result of several unprecedented advances in the capabilities of modern scientific instrumentation, and defines a number of techniques that use mechanical force measurements to study interactions between single molecules and molecular assemblies in chemical and biological systems. Examples of these...

  17. Transport dynamics analysis in ferromagnetic heterojunction using Raman spectroscopy and magnetic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Ren

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The ZnO/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 thin film was epitaxially fabricated on LaAlO3 (100 by pulse laser deposition. The Raman scattering on the single layer LaSrMnO and junction ZnO/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 was investigated in a giant softening by 490 cm−1 John-Teller, 620 and 703 cm−1 optical phonon modes. The Raman spectra LaSrMnO and ZnO/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 were observed with distinct features, i.e., the thickness was in dependent of frequency and intensity. The dynamics results showed that the spin–orbital coupling was caused by anomalies tilt of MnO6 octahedron. The LSMO/ZnO junction exhibited excellent junction positive magneto-resistance behavior in the temperature range of 77–300 K. The kinetic energy gain was achieved by orbital competition, strong crystal field and charge order of energy band splitting. The transport orbits were in the environment of the ferromagnetic-orbital ordering. The structures of barriers could be adjusted by junction interface and domain boundary condition in terms of the presence of spin–orbital fluctuating.

  18. Single-cell force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, Jonne; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Gaub, Hermann E; Muller, Daniel J

    2008-06-01

    The controlled adhesion of cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix is crucial for tissue development and maintenance. Numerous assays have been developed to quantify cell adhesion. Among these, the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) has recently been established. This assay permits the adhesion of living cells to be studied in near-physiological conditions. This implementation of AFM allows unrivaled spatial and temporal control of cells, as well as highly quantitative force actuation and force measurement that is sufficiently sensitive to characterize the interaction of single molecules. Therefore, not only overall cell adhesion but also the properties of single adhesion-receptor-ligand interactions can be studied. Here we describe current implementations and applications of SCFS, as well as potential pitfalls, and outline how developments will provide insight into the forces, energetics and kinetics of cell-adhesion processes.

  19. Effect of cell and microvillus mechanics on the transmission of applied loads to single bonds in dynamic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, V K; Eggleton, C D

    2011-07-01

    Receptor-ligand interactions that mediate cellular adhesion are often subjected to forces that regulate their detachment via modulating off-rates. Although the dynamics of detachment is primarily controlled by the physical chemistry of adhesion molecules, cellular features such as cell deformability and microvillus viscoelasticity have been shown to affect the rolling velocity of leukocytes in vitro through experiments and simulation. In this work, we demonstrate via various micromechanical models of two cells adhered by a single (intramolecular) bond that cell deformability and microvillus viscoelasticity modulate transmission of an applied external load to an intramolecular bond, and thus the dynamics of detachment. Specifically, it is demonstrated that the intermolecular bond force is not equivalent to the instantaneous applied force and that the instantaneous bond force decreases with cellular and microvillus compliance. As cellular compliance increases, not only does the time lag between the applied load and the bond force increase, an initial response time is observed during which cell deformation is observed without transfer of force to the bond. It is further demonstrated that following tether formation the instantaneous intramoleular bond force increases linearly at a rate dependent on microvillus viscosity. Monte Carlo simulations with fixed kinetic parameters predict that both cell and microvillus compliance increase the average rupture time, although the average rupture force based on bond length remains nearly unchanged.

  20. High-speed atomic force microscopy: imaging and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghiaian, Frédéric; Rico, Felix; Colom, Adai; Casuso, Ignacio; Scheuring, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the type of scanning probe microscopy that is probably best adapted for imaging biological samples in physiological conditions with submolecular lateral and vertical resolution. In addition, AFM is a method of choice to study the mechanical unfolding of proteins or for cellular force spectroscopy. In spite of 28 years of successful use in biological sciences, AFM is far from enjoying the same popularity as electron and fluorescence microscopy. The advent of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), about 10 years ago, has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of membrane proteins and molecular machines from the single-molecule to the cellular level. HS-AFM imaging at nanometer-resolution and sub-second frame rate may open novel research fields depicting dynamic events at the single bio-molecule level. As such, HS-AFM is complementary to other structural and cellular biology techniques, and hopefully will gain acceptance from researchers from various fields. In this review we describe some of the most recent reports of dynamic bio-molecular imaging by HS-AFM, as well as the advent of high-speed force spectroscopy (HS-FS) for single protein unfolding.

  1. Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Maroncelli, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-06-08

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics was held at Colby College, Waterville, NH from 07/19/2009 thru 07/24/2009. The Conference was well-attended with participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. The GRC on Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics showcases some of the most recent experimental and theoretical developments in electronic spectroscopy that probes the structure and dynamics of isolated molecules, molecules embedded in clusters and condensed phases, and bulk materials. Electronic spectroscopy is an important tool in many fields of research, and this GRC brings together experts having diverse backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biophysics, and materials science, making the meeting an excellent opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and techniques. Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, biological molecules in the gas phase, electronic structure theory for excited states, multi-chromophore and single-molecule spectroscopies, and excited state dynamics in chemical and biological systems.

  2. High-resolution high-speed dynamic mechanical spectroscopy of cells and other soft materials with the help of atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, M.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), which allows measuring frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties, is important to study soft materials, tissues, biomaterials, polymers. However, the existing DMS techniques (nanoindentation) have limited resolution when used on soft materials, preventing them from being used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. The nanoindenters are not capable of measuring cells, nanointerfaces of composite materials. Here we present a highly accurate DMS modality, which is a combination of three different methods: quantitative nanoindentation (nanoDMA), gentle force and fast response of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy. This new spectroscopy (which we suggest to call FT-nanoDMA) is fast and sensitive enough to allow DMS imaging of nanointerfaces, single cells, while attaining about 100x improvements on polymers in both spatial (to 10–70 nm) and temporal resolution (to 0.7s/pixel) compared to the current art. Multiple frequencies are measured simultaneously. The use of 10 frequencies are demonstrated here (up to 300 Hz which is a rather relevant range for biological materials and polymers, in both ambient conditions and liquid). The method is quantitatively verified on known polymers and demonstrated on cells and polymers blends. Analysis shows that FT-nanoDMA is highly quantitative. The FT-nanoDMA spectroscopy can easily be implemented in the existing AFMs. PMID:26218346

  3. High-resolution high-speed dynamic mechanical spectroscopy of cells and other soft materials with the help of atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, M; Sokolov, I

    2015-07-28

    Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), which allows measuring frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties, is important to study soft materials, tissues, biomaterials, polymers. However, the existing DMS techniques (nanoindentation) have limited resolution when used on soft materials, preventing them from being used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. The nanoindenters are not capable of measuring cells, nanointerfaces of composite materials. Here we present a highly accurate DMS modality, which is a combination of three different methods: quantitative nanoindentation (nanoDMA), gentle force and fast response of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy. This new spectroscopy (which we suggest to call FT-nanoDMA) is fast and sensitive enough to allow DMS imaging of nanointerfaces, single cells, while attaining about 100x improvements on polymers in both spatial (to 10-70 nm) and temporal resolution (to 0.7 s/pixel) compared to the current art. Multiple frequencies are measured simultaneously. The use of 10 frequencies are demonstrated here (up to 300 Hz which is a rather relevant range for biological materials and polymers, in both ambient conditions and liquid). The method is quantitatively verified on known polymers and demonstrated on cells and polymers blends. Analysis shows that FT-nanoDMA is highly quantitative. The FT-nanoDMA spectroscopy can easily be implemented in the existing AFMs.

  4. An RNA toolbox for single-molecule force spectroscopy studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilfan, I.D.; Kamping, W.; Van den Hout, M.; Candelli, A.; Hage, S.; Dekker, N.H.

    2007-01-01

    Precise, controllable single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of RNA and RNA-dependent processes have recently shed new light on the dynamics and pathways of RNA folding and RNAenzyme interactions. A crucial component of this research is the design and assembly of an appropriate RNA construct. Su

  5. Force Dynamics of Verb Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Woźny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Force Dynamics of Verb Complementation The concepts of motion and force are both extensively discussed in cognitive linguistics literature. But they are discussed separately. The first usually in the context of ‘motion situations’ (Talmy, Slobin, Zlatev, the other as part of the Force Dynamics framework, which was developed by Talmy. The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to argue that the concepts of force and motion should not be isolated but considered as two inseparable parts of force-motion events. The second goal is to prove that the modified Force Dynamics (force-motion framework can be used for precise characterization of the verb complementation patterns. To this end, a random sample of 50 sentences containing the verb ‘went’ is analyzed, demonstrating the differences between the categories of intensive and intransitive complementation with respect to the linguistically coded parameters of force and motion.

  6. Force spectroscopy of hepatocytic extracellular matrix components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongsunthon, R., E-mail: YongsuntR@Corning.com [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States); Baker, W.A.; Bryhan, M.D.; Baker, D.E.; Chang, T.; Petzold, O.N.; Walczak, W.J.; Liu, J.; Faris, R.A.; Senaratne, W.; Seeley, L.A.; Youngman, R.E. [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    We present atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy data of live hepatocytes (HEPG2/C3A liver cell line) grown in Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium, a complex solution of salts and amino acids commonly used for cell culture. Contact-mode imaging and force spectroscopy of this system allowed correlation of cell morphology and extracellular matrix (ECM) properties with substrate properties. Force spectroscopy analysis of cellular 'footprints' indicated that the cells secrete large polymers (e.g., 3.5 {mu}m contour length and estimated MW 1000 kDa) onto their substrate surface. Although definitive identification of the polymers has not yet been achieved, fluorescent-labeled antibody staining has specified the presence of ECM proteins such as collagen and laminin in the cellular footprints. The stretched polymers appear to be much larger than single molecules of known ECM components, such as collagen and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, thus suggesting that the cells create larger entangled, macromolecular structures from smaller components. There is strong evidence which suggests that the composition of the ECM is greatly influenced by the hydrophobicity of the substrate surface, with preferential production and/or adsorption of larger macromolecules on hydrophobic surfaces.

  7. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  8. Fundamental High-Speed Limits in Single-Molecule, Single-Cell, and Nanoscale Force Spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Force spectroscopy is enhancing our understanding of single-biomolecule, single-cell, and nanoscale mechanics. Force spectroscopy postulates the proportionality between the interaction force and the instantaneous probe deflection. By studying the probe dynamics, we demonstrate that the total force acting on the probe has three different components: the interaction, the hydrodynamic, and the inertial. The amplitudes of those components depend on the ratio between the resonant frequency and the frequency at which the data are measured. A force–distance curve provides a faithful measurement of the interaction force between two molecules when the inertial and hydrodynamic components are negligible. Otherwise, force spectroscopy measurements will underestimate the value of unbinding forces. Neglecting the above force components requires the use of frequency ratios in the 50–500 range. These ratios will limit the use of high-speed methods in force spectroscopy. The theory is supported by numerical simulations. PMID:27359243

  9. Hands-on Force Spectroscopy: Weird Springs and Protein Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    A force spectroscopy model experiment is presented using a low-cost tensile apparatus described earlier. Force-extension measurements of twisted rubber bands are obtained. They exhibit a complex nonlinear elastic behaviour that resembles atomic force spectroscopy investigations of molecules of titin, a muscle protein. The model experiments open up…

  10. Single molecule atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocun, Marta; Grandbois, Michel; Cuccia, Louis A

    2011-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based force spectroscopy was used to study the desorption of individual chitosan polymer chains from substrates with varying chemical composition. AFM images of chitosan adsorbed onto a flat mica substrate show elongated single strands or aggregated bundles. The aggregated state of the polymer is consistent with the high level of flexibility and mobility expected for a highly positively charged polymer strand. Conversely, the visualization of elongated strands indicated the presence of stabilizing interactions with the substrate. Surfaces with varying chemical composition (glass, self-assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid/decanethiol and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) were probed with chitosan modified AFM tips and the corresponding desorption energies, calculated from plateau-like features, were attributed to the desorption of individual polymer strands. Desorption energies of 2.0±0.3×10(-20)J, 1.8±0.3×10(-20)J and 3.5±0.3×10(-20)J were obtained for glass, SAM of mercaptoundecanoic/dodecanethiol and PTFE, respectively. These single molecule level results can be used as a basis for investigating chitosan and chitosan-based materials for biomaterial applications.

  11. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  12. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2008-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations.

  13. Evolution of nano-rheological properties of Nafion¯ thin films during pH modification by strong base treatment: A static and dynamic force spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Babak; López-Guerra, Enrique A.; Raftari, Maryam; Solares, Santiago D.

    2016-04-01

    Addition of a strong base to Nafion® proton exchange membranes is a common practice in industry to increase their overall performance in fuel cells. Here, we investigate the evolution of the nano-rheological properties of Nafion thin films as a function of the casting pH, via characterization with static and dynamic, contact and intermittent-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. The addition of KOH causes non-monotonic changes in the viscoelastic properties of the films, which behave as highly dissipative, softer materials near neutral pH values, and as harder, more elastic materials at extreme pH values. We quantify this behavior through calculation of the temporal evolution of the compliance and the glassy compliance under static AFM measurements. We complement these observations with dynamic AFM metrics, including dissipated power and virial (for intermittent-contact-mode measurements), and contact resonance frequency and quality factor (for dynamic contact-mode measurements). We explain the non-monotonic material property behavior in terms of the degree of ionic crosslinking and moisture content of the films, which vary with the addition of KOH. This work focuses on the special case study of the addition of strong bases, but the observed mechanical property changes are broadly related to water plasticizing effects and ionic crosslinking, which are also important in other types of films.

  14. Enzyme dynamics from NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Arthur G

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Biological activities of enzymes, including regulation or coordination of mechanistic stages preceding or following the chemical step, may depend upon kinetic or equilibrium changes in protein conformations. Exchange of more open or flexible conformational states with more closed or constrained states can influence inhibition, allosteric regulation, substrate recognition, formation of the Michaelis complex, side reactions, and product release. NMR spectroscopy has long been applied to the study of conformational dynamic processes in enzymes because these phenomena can be characterized over multiple time scales with atomic site resolution. Laboratory-frame spin-relaxation measurements, sensitive to reorientational motions on picosecond-nanosecond time scales, and rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion measurements, sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond-millisecond time scales, provide information on both conformational distributions and kinetics. This Account reviews NMR spin relaxation studies of the enzymes ribonuclease HI from mesophilic (Escherichia coli) and thermophilic (Thermus thermophilus) bacteria, E. coli AlkB, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae triosephosphate isomerase to illustrate the contributions of conformational flexibility and dynamics to diverse steps in enzyme mechanism. Spin relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the bacterial ribonuclease H enzymes show that the handle region, one of three loop regions that interact with substrates, interconverts between two conformations. Comparison of these conformations with the structure of the complex between Homo sapiens ribonuclease H and a DNA:RNA substrate suggests that the more closed state is inhibitory to binding. The large population of the closed conformation in T. thermophilus ribonuclease H contributes to the increased Michaelis constant compared with the E. coli enzyme. NMR spin relaxation and fluorescence spectroscopy have characterized a

  15. Towards force spectroscopy of single tip-link bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koussa, Mounir A.; Sotomayor, Marcos; Wong, Wesley P.; Corey, David P.

    2015-12-01

    Inner-ear mechanotransduction relies on tip links, fine protein filaments made of cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 that convey tension to mechanosensitive channels at the tips of hair-cell stereocilia. The tip-link cadherins are thought to form a heterotetrameric complex, with two cadherin-23 molecules forming the upper part of the filament and two protocadherin-15 molecules forming the lower end. The interaction between cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 is mediated by their N-terminal tips. Missense mutations that modify the interaction interface impair binding and lead to deafness. Molecular dynamics simulations predict that the tip-link bond is mechanically strong enough to withstand forces in hair cells, but its experimentally determined strength is unknown. We have developed molecular tools to facilitate single-molecule force spectroscopy on the tip link bond. Self-assembling DNA nanoswitches are functionalized with the interacting tips of cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 using the enzyme sortase under conditions that preserve protein function. These tip link nanoswitches are designed to provide a signature force-extension profile. This molecular signature should allow us to identify single-molecule rupture events in pulling experiments.

  16. Dynamics of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in Pyrococcus furiosus D14C ferredoxin via nuclear resonance vibrational and resonance Raman spectroscopies, force field simulations, and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Devrani; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Guo, Yisong; Case, David A; Wang, Hongxin; Dong, Weibing; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Jenney, Francis E; Adams, Michael W W; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Zhao, Jiyong; Cramer, Stephen P

    2011-06-14

    We have used (57)Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study oxidized and reduced forms of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in the D14C variant ferredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf D14C Fd). To assist the normal-mode assignments, we conducted NRVS with D14C ferredoxin samples with (36)S substituted into the [4Fe-4S] cluster bridging sulfide positions, and a model compound without ligand side chains, (Ph(4)P)(2)[Fe(4)S(4)Cl(4)]. Several distinct regions of NRVS intensity are identified, ranging from "protein" and torsional modes below 100 cm(-1), through bending and breathing modes near 150 cm(-1), to strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes between 250 and ∼400 cm(-1). The oxidized ferredoxin samples were also investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. We found good agreement between NRVS and RR frequencies, but because of different selection rules, the intensities vary dramatically between the two types of spectra. The (57)Fe partial vibrational densities of states for the oxidized samples were interpreted by normal-mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields for local models of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. Full protein model calculations were also conducted using a supplemented CHARMM force field, and these calculations revealed low-frequency modes that may be relevant to electron transfer with Pf Fd partners. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations complemented these empirical analyses, and DFT was used to estimate the reorganization energy associated with the [Fe(4)S(4)](2+/+) redox cycle. Overall, the NRVS technique demonstrates great promise for the observation and quantitative interpretation of the dynamical properties of Fe-S proteins.

  17. Dynamics of the [4Fe-4S] Cluster in Pyrococcus furiosus D14C Ferredoxin via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational and Resonance Raman Spectroscopies, Force Field Simulations, and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Devrani; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Guo, Yisong; Case, David A.; Wang, Hongxin; Dong, Weibing; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Jenney, Francis E.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Zhao, Jiyong; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    We have used 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study oxidized and reduced forms of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in the D14C variant ferredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf D14C Fd). To assist the normal mode assignments, we recorded the NRVS of D14C ferredoxin samples with 36S substituted into the [4Fe-4S] cluster bridging sulfide positions, and a model compound without ligand side chains: (Ph4P)2[Fe4S4Cl4]. Several distinct regions of NRVS intensity are identified, ranging from `protein' and torsional modes below 100 cm−1, through bending and breathing modes near 150 cm−1, to strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes between 250 cm−1 and ~400 cm−1. The oxidized ferredoxin samples were also investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. We found good agreement between NRVS and RR frequencies, but because of different selection rules, the intensities vary dramatically between the two types of spectra. The 57Fe partial vibrational densities of states (PVDOS) for the oxidized samples were interpreted by normal mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields for local models of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. Full protein model calculations were also conducted using a supplemented CHARMM force field, and these calculations revealed low frequency modes that may be relevant to electron transfer with Pf Fd partners. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations complemented these empirical analyses, and DFT was used to estimate the reorganization energy associated with the [Fe4S4]2+/1+ redox cycle. Overall, the NRVS technique demonstrates great promise for the observation and quantitative interpretation of the dynamical properties of Fe-S proteins. PMID:21500788

  18. Interlaboratory round robin on cantilever calibration for AFM force spectroscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, J. te; Katan, A.J.; Rankl, C.; Stahl, S.W.; Buul, A.M. van; Phang, I.Y.; Gomez-Casado, A.; Schon, P.; Gerritsen, J.W.; Cambi, A.; Rowan, A.E.; Vancso, G.J.; Jonkheijm, P.; Huskens, J.; Oosterkamp, T.H.; Gaub, H.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Figdor, C.G.; Speller, S.

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies performed by Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) strongly rely on accurately determined cantilever spring constants. Hence, to calibrate cantilevers, a reliable calibration protocol is essential. Although the thermal noise method and the direct Sader method are

  19. Dynamics of forced biopolymer translocation

    CERN Document Server

    Lehtola, V V; Kaski, K; 10.1209/0295-5075/85/58006

    2009-01-01

    We present results from our simulations of biopolymer translocation in a solvent which explain the main experimental findings. The forced translocation can be described by simple force balance arguments for the relevant range of pore potentials in experiments and biological systems. Scaling of translocation time with polymer length varies with pore force and friction. Hydrodynamics affects this scaling and significantly reduces translocation times.

  20. Simulation of force spectroscopy experiments on galacturonic acid oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Cybulska

    Full Text Available Pectins, forming a matrix for cellulose and hemicellulose, determine the mechanics of plant cell walls. They undergo salient structural changes during their development. In the presence of divalent cations, usually calcium, pectins can form gel-like structures. Because of their importance they have been the subject of many force spectroscopy experiments, which have examined the conformational changes and molecular tensions due to external forces. The most abundant unit present in the pectin backbone is polygalacturonic acid. Unfortunately, experimental force spectroscopy on polygalacturonic acid molecules is still not a trivial task. The mechanism of the single-molecule response to external forces can be inferred by theoretical methods. Therefore, in this work we simulated such force spectroscopy experiments using the Enforced Geometry Optimization (EGO method. We examined the oligomeric (up to hexamer structures of α-D-galacturonic acid exposed to external stretching forces. The EGO simulation of the force spectroscopy appropriately reproduced the experimental course of the enforced conformational transition: chair →inverted chair via the twisted boat conformation(s in the pyranose ring of α-D-galacturonic acid. Additionally, our theoretical approach also allowed to determine the minimum oligomer size adequate for the description of nano-mechanical properties of (poly-α-D-galacturonic acid.

  1. Simulation of force spectroscopy experiments on galacturonic acid oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Justyna; Brzyska, Agnieszka; Zdunek, Artur; Woliński, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Pectins, forming a matrix for cellulose and hemicellulose, determine the mechanics of plant cell walls. They undergo salient structural changes during their development. In the presence of divalent cations, usually calcium, pectins can form gel-like structures. Because of their importance they have been the subject of many force spectroscopy experiments, which have examined the conformational changes and molecular tensions due to external forces. The most abundant unit present in the pectin backbone is polygalacturonic acid. Unfortunately, experimental force spectroscopy on polygalacturonic acid molecules is still not a trivial task. The mechanism of the single-molecule response to external forces can be inferred by theoretical methods. Therefore, in this work we simulated such force spectroscopy experiments using the Enforced Geometry Optimization (EGO) method. We examined the oligomeric (up to hexamer) structures of α-D-galacturonic acid exposed to external stretching forces. The EGO simulation of the force spectroscopy appropriately reproduced the experimental course of the enforced conformational transition: chair →inverted chair via the twisted boat conformation(s) in the pyranose ring of α-D-galacturonic acid. Additionally, our theoretical approach also allowed to determine the minimum oligomer size adequate for the description of nano-mechanical properties of (poly)-α-D-galacturonic acid.

  2. Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetard, L; Passian, A; Farahi, R H; Kalluri, U C; Davison, B H; Thundat, T

    2010-05-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass and Populus. These features may be attributable to the lignocellulosic cell wall composition, as the collected images exhibit the characteristic macromolecular globule structures attributable to the lignocellulosic systems. Using both AFM and a single case of mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) to characterize Populus, we obtained images that clearly show the cell wall structure. The results are of importance in providing a better understanding of the characteristic features of both mature cells as well as developing plant cells. In addition, we present spectroscopic investigation of the same samples.

  3. Subfemtonewton Force Spectroscopy at the Thermal Limit in Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Lulu; Ginis, Vincent; Capasso, Federico

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate thermally limited force spectroscopy using a probe formed by a dielectric microsphere optically trapped in water near a dielectric surface. We achieve force resolution below 1 fN in 100 s, corresponding to a 2 {\\AA} rms displacement of the probe. Our measurement combines a calibrated evanescent wave particle tracking technique and a lock-in detection method. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method by measurement of the height-dependent force exerted on the probe by an evanescent wave, the results of which are in agreement with Mie theory calculations.

  4. Undulator with dynamic compensation of magnetic forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluskin, Efim; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Xu, Joseph Z.

    2016-05-31

    A method and apparatus for implementing dynamic compensation of magnetic forces for undulators are provided. An undulator includes a respective set of magnet arrays, each attached to a strongback, and placed on horizontal slides and positioned parallel relative to each other with a predetermined gap. Magnetic forces are compensated by a set of compensation springs placed along the strongback. The compensation springs are conical springs having exponential-force characteristics that substantially match undulator magnetic forces independently of the predetermined gap. The conical springs are positioned along the length of the magnets.

  5. Undulator with dynamic compensation of magnetic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluskin, Efim; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Xu, Joseph Z.

    2016-05-31

    A method and apparatus for implementing dynamic compensation of magnetic forces for undulators are provided. An undulator includes a respective set of magnet arrays, each attached to a strongback, and placed on horizontal slides and positioned parallel relative to each other with a predetermined gap. Magnetic forces are compensated by a set of compensation springs placed along the strongback. The compensation springs are conical springs having exponential-force characteristics that substantially match undulator magnetic forces independently of the predetermined gap. The conical springs are positioned along the length of the magnets.

  6. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clouthier, D.J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  7. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky, E-mail: jianqiang.zhou@polytechnique.edu; Reshetnyak, Igor; Giorgetti, Christine; Sottile, Francesco; Reining, Lucia [Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA-DSM-IRAMIS, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Sponza, Lorenzo [Department of Physics, King’s College London, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Guzzo, Matteo [Institut für Physik und IRIS Adlershof, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Gatti, Matteo [Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA-DSM-IRAMIS, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-11-14

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green’s function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green’s function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  8. Chromatin dynamics resolved with force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chien, Fan-Tso

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is organized in chromatin fibers composed of nucleosomes as structural units. A nucleosome contains 1.7 turns of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer and is connected to the adjacent nucleosomes with linker DNA. The folding of chromatin fibers effectively increases t

  9. Minimizing pulling geometry errors in atomic force microscope single molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Monica; Lee, Whasil; Ke, Changhong; Marszalek, Piotr E; Cole, Daniel G; Clark, Robert L

    2008-10-01

    In atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy (AFM-SMFS), it is assumed that the pulling angle is negligible and that the force applied to the molecule is equivalent to the force measured by the instrument. Recent studies, however, have indicated that the pulling geometry errors can drastically alter the measured force-extension relationship of molecules. Here we describe a software-based alignment method that repositions the cantilever such that it is located directly above the molecule's substrate attachment site. By aligning the applied force with the measurement axis, the molecule is no longer undergoing combined loading, and the full force can be measured by the cantilever. Simulations and experimental results verify the ability of the alignment program to minimize pulling geometry errors in AFM-SMFS studies.

  10. Athermalization in atomic force microscope based force spectroscopy using matched microstructure coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torun, H; Finkler, O; Degertekin, F L

    2009-07-01

    The authors describe a method for athermalization in atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy applications using microstructures that thermomechanically match the AFM probes. The method uses a setup where the AFM probe is coupled with the matched structure and the displacements of both structures are read out simultaneously. The matched structure displaces with the AFM probe as temperature changes, thus the force applied to the sample can be kept constant without the need for a separate feedback loop for thermal drift compensation, and the differential signal can be used to cancel the shift in zero-force level of the AFM.

  11. Force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; McBee, Lindsey N

    2014-03-01

    Fixed-ratio schedules are widely used in behavioral research. Although fixed-ratio schedules often conjure up relationships to work and effort, little is known about effort-related measures in these schedules. Early research had shown that force and effort of operant behavior vary systematically during the execution of ratio schedules, and the goal of the present study was to revisit early research on force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules. Four rats earned sucrose by pressing an isometric force transducer. Presses produced sucrose after ten or twenty responses. In general, the force of responses increased then decreased systematically across the ratio. The possibility that decreases in force during ratio execution was due to a trade-off with the differential reinforcement of short inter-response times (IRT) was investigated in an additional condition where sucrose was made available according to a tandem fixed-ratio 19 inter-response (IRT)> t schedule. The tandem IRT requirement did not eliminate decreasing trends in force across the ratio; unexpectedly, the tandem requirement did eliminate increases in force early in the ratio, which may reflect sequence-level organization operating in the control of force dynamics.

  12. Interlaboratory round robin on cantilever calibration for AFM force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Riet, Joost; Katan, Allard J; Rankl, Christian; Stahl, Stefan W; van Buul, Arend M; Phang, In Yee; Gomez-Casado, Alberto; Schön, Peter; Gerritsen, Jan W; Cambi, Alessandra; Rowan, Alan E; Vancso, G Julius; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Huskens, Jurriaan; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H; Gaub, Hermann; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Figdor, Carl G; Speller, Sylvia

    2011-12-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies performed by Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) strongly rely on accurately determined cantilever spring constants. Hence, to calibrate cantilevers, a reliable calibration protocol is essential. Although the thermal noise method and the direct Sader method are frequently used for cantilever calibration, there is no consensus on the optimal calibration of soft and V-shaped cantilevers, especially those used in force spectroscopy. Therefore, in this study we aimed at establishing a commonly accepted approach to accurately calibrate compliant and V-shaped cantilevers. In a round robin experiment involving eight different laboratories we compared the thermal noise and the Sader method on ten commercial and custom-built AFMs. We found that spring constants of both rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers can accurately be determined with both methods, although the Sader method proved to be superior. Furthermore, we observed that simultaneous application of both methods on an AFM proved an accurate consistency check of the instrument and thus provides optimal and highly reproducible calibration. To illustrate the importance of optimal calibration, we show that for biological force spectroscopy studies, an erroneously calibrated cantilever can significantly affect the derived (bio)physical parameters. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that with the pre-established protocol described reliable spring constants can be obtained for different types of cantilevers.

  13. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  14. Atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy on the assessment of protein folding and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Martins, Ivo C; Santos, Nuno C

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) applied to biological systems can, besides generating high-quality and well-resolved images, be employed to study protein folding via AFM-based force spectroscopy. This approach allowed remarkable advances in the measurement of inter- and intramolecular interaction forces with piconewton resolution. The detection of specific interaction forces between molecules based on the AFM sensitivity and the manipulation of individual molecules greatly advanced the understanding of intra-protein and protein-ligand interactions. Apart from the academic interest in the resolution of basic scientific questions, this technique has also key importance on the clarification of several biological questions of immediate biomedical relevance. Force spectroscopy is an especially appropriate technique for "mechanical proteins" that can provide crucial information on single protein molecules and/or domains. Importantly, it also has the potential of combining in a single experiment spatial and kinetic measurements. Here, the main principles of this methodology are described, after which the ability to measure interactions at the single-molecule level is discussed, in the context of relevant protein-folding examples. We intend to demonstrate the potential of AFM-based force spectroscopy in the study of protein folding, especially since this technique is able to circumvent some of the difficulties typically encountered in classical thermal/chemical denaturation studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Kinetic Ductility and Force-Spike Resistance of Proteins from Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio, Pilar; Hummer, Gerhard; Szabo, Attila

    2016-08-23

    Ductile materials can absorb spikes in mechanical force, whereas brittle ones fail catastrophically. Here we develop a theory to quantify the kinetic ductility of single molecules from force spectroscopy experiments, relating force-spike resistance to the differential responses of the intact protein and the unfolding transition state to an applied mechanical force. We introduce a class of unistable one-dimensional potential surfaces that encompass previous models as special cases and continuously cover the entire range from ductile to brittle. Compact analytic expressions for force-dependent rates and rupture-force distributions allow us to analyze force-clamp and force-ramp pulling experiments. We find that the force-transmitting protein domains of filamin and titin are kinetically ductile when pulled from their two termini, making them resistant to force spikes. For the mechanostable muscle protein titin, a highly ductile model reconciles data over 10 orders of magnitude in force loading rate from experiment and simulation. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Handling of impact forces in inverse dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisseling, Rob W.; Hof, At L.

    2006-01-01

    In the standard inverse dynamic method, joint moments are assessed from ground reaction force data and position data, where segmental accelerations are calculated by numerical differentiation of position data after low-pass filtering. This method falls short in analyzing the impact phase, e.g.

  17. Contact force models for multibody dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Flores, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    This book analyzes several compliant contact force models within the context of multibody dynamics, while also revisiting the main issues associated with fundamental contact mechanics. In particular, it presents various contact force models, from linear to nonlinear, from purely elastic to dissipative, and describes their parameters. Addressing the different numerical methods and algorithms for contact problems in multibody systems, the book describes the gross motion of multibody systems by using a two-dimensional formulation based on the absolute coordinates and employs different contact models to represent contact-impact events. Results for selected planar multibody mechanical systems are presented and utilized to discuss the main assumptions and procedures adopted throughout this work. The material provided here indicates that the prediction of the dynamic behavior of mechanical systems involving contact-impact strongly depends on the choice of contact force model. In short, the book provides a comprehens...

  18. Dielectrophoresis force spectroscopy for colloidal nanoparticles (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, H. Daniel; Huang, Hao

    2016-09-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is the motion of colloidal particles in an inhomogeneous electric field. Accurate determination of dielectrophoresis (DEP) force is important for lab-on-a-chip applications. However current DEP force spectroscopy methods are not suitable for accurately measuring the DEP force for sub-micron particles. A new and facile method is developed to measure the DEP force as a function of the frequency of the electric field for nanoparticles by an ensemble analysis approach. Using the principle of Boltzmann distribution of the concentration of non-interacting particles in a DEP potential field, the new method determines the DEP potential field from the measured time-averaged concentration distribution of fluorescently labeled nanoparticle in the DEP field by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Frequency dependent DEP force is determined by the negative gradient of the DEP potential created by the electric field across gold-film electrodes in a microfluidic setting. This approach is capable of measuring forces at the level of one femto Newton for particles with diameters in the range of 63 nm to 410 nm.

  19. Forced synchronization of autonomous dynamical Boolean networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Durón, R. R., E-mail: roberto.rivera@ipicyt.edu.mx; Campos-Cantón, E., E-mail: eric.campos@ipicyt.edu.mx [División de Matemáticas Aplicadas, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A. C., Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4 Sección, C.P. 78216, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Campos-Cantón, I. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Álvaro Obregón 64, C.P. 78000, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Gauthier, Daniel J. [Department of Physics and Center for Nonlinear and Complex Systems, Duke University, Box 90305, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We present the design of an autonomous time-delay Boolean network realized with readily available electronic components. Through simulations and experiments that account for the detailed nonlinear response of each circuit element, we demonstrate that a network with five Boolean nodes displays complex behavior. Furthermore, we show that the dynamics of two identical networks display near-instantaneous synchronization to a periodic state when forced by a common periodic Boolean signal. A theoretical analysis of the network reveals the conditions under which complex behavior is expected in an individual network and the occurrence of synchronization in the forced networks. This research will enable future experiments on autonomous time-delay networks using readily available electronic components with dynamics on a slow enough time-scale so that inexpensive data collection systems can faithfully record the dynamics.

  20. Forced synchronization of autonomous dynamical Boolean networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Durón, R R; Campos-Cantón, E; Campos-Cantón, I; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2015-08-01

    We present the design of an autonomous time-delay Boolean network realized with readily available electronic components. Through simulations and experiments that account for the detailed nonlinear response of each circuit element, we demonstrate that a network with five Boolean nodes displays complex behavior. Furthermore, we show that the dynamics of two identical networks display near-instantaneous synchronization to a periodic state when forced by a common periodic Boolean signal. A theoretical analysis of the network reveals the conditions under which complex behavior is expected in an individual network and the occurrence of synchronization in the forced networks. This research will enable future experiments on autonomous time-delay networks using readily available electronic components with dynamics on a slow enough time-scale so that inexpensive data collection systems can faithfully record the dynamics.

  1. Motility Contrast Imaging and Tissue Dynamics Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, David D.; An, Ran; Turek, John

    Motion is the defining physiological characteristic of living matter. If we are interested in how things function, then the way they move is most informative. Motion provides an endogenous and functional suite of biomarkers that are sensitive to subtle changes that occur under applied pharmacological doses or cellular stresses. This chapter reviews the application of biodynamic imaging to measure cellular dynamics in three-dimensional tissue culture for drug screening applications. Nanoscale and microscale motions are detected through statistical fluctuations in dynamic speckle across an ensemble of cells within each resolution voxel. Tissue dynamics spectroscopy generates drug-response spectrograms that serve as phenotypic fingerprints of drug action and can differentiate responses from heterogeneous regions of tumor tissue.

  2. Adaptive control of force microscope cantilever dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, S. E.; Dougherty, W. M.; Garbini, J. L.; Sidles, J. A.

    2007-09-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) and other emerging scanning probe microscopies entail the detection of attonewton-scale forces. Requisite force sensitivities are achieved through the use of soft force microscope cantilevers as high resonant-Q micromechanical oscillators. In practice, the dynamics of these oscillators are greatly improved by the application of force feedback control computed in real time by a digital signal processor (DSP). Improvements include increased sensitive bandwidth, reduced oscillator ring up/down time, and reduced cantilever thermal vibration amplitude. However, when the cantilever tip and the sample are in close proximity, electrostatic and Casimir tip-sample force gradients can significantly alter the cantilever resonance frequency, foiling fixed-gain narrow-band control schemes. We report an improved, adaptive control algorithm that uses a Hilbert transform technique to continuously measure the vibration frequency of the thermally-excited cantilever and seamlessly adjust the DSP program coefficients. The closed-loop vibration amplitude is typically 0.05 nm. This adaptive algorithm enables narrow-band formally-optimal control over a wide range of resonance frequencies, and preserves the thermally-limited signal to noise ratio (SNR).

  3. Force field dependence of riboswitch dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Christian A; Gohlke, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches are noncoding regulatory elements that control gene expression in response to the presence of metabolites, which bind to the aptamer domain. Metabolite binding appears to occur through a combination of conformational selection and induced fit mechanism. This demands to characterize the structural dynamics of the apo state of aptamer domains. In principle, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can give insights at the atomistic level into the dynamics of the aptamer domain. However, it is unclear to what extent contemporary force fields can bias such insights. Here, we show that the Amber force field ff99 yields the best agreement with detailed experimental observations on differences in the structural dynamics of wild type and mutant aptamer domains of the guanine-sensing riboswitch (Gsw), including a pronounced influence of Mg2+. In contrast, applying ff99 with parmbsc0 and parmχOL modifications (denoted ff10) results in strongly damped motions and overly stable tertiary loop-loop interactions. These results are based on 58 MD simulations with an aggregate simulation time>11 μs, careful modeling of Mg2+ ions, and thorough statistical testing. Our results suggest that the moderate stabilization of the χ-anti region in ff10 can have an unwanted damping effect on functionally relevant structural dynamics of marginally stable RNA systems. This suggestion is supported by crystal structure analyses of Gsw aptamer domains that reveal χ torsions with high-anti values in the most mobile regions. We expect that future RNA force field development will benefit from considering marginally stable RNA systems and optimization toward good representations of dynamics in addition to structural characteristics.

  4. Probing living bacterial adhesion by single cell force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Regina, Viduthalai R.

    /Dead fluorescence staining at the end of each experiment. The adhesion force and final rupture length were dependent on bacterial strains, surfaces properties, and time of contact. The single-cell probe offers control of the cell immobilization, thus holds advantages over the commonly used multi-cell probes where...... random immobilization is obtained by submerging the cantilever in a bacterial suspension. The reported method provides a general platform for investigating single cell interactions of bacteria with different surfaces and other cells by AFM force spectroscopy, thus improving our understanding...... density PLL-g-PEG coatings were about eight times as thick as the conventional PLL-g-PEG coatings. Adhesion forces toward high density PLL-g-PEG coatings were low (P. aeruginosa) or close to zero (S. aureus and S. epidermidis) compared to bare titanium surface. However, no decrease in adhesion force...

  5. Dynamical friction force exerted on spherical bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, O

    2007-01-01

    We present a rigorous calculation of the dynamical friction force exerted on a spherical massive perturber moving through an infinite homogenous system of field stars. By calculating the shape and mass of the polarization cloud induced by the perturber in the background system, which decelerates the motion of the perturber, we recover Chandrasekhar's drag force law with a modified Coulomb logarithm. As concrete examples we calculate the drag force exerted on a Plummer sphere or a sphere with the density distribution of a Hernquist profile. It is shown that the shape of the perturber affects only the exact form of the Coulomb logarithm. The latter converges on small scales, because encounters of the test and field stars with impact parameters less than the size of the massive perturber become inefficient. We confirm this way earlier results based on the impulse approximation of small angle scatterings.

  6. Atomic force microscopy imaging and single molecule recognition force spectroscopy of coat proteins on the surface of Bacillus subtilis spore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jilin; Krajcikova, Daniela; Zhu, Rong; Ebner, Andreas; Cutting, Simon; Gruber, Hermann J; Barak, Imrich; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Coat assembly in Bacillus subtilis serves as a tractable model for the study of the self-assembly process of biological structures and has a significant potential for use in nano-biotechnological applications. In the present study, the morphology of B. subtilis spores was investigated by magnetically driven dynamic force microscopy (MAC mode atomic force microscopy) under physiological conditions. B. subtilis spores appeared as prolate structures, with a length of 0.6-3 microm and a width of about 0.5-2 microm. The spore surface was mainly covered with bump-like structures with diameters ranging from 8 to 70 nm. Besides topographical explorations, single molecule recognition force spectroscopy (SMRFS) was used to characterize the spore coat protein CotA. This protein was specifically recognized by a polyclonal antibody directed against CotA (anti-CotA), the antibody being covalently tethered to the AFM tip via a polyethylene glycol linker. The unbinding force between CotA and anti-CotA was determined as 55 +/- 2 pN. From the high-binding probability of more than 20% in force-distance cycles it is concluded that CotA locates in the outer surface of B. subtilis spores.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Single Collagen Fibrils Revealed by Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, John; Phillips, Charlotte; Grandbois, Michel

    2004-03-01

    In the field of biomechanics, collagen fibrils are believed to be robust mechanical structures characterized by a low extensibility. Until very recently, information on the mechanical properties of collagen fibrils could only be derived from ensemble measurements performed on complete tissues such as bone, skin and tendon. Here we measure force-elongation/relaxation profiles of single collagen fibrils using atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy. The elongation profiles indicate that in vitro assembled heterotrimeric type I collagen fibrils are characterized by a large extensibility. Numerous discontinuities and a plateau in the force profile indicate major reorganization occurs within the fibrils in the 1.5 -- 4.5 nN range. Our study demonstrates that newly assembled collagen fibrils are robust structures with a significant reserve of elasticity that could play a determinant role in cellular motion in the context of tissue growth and morphogenesis. In contrast, homotrimeric collagen fibrils corresponding to osteogenesis imperfecta pathology exhibit a marked difference in their elasticity profile.

  8. Debye Entropic Force and Modified Newtonian Dynamics*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin; CHANG Zhe

    2011-01-01

    Verlinde has suggested that the gravity has an entropic origin, and a gravitational system could be regarded as a thermodynamical system.It is well-known that the equipartition law of energy is invalid at very low temperature.Therefore, entropic force should be modified while the temperature of the holographic screen is very low.It is shown that the modified entropic force is proportional to the square of the acceleration, while the temperature of the holographic screen is much lower than the Debye temperature TD.The modified entropic force returns to the Newton's law of gravitation while the temperature of the holographic screen is much higher than the Debye temperature.The modified entropic force is connected with modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND).The constant ao involved in MOND is linear in the Debye frequency ωD, which can be regarded as the largest frequency of the bits in screen.We find that there do have a strong connection between MOND and cosmology in the framework of Verlinde's entropic force, if the holographic screen is taken to be bound of the Universe.The Debye frequency is linear in the Hubble constant Ho.

  9. Nonlinearly Additive Forces in Multivalent Ligand Binding to a Single Protein Revealed with Force Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, T V; Rudd, R E; Langry, K C; Balhorn, R L; McElfresh, M W

    2005-07-15

    We present evidence of multivalent interactions between a single protein molecule and multiple carbohydrates at a pH where the protein can bind four ligands. The evidence is based not only on measurements of the force required to rupture the bonds formed between ConcanavalinA (ConA) and {alpha}-D-mannose, but also on an analysis of the polymer-extension force curves to infer the polymer architecture that binds the protein to the cantilever and the ligands to the substrate. We find that although the rupture forces for multiple carbohydrate connections to a single protein are larger than the rupture force for a single connection, they do not scale additively with increasing number. Specifically, the most common rupture forces are approximately 46, 66, and 85 pN, which we argue corresponds to 1, 2, and 3 ligands being pulled simultaneously from a single protein as corroborated by an analysis of the linkage architecture. As in our previous work polymer tethers allow us to discriminate between specific and non-specific binding. We analyze the binding configuration (i.e. serial versus parallel connections) through fitting the polymer stretching data with modified Worm-Like Chain (WLC) models that predict how the effective stiffness of the tethers is affected by multiple connections. This analysis establishes that the forces we measure are due to single proteins interacting with multiple ligands, the first force spectroscopy study that establishes single-molecule multivalent binding unambiguously.

  10. Medical applications of atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Samjin; Jung, Gyeong Bok; Kim, Kyung Sook; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy techniques, which are considered the multi-functional and powerful toolkits for probing the nanostructural, biomechanical and physicochemical properties of biomedical samples in medical science. We introduce briefly the basic principles of AFM and Raman spectroscopy, followed by diagnostic assessments of some selected diseases in biomedical applications using them, including mitochondria isolated from normal and ischemic hearts, hair fibers, individual cells, and human cortical bone. Finally, AFM and Raman spectroscopy applications to investigate the effects of pharmacotherapy, surgery, and medical device therapy in various medicines from cells to soft and hard tissues are discussed, including pharmacotherapy--paclitaxel on Ishikawa and HeLa cells, telmisartan on angiotensin II, mitomycin C on strabismus surgery and eye whitening surgery, and fluoride on primary teeth--and medical device therapy--collagen cross-linking treatment for the management of progressive keratoconus, radiofrequency treatment for skin rejuvenation, physical extracorporeal shockwave therapy for healing of Achilles tendinitis, orthodontic treatment, and toothbrushing time to minimize the loss of teeth after exposure to acidic drinks.

  11. Taking nanomedicine teaching into practice with atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C

    2015-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic force microscope by performing AFM scanning images of human blood cells and force spectroscopy measurements of the fibrinogen-platelet interaction. Since the beginning of this course, in 2008, the overall rating by the students was 4.7 (out of 5), meaning a good to excellent evaluation. Students were very enthusiastic and produced high-quality AFM images and force spectroscopy data. The implementation of the hands-on AFM course was a success, giving to the students the opportunity of contact with a technique that has a wide variety of applications on the nanomedicine field. In the near future, nanomedicine will have remarkable implications in medicine regarding the definition, diagnosis, and treatment of different diseases. AFM enables students to observe single molecule interactions, enabling the understanding of molecular mechanisms of different physiological and pathological processes at the nanoscale level. Therefore, the introduction of nanomedicine courses in bioscience and medical school curricula is essential.

  12. Bayesian field theoretic reconstruction of bond potential and bond mobility in single molecule force spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Joshua C; Chou, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the forces between and within macromolecules is a necessary first step in understanding the mechanics of molecular structure, protein folding, and enzyme function and performance. In such macromolecular settings, dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy (DFS) has been used to distort bonds. The resulting responses, in the form of rupture forces, work applied, and trajectories of displacements, have been used to reconstruct bond potentials. Such approaches often rely on simple parameterizations of one-dimensional bond potentials, assumptions on equilibrium starting states, and/or large amounts of trajectory data. Parametric approaches typically fail at inferring complex-shaped bond potentials with multiple minima, while piecewise estimation may not guarantee smooth results with the appropriate behavior at large distances. Existing techniques, particularly those based on work theorems, also do not address spatial variations in the diffusivity that may arise from spatially inhomogeneous coupling to...

  13. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-02-27

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment.

  14. Mechanically induced silyl ester cleavage under acidic conditions investigated by AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy in the force-ramp mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sebastian W; Pill, Michael F; Kersch, Alfred; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Beyer, Martin K

    2014-01-01

    AFM-based dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy was used to stretch carboxymethylated amylose (CMA) polymers, which have been covalently tethered between a silanized glass substrate and a silanized AFM tip via acid-catalyzed ester condensation at pH 2.0. Rupture forces were measured as a function of temperature and force loading rate in the force-ramp mode. The data exhibit significant statistical scattering, which is fitted with a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) algorithm. Bond rupture is described with a Morse potential based Arrhenius kinetics model. The fit yields a bond dissociation energy De = 35 kJ mol(-1) and an Arrhenius pre-factor A = 6.6 × 10(4) s(-1). The bond dissociation energy is consistent with previous experiments under identical conditions, where the force-clamp mode was employed. However, the bi-exponential decay kinetics, which the force-clamp results unambiguously revealed, are not evident in the force-ramp data. While it is possible to fit the force-ramp data with a bi-exponential model, the fit parameters differ from the force-clamp experiments. Overall, single-molecule force spectroscopy in the force-ramp mode yields data whose information content is more limited than force-clamp data. It may, however, still be necessary and advantageous to perform force-ramp experiments. The number of successful events is often higher in the force-ramp mode, and competing reaction pathways may make force-clamp experiments impossible.

  15. Eulerian Dynamics with a Commutator Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    not. The results below are stated over the torus, Ω = T1, for the purely technical reason of securing a uniform lower bound of the density away from...2.1. L∞-bound of the velocity. We assume that L satisfies the following monotonicity condition. Let x+ = arg max x g(x) and x− = arg min x g(x). Then...special case of the monotonicity condition (2.1) with (f, g) = (1, ρ) implies L(ρ)(x−) > L(1(x−))ρ− = 0. EULERIAN DYNAMICS WITH A COMMUTATOR FORCING 9 Here

  16. Relativistic Newtonian Dynamics under a central force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Yaakov

    2016-10-01

    Planck's formula and General Relativity indicate that potential energy influences spacetime. Using Einstein's Equivalence Principle and an extension of his Clock Hypothesis, an explicit description of this influence is derived. We present a new relativity model by incorporating the influence of the potential energy on spacetime in Newton's dynamics for motion under a central force. This model extends the model used by Friedman and Steiner (EPL, 113 (2016) 39001) to obtain the exact precession of Mercury without curving spacetime. We also present a solution of this model for a hydrogen-like atom, which explains the reason for a probabilistic description.

  17. Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesbitt, David J. [Research/Professor

    2013-08-06

    Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ≈10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

  18. Force spectroscopy studies on protein-ligand interactions: a single protein mechanics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaotang; Li, Hongbin

    2014-10-01

    Protein-ligand interactions are ubiquitous and play important roles in almost every biological process. The direct elucidation of the thermodynamic, structural and functional consequences of protein-ligand interactions is thus of critical importance to decipher the mechanism underlying these biological processes. A toolbox containing a variety of powerful techniques has been developed to quantitatively study protein-ligand interactions in vitro as well as in living systems. The development of atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy techniques has expanded this toolbox and made it possible to directly probe the mechanical consequence of ligand binding on proteins. Many recent experiments have revealed how ligand binding affects the mechanical stability and mechanical unfolding dynamics of proteins, and provided mechanistic understanding on these effects. The enhancement effect of mechanical stability by ligand binding has been used to help tune the mechanical stability of proteins in a rational manner and develop novel functional binding assays for protein-ligand interactions. Single molecule force spectroscopy studies have started to shed new lights on the structural and functional consequence of ligand binding on proteins that bear force under their biological settings. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Probing new light force-mediators by isotope shift spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berengut, Julian C. [New South Wales Univ., Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Budker, Dmitry [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Helmholtz-Inst. Mainz; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Physics Dept.; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.; Delaunay, Cedric [Savoie Mont Blanc Univ., Annecy-le-Vieux (France). Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique Theorique LAPTh; and others

    2017-04-15

    In this Letter we explore the potential of probing new light force-carriers, with spin-independent couplings to the electron and the neutron, using precision isotope shift spectroscopy. We develop a formalism to interpret linear King plots as bounds on new physics with minimal theory inputs. We focus only on bounding the new physics contributions that can be calculated independently of the Standard Model nuclear effects. We apply our method to existing Ca{sup +} data and project its sensitivity to possibly existing new bosons using narrow transitions in other atoms and ions (specifically, Sr and Yb). Future measurements are expected to improve the relative precision by five orders of magnitude, and can potentially lead to an unprecedented sensitivity for bosons within the 10 keV to 10 MeV mass range.

  20. Irreversible energy flow in forced Vlasov dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Plunk, Gabriel G.

    2014-10-01

    © EDP Sciences, Società Italiana di Fisica, Springer-Verlag. The recent paper of Plunk [G.G. Plunk, Phys. Plasmas 20, 032304 (2013)] considered the forced linear Vlasov equation as a model for the quasi-steady state of a single stable plasma wavenumber interacting with a bath of turbulent fluctuations. This approach gives some insight into possible energy flows without solving for nonlinear dynamics. The central result of the present work is that the forced linear Vlasov equation exhibits asymptotically zero (irreversible) dissipation to all orders under a detuning of the forcing frequency and the characteristic frequency associated with particle streaming. We first prove this by direct calculation, tracking energy flow in terms of certain exact conservation laws of the linear (collisionless) Vlasov equation. Then we analyze the steady-state solutions in detail using a weakly collisional Hermite-moment formulation, and compare with numerical solution. This leads to a detailed description of the Hermite energy spectrum, and a proof of no dissipation at all orders, complementing the collisionless Vlasov result.

  1. Chapter 15: Live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Panorchan, Porntula; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method to measure the kinetics and micromechanical properties of individual receptor-ligand bonds formed between two living cells. Using living cells rather than recombinant proteins ensures that the orientation, surface density, and posttranslational modifications of the probed receptors are physiological and that their regulated attachment to the cytoskeleton can occur. A cell is tethered to a flexible cantilever and brought into contact with cells adherent to a substratum before being pulled at a controlled retraction velocity. Measurements of bond rupture forces and associated bond loading rates over an extended range of retraction velocities allow us to compute precisely the tensile strength, reactive compliance, lifetime, and dissociation rate of individual intercellular receptor-ligand bonds. We also describe tests of specificity and Monte Carlo simulations, which ensure that measurements obtained by this method correspond to a single type of intercellular adhesion bond. We illustrate this live-cell single molecule force spectroscopy assay by characterizing homotypic bonds composed of vascular endothelial -cadherin pairs formed between living endothelial cells. This versatile assay could be used to establish the molecular principles that drive a wide range of important physiological processes involving receptor-mediated intercellular adhesion, such as the immunological synapse between a lymphocyte and an antigen-presenting cell and synaptic interactions between neuron cells, and pathological processes resulting in altered intercellular adhesion.

  2. An open source/real-time atomic force microscope architecture to perform customizable force spectroscopy experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materassi, Donatello; Baschieri, Paolo; Tiribilli, Bruno; Zuccheri, Giampaolo; Samorì, Bruno

    2009-08-01

    We describe the realization of an atomic force microscope architecture designed to perform customizable experiments in a flexible and automatic way. Novel technological contributions are given by the software implementation platform (RTAI-LINUX), which is free and open source, and from a functional point of view, by the implementation of hard real-time control algorithms. Some other technical solutions such as a new way to estimate the optical lever constant are described as well. The adoption of this architecture provides many degrees of freedom in the device behavior and, furthermore, allows one to obtain a flexible experimental instrument at a relatively low cost. In particular, we show how such a system has been employed to obtain measures in sophisticated single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments [Fernandez and Li, Science 303, 1674 (2004)]. Experimental results on proteins already studied using the same methodologies are provided in order to show the reliability of the measure system.

  3. Surface-charge differentiation of streptavidin and avidin by atomic force microscopy-force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonte, Lisa; Lopez-Elvira, Elena; Baró, Arturo M

    2014-09-15

    Chemical information can be obtained by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and force spectroscopy (FS) with atomic or molecular resolution, even in liquid media. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that single molecules of avidin and streptavidin anchored to a biotinylated bilayer can be differentiated by using AFM, even though AFM topographical images of the two proteins are remarkably alike. At physiological pH, the basic glycoprotein avidin is positively charged, whereas streptavidin is a neutral protein. This charge difference can be determined with AFM, which can probe electrostatic double-layer forces by using FS. The force curves, owing to the electrostatic interaction, show major differences when measured on top of each protein as well as on the lipid substrate. FS data show that the two proteins are negatively charged. Nevertheless, avidin and streptavidin can be clearly distinguished, thus demonstrating the sensitivity of AFM to detect small changes in the charge state of macromolecules. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Evolution of nano-rheological properties of Nafion{sup ®} thin films during pH modification by strong base treatment: A static and dynamic force spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslami, Babak; López-Guerra, Enrique A.; Raftari, Maryam; Solares, Santiago D., E-mail: ssolares@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Addition of a strong base to Nafion{sup ®} proton exchange membranes is a common practice in industry to increase their overall performance in fuel cells. Here, we investigate the evolution of the nano-rheological properties of Nafion thin films as a function of the casting pH, via characterization with static and dynamic, contact and intermittent-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. The addition of KOH causes non-monotonic changes in the viscoelastic properties of the films, which behave as highly dissipative, softer materials near neutral pH values, and as harder, more elastic materials at extreme pH values. We quantify this behavior through calculation of the temporal evolution of the compliance and the glassy compliance under static AFM measurements. We complement these observations with dynamic AFM metrics, including dissipated power and virial (for intermittent-contact-mode measurements), and contact resonance frequency and quality factor (for dynamic contact-mode measurements). We explain the non-monotonic material property behavior in terms of the degree of ionic crosslinking and moisture content of the films, which vary with the addition of KOH. This work focuses on the special case study of the addition of strong bases, but the observed mechanical property changes are broadly related to water plasticizing effects and ionic crosslinking, which are also important in other types of films.

  5. Dynamics of an [Fe4S4(SPh)4]2- cluster explored via IR, Raman, and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS)-analysis using 36S substitution, DFT calculations, and empirical force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuming; Koutmos, Markos; Case, David A; Coucouvanis, Dimitri; Wang, Hongxin; Cramer, Stephen P

    2006-05-14

    We have used four vibrational spectroscopies--FT-IR, FT-Raman, resonance Raman, and 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS)--to study the normal modes of the Fe-S cluster in [(n-Bu)4N]2[Fe4S4(SPh)4]. This [Fe4S4(SR)4]2- complex serves as a model for the clusters in 4Fe ferredoxins and high-potential iron proteins (HiPIPs). The IR spectra exhibited differences above and below the 243 K phase transition. Significant shifts with 36S substitution into the bridging S positions were also observed. The NRVS results were in good agreement with the low temperature data from the conventional spectroscopies. The NRVS spectra were interpreted by normal mode analysis using optimized Urey-Bradley force fields (UBFF) as well as from DFT theory. For the UBFF calculations, the parameters were refined by comparing calculated and observed NRVS frequencies and intensities. The frequency shifts after 36S substitution were used as an additional constraint. A D 2d symmetry Fe4S4S'4 model could explain most of the observed frequencies, but a better match to the observed intensities was obtained when the ligand aromatic rings were included for a D 2d Fe4S4(SPh)4 model. The best results were obtained using the low temperature structure without symmetry constraints. In addition to stretching and bending vibrations, low frequency modes between approximately 50 and 100 cm(-1) were observed. These modes, which have not been seen before, are interpreted as twisting motions with opposing sides of the cube rotating in opposite directions. In contrast with a recent paper on a related Fe4S4 cluster, we find no need to assign a large fraction of the low frequency NRVS intensity to 'rotational lattice modes'. We also reassign the 430 cm(-1) band as primarily an elongation of the thiophenolate ring, with approximately 10% terminal Fe-S stretch character. This study illustrates the benefits of combining NRVS with conventional Raman and IR analysis for characterization of Fe-S centers. DFT

  6. Influence of surfactants in forced dynamic dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Franziska; Fell, Daniela; Truszkowska, Dorota; Weirich, Marcel; Anyfantakis, Manos; Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Wagner, Manfred; Auernhammer, Günter K; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-09-20

    In this work we show that the forced dynamic dewetting of surfactant solutions depends sensitively on the surfactant concentration. To measure this effect, a hydrophobic rotating cylinder was horizontally half immersed in aqueous surfactant solutions. Dynamic contact angles were measured optically by extrapolating the contour of the meniscus to the contact line. Anionic (sodium 1-decanesulfonate, S-1DeS), cationic (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) and nonionic surfactants (C4E1, C8E3 and C12E5) with critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) spanning four orders of magnitude were used. The receding contact angle in water decreased with increasing velocity. This decrease was strongly enhanced when adding surfactant, even at surfactant concentrations of 10% of the critical micelle concentration. Plots of the receding contact angle-versus-velocity almost superimpose when being plotted at the same relative concentration (concentration/CMC). Thus the rescaled concentration is the dominating property for dynamic dewetting. The charge of the surfactants did not play a role, thus excluding electrostatic effects. The change in contact angle can be interpreted by local surface tension gradients, i.e. Marangoni stresses, close to the three-phase contact line. The decrease of dynamic contact angles with velocity follows two regimes. Despite the existence of Marangoni stresses close to the contact line, for a dewetting velocity above 1-10 mm s(-1) the hydrodynamic theory is able to describe the experimental results for all surfactant concentrations. At slower velocities an additional steep decrease of the contact angle with velocity was observed. Particle tracking velocimetry showed that the flow profiles do not differ with and without surfactant on a scales >100 μm.

  7. Probing nanoscale graphene-liquid interfacial interactions via ultrasonic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Benjamin J; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2014-09-21

    We probe the interfacial forces in graphene-air and graphene-liquid environments with nanoscale resolution. Experimentally, probe 'snap-in' to contact, in scanning probe microscopy, is overcome by combining the ultrasonic force spectroscopy (UFS) approach and MHz frequency range harmonic oscillation of the sample thereby sweeping the tip-surface dynamically from separated to indented state across the region of intimate interface contact. We measured the force interaction between nanoscale probe tip and graphene, graphite and reference SiO₂ surface in ambient, polar and non-polar liquid environments. Via modelling we estimated the decay length of the force interaction in water to be 0.25-0.75 nm, equivalent to 1-3 monolayers, and interfacial effective stiffness at these distances associated with the liquid layer was an order of magnitude greater for non-polar than for polar liquid environment. During the elastic indentation at increased forces, the effective Young's modulus of graphene was shown only to be slightly reduced in ambient environment while experiencing significant reduction by a factor of 3 in non-polar dodecane environment.

  8. Dynamic force microscopy imaging of native membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienberger, Ferry; Stroh, Cordula; Kada, Gerald; Moser, Rosita; Baumgartner, Werner; Pastushenko, Vassili; Rankl, Christian; Schmidt, Ute; Mueller, Harald; Orlova, Elena; LeGrimellec, Christian; Drenckhahn, Detlev; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2003-10-15

    We employed magnetic ACmode atomic force microscopy (MACmode AFM) as a novel dynamic force microscopy method to image surfaces of biological membranes in their native environments. The lateral resolution achieved under optimized imaging conditions was in the nanometer range, even when the sample was only weakly attached to the support. Purple membranes (PM) from Halobacterium salinarum were used as a test standard for topographical imaging. The hexagonal arrangement of the bacteriorhodopsin trimers on the cytoplasmic side of PM was resolved with 1.5 nm lateral accuracy, a resolution similar to images obtained in contact and tapping-mode AFM. Human rhinovirus 2 (HRV2) particles were attached to mica surfaces via nonspecific interactions. The capsid structure and 2 nm sized protein loops of HRV2 were routinely obtained without any displacement of the virus. Globular and filamentous structures on living and fixed endothelial cells were observed with a resolution of 5-20 nm. These examples show that MACmode AFM is a favorable method in studying the topography of soft and weakly attached biological samples with high resolution under physiological conditions.

  9. Hydrodynamic Boundary Conditions and Dynamic Forces between Bubbles and Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Ofer; Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Tang, Xiaosong; O'Shea, Sean J.; Stevens, Geoffrey W.; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R.; Chan, Derek Y. C.

    2008-07-01

    Dynamic forces between a 50μm radius bubble driven towards and from a mica plate using an atomic force microscope in electrolyte and in surfactant exhibit different hydrodynamic boundary conditions at the bubble surface. In added surfactant, the forces are consistent with the no-slip boundary condition at the mica and bubble surfaces. With no surfactant, a new boundary condition that accounts for the transport of trace surface impurities explains variations of dynamic forces at different speeds and provides a direct connection between dynamic forces and surface transport effects at the air-water interface.

  10. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  11. Single-molecule force-conductance spectroscopy of hydrogen-bonded complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro; De Vico, Luca; Solomon, Gemma C.; Franco, Ignacio

    2017-03-01

    The emerging ability to study physical properties at the single-molecule limit highlights the disparity between what is observable in an ensemble of molecules and the heterogeneous contributions of its constituent parts. A particularly convenient platform for single-molecule studies are molecular junctions where forces and voltages can be applied to individual molecules, giving access to a series of electromechanical observables that can form the basis of highly discriminating multidimensional single-molecule spectroscopies. Here, we computationally examine the ability of force and conductance to inform about molecular recognition events at the single-molecule limit. For this, we consider the force-conductance characteristics of a prototypical class of hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes sandwiched between gold electrodes. The complexes consist of derivatives of a barbituric acid and a Hamilton receptor that can form up to six simultaneous hydrogen bonds. The simulations combine classical molecular dynamics of the mechanical deformation of the junction with non-equilibrium Green's function computations of the electronic transport. As shown, in these complexes hydrogen bonds mediate transport either by directly participating as a possible transport pathway or by stabilizing molecular conformations with enhanced conductance properties. Further, we observe that force-conductance correlations can be very sensitive to small changes in the chemical structure of the complexes and provide detailed information about the behavior of single molecules that cannot be gleaned from either measurement alone. In fact, there are regions during the elongation that are only mechanically active, others that are only conductance active, and regions where both force and conductance changes as the complex is mechanically manipulated. The implication is that force and conductance provide complementary information about the evolution of molecules in junctions that can be used to

  12. Dynamic balancing with rotating radial electromagnetic force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勇; 陆永平

    2004-01-01

    A method of producing rotating radial electromagnetic force with a separable structure is proposed,and an experimental model was designed on which open loop vibration control experiments were carried out. Experimental results prove that the electromagnetic force designed has a constant magnitude and an uniform speed,and the idea of using an electromagnetic force as an active control in automatic balancing is correct in principle,and practicable in engineering.

  13. Dynamic force patterns of an undulatory microswimmer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Rafael D; Backholm, Matilda; Ryu, William S; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2014-05-01

    We probe the viscous forces involved in the undulatory swimming of the model organism C. elegans. Using micropipette deflection, we attain direct measurements of lateral and propulsive forces produced in response to the motion of the worm. We observe excellent agreement of the results with resistive force theory, through which we determine the drag coefficients of this organism. The drag coefficients are in accordance with theoretical predictions. Using a simple scaling argument, we obtain a relationship between the size of the worm and the forces that we measure, which well describes our data.

  14. Waiting Time Dynamics in Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Knoester, Jasper

    We review recent work on the waiting time dynamics of coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. This dynamics can reveal chemical and physical processes that take place on the femto- and picosecond time scale, which is faster than the time scale that may be probed by, for example,

  15. Force Factor Modulation in Electro Dynamic Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risbo, Lars; Agerkvist, Finn T.; Tinggaard, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the non-linear phenomenon of ’reluctance force’ and the position dependency of the voice coil inductance was established in 1949 by Cunningham, who called it ’magnetic attraction force’. This paper revisits Cunningham’s analysis and expands it into a generalised form...... that includes the frequency dependency and applies to coils with non-inductive (lossy) blocked impedance. The paper also demonstrates that Cunningham’s force can be explained physically as a modulation of the force factor which again is directly linked to modulation of the flux of the coil. A verification based...... on both experiments and simulations is presented along discussions of the impact of force factor modulation for various motor topologies. Finally, it is shown that the popular L2R2 coil impedance model does not correctly predict the force unless the new analysis is applied....

  16. Force Factor Modulation in Electro Dynamic Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risbo, Lars; Agerkvist, Finn T.; Tinggaard, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the non-linear phenomenon of ’reluctance force’ and the position dependency of the voice coil inductance was established in 1949 by Cunningham, who called it ’magnetic attraction force’. This paper revisits Cunningham’s analysis and expands it into a generalised form that...... on both experiments and simulations is presented along discussions of the impact of force factor modulation for various motor topologies. Finally, it is shown that the popular L2R2 coil impedance model does not correctly predict the force unless the new analysis is applied....... that includes the frequency dependency and applies to coils with non-inductive (lossy) blocked impedance. The paper also demonstrates that Cunningham’s force can be explained physically as a modulation of the force factor which again is directly linked to modulation of the flux of the coil. A verification based...

  17. Bifurcation, chaos, and scan instability in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, John H., E-mail: john.h.cantrell@nasa.gov [Research Directorate, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Cantrell, Sean A., E-mail: scantrell@nlsanalytics.com [NLS Analytics, LLC, 375 Dundee Road, Glencoe, Illinois 60022 (United States)

    2016-03-28

    The dynamical motion at any point on the cantilever of an atomic force microscope can be expressed quite generally as a superposition of simple harmonic oscillators corresponding to the vibrational modes allowed by the cantilever shape. Central to the dynamical equations is the representation of the cantilever-sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients that account for the interaction force “stiffness,” the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Renormalization of the cantilever beam model shows that for a given cantilever drive frequency cantilever dynamics can be accurately represented by a single nonlinear mass-spring model with frequency-dependent stiffness and damping coefficients [S. A. Cantrell and J. H. Cantrell, J. Appl. Phys. 110, 094314 (2011)]. Application of the Melnikov method to the renormalized dynamical equation is shown to predict a cascade of period doubling bifurcations with increasing cantilever drive force that terminates in chaos. The threshold value of the drive force necessary to initiate bifurcation is shown to depend strongly on the cantilever setpoint and drive frequency, effective damping coefficient, nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. The model predicts the experimentally observed interruptions of the bifurcation cascade for cantilevers of sufficiently large stiffness. Operational factors leading to the loss of image quality in dynamic atomic force microscopy are addressed, and guidelines for optimizing scan stability are proposed using a quantitative analysis based on system dynamical parameters and choice of feedback loop parameter.

  18. Corticomuscular synchronization with small and large dynamic force output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witte Matthias

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last few years much research has been devoted to investigating the synchronization between cortical motor and muscular activity as measured by EEG/MEG-EMG coherence. The main focus so far has been on corticomuscular coherence (CMC during static force condition, for which coherence in beta-range has been described. In contrast, we showed in a recent study 1 that dynamic force condition is accompanied by gamma-range CMC. The modulation of the CMC by various dynamic force amplitudes, however, remained uninvestigated. The present study addresses this question. We examined eight healthy human subjects. EEG and surface EMG were recorded simultaneously. The visuomotor task consisted in isometric compensation for 3 forces (static, small and large dynamic generated by a manipulandum. The CMC, the cortical EEG spectral power (SP, the EMG SP and the errors in motor performance (as the difference between target and exerted force were analyzed. Results For the static force condition we found the well-documented, significant beta-range CMC (15–30 Hz over the contralateral sensorimotor cortex. Gamma-band CMC (30–45 Hz occurred in both small and large dynamic force conditions without any significant difference between both conditions. Although in some subjects beta-range CMC was observed during both dynamic force conditions no significant difference between conditions could be detected. With respect to the motor performance, the lowest errors were obtained in the static force condition and the highest ones in the dynamic condition with large amplitude. However, when we normalized the magnitude of the errors to the amplitude of the applied force (relative errors no significant difference between both dynamic conditions was observed. Conclusion These findings confirm that during dynamic force output the corticomuscular network oscillates at gamma frequencies. Moreover, we show that amplitude modulation of dynamic force has no

  19. Corticomuscular synchronization with small and large dynamic force output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrykiewicz, Agnieszka; Patino, Luis; Naranjo, Jose Raul; Witte, Matthias; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2007-11-27

    Over the last few years much research has been devoted to investigating the synchronization between cortical motor and muscular activity as measured by EEG/MEG-EMG coherence. The main focus so far has been on corticomuscular coherence (CMC) during static force condition, for which coherence in beta-range has been described. In contrast, we showed in a recent study 1 that dynamic force condition is accompanied by gamma-range CMC. The modulation of the CMC by various dynamic force amplitudes, however, remained uninvestigated. The present study addresses this question. We examined eight healthy human subjects. EEG and surface EMG were recorded simultaneously. The visuomotor task consisted in isometric compensation for 3 forces (static, small and large dynamic) generated by a manipulandum. The CMC, the cortical EEG spectral power (SP), the EMG SP and the errors in motor performance (as the difference between target and exerted force) were analyzed. For the static force condition we found the well-documented, significant beta-range CMC (15-30 Hz) over the contralateral sensorimotor cortex. Gamma-band CMC (30-45 Hz) occurred in both small and large dynamic force conditions without any significant difference between both conditions. Although in some subjects beta-range CMC was observed during both dynamic force conditions no significant difference between conditions could be detected. With respect to the motor performance, the lowest errors were obtained in the static force condition and the highest ones in the dynamic condition with large amplitude. However, when we normalized the magnitude of the errors to the amplitude of the applied force (relative errors) no significant difference between both dynamic conditions was observed. These findings confirm that during dynamic force output the corticomuscular network oscillates at gamma frequencies. Moreover, we show that amplitude modulation of dynamic force has no effect on the gamma CMC in the low force range investigated

  20. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouthier, D. J.

    1994-02-01

    Work was done on sub-Doppler spectroscopy of thioformaldehyde, electronic spectrum of FS2 radical, FTIR spectra of the transient molecule formyl chloride (HCOCl and DCOCl), and high-resolution FTIR spectra of the nu(sub 9) (CH2 wag) and nu(sub 5) (CSO symm. stretch) bands of sulfine (H2CSO), a transient species formed in pyrolysis of dimethyl sulfoxide and oxidation of thioformaldehyde.

  1. Traceable dynamic calibration of force transducers by primary means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlajic, Nicholas; Chijioke, Ako

    2016-08-01

    We describe an apparatus for traceable, dynamic calibration of force transducers using harmonic excitation, and report calibration measurements of force transducers using this apparatus. In this system, the force applied to the transducer is produced by the acceleration of an attached mass, and is determined according to Newton’s second law, F  =  ma. The acceleration is measured by primary means, using laser interferometry. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated by performing dynamic calibrations of two shear-web-type force transducers up to a frequency of 2 kHz, with an expanded uncertainty below 1.2%. We give an account of all significant sources of uncertainty, including a detailed consideration of the effects of dynamic tilting (rocking), which is a leading source of uncertainty in such harmonic force calibration systems.

  2. Interrogation of Single Synthetic Polymer Chains and Polysaccharides by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannotti, M.I.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2007-01-01

    This contribution reviews selected mechanical experiments on individual flexible macromolecules using single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) based on atomic force microscopy. Focus is placed on the analysis of elasticity and conformational changes in single polymer chains upon variation of the ex

  3. Optical tweezers for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Axner, Ove; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Fällman, Erik

    2006-08-01

    Instrumentation and methodologies for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles by the use of force measuring optical tweezers have been developed. A thorough study of the biomechanical properties of fimbrial adhesion organelles expressed by uropathogenic E. coli, so-called pili, is presented. Steady-state as well as dynamic force measurements on P pili, expressed by E. coli causing pyelonephritis, have revealed, among other things, various unfolding and refolding properties of the helical structure of P pili, the PapA rod. Based on these properties an energy landscape model has been constructed by which specific biophysical properties of the PapA rod have been extracted, e.g. the number of subunits, the length of a single pilus, bond lengths and activation energies for bond opening and closure. Moreover, long time repetitive measurements have shown that the rod can be unfolded and refolded repetitive times without losing its intrinsic properties. These properties are believed to be of importance for the bacteria's ability to maintain close contact with host cells during initial infections. The results presented are considered to be of importance for the field of biopolymers in general and the development of new pharmaceuticals towards urinary tract infections in particular. The results show furthermore that the methodology can be used to gain knowledge of the intrinsic biomechanical function of adhesion organelles. The instrumentation is currently used for characterization of type 1 pili, expressed by E. coli causing cystitis, i.e. infections in the bladder. The first force spectrometry investigations of these pili will be presented.

  4. Structural impact of cations on lipid bilayer models: nanomechanical properties by AFM-force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Giannotti, Marina I; Sanz, Fausto

    2014-02-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has become an invaluable tool for studying the micro- and nanoworlds. As a stand-alone, high-resolution imaging technique and force transducer, it defies most other surface instrumentation in ease of use, sensitivity and versatility. The main strength of AFM relies on the possibility to operate in an aqueous environment on a wide variety of biological samples, from single molecules - DNA or proteins - to macromolecular assemblies like biological membranes. Understanding the effect of mechanical stress on membranes is of primary importance in biophysics, since cells are known to perform their function under a complex combination of forces. In the later years, AFM-based Force-Spectroscopy (AFM-FS) has provided a new vista on membrane mechanics in a confined area within the nanometer realm, where most of the specific molecular interactions take place. Lipid membranes are electrostatically charged entities that physiologically coexist with electrolyte solutions. Thus, specific interactions with ions are a matter of considerable interest. The distribution of ions in the solution and their interaction with the membranes are factors that substantially modify the structure and dynamics of the cell membranes. Furthermore, signaling processes are modified by the membrane capability of retaining ions. Supported Lipid Bilayers (SLBs) are a versatile tool to investigate phospholipid membranes mimicking biological surfaces. In the present contribution, we review selected experiments on the mechanical stability of SLBs as models of lipid membranes by means of AFM-FS, with special focus on the effect of cations and ionic strength in the overall nanomechanical stability.

  5. Bimolecular reaction dynamics from photoelectron spectroscopy of negative ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradforth, S.E.

    1992-11-01

    The transition state region of a neutral bimolecular reaction may be experimentally investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy of an appropriate negative ion. The photoelectron spectrum provides information on the spectroscopy and dynamics of the short lived transition state and may be used to develop model potential energy surfaces that are semi-quantitative in this important region. The principles of bound [yields] bound negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy are illustrated by way of an example: a full analysis of the photoelectron bands of CN[sup [minus

  6. Reverse engineering of an affinity-switchable molecular interaction characterized by atomic force microscopy single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Dario; Bartels, Frank Wilco; Becker, Anke; Decker, Björn; Eckel, Rainer; McIntosh, Matthew; Mattay, Jochen; Plattner, Patrik; Ros, Robert; Schäfer, Christian; Sewald, Norbert

    2008-02-19

    Tunable and switchable interaction between molecules is a key for regulation and control of cellular processes. The translation of the underlying physicochemical principles to synthetic and switchable functional entities and molecules that can mimic the corresponding molecular functions is called reverse molecular engineering. We quantitatively investigated autoinducer-regulated DNA-protein interaction in bacterial gene regulation processes with single atomic force microscopy (AFM) molecule force spectroscopy in vitro, and developed an artificial bistable molecular host-guest system that can be controlled and regulated by external signals (UV light exposure and thermal energy). The intermolecular binding functionality (affinity) and its reproducible and reversible switching has been proven by AFM force spectroscopy at the single-molecule level. This affinity-tunable optomechanical switch will allow novel applications with respect to molecular manipulation, nanoscale rewritable molecular memories, and/or artificial ion channels, which will serve for the controlled transport and release of ions and neutral compounds in the future.

  7. Brillouin spectroscopy of clotting dynamics in a model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante-Lopez, Sandra C.; Traverso, Andrew J.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2016-02-01

    Keys to successful treatment of disease include early diagnosis and timely treatment. It is hypothesized that early clotting events may contribute to a pro-thrombotic state that exacerbates atherothrombotic vascular disease. Brillouin spectroscopy involves inelastic coupling of light with phonons and enables viscoelastic characterization of samples at the microscale. In this work, we apply Brillouin spectroscopy to a model fibrinogen-thrombin clotting system with the goal of measuring clotting dynamics at the microscale and providing characterization that is not possible with standard rheometric techniques. Here, the clotting dynamics of the model clotting system are measured at various fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations.

  8. EMG-force relation in dynamically contracting cat plantaris muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, W; Sokolosky, J; Zhang, Y T; Guimarães, A C

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to revisit the electromyographical (EMG)-force relationship of dynamically contracting muscles using direct measurements of EMG and force in cat hindlimb muscles during locomotion. EMG signals were recorded from the plantaris muscle using bipolar indwelling wire electrodes, and the corresponding forces were measured using a tendon force transducer. Force-time histories of cat plantaris muscle were predicted by estimating selected force parameters from EMG and timing parameters, and then constructing two smoothly fitting quintic spline functions from the estimated force parameters. The force predictions did not contain information on force-length or force-velocity properties of the cat plantaris and did not use instantaneous contractile conditions as input. It was found that two smoothly fitting quintic spline functions provided the required properties to approximate plantaris force-time histories accurately, and approximations of the force-time histories using EMG and timing parameters as input for the quintic splines were good. The root mean square errors (RMS) of the predicted compared to the actual plantaris forces were smaller than corresponding results reported in the literature, even though the prediction model did not require the force-length-velocity properties or the instantaneous contractile conditions of the target muscles as input. From the results obtained in this study, it appears that force-time histories of the cat plantaris muscle during locomotion can be predicted adequately from information obtained using EMG and video records, without information on either the force-length and force-velocity properties, or the instantaneous contractile conditions of the muscle.

  9. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Lange

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements. When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip–sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip. In this paper, we present the direct measurement of the whole hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves at 77 K on the PTCDA/Ag/Si(111 √3 × √3 surface by means of a tuning-fork-based NC-AFM with an oscillation amplitude smaller than the distance range of the hysteresis loop. The hysteresis effect is caused by the making and breaking of a bond between PTCDA molecules on the surface and a PTCDA molecule at the tip. The corresponding energy loss was determined to be 0.57 eV by evaluation of the force–distance curves upon approach and retraction. Furthermore, a second dissipation process was identified through the damping of the oscillation while the molecule on the tip is in contact with the surface. This dissipation process occurs mainly during the retraction of the tip. It reaches a maximum value of about 0.22 eV/cycle.

  10. Dynamic Correction Algorithm of Rolling Force in Plate Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Hong-lei; WANG Jun; HU Xian-lei; WANG Zhao-dong; WANG Guo-dong

    2005-01-01

    Based on the Shougang plat mill project, an on-line dynamic correction algorithm was analyzed. This algorithm can adjust model coefficients better because the reasonable correction is based on the measured and calculated rolling force. The results of application on site show that this on-line dynamic correction algorithm is effective.

  11. Ultrafast spectroscopy of quasiparticle dynamics in cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Chunfeng, E-mail: cfzhang@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wang, Xiaoyong [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chakhalian, Jak, E-mail: jchakhal@uark.edu [Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Xiao, Min, E-mail: mxiao@uark.edu [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy is a powerful tool to study the nonequilibrium dynamics in high-Tc cuprate superconductors. The photo-induced quasiparticle (QP) dynamics revealed by pump-probe spectroscopy are sensitive to the near-Fermi level electronic structures. Here we review several selected examples to illustrate the enduring challenges including pairing glue, phase separation, and phase transitions in cuprate superconductors. We also present the data obtained on thin films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} in connection to these issues. - Highlights: • This paper reviews recent ultrafast spectroscopic study on cuprates. • Dynamics related to pairing glues and phase separations are summarized. • Mid-IR pulses enhance the coherent transport in underdoped cuprates. • Pump-probe data on the quasiparticle dynamics in YBCO films are presented.

  12. MD1405: Demonstration of forced dynamic aperture measurements at injection

    CERN Document Server

    Carlier, Felix Simon; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    Accurate measurements of dynamic aperture become more important for the LHC as it advances into increasingly nonlinear regimes of operations, as well as for the High Luminosity LHC where machine nonlinearities will have a significantly larger impact. Direct dynamic aperture measurements at top energy in the LHC are challenging, and conventional single kick methods are not viable. Dynamic aperture measurements under forced oscillation of AC dipoles have been proposed as s possible alternative observable. A first demonstration of forced DA measurements at injections energy is presented.

  13. Dynamic Analysis of Axial Magnetic Forces for DVD Spindle Motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The axial magnetic force, induced by the complicated flux linkage distribution from rotor magnet and stator slotted, is constructed by different relative heights and calculated by 3D finite element method (FEM) to analyze the dynamic characteristics for a DVD spindle motor. The axial magnetic force is designed to provide an axial stiffness and govern the natural frequency of the dynamic performance. According to the simulation results and experimental measurements, the dynamic behaviors are significantly improved with a variation of relative height of rotor magnet and stator slotted on a DVD spindle motor.

  14. Simplistic Coulomb Forces in Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    salt model the SF approximation overall reproduces the structural and dynamical properties as accurately as does the Wolf method. It is shown that the optimal Wolf damping parameter depends on the property in focus and that neither the potential energy nor the radial distribution function are useful...

  15. Force Spectroscopy of the Plasmodium falciparum Vaccine Candidate Circumsporozoite Protein Suggests a Mechanically Pliable Repeat Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Aditya Prasad; Sharma, Shobhona; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti

    2017-02-10

    The most effective vaccine candidate of malaria is based on the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP), a major surface protein implicated in the structural strength, motility, and immune evasion properties of the infective sporozoites. It is suspected that reversible conformational changes of CSP are required for infection of the mammalian host, but the detailed structure and dynamic properties of CSP remain incompletely understood, limiting our understanding of its function in the infection. Here, we report the structural and mechanical properties of the CSP studied using single-molecule force spectroscopy on several constructs, one including the central region of CSP, which is rich in NANP amino acid repeats (CSPrep), and a second consisting of a near full-length sequence without the signal and anchor hydrophobic domains (CSPΔHP). Our results show that the CSPrep is heterogeneous, with 40% of molecules requiring virtually no mechanical force to unfold (<10 piconewtons (pN)), suggesting that these molecules are mechanically compliant and perhaps act as entropic springs, whereas the remaining 60% are partially structured with low mechanical resistance (∼70 pN). CSPΔHP having multiple force peaks suggests specifically folded domains, with two major populations possibly indicating the open and collapsed forms. Our findings suggest that the overall low mechanical resistance of the repeat region, exposed on the outer surface of the sporozoites, combined with the flexible full-length conformations of CSP, may provide the sporozoites not only with immune evasion properties, but also with lubricating capacity required during its navigation through the mosquito and vertebrate host tissues. We anticipate that these findings would further assist in the design and development of future malarial vaccines. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Stiffness, resilience, compressibility. Atomic scale force spectroscopy of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Bogdan M.; Sage, J. Timothy

    2016-12-01

    The flexibility of a protein is an important component of its functionality. We use nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to quantify the flexibility of the heme iron environment in the electron-carrying protein cytochrome c by measuring the stiffness and the resilience. These quantities are sensitive to structural differences between the active sites of different proteins, as illustrated by a comparative analysis with myoglobin. The elasticity of the entire protein, on the other hand, can be probed quantitatively from NRVS and high energy-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) measurements, an approach that we used to extract the bulk modulus of cytochrome c.

  17. NONLINEAR DYNAMICS OF CARBON NANOTUBES UNDER LARGE ELECTROSTATIC FORCE

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Tiantian

    2015-06-01

    Because of the inherent nonlinearities involving the behavior of CNTs when excited by electrostatic forces, modeling and simulating their behavior is challenging. The complicated form of the electrostatic force describing the interaction of their cylindrical shape, forming upper electrodes, to lower electrodes poises serious computational challenges. This presents an obstacle against applying and using several nonlinear dynamics tools typically used to analyze the behavior of complicated nonlinear systems undergoing large motion, such as shooting, continuation, and integrity analysis techniques. This works presents an attempt to resolve this issue. We present an investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of carbon nanotubes when actuated by large electrostatic forces. We study expanding the complicated form of the electrostatic force into enough number of terms of the Taylor series. Then, we utilize this form along with an Euler-Bernoulli beam model to study for the first time the dynamic behavior of CNTs when excited by large electrostatic force. The geometric nonlinearity and the nonlinear electrostatic force are considered. An efficient reduced-order model (ROM) based on the Galerkin method is developed and utilized to simulate the static and dynamic responses of the CNTs. Several results are generated demonstrating softening and hardening behavior of the CNTs near their primary and secondary resonances. The effects of the DC and AC voltage loads on the behavior have been studied. The impacts of the initial slack level and CNT diameter are also demonstrated.

  18. Software for Correcting the Dynamic Error of Force Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Miyashita

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Software which corrects the dynamic error of force transducers in impact force measurements using their own output signal has been developed. The software corrects the output waveform of the transducers using the output waveform itself, estimates its uncertainty and displays the results. In the experiment, the dynamic error of three transducers of the same model are evaluated using the Levitation Mass Method (LMM, in which the impact forces applied to the transducers are accurately determined as the inertial force of the moving part of the aerostatic linear bearing. The parameters for correcting the dynamic error are determined from the results of one set of impact measurements of one transducer. Then, the validity of the obtained parameters is evaluated using the results of the other sets of measurements of all the three transducers. The uncertainties in the uncorrected force and those in the corrected force are also estimated. If manufacturers determine the correction parameters for each model using the proposed method, and provide the software with the parameters corresponding to each model, then users can obtain the waveform corrected against dynamic error and its uncertainty. The present status and the future prospects of the developed software are discussed in this paper.

  19. Dynamics of gecko locomotion: a force-measuring array to measure 3D reaction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhendong; Wang, Zhouyi; Ji, Aihong

    2011-03-01

    Measuring the interaction between each foot of an animal and the substrate is one of the most effective ways to understand the dynamics of legged locomotion. Here, a new facility - the force-measuring array (FMA) - was developed and applied to measure 3D reaction forces of geckos on different slope surfaces. The FMA consists of 16 3D sensors with resolution to the mN level. At the same time the locomotion behaviour of geckos freely moving on the FMA was recorded by high speed camera. The reaction forces acting on the gecko's individual feet measured by the FMA and correlated with locomotion behaviour provided enough information to reveal the mechanical and dynamic secrets of gecko locomotion. Moreover, dynamic forces were also measured by a force platform and correlated with locomotion behaviour. The difference between the forces measured by the two methods is discussed. From the results we conclude that FMA is the best way to obtain true reaction forces acting on the gecko's individual feet.

  20. Photodissociation dynamics and spectroscopy of free radical combustion intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals is studied by the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Photodetachment of internally cold, mass-selected negative ions produces a clean source of radicals, which are subsequently dissociated and detected. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states of the radical. In addition, the photodissociation dynamics, product branching ratios, and bond energies are probed at fixed photon energies by measuring the translational energy, P(E{sub T}), and angular distribution of the recoiling fragments using a time- and position-sensitive detector. Ab initio calculations are combined with dynamical and statistical models to interpret the observed data. The photodissociation of three prototypical hydrocarbon combustion intermediates forms the core of this work.

  1. Photodissociation dynamics and spectroscopy of free radical combustion intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, David Lewis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals is studied by the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Photodetachment of internally cold, mass-selected negative ions produces a clean source of radicals, which are subsequently dissociated and detected. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states of the radical. In addition, the photodissociation dynamics, product branching ratios, and bond energies are probed at fixed photon energies by measuring the translational energy, P(ET), and angular distribution of the recoiling fragments using a time- and position-sensitive detector. Ab initio calculations are combined with dynamical and statistical models to interpret the observed data. The photodissociation of three prototypical hydrocarbon combustion intermediates forms the core of this work.

  2. Microfluidic multifunctional probe array dielectrophoretic force spectroscopy with wide loading rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Soo; Eom, Kilho; Son, Jongsang; Chang, Woo-Jin; Park, Kidong; Kwon, Taeyun; Yoon, Dae Sung; Bashir, Rashid; Lee, Sang Woo

    2012-10-23

    The simultaneous investigation of a large number of events with different types of intermolecular interactions, from nonequilibrium high-force pulling assays to quasi-equilibrium unbinding events in the same environment, can be very important for fully understanding intermolecular bond-rupture mechanisms. Here, we describe a novel dielectrophoretic force spectroscopy technique that utilizes microsized beads as multifunctional probes for parallel measurement of intermolecular forces with an extremely wide range of force rate (10(-4) to 10(4) pN/s) inside a microfluidic device. In our experiments, various forces, which broadly form the basis of all molecular interactions, were measured across a range of force loading rates by multifunctional probes of various diameters with a throughput of over 600 events per mm(2), simultaneously and in the same environment. Furthermore, the individual bond-rupture forces, the parameters for the characterization of entire energy landscapes, and the effective stiffness of the force spectroscopy were determined on the basis of the measured results. This method of determining intermolecular forces could be very useful for the precise and simultaneous examination of various molecular interactions, as it can be easily and cost-effectively implemented within a microfluidic device for a range of applications including immunoassays, molecular mechanics, chemical and biological screening, and mechanobiology.

  3. Dissipation and oscillatory solvation forces in confined liquids studied by small-amplitude atomic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, de Sissi; Ende, van den Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2010-01-01

    We determine conservative and dissipative tip–sample interaction forces from the amplitude and phase response of acoustically driven atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers using a non-polar model fluid (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, which displays strong molecular layering) and atomically flat su

  4. Photoelectron and electron momentum spectroscopy of tetrahydrofuran from a molecular dynamical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, S H Reza; Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael S

    2013-03-07

    The results of experimental studies of the valence electronic structure of tetrahydrofuran employing He I photoelectron spectroscopy as well as Electron Momentum Spectroscopy (EMS) have been reinterpreted on the basis of Molecular Dynamical simulations employing the classical MM3 force field and large-scale quantum mechanical simulations employing Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics in conjunction with the dispersion corrected ωB97XD exchange-correlation functional. Analysis of the produced atomic trajectories demonstrates the importance of thermal deviations from the lowest energy path for pseudorotation, in the form of considerable variations of the ring-puckering amplitude. These deviations are found to have a significant influence on several outer-valence electron momentum distributions, as well as on the He I photoelectron spectrum.

  5. Spin motive force driven by skyrmion dynamics in magnetic nanodisks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yuhki; Ohe, Jun-ichiro

    2015-05-01

    The spin motive force driven by the dynamics of the skyrmion structure formed in a nanomagnetic disk is numerically investigated. Due to the existence of the magnetic structure along the disk edge, the collective mode of the magnetization is modified from that of the bulk skyrmion lattice obtained by using the periodic boundary condition. For a single-skyrmion disk, the dynamics of the skyrmion core and the edge magnetization induce the spin motive force, and a measurable AC voltage is obtained by two probes on the disk. For a multi-skyrmions disk, the phase-locked collective mode of skyrmions is found in the lowest resonant frequency where the amplitude of the AC voltage is enhanced by the cascade effect of the spin motive force. We also investigate the effect of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling on the spin motive force.

  6. Jamming transitions in force-based models for pedestrian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chraibi, Mohcine; Tordeux, Antoine; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Schadschneider, Andreas; Seyfried, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Force-based models describe pedestrian dynamics in analogy to classical mechanics by a system of second order ordinary differential equations. By investigating the linear stability of two main classes of forces, parameter regions with unstable homogeneous states are identified. In this unstable regime it is then checked whether phase transitions or stop-and-go waves occur. Results based on numerical simulations show, however, that the investigated models lead to unrealistic behavior in form of backwards moving pedestrians and overlapping. This is one reason why stop-and-go waves have not been observed in these models. The unrealistic behavior is not related to the numerical treatment of the dynamic equations but rather indicates an intrinsic problem of this model class. Identifying the underlying generic problems gives indications how to define models that do not show such unrealistic behavior. As an example we introduce a new force-based model which produces realistic jam dynamics without the appearance of u...

  7. Identifying the Stern-Gerlach force of classical electron dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Meng; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2016-08-01

    Different classical theories are commonly applied in various branches of physics to describe the relativistic dynamics of electrons by coupled equations for the orbital motion and spin precession. Exemplarily, we benchmark the Frenkel model and the classical Foldy-Wouthuysen model with spin-dependent forces (Stern-Gerlach forces) to the quantum dynamics as predicted by the Dirac equation. Both classical theories can lead to different or even contradicting predictions how the Stern-Gerlach forces modify the electron’s orbital motion, when the electron moves in strong electromagnetic field configurations of emerging high-intensity laser facilities. In this way, one may evaluate the validity and identify the limits of these classical theories via a comparison with possible experiments to provide a proper description of spin-induced dynamics. Our results indicate that the Foldy-Wouthuysen model is qualitatively in better agreement with the Dirac theory than the widely used Frenkel model.

  8. Dynamic forces between bubbles and surfaces and hydrodynamic boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Ofer; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C

    2008-10-21

    A bubble attached to the end of an atomic force microscope cantilever and driven toward or away from a flat mica surface across an aqueous film is used to characterize the dynamic force that arises from hydrodynamic drainage and electrical double layer interactions across the nanometer thick intervening aqueous film. The hydrodynamic response of the air/water interface can range from a classical fully immobile, no-slip surface in the presence of added surfactants to a partially mobile interface in an electrolyte solution without added surfactants. A model that includes the convection and diffusion of trace surface contaminants can account for the observed behavior presented. This model predicts quantitatively different interfacial dynamics to the Navier slip model that can also be used to fit dynamic force data with a post hoc choice of a slip length.

  9. The dynamics of peptide-water interactions in dialanine: An ultrafast amide I 2D IR and computational spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chi-Jui; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2017-08-01

    We present a joint experimental and computational study of the dynamic interactions of dialanine (Ala-Ala) with water, comparing the results of ultrafast 2D IR and infrared transient absorption spectroscopy of its amide I vibration with spectra modeled from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The experimental data are analyzed to describe vibrational frequency fluctuations, vibrational energy relaxation, and chemical exchange processes. The origin of these processes in the same underlying fluctuating forces allows a common description in terms of the fluctuations and conformational dynamics of the peptide and associated solvent. By comparing computational spectroscopy from MD simulations with multiple force fields and water models, we describe how the dynamics of water hydrogen bond fluctuations and switching processes act as a source of friction that governs the dephasing and vibrational relaxation, and provide a description of coupled water and peptide motions that give rise to spectroscopic exchange processes.

  10. [The Northeast: fertility and recent dynamics of the labor force].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, L A

    1985-01-01

    Data from the 1970 and 1980 censuses of Brazil are analyzed to examine the economic growth of the Notheast, changes in the region's population dynamics, and changes in fertility. Consideration is given to the segmentation of the urban labor market, the income of the economically active population, children in the labor force, female education versus fertility, and family income versus female participation in the work force.

  11. Directly measuring single molecule heterogeneity using force spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intriguing results of single molecule experiments on proteins and nucleic acids is the discovery of functional heterogeneity: the observation that complex cellular machines exhibit multiple, biologically active conformations. The structural differences between these conformations may be subtle, but each distinct state can be remarkably long-lived, with random interconversions between states occurring only at macroscopic timescales, fractions of a second or longer. Though we now have proof of functional heterogeneity in a handful of systems---enzymes, motors, adhesion complexes---identifying and measuring it remains a formidable challenge. Here we show that evidence of this phenomenon is more widespread than previously known, encoded in data collected from some of the most well-established single molecule techniques: AFM or optical tweezer pulling experiments. We present a theoretical procedure for analyzing distributions of rupture/unfolding forces recorded at different pulling speeds. This re...

  12. Quadrature phase interferometer for high resolution force spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Paolino, Pierdomenico; Bellon, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present a deflection measurement setup for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). It is based on a quadrature phase differential interferometer: we measure the optical path difference between a laser beam reflecting above the cantilever tip and a reference beam reflecting on the static base of the sensor. A design with very low environmental susceptibility and another allowing calibrated measurements on a wide spectral range are described. Both enable a very high resolution (down to $2.5E-15 m/sqrt{Hz}$), illustrated by a thermal noise measurement on an AFM cantilever. A quick review shows that our precision is equaling or outperforming the best results reported in the literature, but for a much larger deflection range, up to a few microns.

  13. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel J; Engel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Membrane proteins comprise 30% of the proteome of higher organisms. They mediate energy conversion, signal transduction, solute transport and secretion. Their native environment is a bilayer in a physiological buffer solution, hence their structure and function are preferably assessed in this environment. The surface structure of single membrane proteins can be determined in buffer solutions by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at a lateral resolution of less than 1 nm and a vertical resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm. Moreover, single proteins can be directly addressed, stuck to the AFM stylus and subsequently unfolded, revealing the molecular interactions of the protein studied. The examples discussed here illustrate the power of AFM in the structural analysis of membrane proteins in a native environment.

  14. Diversity of Chemical Mechanisms in Thioredoxin Catalysis Revealed by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are oxidoreductase enzymes, present in all organisms, that catalyze the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins. By applying a calibrated force to a substrate disulfide, the chemical mechanisms of Trx catalysis can be examined in detail at the single-molecule level. Here we use single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to explore the chemical evolution of Trx catalysis by probing the chemistry of eight different Trx enzymes. All Trxs show a characteristic Michaelis-Menten ...

  15. Dynamics of a Parametrically Excited System with Two Forcing Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Sofroniou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the dynamics of a trimaran, an investigation of the dynamic behaviour of a double forcing parametrically excited system is carried out. Initially, we provide an outline of the stability regions, both numerically and analytically, for the undamped linear, extended version of the Mathieu equation. This paper then examines the anticipated form of response of our proposed nonlinear damped double forcing system, where periodic and quasiperiodic routes to chaos are graphically demonstrated and compared with the case of the single vertically-driven pendulum.

  16. Approximate photochemical dynamics of azobenzene with reactive force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hartke, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    We have fitted reactive force fields of the ReaxFF type to the ground and first excited electronic states of azobenzene, using global parameter optimization by genetic algorithms. Upon coupling with a simple energy-gap transition probability model, this setup allows for completely force-field-based simulations of photochemical cis→trans- and trans→cis-isomerizations of azobenzene, with qualitatively acceptable quantum yields. This paves the way towards large-scale dynamics simulations of molecular machines, including bond breaking and formation (via the reactive force field) as well as photochemical engines (presented in this work).

  17. Approximate photochemical dynamics of azobenzene with reactive force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hartke, Bernd

    2013-12-14

    We have fitted reactive force fields of the ReaxFF type to the ground and first excited electronic states of azobenzene, using global parameter optimization by genetic algorithms. Upon coupling with a simple energy-gap transition probability model, this setup allows for completely force-field-based simulations of photochemical cis→trans- and trans→cis-isomerizations of azobenzene, with qualitatively acceptable quantum yields. This paves the way towards large-scale dynamics simulations of molecular machines, including bond breaking and formation (via the reactive force field) as well as photochemical engines (presented in this work).

  18. Gamma-range corticomuscular coherence during dynamic force output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omlor, Wolfgang; Patino, Luis; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2007-02-01

    The beta-range synchronization between cortical motor and muscular activity as revealed by EEG/MEG-EMG coherence has been extensively investigated for steady-state motor output. However, there is a lack of information on the modulation of the corticomuscular coherence in conjunction with dynamic force output. We addressed this question comparing the EEG-EMG coherence and the cortical motor spectral power in eight healthy subjects in a visuomotor task, in which the subjects exerted a steady-state or periodically modulated dynamic isometric force output with their right-index finger to keep a visual cursor within a target zone. In the static condition, significant coherence was confined to the beta-range. In the dynamic condition, the most distinct coherence occurred in the gamma-range and the significant beta-range coherence was strikingly reduced. The cortical motor power in the beta-range during dynamic force output was decreased, whereas the power in the gamma-range remained without significant change. We conclude that during dynamic force the corticospinal oscillation mode of the sensorimotor system shifts towards higher (principally gamma) frequencies for the rapid integration of the visual and somatosensory information required to produce the appropriate motor command.

  19. Dynamic steering beams for efficient force measurement in optical manipulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaocong Yuan; Yuquan Zhang; Rui Cao; Xing Zhao; Jing Bu; Siwei Zhu

    2011-01-01

    @@ An efficient and inexpensive method that uses a glass plate mounted onto a motorized rotating stage as a beam-steering device for the generation of dynamic optical traps is reported.Force analysis reveals that there are drag and trapping forces imposed on the bead in the opposite directions, respectively, in a viscous medium.The trapped bead will be rotated following the beam's motion before it reaches the critical escape velocity when the drag force is equal to the optical trapping force.The equilibrium condition facilitates the experimental measurement of the drag force with potential extensions to the determination of the viscosity of the medium or the refractive index of the bead.The proposed technique can easily be integrated into conventional optical microscopic systems with minimum modifications.%An efficient and inexpensive method that uses a glass plate mounted onto a motorized rotating stage as a beam-steering device for the generation of dynamic optical traps is reported. Force analysis reveals that there are drag and trapping forces imposed on the bead in the opposite directions, respectively, in a viscous medium. The trapped bead will be rotated following the beam's motion before it reaches the critical escape velocity when the drag force is equal to the optical trapping force. The equilibrium condition facilitates the experimental measurement of the drag force with potential extensions to the determination of the viscosity of the medium or the refractive index of the bead. The proposed technique can easily be integrated into conventional optical microscopic systems with minimum modifications.

  20. Switched Dynamical Latent Force Models for Modelling Transcriptional Regulation

    CERN Document Server

    López-Lopera, Andrés F

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop statistical approaches for transcription networks, statistical community has proposed several methods to infer activity levels of proteins, from time-series measurements of targets' expression levels. A few number of approaches have been proposed in order to outperform the representation of fast switching time instants, but computational overheads are significant due to complex inference algorithms. Using the theory related to latent force models (LFM), the development of this project provide a switched dynamical hybrid model based on Gaussian processes (GPs). To deal with discontinuities in dynamical systems (or latent driving force), an extension of the single input motif approach is introduced, that switches between different protein concentrations, and different dynamical systems. This creates a versatile representation for transcription networks that can capture discrete changes and non-linearities in the dynamics. The proposed method is evaluated on both simulated data and real data,...

  1. Nonergodic dynamics of force-free granular gases

    OpenAIRE

    Bodrova, Anna; Chechkin, Aleksei V.; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    We study analytically and by event-driven molecular dynamics simulations the nonergodic and aging properties of force-free cooling granular gases with both constant and velocity-dependent (viscoelastic) restitution coefficient $\\varepsilon$ for particle pair collisions. We compare the granular gas dynamics with an effective single particle stochastic model based on an underdamped Langevin equation with time dependent diffusivity. We find that both models share the same behavior of the ensembl...

  2. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chibum [Department of Mechanical System Design Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of); Salapaka, Srinivasa M., E-mail: salapaka@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H{sub ∞} control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  3. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H(∞) control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  4. Atomic force microscope infrared spectroscopy of griseofulvin nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, A. J.; Bilgili, E. A.; Beaudoin, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the ability of photothermal induced resonance (PTIR) to measure the local infrared absorption spectra of crystalline organic drug nanoparticles embedded within solid matrices. Herein, the first reports of the chemical characterization of sub-100 nm organic crystals are described; infrared spectra of 90 nm griseofulvin particles were obtained, confirming the chemical resolution of PTIR beyond the diffraction limit. Additionally, particle size distributions via dynamic light scattering and PTIR image analysis were found to be similar, suggesting that the PTIR measurements are not significantly affected by inhomogeneous infrared absorptivity of this system. Thus as medical applications increasingly emphasize localized drug delivery via micro/nano-engineered structures, PTIR can be used to unambiguously chemically characterize drug formulations at these length scales. PMID:24171582

  5. Monitoring dynamic loads on wind tunnel force balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Alice T.; White, William C.

    1989-01-01

    Two devices have been developed at NASA Langley to monitor the dynamic loads incurred during wind-tunnel testing. The Balance Dynamic Display Unit (BDDU), displays and monitors the combined static and dynamic forces and moments in the orthogonal axes. The Balance Critical Point Analyzer scales and sums each normalized signal from the BDDU to obtain combined dynamic and static signals that represent the dynamic loads at predefined high-stress points. The display of each instrument is a multiplex of six analog signals in a way that each channel is displayed sequentially as one-sixth of the horizontal axis on a single oscilloscope trace. Thus this display format permits the operator to quickly and easily monitor the combined static and dynamic level of up to six channels at the same time.

  6. Dynamic Stability of Euler Beams under Axial Unsteady Wind Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Qin Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic instability of beams in complex structures caused by unsteady wind load has occurred more frequently. However, studies on the parametric resonance of beams are generally limited to harmonic loads, while arbitrary dynamic load is rarely involved. The critical frequency equation for simply supported Euler beams with uniform section under arbitrary axial dynamic forces is firstly derived in this paper based on the Mathieu-Hill equation. Dynamic instability regions with high precision are then calculated by a presented eigenvalue method. Further, the dynamically unstable state of beams under the wind force with any mean or fluctuating component is determined by load normalization, and the wind-induced parametric resonant response is computed by the Runge-Kutta approach. Finally, a measured wind load time-history is input into the dynamic system to indicate that the proposed methods are effective. This study presents a new method to determine the wind-induced dynamic stability of Euler beams. The beam would become dynamically unstable provided that the parametric point, denoting the relation between load properties and structural frequency, is located in the instability region, no matter whether the wind load component is large or not.

  7. Sulfonated polyetherketone (SPEK-C) films investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Htwe Htwe Yin; YIN Ze-Jie; TANG Shi-Biao; HUANG Huan; ZHU Da-Ming

    2005-01-01

    The characterization of sulfonated polyetherketone (SPEK-C) films was investigated by using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that free volume radius and intensity depend on the variation of sulfonation degree and solvent evaporation time of the films. Pore size and distribution determined from PALS and AFM measurements showed reasonable agreement.

  8. Applications of laser-induced gratings to spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohlfing, E.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program has traditionally emphasized two principal areas of research. The first is the spectroscopic characterization of large-amplitude motion on the ground-state potential surface of small, transient molecules. The second is the reactivity of carbonaceous clusters and its relevance to soot and fullerene formation in combustion. Motivated initially by the desire to find improved methods of obtaining stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of transients, most of our recent work has centered on the use of laser-induced gratings or resonant four-wave mixing in free-jet expansions. These techniques show great promise for several chemical applications, including molecular spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics. The author describes recent applications of two-color laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) to obtain background-free SEP spectra of transients and double resonance spectra of nonfluorescing species, and the use of photofragment transient gratings to probe photodissociation dynamics.

  9. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals, clusters, and ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyeon, Choi

    1999-12-16

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals and ions is studied to characterize the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a special method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states. Branching ratios to various product channels, the translational energy distributions of the fragments, and bond dissociation energies are then determined at selected photon energies. The detailed picture of photodissociation dynamics is provided with the aid of ab initio calculations and a statistical model to interpret the observed data. Important reaction intermediates in combustion reactions have been studied: CCO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}O, and linear C{sub n} (n = 4--6).

  10. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals, clusters, and ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeon [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals and ions is studied to characterize the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a special method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states. Branching ratios to various product channels, the translational energy distributions of the fragments, and bond dissociation energies are then determined at selected photon energies. The detailed picture of photodissociation dynamics is provided with the aid of ab initio calculations and a statistical model to interpret the observed data. Important reaction intermediates in combustion reactions have been studied: CCO, C2H5O, and linear Cn (n = 4--6).

  11. Energy landscape investigation by wavelet transform analysis of atomic force spectroscopy data in a biorecognition experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, Anna Rita

    2016-01-01

    Force fluctuations recorded in an atomic force spectroscopy experiment, during the approach of a tip functionalized with biotin towards a substrate charged with avidin, have been analyzed by a wavelet transform. The observation of strong transient changes only when a specific biorecognition process between the partners takes place suggests a drastic modulation of the force fluctuations when biomolecules recognize each other. Such an analysis allows to investigate the peculiar features of a biorecognition process. These results are discussed in connection with the possible role of energy minima explored by biomolecules during the biorecognition process.

  12. Relationships between Isometric Force-Time Characteristics and Dynamic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dos’Santos

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP force-time characteristics (peak force and time-specific force vales (100–250 ms and dynamic performance and compare dynamic performance between stronger and weaker athletes. Forty-three athletes from different sports (rowing, soccer, bicycle motocross, and hockey performed three trials of the squat jump (SJ, countermovement jump (CMJ, and IMTP, and performed a one repetition maximum power clean (PC. Reactive strength index modified (RSImod was also calculated from the CMJ. Statistically significant large correlations between IMTP force-time characteristics and PC (ρ = 0.569–0.674, p < 0.001, and moderate correlations between IMTP force-time characteristics (excluding force at 100 ms and RSImod (ρ = 0.389–0.449, p = 0.013–0.050 were observed. Only force at 250 ms demonstrated a statistically significant moderate correlation with CMJ height (ρ = 0.346, p = 0.016 and no statistically significant associations were observed between IMTP force-time characteristics and SJ height. Stronger athletes (top 10 demonstrated statistically significantly greater CMJ heights, RSImods, and PCs (p ≤ 0.004, g = 1.32–1.89 compared to weaker (bottom 10 athletes, but no differences in SJ height were observed (p = 0.871, g = 0.06. These findings highlight that the ability to apply rapidly high levels of force in short time intervals is integral for PC, CMJ height, and reactive strength.

  13. Dielectrophoretic positioning of single nanoparticles on atomic force microscope tips for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, Christian; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Singh, Prabha; Wirth, Janina; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, a combination of Raman spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy, is a powerful technique to detect the vibrational fingerprint of molecules at the nanometer scale. A metal nanoparticle at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip leads to a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field when illuminated with an appropriate wavelength, resulting in an increased Raman signal. A controlled positioning of individual nanoparticles at the tip would improve the reproducibility of the probes and is quite demanding due to usually serial and labor-intensive approaches. In contrast to commonly used submicron manipulation techniques, dielectrophoresis allows a parallel and scalable production, and provides a novel approach toward reproducible and at the same time affordable tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tips. We demonstrate the successful positioning of an individual plasmonic nanoparticle on a commercial atomic force microscope tip by dielectrophoresis followed by experimental proof of the Raman signal enhancing capabilities of such tips.

  14. Exploring process dynamics by near infrared spectroscopy in lactic fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Carina; Cieplak, Tomasz; van der Berg, Franciscus Winfried J

    2016-01-01

    In the industrial production of yoghurt, measurement of pH is normally the only in-line technique applied as a real-time monitoring signalfor following the dynamics during the fermentation process. However, every dairy company would benefit from an in-line technique giving information about...... the chemical composition, physical/textural properties and/or microbial contamination. In this study lactic fermentation batches with the starter bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus are explored by in-line near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. The dynamics obtained...

  15. Force-dynamic cultural models in a scalar adjectival construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    'm in a certain group that's almost too old to hire. (COCA 2011 NEWS Denver) (6) Mr. Turman insisted he was too busy to meet at any other time. (COCA 2011 NEWS NYTimes) In all instances, semantic relations of force-dynamics are set up between the adjective and verb positions, such that the adjective describes...

  16. Vertically polarizing undulator with dynamic compensation of magnetic forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strelnikov, N; Vasserman, I; Xu, J; Jensen, D; Schmidt, O; Trakhtenberg, E; Suthar, K; Moog, E. R; Pile, G; Gluskin, E

    2017-01-01

    As part of the R&D program of the LCLS-II project, a novel 3.4-meter-long undulator prototype with horizontal magnetic field and dynamic force compensation has recently been developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS...

  17. Molecular force spectroscopy with a DNA origami-based nanoscopic force clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Philipp C; Wünsch, Bettina; Holzmeister, Phil; Bae, Wooli; Kneer, Luisa M; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip; Liedl, Tim

    2016-10-21

    Forces in biological systems are typically investigated at the single-molecule level with atomic force microscopy or optical and magnetic tweezers, but these techniques suffer from limited data throughput and their requirement for a physical connection to the macroscopic world. We introduce a self-assembled nanoscopic force clamp built from DNA that operates autonomously and allows massive parallelization. Single-stranded DNA sections of an origami structure acted as entropic springs and exerted controlled tension in the low piconewton range on a molecular system, whose conformational transitions were monitored by single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer. We used the conformer switching of a Holliday junction as a benchmark and studied the TATA-binding protein-induced bending of a DNA duplex under tension. The observed suppression of bending above 10 piconewtons provides further evidence of mechanosensitivity in gene regulation.

  18. Structural dynamics in complex liquids studied with multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The development of new sustainable energy sources is linked to our understanding of the molecular properties of water and aqueous solutions. Energy conversion, storage, and transduction processes, particularly those that occur in biology, fuel cells, and batteries, make use of water for the purpose of moving energy in the form of charges and mediating the redox chemistry that allows this energy to be stored as and released from chemical bonds. To build our fundamental knowledge in this area, this project supports work in the Tokmakoff group to investigate the molecular dynamics of water’s hydrogen bond network, and how these dynamics influence its solutes and the mechanism of proton transport in water. To reach the goals of this grant, we developed experiments to observe molecular dynamics in water as directly as possible, using ultrafast multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy. We excite and probe broad vibrational resonances of water, molecular solutes, and protons in water. By correlating how molecules evolve from an initial excitation frequency to a final frequency, we can describe the underlying molecular dynamics. Theoretical modeling of the data with the help of computational spectroscopy coupled with molecular dynamics simulations provided the atomistic insight in these studies.

  19. Forced Fluid Dynamics from Blackfolds in General Supergravity Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Armas, Jay; Niarchos, Vasilis; Obers, Niels A; Pedersen, Andreas Vigand

    2016-01-01

    We present a general treatment of the leading order dynamics of the collective modes of charged dilatonic $p$-brane solutions of (super)gravity theories in arbitrary backgrounds. To this end we employ the general strategy of the blackfold approach which is based on a long-wavelength derivative expansion around an exact or approximate solution of the (super)gravity equations of motion. The resulting collective mode equations are formulated as forced hydrodynamic equations on dynamically embedded hypersurfaces. We derive them in full generality (including all possible asymptotic fluxes and dilaton profiles) in a far-zone analysis of the (super)gravity equations and in representative examples in a near-zone analysis. An independent treatment based on the study of external couplings in hydrostatic partition functions is also presented. Special emphasis is given to the forced collective mode equations that arise in type IIA/B and eleven-dimensional supergravities, where besides the standard Lorentz force couplings...

  20. Nanopuller-open data acquisition platform for AFM force spectroscopy experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Konrad; Strzelecki, Janusz

    2016-05-01

    Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a widely used tool in force spectroscopy studies. Presently, this instrument is accessible from numerous vendors, albeit commercial solutions are expensive and almost always hardware and software closed. Approaches for open setups were published, as with modern low cost and readily available piezoelectric actuators, data acquisition interfaces and optoelectronic components building such force spectroscopy AFM is relatively easy. However, suitable software to control such laboratory made instrument was not released. Developing it in the lab requires significant time and effort. Our Nanopuller software described in this paper is intended to eliminate this obstacle. With only minimum adjustments this program can be used to control and acquire data with any suitable National Instruments universal digital/analog interface and piezoelectric actuator analog controller, giving significant freedom and flexibility in designing force spectroscopy experiment. Since the full code, written in a graphical LabVIEW environment is available, our Nanopuller can be easily customized. In this paper we describe the program and test its performance in controlling different setups. Successful and accurate force curve acquisition for standard samples (single molecules of I27O reference titin polyprotein and DNA as well as red blood cells) is shown.

  1. Nanopuller-open data acquisition platform for AFM force spectroscopy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlak, Konrad; Strzelecki, Janusz

    2016-05-15

    Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a widely used tool in force spectroscopy studies. Presently, this instrument is accessible from numerous vendors, albeit commercial solutions are expensive and almost always hardware and software closed. Approaches for open setups were published, as with modern low cost and readily available piezoelectric actuators, data acquisition interfaces and optoelectronic components building such force spectroscopy AFM is relatively easy. However, suitable software to control such laboratory made instrument was not released. Developing it in the lab requires significant time and effort. Our Nanopuller software described in this paper is intended to eliminate this obstacle. With only minimum adjustments this program can be used to control and acquire data with any suitable National Instruments universal digital/analog interface and piezoelectric actuator analog controller, giving significant freedom and flexibility in designing force spectroscopy experiment. Since the full code, written in a graphical LabVIEW environment is available, our Nanopuller can be easily customized. In this paper we describe the program and test its performance in controlling different setups. Successful and accurate force curve acquisition for standard samples (single molecules of I27O reference titin polyprotein and DNA as well as red blood cells) is shown. - Highlights: • We created open data acquisition software for performing Atomic Force Microscopy force measurements with custom laboratory made setups. • The software allows large flexibility in atomic force microscope design with minimum adjustment necessary. • The software is written in LabVIEW, allowing easy customization. • We successfully tested the program on two different hardware configurations by stretching single macromolecules and indenting cells.

  2. Estimation of the shear force in transverse dynamic force microscopy using a sliding mode observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thang Nguyen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of estimating the shear force affecting the tip of the cantilever in a Transverse Dynamic Force Microscope (TDFM using a real-time implementable sliding mode observer is addressed. The behaviour of a vertically oriented oscillated cantilever, in close proximity to a specimen surface, facilitates the imaging of the specimen at nano-metre scale. Distance changes between the cantilever tip and the specimen can be inferred from the oscillation amplitudes, but also from the shear force acting at the tip. Thus, the problem of accurately estimating the shear force is of significance when specimen images and mechanical properties need to be obtained at submolecular precision. A low order dynamic model of the cantilever is derived using the method of lines, for the purpose of estimating the shear force. Based on this model, an estimator using sliding mode techniques is presented to reconstruct the unknown shear force, from only tip position measurements and knowledge of the excitation signal applied to the top of the cantilever. Comparisons to methods assuming a quasi-static harmonic balance are made.

  3. Taking Nanomedicine Teaching into Practice with Atomic Force Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic…

  4. Taking Nanomedicine Teaching into Practice with Atomic Force Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic…

  5. Modeling of Dynamic Fluid Forces in Fast Switching Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen;

    2015-01-01

    Switching valves experience opposing fluid forces due to movement of the moving member itself, as the surrounding fluid volume must move to accommodate the movement. This movement-induced fluid force may be divided into three main components; the added mass term, the viscous term and the socalled...... history term. For general valve geometries there are no simple solution to either of these terms. During development and design of such switching valves, it is therefore, common practice to use simple models to describe the opposing fluid forces, neglecting all but the viscous term which is determined...... based on shearing areas and venting channels. For fast acting valves the opposing fluid force may retard the valve performance significantly, if appropriate measures are not taken during the valve design. Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are available to simulate the total fluid...

  6. Refolding dynamics of stretched biopolymers upon force quench

    CERN Document Server

    Hyeon, Changbong; Pincus, David L; Thirumalai, D

    2009-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy methods can be used to generate folding trajectories of biopolymers from arbitrary regions of the folding landscape. We illustrate the complexity of the folding kinetics and generic aspects of the collapse of RNA and proteins upon force quench, using simulations of an RNA hairpin and theory based on the de Gennes model for homopolymer collapse. The folding time, $\\tau_F$, depends asymmetrically on $\\delta f_S = f_S - f_m$ and $\\delta f_Q = f_m - f_Q$ where $f_S$ ($f_Q$) is the stretch (quench) force, and $f_m$ is the transition mid-force of the RNA hairpin. In accord with experiments, the relaxation kinetics of the molecular extension, $R(t)$, occurs in three stages: a rapid initial decrease in the extension is followed by a plateau, and finally an abrupt reduction in $R(t)$ that occurs as the native state is approached. The duration of the plateau increases as $\\lambda =\\tau_Q/\\tau_F$ decreases (where $\\tau_Q$ is the time in which the force is reduced from $f_S$ to $f_Q$). ...

  7. High-Resolution Force Balance Analyses of Tidewater Glacier Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderlin, E. M.; Hamilton, G. S.; O'Neel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in glacier velocity, thickness, and terminus position have been used to infer the dynamic response of tidewater glaciers to environmental perturbations, yet few analyses have attempted to quantify the associated variations in the glacier force balance. Where repeat high-resolution ice thickness and velocity estimates are available, force balance time series can be constructed to investigate the redistribution of driving and resistive forces associated with changes in terminus position. Comparative force balance analyses may, therefore, help us understand the variable dynamic response observed for glaciers in close proximity to each other. Here we construct force balance time series for Helheim Glacier, SE Greenland, and Columbia Glacier, SE Alaska, to investigate differences in dynamic sensitivity to terminus position change. The analysis relies on in situ and remotely sensed observations of ice thickness, velocity, and terminus position. Ice thickness time series are obtained from stereo satellite image-derived surface elevation and continuity-derived bed elevations that are constrained by airborne radar observations. Surface velocity time series are obtained from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations. Approximately daily terminus positions are from a combination of satellite images and terrestrial time-lapse photographs. Helheim and Columbia glaciers are two of the best-studied Arctic tidewater glaciers with comprehensive high-resolution observational time series, yet we find that bed elevation uncertainties and poorly-constrained stress-coupling length estimates still hinder the analysis of spatial and temporal force balance variations. Here we use a new observationally-based method to estimate the stress-coupling length which successfully reduces noise in the derived force balance but preserves spatial variations that can be over-smoothed when estimating the stress-coupling length as a scalar function of the ice thickness

  8. Dynamics of poly(vinyl methyl ketone) thin films studied by local dielectric spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalini, R.; Labardi, M.; Roland, C. M.

    2017-05-01

    Local dielectric spectroscopy, which entails measuring the change in resonance frequency of the conducting tip of an atomic force microscope to determine the complex permittivity of a sample with high spatial (lateral) resolution, was employed to characterize the dynamics of thin films of poly(vinyl methyl ketone) (PVMK) having different substrate and top surface layers. A free surface yields the usual speeding up of the segmental dynamics, corresponding to a glass transition suppression of 6.5° for 18 nm film thickness. This result is unaffected by the presence of a glassy, compatible polymer, poly-4-vinyl phenol (PVPh), between the metal substrate and the PVMK. However, covering the top surface with a thin layer of the PVPh suppresses the dynamics. The speeding up of PVMK segmental motions observed for a free surface is absent due to interfacial interactions of the PVMK with the glass layer, an effect not seen when the top layer is an incompatible polymer.

  9. Nanobiosensors exploiting specific interactions between an enzyme and herbicides in atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Aline C N; Deda, Daiana K; Bueno, Carolina C; Moraes, Ariana S; Da Roz, Alessandra L; Yamaji, Fabio M; Prado, Rogilene A; Viviani, Vadim; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Leite, Fábio L

    2014-09-01

    The development of sensitive methodologies for detecting agrochemicals has become important in recent years due to the increasingly indiscriminate use of these substances. In this context, nanosensors based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are useful because they provide higher sensitivity with operation at the nanometer scale. In this paper we exploit specific interactions between AFM tips functionalized with the enzyme acetolactate synthase (ALS) to detect the ALS-inhibitor herbicides metsulfuron-methyl and imazaquin. Using atomic force spectroscopy (AFS) we could measure the adhesion force between tip and substrate, which was considerably higher when the ALS-functionalized tip (nanobiosensor) was employed. The increase was approximately 250% and 160% for metsulfuron-methyl and imazaquin, respectively, in comparison to unfunctionalized probes. We estimated the specific enzyme-herbicide force by assuming that the measured force comprises an adhesion force according to the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model, the capillary force and the specific force. We show that the specific, biorecognition force plays a crucial role in the higher sensitivity of the nanobiosensor, thus opening the way for the design of similarly engineered tips for detecting herbicides and other analytes.

  10. The structure and function of cell membranes examined by atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda

    2015-06-07

    The cell membrane is one of the most complicated biological complexes, and long-term fierce debates regarding the cell membrane persist because of technical hurdles. With the rapid development of nanotechnology and single-molecule techniques, our understanding of cell membranes has substantially increased. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has provided several unprecedented advances (e.g., high resolution, three-dimensional and in situ measurements) in the study of cell membranes and has been used to systematically dissect the membrane structure in situ from both sides of membranes; as a result, novel models of cell membranes have recently been proposed. This review summarizes the new progress regarding membrane structure using in situ AFM and single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), which may shed light on the study of the structure and functions of cell membranes.

  11. Sequential reconstruction of driving-forces from nonlinear nonstationary dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güntürkün, Ulaş

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes a functional analysis-based method for the estimation of driving-forces from nonlinear dynamic systems. The driving-forces account for the perturbation inputs induced by the external environment or the secular variations in the internal variables of the system. The proposed algorithm is applicable to the problems for which there is too little or no prior knowledge to build a rigorous mathematical model of the unknown dynamics. We derive the estimator conditioned on the differentiability of the unknown system’s mapping, and smoothness of the driving-force. The proposed algorithm is an adaptive sequential realization of the blind prediction error method, where the basic idea is to predict the observables, and retrieve the driving-force from the prediction error. Our realization of this idea is embodied by predicting the observables one-step into the future using a bank of echo state networks (ESN) in an online fashion, and then extracting the raw estimates from the prediction error and smoothing these estimates in two adaptive filtering stages. The adaptive nature of the algorithm enables to retrieve both slowly and rapidly varying driving-forces accurately, which are illustrated by simulations. Logistic and Moran-Ricker maps are studied in controlled experiments, exemplifying chaotic state and stochastic measurement models. The algorithm is also applied to the estimation of a driving-force from another nonlinear dynamic system that is stochastic in both state and measurement equations. The results are judged by the posterior Cramer-Rao lower bounds. The method is finally put into test on a real-world application; extracting sun’s magnetic flux from the sunspot time series.

  12. Macromolecular Dynamics in Red Blood Cells Investigated Using Neutron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadler, Andreas Maximilian; Demmel, Franz; Artmann, Gerhard; 10.1098/rsif.2010.0306

    2011-01-01

    We present neutron scattering measurements on the dynamics of hemoglobin (Hb) in human red blood cells in vivo. Global and internal Hb dynamics were measured in the ps to ns time- and {\\AA} length-scale using quasielastic neutron backscattering spectroscopy. We observed the cross-over from global Hb short-time to long-time self-diffusion. Both short- and long-time diffusion coefficients agree quantitatively with predicted values from hydrodynamic theory of non-charged hard-sphere suspensions when a bound water fraction of around 0.23g H2O/ g Hb is taken into account. The higher amount of water in the cells facilitates internal protein fluctuations in the ps time-scale when compared to fully hydrated Hb powder. Slower internal dynamics of Hb in red blood cells in the ns time-range were found to be rather similar to results obtained with fully hydrated protein powders, solutions and E. coli cells.

  13. Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of fibrin 'A-a' polymerization interactions via the atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averett, Laurel E.

    Fibrin, the polymerized form of the soluble plasma protein fibrinogen, plays a critical role in hemostasis as the structural scaffold of blood clots. The primary functions of fibrin are to withstand the shear forces of blood flow and provide mechanical stability to the clot, protecting the wound. While studies have investigated the mechanical properties of fibrin constructs, the response to force of critical polymerization interactions such as the 'A--a' knob--hole interaction remains unclear. Herein, the response of the 'A--a' bond to force was examined at the single-molecule level using the atomic force microscope. Force spectroscopy methodology was developed to examine the 'A--a' interaction while reducing the incidence of both nonspecific and multiple molecule interactions. The rupture of this interaction resulted in a previously unreported characteristic force profile comprised of up to four events. We hypothesized that the first event represented reorientation of the fibrinogen molecule, the second and third represented unfolding of structures in the D region of fibrinogen, and the last event was the rupture of the 'A--a' bond weakened by prior structural unfolding. The configuration, molecular extension, and kinetic parameters of each event in the characteristic pattern were examined to compare the unfolding of fibrin to other proteins unfolded by force. Fitting the pattern with polymer models showed that the D region of fibrinogen could lengthen by ˜50% of the length of a fibrin monomer before rupture of the 'A--a' bond. Analysis showed that the second and third events had kinetic parameters similar to other protein structures unfolded by force. Studies of the dependence of the characteristic pattern on calcium, concentration of sodium chloride, pH, and temperature demonstrated that the incidence of the last event was affected by solution conditions. However, only low pH and high temperatures reduced the probability that an interaction was characteristic

  14. Diversity of Chemical Mechanisms in Thioredoxin Catalysis Revealed by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Li, Jingyuan; Kosuri, Pallav; Sanchez-Romero, Inmaculada; Wiita, Arun P.; Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Chueca, Ana; Holmgren, Arne; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio; Becker, Katja; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Beckwith, Jon; Gelhaye, Eric; Jacquot, Jean P.; Gaucher, Eric; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.; Berne, Bruce J.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2009-01-01

    Thioredoxins are oxido-reductase enzymes present in all organisms, catalyzing the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins. By applying a calibrated force to a substrate disulfide, the chemical mechanisms of Trx catalysis can be examined in detail at the single molecule level. Here we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to explore the chemical evolution of Trx catalysis by probing the chemistry of eight different thioredoxin enzymes. While all Trxs show a characteristic Michaelis-Menten mechanism detected when the disulfide bond is stretched at low forces, two different chemical behaviors distinguish bacterial from eukaryotic-origin Trxs at high forces. Eukaryotic-origin Trxs reduce disulfide bonds through a single-electron transfer reaction (SET) whereas bacterial-origin Trxs exhibit both nucleophilic substitution (SN2) and SET reactions. A computational analysis of Trx structures identifies the evolution of the binding groove as an important factor controlling the chemistry of Trx catalysis. PMID:19597482

  15. Signatures of hydrophobic collapse in extended proteins captured with force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Kirstin A.; Gräter, Frauke; Dougan, Lorna; Badilla, Carmen L.; Berne, Bruce J.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2007-01-01

    We unfold and extend single proteins at a high force and then linearly relax the force to probe their collapse mechanisms. We observe a large variability in the extent of their recoil. Although chain entropy makes a small contribution, we show that the observed variability results from hydrophobic interactions with randomly varying magnitude from protein to protein. This collapse mechanism is common to highly extended proteins, including nonfolding elastomeric proteins like PEVK from titin. Our observations explain the puzzling differences between the folding behavior of highly extended proteins, from those folding after chemical or thermal denaturation. Probing the collapse of highly extended proteins with force spectroscopy allows separation of the different driving forces in protein folding. PMID:17470816

  16. Dynamic stability of repulsive-force maglev suspension systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Wang, Z. [and others

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the research performed on maglev vehicle dynamic stability at Argonne National Laboratory during the past few years. It also documents both measured and calculated magnetic-force data. Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all maglev systems. This report presents dynamic stability experiments on maglev systems and compares the results with predictions calculated by a nonlinear-dynamics computer code. Instabilities of an electrodynamic-suspension system type vehicle model were obtained by experimental observation and computer simulation of a five-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle moving on a guideway that consists of a pair of L-shaped aluminum conductors attached to a rotating wheel. The experimental and theoretical analyses developed in this study identify basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  17. Structure and Nanomechanics of Model Membranes by Atomic Force Microscopy and Spectroscopy: Insights into the Role of Cholesterol and Sphingolipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Gumí-Audenis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes mediate several biological processes that are directly associated with their physical properties but sometimes difficult to evaluate. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs are model systems widely used to characterize the structure of biological membranes. Cholesterol (Chol plays an essential role in the modulation of membrane physical properties. It directly influences the order and mechanical stability of the lipid bilayers, and it is known to laterally segregate in rafts in the outer leaflet of the membrane together with sphingolipids (SLs. Atomic force microscope (AFM is a powerful tool as it is capable to sense and apply forces with high accuracy, with distance and force resolution at the nanoscale, and in a controlled environment. AFM-based force spectroscopy (AFM-FS has become a crucial technique to study the nanomechanical stability of SLBs by controlling the liquid media and the temperature variations. In this contribution, we review recent AFM and AFM-FS studies on the effect of Chol on the morphology and mechanical properties of model SLBs, including complex bilayers containing SLs. We also introduce a promising combination of AFM and X-ray (XR techniques that allows for in situ characterization of dynamic processes, providing structural, morphological, and nanomechanical information.

  18. Structure and Nanomechanics of Model Membranes by Atomic Force Microscopy and Spectroscopy: Insights into the Role of Cholesterol and Sphingolipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumí-Audenis, Berta; Costa, Luca; Carlá, Francesco; Comin, Fabio; Sanz, Fausto; Giannotti, Marina I.

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes mediate several biological processes that are directly associated with their physical properties but sometimes difficult to evaluate. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are model systems widely used to characterize the structure of biological membranes. Cholesterol (Chol) plays an essential role in the modulation of membrane physical properties. It directly influences the order and mechanical stability of the lipid bilayers, and it is known to laterally segregate in rafts in the outer leaflet of the membrane together with sphingolipids (SLs). Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool as it is capable to sense and apply forces with high accuracy, with distance and force resolution at the nanoscale, and in a controlled environment. AFM-based force spectroscopy (AFM-FS) has become a crucial technique to study the nanomechanical stability of SLBs by controlling the liquid media and the temperature variations. In this contribution, we review recent AFM and AFM-FS studies on the effect of Chol on the morphology and mechanical properties of model SLBs, including complex bilayers containing SLs. We also introduce a promising combination of AFM and X-ray (XR) techniques that allows for in situ characterization of dynamic processes, providing structural, morphological, and nanomechanical information. PMID:27999368

  19. Structure and Nanomechanics of Model Membranes by Atomic Force Microscopy and Spectroscopy: Insights into the Role of Cholesterol and Sphingolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumí-Audenis, Berta; Costa, Luca; Carlá, Francesco; Comin, Fabio; Sanz, Fausto; Giannotti, Marina I

    2016-12-19

    Biological membranes mediate several biological processes that are directly associated with their physical properties but sometimes difficult to evaluate. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are model systems widely used to characterize the structure of biological membranes. Cholesterol (Chol) plays an essential role in the modulation of membrane physical properties. It directly influences the order and mechanical stability of the lipid bilayers, and it is known to laterally segregate in rafts in the outer leaflet of the membrane together with sphingolipids (SLs). Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool as it is capable to sense and apply forces with high accuracy, with distance and force resolution at the nanoscale, and in a controlled environment. AFM-based force spectroscopy (AFM-FS) has become a crucial technique to study the nanomechanical stability of SLBs by controlling the liquid media and the temperature variations. In this contribution, we review recent AFM and AFM-FS studies on the effect of Chol on the morphology and mechanical properties of model SLBs, including complex bilayers containing SLs. We also introduce a promising combination of AFM and X-ray (XR) techniques that allows for in situ characterization of dynamic processes, providing structural, morphological, and nanomechanical information.

  20. Refolding dynamics of stretched biopolymers upon force quench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyeon, Changbong; Morrison, Greg; Pincus, David L.; Thirumalai, D.

    2009-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy methods can be used to generate folding trajectories of biopolymers from arbitrary regions of the folding landscape. We illustrate the complexity of the folding kinetics and generic aspects of the collapse of RNA and proteins upon force quench by using simulations of an RNA hairpin and theory based on the de Gennes model for homopolymer collapse. The folding time, τF, depends asymmetrically on δfS = f S − f m and δf Q = f m − f Q where f S (f Q) is the stretch (quench) force and f m is the transition midforce of the RNA hairpin. In accord with experiments, the relaxation kinetics of the molecular extension, R(t), occurs in three stages: A rapid initial decrease in the extension is followed by a plateau and finally, an abrupt reduction in R(t) occurs as the native state is approached. The duration of the plateau increases as λ = τ Q/τ F decreases (where τ Q is the time in which the force is reduced from f S to f Q). Variations in the mechanisms of force-quench relaxation as λ is altered are reflected in the experimentally measurable time-dependent entropy, which is computed directly from the folding trajectories. An analytical solution of the de Gennes model under tension reproduces the multistage stage kinetics in R(t). The prediction that the initial stages of collapse should also be a generic feature of polymers is validated by simulation of the kinetics of toroid (globule) formation in semiflexible (flexible) homopolymers in poor solvents upon quenching the force from a fully stretched state. Our findings give a unified explanation for multiple disparate experimental observations of protein folding. PMID:19915145

  1. [Tension force in dynamic splints made of neoprene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsola-Izard, V; Rouzaud, J C; Thomas, D; Lluch; Garcia-Elias

    2001-06-01

    Dynamic splints are the most difficult ortheses to make. Unrestricted finger joint mobility is usually prevented by the size of their components. Ortheses made out of neoprene material have the advantage of being pliable and at the same time can be constructed as dynamic splints. Neoprene material elasticity allows conforming it into a tube that can be fitted over a finger, spreading uniform pressure. A traction slip can be cemented to the neoprene finger tube. With neoprene splints, lever arms are more efficient. Their tubular design applies and spreads traction and countertraction forces in all directions. Neoprene material's elasticity contributes in reducing edema formation as well as distributes forces applied to the finger over a large area. The risk of excessive pressure is the only drawback of an elastic tubular design, it may cause pain and tissue ischemia. A meticulous tailoring prevents this potential risk.

  2. Forced dynamic position control of PMSM with DTC utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Michal

    2012-11-01

    Almost one and a half century after the publication of Maxwell’s On Governors, feedback theory with PID controllers in cascade structure is still an essential part of control structures of most controlled electric drives. There are a few control strategies which are “ready” to replace it but they usually miss one of the essential fundamentals of every successful approach - simplicity hand in hand with lucidity. But there is one close relative which is simple and powerful at the same time, is not excessively abstract and without complicated mathematics. The name of this technique is Forced Dynamic Control. In this paper forced dynamic control is presented together with direct torque controlled PMSM drive as unique combination of simple algorithms for inner and outer loop of cascade structure.

  3. Monitoring RNA release from human rhinovirus by dynamic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienberger, Ferry; Zhu, Rong; Moser, Rosita; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2004-04-01

    Human rhinoviruses were imaged under physiological conditions by dynamic force microscopy. Topographical images revealed various polygonal areas on the surfaces of the 30-nm viral particles. RNA release was initiated by exposure to a low-pH buffer. The lengths of the RNAs that were released but still connected to the virus capsid varied between 40 and 330 nm, whereas RNA molecules that were completely released from the virus were observed with lengths up to 1 micro m. Fork-like structure elements with 30-nm extensions were sometimes resolved at one end of the RNA molecules. They possibly correspond to the characteristic multi-stem-loop conformation, the internal ribosomal entry site, located at the 5' region of the genome. This study demonstrates that dynamic force microscopy can be used to study viral RNA release in situ under physiological conditions.

  4. Evaluation of the sensing block method for dynamic force measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghui; Chen, Hao; Li, Wenzhao; Song, Li

    2017-01-01

    Sensing block method was proposed for the dynamic force measurement by Tanimura et al. in 1994. Comparing with the Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique, it can provide a much longer measuring time for the dynamic properties test of materials. However, the signals recorded by sensing block are always accompanied with additional oscillations. Tanimura et al. discussed the effect of force rising edge on the test results, whereas more research is still needed. In this paper, some more dominant factors have been extracted through dimensional analysis. The finite element simulation has been performed to assess these factors. Base on the analysis and simulation, some valuable results are obtained and some criterions proposed in this paper can be applied in design or selection of the sensing block.

  5. Unraveling protein-protein interactions in clathrin assemblies via atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Albert J; Lafer, Eileen M; Peng, Jennifer Q; Smith, Paul D; Nossal, Ralph

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and single particle force spectroscopy (SPFS) are used to characterize intermolecular interactions and domain structures of clathrin triskelia and clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). The latter are involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) and other trafficking pathways. Here, we subject individual triskelia, bovine-brain CCVs, and reconstituted clathrin-AP180 coats to AFM-SMFS and AFM-SPFS pulling experiments and apply novel analytics to extract force-extension relations from very large data sets. The spectroscopic fingerprints of these samples differ markedly, providing important new information about the mechanism of CCV uncoating. For individual triskelia, SMFS reveals a series of events associated with heavy chain alpha-helix hairpin unfolding, as well as cooperative unraveling of several hairpin domains. SPFS of clathrin assemblies exposes weaker clathrin-clathrin interactions that are indicative of inter-leg association essential for RME and intracellular trafficking. Clathrin-AP180 coats are energetically easier to unravel than the coats of CCVs, with a non-trivial dependence on force-loading rate.

  6. Dynamic force microscopy for imaging of viruses under physiological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kienberger Ferry

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic force microscopy (DFM allows imaging of the structure and the assessment of the function of biological specimens in their physiological environment. In DFM, the cantilever is oscillated at a given frequency and touches the sample only at the end of its downward movement. Accordingly, the problem of lateral forces displacing or even destroying bio-molecules is virtually inexistent as the contact time and friction forces are reduced. Here, we describe the use of DFM in studies of human rhinovirus serotype 2 (HRV2 weakly adhering to mica surfaces. The capsid of HRV2 was reproducibly imaged without any displacement of the virus. Release of the genomic RNA from the virions was initiated by exposure to low pH buffer and snapshots of the extrusion process were obtained. In the following, the technical details of previous DFM investigations of HRV2 are summarized.

  7. Single-molecule force-conductance spectroscopy of hydrogen-bonded complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro; De Vico, Luca; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2017-01-01

    The emerging ability to study physical properties at the single-molecule limit highlights the disparity between what is observable in an ensemble of molecules and the heterogeneous contributions of its constituent parts. A particularly convenient platform for single-molecule studies are molecular...... junctions where forces and voltages can be applied to individual molecules, giving access to a series of electromechanical observables that can form the basis of highly discriminating multidimensional single-molecule spectroscopies. Here, we computationally examine the ability of force and conductance...

  8. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  9. Supramolecular Chemistry and Mechanochemistry of Macromolecules: Recent Advances by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bo; Cui, Shuxun

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was invented in the 1990s. Since then, SMFS has been developed into a powerful tool to study the inter- and intra-molecular interactions of macromolecules. Using SMFS, a number of problems in the field of supramolecular chemistry and mechanochemistry have been studied at the single-molecule level, which are not accessible by traditional ensemble characterization methods. In this review, the principles of SMFS are introduced, followed by the discussion of several problems of contemporary interest at the interface of supramolecular chemistry and mechanochemistry of macromolecules, including single-chain elasticity of macromolecules, interactions between water and macromolecules, interactions between macromolecules and solid surface, and the interactions in supramolecular polymers.

  10. Subharmonic Oscillations and Chaos in Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of dynamic atomic force microscopy (d-AFM) for nanoscale materials characterization calls for a deeper understanding of the cantilever dynamics influencing scan stability, predictability, and image quality. Model development is critical to such understanding. Renormalization of the equations governing d- AFM provides a simple interpretation of cantilever dynamics as a single spring and mass system with frequency dependent cantilever stiffness and damping parameters. The renormalized model is sufficiently robust to predict the experimentally observed splitting of the free-space cantilever resonance into multiple resonances upon cantilever-sample contact. Central to the model is the representation of the cantilever sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients F(sub ij) (i,j = 0, 1, 2) that account for the effective interaction stiffness parameter, the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Application of the Melnikov method to the model equation is shown to predict a homoclinic bifurcation of the Smale horseshoe type leading to a cascade of period doublings with increasing drive displacement amplitude culminating in chaos and loss of image quality. The threshold value of the drive displacement amplitude necessary to initiate subharmonic generation depends on the acoustic drive frequency, the effective damping coefficient, and the nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force. For parameter values leading to displacement amplitudes below threshold for homoclinic bifurcation other bifurcation scenarios can occur, some of which lead to chaos.

  11. Harmonic Force Spectroscopy measures load-dependent kinetics of individual human β-cardiac myosin molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Mortensen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Molecular motors are responsible for numerous cellular processes from cargo transport to heart contraction. Their interactions with other cellular components are often transient and exhibit kinetics that depend on load. Here, we measure such interactions using ‘harmonic force spectroscopy...... concentration. We show that a molecule’s ADP release rate depends exponentially on the applied load, in qualitative agreement with cardiac muscle, which contracts with a velocity inversely proportional to external load....

  12. Satellite Dynamic Damping via Active Force Control Augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2012-07-01

    An approach that incorporates the Active Force Control (AFC) technique into a conventional Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a satellite active dynamic damping towards a full attitude control. The AFC method has been established to facilitate a robust motion control of dynamical systems in the presence of disturbances, parametric uncertainties and changes that are commonly prevalent in the real-world environment. The usefulness of the method can be extended by introducing intelligent mechanisms to approximate the mass or inertia matrix of the dynamic system to trigger the compensation effect of the controller. AFC is a technique that relies on the appropriate estimation of the inertial or mass parameters of the dynamic system and the measurements of the acceleration and force signals induced by the system if practical implementation is ever considered. In AFC, it is shown that the system subjected to a number of disturbances remains stable and robust via the compensating action of the control strategy. We demonstrate that it is possible to design a spacecraft attitude feedback controller that will ensure the system dynamics set point remains unchanged even in the presence of the disturbances provided that the actual disturbances can be modeled effectively. In order to further facilitate this analysis, a combined energy and attitude control system (CEACS) is proposed as a model satellite attitude control actuator. All the governing equations are established and the proposed satellite attitude control architecture is made amenable to numerical treatments. The results show that the PD-AFC attitude damping performances are superiorly better than that of the solely PD type. It is also shown that the tunings of the AFC system gains are crucial to ensure a better attitude damping performance and this process is mandatory for AFC systems. Finally, the results demonstrate an important satellite dynamic damping enhancement capability using the AFC

  13. Minimizing tip-sample forces and enhancing sensitivity in atomic force microscopy with dynamically compliant cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvani, Aliasghar; Sadeghian, Hamed; Tamer, Mehmet Selman; Goosen, Johannes Frans Loodewijk; van Keulen, Fred

    2017-06-01

    Due to the harmonic motion of the cantilever in Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy, it is seemingly impossible to estimate the tip-sample interactions from the motion of the cantilever. Not directly observing the interaction force, it is possible to damage the surface or the tip by applying an excessive mechanical load. The tip-sample interactions scale with the effective stiffness of the probe. Thus, the reduction of the mechanical load is usually limited by the manufacturability of low stiffness probes. However, the one-to-one relationship between spring constant and applied force only holds when higher modes of the cantilever are not excited. In this paper, it is shown that, by passively tuning higher modes of the cantilever, it is possible to reduce the peak repulsive force. These tuned probes can be dynamically more compliant than conventional probes with the same static spring constant. Both theoretical and experimental results show that a proper tuning of dynamic modes of cantilevers reduces the contact load and increases the sensitivity considerably. Moreover, due to the contribution of higher modes, the tuned cantilevers provide more information on the tip-sample interaction. This extra information from the higher harmonics can be used for mapping and possibly identification of material properties of samples.

  14. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  15. A broadband x-ray imaging spectroscopy with high-angular resolution: the FORCE mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koji; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Okajima, Takashi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Matsumoto, Hironori; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Zhang, William W.

    2016-07-01

    We are proposing FORCE (Focusing On Relativistic universe and Cosmic Evolution) as a future Japan-lead Xray observatory to be launched in the mid 2020s. Hitomi (ASTRO-H) possesses a suite of sensitive instruments enabling the highest energy-resolution spectroscopy in soft X-ray band, a broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy in soft and hard X-ray bands, and further high energy coverage up to soft gamma-ray band. FORCE is the direct successor to the broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy aspect of Hitomi (ASTRO-H) with significantly higher angular resolution. The current design of FORCE defines energy band pass of 1-80 keV with angular resolution of black holes" in various mass-scales: "buried supermassive black holes (SMBHs)" (> 104 M⊙) residing in the center of galaxies in a cosmological distance, "intermediate-mass black holes" (102-104 M⊙) acting as the possible seeds from which SMBHs grow, and "orphan stellar-mass black holes" (mirror and wide-band X-ray detector. The focal length is currently planned to be 10 m. The silicon mirror with multi-layer coating is our primary choice to achieve lightweight, good angular optics. The detector is a descendant of hard X-ray imager onboard Hitomi (ASTRO-H) replacing its silicon strip detector with SOI-CMOS silicon pixel detector, allowing an extension of the low energy threshold down to 1 keV or even less.

  16. Force spectroscopy of hyaluronan by atomic force microscopy: from hydrogen-bonded networks toward single-chain behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Marina I; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Vancso, G Julius

    2007-09-01

    The conformational behavior of hyaluronan (HA) polysaccharide chains in aqueous NaCl solution was characterized directly at the single-molecule level. This communication reports on one of the first single-chain atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed at variable temperatures, investigating the influence of the temperature on the stability of the HA single-chain conformation. Through AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy, the temperature destabilization of a local structure was proven. This structure involved a hydrogen-bonded network along the polymeric chain, with hydrogen bonds between the polar groups of HA and possibly water, and a change from a nonrandom coil to a random coil behavior was observed when increasing the temperature from 29 +/- 1 to 46 +/- 1 degrees C. As a result of the applied force, this superstructure was found to break progressively at room temperature. The use of a hydrogen-bonding breaker solvent demonstrated the hydrogen-bonded water-bridged nature of the network structure of HA single chains in aqueous NaCl solution.

  17. Frequency adaptation for enhanced radiation force amplitude in dynamic elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouared, Abderrahmane; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Kazemirad, Siavash; Gaboury, Louis; Robidoux, André; Cloutier, Guy

    2015-08-01

    In remote dynamic elastography, the amplitude of the generated displacement field is directly related to the amplitude of the radiation force. Therefore, displacement improvement for better tissue characterization requires the optimization of the radiation force amplitude by increasing the push duration and/or the excitation amplitude applied on the transducer. The main problem of these approaches is that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) thresholds for medical applications and transducer limitations may be easily exceeded. In the present study, the effect of the frequency used for the generation of the radiation force on the amplitude of the displacement field was investigated. We found that amplitudes of displacements generated by adapted radiation force sequences were greater than those generated by standard nonadapted ones (i.e., single push acoustic radiation force impulse and supersonic shear imaging). Gains in magnitude were between 20 to 158% for in vitro measurements on agar-gelatin phantoms, and 170 to 336% for ex vivo measurements on a human breast sample, depending on focus depths and attenuations of tested samples. The signal-to-noise ratio was also improved more than 4-fold with adapted sequences. We conclude that frequency adaptation is a complementary technique that is efficient for the optimization of displacement amplitudes. This technique can be used safely to optimize the deposited local acoustic energy without increasing the risk of damaging tissues and transducer elements.

  18. Forced versus coupled dynamics in Earth system modelling and prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Knopf

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We compare coupled nonlinear climate models and their simplified forced counterparts with respect to predictability and phase space topology. Various types of uncertainty plague climate change simulation, which is, in turn, a crucial element of Earth System modelling. Since the currently preferred strategy for simulating the climate system, or the Earth System at large, is the coupling of sub-system modules (representing, e.g. atmosphere, oceans, global vegetation, this paper explicitly addresses the errors and indeterminacies generated by the coupling procedure. The focus is on a comparison of forced dynamics as opposed to fully, i.e. intrinsically, coupled dynamics. The former represents a particular type of simulation, where the time behaviour of one complex systems component is prescribed by data or some other external information source. Such a simplifying technique is often employed in Earth System models in order to save computing resources, in particular when massive model inter-comparisons need to be carried out. Our contribution to the debate is based on the investigation of two representative model examples, namely (i a low-dimensional coupled atmosphere-ocean simulator, and (ii a replica-like simulator embracing corresponding components.Whereas in general the forced version (ii is able to mimic its fully coupled counterpart (i, we show in this paper that for a considerable fraction of parameter- and state-space, the two approaches qualitatively differ. Here we take up a phenomenon concerning the predictability of coupled versus forced models that was reported earlier in this journal: the observation that the time series of the forced version display artificial predictive skill. We present an explanation in terms of nonlinear dynamical theory. In particular we observe an intermittent version of artificial predictive skill, which we call on-off synchronization, and trace it back to the appearance of unstable periodic orbits. We also

  19. Dynamics and Morphology of Sulfonated Polystyrene Ionomers by Dielectric Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Alicia; Wang, Wenqin; Winey, Karen I.; Runt, James

    2009-03-01

    The dynamics of sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) ionomers, in both the acid and neutralized forms, were investigated using broadband dielectric spectroscopy. The influences of acid content, counterion type (Zn, Na and Cs), degree of neutralization, and microphase separated morphology on segmental and local dynamics, as well as on Maxwell -- Wagner -- Sillars interfacial polarization, were examined. Ionomers prepared from SPS containing 1.9 mol% sulfonic acid species exhibit a broader segmental process indicative of a considerably broader distribution of local environments, as compared to those in unneutralized SPS. Moreover, multiple segmental relaxations were identified in the dielectric spectra of Zn and Na neutralized SPS (1.9 mol%) ionomers, likely indicating two distinct environments arising from ion clustering. A combination of STEM imaging and X-ray scattering confirmed the presence of monodisperse spherical ionic aggregates that were homogeneously distributed in the polymer matrix.

  20. Bimolecular reaction dynamics from photoelectron spectroscopy of negative ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradforth, S.E.

    1992-11-01

    The transition state region of a neutral bimolecular reaction may be experimentally investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy of an appropriate negative ion. The photoelectron spectrum provides information on the spectroscopy and dynamics of the short lived transition state and may be used to develop model potential energy surfaces that are semi-quantitative in this important region. The principles of bound {yields} bound negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy are illustrated by way of an example: a full analysis of the photoelectron bands of CN{sup {minus}}, NCO{sup {minus}} and NCS{sup {minus}}. Transition state photoelectron spectra are presented for the following systems Br + HI, Cl + HI, F + HI, F + CH{sub 3}0H,F + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH,F + OH and F + H{sub 2}. A time dependent framework for the simulation and interpretation of the bound {yields} free transition state photoelectron spectra is subsequently developed and applied to the hydrogen transfer reactions Br + HI, F + OH {yields} O({sup 3}P, {sup 1}D) + HF and F + H{sub 2}. The theoretical approach for the simulations is a fully quantum-mechanical wave packet propagation on a collinear model reaction potential surface. The connection between the wavepacket time evolution and the photoelectron spectrum is given by the time autocorrelation function. For the benchmark F + H{sub 2} system, comparisons with three-dimensional quantum calculations are made.

  1. Comparing localized and nonlocalized dynamic (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in exercising muscle at 7T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerspeer, M.; Robinson, S.; Nabuurs, C.I.H.C.; Scheenen, T.W.; Schoisengeier, A.; Unger, E.; Kemp, G.J.; Moser, E.

    2012-01-01

    By improving spatial and anatomical specificity, localized spectroscopy can enhance the power and accuracy of the quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. Localized and nonlocalized dynamic (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a surface coil was compared during aerobic

  2. Comparing localized and nonlocalized dynamic (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in exercising muscle at 7T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerspeer, M.; Robinson, S.; Nabuurs, C.I.H.C.; Scheenen, T.W.; Schoisengeier, A.; Unger, E.; Kemp, G.J.; Moser, E.

    2012-01-01

    By improving spatial and anatomical specificity, localized spectroscopy can enhance the power and accuracy of the quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. Localized and nonlocalized dynamic (31) P magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a surface coil was compared during aerobic

  3. Guided crowd dynamics via modified social force model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Dong, Hairong; Wang, Qianling; Chen, Yao; Hu, Xiaoming

    2014-10-01

    Pedestrian dynamics is of great theoretical significance for strategy design of emergency evacuation. Modification of pedestrian dynamics based on the social force model is presented to better reflect pedestrians' behavioral characteristics in emergency. Specifically, the modified model can be used for guided crowd dynamics in large-scale public places such as subway stations and stadiums. This guided crowd model is validated by explicitly comparing its density-speed and density-flow diagrams with fundamental diagrams. Some social phenomena such as gathering, balance and conflicts are clearly observed in simulation, which further illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed modeling method. Also, time delay for pedestrians with time-dependent desired velocities is observed and explained using the established model in this paper. Furthermore, this guided crowd model is applied to the simulation system of Beijing South Railway Station for predictive evacuation experiments.

  4. Dynamic force matching: Construction of dynamic coarse-grained models with realistic short time dynamics and accurate long time dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davtyan, Aram; Voth, Gregory A.; Andersen, Hans C.

    2016-12-01

    We recently developed a dynamic force matching technique for converting a coarse-grained (CG) model of a molecular system, with a CG potential energy function, into a dynamic CG model with realistic dynamics [A. Davtyan et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 154104 (2015)]. This is done by supplementing the model with additional degrees of freedom, called "fictitious particles." In that paper, we tested the method on CG models in which each molecule is coarse-grained into one CG point particle, with very satisfactory results. When the method was applied to a CG model of methanol that has two CG point particles per molecule, the results were encouraging but clearly required improvement. In this paper, we introduce a new type (called type-3) of fictitious particle that exerts forces on the center of mass of two CG sites. A CG model constructed using type-3 fictitious particles (as well as type-2 particles previously used) gives a much more satisfactory dynamic model for liquid methanol. In particular, we were able to construct a CG model that has the same self-diffusion coefficient and the same rotational relaxation time as an all-atom model of liquid methanol. Type-3 particles and generalizations of it are likely to be useful in converting more complicated CG models into dynamic CG models.

  5. Rotational coherence spectroscopy at FLASH. Toward dynamic studies in nanosuperfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kickermann, Andreas

    2013-07-15

    The field of molecular physics, which is focusing on molecular motion in the transition states of physical, chemical, and biological changes, is a wide-spread research area. It strives to reveal the structural and functional properties of molecules, the chemical bonds between atoms and the time evolution. Many processes occurring in nature upon electronic excitation proceed on the ultrafast femtosecond timescale and can be triggered by modern ultrashort femtosecond-laser sources under laboratory conditions. In the present thesis pump-probe studies were performed to follow molecular motion using ultrashort light pulses in the nanometer wavelength range provided by an XUV freeelectron laser (FEL). In detail, alignment of molecular species in space under field-free conditions was investigated. In the specific case of rotational wave packets in molecules the rotational dynamics shows characteristic temporal features, which contain a wealth of information on molecular structure and give insight into molecular coupling mechanisms, i.e. rotational constants and transition frequencies. Within this thesis, Rotational Coherence Spectroscopy (RCS) reveals wave-packet motion observed by subsequent Coulomb explosion of Raman excited carbon monoxide, which results in a time-dependent asymmetry of spatial fragmentation patterns. With the method presented here, the time resolution to elucidate the fast dynamics of strong couplings can be pushed toward a single rotational period even for the fastest rotors. This is due to large pump-probe delays with small subpicosecond step size. This kind of spectroscopy can also be expanded to molecular species, which are not accessible by other powerful spectroscopic methods, such as Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy (FTMW). Furthermore, it allows to measure weak molecular couplings on a long timescale (large pump-probe delays), e.g. couplings of molecules in a solution or molecules dissolved in quantum fluids. This is valuable to

  6. The physics of pulling polyproteins: a review of single molecule force spectroscopy using the AFM to study protein unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Megan L.; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of biological physics in recent years is the ability to manipulate single molecules and probe their properties and function. Since its emergence over two decades ago, single molecule force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to explore the response of biological molecules, including proteins, DNA, RNA and their complexes, to the application of an applied force. The force versus extension response of molecules can provide valuable insight into its mechanical stability, as well as details of the underlying energy landscape. In this review we will introduce the technique of single molecule force spectroscopy using the atomic force microscope (AFM), with particular focus on its application to study proteins. We will review the models which have been developed and employed to extract information from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Finally, we will end with a discussion of future directions in this field.

  7. AFM-based force spectroscopy measurements of mature amyloid fibrils of the peptide glucagon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Mingdong; Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Mamdouh, Wael; Xu Sailong; Otzen, Daniel Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)], E-mail: dao@inano.dk, E-mail: fbe@inano.dk

    2008-09-24

    We report on the mechanical characterization of individual mature amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). These self-assembling materials, formed from the 29-residue amphiphatic peptide hormone glucagon, were found to display a reversible elastic behaviour. Based on AFM morphology and SMFS studies, we suggest that the observed elasticity is due to a force-induced conformational transition which is reversible due to the {beta}-helical conformation of protofibrils, allowing a high degree of extension. The elastic properties of such mature fibrils contribute to their high stability, suggesting that the internal hydrophobic interactions of amyloid fibrils are likely to be of fundamental importance in the assembly of amyloid fibrils and therefore for the understanding of the progression of their associated pathogenic disorders. In addition, such biological amyloid fibril structures with highly stable mechanical properties can potentially be used to produce nanofibres (nanowires) that may be suitable for nanotechnological applications.

  8. Forced fluid dynamics from blackfolds in general supergravity backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jay; Gath, Jakob; Niarchos, Vasilis; Obers, Niels A.; Pedersen, Andreas Vigand

    2016-10-01

    We present a general treatment of the leading order dynamics of the collective modes of charged dilatonic p-brane solutions of (super) gravity theories in arbitrary backgrounds. To this end we employ the general strategy of the blackfold approach which is based on a long-wavelength derivative expansion around an exact or approximate solution of the (super)gravity equations of motion. The resulting collective mode equations are formulated as forced hydrodynamic equations on dynamically embedded hypersurfaces. We derive them in full generality (including all possible asymptotic fluxes and dilaton profiles) in a far-zone analysis of the (super)gravity equations and in representative examples in a near-zone analysis. An independent treatment based on the study of external couplings in hydrostatic partition functions is also presented. Special emphasis is given to the forced collective mode equations that arise in type IIA/B and eleven-dimensional supergravities, where besides the standard Lorentz force couplings our analysis reveals additional couplings to the background, including terms that arise from Chern-Simons interactions. We also present a general overview of the blackfold approach and some of the key conceptual issues that arise when applied to arbitrary backgrounds.

  9. Forced fluid dynamics from blackfolds in general supergravity backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armas, Jay [Physique Théorique et Mathématique,Université Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes,ULB-Campus Plaine CP231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Gath, Jakob [Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique,CNRS UMR 7644, Université Paris-Saclay,F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Niarchos, Vasilis [Crete Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics,Crete Center for Quantum Complexity and Nanotechnology,Department of Physics, University of Crete,Heraklion, 71303 (Greece); Obers, Niels A.; Pedersen, Andreas Vigand [The Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

    2016-10-27

    We present a general treatment of the leading order dynamics of the collective modes of charged dilatonic p-brane solutions of (super)gravity theories in arbitrary backgrounds. To this end we employ the general strategy of the blackfold approach which is based on a long-wavelength derivative expansion around an exact or approximate solution of the (super)gravity equations of motion. The resulting collective mode equations are formulated as forced hydrodynamic equations on dynamically embedded hypersurfaces. We derive them in full generality (including all possible asymptotic fluxes and dilaton profiles) in a far-zone analysis of the (super)gravity equations and in representative examples in a near-zone analysis. An independent treatment based on the study of external couplings in hydrostatic partition functions is also presented. Special emphasis is given to the forced collective mode equations that arise in type IIA/B and eleven-dimensional supergravities, where besides the standard Lorentz force couplings our analysis reveals additional couplings to the background, including terms that arise from Chern-Simons interactions. We also present a general overview of the blackfold approach and some of the key conceptual issues that arise when applied to arbitrary backgrounds.

  10. 2012 ELECTRONIC SPECTROSCOPY & DYNAMICS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 22-27, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Bern

    2012-07-27

    Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, coherent electronic energy transport in biology, excited state theory and dynamics, excitonics, electronic spectroscopy of cold and ultracold molecules, and the spectroscopy of nanostructures. Several sessions will highlight innovative techniques such as time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy, frequency combs, and liquid microjet photoelectron spectroscopy that have forged stimulating new connections between gas-phase and condensed-phase work.

  11. Waiting time dynamics in two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Thomas L C; Knoester, Jasper

    2009-09-15

    We review recent work on the waiting time dynamics of coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. This dynamics can reveal chemical and physical processes that take place on the femto- and picosecond time scale, which is faster than the time scale that may be probed by, for example, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A large number of chemically relevant processes take place on this time scale. Such processes range from forming and breaking hydrogen bonds and proton transfer to solvent exchange and vibrational population transfer. In typical 2DIR spectra, multiple processes contribute to the waiting time dynamics and the spectra are often congested. This makes the spectra challenging to interpret, and the aid of theoretical models and simulations is often needed. To be useful, such models need to account for all dynamical processes in the sample simultaneously. The numerical integration of the Schrodinger equation (NISE) method has proven to allow for a very general treatment of the dynamical processes. It accounts for both the motional narrowing resulting from solvent-induced frequency fluctuations and population transfer between coupled vibrations. At the same time, frequency shifts arising from chemical-exchange reactions and changes of the transition dipoles because of either non-Condon effects or molecular reorientation are included in the treatment. This method therefore allows for the disentanglement of all of these processes. The NISE method has thus far been successfully applied to study chemical-exchange processes. It was demonstrated that 2DIR is not only sensitive to reaction kinetics but also to the more detailed reaction dynamics. NISE has also been applied to the study of population transfer within the amide I band (CO stretch) and between the amide I and amide II bands (CN stretch and NH bend) in polypeptides. From the amide I studies, it was found that the population transfer can be used to enhance cross-peaks that act as

  12. Understanding ion association states and molecular dynamics using infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masser, Hanqing

    A molecular level understanding of the ion transport mechanism within polymer electrolytes is crucial to the further development for advanced energy storage applications. This can be achieved by the identification and quantitative measurement of different ion species in the system and further relating them to the ion conductivity. In the first part of this thesis, research is presented towards understanding the ion association states (free ions, ion pairs and ion aggregates) in ionomer systems, and the correlation of ion association states, ion conduction, polymer dynamics, and morphology. Ion conductivity in ionomers can be improved by lowering glass transition temperature, increasing polymer ion solvation ability, and adjusting ionomer structural variables such as ion content, cation type and side chain structure. These effects are studied in three ionomer systems respectively, using a combination of characterization methods. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) identifies and quantifies the ion association states. Dielectric Spectroscopy (DRS) characterizes ion conductivity and polymer and ion dynamics. X-ray scattering reveals changes in morphology. The influence of a cation solvating plasticizer on a polyester ionomer is systematically investigated with respect to ion association states, ion and polymer dynamics and morphology. A decrease in the number ratio of ion aggregates with increased plasticizer content and a slight increase at elevated temperature are observed in FTIR. Similar results are also detected by X-ray scattering. As determined from dielectric spectroscopy, ion conductivity increases with plasticizer content, in accordance with the decrease in glass transition temperature. Research on copolymer of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(tetramethylene oxide) (PTMO) based ionomers further develops an understanding of the trade-off between ion solvation and segmental dynamics. Upon the incorporation of PTMO, the majority of the PTMO

  13. Harmonic force spectroscopy reveals a force-velocity curve from a single human beta cardiac myosin motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Vestergaard, Christian; Mortensen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Spudich, James

    2014-03-01

    A muscle contracts rapidly under low load, but slowly under high load. Its molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated, however. During contraction, myosins in thick filaments interact with actin in thin filaments in the sarcomere, cycling between a strongly bound (force producing) state and a weakly bound (relaxed) state. Huxley et al. have previously proposed that the transition from the strong to the weak interaction can be modulated by a load. We use a new method we call ``harmonic force spectroscopy'' to extract a load-velocity curve from a single human beta cardiac myosin II motor. With a dual-beam optical trap, we hold an actin dumbbell over a myosin molecule anchored to the microscope stage that oscillates sinusoidally. Upon binding, the motor experiences an oscillatory load with a mean that is directed forward or backward, depending on binding location We find that the bound time at saturating [ATP] is exponentially correlated with the mean load, which is explained by Arrhenius transition theory. With a stroke size measurement, we obtained a load-velocity curve from a single myosin. We compare the curves for wild-type motors with mutants that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, to understand the effects on the contractile cycle

  14. Optimizing 1-μs-Resolution Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy on a Commercial Atomic Force Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Devin T; Faulk, Jaevyn K; Sanders, Aric W; Bull, Matthew S; Walder, Robert; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Sousa, Marcelo C; Perkins, Thomas T

    2015-10-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is widely used to mechanically measure the folding and unfolding of proteins. However, the temporal resolution of a standard commercial cantilever is 50-1000 μs, masking rapid transitions and short-lived intermediates. Recently, SMFS with 0.7-μs temporal resolution was achieved using an ultrashort (L = 9 μm) cantilever on a custom-built, high-speed AFM. By micromachining such cantilevers with a focused ion beam, we optimized them for SMFS rather than tapping-mode imaging. To enhance usability and throughput, we detected the modified cantilevers on a commercial AFM retrofitted with a detection laser system featuring a 3-μm circular spot size. Moreover, individual cantilevers were reused over multiple days. The improved capabilities of the modified cantilevers for SMFS were showcased by unfolding a polyprotein, a popular biophysical assay. Specifically, these cantilevers maintained a 1-μs response time while eliminating cantilever ringing (Q ≅ 0.5). We therefore expect such cantilevers, along with the instrumentational improvements to detect them on a commercial AFM, to accelerate high-precision AFM-based SMFS studies.

  15. A modified social force model for crowd dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ummi Nurmasyitah; Zainuddin, Zarita; Abu-Sulyman, Ibtesam M.

    2017-08-01

    The Social Force Model (SFM) is one of the most successful models in microscopic pedestrian studies that is used to study the movement of pedestrians. Many modifications have been done to improvise the SFM by earlier researchers such as the incorporation of a constant respect factor into the self-stopping mechanism. Before the new mechanism is introduced, the researchers found out that a pedestrian will immediately come to a halt if other pedestrians are near to him, which seems to be an unrealistic behavior. Therefore, researchers introduce a self-slowing mechanism to gradually stop a pedestrian when he is approaching other pedestrians. Subsequently, the dynamic respect factor is introduced into the self-slowing mechanism based on the density of the pedestrians to make the model even more realistic. In real life situations, the respect factor of the pedestrians should be dynamic values instead of a constant value. However, when we reproduce the simulation of the dynamic respect factor, we found that the movement of the pedestrians are unrealistic because the pedestrians are lacking perception of the pedestrians in front of him. In this paper, we adopted both dynamic respect factor and dynamic angular parameter, called modified dynamic respect factor, which is dependent on the density of the pedestrians. Simulations are performed in a normal unidirectional walkway to compare the simulated pedestrians' movements produced by both models. The results obtained showed that the modified dynamic respect factor produces more realistic movement of the pedestrians which conform to the real situation. Moreover, we also found that the simulations endow the pedestrian with a self-slowing mechanism and a perception of other pedestrians in front of him.

  16. A stochastic boundary forcing for dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenhoff, Adrian M.; Walther, Jens H.; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2007-07-01

    The method of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is an effective, coarse grained model of the hydrodynamics of complex fluids. DPD simulations of wall-bounded flows are however often associated with spurious fluctuations of the fluid properties near the wall. We present a novel stochastic boundary forcing for DPD simulations of wall-bounded flows, based on the identification of fluctuations in simulations of the corresponding homogeneous system at equilibrium. The present method is shown to enforce accurately the no-slip boundary condition, while minimizing spurious fluctuations of material properties, in a number of benchmark problems.

  17. Single-cell force spectroscopy of the medically important Staphylococcus epidermidis-Candida albicans interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussart, Audrey; Herman, Philippe; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Lipke, Peter N.; Kucharíková, Soňa; van Dijck, Patrick; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-10-01

    Despite the clinical importance of bacterial-fungal interactions, their molecular details are poorly understood. A hallmark of such medically important interspecies associations is the interaction between the two nosocomial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, which can lead to mixed biofilm-associated infections with enhanced antibiotic resistance. Here, we use single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) to quantify the forces engaged in bacterial-fungal co-adhesion, focusing on the poorly investigated S. epidermidis-C. albicans interaction. Force curves recorded between single bacterial and fungal germ tubes showed large adhesion forces (~5 nN) with extended rupture lengths (up to 500 nm). By contrast, bacteria poorly adhered to yeast cells, emphasizing the important role of the yeast-to-hyphae transition in mediating adhesion to bacterial cells. Analysis of mutant strains altered in cell wall composition allowed us to distinguish the main fungal components involved in adhesion, i.e. Als proteins and O-mannosylations. We suggest that the measured co-adhesion forces are involved in the formation of mixed biofilms, thus possibly as well in promoting polymicrobial infections. In the future, we anticipate that this SCFS platform will be used in nanomedicine to decipher the molecular mechanisms of a wide variety of pathogen-pathogen interactions and may help in designing novel anti-adhesion agents.

  18. Hydration free energies of cyanide and hydroxide ions from molecular dynamics simulations with accurate force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Meuwly, M.

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of hydration free energies is a sensitive test to assess force fields used in atomistic simulations. We showed recently that the vibrational relaxation times, 1D- and 2D-infrared spectroscopies for CN(-) in water can be quantitatively described from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with multipolar force fields and slightly enlarged van der Waals radii for the C- and N-atoms. To validate such an approach, the present work investigates the solvation free energy of cyanide in water using MD simulations with accurate multipolar electrostatics. It is found that larger van der Waals radii are indeed necessary to obtain results close to the experimental values when a multipolar force field is used. For CN(-), the van der Waals ranges refined in our previous work yield hydration free energy between -72.0 and -77.2 kcal mol(-1), which is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In addition to the cyanide ion, we also study the hydroxide ion to show that the method used here is readily applicable to similar systems. Hydration free energies are found to sensitively depend on the intermolecular interactions, while bonded interactions are less important, as expected. We also investigate in the present work the possibility of applying the multipolar force field in scoring trajectories generated using computationally inexpensive methods, which should be useful in broader parametrization studies with reduced computational resources, as scoring is much faster than the generation of the trajectories.

  19. Force spectroscopy reveals the presence of structurally modified dimers in transthyretin amyloid annular oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Ricardo H; Saraiva, Maria J; Damas, Ana M; Kellermayer, Miklós S Z

    2017-03-01

    Toxicity in amyloidogenic protein misfolding disorders is thought to involve intermediate states of aggregation associated with the formation of amyloid fibrils. Despite their relevance, the heterogeneity and transience of these oligomers have placed great barriers in our understanding of their structural properties. Among amyloid intermediates, annular oligomers or annular protofibrils have raised considerable interest because they may contribute to a mechanism of cellular toxicity via membrane permeation. Here we investigated, by using AFM force spectroscopy, the structural detail of amyloid annular oligomers from transthyretin (TTR), a protein involved in systemic and neurodegenerative amyloidogenic disorders. Manipulation was performed in situ, in the absence of molecular handles and using persistence length-fit values to select relevant curves. Force curves reveal the presence of dimers in TTR annular oligomers that unfold via a series of structural intermediates. This is in contrast with the manipulation of native TTR that was more often manipulated over length scales compatible with a TTR monomer and without unfolding intermediates. Imaging and force spectroscopy data suggest that dimers are formed by the assembly of monomers in a head-to-head orientation with a nonnative interface along their β-strands. Furthermore, these dimers stack through nonnative contacts that may enhance the stability of the misfolded structure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Quantitating membrane bleb stiffness using AFM force spectroscopy and an optical sideview setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnermann, Carina; Huang, Chaolie; Becker, Sarah F; Stamov, Dimitar R; Wedlich, Doris; Kashef, Jubin; Franz, Clemens M

    2015-03-01

    AFM-based force spectroscopy in combination with optical microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating cell mechanics and adhesion on the single cell level. However, standard setups featuring an AFM mounted on an inverted light microscope only provide a bottom view of cell and AFM cantilever but cannot visualize vertical cell shape changes, for instance occurring during motile membrane blebbing. Here, we have integrated a mirror-based sideview system to monitor cell shape changes resulting from motile bleb behavior of Xenopus cranial neural crest (CNC) cells during AFM elasticity and adhesion measurements. Using the sideview setup, we quantitatively investigate mechanical changes associated with bleb formation and compared cell elasticity values recorded during membrane bleb and non-bleb events. Bleb protrusions displayed significantly lower stiffness compared to the non-blebbing membrane in the same cell. Bleb stiffness values were comparable to values obtained from blebbistatin-treated cells, consistent with the absence of a functional actomyosin network in bleb protrusions. Furthermore, we show that membrane blebs forming within the cell-cell contact zone have a detrimental effect on cell-cell adhesion forces, suggesting that mechanical changes associated with bleb protrusions promote cell-cell detachment or prevent adhesion reinforcement. Incorporating a sideview setup into an AFM platform therefore provides a new tool to correlate changes in cell morphology with results from force spectroscopy experiments.

  1. The Dynamics and Driving Force of Farmland Ecosystem Productivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Liang-ping; SHAO Ming-an; LI Yu-shan

    2005-01-01

    Based on the experimental data of crop yield, soil water and fertility of a dryland farming ecosystem in northwest China, a systematic analysis is carried out to study the dynamics of dryland farming ecosystem productivity and its limiting factors. This paper also discusses which of the two limiting factors, i.e., soil water or fertility, is the primary factor and their dynamics. The result shows that fertility is the primary limiting factor when the productivity is rather low. As chemical fertilizer input increases and the productivity promotes, water gradually becomes the primary limiting factor. Chemical fertilizers and plastic film mulching are the two major driving forces that determine the crop productivity and its stability in these areas.

  2. Design and testing of magnetorheological valve with fast force response time and great dynamic force range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubík, M.; Macháček, O.; Strecker, Z.; Roupec, J.; Mazůrek, I.

    2017-04-01

    The paper deals with design, simulation and experimental testing of a magnetorheological (MR) valve with short response time. The short response time is achieved by a suitable design of an active zone in combination with use of a ferrite material for magnetic circuit. The magneto-static model and the simplified hydraulic model of the MR valve are examined and experimentally verified. The development the MR valve achieves an average response time 4.1 ms and the maximum dynamic force range of eight.

  3. Lattice dynamic studies from {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katada, Motomi [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Hachioji (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-03-01

    New complexes {l_brace}(Eu(napy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3})(Fe(CN){sub 6})4H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub x}, bpy({l_brace}(Eu(bpy)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4})(Fe(CN){sub 6})1.5bpy4H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub x}) and ({l_brace}(Eu(phen){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2})(Fe(CN){sub 6})2phen{r_brace}{sub x}) etc were synthesized using phenanthroline and bipyridine. Lattice dynamic behaviors of Eu and Fe atom in the complexes were investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy. By {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectrum and parameters of new complexes, bpy complex showed the largest quadrupole splitting value, indicating bad symmetry of Eu ligand in the environment. Molecular structure of napy, bpy and phen complex were shown. These complexes are consisted of Eu atom coordinated with ligand and water molecule, of which (Fe(CN){sub 6}){sup 3-} ion formed one dimentional polymer chain and naphthyridines formed stacking structure. New complexes were observed by {sup 57}Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy, too. The quadrupole splitting values were very different each other, indicating change of symmetry of Fe atom in the environment and three valence low spin state of Fe in the complex. (S.Y.)

  4. Environmental noise spectroscopy with qubits subjected to dynamical decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szańkowski, P.; Ramon, G.; Krzywda, J.; Kwiatkowski, D.; Cywiński, Ł.

    2017-08-01

    A qubit subjected to pure dephasing due to classical Gaussian noise can be turned into a spectrometer of this noise by utilizing its readout under properly chosen dynamical decoupling (DD) sequences to reconstruct the power spectral density of the noise. We review the theory behind this DD-based noise spectroscopy technique, paying special attention to issues that arise when the environmental noise is non-Gaussian and/or it has truly quantum properties. While we focus on the theoretical basis of the method, we connect the discussed concepts with specific experiments, and provide an overview of environmental noise models relevant for solid-state based qubits, including quantum-dot based spin qubits, superconducting qubits, and NV centers in diamond.

  5. Dynamics of Sulfonated Polystyrene Ionomers by Dielectric Relaxation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Alicia; Wang, Wenqin; Winey, Karen; Runt, James

    2010-03-01

    Broadband dielectric spectroscopy was used to investigate the dynamics of sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) ionomers, in both the acid and neutralized form. This study seeks to elucidate the role of counter ion type (Zn, Na, and Cs), degree of sulfonation (9 and 6%), and ion cluster morphology on the relaxation phenomena of SPS. Degree of neutralization and ion type have been found to significantly impact the breadth and time scale of the segmental relaxation process. High temperature relaxation processes, tentatively proposed to arise from Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars interfacial polarization and a hydrogen bonding relaxation, have also been identified. Bands in the sulfonate stretching region of FTIR spectra reveal information about ion coordination in the local aggregate environment. A combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and X-ray scattering confirmed the presence of homogeneously distributed, nearly monodisperse spherical ionic aggregates in the polymer matrix.

  6. Research on the Earth system multi-body force system dynamical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xiaofei; BI; Siwen; WU; Fei; DONG; Qianlin

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the binding force and freedom force of Earth system, and describes force moment to point and line and force system in the Earth system. It introduces the force theory of the Earth system multi-body force system from special or equivalent force system of Earth system mechanics, general force and no-power force of Earth system. Finally it describes the force and moment of nodes of Earth system and provides basic model for the research of the Earth system multi-body dynamics.

  7. Study on the AFM Force Spectroscopy method for elastic modulus measurement of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demichelis, A.; Pavarelli, S.; Mortati, L.; Sassi, G.; Sassi, M.

    2013-09-01

    The cell elasticity gives information about its pathological state and metastatic potential. The aim of this paper is to study the AFM Force Spectroscopy technique with the future goal of realizing a reference method for accurate elastic modulus measurement in the elasticity range of living cells. This biological range has not been yet explored with a metrological approach. Practical hints are given for the realization of a Sylgard elasticity scale. Systematic effects given by the sample curing thickness and nanoindenter geometry have been found with regards of the measured elastic modulus. AFM measurement reproducibility better than 20% is obtained in the entire investigated elastic modulus scale of 101 - 104 kPa.

  8. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells. PMID:25999971

  9. Information Flow and Protein Dynamics: the Interplay Between Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina ePastor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells.

  10. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy to probe single membrane proteins in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, K Tanuj

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has opened vast avenues hitherto inaccessible to the biological scientist. The high temporal (millisecond) and spatial (nanometer) resolutions of the AFM are suited for studying many biological processes in their native conditions. The AFM cantilever stylus is aptly termed as a "lab on a tip" owing to its versatility as an imaging tool as well as a handle to manipulate single bonds and proteins. Recent examples assert that the AFM can be used to study the mechanical properties and monitor processes of single proteins and single cells, thus affording insight into important mechanistic details. This chapter specifically focuses on practical and analytical protocols of single-molecule AFM methodologies related to high-resolution imaging and single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins. Both these techniques are operator oriented, and require specialized working knowledge of the instrument, theoretical, and practical skills.

  11. Harmonic force spectroscopy measures load-dependent kinetics of individual human β-cardiac myosin molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Mortensen, Kim I.; Vestergaard, Christian L.; Sutton, Shirley; Ruppel, Kathleen; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Spudich, James A.

    2015-08-01

    Molecular motors are responsible for numerous cellular processes from cargo transport to heart contraction. Their interactions with other cellular components are often transient and exhibit kinetics that depend on load. Here, we measure such interactions using `harmonic force spectroscopy'. In this method, harmonic oscillation of the sample stage of a laser trap immediately, automatically and randomly applies sinusoidally varying loads to a single motor molecule interacting with a single track along which it moves. The experimental protocol and the data analysis are simple, fast and efficient. The protocol accumulates statistics fast enough to deliver single-molecule results from single-molecule experiments. We demonstrate the method's performance by measuring the force-dependent kinetics of individual human β-cardiac myosin molecules interacting with an actin filament at physiological ATP concentration. We show that a molecule's ADP release rate depends exponentially on the applied load, in qualitative agreement with cardiac muscle, which contracts with a velocity inversely proportional to external load.

  12. An Optical Tweezers Platform for Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy in Organic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jacob; Kamenetska, Maria; Ganim, Ziad

    2017-10-03

    Observation at the single molecule level has been a revolutionary tool for molecular biophysics and materials science, but single molecule studies of solution-phase chemistry are less widespread. In this work we develop an experimental platform for solution-phase single molecule force spectroscopy in organic solvents. This optical-tweezer-based platform was designed for broad chemical applicability and utilizes optically trapped core-shell microspheres, synthetic polymer tethers, and click chemistry linkages formed in situ. We have observed stable optical trapping of the core-shell microspheres in ten different solvents, and single molecule link formation in four different solvents. These experiments demonstrate how to use optical tweezers for single molecule force application in the study of solution-phase chemistry.

  13. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  14. Single-molecule force spectroscopy reveals the individual mechanical unfolding pathways of a surface layer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horejs, Christine; Ristl, Robin; Tscheliessnig, Rupert; Sleytr, Uwe B; Pum, Dietmar

    2011-08-05

    Surface layers (S-layers) represent an almost universal feature of archaeal cell envelopes and are probably the most abundant bacterial cell proteins. S-layers are monomolecular crystalline structures of single protein or glycoprotein monomers that completely cover the cell surface during all stages of the cell growth cycle, thereby performing their intrinsic function under a constant intra- and intermolecular mechanical stress. In gram-positive bacteria, the individual S-layer proteins are anchored by a specific binding mechanism to polysaccharides (secondary cell wall polymers) that are linked to the underlying peptidoglycan layer. In this work, atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy and a polyprotein approach are used to study the individual mechanical unfolding pathways of an S-layer protein. We uncover complex unfolding pathways involving the consecutive unfolding of structural intermediates, where a mechanical stability of 87 pN is revealed. Different initial extensibilities allow the hypothesis that S-layer proteins adapt highly stable, mechanically resilient conformations that are not extensible under the presence of a pulling force. Interestingly, a change of the unfolding pathway is observed when individual S-layer proteins interact with secondary cell wall polymers, which is a direct signature of a conformational change induced by the ligand. Moreover, the mechanical stability increases up to 110 pN. This work demonstrates that single-molecule force spectroscopy offers a powerful tool to detect subtle changes in the structure of an individual protein upon binding of a ligand and constitutes the first conformational study of surface layer proteins at the single-molecule level.

  15. High-throughput single-molecule force spectroscopy for membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosshart, Patrick D; Casagrande, Fabio; Frederix, Patrick L T M; Engel, Andreas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios [M E Mueller Institute for Structural Biology, Biozentrum of the University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Ratera, Merce; Palacin, Manuel [Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Barcelona Science Park, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biology, University of Barcelona and Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Enfermedades Raras, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bippes, Christian A; Mueller, Daniel J [BioTechnology Center, Technical University, Tatzberg 47, D-01307 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: andreas.engel@unibas.ch, E-mail: dimitrios.fotiadis@mci.unibe.ch

    2008-09-24

    Atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is a powerful tool for studying the mechanical properties, intermolecular and intramolecular interactions, unfolding pathways, and energy landscapes of membrane proteins. One limiting factor for the large-scale applicability of SMFS on membrane proteins is its low efficiency in data acquisition. We have developed a semi-automated high-throughput SMFS (HT-SMFS) procedure for efficient data acquisition. In addition, we present a coarse filter to efficiently extract protein unfolding events from large data sets. The HT-SMFS procedure and the coarse filter were validated using the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) from Halobacterium salinarum and the L-arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC from the bacterium Escherichia coli. To screen for molecular interactions between AdiC and its substrates, we recorded data sets in the absence and in the presence of L-arginine, D-arginine, and agmatine. Altogether {approx}400 000 force-distance curves were recorded. Application of coarse filtering to this wealth of data yielded six data sets with {approx}200 (AdiC) and {approx}400 (BR) force-distance spectra in each. Importantly, the raw data for most of these data sets were acquired in one to two days, opening new perspectives for HT-SMFS applications.

  16. Probing static disorder in Arrhenius kinetics by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Li, Jingyuan; Barel, Itay; Lu, Hui; Berne, Bruce J.; Urbakh, Michael; Klafter, Joseph; Fernández, Julio M.

    2010-01-01

    The widely used Arrhenius equation describes the kinetics of simple two-state reactions, with the implicit assumption of a single transition state with a well-defined activation energy barrier ΔE, as the rate-limiting step. However, it has become increasingly clear that the saddle point of the free-energy surface in most reactions is populated by ensembles of conformations, leading to nonexponential kinetics. Here we present a theory that generalizes the Arrhenius equation to include static disorder of conformational degrees of freedom as a function of an external perturbation to fully account for a diverse set of transition states. The effect of a perturbation on static disorder is best examined at the single-molecule level. Here we use force-clamp spectroscopy to study the nonexponential kinetics of single ubiquitin proteins unfolding under force. We find that the measured variance in ΔE shows both force-dependent and independent components, where the force-dependent component scales with F2, in excellent agreement with our theory. Our study illustrates a novel adaptation of the classical Arrhenius equation that accounts for the microscopic origins of nonexponential kinetics, which are essential in understanding the rapidly growing body of single-molecule data. PMID:20534507

  17. Origin of the nonadhesive properties of fibrinogen matrices probed by force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolenko, Ivan S; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Magonov, Sergei N; Lishko, Valeryi K; Oshkadyerov, Stanislav P; Ros, Robert; Ugarova, Tatiana P

    2010-11-16

    The deposition of a multilayered fibrinogen matrix on various surfaces results in a dramatic reduction of integrin-mediated cell adhesion and outside-in signaling in platelets and leukocytes. The conversion of a highly adhesive, low-density fibrinogen substrate to the nonadhesive high-density fibrinogen matrix occurs within a very narrow range of fibrinogen coating concentrations. The molecular events responsible for this transition are not well understood. Herein, single-cell and molecular force spectroscopy were used to determine the early steps in the formation of nonadhesive fibrinogen substrates. We show that the adsorption of fibrinogen in the form of a molecular bilayer coincides with a several-fold reduction in the adhesion forces generated between the AFM tip and the substrate as well as between a cell and the substrate. The subsequent deposition of new layers at higher coating concentrations of fibrinogen results in a small additional decrease in adhesion forces. The poorly adhesive fibrinogen bilayer is more extensible under an applied tensile force than is the surface-bound fibrinogen monolayer. Following chemical cross-linking, the stabilized bilayer displays the mechanical and adhesive properties characteristic of a more adhesive fibrinogen monolayer. We propose that a greater compliance of the bi- and multilayer fibrinogen matrices has its origin in the interaction between the molecules forming the adjacent layers. Understanding the mechanical properties of nonadhesive fibrinogen matrices should be of importance in the therapeutic control of pathological thrombosis and in biomaterials science.

  18. Probing static disorder in Arrhenius kinetics by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Li, Jingyuan; Barel, Itay; Lu, Hui; Berne, Bruce J; Urbakh, Michael; Klafter, Joseph; Fernández, Julio M

    2010-06-22

    The widely used Arrhenius equation describes the kinetics of simple two-state reactions, with the implicit assumption of a single transition state with a well-defined activation energy barrier DeltaE, as the rate-limiting step. However, it has become increasingly clear that the saddle point of the free-energy surface in most reactions is populated by ensembles of conformations, leading to nonexponential kinetics. Here we present a theory that generalizes the Arrhenius equation to include static disorder of conformational degrees of freedom as a function of an external perturbation to fully account for a diverse set of transition states. The effect of a perturbation on static disorder is best examined at the single-molecule level. Here we use force-clamp spectroscopy to study the nonexponential kinetics of single ubiquitin proteins unfolding under force. We find that the measured variance in DeltaE shows both force-dependent and independent components, where the force-dependent component scales with F(2), in excellent agreement with our theory. Our study illustrates a novel adaptation of the classical Arrhenius equation that accounts for the microscopic origins of nonexponential kinetics, which are essential in understanding the rapidly growing body of single-molecule data.

  19. Investigation of adhesion and mechanical properties of human glioma cells by single cell force spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Laura; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Migliorini, Elisa; Palma, Anita; Pucer, Anja; Skrap, Miran; Scoles, Giacinto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela; Lazzarino, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Active cell migration and invasion is a peculiar feature of glioma that makes this tumor able to rapidly infiltrate into the surrounding brain tissue. In our recent work, we identified a novel class of glioma-associated-stem cells (defined as GASC for high-grade glioma--HG--and Gasc for low-grade glioma--LG) that, although not tumorigenic, act supporting the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating stem cells (defined as GSC for HG and Gsc for LG) favoring also their motility. Migrating cancer cells undergo considerable molecular and cellular changes by remodeling their cytoskeleton and cell interactions with surrounding environment. To get a better understanding about the role of the glioma-associated-stem cells in tumor progression, cell deformability and interactions between glioma-initiating stem cells and glioma-associated-stem cells were investigated. Adhesion of HG/LG-cancer cells on HG/LG-glioma-associated stem cells was studied by time-lapse microscopy, while cell deformability and cell-cell adhesion strengths were quantified by indentation measurements by atomic force microscopy and single cell force spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that for both HG and LG glioma, cancer-initiating-stem cells are softer than glioma-associated-stem cells, in agreement with their neoplastic features. The adhesion strength of GSC on GASC appears to be significantly lower than that observed for Gsc on Gasc. Whereas, GSC spread and firmly adhere on Gasc with an adhesion strength increased as compared to that obtained on GASC. These findings highlight that the grade of glioma-associated-stem cells plays an important role in modulating cancer cell adhesion, which could affect glioma cell migration, invasion and thus cancer aggressiveness. Moreover this work provides evidence about the importance of investigating cell adhesion and elasticity for new developments in disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

  20. Investigation of adhesion and mechanical properties of human glioma cells by single cell force spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Andolfi

    Full Text Available Active cell migration and invasion is a peculiar feature of glioma that makes this tumor able to rapidly infiltrate into the surrounding brain tissue. In our recent work, we identified a novel class of glioma-associated-stem cells (defined as GASC for high-grade glioma--HG--and Gasc for low-grade glioma--LG that, although not tumorigenic, act supporting the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating stem cells (defined as GSC for HG and Gsc for LG favoring also their motility. Migrating cancer cells undergo considerable molecular and cellular changes by remodeling their cytoskeleton and cell interactions with surrounding environment. To get a better understanding about the role of the glioma-associated-stem cells in tumor progression, cell deformability and interactions between glioma-initiating stem cells and glioma-associated-stem cells were investigated. Adhesion of HG/LG-cancer cells on HG/LG-glioma-associated stem cells was studied by time-lapse microscopy, while cell deformability and cell-cell adhesion strengths were quantified by indentation measurements by atomic force microscopy and single cell force spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that for both HG and LG glioma, cancer-initiating-stem cells are softer than glioma-associated-stem cells, in agreement with their neoplastic features. The adhesion strength of GSC on GASC appears to be significantly lower than that observed for Gsc on Gasc. Whereas, GSC spread and firmly adhere on Gasc with an adhesion strength increased as compared to that obtained on GASC. These findings highlight that the grade of glioma-associated-stem cells plays an important role in modulating cancer cell adhesion, which could affect glioma cell migration, invasion and thus cancer aggressiveness. Moreover this work provides evidence about the importance of investigating cell adhesion and elasticity for new developments in disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

  1. Revealing subsurface vibrational modes by atom-resolved damping force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashino, Makoto; Wiesendanger, Roland; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Berber, Savas; Tománek, David

    2009-05-15

    We propose to use the damping signal of an oscillating cantilever in dynamic atomic force microscopy as a noninvasive tool to study the vibrational structure of the substrate. We present atomically resolved maps of damping in carbon nanotube peapods, capable of identifying the location and packing of enclosed Dy@C_{82} molecules as well as local excitations of vibrational modes inside nanotubes of different diameter. We elucidate the physical origin of damping in a microscopic model and provide quantitative interpretation of the observations by calculating the vibrational spectrum and damping of Dy@C_{82} inside nanotubes with different diameters using ab initio total energy and molecular dynamics calculations.

  2. Dynamics of stainless steel turning: Analysis by flicker-noise spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Litak, Grzegorz; Timashev, Serge F; Rusinek, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    We use flicker-noise spectroscopy (FNS), a phenomenological method for the analysis of time and spatial series operating on structure functions and power spectrum estimates, to identify and study harmful chatter vibrations in a regenerative turning process. The 3D cutting force components experimentally measured during stainless steel turning are analyzed, and the parameters of their stochastic dynamics are estimated. Our analysis shows that the system initially exhibiting regular vibrations associated with spindle rotation becomes unstable to high-frequency noisy oscillations (chatter) at larger cutting depths. We suggest that the chatter may be attributed to frictional stick-and-slip interactions between the contact surfaces of cutting tool and workpiece. We compare our findings with previously reported results obtained by statistical, recurrence, multifractal, and wavelet methods. We discuss the potential of FNS in monitoring the turning process in manufacturing practice.

  3. Atomic force spectroscopy and density-functional study of graphene corrugation on Ru(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshina, Elena; Dedkov, Yuriy

    2016-06-01

    Graphene, the thinnest material in the world, can form moiré structures on different substrates, including graphite, h -BN, or metal surfaces. In such systems, the structure of graphene, i.e., its corrugation, as well as its electronic and elastic properties, are defined by the combination of the system geometry and local interaction strength at the interface. The corrugation in such structures on metals is heavily extracted from diffraction or local probe microscopy experiments, and it can be obtained only via comparison with theoretical data, which usually simulate the experimental findings. Here we show that graphene corrugation on metals can be measured directly employing atomic force spectroscopy, and the obtained value coincides with state-of-the-art theoretical results. The presented results demonstrate an unexpected space selectivity for the Δ f (z ) signal in the atomic force spectroscopy in the moiré graphene lattice on Ru(0001), which is explained by the different response of the graphene layer on the indentation process. We also address the elastic reaction of the formed graphene nanodoms on the indentation process by the scanning tip that is important for the modeling and fabrication of graphene-based nanoresonators on the nanoscale.

  4. Mining the "glycocode"--exploring the spatial distribution of glycans in gastrointestinal mucin using force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, A Patrick; Kirby, Andrew R; Fuell, Christine; Pin, Carmen; Tailford, Louise E; Juge, Nathalie

    2013-06-01

    Mucins are the main components of the gastrointestinal mucus layer. Mucin glycosylation is critical to most intermolecular and intercellular interactions. However, due to the highly complex and heterogeneous mucin glycan structures, the encoded biological information remains largely encrypted. Here we have developed a methodology based on force spectroscopy to identify biologically accessible glycoepitopes in purified porcine gastric mucin (pPGM) and purified porcine jejunal mucin (pPJM). The binding specificity of lectins Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA), peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin (PNA), Maackia amurensis lectin II (MALII), and Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA) was utilized in force spectroscopy measurements to quantify the affinity and spatial distribution of their cognate sugars at the molecular scale. Binding energy of 4, 1.6, and 26 aJ was determined on pPGM for RCA, PNA, and UEA. Binding was abolished by competition with free ligands, demonstrating the validity of the affinity data. The distributions of the nearest binding site separations estimated the number of binding sites in a 200-nm mucin segment to be 4 for RCA, PNA, and UEA, and 1.8 for MALII. Binding site separations were affected by partial defucosylation of pPGM. Furthermore, we showed that this new approach can resolve differences between gastric and jejunum mucins.

  5. Force spectroscopy predicts thermal stability of immobilized proteins by measuring microbead mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregurec, Danijela; Velasco-Lozano, Susana; Moya, Sergio E; Vázquez, Luis; López-Gallego, Fernando

    2016-10-26

    Optimal immobilization of enzymes on porous microbeads enables the fabrication of highly active and stable heterogeneous biocatalysts to implement biocatalysis in synthetic and analytical chemistry. However, empirical procedures for enzyme immobilization still prevail over rational ones because there is an unmet need for more comprehensive characterization techniques that aid to understand and trace the immobilization process. Here, we present the use of atomic force spectroscopy (AFS) as an innovative solution to indirectly characterize immobilized proteins on porous materials and monitor the immobilization process in real time. We investigate the mechanical properties of porous agarose microbeads immobilizing proteins by indenting a colloidal probe (silica microparticle) into a single bead. AFS demonstrates that the binding of proteins to the solid matrix of an agarose microbead alters its stiffness. Interestingly, we discovered that irreversible and multivalent immobilizations that make microbeads stiffer also stabilize the immobilized proteins against the temperature. Hence, we propose atomic force spectroscopy as a useful technique to indirectly unravel the stability of the immobilized enzymes investigating the mechanics of the heterogenous biocatalysts as a solid biomaterial beyond the intrinsic mechanics of the proteins.

  6. Characterization of the Interaction between Gallic Acid and Lysozyme by Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Optical Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minzhong Zhan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The binding interaction between gallic acid (GA and lysozyme (LYS was investigated and compared by molecular dynamics (MD simulation and spectral techniques. The results from spectroscopy indicate that GA binds to LYS to generate a static complex. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. MD simulation revealed that the main driving forces for GA binding to LYS are hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. The root-mean-square deviation verified that GA and LYS bind to form a stable complex, while the root-mean-square fluctuation results showed that the stability of the GA-LYS complex at 298 K was higher than that at 310 K. The calculated free binding energies from the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method showed that van der Waals forces and electrostatic interactions are the predominant intermolecular forces. The MD simulation was consistent with the spectral experiments. This study provides a reference for future study of the pharmacological mechanism of GA.

  7. Combined low-temperature scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope for atomic resolution imaging and site-specific force spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo; Albers, Boris J.; Liebmann, Marcus; Schwendemann, Todd C.; Baykara, Mehmet Z.; Heyde, Markus; Salmeron, Miquel; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2008-02-27

    The authors present the design and first results of a low-temperature, ultrahigh vacuum scanning probe microscope enabling atomic resolution imaging in both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) modes. A tuning-fork-based sensor provides flexibility in selecting probe tip materials, which can be either metallic or nonmetallic. When choosing a conducting tip and sample, simultaneous STM/NC-AFM data acquisition is possible. Noticeable characteristics that distinguish this setup from similar systems providing simultaneous STM/NC-AFM capabilities are its combination of relative compactness (on-top bath cryostat needs no pit), in situ exchange of tip and sample at low temperatures, short turnaround times, modest helium consumption, and unrestricted access from dedicated flanges. The latter permits not only the optical surveillance of the tip during approach but also the direct deposition of molecules or atoms on either tip or sample while they remain cold. Atomic corrugations as low as 1 pm could successfully be resolved. In addition, lateral drifts rates of below 15 pm/h allow long-term data acquisition series and the recording of site-specific spectroscopy maps. Results obtained on Cu(111) and graphite illustrate the microscope's performance.

  8. Combined low-temperature scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope for atomic resolution imaging and site-specific force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Boris J.; Liebmann, Marcus; Schwendemann, Todd C.; Baykara, Mehmet Z.; Heyde, Markus; Salmeron, Miquel; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2008-03-01

    We present the design and first results of a low-temperature, ultrahigh vacuum scanning probe microscope enabling atomic resolution imaging in both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) modes. A tuning-fork-based sensor provides flexibility in selecting probe tip materials, which can be either metallic or nonmetallic. When choosing a conducting tip and sample, simultaneous STM/NC-AFM data acquisition is possible. Noticeable characteristics that distinguish this setup from similar systems providing simultaneous STM/NC-AFM capabilities are its combination of relative compactness (on-top bath cryostat needs no pit), in situ exchange of tip and sample at low temperatures, short turnaround times, modest helium consumption, and unrestricted access from dedicated flanges. The latter permits not only the optical surveillance of the tip during approach but also the direct deposition of molecules or atoms on either tip or sample while they remain cold. Atomic corrugations as low as 1pm could successfully be resolved. In addition, lateral drifts rates of below 15pm/h allow long-term data acquisition series and the recording of site-specific spectroscopy maps. Results obtained on Cu(111) and graphite illustrate the microscope's performance.

  9. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: general dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  10. Vertically polarizing undulator with dynamic compensation of magnetic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelnikov, N.; Vasserman, I.; Xu, J.; Jensen, D.; Schmidt, O.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Suthar, K.; Moog, E. R.; Pile, G.; Gluskin, E.

    2017-01-01

    As part of the R&D program of the LCLS-II project, a novel 3.4-meter-long undulator prototype with horizontal magnetic field and dynamic force compensation has recently been developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Previous steps in this development were the shorter 0.8-meter-long and 2.8-meter-long prototypes. Extensive mechanical and magnetic testing were carried out for each prototype, and each prototype was magnetically tuned using magnetic shims. The resulting performance of the 3.4-meter-long undulator prototype meets all requirements for the LCLS-II insertion device, including limits on the field integrals, phase errors, higher-order magnetic moments, and electron-beam trajectory for all operational gaps, as well as the reproducibility and accuracy of the gap settings.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoli; Egberts, Philip; Dong, Yalin; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-06-12

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to model amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). In this novel simulation, the model AFM tip responds to both tip-substrate interactions and to a sinusoidal excitation signal. The amplitude and phase shift of the tip oscillation observed in the simulation and their variation with tip-sample distance were found to be consistent with previously reported trends from experiments and theory. These simulation results were also fit to an expression enabling estimation of the energy dissipation, which was found to be smaller than that in a corresponding experiment. The difference was analyzed in terms of the effects of tip size and substrate thickness. Development of this model is the first step toward using MD to gain insight into the atomic-scale phenomena that occur during an AM-AFM measurement.

  12. Vertically Polarizing Undulator with Dynamic Compensation of Magnetic Forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strelnikov, N.; Vasserman, I.; Xu, J.; Jensen, D.; Schmidt, O.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Suthar, K.; Moog, E. R.; Pile, G.; Gluskin, E.

    2017-01-20

    As part of the R&D program of the LCLS-II project, a novel 3.4-meter-long undulator prototype with horizontal magnetic field and dynamic force compensation has recently been developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Previous steps in this development were the shorter 0.8-meter-long and 2.8-meter-long prototypes. Extensive mechanical and magnetic testing was carried out for each prototype, and each prototype was magnetically tuned using magnetic shims. The resulting performance of the 3.4-meter-long undulator prototype meets all requirements for the LCLS-II insertion device, including limits on the field integrals, phase errors, higher-order magnetic moments, and electron-beam trajectory for all operational gaps, as well as the reproducibility and accuracy of the gap settings.

  13. Probing the interaction of individual amino acids with inorganic surfaces using atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvag, Yair; Gutkin, Vitaly; Reches, Meital

    2013-08-13

    This article describes single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements of the interaction between individual amino acid residues and inorganic surfaces in an aqueous solution. In each measurement, there is an amino acid residue, lysine, glutamate, phenylalanine, leucine, or glutamine, and each represents a class of amino acids (positively or negatively charged, aromatic, nonpolar, and polar). Force-distance curves measured the interaction of the individual amino acid bound to a silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip with a silcon substrate, cut from a single-crystal wafer, or mica. Using this method, we were able to measure low adhesion forces (below 300 pN) and could clearly determine the strength of interactions between the individual amino acid residues and the inorganic substrate. In addition, we observed how changes in the pH and ionic strength of the solution affected the adsorption of the residues to the substrates. Our results pinpoint the important role of hydrophobic interactions among the amino acids and the substrate, where hydrophobic phenylalanine exhibited the strongest adhesion to a silicon substrate. Additionally, electrostatic interactions also contributed to the adsorption of amino acid residues to inorganic substrates. A change in the pH or ionic strength values of the buffer altered the strength of interactions among the amino acids and the substrate. We concluded that the interplay between the hydrophobic forces and electrostatic interactions will determine the strength of adsorption among the amino acids and the surface. Overall, these results contribute to our understanding of the interaction at the organic-inorganic interface. These results may have implications for our perception of the specificity of peptide binding to inorganic surfaces. Consequently, it would possibly lead to a better design of composite materials and devices.

  14. Non-linear optical studies of adsorbates: Spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiangdong.

    1989-08-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we have established a systematic procedure to apply the surface optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) technique to study surface dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, we have developed a novel technique for studies of molecular surface diffusions. In this technique, the laser-induced desorption with two interfering laser beams is used to produce a monolayer grating of adsorbates. The monolayer grating is detected with diffractions of optical SHG. By monitoring the first-order second-harmonic diffraction, we can follow the time evolution of the grating modulation from which we are able to deduce the diffusion constant of the adsorbates on the surface. We have successfully applied this technique to investigate the surface diffusion of CO on Ni(111). The unique advantages of this novel technique will enable us to readily study anisotropy of a surface diffusion with variable grating orientation, and to investigate diffusion processes of a large dynamic range with variable grating spacings. In the second part of this work, we demonstrate that optical infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) from surfaces can be used as a viable surface vibrational spectroscopic technique. We have successfully recorded the first vibrational spectrum of a monolayer of adsorbates using optical infrared-visible SFG. The qualitative and quantitative correlation of optical SFG with infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies are examined and experimentally demonstrated. We have further investigated the possibility to use transient infrared-visible SFG to probe vibrational transients and ultrafast relaxations on surfaces. 146 refs.

  15. Structure, spectroscopy and dynamics of layered H2O and CO2 ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; Plattner, Nuria; Meuwly, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of structural, spectroscopic and dynamical properties of mixed water–carbon dioxide (H2O–CO2) ices are discussed over temperature ranges relevant to atmospheric and astrophysical conditions. The simulations employ multipolar force fields to represent electrostatic interactions which are essential for spectroscopic and dynamical investigations. It is found that at the water/CO2 interface the water surface acts as a template for the CO2 component. The rotational reorientation times in both bulk phases agree well with experimental observations. A pronounced temperature effect on the CO2 reorientation time is observed between 100 K and 200 K. At the interface, water reorientation times are nearly twice as long compared to water in the bulk. The spectroscopy of such ices is rich in the far-infrared region of the spectrum and can be related to translational and rotational modes. Furthermore, spectroscopic signatures mediated across the water/CO2 interface are found in this frequency range (around 440 cm−1). These results will be particularly important for new airborne experiments such as planned for SOFIA.

  16. Dynamic Force Identification for Beamlike Structures Using an Improved Dynamic Stiffness Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Chen

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a procedure of dynamic force identification for beamlike structures is developed based on an improved dynamic stiffness method. In this procedure, the entire structure is first divided into substructures according to the excitation locations and the measured response sites. Each substructure is then represented by an equivalent element. The resulting model only retains the degree of freedom (DOF associated with the excitations and the measured responses and the DOF corresponding to the boundaries of the structures. Because the technique partly bypasses the processes of modal parameter extraction, global matrix inversion, and model reduction, it can eliminate many of the approximations and errors that may be introduced during these processes. The principle of the method is described in detail and its efficiency is demonstrated via numerical simulations of three different structures. The sensitivity of the estimated force to random noise is discussed and the limitation of the technique is pointed out.

  17. Dynamic force matching: A method for constructing dynamical coarse-grained models with realistic time dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davtyan, Aram; Dama, James F.; Voth, Gregory A. [Department of Chemistry, The James Franck Institute, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and Computation Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Andersen, Hans C., E-mail: hca@stanford.edu [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    Coarse-grained (CG) models of molecular systems, with fewer mechanical degrees of freedom than an all-atom model, are used extensively in chemical physics. It is generally accepted that a coarse-grained model that accurately describes equilibrium structural properties (as a result of having a well constructed CG potential energy function) does not necessarily exhibit appropriate dynamical behavior when simulated using conservative Hamiltonian dynamics for the CG degrees of freedom on the CG potential energy surface. Attempts to develop accurate CG dynamic models usually focus on replacing Hamiltonian motion by stochastic but Markovian dynamics on that surface, such as Langevin or Brownian dynamics. However, depending on the nature of the system and the extent of the coarse-graining, a Markovian dynamics for the CG degrees of freedom may not be appropriate. In this paper, we consider the problem of constructing dynamic CG models within the context of the Multi-Scale Coarse-graining (MS-CG) method of Voth and coworkers. We propose a method of converting a MS-CG model into a dynamic CG model by adding degrees of freedom to it in the form of a small number of fictitious particles that interact with the CG degrees of freedom in simple ways and that are subject to Langevin forces. The dynamic models are members of a class of nonlinear systems interacting with special heat baths that were studied by Zwanzig [J. Stat. Phys. 9, 215 (1973)]. The properties of the fictitious particles can be inferred from analysis of the dynamics of all-atom simulations of the system of interest. This is analogous to the fact that the MS-CG method generates the CG potential from analysis of equilibrium structures observed in all-atom simulation data. The dynamic models generate a non-Markovian dynamics for the CG degrees of freedom, but they can be easily simulated using standard molecular dynamics programs. We present tests of this method on a series of simple examples that demonstrate that

  18. Unfolding DNA condensates produced by DNA-like charged depletants: A force spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, C. H. M.; Rocha, M. S.; Ramos, E. B.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we have measured, by means of optical tweezers, forces acting on depletion-induced DNA condensates due to the presence of the DNA-like charged protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). The stretching and unfolding measurements performed on the semi-flexible DNA chain reveal (1) the softening of the uncondensed DNA contour length and (2) a mechanical behavior strikingly different from those previously observed: the force-extension curves of BSA-induced DNA condensates lack the "saw-tooth" pattern and applied external forces as high as ≈80 pN are unable to fully unfold the condensed DNA contour length. This last mechanical experimental finding is in agreement with force-induced "unpacking" detailed Langevin dynamics simulations recently performed by Cortini et al. on model rod-like shaped condensates. Furthermore, a simple thermodynamics analysis of the unfolding process has enabled us to estimate the free energy involved in the DNA condensation: the estimated depletion-induced interactions vary linearly with both the condensed DNA contour length and the BSA concentration, in agreement with the analytical and numerical analysis performed on model DNA condensates. We hope that future additional experiments can decide whether the rod-like morphology is the actual one we are dealing with (e.g. pulling experiments coupled with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy).

  19. Probing weak force induced parity violation by high resolution mid-infrared molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Tokunaga, Sean K; Auguste, Frédéric; Shelkovnikov, Alexander; Daussy, Christophe; Amy-Klein, Anne; Chardonnet, Christian; Darquié, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    To date no experiment has reached the level of sensitivity required to observe weak nuclear force induced parity violation (PV) energy differences in chiral molecules. In this paper, we present the approach, adopted at Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers (LPL), to measure frequency differences in the vibrational spectrum of enantiomers. We review different spectroscopic methods developed at LPL leading to the highest resolutions, as well as 20 years of CO2 laser stabilization work enabling such precise measurements. After a first attempt to observe PV vibrational frequency shifts using sub-Doppler saturated absorption spectroscopy in a cell, we are currently aiming at an experiment based on Doppler-free two-photon Ramsey interferometry on a supersonic beam. We report on our latest progress towards observing PV with chiral organo-metallic complexes containing a heavy rhenium atom.

  20. Modelling multi-pulse population dynamics from ultrafast spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luuk J G W van Wilderen

    Full Text Available Current advanced laser, optics and electronics technology allows sensitive recording of molecular dynamics, from single resonance to multi-colour and multi-pulse experiments. Extracting the occurring (bio- physical relevant pathways via global analysis of experimental data requires a systematic investigation of connectivity schemes. Here we present a Matlab-based toolbox for this purpose. The toolbox has a graphical user interface which facilitates the application of different reaction models to the data to generate the coupled differential equations. Any time-dependent dataset can be analysed to extract time-independent correlations of the observables by using gradient or direct search methods. Specific capabilities (i.e. chirp and instrument response function for the analysis of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopic data are included. The inclusion of an extra pulse that interacts with a transient phase can help to disentangle complex interdependent pathways. The modelling of pathways is therefore extended by new theory (which is included in the toolbox that describes the finite bleach (orientation effect of single and multiple intense polarised femtosecond pulses on an ensemble of randomly oriented particles in the presence of population decay. For instance, the generally assumed flat-top multimode beam profile is adapted to a more realistic Gaussian shape, exposing the need for several corrections for accurate anisotropy measurements. In addition, the (selective excitation (photoselection and anisotropy of populations that interact with single or multiple intense polarised laser pulses is demonstrated as function of power density and beam profile. Using example values of real world experiments it is calculated to what extent this effectively orients the ensemble of particles. Finally, the implementation includes the interaction with multiple pulses in addition to depth averaging in optically dense samples. In summary, we show that mathematical

  1. Studies of Molecular Dynamics by Solid State Deuterium NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baiyi

    The rotational dynamics of molecules in a number of solid systems were followed by variable temperature deuterium (^2H), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy via changes in the spectral lineshapes and spin-lattice relaxation times (T _1). First the pure solid trimethylamine-borane adduct, (CH_3)_3NBH_3, was studied. For a methyl deuterated sample, T _1 measurements yielded two T_1 minima, 6.9 ms and 4.3 ms corresponding to the slowing of methyl and trimethyl rotation, respectively, with decreasing temperature. Activation energies for methyl and trimethyl rotation, obtained from fitting the T _1 curve as a function of temperature, were 32.8 and 15.0 kJ/mol, respectively; simulations of the spectral lineshapes gave 26.6 and 18.9 kT/mol, respectively. Fitting of the ^2H T_1 curve for the borane deuterated sample gave a BH _3 rotation activation energy of 14.1 kT/mol and a ^2H quadrupolar coupling constant, chi, of 101 kHz. The activation energy for BH_3 rotation obtained from the spectral lineshape simulations gave 12.6 kT/mol. A series of deuterated organic chalcogen cations: (CH_3)_3S^+, (CH_3)_3Se^+ and (CH_3)_3Te^+, were ion exchanged into the cavities of sodium Mordenite LZ-M5 and the dynamics of these guests within the hydrated zeolite were followed by ^2H NMR. All three undergo isotropic motion above about -80 to -90^circC. Below this temperature two superimposed ^2H powder spectra appear; the broad lineshape is consistent with only methyl rotation in a hindered, coordinated site, and the other narrow lineshape is due to both methyl and trimethyl rotation in a less hindered, uncoordinated site. As the temperature is lowered the population of the lower energy coordinated site increases. Relative peak areas yield adsorption enthalpies of 6.7, 7.8 and 10.0 kJ/mol for (CH_3)_3S^+, (CH_3)_3Se^+ and (CH_3)_3Te^+, respectively. The series of methyl deuterated ammonium and phosphonium cations: (CH_3)NH_3^+ , (CH_3)_2NH^+ , (CH_3)_3NH^+ and (CH_3)_4P^+ , were

  2. Combined force spectroscopy, AFM and calorimetric studies to reveal the nanostructural organization of biomimetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Germà, C; Morros, A; Montero, M T; Hernández-Borrell, J; Domènech, Ò

    2014-10-01

    In this work we studied a binary lipid matrix of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (POPG), a composition that mimics the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. More specifically, liposomes with varying fractions of POPG were analysed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and a binary phase diagram of the system was created. Additionally, we performed atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) of similar compositions at different temperatures, in order to create a pseudo-binary phase diagram specific to this membrane model. AFM study of SLBs is of particular interest, as it is conceived as the most adequate technique not only for studying lipid bilayer systems but also for imaging and even nanomanipulating inserted membrane proteins. The construction of the above-mentioned phase diagram enabled us to grasp better the thermodynamics of the thermal lipid transition from a gel-like POPE:POPG phase system to a more fluid phase system. Finally, AFM force spectroscopy (FS) was used to determine the nanomechanics of these two lipid phases at 27°C and at different POPG fractions. The resulting data correlated with the specific composition of each phase was calculated from the AFM phase diagram obtained. All the experiments were done in the presence of 10 mM of Ca(2+), as this ion is commonly used when performing AFM with negatively charged phospholipids.

  3. Traction force dynamics predict gap formation in activated endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Erik T; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Hordijk, Peter L

    2016-09-10

    In many pathological conditions the endothelium becomes activated and dysfunctional, resulting in hyperpermeability and plasma leakage. No specific therapies are available yet to control endothelial barrier function, which is regulated by inter-endothelial junctions and the generation of acto-myosin-based contractile forces in the context of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. However, the spatiotemporal distribution and stimulus-induced reorganization of these integral forces remain largely unknown. Traction force microscopy of human endothelial monolayers was used to visualize contractile forces in resting cells and during thrombin-induced hyperpermeability. Simultaneously, information about endothelial monolayer integrity, adherens junctions and cytoskeletal proteins (F-actin) were captured. This revealed a heterogeneous distribution of traction forces, with nuclear areas showing lower and cell-cell junctions higher traction forces than the whole-monolayer average. Moreover, junctional forces were asymmetrically distributed among neighboring cells. Force vector orientation analysis showed a good correlation with the alignment of F-actin and revealed contractile forces in newly formed filopodia and lamellipodia-like protrusions within the monolayer. Finally, unstable areas, showing high force fluctuations within the monolayer were prone to form inter-endothelial gaps upon stimulation with thrombin. To conclude, contractile traction forces are heterogeneously distributed within endothelial monolayers and force instability, rather than force magnitude, predicts the stimulus-induced formation of intercellular gaps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Implementation of force distribution analysis for molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifert Christian

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The way mechanical stress is distributed inside and propagated by proteins and other biopolymers largely defines their function. Yet, determining the network of interactions propagating internal strain remains a challenge for both, experiment and theory. Based on molecular dynamics simulations, we developed force distribution analysis (FDA, a method that allows visualizing strain propagation in macromolecules. Results To be immediately applicable to a wide range of systems, FDA was implemented as an extension to Gromacs, a commonly used package for molecular simulations. The FDA code comes with an easy-to-use command line interface and can directly be applied to every system built using Gromacs. We provide an additional R-package providing functions for advanced statistical analysis and presentation of the FDA data. Conclusions Using FDA, we were able to explain the origin of mechanical robustness in immunoglobulin domains and silk fibers. By elucidating propagation of internal strain upon ligand binding, we previously also successfully revealed the functionality of a stiff allosteric protein. FDA thus has the potential to be a valuable tool in the investigation and rational design of mechanical properties in proteins and nano-materials.

  5. Exploring the molecular forces within and between CbsA S-layer proteins using single molecule force spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbelen, Claire [Unite de chimie des interfaces, Universite catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud 2/18, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Antikainen, Jenni; Korhonen, Timo K. [General Microbiology, Faculty of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Fin-00014 (Finland); Dufrene, Yves F. [Unite de chimie des interfaces, Universite catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud 2/18, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)], E-mail: dufrene@cifa.ucl.ac.be

    2007-10-15

    We used single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the molecular forces driving the folding and assembly of the S-layer protein CbsA. Force curves recorded between tips and supports modified with CbsA proteins showed sawtooth patterns with multiple force peaks of 58{+-}26 pN that we attribute to the unfolding of {alpha}-helices, in agreement with earlier secondary structure predictions. The average unfolding force increased with the pulling speed but was independent on the interaction time. Force curves obtained for CbsA peptides truncated in their C-terminal region showed similar periodic features, except that fewer force peaks were seen. Furthermore, the average unfolding force was 83{+-}45 pN, suggesting the domains were more stable. By contrast, cationic peptides truncated in their N-terminal region showed single force peaks of 366{+-}149 pN, presumably reflecting intermolecular electrostatic bridges rather than unfolding events. Interestingly, these large intermolecular forces increased not only with pulling speed but also with interaction time. We expect that the intra- and intermolecular forces measured here may play a significant role in controlling the stability and assembly of the CbsA protein.

  6. Toward the fourth dimension of membrane protein structure: insight into dynamics from spin-labeling EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHaourab, Hassane S; Steed, P Ryan; Kazmier, Kelli

    2011-11-09

    Trapping membrane proteins in the confines of a crystal lattice obscures dynamic modes essential for interconversion between multiple conformations in the functional cycle. Moreover, lattice forces could conspire with detergent solubilization to stabilize a minor conformer in an ensemble thus confounding mechanistic interpretation. Spin labeling in conjunction with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy offers an exquisite window into membrane protein dynamics in the native-like environment of a lipid bilayer. Systematic application of spin labeling and EPR identifies sequence-specific secondary structures, defines their topology and their packing in the tertiary fold. Long range distance measurements (60 Å-80 Å) between pairs of spin labels enable quantitative analysis of equilibrium dynamics and triggered conformational changes. This review highlights the contribution of spin labeling to bridging structure and mechanism. Efforts to develop methods for determining structures from EPR restraints and to increase sensitivity and throughput promise to expand spin labeling applications in membrane protein structural biology.

  7. Modeling of Dynamic Fluid Forces in Fast Switching Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen;

    2015-01-01

    force, but these models are computationally expensive and are not suitable for evaluating large numbers of different operation conditions or even design optimization. In the present paper, an effort is done to describe these fluid forces and their origin. An example of the total opposing fluid force...

  8. AFM force spectroscopy reveals how subtle structural differences affect the interaction strength between Candida albicans and DC-SIGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Riet, Joost; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Figdor, Carl G; Cambi, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    The fungus Candida albicans is the most common cause of mycotic infections in immunocompromised hosts. Little is known about the initial interactions between Candida and immune cell receptors, such as the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intracellular cell adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3)-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), because a detailed characterization at the structural level is lacking. DC-SIGN recognizes specific Candida-associated molecular patterns, that is, mannan structures present in the cell wall of Candida. The molecular recognition mechanism is however poorly understood. We postulated that small differences in mannan-branching may result in considerable differences in the binding affinity. Here, we exploit atomic force microscope-based dynamic force spectroscopy with single Candida cells to gain better insight in the carbohydrate recognition capacity of DC-SIGN. We demonstrate that slight differences in the N-mannan structure of Candida, that is, the absence or presence of a phosphomannan side chain, results in differences in the recognition by DC-SIGN as follows: (i) it contributes to the compliance of the outer cell wall of Candida, and (ii) its presence results in a higher binding energy of 1.6 kB T. The single-bond affinity of tetrameric DC-SIGN for wild-type C. albicans is ~10.7 kB T and a dissociation constant kD of 23 μM, which is relatively strong compared with other carbohydrate-protein interactions described in the literature. In conclusion, this study shows that DC-SIGN specifically recognizes mannan patterns on C. albicans with high affinity. Knowledge on the binding pocket of DC-SIGN and its pathogenic ligands will lead to a better understanding of how fungal-associated carbohydrate structures are recognized by receptors of the immune system and can ultimately contribute to the development of new anti-fungal drugs.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF THE DYNAMIC BUCKLING OF DOUBLEWALLED CARBON NANOTUBE SUBJECTED TO AXIAL PERIODIC DISTURBING FORCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHA Feng-huan; ZHAO Long-mao; YANG Gui-tong

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic response of a double-walled carbon nanotube embedded in elastic medium subjected to periodic disturbing forces is investigated. Investigation of the dynamic buckling of a double-walled carbon nanotube develops continuum model. The effect of the van der Waals forces between two tubes and the surrounding elastic medium for axial dynamic buckling are considered. The buckling model subjected to periodic disturbing forces and the critical axial strain and the critical frequencies are given. It is found that the critical axial strain of the embedded multi-walled carbon nanotube due to the intertube van der Waals forces is lower than that of an embedded single-walled carbon nanotube. The van der Waals forces and the surrounding elastic medium affect region of dynamic instability. The van der Waals forces increase the critical frequencies of a double-walled carbon nanotube. The effect of the surrounding elastic medium for the critical frequencies is small.

  10. Dynamic force microscopy simulator (dForce: A tool for planning and understanding tapping and bimodal AFM experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio V. Guzman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a simulation environment, dForce, which can be used for a better understanding of dynamic force microscopy experiments. The simulator presents the cantilever–tip dynamics for two dynamic AFM methods, tapping mode AFM and bimodal AFM. It can be applied for a wide variety of experimental situations in air or liquid. The code provides all the variables and parameters relevant in those modes, for example, the instantaneous deflection and tip–surface force, velocity, virial, dissipated energy, sample deformation and peak force as a function of time or distance. The simulator includes a variety of interactions and contact mechanics models to describe AFM experiments including: van der Waals, Hertz, DMT, JKR, bottom effect cone correction, linear viscoelastic forces or the standard linear solid viscoelastic model. We have compared two numerical integration methods to select the one that offers optimal accuracy and speed. The graphical user interface has been designed to facilitate the navigation of non-experts in simulations. Finally, the accuracy of dForce has been tested against numerical simulations performed during the last 18 years.

  11. Dynamic force microscopy simulator (dForce): A tool for planning and understanding tapping and bimodal AFM experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Horacio V; Garcia, Pablo D; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    We present a simulation environment, dForce, which can be used for a better understanding of dynamic force microscopy experiments. The simulator presents the cantilever-tip dynamics for two dynamic AFM methods, tapping mode AFM and bimodal AFM. It can be applied for a wide variety of experimental situations in air or liquid. The code provides all the variables and parameters relevant in those modes, for example, the instantaneous deflection and tip-surface force, velocity, virial, dissipated energy, sample deformation and peak force as a function of time or distance. The simulator includes a variety of interactions and contact mechanics models to describe AFM experiments including: van der Waals, Hertz, DMT, JKR, bottom effect cone correction, linear viscoelastic forces or the standard linear solid viscoelastic model. We have compared two numerical integration methods to select the one that offers optimal accuracy and speed. The graphical user interface has been designed to facilitate the navigation of non-experts in simulations. Finally, the accuracy of dForce has been tested against numerical simulations performed during the last 18 years.

  12. Modeling Robot Dynamic Performance for Endpoint Force Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Task Dynamics 55 2.5.1 The Dynamic Workpiece Model 55 2.5.2 Adding Robot Dynamics 56 2.5.3 Adding Actuator Dynamics 56 Tabie I o iiau 6 2.6 Grip...motion control system. Robot dynamics couple with the task dynamics in a very complex way. When the robot makes contact with the environment, the impact...robot flexibility or actuator dynamics. 2.5.2 Adding Robot Dynamics Figure 2.29 shows the robot now represented by two lumped masses, as in the robot

  13. Mobile charge generation dynamics in P3HT: PCBM observed by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, D. G.; Krebs, Frederik C; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale.......Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale....

  14. Force spectroscopy of membrane hardness of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells before and after differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sangwoo; Yang, Woochul; Choi, Yun Kyong; Park, Jung Keuck

    2014-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is utilized in many studies for measuring the structure and the physical characteristics of soft and bio materials. In particular, the force spectroscopy function in the AFM system allows us to explore the mechanical properties of bio cells. In this study, we probe the variation in the membrane hardness of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells (SH-cells) before and after differentiation by using force spectroscopy. The SH-cell, which is usually differentiated by using a chemical treatment with retinoic acid (RA), is a neuronal cell line employed widely as an in-vitro model for neuroscience research. In force spectroscopy, the force-distance curves are obtained from both the original and the RA-treated cells while the AFM tip approaches and pushes on the cell membranes. The slope deduced from linear region in the force-distance curve is the spring constant and corresponds to the hardness of the cell membrane. The spring constant of the RA-treated cells (0.597 ± 0.010 nN/nm) was smaller than that of the original cells (0.794 ± 0.010 nN/nm), reflecting a hardness decrease in the cells differentiated with the RA treatments. The results clearly demonstrated that the differentiated cells are softer than the original cells. The change in the elasticity of the differentiated cells might be caused by morphological modification during differentiation process. We suggest that force spectroscopy can be employed as a novel method to determine the degree of differentiation of stem cells into various functional cells.

  15. Force Spectroscopy of Individual Stimulus-Responsive Poly(ferrocenyldimethylsilane) Chains: Towards a Redox-Driven Macromolecular Motor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zou, Shan; Hempenius, Mark A.; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, G. Julius

    2006-01-01

    Progress in the development of a redox-driven macromolecular motor and the characterization of its redox-mechanical cycle using electrochemical AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is described. The elasticities of individual neutral and oxidized poly(ferrocenyldimethylsilane) (PFS) m

  16. Dynamics of an [Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}(SPh){sub 4}{sup 2-} cluster explored via IR, Raman, and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS)-analysis using {sup 36}S substitution, DFT calculations, and empirical force fields.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Y.; Koutmos, M.; Case, D.A.; Coucouvanis, D.; Wang, H.; Cramer, S.P.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of California; LBNL; The Scripps Research Inst.; Univ. of Michigan

    2006-01-01

    We have used four vibrational spectroscopies--FT-IR, FT-Raman, resonance Raman, and {sup 57}Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS)--to study the normal modes of the Fe-S cluster in [(n-Bu){sub 4}N]{sub 2}[Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}(SPh){sub 4}]. This [Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}(SR){sub 4}]{sup 2-} complex serves as a model for the clusters in 4Fe ferredoxins and high-potential iron proteins (HiPIPs). The IR spectra exhibited differences above and below the 243 K phase transition. Significant shifts with {sup 36}S substitution into the bridging S positions were also observed. The NRVS results were in good agreement with the low temperature data from the conventional spectroscopies.The NRVS spectra were interpreted by normal mode analysis using optimized Urey-Bradley force fields (UBFF) as well as from DFT theory. For the UBFF calculations, the parameters were refined by comparing calculated and observed NRVS frequencies and intensities. The frequency shifts after {sup 36}S substitution were used as an additional constraint. A D{sub 2d} symmetry Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}S{sub 4} model could explain most of the observed frequencies, but a better match to the observed intensities was obtained when the ligand aromatic rings were included for a D{sub 2d} Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4}(SPh){sub 4} model. The best results were obtained using the low temperature structure without symmetry constraints. In addition to stretching and bending vibrations, low frequency modes between 50 and 100 cm{sup -1} were observed. These modes, which have not been seen before, are interpreted as twisting motions with opposing sides of the cube rotating in opposite directions. In contrast with a recent paper on a related Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4} cluster, we find no need to assign a large fraction of the low frequency NRVS intensity to rotational lattice modes. We also reassign the 430 cm{sup -1} band as primarily an elongation of the thiophenolate ring, with 10% terminal Fe-S stretch character. This study illustrates the

  17. A Simple Bioconjugate Attachment Protocol for Use in Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy Experiments Based on Mixed Self-Assembled Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Ouberai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Single molecule force spectroscopy is a technique that can be used to probe the interaction force between individual biomolecular species. We focus our attention on the tip and sample coupling chemistry, which is crucial to these experiments. We utilised a novel approach of mixed self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols in conjunction with a heterobifunctional crosslinker. The effectiveness of the protocol is demonstrated by probing the biotin-avidin interaction. We measured unbinding forces comparable to previously reported values measured at similar loading rates. Specificity tests also demonstrated a significant decrease in recognition after blocking with free avidin.

  18. Accelerating Steered Molecular Dynamics: Toward Smaller Velocities in Forced Unfolding Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2016-03-08

    The simulation of forced unfolding experiments, in which proteins are pulled apart, is conventionally done using steered molecular dynamics. We present here a hybrid scheme in which accelerated molecular dynamics is used together with steered molecular dynamics. We show that the new scheme changes the force-distance curves mainly in the region around the force maximum and thus demonstrate that the improved equilibration of the protein-solvent system brought about by using accelerated molecular dynamics makes the simulation more comparable to experimental data.

  19. Probing molecular interaction in ionic liquids by low frequency spectroscopy: Coulomb energy, hydrogen bonding and dispersion forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumino, Koichi; Reimann, Sebastian; Ludwig, Ralf

    2014-10-28

    Ionic liquids are defined as salts composed solely of ions with melting points below 100 °C. These remarkable liquids have unique and fascinating properties and offer new opportunities for science and technology. New combinations of ions provide changing physical properties and thus novel potential applications for this class of liquid materials. To a large extent, the structure and properties of ionic liquids are determined by the intermolecular interaction between anions and cations. In this perspective we show that far infrared and terahertz spectroscopy are suitable methods for studying the cation-anion interaction in these Coulomb fluids. The interpretation of the measured low frequency spectra is supported by density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. We present results for selected aprotic and protic ionic liquids and their mixtures with molecular solvents. In particular, we focus on the strength and type of intermolecular interaction and how both parameters are influenced by the character of the ions and their combinations. We show that the total interaction between cations and anions is a result of a subtle balance between Coulomb forces, hydrogen bonds and dispersion forces. For protic ionic liquids we could measure distinct vibrational modes in the low frequency spectra indicating clearly the cation-anion interaction characterized by linear and medium to strong hydrogen bonds. Using isotopic substitution we have been able to dissect frequency shifts related to pure interaction strength between cations and anions and to different reduced masses only. In this context we also show how these different types of interaction may influence the physical properties of ionic liquids such as the melting point, viscosity or enthalpy of vaporization. Furthermore we demonstrate that low frequency spectroscopy can also be used for studying ion speciation. Low vibrational features can be assigned to contact ion pairs and solvent separated

  20. Forcing of stratospheric chemistry and dynamics during the Dalton Minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Anet

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The response of atmospheric chemistry and climate to volcanic eruptions and a decrease in solar activity during the Dalton Minimum is investigated with the fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-chemistry general circulation model SOCOL-MPIOM covering the time period 1780 to 1840 AD. We carried out several sensitivity ensemble experiments to separate the effects of (i reduced solar ultra-violet (UV irradiance, (ii reduced solar visible and near infrared irradiance, (iii enhanced galactic cosmic ray intensity as well as less intensive solar energetic proton events and auroral electron precipitation, and (iv volcanic aerosols. The introduced changes of UV irradiance and volcanic aerosols significantly influence stratospheric climate in the early 19th century, whereas changes in the visible part of the spectrum and energetic particles have smaller effects. A reduction of UV irradiance by 15% causes global ozone decrease below the stratopause reaching 8% in the midlatitudes at 5 hPa and a significant stratospheric cooling of up to 2 °C in the midstratosphere and to 6 °C in the lower mesosphere. Changes in energetic particle precipitation lead only to minor changes in the yearly averaged temperature fields in the stratosphere. Volcanic aerosols heat the tropical lower stratosphere allowing more water vapor to enter the tropical stratosphere, which, via HOx reactions, decreases upper stratospheric and mesospheric ozone by roughly 4%. Conversely, heterogeneous chemistry on aerosols reduces stratospheric NOx leading to a 12% ozone increase in the tropics, whereas a decrease in ozone of up to 5% is found over Antarctica in boreal winter. The linear superposition of the different contributions is not equivalent to the response obtained in a simulation when all forcing factors are applied during the DM – this effect is especially well visible for NOx/NOy. Thus, this study highlights the non-linear behavior of the coupled chemistry-climate system. Finally, we

  1. Force feedback coupling with dynamics for physical simulation of product assembly and operation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenyu; Tan, Jianrong; Duan, Guifang; Fu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Most existing force feedback methods are still difficult to meet the requirements of real-time force calculation in virtual assembly and operation with complex objects. In addition, there is often an assumption that the controlled objects are completely free and the target object is only completely fixed or free, thus, the dynamics of the kinematic chain where the controlled objects are located are neglected during the physical simulation of the product manipulation with force feedback interaction. This paper proposes a physical simulation method of product assembly and operation manipulation based on statistically learned contact force prediction model and the coupling of force feedback and dynamics. In the proposed method, based on hidden Markov model (HMM) and local weighting learning (LWL), contact force prediction model is constructed, which can estimate the contact force in real time during interaction. Based on computational load balance model, the computing resources are dynamically assigned and the dynamics integral step is optimized. In addition, smoothing process is performed to the force feedback on the synchronization points. Consequently, we can solve the coupling and synchronization problems of high-frequency feedback force servo, low-frequency dynamics solver servo and scene rendering servo, and realize highly stable and accurate force feedback in the physical simulation of product assembly and operation manipulation. This research proposes a physical simulation method of product assembly and operation manipulation.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Atomic Force Microscopy at the Water-Muscovite Interface: Hydration Layer Structure and Force Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Amano, Ken-ichi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-04-19

    With the development of atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is now possible to detect the buried liquid-solid interfacial structure in three dimensions at the atomic scale. One of the model surfaces used for AFM is the muscovite surface because it is atomically flat after cleavage along the basal plane. Although it is considered that force profiles obtained by AFM reflect the interfacial structures (e.g., muscovite surface and water structure), the force profiles are not straightforward because of the lack of a quantitative relationship between the force and the interfacial structure. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the relationship between the muscovite-water interfacial structure and the measured AFM force using a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip. We provide divided force profiles, where the force contributions from each water layer at the interface are shown. They reveal that the first hydration layer is dominant in the total force from water even after destruction of the layer. Moreover, the lateral structure of the first hydration layer transcribes the muscovite surface structure. It resembles the experimentally resolved surface structure of muscovite in previous AFM studies. The local density profile of water between the tip and the surface provides further insight into the relationship between the water structure and the detected force structure. The detected force structure reflects the basic features of the atomic structure for the local hydration layers. However, details including the peak-peak distance in the force profile (force-distance curve) differ from those in the density profile (density-distance curve) because of disturbance by the tip.

  3. Stimulated Raman spectroscopy and nanoscopy of molecules using near field photon induced forces without resonant electronic enhancement gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Huang, Fei; Nowak, Derek; Kumar Wickramasinghe, H.

    2016-06-01

    We report on stimulated Raman spectroscopy and nanoscopy of molecules, excited without resonant electronic enhancement gain, and recorded using near field photon induced forces. Photon-induced interaction forces between the sharp metal coated silicon tip of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a sample resulting from stimulated Raman excitation were detected. We controlled the tip to sample spacing using the higher order flexural eigenmodes of the AFM cantilever, enabling the tip to come very close to the sample. As a result, the detection sensitivity was increased compared with previous work on Raman force microscopy. Raman vibrational spectra of azobenzene thiol and l-phenylalanine were measured and found to agree well with published results. Near-field force detection eliminates the need for far-field optical spectrometer detection. Recorded images show spatial resolution far below the optical diffraction limit. Further optimization and use of ultrafast pulsed lasers could push the detection sensitivity towards the single molecule limit.

  4. Nanostructure and force spectroscopy analysis of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingqian; Wang, Jiongkun; Cai, Jiye; Wu, Yangzhe; Wang, Xiaoping

    2008-09-12

    To date, nanoscale imaging of the morphological changes and adhesion force of CD4(+) T cells during in vitro activation remains largely unreported. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the morphological changes and specific binding forces in resting and activated human peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells. The AFM images revealed that the volume of activated CD4(+) T cells increased and the ultrastructure of these cells also became complex. Using a functionalized AFM tip, the strength of the specific binding force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was found to be approximately three times that of the unspecific force. The adhesion forces were not randomly distributed over the surface of a single activated CD4(+) T cell, indicated that the CD4 molecules concentrated into nanodomains. The magnitude of the adhesion force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction did not change markedly with the activation time. Multiple bonds involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction were measured at different activation times. These results suggest that the adhesion force involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction is highly selective and of high affinity.

  5. Unspecific membrane protein-lipid recognition: combination of AFM imaging, force spectroscopy, DSC and FRET measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Jordi H; Montero, M Teresa; Morros, Antoni; Domènech, Òscar

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we will describe in quantitative terms the unspecific recognition between lactose permease (LacY) of Escherichia coli, a polytopic model membrane protein, and one of the main components of the inner membrane of this bacterium. Supported lipid bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) (3:1, mol/mol) in the presence of Ca(2+) display lateral phase segregation that can be distinguished by atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as force spectroscopy. LacY shows preference for fluid (Lα) phases when it is reconstituted in POPE : POPG (3:1, mol/mol) proteoliposomes at a lipid-to-protein ratio of 40. When the lipid-to-protein ratio is decreased down to 0.5, two domains can be distinguished by AFM. While the upper domain is formed by self-segregated units of LacY, the lower domain is constituted only by phospholipids in gel (Lβ) phase. On the one hand, classical differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements evidenced the segregation of a population of phospholipids and point to the existence of a boundary region at the lipid-protein interface. On the other hand, Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) measurements in solution evidenced that POPE is selectively recognized by LacY. A binary pseudophase diagram of POPE : POPG built from AFM observations enables to calculate the composition of the fluid phase where LacY is inserted. These results are consistent with a model where POPE constitutes the main component of the lipid-LacY interface segregated from the fluid bulk phase where POPG predominates. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The force synergy of human digits in static and dynamic cylindrical grasps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chieh Kuo

    Full Text Available This study explores the force synergy of human digits in both static and dynamic cylindrical grasping conditions. The patterns of digit force distribution, error compensation, and the relationships among digit forces are examined to quantify the synergetic patterns and coordination of multi-finger movements. This study recruited 24 healthy participants to perform cylindrical grasps using a glass simulator under normal grasping and one-finger restricted conditions. Parameters such as the grasping force, patterns of digit force distribution, and the force coefficient of variation are determined. Correlation coefficients and principal component analysis (PCA are used to estimate the synergy strength under the dynamic grasping condition. Specific distribution patterns of digit forces are identified for various conditions. The compensation of adjacent fingers for the force in the normal direction of an absent finger agrees with the principle of error compensation. For digit forces in anti-gravity directions, the distribution patterns vary significantly by participant. The forces exerted by the thumb are closely related to those exerted by other fingers under all conditions. The index-middle and middle-ring finger pairs demonstrate a significant relationship. The PCA results show that the normal forces of digits are highly coordinated. This study reveals that normal force synergy exists under both static and dynamic cylindrical grasping conditions.

  7. PREFACE: Liquid-solid interfaces: structure and dynamics from spectroscopy and simulations Liquid-solid interfaces: structure and dynamics from spectroscopy and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2012-03-01

    /computational communities. On the experimental side, surface specific techniques, such as non-linear optical spectroscopy (sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG) and second harmonic generation (SHG)), surface sensitive x-ray scattering, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy provide information on layers of nanometric thickness at the interface. On the other hand, it is quite clear that the experiments require theoretical modelling in order to dissect the experimental results and to rationalize the different factors that contribute to the interfacial properties. In this respect molecular dynamics simulations are a major tool. While many successes have already been achieved with molecular dynamics simulations based on empirical force fields, first principles molecular dynamics simulations are now emerging as the other major approach where structure and reactivity are treated in a consistent way. Recent progress within the past 3-5 years on efficient treatments of basis sets and long range interactions in density functional theory (DFT) indeed extend such simulation capabilities to hundreds and thousands of atoms, thus allowing realistic models for interfaces to be tackled, maintaining first principles quality. Most of these simulations bring information on the structural organization of the solvent in the interfacial region between the solid and the liquid, but very few investigate the supplementary challenge of extracting vibrational spectroscopic fingerprints of the interface and, in particular, the direct modeling of the vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) non-linear spectra. The present special section reports an interesting contribution from the group of R Y Shen who pioneered VSFG optical experiments. They show how VSFG measurements can be used to unravel the behavior of interfacial water on alumina Al2O3 as a function of pH. The groups of A Hodgson and C Busse respectively provide complementary experiments based on low

  8. Force modulating dynamic disorder: A physical model of catch-slip bond transitions in receptor-ligand forced dissociation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Ou-Yang, Zhong-Can

    2006-11-01

    Recent experiments found that some adhesive receptor-ligand complexes have counterintuitive catch-slip transition behaviors: the mean lifetimes of these complexes first increase (catch) with initial application of a small external force, and then decrease (slip) when the force is beyond some threshold. In this work we suggest that the forced dissociation of these complexes might be a typical rate process with dynamic disorder. The one-dimensional force modulating Agmon-Hopfield model is used to describe the transitions in the single-bond P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1-P-selectin forced dissociation experiments, which were respectively performed in the constant force [Marshall , Nature (Landon) 423, 190 (2003)] and the ramping force [Evans , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A 98, 11281 (2004)] modes. We find that, an external force can not only accelerate the bond dissociation, but also modulate the complex from the lower-energy barrier to the higher one; the catch-slip bond transition can arise from a particular energy barrier shape. The agreement between our calculation and the experimental data is satisfactory.

  9. Dynamics of double-pulse laser produced titanium plasma inferred from thin film morphology and optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krstulović, N., E-mail: niksak@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Salamon, K., E-mail: ksalamon@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Modic, M., E-mail: martina.modic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Bišćan, M., E-mail: mbiscan@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Milat, O., E-mail: milat@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Milošević, S., E-mail: slobodan@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, dynamics of double-pulse laser produced titanium plasma was studied both directly using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and indirectly from morphological properties of deposited thin films. Both approaches yield consistent results. Ablated material was deposited in a form of thin film on the Si substrate. During deposition, plasma dynamics was monitored using optical emission spectroscopy with spatial and temporal resolutions. The influence of ablation mode (single and double) and delay time τ (delay between first and second pulses in double-pulse mode) on plasma dynamics and consequently on morphology of deposited Ti-films was studied using X-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy. Delay time τ was varied from 170 ns to 4 μs. The results show strong dependence of both emission signal and Ti-film properties, such as thickness, density and roughness, on τ. In addition, correlation of average density and thickness of film is observed. These results are discussed in terms of dependency of angular distribution and kinetic energy of plasma plume particles on τ. Advantages of using double-pulse laser deposition for possible application in thin film production are shown. - Highlights: • Ti-thin films produced by single and double pulse laser ablation mode. • Ablation mode and delay time influenced plasma plume and film characteristics. • Films are most compact for optimized delay time (thinnest, smoothest and most dense). • Plasma dynamics can be inferred from film characteristics.

  10. Mechanical Spectroscopy: Some Applications On Structural Changes And Relaxation Dynamics In Soft Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xuebang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The general trend in soft matter is to study systems of increasing complexity covering a wide range in time and frequency. Mechanical spectroscopy is a powerful tool for understanding the structure and relaxation dynamics of these materials over a large temperature range and frequency scale. In this work, we collect a few recent applications using low-frequency mechanical spectroscopy for elucidating the structural changes and relaxation dynamics in soft matter, largely based on the author’s group. We illustrate the potential of mechanical spectroscopy with three kinds of soft materials: colloids, polymers and granular systems. Examples include structural changes in colloids, segmental relaxations in amorphous polymers, and resonant dissipation of grain chains in three-dimensional media. The present work shows that mechanical spectroscopy has been applied as a necessary and complementary tool to study the dynamics of such complex systems.

  11. Membrane tube formation by motor proteins : forces and dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Gerbrand

    2005-01-01

    Membrane tubes are ubiquitous within cells. They have a diameter of approximately 50 nanometers, and are formed when a sufficiently large localized force is exerted on a membrane. Important generators of this force are the motor proteins that can move along cytoskeletal filaments. We studied

  12. DNA interaction with DAPI fluorescent dye: Force spectroscopy decouples two different binding modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, L A; Rocha, M S

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we use force spectroscopy to investigate the interaction between the DAPI fluorescent dye and the λ-DNA molecule under high (174 mM) and low (34 mM) ionic strengths. Firstly, we have measured the changes on the mechanical properties (persistence and contour lengths) of the DNA-DAPI complexes as a function of the dye concentration in the sample. Then, we use recently developed models in order to connect the behavior of both mechanical properties to the physical chemistry of the interaction. Such analysis has allowed us to identify and to decouple two main binding modes, determining the relevant physicochemical (binding) parameters for each of these modes: minor groove binding, which saturates at very low DAPI concentrations ( CT ∼ 0.50 μM) and presents equilibrium binding constants of the order of ∼10(7) M(-1) for the two ionic strengths studied; and intercalation, which starts to play a significant role only after the saturation of the first mode, presenting much smaller equilibrium binding constants (∼10(5) M(-1) ).

  13. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation.

  14. Investigating the mechanical properties of zona pellucida of whole human oocytes by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Laura; Masiero, Elena; Giolo, Elena; Martinelli, Monica; Luppi, Stefania; Dal Zilio, Simone; Delfino, Ines; Bortul, Roberta; Zweyer, Marina; Ricci, Giuseppe; Lazzarino, Marco

    2016-08-08

    The role of mechanics in numerous biological processes is nowadays recognized, while in others, such as the fertilization process, it is still neglected. In the case of oocytes the description of their mechanical properties could improve the comprehension of the oocyte-spermatozoon interaction and be helpful for application in in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics. Herein the mechanical properties of whole human oocytes (HOs) immediately after retrieval are investigated by indentation measurements with atomic force spectroscopy under physiological conditions. Measurements are performed on immature (metaphase I - MI) and mature (metaphase II - MII) HOs. According to their morphological characteristics MII-HOs are classified as "suitable" and "rejected"; these latter would be usually rejected for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). For all maturation stages we observe that the elastic response of the zona pellucida (ZP) outer layer was different and distinguishable from the rest of the ZP-HO. The elasticity of this ZP outer layer varies with maturation and quality: stiffness decreases from immature MI to good quality MII, up to poor-quality rejected MII. An indirect analysis with IVF outcome indicates that the ZP outer layer of analysed HOs donated by women who achieved pregnancy is stiffer than that of HOs from women with negative outcome. Our findings suggest that mechanical properties can represent important oocyte quality indicators that may be exploited for the design of innovative ICSI dedicated cell sorters.

  15. Diverse metastable structures formed by small oligomers of α-synuclein probed by force spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Neupane

    Full Text Available Oligomeric aggregates are widely suspected as toxic agents in diseases caused by protein aggregation, yet they remain poorly characterized, partly because they are challenging to isolate from a heterogeneous mixture of species. We developed an assay for characterizing structure, stability, and kinetics of individual oligomers at high resolution and sensitivity using single-molecule force spectroscopy, and applied it to observe the formation of transient structured aggregates within single oligomers of α-synuclein, an intrinsically-disordered protein linked to Parkinson's disease. Measurements of the molecular extension as the proteins unfolded under tension in optical tweezers revealed that even small oligomers could form numerous metastable structures, with a surprisingly broad range of sizes. Comparing the structures formed in monomers, dimers and tetramers, we found that the average mechanical stability increased with oligomer size. Most structures formed within a minute, with size-dependent rates. These results provide a new window onto the complex α-synuclein aggregation landscape, characterizing the microscopic structural heterogeneity and kinetics of different pathways.

  16. Single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins from membranes freely spanning across nanoscopic pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Rafayel; Bippes, Christian A; Walheim, Stefan; Harder, Daniel; Fotiadis, Dimitrios; Schimmel, Thomas; Alsteens, David; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-05-13

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) provides detailed insight into the mechanical (un)folding pathways and structural stability of membrane proteins. So far, SMFS could only be applied to membrane proteins embedded in native or synthetic membranes adsorbed to solid supports. This adsorption causes experimental limitations and raises the question to what extent the support influences the results obtained by SMFS. Therefore, we introduce here SMFS from native purple membrane freely spanning across nanopores. We show that correct analysis of the SMFS data requires extending the worm-like chain model, which describes the mechanical stretching of a polypeptide, by the cubic extension model, which describes the bending of a purple membrane exposed to mechanical stress. This new experimental and theoretical approach allows to characterize the stepwise (un)folding of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin and to assign the stability of single and grouped secondary structures. The (un)folding and stability of bacteriorhodopsin shows no significant difference between freely spanning and directly supported purple membranes. Importantly, the novel experimental SMFS setup opens an avenue to characterize any protein from freely spanning cellular or synthetic membranes.

  17. Synchronous monitoring of muscle dynamics and muscle force for maximum isometric tetanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir Hossain, M.; Grill, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    Skeletal muscle is a classic example of a biological soft matter . At both macro and microscopic levels, skeletal muscle is exquisitely oriented for force generation and movement. In addition to the dynamics of contracting and relaxing muscle which can be monitored with ultrasound, variations in the muscle force are also expected to be monitored. To observe such force and sideways expansion variations synchronously for the skeletal muscle a novel detection scheme has been developed. As already introduced for the detection of sideways expansion variations of the muscle, ultrasonic transducers are mounted sideways on opposing positions of the monitored muscle. To detect variations of the muscle force, angle of pull of the monitored muscle has been restricted by the mechanical pull of the sonic force sensor. Under this condition, any variation in the time-of-flight (TOF) of the transmitted ultrasonic signals can be introduced by the variation of the path length between the transducers. The observed variations of the TOF are compared to the signals obtained by ultrasound monitoring for the muscle dynamics. The general behavior of the muscle dynamics and muscle force shows almost an identical concept. Since muscle force also relates the psychological boosting-up effects, the influence of boosting-up on muscle force and muscle dynamics can also be quantified form this study. Length-tension or force-length and force-velocity relationship can also be derived quantitatively with such monitoring.

  18. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  19. Two-dimensional optical correlation spectroscopy applied to liquid/glass dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazonder, Kees; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    2006-01-01

    Correlation spectroscopy was used to study the effects of temperature and phase changes on liquid and glass solvent dynamics. This method yielded both intuitive clues and a quantitative measure of the dynamics of the system. © 2006 Optical Society of America.

  20. Role of attractive forces in determining the equilibrium structure and dynamics of simple liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2015-01-01

    condensed fluids, even the attractive forces outside the FCS play a role. The changes in the distribution caused by neglecting the attractive forces, lead to a too high pressure. The weak long-range attractions damp the dynamics and the diffusion of the particles in gas-, super critical fluid- and in liquid......Molecular Dynamics simulations of a Lennard-Jones system with different range of attraction show that the attractive forces modify the radial distribution of the particles. For condensed liquids only, the forces within the the first coordination shell (FCS) are important, but for gases and moderate...

  1. Role of attractive forces in determining the equilibrium structure and dynamics of simple liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulations of a Lennard-Jones system with different range of attraction show that the attractive forces modify the radial distribution of the particles. For condensed liquids only, the forces within the the first coordination shell (FCS) are important, but for gases and moderate...... condensed fluids, even the attractive forces outside the FCS play a role. The changes in the distribution caused by neglecting the attractive forces, lead to a too high pressure. The weak long-range attractions damp the dynamics and the diffusion of the particles in gas-, super critical fluid- and in liquid...

  2. Analysis of dynamic foot pressure distribution and ground reaction forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, F. R.; Wong, T. S.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between forces derived from in-shoe pressure distribution and GRFs during normal gait. The relationship served to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of the in-shoe pressure sensor. The in-shoe pressure distribution from Tekscan F-Scan system outputs vertical forces and Centre of Force (COF), while the Kistler force plate gives ground reaction forces (GRFs) in terms of Fz, Fx and Fy, as well as vertical torque, Tz. The two systems were synchronized for pressure and GRFs measurements. Data was collected from four volunteers through three trials for both left and right foot under barefoot condition with the in-shoe sensor. The forces derived from pressure distribution correlated well with the vertical GRFs, and the correlation coefficient (r2) was in the range of 0.93 to 0.99. This is a result of extended calibration, which improves pressure measurement to give better accuracy and reliability. The COF from in-shoe sensor generally matched well with the force plate COP. As for the maximum vertical torque at the forefoot during toe-off, there was no relationship with the pressure distribution. However, the maximum torque was shown to give an indication of the rotational angle of the foot.

  3. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  4. Cold ion UV photofragmentation spectroscopy and dynamics (Invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feraud, Geraldine; Dedonder, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe [CNRS, Aix Marseille Université, laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires (PIIM) UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France); Broquier, Michel [Université Paris Sud, CLUPS (Centre Laser de l' Université Paris Sud) LUMAT FR 2764, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France and CNRS, Université Paris Sud, Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d' Orsay (ISMO) UMR 8624, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Gregoire, Gilles [CNRS, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, UMR 7538, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Soorkia, Satchin [CNRS, Université Paris Sud, Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d' Orsay (ISMO) UMR 8624, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2014-12-09

    Up to ten years ago, very little was known about the excited states of protonated amino acids isolated in the gas phase. From the experimental point of view, the study was hampered by the lack of ease of production of such species in sufficient density to apply photon-based techniques. With the development and widespread use of electrospray ionization sources coupled with modified or homebuilt mass spectrometers, there has been significant research into the spectroscopy of biomimetic and biologically relevant molecules. Besides, these species are floppy such that an efficient cooling is required to record clear spectroscopy. Warm protonated species display congested spectra. To extract precise spectroscopic information and avoid spectral congestion, the species need to be cooled down to less than 50 K. We present our latest results on the electronic spectroscopy of protonated phenylalanine and tyrosine on a large spectral domain (225-290 nm). These species are studied in a new simplified apparatus combining an electrospray ionization source, a cryogenically cooled quadrupole ion trap (∼10 K) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The role of proton transfer from the NH{sub 3}{sup +} moiety to the p-ring or to CO of the carboxylic acid group is evidenced by UV photofragment spectroscopy. This first step controls the fragmentation pathways, which strongly depend on the nature of the electronic excited states, i.e. ππ*, ππ*{sub CO} and πσ{sub NH3}.

  5. Cold ion UV photofragmentation spectroscopy and dynamics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feraud, Geraldine; Broquier, Michel; Dedonder, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Gregoire, Gilles; Soorkia, Satchin

    2014-12-01

    Up to ten years ago, very little was known about the excited states of protonated amino acids isolated in the gas phase. From the experimental point of view, the study was hampered by the lack of ease of production of such species in sufficient density to apply photon-based techniques. With the development and widespread use of electrospray ionization sources coupled with modified or homebuilt mass spectrometers, there has been significant research into the spectroscopy of biomimetic and biologically relevant molecules. Besides, these species are floppy such that an efficient cooling is required to record clear spectroscopy. Warm protonated species display congested spectra. To extract precise spectroscopic information and avoid spectral congestion, the species need to be cooled down to less than 50 K. We present our latest results on the electronic spectroscopy of protonated phenylalanine and tyrosine on a large spectral domain (225-290 nm). These species are studied in a new simplified apparatus combining an electrospray ionization source, a cryogenically cooled quadrupole ion trap (˜10 K) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The role of proton transfer from the NH3+ moiety to the p-ring or to CO of the carboxylic acid group is evidenced by UV photofragment spectroscopy. This first step controls the fragmentation pathways, which strongly depend on the nature of the electronic excited states, i.e. ππ*, ππ*CO and πσNH 3.

  6. Dynamics in photosynthetic transient complexes studied by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scanu, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on fundamental aspects of protein-protein interactions. A multidisciplinary methodology for the detection and visualization of transient, lowly-populated encounter protein complexes is described. The new methodology combined paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy with computational

  7. Modeling of Dynamic Fluid Forces in Fast Switching Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2015-01-01

    Switching valves experience opposing fluid forces due to movement of the moving member itself, as the surrounding fluid volume must move to accommodate the movement. This movement-induced fluid force may be divided into three main components; the added mass term, the viscous term and the socalled...... is given using an analytically solvable example, showing the explicit form of the force terms and highlighting the significance of the added mass and history term in certain fast switching valve applications. A general approximate model for arbitrary valve geometries is then proposed with offset...

  8. Characterization of a SiC/SiC composite by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and positron spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, G. [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)]. E-mail: g.brauer@fz-rossendorf.de; Anwand, W. [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Eichhorn, F. [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Skorupa, W. [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Hofer, C. [Institut fuer Physik, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz Josef Str. 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Teichert, C. [Institut fuer Physik, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz Josef Str. 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Kuriplach, J. [Department of Low Temperature Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, CZ-180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Cizek, J. [Department of Low Temperature Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, CZ-180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Prochazka, I. [Department of Low Temperature Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, CZ-180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Coleman, P.G. [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7 AY (United Kingdom); Nozawa, T. [Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, MS6151, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6151 (United States); Kohyama, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2006-02-28

    A SiC/SiC composite is characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and various positron spectroscopies (slow positron implantation, positron lifetime and re-emission). It is found that besides its main constituent 3C-SiC the composite still must contain some graphite. In order to better interpret the experimental findings of the composite, a pyrolytic graphite sample was also investigated by slow positron implantation and positron lifetime spectroscopies. In addition, theoretical calculations of positron properties of graphite are presented.

  9. Applications of time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy in ultrafast carrier dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingli Zhou; Xicheng Zhang

    2011-01-01

    1.Introduction Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS)[1-3]is a powerful and coherent free-space technique in which nearly single-cycle electromagnetic pulse is generated and detected using femtosecond optical pulses.THz-TDS has been utilized as one of the important methods for material characterization in the past two decades.Because transmission or reflection of THz waves is sensitive to carrier density and mobility,an ultrafast THz-TDS system is required to provide time-resolved capability of material characterization in the THz region[4-6].In the past decade,one of the widely used time-resolved THz spectroscopy methods is optical-pump/THz probe (O/T)spectroscopy[3].%Three time-resolved terahertz (THz) spectroscopy methods (optical-pump/THz-probe spectroscopy, THz-pump/THz-probe spectroscopy, and THz-pump/optical-probe spectroscopy) are reviewed. These are used to characterize ultrafast dynamics in photo- or THz-excited semiconductors, superconductors, nanomateri-als, and other materials. In particular, the optical-pump/THz-probe spectroscopy is utilized to investigate carrier dynamics and the related intervalley scattering phenomena in semiconductors. The recent development of intense pulsed THz sources is expected to affect the research in nonlinear THz responses of various materials.

  10. Unified Model of Dynamic Forced Barrier Crossing in Single Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friddle, R W

    2007-06-21

    Thermally activated barrier crossing in the presence of an increasing load can reveal kinetic rate constants and energy barrier parameters when repeated over a range of loading rates. Here we derive a model of the mean escape force for all relevant loading rates--the complete force spectrum. Two well-known approximations emerge as limiting cases; one of which confirms predictions that single-barrier spectra should converge to a phenomenological description in the slow loading limit.

  11. UV-vis spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering study of gold nanorods aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjanawarut, Roejarek; Yuan, Bo; XiaoDi, Su

    2013-08-01

    Gold nanorods (AuNRs) were used as spectroscopic sensing elements to detect specific DNA sequences with a single-base mismatch sensitivity. The assay was based on the observation that the stabilizing repulsive forces between CTA(+)-coated AuNRs can be removed by citrate ions, which causes aggregation among AuNRs; whereas nucleic acids of different structures[ i.e., peptide nucleic acid (PNA), single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), PNA-DNA complex, and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)] can retard the aggregation. Moreover, the dsDNA PNA-DNA duplexes provide larger retardation than that by unhybridized ssDNA and PNA probe. This assay can differentiate single-base mismatched targets with base substitution at different locations (center and end) with AuNRs of a larger aspect ratio. Besides ultraviolet-visable spectroscopy measurement of particle assembly-induced plasmonic coupling that in turn provides a spectroscopic detection of the specific DNA, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used to measure smaller degree of aggregation that can reveal sodium citrate- and dsDNA-AuNRs interactions in fine detail.

  12. Ultrafast solvation dynamics explored by nonlinear optical spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeij, Wilhelmus Petrus de; Wiersma, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical reaction dynamics and chemical rate processes in the liquid phase are intimately connected to the specific interaction of the solvent on the reaction species. The strong coupling between the dissolved solute and the dynamical solvent causes fluctuations in the solute's energy levels. These

  13. Flight Dynamics of Flexible Aircraft with Aeroelastic and Inertial Force Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Tuzcu, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated flight dynamic modeling method for flexible aircraft that captures coupled physics effects due to inertial forces, aeroelasticity, and propulsive forces that are normally present in flight. The present approach formulates the coupled flight dynamics using a structural dynamic modeling method that describes the elasticity of a flexible, twisted, swept wing using an equivalent beam-rod model. The structural dynamic model allows for three types of wing elastic motion: flapwise bending, chordwise bending, and torsion. Inertial force coupling with the wing elasticity is formulated to account for aircraft acceleration. The structural deflections create an effective aeroelastic angle of attack that affects the rigid-body motion of flexible aircraft. The aeroelastic effect contributes to aerodynamic damping forces that can influence aerodynamic stability. For wing-mounted engines, wing flexibility can cause the propulsive forces and moments to couple with the wing elastic motion. The integrated flight dynamics for a flexible aircraft are formulated by including generalized coordinate variables associated with the aeroelastic-propulsive forces and moments in the standard state-space form for six degree-of-freedom flight dynamics. A computational structural model for a generic transport aircraft has been created. The eigenvalue analysis is performed to compute aeroelastic frequencies and aerodynamic damping. The results will be used to construct an integrated flight dynamic model of a flexible generic transport aircraft.

  14. Muscle force estimation with surface EMG during dynamic muscle contractions: a wavelet and ANN based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Fengjun; Chew, Chee-Meng

    2013-01-01

    Human muscle force estimation is important in biomechanics studies, sports and assistive devices fields. Therefore, it is essential to develop an efficient algorithm to estimate force exerted by muscles. The purpose of this study is to predict force/torque exerted by muscles under dynamic muscle contractions based on continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and artificial neural networks (ANN) approaches. Mean frequency (MF) of the surface electromyography (EMG) signals power spectrum was calculated from CWT. ANN models were trained to derive the MF-force relationships from the subset of EMG signals and the measured forces. Then we use the networks to predict the individual muscle forces for different muscle groups. Fourteen healthy subjects (10 males and 4 females) were voluntarily recruited in this study. EMG signals were collected from the biceps brachii, triceps, hamstring and quadriceps femoris muscles to evaluate the proposed method. Root mean square errors (RMSE) and correlation coefficients between the predicted forces and measured actual forces were calculated.

  15. Insights into the Interactions of Amino Acids and Peptides with Inorganic Materials Using Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Priyadip; Duanias-Assaf, Tal; Reches, Meital

    2017-03-06

    The interactions between proteins or peptides and inorganic materials lead to several interesting processes. For example, combining proteins with minerals leads to the formation of composite materials with unique properties. In addition, the undesirable process of biofouling is initiated by the adsorption of biomolecules, mainly proteins, on surfaces. This organic layer is an adhesion layer for bacteria and allows them to interact with the surface. Understanding the fundamental forces that govern the interactions at the organic-inorganic interface is therefore important for many areas of research and could lead to the design of new materials for optical, mechanical and biomedical applications. This paper demonstrates a single-molecule force spectroscopy technique that utilizes an AFM to measure the adhesion force between either peptides or amino acids and well-defined inorganic surfaces. This technique involves a protocol for attaching the biomolecule to the AFM tip through a covalent flexible linker and single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements by atomic force microscope. In addition, an analysis of these measurements is included.

  16. Analysis of limit forces on the vehicle wheels using an algorithm of Dynamic Square Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brukalski, M.

    2016-09-01

    This article presents a method named as Dynamic Square Method (DSM) used for dynamic analysis of a vehicle equipped with a four wheel drive system. This method allows determination of maximum (limit) forces acting on the wheels. Here, the maximum longitudinal forces acting on the wheels are assumed and then used to predict whether they can be achieved by a specific dynamic motion or whether the actual friction forces under a given wheel is large enough to transfer lateral forces. For the analysis of DSM a four wheel vehicle model is used. On the basis of this characteristic it is possible to determine the maximum longitudinal force acting on the wheels of the given axle depending on the lateral acceleration of the vehicle. The results of this analysis may be useful in the development of a control algorithm used for example in active differentials.

  17. Analyzing protein-ligand interactions by dynamic NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittermaier, Anthony; Meneses, Erick

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can provide detailed information on protein-ligand interactions that is inaccessible using other biophysical techniques. This chapter focuses on NMR-based approaches for extracting affinity and rate constants for weakly binding transient protein complexes with lifetimes of less than about a second. Several pulse sequences and analytical techniques are discussed, including line-shape simulations, spin-echo relaxation dispersion methods (CPMG), and magnetization exchange (EXSY) experiments.

  18. Dynamics of bow-tie shaped bursting: Forced pendulum with dynamic feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, Janaki

    2016-12-01

    A detailed study is performed on the parameter space of the mechanical system of a driven pendulum with damping and constant torque under feedback control. We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting oscillatory behaviour, which is exhibited for small driving frequencies, in a certain parameter regime, which has not been reported earlier in this forced system with dynamic feedback. We show that the bursting oscillations are caused because of a transition of the quiescent state to the spiking state by a saddle-focus bifurcation, and because of another saddle-focus bifurcation, which leads to cessation of spiking, bringing the system back to the quiescent state. The resting period between two successive bursts (Trest) is estimated analytically.

  19. Characterization of unfolding mechanism of human lamin A Ig fold by single-molecule force spectroscopy-implications in EDMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Manindra; Kotamarthi, Hema Chandra; Dutta, Subarna; Ray, Angana; Ghosh, Saptaparni; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti; Sengupta, Kaushik

    2014-11-25

    A- and B-type lamins are intermediate filament proteins constituting the nuclear lamina underneath the nuclear envelope thereby conferring proper shape and mechanical rigidity to the nucleus. Lamin proteins are also shown to be related diversely to basic nuclear processes. More than 400 mutations in human lamin A protein alone have been reported to produce at least 11 different disease conditions jointly termed as laminopathies. These mutations in lamin A are scattered throughout its helical rod domain, as well as the C-terminal domain containing the conserved Ig-fold region. The commonality of phenotypes in all these diseases is characterized by misshapen nuclei of the affected tissues which might stem from altered rigidity of the supporting lamina hence lamins. Here we have focused on autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy, one such laminopathy where R453W is the causative mutation located in the Ig domain of lamin A. We have investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy how a stretching mechanical perturbation senses the destabilizing effect of the mutation in the lamin A Ig domain and compared the mechanoelastic properties of the mutant R453W with that of the wild-type in conjunction with steered molecular dynamics. Furthermore, we have shown the interaction of Ig domain with emerin, another key player and interacting partner in the pathogenesis of EDMD, is disrupted in the R453W mutant. This altered mechanoresistance of Ig domain itself and consequent uncoupling of lamin A-emerin interaction might underlie the altered mechanotransduction properties of EDMD affected nuclei.

  20. Variable-Temperature Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Single-Molecule Fluctuations and Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Muller, Eric A; Kravtsov, Vasily; Sass, Paul M; Dreyer, Jens; Atkin, Joanna M; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-01-13

    Structure, dynamics, and coupling involving single-molecules determine function in catalytic, electronic or biological systems. While vibrational spectroscopy provides insight into molecular structure, rapid fluctuations blur the molecular trajectory even in single-molecule spectroscopy, analogous to spatial averaging in measuring large ensembles. To gain insight into intramolecular coupling, substrate coupling, and dynamic processes, we use tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) at variable and cryogenic temperatures, to slow and control the motion of a single molecule. We resolve intrinsic line widths of individual normal modes, allowing detailed and quantitative investigation of the vibrational modes. From temperature dependent line narrowing and splitting, we quantify ultrafast vibrational dephasing, intramolecular coupling, and conformational heterogeneity. Through statistical correlation analysis of fluctuations of individual modes, we observe rotational motion and spectral fluctuations of the molecule. This work demonstrates single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy beyond chemical identification, opening the possibility for a complete picture of molecular motion ranging from femtoseconds to minutes.

  1. Mismatch detection in DNA monolayers by atomic force microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryse D. Nkoua Ngavouka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: DNA hybridization is at the basis of most current technologies for genotyping and sequencing, due to the unique properties of DNA base-pairing that guarantee a high grade of selectivity. Nonetheless the presence of single base mismatches or not perfectly matched sequences can affect the response of the devices and the major challenge is, nowadays, to distinguish a mismatch of a single base and, at the same time, unequivocally differentiate devices read-out of fully and partially matching sequences.Results: We present here two platforms based on different sensing strategies, to detect mismatched and/or perfectly matched complementary DNA strands hybridization into ssDNA oligonucleotide monolayers. The first platform exploits atomic force microscopy-based nanolithography to create ssDNA nano-arrays on gold surfaces. AFM topography measurements then monitor the variation of height of the nanostructures upon biorecognition and then follow annealing at different temperatures. This strategy allowed us to clearly detect the presence of mismatches. The second strategy exploits the change in capacitance at the interface between an ssDNA-functionalized gold electrode and the solution due to the hybridization process in a miniaturized electrochemical cell. Through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements on extended ssDNA self-assembled monolayers we followed in real-time the variation of capacitance, being able to distinguish, through the difference in hybridization kinetics, not only the presence of single, double or triple mismatches in the complementary sequence, but also the position of the mismatched base pair with respect to the electrode surface.Conclusion: We demonstrate here two platforms based on different sensing strategies as sensitive and selective tools to discriminate mismatches. Our assays are ready for parallelization and can be used in the detection and quantification of single nucleotide mismatches in microRNAs or

  2. WearDY: Wearable dynamics. A prototype for human whole-body force and motion estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latella, Claudia; Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Nori, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Motion capture is a powerful tool used in a large range of applications towards human movement analysis. Although it is a well-established technique, its main limitation is the lack of dynamic information such as forces and torques during the motion capture. In this paper, we present a novel approach for human wearable dynamic (WearDY) motion capture for the simultaneous estimation of whole-body forces along with the motion. Our conceptual framework encompasses traditional passive markers based methods, inertial and contact force sensor modalities and harnesses a probabilistic computational framework for estimating dynamic quantities originally proposed in the domain of humanoid robot control. We present preliminary experimental analysis of our framework on subjects performing a two Degrees-of-Freedom bowing task and we estimate the motion and dynamic quantities. We discuss the implication of our proposal towards the design of a novel wearable force and motion capture suit and its applications.

  3. Reaction Dynamics and Spectroscopy of Hydrocarbons in Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.

    2014-03-24

    This grant supported research in theoretical and computational Chemical Physics that resulted in numerous publications on fitting ab initio potential energy surfaces and dipole moment surfaces of polyatomic molecules and cations. This work made use of novel fitting methods that ensures that these surfaces are invariant with respect to all permutations of like atoms. The surfaces were used in various dynamics calculations, ranging from quantum vibrational dynamics to(quasi)classical trajectory calculations of reaction dynamics. A number of these studies were done in collaboration with experimental groups where the theoretical analyses turned out to be essential to give a proper understanding of the experimental results.

  4. Forcing-dependent dynamics and emergence of helicity in rotating turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Dallas, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    The effects of large scale mechanical forcing on the dynamics of rotating turbulent flows are studied by means of numerical simulations, varying systematically the nature of the mechanical force in time. We demonstrate that the statistically stationary solutions of these flows depend on the nature of the forcing mechanism. Rapidly enough rotating flows with a forcing that has a persistent direction relatively to the axis of rotation bifurcate from a non-helical state to a helical state despite the fact that the forcing is non-helical. We find that the nature of the mechanical force in time and the emergence of helicity have direct implications on the cascade dynamics of these flows, determining the anisotropy in the flow, the energy condensation at large scales and the power-law energy spectra that are consistent with previous findings and phenomenologies under strong and weak-wave turbulent conditions.

  5. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet Resonance Raman (UVRR) Spectroscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for Study of the Kinetics of Formation and Structural Characterization of Tau Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Gayathri

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic studies of tau fibril formation in vitro most commonly employ spectroscopic probes such as thioflavinT fluorescence and laser light scattering or negative stain transmission electron microscopy. Here, I describe the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as complementary probes for studies of tau aggregation. The sensitivity of vibrational spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and UVRR) to secondary structure content allows for measurement of conformational changes that occur when the intrinsically disordered protein tau transforms into cross-β-core containing fibrils. AFM imaging serves as a gentle probe of structures populated over the time course of tau fibrillization. Together, these assays help further elucidate the structural and mechanistic complexity inherent in tau fibril formation.

  6. Light-Quark Baryon Spectroscopy within ANL-Osaka Dynamical Coupled-Channels Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamano, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Recent results on the study of light-quark baryons with the ANL-Osaka dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) approach are presented, which contain the N^* and Δ ^* spectroscopy via the analysis of π N and γ N reactions and the Λ ^* and Σ ^* spectroscopy via the analysis of K^- p reactions. A recent application of our DCC approach to neutrino-nucleon reactions in the resonance region is also presented.

  7. Harmonic Force Spectroscopy Reveals a Force-Velocity Curve from a Single Human Beta Cardiac Myosin Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Vestergaard, Christian L.

    2014-01-01

    in thin filaments in the sarcomere, cycling between a strongly bound state (force producing state) and a weakly bound state (relaxed state). Huxley and Simmons have previously proposed that the transition from the strong to the weak interaction can be modulated by an external load, i.e., the transition...

  8. Force

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Forces are at work all around us. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance. We use simple language and vocabulary to make this invisible world easy for students to ""see"" and understand. Examine how forces ""add up"" to create the total force on an object, and reinforce concepts and extend learning with sample problems.

  9. Attitude dynamics and control of spacecraft using geomagnetic Lorentz force

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Aziz, Yehia A

    2014-01-01

    The attitude stabilization of a charged rigid spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) using torques due to Lorentz force in pitch and roll directions is considered. A spacecraft that generates an electrostatic charge on its surface in the Earth magnetic field will be subject to perturbations from Lorentz force. The Lorentz force acting on an electrostatically charged spacecraft may provide a useful thrust for controlling a spacecraft's orientation. We assume that the spacecraft is moving in the Earth's magnetic field in an elliptical orbit under the effects of the gravitational, geomagnetic and Lorentz torques. The magnetic field of the Earth is modeled as a non-tilted dipole. A model incorporating all Lorentz torques as a function of orbital elements has been developed on the basis of electric and magnetic fields. The stability of the spacecraft orientation is investigated both analytically and numerically. The existence and stability of equilibrium positions is investigated for different values of the charge to...

  10. Earth's Inner Core dynamics induced by the Lorentz force

    CERN Document Server

    Lasbleis, M; Cardin, P; Labrosse, S

    2015-01-01

    Seismic studies indicate that the Earth's inner core has a complex structure and exhibits a strong elastic anisotropy with a cylindrical symmetry. Among the various models which have been proposed to explain this anisotropy, one class of models considers the effect of the Lorentz force associated with the magnetic field diffused within the inner core. In this paper we extend previous studies and use analytical calculations and numerical simulations to predict the geometry and strength of the flow induced by the poloidal component of the Lorentz force in a neutrally or stably stratified growing inner core, exploring also the effect of different types of boundary conditions at the inner core boundary (ICB). Unlike previous studies, we show that the boundary condition that is most likely to produce a significant deformation and seismic anisotropy is impermeable, with negligible radial flow through the boundary. Exact analytical solutions are found in the case of a negligible effect of buoyancy forces in the inne...

  11. A Bimorph Moment/Force Actuator for Dynamic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Xiaoyan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on a novel bimorph actuator which can produce pure moment or pure force to structures under testing. Due to its unique construction, this actuator is only sensitive to one translational and one rotational degree of freedom (DOF, which can be further decoupled from each other through controlling the phase of the excitation voltage supplied to the actuator. To correlate the input electrical voltage with the output moment (or force, angular velocity, linear velocity, rotational (or translational conversion functions are defined and then numerically determined. Compared with conventional twin-shaker setup to generate moment, the bimorph actuator is simple, compact, light-weight, effective and cheap. When generating moment, the usually-existing unwanted force excitation is avoided. The working frequency range of the actuator is much wider and the loading effect is greatly reduced.

  12. Discriminating Intercalative Effects of Threading Intercalator Nogalamycin, from Classical Intercalator Daunomycin, Using Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    T.; Banerjee; Banerjee, S.; Sett, S.; Ghosh, S.; T. Rakshit; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2016-01-01

    DNA threading intercalators are a unique class of intercalating agents, albeit little biophysical information is available on their intercalative actions. Herein, the intercalative effects of nogalamycin, which is a naturally-occurring DNA threading intercalator, have been investigated by high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy (AFS). The results have been compared with those of the well-known chemotherapeutic drug daunomycin, which is a non-threading classical intercal...

  13. Ultra-short laser pulse ablation using shear-force feedback: Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samek, Ota [ISAS-Institute for Analytical Sciences, Bunsen-Kirchhoff Str.11, 44139 Dortmund (Germany)]. E-mail: samek@ansci.de; Kurowski, Andre [ISAS-Institute for Analytical Sciences, Bunsen-Kirchhoff Str.11, 44139 Dortmund (Germany); Kittel, Silke [ISAS-Institute for Analytical Sciences, Bunsen-Kirchhoff Str.11, 44139 Dortmund (Germany); Kukhlevsky, Sergei [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Ifjusag u. 6, Pecs 7624 (Hungary); Hergenroeder, Roland [ISAS-Institute for Analytical Sciences, Bunsen-Kirchhoff Str.11, 44139 Dortmund (Germany)

    2005-08-31

    This work reports on a feasibility study of proximity ablation using femtosecond pulses. Ultra-short pulses were launched to a bare tapered optical fiber and delivered to the sample. The tip-sample distance was controlled by means of shear-force feedback. Consequently, ablation craters with submicrometer dimensions were obtained. Potential analytical applications for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, such as e.g. inclusions in steel or bio cells, are suggested.

  14. A COMPARISON OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION MUSCLE FORCE PREDICTIONS DURING WHEELCHAIR PROPULSION

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, Melissa M.; Rankin, Jeffery W.; Neptune, Richard R.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to compare static and dynamic optimization muscle force and work predictions during the push phase of wheelchair propulsion. A secondary purpose was to compare the differences in predicted shoulder and elbow kinetics and kinematics and handrim forces. The forward dynamics simulation minimized differences between simulated and experimental data (obtained from 10 manual wheelchair users) and muscle co-contraction. For direct comparison between models, the s...

  15. Analytical and Numerical Studies for Chaotic Dynamics of a Duffing Oscillator with a Parametric Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The chaotic dynamics of a Duffing oscillator with a parametric force is investigated. By using the direct perturbation technique, we analytically obtain the general solution of the 1st-order equation. Through the boundedness condition of the general solution we get the famous Melnikov function predicting the onset of chaos. When the parametric and external forces are strong, numerical simulations show that increasing the amplitude of the parametric or external force can lead the system into chaos via period doubling.

  16. How sensitive are nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations of proteins to changes in the force field?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa, Alessandra; Fan, Hao; Wassenaar, Tsjerk; Mark, Alan E.

    2007-01-01

    The sensitivity of molecular dynamics simulations to variations in the force field has been examined in relation to a set of 36 structures corresponding to 31 proteins simulated by using different versions of the GROMOS force field. The three parameter sets used (43a1, 53a5, and 53a6) differ signifi

  17. WRIST FORCE SENSOR'S DYNAMIC PERFORMANCE CALIBRATION BASED ON NEGATIVE STEP RESPONSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Hongmei

    2008-01-01

    Negative step response experimental method is used in wrist force sensor's dynamic performance calibration. The exciting manner of negative step response method is the same as wrist force sensor's load in working. This experimental method needn't special experiment equipments. Experiment's dynamic repeatability is good. So wrist force sensor's dynamic performance is suitable to be calibrated by negative step response method. A new correlation wavelet transfer method is studied. By wavelet transfer method, the signal is decomposed into two dimensional spaces of time-frequency. So the problem of negative step exciting energy concentrating in the low frequency band is solved. Correlation wavelet transfer doesn't require that wavelet primary function be orthogonal and needn't wavelet reconstruction. So analyzing efficiency is high. An experimental bench is designed and manufactured to load the wrist force sensor orthogonal excitation force/moment. A piezoelectric force sensor is used to setup soft trigger and calculate the value of negative step excitation. A wrist force sensor is calibrated. The pulse response function is calculated after negative step excitation and step response have been transformed to positive step excitation and step response. The pulse response function is transferred to frequency response function. The wrist force sensor's dynamic characteristics are identified by the frequency response function.

  18. Influence of materials' optical response on actuation dynamics by Casimir forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi Ghozotkhar, Mehdi; Broer, W. H.; Van der Veeke, S.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2015-01-01

    The dependence of the Casimir force on the frequency-dependent dielectric functions of interacting materials makes it possible to tailor the actuation dynamics of microactuators. The Casimir force is largest for metallic interacting systems due to the high absorption of conduction electrons in the f

  19. Dynamic Image Forces Near a Metal Surface and the Point-Charge Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabovich, A. M.; Voitenko, A. I.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of charge motion governed by image force attraction near a plane metal surface is considered and solved self-consistently. The temporal dispersion of metal dielectric permittivity makes the image forces dynamic and, hence, finite, contrary to the results of the conventional approach. Therefore, the maximal attainable velocity turns out…

  20. Quantification of in-contact probe-sample electrostatic forces with dynamic atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Carmichael, Ben; Baris Okatan, M.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Tselev, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods utilizing resonant mechanical vibrations of cantilevers in contact with a sample surface have shown sensitivities as high as few picometers for detecting surface displacements. Such a high sensitivity is harnessed in several AFM imaging modes. Here, we demonstrate a cantilever-resonance-based method to quantify electrostatic forces on a probe in the probe-sample junction in the presence of a surface potential or when a bias voltage is applied to the AFM probe. We find that the electrostatic forces acting on the probe tip apex can produce signals equivalent to a few pm of surface displacement. In combination with modeling, the measurements of the force were used to access the strength of the electrical field at the probe tip apex in contact with a sample. We find an evidence that the electric field strength in the junction can reach ca. 1 V nm-1 at a bias voltage of a few volts and is limited by non-ideality of the tip-sample contact. This field is sufficiently strong to significantly influence material states and kinetic processes through charge injection, Maxwell stress, shifts of phase equilibria, and reduction of energy barriers for activated processes. Besides, the results provide a baseline for accounting for the effects of local electrostatic forces in electromechanical AFM measurements as well as offer additional means to probe ionic mobility and field-induced phenomena in solids.

  1. Stochastic model for aerodynamic force dynamics on wind turbine blades in unsteady wind inflow

    CERN Document Server

    Luhur, Muhammad Ramzan; Kühn, Martin; Wächter, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a stochastic approach to estimate the aerodynamic forces with local dynamics on wind turbine blades in unsteady wind inflow. This is done by integrating a stochastic model of lift and drag dynamics for an airfoil into the aerodynamic simulation software AeroDyn. The model is added as an alternative to the static table lookup approach in blade element momentum (BEM) wake model used by AeroDyn. The stochastic forces are obtained for a rotor blade element using full field turbulence simulated wind data input and compared with the classical BEM and dynamic stall models for identical conditions. The comparison shows that the stochastic model generates additional extended dynamic response in terms of local force fluctuations. Further, the comparison of statistics between the classical BEM, dynamic stall and stochastic models' results in terms of their increment probability density functions gives consistent results.

  2. Molecular excitation dynamics and relaxation quantum theory and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Valkunas, Leonas; Mancal, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Meeting the need for a work that brings together quantum theory and spectroscopy to convey excitation processes to advanced students and specialists wishing to conduct research and understand the entire field rather than just single aspects.Written by an experienced author and recognized authority in the field, this text covers numerous applications and offers examples taken from different disciplines. As a result, spectroscopists, molecular physicists, physical chemists, and biophysicists will all find this a must-have for their research. Also suitable as supplementary reading in graduate

  3. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy & Dynamics Lecture: Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy for Chemical Kinetics, Molecular Structure, and Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Brooks

    2013-03-01

    Advances in high-speed digital electronics have enabled a new generation of molecular rotational spectroscopy techniques that provide instantaneous broadband spectral coverage. These techniques use a chirped excitation pulse to coherently excite the molecular sample over a spectral bandwidth of 10 GHz or larger through rapid passage. The subsequent time-domain emission is recorded using high-speed digitizers (up to 100 Gigasample/s) and the frequency domain spectrum is produced by fast Fourier transformation. The chirped-pulse Fourier transform (CP-FT) method has been implemented in the microwave frequency range (2-40 GHz) for studies of cold samples in pulsed jet sources and in the mm-wave/terahertz (THz) frequency range for studies of samples at room-temperature. The method has opened new applications for molecular rotational spectroscopy in the area of chemical kinetics where dynamic rotational spectroscopy is used to measure the rates of unimolecular isomerization reactions in highly excited molecules prepared by pulsed infrared laser excitation. In these applications, the isomerization rate is obtained from an analysis of the overall line shapes which are modified by chemical exchange leading to coalescence behavior similar to the effect in NMR spectroscopy. The sensitivity of the method and the ability to extend it to low frequency (2-8 GHz) have significantly increased the size range of molecules and molecular clusters for structure determination using isotopic substitution to build up the 3D molecular structures atom-by-atom. Application to the structure of water clusters with up to 15 water molecules will be presented. When coupled with advances in solid-state mm-wave/THz devices, this method provides a direct digital technique for analytical chemistry of room-temperature gases based on molecular rotational spectroscopy. These high-throughput methods can analyze complex sample mixtures with unmatched chemical selectivity and short analysis times. Work

  4. Atomic Force Microscopy of dynamic protein DNA interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van Simon Johannes Theodorus

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis a dedicated Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) setup is used for imaging biochemical reactions with molecular resolution. The basis for the high resolution of AFM is the combination of a small probe, close proximity to the sample and a short-range interaction between the probe and the samp

  5. Soliton ratchetlike dynamics by ac forces with harmonic mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salerno, Mario; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of unidirectional motion of a kink (topological soliton) of a dissipative sine-Gordon equation in the presence of ac forces with harmonic mixing (at least biharmonic) and of zero mean, is presented. The dependence of the kink mean velocity on system parameters is investigated...

  6. Estimation of changes in dynamic hydraulic force in a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with transient computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ohta, Akiko; Tanaka, Nobuatu; Qian, Yi; Tsukiya, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the hydraulic force on magnetically levitated (maglev) pumps should be studied carefully to improve the suspension performance and the reliability of the pumps. A maglev centrifugal pump, developed at Ibaraki University, was modeled with 926 376 hexahedral elements for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. The pump has a fully open six-vane impeller with a diameter of 72.5 mm. A self-bearing motor suspends the impeller in the radial direction. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 250 mmHg and 14 l/min, respectively. First, a steady-state analysis was performed using commercial code STAR-CD to confirm the model's suitability by comparing the results with the real pump performance. Second, transient analysis was performed to estimate the hydraulic force on the levitated impeller. The impeller was rotated in steps of 1 degrees using a sliding mesh. The force around the impeller was integrated at every step. The transient analysis revealed that the direction of the radial force changed dynamically as the vane's position changed relative to the outlet port during one circulation, and the magnitude of this force was about 1 N. The current maglev pump has sufficient performance to counteract this hydraulic force. Transient CFD analysis is not only useful for observing dynamic flow conditions in a centrifugal pump but is also effective for obtaining information about the levitation dynamics of a maglev pump.

  7. Structure and Dynamics of Dinucleosomes Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina A. Filenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of nucleosomes and their interactions are important for understanding the mechanism of chromatin assembly. Internucleosomal interaction is required for the formation of higher-order chromatin structures. Although H1 histone is critically involved in the process of chromatin assembly, direct internucleosomal interactions contribute to this process as well. To characterize the interactions of nucleosomes within the nucleosome array, we designed a dinucleosome and performed direct AFM imaging. The analysis of the AFM data showed dinucleosomes are very dynamic systems, enabling the nucleosomes to move in a broad range along the DNA template. Di-nucleosomes in close proximity were observed, but their population was low. The use of the zwitterionic detergent, CHAPS, increased the dynamic range of the di-nucleosome, facilitating the formation of tight di-nucleosomes. The role of CHAPS and similar natural products in chromatin structure and dynamics is also discussed.

  8. Dynamics of Rhodobacter capsulatus [2Fe-2S] Ferredoxin VI and Aquifex aeolicus Ferredoxin 5 Via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) and Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Yuming; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Wang, Hongxin; Guo, Yisong; Smith, Matt C.; Meyer, Jacques; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2008-06-24

    We have used (57)Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study the Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) sites in oxidized and reduced [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins from Rhodobacter capsulatus (Rc FdVI) and Aquifex aeolicus (Aa Fd5). In the oxidized forms, nearly identical NRVS patterns are observed, with strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes peaking around 335 cm(-1), and additional features observed as high as the B(2u) mode at approximately 421 cm(-1). Both forms of Rc FdVI have also been investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. There is good correspondence between NRVS and Raman frequencies, but because of different selection rules, intensities vary dramatically between the two kinds of spectra. For example, the B(3u) mode at approximately 288 cm(-1), attributed to an asymmetric combination of the two FeS(4) breathing modes, is often the strongest resonance Raman feature. In contrast, it is nearly invisible in the NRVS, as there is almost no Fe motion in such FeS(4) breathing. NRVS and RR analysis of isotope shifts with (36)S-substituted into bridging S(2-) ions in Rc FdVI allowed quantitation of S(2-) motion in different normal modes. We observed the symmetric Fe-Fe stretching mode at approximately 190 cm(-1) in both NRVS and RR spectra. At still lower energies, the NRVS presents a complex envelope of bending, torsion, and protein modes, with a maximum at 78 cm(-1). The (57)Fe partial vibrational densities of states (PVDOS) were interpreted by normal-mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields. Progressively more complex D(2h) Fe(2)S(2)S'(4), C(2h) Fe(2)S(2)(SCC)(4), and C(1) Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) models were optimized by comparison with the experimental spectra. After modification of the CHARMM22 all-atom force field by the addition of refined Fe-S force constants, a simulation employing the complete protein structure was used to reproduce the PVDOS, with better results in the low frequency protein mode region. This process was then repeated

  9. Exploring the Contribution of Collective Motions to the Dynamics of Forced-Unfolding in Tubulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Harshad; Momin, Farhana; Haines, Kelly E.; Dima, Ruxandra I.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Decomposition of the intrinsic dynamics of proteins into collective motions among distant regions of the protein structure provides a physically appealing approach that couples the dynamics of the system with its functional role. The cellular functions of microtubules (an essential component of the cytoskeleton in all eukaryotic cells) depend on their dynamic instability, which is altered by various factors among which applied forces are central. To shed light on the coupling between forces and the dynamic instability of microtubules, we focus on the investigation of the response of the microtubule subunits (tubulin) to applied forces. We address this point by adapting an approach designed to survey correlations for the equilibrium dynamics of proteins to the case of correlations for proteins forced-dynamics. The resulting collective motions in tubulin have a number of functional implications, such as the identification of long-range couplings with a role in blocking the dynamic instability of microtubules. A fundamental implication of our study for the life of a cell is that, to increase the likelihood of unraveling of large cytoskeletal filaments under physiological forces, molecular motors must use a combination of pulling and torsion rather than just pulling. PMID:20159162

  10. Atomic Force Microscopy-Infrared Spectroscopy of Individual Atmospheric Aerosol Particles: Subdiffraction Limit Vibrational Spectroscopy and Morphological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Amy L; Kirpes, Rachel M; Merzel, Rachel L; Pratt, Kerri A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Ault, Andrew P

    2017-09-05

    Chemical analysis of atmospheric aerosols is an analytical challenge, as aerosol particles are complex chemical mixtures that can contain hundreds to thousands of species in attoliter volumes at the most abundant sizes in the atmosphere (∼100 nm). These particles have global impacts on climate and health, but there are few methods available that combine imaging and the detailed molecular information from vibrational spectroscopy for individual particles particles down to 150 nm. By detecting photothermal expansion at frequencies where particle species absorb IR photons from a tunable laser, AFM-IR can study particles smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Combining strengths of AFM (ambient pressure, height, morphology, and phase measurements) with photothermal IR spectroscopy, the potential of AFM-IR is shown for a diverse set of single-component particles, liquid-liquid phase separated particles (core-shell morphology), and ambient atmospheric particles. The spectra from atmospheric model systems (ammonium sulfate, sodium nitrate, succinic acid, and sucrose) had clearly identifiable features that correlate with absorption frequencies for infrared-active modes. Additionally, molecular information was obtained with particles with a ∼150 nm shell and 300 nm core. The subdiffraction limit capability of AFM-IR has the potential to advance understanding of particle impacts on climate and health by improving analytical capabilities to study water uptake, heterogeneous reactivity, and viscosity.

  11. Force on Force Modeling with Formal Task Structures and Dynamic Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-24

    shared metrics and an executable integration architecture. • Generate a formal top-down mission specification for sample operating force organizations...in a simulation environment. The mission specification team applied best military judgement to specify required capability for collective tasks by

  12. Modeling the effect of cell-associated polymeric fluid layers on force spectroscopy measurements. Part I: model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldren, Faith M; Foteinopoulou, Katerina; Carroll, David L; Laso, Manuel

    2008-09-02

    The mechanical response, the force-indentation relationship, in normal force spectroscopy measurements carried out on individual polysaccharide encapsulated bacteria is modeled using three increasingly refined approaches that consider the elastic response of the bacterium and cantilever in combination with a fluid (hydrodynamic) model for the polysaccharide layer. For the hydrodynamic description of the polysaccharide layer, several increasingly realistic models are described in detail, together with numerical solution techniques. These models range from one-dimensional, Newtonian, to two-dimensional, axisymmetric, fully viscoelastic (Phan-Thien/Tanner). In all cases, the models rigorously consider the time-dependent rheological-mechanical coupling between the elastic and fluid viscoelastic physical components of the experimental setup. Effects of inherent variability in geometrical and material properties of the bacterium and polysaccharide layer on the measurable response are quantified. A parametric investigation of the force-indentation relationship highlights the importance of accurate knowledge of the rheology of the extracellular polysaccharides. We also draw conclusions about the design and evaluation of force spectroscopy experiments on single encapsulated bacteria. Supported by model calculations, we also point the way to methods of in vivo rheological characterization of the extracellular polysaccharide as a preferable alternative to characterization after its removal from the native environment.

  13. Variation of Surface Charge along the Surface of Wool Fibers Assessed by High-Resolution Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Bonnie; Chow, James; Abbott, Albert G.; Ellison, Michael S.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Dean, Delphine

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have mapped the surface charge of wool fibers using chemically specific high-resolution force spectroscopy in order to better understand the dispersion of amino acids in relation to fiber morphology. The inter-surface forces between standard atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tips (tip radius ~ 50 nm) functionalized with COOH and NH3 terminated alkanethiol self assembling monolayers and the wool surface were used to estimate the surface charge per unit area using linear Poisson-Boltzmann-based electrostatic double layer theory. The positional measurement of nano-scale surface charge showed a correlation between the surface charge and fiber morphology, indicated that basic amino acids are located near the scale edges. PMID:21866220

  14. Superconducting detector dynamics studied by quantum pump-probe spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeres, R.W.; Zwiller, V.

    2012-01-01

    We explore the dynamics of superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) on the picosecond time-scale using a correlated photon-pair source based on spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC), corresponding to a pump-probe experiment at the single-photon level. We show that the detector can oper

  15. Absence of gamma-range corticomuscular coherence during dynamic force in a deafferented patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Luis; Omlor, Wolfgang; Chakarov, Vihren; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2008-04-01

    Recently, we studied corticomuscular coherence (CMC) in a visuomotor task and showed for the first time gamma-range (30-45 Hz) CMC during isometric compensation of a periodically modulated dynamic force. We speculated that for the control of such forces, the sensorimotor system resonates at gamma-range frequencies to rapidly integrate the visual and proprioceptive information and produce the appropriate motor command. In this study, we tested the role of the proprioceptive afferent feedback on gamma-range CMC by comparing the deafferented patient GL to six age- and sex-matched subjects during the performance of a visuomotor force task consisting of isometric compensation of static and dynamic forces applied on the finger. Patient GL presented no significant gamma-band CMC during dynamic force. Instead, she had only beta-range CMC as in the static force condition; concurrently, her performance was significantly worse than that of the controls in both conditions. This gives support to the conclusions of our previous paper and suggests that proprioceptive information is mandatory in the genesis of gamma-band CMC during the generation and control of dynamic forces.

  16. Attitude dynamics and control of spacecraft using geomagnetic Lorentz force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Yehia A.; Shoaib, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Attitude stabilization of a charged rigid spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit using torques due to Lorentz force in pitch and roll directions is considered. A spacecraft that generates an electrostatic charge on its surface in the Earth's magnetic field will be subject to perturbations from the Lorentz force. The Lorentz force acting on an electrostatically charged spacecraft may provide a useful thrust for controlling a spacecraft's orientation. We assume that the spacecraft is moving in the Earth's magnetic field in an elliptical orbit under the effects of gravitational, geomagnetic and Lorentz torques. The magnetic field of the Earth is modeled as a non-tilted dipole. A model incorporating all Lorentz torques as a function of orbital elements has been developed on the basis of electric and magnetic fields. The stability of the spacecraft orientation is investigated both analytically and numerically. The existence and stability of equilibrium positions is investigated for different values of the charge to mass ratio (α*). Stable orbits are identified for various values of α*. The main parameters for stabilization of the spacecraft are α* and the difference between the components of the moment of inertia for the spacecraft.

  17. Static and Dynamic Performance Simulation of Direct-Acting Force Motor Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xinghai; Ding, Jianjun; Zheng, Gang; Jiang, Kunpeng; Chen, Dongdong

    2017-07-01

    This work focuses on static and dynamic characteristics of direct-acting force motor valve. First, we analyzed the structure features and operating principle of the Mitsubishi-Hitachi force motor valve (FMV) and the operating principle of its internal permanent-magnet moving-coil force motor magnetic circuit, determined the transfer function of the FMV force motor system, and established a mathematical model for the system. Secondly, we established a static performance analysis model using the AMESIM software and utilized the model in combination with experimental results to analyze the effects of electro-hydraulic servo valve structural parameters on static characteristics. Lastly, we deduced the trajectory equation of the system, established the relationship between dynamic characteristic indexes and structural parameters, and analyzed the effects of different parameter values on the dynamic characteristics of the system. This research can provide a theoretical guidance for designing and manufacturing the FMV body.

  18. Interacting trophic forcing and the population dynamics of herring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Martin; Ostman, Orjan; Gardmark, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Small pelagic fish occupy a central position in marine ecosystems worldwide, largely by determining the energy transfer from lower trophic levels to predators at the top of the food web, including humans. Population dynamics of small pelagic fish may therefore be regulated neither strictly bottom......-up nor top-down, but rather through multiple external and internal drivers. While in many studies single drivers have been identified, potential synergies of multiple factors, as well as their relative importance in regulating population dynamics of small pelagic fish, is a largely unresolved issue....... Using a statistical, age-structured modeling approach, we demonstrate the relative importance and influence of bottom-up (e.g., climate, zooplankton availability) and top-down (i.e., fishing and predation) factors on the population dynamics of Bothnian Sea herring (Clupea harengus) throughout its life...

  19. Investigation of Multiscale Non-equilibrium Flow Dynamics Under External Force Field

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Tianbai

    2016-01-01

    The multiple scale non-equilibrium gaseous flow behavior under external force field is investigated. Both theoretical analysis based on the kinetic model equation and numerical study are presented to demonstrate the dynamic effect of external force on the flow evolution, especially on the non-equilibrium heat flux. The current numerical experiment is based on the well-balanced unified gas-kinetic scheme (UGKS), which presents accurate solutions in the whole flow regime from the continuum Navier-Stokes solution to the transition and free molecular ones. The heat conduction in the non-equilibrium regime due to the external forcing term is quantitatively investigated. In the lid-driven cavity flow study, due to the external force field the density distribution inside cavity gets stratified and a multiscale non-equilibrium flow transport appears in a single gas dynamic system. With the increment of external forcing term, the flow topological structure changes dramatically, and the temperature gradient, shearing s...

  20. Identification of dynamic forces using group-sparsity in frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezayat, A.; Nassiri, V.; De Pauw, B.; Ertveldt, J.; Vanlanduit, S.; Guillaume, P.

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of acting dynamic forces is required for the design of structures. Given the structural model, inverse techniques offer the possibility to reconstruct the system's input forces from vibration data. The inverse problem is highly sensitive to measurement noise, and the classical pseudo-inverse method generally fails to find the correct loads. In this paper we propose a new penalty function that combines the advantages of the ℓp-norm properties, together with a modified iterative optimization technique. The new algorithm (G-FISTA) is used to localize and reconstruct dynamic point-forces on a beam structure, with no prior knowledge on the force locations. The algorithm is validated by means of several simulations and experiments. The strain data is measured using Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) attached to the beam. The obtained results show that the location and time history of point forces are better estimated using the proposed technique.

  1. A discrete force allocation algorithm for modelling wind turbines in computational fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an algorithm for allocating discrete forces in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Discrete forces are useful in wind energy CFD. They are used as an approximation of the wind turbine blades’ action on the wind (actuator disc/line), to model forests and to model turbulent......, this algorithm does not address the specific cases where discrete forces are present. The velocities and pressure exhibit some significant numerical fluctuations at the position where the body forces are applied. While this issue is limited in space, it is usually critical to accurately estimate the velocity...

  2. BIFURCATION AND DYNAMICS OF THIN SLIPPING FILMS UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF INTERMOLECULAR FORCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Guo-hui

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the Born repulsive force on the stability and dynamics of ultra-thin slipping films under the influences of intermolecular forces are investigated with bifurcation theory and numerical simulation. Results show that the repulsive force has a stabilizing effect on the development of perturbations, and can suppress the rupture process induced by the van der Waals attractive force. Although slippage will enhance the growth of disturbances, it does not have influence on the linear cutoff wave number and the final shape of the film thickness as time approaches to infinity.

  3. On the applicability of centroid and ring polymer path integral molecular dynamics for vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Alexander; Ivanov, Sergei D.; Shiga, Motoyuki; Forbert, Harald; Marx, Dominik

    2009-05-01

    Centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) are two conceptually distinct extensions of path integral molecular dynamics that are able to generate approximate quantum dynamics of complex molecular systems. Both methods can be used to compute quasiclassical time correlation functions which have direct application in molecular spectroscopy; in particular, to infrared spectroscopy via dipole autocorrelation functions. The performance of both methods for computing vibrational spectra of several simple but representative molecular model systems is investigated systematically as a function of temperature and isotopic substitution. In this context both CMD and RPMD feature intrinsic problems which are quantified and investigated in detail. Based on the obtained results guidelines for using CMD and RPMD to compute infrared spectra of molecular systems are provided.

  4. A time-correlation function approach to nuclear dynamical effects in X-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Karsten, Sven; Aziz, Saadullah G; Ivanov, Sergei D; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Modern X-ray spectroscopy has proven itself as a robust tool for probing the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Despite working on energy scales that are much larger than those corresponding to nuclear motions, taking nuclear dynamics and the associated nuclear correlations into account may be of importance for X-ray spectroscopy. Recently, we have developed an efficient protocol to account for nuclear dynamics in X-ray absorption and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra [Karsten \\textit{et al.} arXiv:1608.03436], based on ground state molecular dynamics accompanied with state-of-the-art calculations of electronic excitation energies and transition dipoles. Here, we present an alternative derivation of the formalism and elaborate on the developed simulation protocol on the examples of gas phase and bulk water. The specific spectroscopic features stemming from the nuclear motions are analyzed and traced down to the dynamics of electronic energy gaps and transition dipole correlation ...

  5. A comparison of static and dynamic optimization muscle force predictions during wheelchair propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Melissa M; Rankin, Jeffery W; Neptune, Richard R; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2014-11-07

    The primary purpose of this study was to compare static and dynamic optimization muscle force and work predictions during the push phase of wheelchair propulsion. A secondary purpose was to compare the differences in predicted shoulder and elbow kinetics and kinematics and handrim forces. The forward dynamics simulation minimized differences between simulated and experimental data (obtained from 10 manual wheelchair users) and muscle co-contraction. For direct comparison between models, the shoulder and elbow muscle moment arms and net joint moments from the dynamic optimization were used as inputs into the static optimization routine. RMS errors between model predictions were calculated to quantify model agreement. There was a wide range of individual muscle force agreement that spanned from poor (26.4% Fmax error in the middle deltoid) to good (6.4% Fmax error in the anterior deltoid) in the prime movers of the shoulder. The predicted muscle forces from the static optimization were sufficient to create the appropriate motion and joint moments at the shoulder for the push phase of wheelchair propulsion, but showed deviations in the elbow moment, pronation-supination motion and hand rim forces. These results suggest the static approach does not produce results similar enough to be a replacement for forward dynamics simulations, and care should be taken in choosing the appropriate method for a specific task and set of constraints. Dynamic optimization modeling approaches may be required for motions that are greatly influenced by muscle activation dynamics or that require significant co-contraction.

  6. A COMPARISON OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION MUSCLE FORCE PREDICTIONS DURING WHEELCHAIR PROPULSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Melissa M.; Rankin, Jeffery W.; Neptune, Richard R.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to compare static and dynamic optimization muscle force and work predictions during the push phase of wheelchair propulsion. A secondary purpose was to compare the differences in predicted shoulder and elbow kinetics and kinematics and handrim forces. The forward dynamics simulation minimized differences between simulated and experimental data (obtained from 10 manual wheelchair users) and muscle co-contraction. For direct comparison between models, the shoulder and elbow muscle moment arms and net joint moments from the dynamic optimization were used as inputs into the static optimization routine. RMS errors between model predictions were calculated to quantify model agreement. There was a wide range of individual muscle force agreement that spanned from poor (26.4 % Fmax error in the middle deltoid) to good (6.4 % Fmax error in the anterior deltoid) in the prime movers of the shoulder. The predicted muscle forces from the static optimization were sufficient to create the appropriate motion and joint moments at the shoulder for the push phase of wheelchair propulsion, but showed deviations in the elbow moment, pronation-supination motion and hand rim forces. These results suggest the static approach does not produce results similar enough to be a replacement for forward dynamics simulations, and care should be taken in choosing the appropriate method for a specific task and set of constraints. Dynamic optimization modeling approaches may be required for motions that are greatly influenced by muscle activation dynamics or that require significant co-contraction. PMID:25282075

  7. Rich stochastic dynamics of co-doped Er:Yb fluorescence upconversion nanoparticles in the presence of thermal, non-conservative, harmonic and optical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nome, Rene A.; Sorbello, Cecilia; Jobbágy, Matías; Barja, Beatriz C.; Sanches, Vitor; Cruz, Joyce S.; Aguiar, Vinicius F.

    2017-03-01

    The stochastic dynamics of individual co-doped Er:Yb upconversion nanoparticles (UCNP) were investigated from experiments and simulations. The UCNP were characterized by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and zeta potential measurements. Single UCNP measurements were performed by fluorescence upconversion micro-spectroscopy and optical trapping. The mean-square displacement (MSD) from single UCNP exhibited a time-dependent diffusion coefficient which was compared with Brownian dynamics simulations of a viscoelastic model of harmonically bound spheres. Experimental time-dependent two-dimensional trajectories of individual UCNP revealed correlated two-dimensional nanoparticle motion. The measurements were compared with stochastic trajectories calculated in the presence of a non-conservative rotational force field. Overall, the complex interplay of UCNP adhesion, thermal fluctuations and optical forces led to a rich stochastic behavior of these nanoparticles.

  8. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  9. Dynamic measurement of temperature using neutron resonance spectroscopy (NRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, D.J.; Asay, B.W.; Bennett, B.I.; Bowman, J.D.; Boat, R.M.; Dickson, P.M.; Henson, B.F.; Hull, L.M.; Idar, D.J.; Laabs, G.W.; London, R.K.; Mace, J.L.; Morgan, G.L.; Murk, D.M.; Rabie, R.L.; Ragan, C.E.; Stacy, H.L.; Yuan, V.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Accurate temperature measurements in dynamic systems have been pursued for decades and have usually relied on optical techniques. These approaches are generally hampered by insufficient information regarding the emissivity of the system under study. We are developing NRS techniques to measure temperature in dynamic systems and overcome these limitations. Many neutron resonances have narrow intrinsic Breit-Wigner widths such that the resonance is substantially broadened by the atomic motion even at room temperature. Thus, accurate measurement of the Doppler contribution allows one to infer the material temperature, and for the conditions achieved using standard high explosives, the probe itself is not perturbed by the high temperature and pressure. Experiments are conducted using a pulsed spallation source at LANSCE with time-of-flight measurement of the neutron spectra. In initial experiments, we have demonstrated that measurements with ten percent accuracy are possible. We have fielded dynamic tests, most of which were neutron-flux limited. An overview of the approach and the status of our experimental campaign are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Investigating the lignocellulosic composition during delignification using confocal raman spectroscopy, cross-polarization magic angle spinning carbon 13 - nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS 13C- NMR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chunilall, Viren

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available spectroscopy, Cross-Polarization Magic Angle Spinning Carbon 13 - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP/MAS 13C-NMR) spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in conjunction with image analysis. The confocal Raman results showed that there were differences...

  11. Two-dimensional optical correlation spectroscopy applied to liquid/glass dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazonder, Kees; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Corkum, Paul; Jonas, David M.; Miller, R.J. Dwayne.; Weiner, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    Correlation spectroscopy was used to study the effects of temperature and phase changes on liquid and glass solvent dynamics. By assessing the eccentricity of the elliptic shape of a 2D optical correlation spectrum the value of the underlying frequency-frequency correlation function can be retrieved

  12. Hydrogen bond dynamics in alcohols studied by 2D IR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V.; Jansen, Thomas L C; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast hydrogen-bond dynamics in alcohols are studied by 2D IR spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics—quantum mechanical simulations on the OH stretching mode. Fast memory loss in *100 fs are attributed to intact hydrogen-bond fluctuations. Stable (at the experimental timescale) hydrogen bo

  13. Dynamic and unique nucleolar microenvironment revealed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hweon; Han, Sung-Sik; Sako, Yasushi; Pack, Chan-Gi

    2015-03-01

    Organization and functions of the nucleolus is maintained by mobilities and interactions of nucleolar factors. Because the nucleolus is a densely packed structure, molecular crowding effects determined by the molecular concentrations and mobilities in the nucleolus should also be important for regulating nucleolar organization and functions. However, such molecular property of nucleolar organization is not fully understood. To understand the biophysical property of nucleolar organization, the diffusional behaviors of inert green fluorescent protein (GFP) oligomers with or without nuclear localization signals (NLSs) were analyzed under various conditions by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Our result demonstrates that the mobility of GFPs inside the nucleolus and the nucleoplasm can be represented by single free diffusion under normal conditions, even though the mobility in the nucleolus is considerably slower than that in the chromatin region. Moreover, the free diffusion of GFPs is found to be significantly size- and NLS-dependent only in the nucleolus. Interestingly, the mobility in the nucleolus is highly sensitive to ATP depletion, as well as actinomycin D (ActD) treatment. In contrast, the ultra-structure of the nucleolus was not significantly changed by ATP depletion but was changed by ActD treatment. These results suggest that the nucleolus behaves similarly to an open aqueous-phase medium with an increased molecular crowding effect that depends on both energy and transcription.

  14. Dynamical Fluctuating Charge Force Fields Application to Liquid Water

    CERN Document Server

    Rick, S W; Berne, B J; Rick, Steven W.; Stuart, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    A new molecular dynamics model in which the point charges on atomic sites are allowed to fluctuate in response to the environment is developed and applied to water. The idea for treating charges as variables is based on the concept of electronegativity equalization according to which: (a) The electronegativity of an atomic site is dependent on the atom's type and charge and is perturbed by the electrostatic potential it experiences from its neighbors and (b) Charge is transferred between atomic sites in such a way that electronegativities are equalized. The charges are treated as dynamical variables using an extended Lagrangian method in which the charges are given a fictitious mass, velocities and kinetic energy and then propagated according to Newtonian mechanics along with the atomic degrees of freedom. Models for water with fluctuating charges are developed using the geometries of two common fixed-charge water potentials: the simple point charge (SPC) and the 4-point transferable intermolecular potential ...

  15. Pseudorotation dynamics in liquid cyclopentane by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhail, Richard A.; Variyar, Jayasankar E.

    1989-09-01

    We have measured isotropic Raman spectra of cyclopentane- d9 in the CH stretching region from 180 to 300 K. The spectra show what is apparently a partial motional averaging of the CH stretching bands by pseudorotation, a barrierless conformational rearrangement. We have fit the experimental spectra with a model in which the pseudorotation dynamics are described as one-dimensional diffusion on a ring, with an exponentially decaying temporal memory function. Although the fit to the data is good the resulting values of the parameters indicate that the model is unsatisfactory and that inertial behavior must be included.

  16. Integrated dynamic and static tactile sensor: focus on static force sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettels, Nicholas; Pletner, Baruch

    2012-04-01

    Object grasping by robotic hands in unstructured environments demands a sensor that is durable, compliant, and responsive to static and dynamic force conditions. In order for a tactile sensor to be useful for grasp control in these, it should have the following properties: tri-axial force sensing (two shear plus normal component), dynamic event sensing across slip frequencies, compliant surface for grip, wide dynamic range (depending on application), insensitivity to environmental conditions, ability to withstand abuse and good sensing behavior (e.g. low hysteresis, high repeatability). These features can be combined in a novel multimodal tactile sensor. This sensor combines commercial-off-the-shelf MEMS technology with two proprietary force sensors: a high bandwidth device based on PZT technology and low bandwidth device based on elastomers and optics. In this study, we focus on the latter transduction mechanism and the proposed architecture of the completed device. In this study, an embedded LED was utilized to produce a constant light source throughout a layer of silicon rubber which covered a plastic mandrel containing a set of sensitive phototransistors. Features about the contacted object such as center of pressure and force vectors can be extracted from the information in the changing patterns of light. The voltage versus force relationship obtained with this molded humanlike finger had a wide dynamic range that coincided with forces relevant for most human grip tasks.

  17. The interaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole with human serum albumin as determined by spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuqin; Jia, Baoxiu; Wang, Hao; Li, Nana; Chen, Gaopan; Lin, Yuejuan; Gao, Wenhua

    2013-04-01

    The interaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied in vitro by equilibrium dialysis under normal physiological conditions. This study used fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling techniques. Association constants, the number of binding sites and basic thermodynamic parameters were used to investigate the quenching mechanism. Based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the distance between the HSA and MBI was 2.495 nm. The ΔG(0), ΔH(0), and ΔS(0) values across temperature indicated that the hydrophobic interaction was the predominant binding Force. The UV, FT-IR, CD and Raman spectra confirmed that the HSA secondary structure was altered in the presence of MBI. In addition, the molecular modeling showed that the MBI-HSA complex was stabilized by hydrophobic forces, which resulted from amino acid residues. The AFM results revealed that the individual HSA molecule dimensions were larger after interaction with MBI. Overall, this study suggested a method for characterizing the weak intermolecular interaction. In addition, this method is potentially useful for elucidating the toxigenicity of MBI when it is combined with the biomolecular function effect, transmembrane transport, toxicological testing and other experiments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Laser sources and techniques for spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, A.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program focuses on the development of novel laser and spectroscopic techniques in the IR, UV, and VUV regions for studying combustion related molecular dynamics at the microscopic level. Laser spectroscopic techniques have proven to be extremely powerful in the investigation of molecular processes which require very high sensitivity and selectivity. The authors approach is to use quantum electronic and non-linear optical techniques to extend the spectral coverage and to enhance the optical power of ultrahigh resolution laser sources so as to obtain and analyze photoionization, fluorescence, and photoelectron spectra of jet-cooled free radicals and of reaction products resulting from unimolecular and bimolecular dissociations. New spectroscopic techniques are developed with these sources for the detection of optically thin and often short-lived species. Recent activities center on regenerative amplification of high resolution solid-state lasers, development of tunable high power mid-IR lasers and short-pulse UV/VUV tunable lasers, and development of a multipurpose high-order suppressor crossed molecular beam apparatus for use with synchrotron radiation sources. This program also provides scientific and technical support within the Chemical Sciences Division to the development of LBL`s Combustion Dynamics Initiative.

  19. The acute effects of dynamic and ballistic stretching on vertical jump height, force, and power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggers, Jason R; Swank, Ann M; Frost, Karen L; Lee, Chong D

    2008-11-01

    Stretching before performance is a common practice among athletes in hopes of increasing performance and reducing the risk of injury. However, cumulative results indicate a negative impact of static stretching and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on performance; thus, there is a need for evaluating other stretching strategies for effective warm-up. The purpose of this study was to compare the differences between two sets of ballistic stretching and two sets of a dynamic stretching routine on vertical jump performance. Twenty healthy male and female college students between the ages of 22 and 34 (24.8 +/- 3 years) volunteered to participate in this study. All subjects completed three individual testing sessions on three nonconsecutive days. On each day, the subjects completed one of three treatments (no stretch, ballistic stretch, and dynamic stretch). Intraclass reliability was determined using the data obtained from each subject. A paired samples t-test revealed no significant difference in jump height, force, or power when comparing no stretch with ballistic stretch. A significant difference was found on jump power when comparing no stretch with dynamic stretch, but no significant difference was found for jump height or force. Statistics showed a very high reliability when measuring jump height, force, and power using the Kistler Quattro Jump force plate. It seems that neither dynamic stretching nor ballistic stretching will result in an increase in vertical jump height or force. However, dynamic stretching elicited gains in jump power poststretch.

  20. Dynamics of sessile drops. Part 3. Theory of forced oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Bostwick, Joshua B

    2016-01-01

    A partially-wetting sessile drop is driven by a sinusoidal pressure field that produces capillary waves on the liquid/gas interface. The analysis presented in Part 1 of this series (Bostwick & Steen 2014) is extended by computing response diagrams and phase shifts for the viscous droplet, whose three phase contact-line moves with contact-angle that is a smooth function of the contact line speed. Viscous dissipation is incorporated through the viscous potential flow approximation and the critical Ohnesorge number bounding regions beyond which a given mode becomes over-damped is computed. Davis dissipation originating from the contact-line speed condition leads to damped oscillations for drops with finite contact-line mobility, even for inviscid fluids. The critical mobility and associated driving frequency to generate the largest Davis dissipation is computed. Lastly, regions of modal coexistence where two modes can be simultaneously excited by a single forcing frequency are identified. Predictions compare...

  1. Foot force models of crowd dynamics on a wobbly bridge

    CERN Document Server

    Belykh, Igor; Belykh, Vladamir

    2016-01-01

    Modern pedestrian and suspension bridges are designed using industry-standard packages, yet disastrous resonant vibrations are observed, necessitating multi-million dollar repairs. Recent examples include pedestrian induced vibrations during the openings of the Solf\\'erino Bridge in Paris in 1999 and the increased bouncing of the Squibb Park Bridge in Brooklyn in 2014. The most prominent example of an unstable lively bridge is the London Millennium Bridge which started wobbling as a result of pedestrian-bridge interactions. Pedestrian phase-locking due to footstep phase adjustment, is suspected to be the main cause of its large lateral vibrations; however, its role in the initiation of wobbling was debated. In this paper, we develop foot force models of pedestrians' response to bridge motion and detailed, yet analytically tractable models of crowd phase-locking. We use bio-mechanically inspired models of crowd lateral movement to investigate to what degree pedestrian synchrony must be present for a bridge to ...

  2. Light hadron spectroscopy with O(a) improved dynamical fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Allton, C R; Bowler, K C; Foster, M; Garden, J; Irving, A C; Kenway, R D; Michael, C; Peisa, J; Pickles, S M; Sexton, J C; Sroczynski, Z; Talevi, M; Wittig, H

    1999-01-01

    We present the first results for the static quark potential and the light hadron spectrum using dynamical fermions at $\\beta=5.2$ using an O(a) improved Wilson fermion action together with the standard Wilson plaquette action for the gauge part. Sea quark masses were chosen such that the pseudoscalar-vector mass ratio, m_PS/m_V$, varies from 0.86 to 0.67. Finite-size effects are studied by using three different volumes, 8^3\\cdot 24, 12^3\\cdot 24 and 16^3\\cdot 24. Comparing our results to previous ones obtained using the quenched approximation, we find evidence for sea quark effects in quantities like the static quark potential and the vector-pseudoscalar hyperfine splitting.

  3. Spectroscopy and reaction dynamics of collision complexes containing hydroxyl radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lester, M.I. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The DOE supported work in this laboratory has focused on the spectroscopic characterization of the interaction potential between an argon atom and a hydroxyl radical in the ground X{sup 2}II and excited A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +} electronic states. The OH-Ar system has proven to be a test case for examining the interaction potential in an open-shell system since it is amenable to experimental investigation and theoretically tractable from first principles. Experimental identification of the bound states supported by the Ar + OH (X {sup 2}II) and Ar + OH(A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +}) potentials makes it feasible to derive realistic potential energy surfaces for these systems. The experimentally derived intermolecular potentials provide a rigorous test of ab initio theory and a basis for understanding the dramatically different collision dynamics taking place on the ground and excited electronic state surfaces.

  4. Observations of Quantum Dynamics by Solution-State NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pravia, M A; Weinstein, Yu S; Price, M D; Teklemariam, G; Nelson, R J; Sharf, Y; Somaroo, S S; Tseng, C H; Havel, T F; Cory, D G

    1999-01-01

    NMR is emerging as a valuable testbed for the investigation of foundational questions in quantum mechanics. The present paper outlines the preparation of a class of mixed states, called pseudo-pure states, that emulate pure quantum states in the highly mixed environment typically used to describe solution-state NMR samples. It also describes the NMR observation of spinor behavior in spin 1/2 nuclei, the simulation of wave function collapse using a magnetic field gradient, the creation of entangled (or Bell) pseudo-pure states, and a brief discussion of quantum computing logic gates, including the Quantum Fourier Transform. These experiments show that liquid-state NMR can be used to demonstrate quantum dynamics at a level suitable for laboratory exercises.

  5. Recording the dynamic endocytosis of single gold nanoparticles by AFM-based force tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bohua; Tian, Yongmei; Pan, Yangang; Shan, Yuping; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Sun, Yingchun; Wang, Hongda

    2015-04-01

    We utilized force tracing to directly record the endocytosis of single gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) with different sizes, revealing the size-dependent endocytosis dynamics and the crucial role of membrane cholesterol. The force, duration and velocity of Au NP invagination are accurately determined at the single-particle and microsecond level unprecedentedly.We utilized force tracing to directly record the endocytosis of single gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) with different sizes, revealing the size-dependent endocytosis dynamics and the crucial role of membrane cholesterol. The force, duration and velocity of Au NP invagination are accurately determined at the single-particle and microsecond level unprecedentedly. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the experimental procedures and the results of the control experiments. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01020a

  6. An ab initio approach to free-energy reconstruction using logarithmic mean force dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Obata, Masao; Morishita, Tetsuya; Oda, Tatsuki

    2014-05-14

    We present an ab initio approach for evaluating a free energy profile along a reaction coordinate by combining logarithmic mean force dynamics (LogMFD) and first-principles molecular dynamics. The mean force, which is the derivative of the free energy with respect to the reaction coordinate, is estimated using density functional theory (DFT) in the present approach, which is expected to provide an accurate free energy profile along the reaction coordinate. We apply this new method, first-principles LogMFD (FP-LogMFD), to a glycine dipeptide molecule and reconstruct one- and two-dimensional free energy profiles in the framework of DFT. The resultant free energy profile is compared with that obtained by the thermodynamic integration method and by the previous LogMFD calculation using an empirical force-field, showing that FP-LogMFD is a promising method to calculate free energy without empirical force-fields.

  7. Dynamical forcing of sub-seasonal variability in the tropical Brewer-Dobson circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abalos, Marta; Randel, William; Serrano, Encarna

    2014-05-01

    Upwelling across the tropical tropopause exhibits strong sub-seasonal variability superimposed on the well-known annual cycle, and these variations directly affect temperature and tracers in the tropical lower stratosphere. The dynamical forcing of tropical upwelling on sub-seasonal timescales is investigated using the ERA-Interim reanalysis for 1979-2011. Momentum balance diagnostics reveal that transience is linked to the effects of extratropical wave forcing, with centers of action in the extratropical winter stratosphere and in the subtropical upper troposphere of both hemispheres. From a diagnostic point of view, the zonal-mean wind transient response is important for communicating the remote wave forcing to the tropical stratosphere. Dynamical patterns reflect distinctive forcing of the shallow versus deep branches of the Brewer-Dobson circulation.

  8. Interactions of Histone Acetyltransferase p300 with the Nuclear Proteins Histone and HMGB1, As Revealed by Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S; Rakshit, T; Sett, S; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2015-10-22

    One of the important properties of the transcriptional coactivator p300 is histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity that enables p300 to influence chromatin action via histone modulation. p300 can exert its HAT action upon the other nuclear proteins too--one notable example being the transcription-factor-like protein HMGB1, which functions also as a cytokine, and whose accumulation in the cytoplasm, as a response to tissue damage, is triggered by its acetylation. Hitherto, no information on the structure and stability of the complexes between full-length p300 (p300FL) (300 kDa) and the histone/HMGB1 proteins are available, probably due to the presence of unstructured regions within p300FL that makes it difficult to be crystallized. Herein, we have adopted the high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach, which allows molecularly resolved three-dimensional contour mapping of a protein molecule of any size and structure. From the off-rate and activation barrier values, obtained using single molecule dynamic force spectroscopy, the biochemical proposition of preferential binding of p300FL to histone H3, compared to the octameric histone, can be validated. Importantly, from the energy landscape of the dissociation events, a model for the p300-histone and the p300-HMGB1 dynamic complexes that HAT forms, can be proposed. The lower unbinding forces of the complexes observed in acetylating conditions, compared to those observed in non-acetylating conditions, indicate that upon acetylation, p300 tends to weakly associate, probably as an outcome of charge alterations on the histone/HMGB1 surface and/or acetylation-induced conformational changes. To our knowledge, for the first time, a single molecule level treatment of the interactions of HAT, where the full-length protein is considered, is being reported.

  9. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  10. Life in extreme environments: single molecule force spectroscopy as a tool to explore proteins from extremophilic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Hoffmann, Toni; Batchelor, Matthew; Hughes, Megan L; Kendrick, Katherine E; Walsh, Danielle L; Wilson, Michael; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2015-04-01

    Extremophiles are organisms which survive and thrive in extreme environments. The proteins from extremophilic single-celled organisms have received considerable attention as they are structurally stable and functionally active under extreme physical and chemical conditions. In this short article, we provide an introduction to extremophiles, the structural adaptations of proteins from extremophilic organisms and the exploitation of these proteins in industrial applications. We provide a review of recent developments which have utilized single molecule force spectroscopy to mechanically manipulate proteins from extremophilic organisms and the information which has been gained about their stability, flexibility and underlying energy landscapes.

  11. Research on Dynamic Tension for Belt Conveyor with Constant Force Automatic Take-Up Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Guo-ying; CHEN Jing-li; LI Yu-jin

    2003-01-01

    The article Provides a dynamic model for belt conveyor. Based on the drive-force of conveyor, take-up tension of take-up assembly, gravity of conveyor belt and material, and friction between belt and idlers, it gives a viscoelastic dynamic equation for conveyor belt. It presents a calculation method of analytic solution to both viscoelastic dynamic equation and geometric dynamic equation when automatic take-up assembly is applied to belt conveyor. The article also makes a study of design method of limiting and eliminating the conveyor belt's elastic vibration.

  12. Accelerated molecular dynamics force evaluation on graphics processing units for thermal conductivity calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Zheyong; Siro, Topi; Harju, Ari

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a highly efficient molecular dynamics code fully implemented on graphics processing units for thermal conductivity calculations using the Green-Kubo formula. We compare two different schemes for force evaluation, a previously used thread-scheme where a single thread is used for one particle and each thread calculates the total force for the corresponding particle, and a new block-scheme where a whole block is used for one particle and each thread in the block calcula...

  13. Dynamics of the Dermatologic Microbiome in U.S. Air Force Basic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-05

    DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 59TH MEDICAL WING (AETC) JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO - LACKLAND TEXAS MEMORANDUMFORSGTf ATfN: CAPT ANDREW PATfERSON FROM...59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 7 APR 20 17 1. Your paper, entitled Dvnamics of the Dermatologic Microbiome in U.S. Air ...PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Dynamics of the dennatologic microbiome in U.S. Air Force Basic Training 7. FUNDING RECEIVED FOR THIS STUDY? r8J YES 0 NO

  14. Instrumented Footwear Inserts: A New Tool for Measuring Forces and Biomechanical State Changes During Dynamic Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-03

    1 Instrumented Footwear Inserts: A New Tool For Measuring Forces and Biomechanical State Changes During Dynamic Movements Joe Lacirignola1...bones and joints are repeatedly subjected to aggressive movements and high forces. The ability to measure these elements during training would be a...critical enabler for prevention of injury and development of more quantitative training procedures that focus on ambulatory mobility and agility. It

  15. Visualization of subsurface nanoparticles in a polymer matrix using resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yao, Atsushi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-01

    A visualization technique of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale spatial resolution is strongly demanded. Some research groups have demonstrated the visualization of subsurface features using various techniques based on atomic force microscopy. However, the imaging mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the visualization of subsurface Au nanoparticles buried in a polymer matrix 900 nm from the surface using two techniques; i.e., resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy. It was clarified that the subsurface features were visualized by the two techniques as the area with a higher contact resonance frequency and a higher Q-factor than those in the surrounding area, which suggests that the visualization is realized by the variation of the contact stiffness and damping of the polymer matrix due to the existence of the buried nanoparticles.

  16. Interaction of an anticancer peptide fragment of azurin with p53 and its isolated domains studied by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Santini, Simona; Coppari, Emilia; Bucciantini, Monica; Di Agostino, Silvia; Yamada, Tohru; Beattie, Craig W; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    p28 is a 28-amino acid peptide fragment of the cupredoxin azurin derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that preferentially penetrates cancerous cells and arrests their proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Its antitumor activity reportedly arises from post-translational stabilization of the tumor suppressor p53 normally downregulated by the binding of several ubiquitin ligases. This would require p28 to specifically bind to p53 to inhibit specific ligases from initiating proteosome-mediated degradation. In this study, atomic force spectroscopy, a nanotechnological approach, was used to investigate the interaction of p28 with full-length p53 and its isolated domains at the single molecule level. Analysis of the unbinding forces and the dissociation rate constant suggest that p28 forms a stable complex with the DNA-binding domain of p53, inhibiting the binding of ubiquitin ligases other than Mdm2 to reduce proteasomal degradation of p53.

  17. Relaxation dynamics of a protein solution investigated by dielectric spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, M; Gulich, R; Lunkenheimer, P; Loidl, A

    2012-05-01

    In the present work, we provide a dielectric study on two differently concentrated aqueous lysozyme solutions in the frequency range from 1MHz to 40GHz and for temperatures from 275 to 330K. We analyze the three dispersion regions, commonly found in protein solutions, usually termed β-, γ-, and δ-relaxations. The β-relaxation, occurring in the frequency range around 10MHz and the γ-relaxation around 20GHz (at room temperature) can be attributed to the rotation of the polar protein molecules in their aqueous medium and the reorientational motion of the free water molecules, respectively. The nature of the δ-relaxation, which is often ascribed to the motion of bound water molecules, is not yet fully understood. Here we provide data on the temperature dependence of the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of all three detected processes and on the dc conductivity arising from ionic charge transport. The temperature dependences of the β- and γ-relaxations are closely correlated. We found a significant temperature dependence of the dipole moment of the protein, indicating conformational changes. Moreover we find a breakdown of the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relation in this protein solution, i.e., the dc conductivity is not completely governed by the mobility of the solvent molecules. Instead it seems that the dc conductivity is closely connected to the hydration shell dynamics.

  18. DYNAMIC COMPACTION OF PURE COPPER POWDER USING PULSED MAGNETIC FORCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The compaction of pure Cu powder was carried out through a series of experiments using dynamic magnetic pulse compaction, and the effects of process parameters, such as discharge energy and compacting direction, on the homogeneity and the compaction density of compacted specimens were presented and discussed. The results indicated that the compaction density of specimens increased with the augment of discharge voltage and time. During unidirectional compaction, there was a density gradient along the loading direction in the compacted specimen, and the minimum compaction density was localized to the center of the bottom of the specimen. The larger the aspect ratio of a powder body, the higher the compaction density of the compacted specimen. And high conductivity drivers were beneficial to the increase of the compaction density. The iterative and the double direction compaction were efficient means to manufacture the homogeneous and high-density powder parts.

  19. Galactic Dynamics Using 1/r Force Without Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, Martin Wen-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Dark matter, a conjectured substance not directly observable but which has tremendous mass, was proposed to explain why galaxies hold together and rotate faster at their edges than predicted by Newton's Inverse Square (1/r2) Law of Gravity. Here we propose an alternative, an Inverse Law (1/r), which explains galactic morphology and rotation without dark matter. By varying initial conditions, the Inverse Law can systematically and easily generate realistic galactic formations including spirals, cartwheels (extremely difficult under Newtonian gravity), bars, rings, and spokes. This model can also produce filaments and void structures reminiscent of the large-scale structure of the universe. Newtonian gravity cannot do all this without dark matter. Occam's Razor suggests that at galactic scales, gravity should be 1/r and dark matter is unnecessary. This simple model with its self-organizing emergent properties, combined with dynamical systems theory, has broader implications. It may help us understand more compl...

  20. Haptic perception of force magnitude and its relation to postural arm dynamics in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Femke E; Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M; Mugge, Winfred; Kappers, Astrid M L

    2015-12-08

    In a previous study, we found the perception of force magnitude to be anisotropic in the horizontal plane. In the current study, we investigated this anisotropy in three dimensional space. In addition, we tested our previous hypothesis that the perceptual anisotropy was directly related to anisotropies in arm dynamics. In experiment 1, static force magnitude perception was studied using a free magnitude estimation paradigm. This experiment revealed a significant and consistent anisotropy in force magnitude perception, with forces exerted perpendicular to the line between hand and shoulder being perceived as 50% larger than forces exerted along this line. In experiment 2, postural arm dynamics were measured using stochastic position perturbations exerted by a haptic device and quantified through system identification. By fitting a mass-damper-spring model to the data, the stiffness, damping and inertia parameters could be characterized in all the directions in which perception was also measured. These results show that none of the arm dynamics parameters were oriented either exactly perpendicular or parallel to the perceptual anisotropy. This means that endpoint stiffness, damping or inertia alone cannot explain the consistent anisotropy in force magnitude perception.

  1. Traceable calibration and demonstration of a portable dynamic force transfer standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlajic, Nicholas; Chijioke, Ako

    2017-08-01

    In general, the dynamic sensitivity of a force transducer depends upon the mechanical system in which it is used. This dependence serves as motivation to develop a dynamic force transfer standard, which can be used to calibrate an application transducer in situ. In this work, we SI-traceably calibrate a hand-held force transducer, namely an impact hammer, by using a mass suspended from a thin line which is cut to produce a known dynamic force in the form of a step function. We show that this instrument is a promising candidate as a transfer standard, since its dynamic response has small variance between different users. This calibrated transfer standard is then used to calibrate a secondary force transducer in an example application setting. The combined standard uncertainty (k  =  2) in the calibration of the transfer standard was determined to be 2.1% or less, up to a bandwidth of 5 kHz. The combined standard uncertainty (k  =  2) in the performed transfer calibration was less than 4%, up to 3 kHz. An advantage of the transfer calibration framework presented here, is that the transfer standard can be used to transfer SI-traceable calibrations without the use of any SI-traceable voltage metrology instrumentation.

  2. Signatures of hydrophobic collapse in extended proteins captured with force spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    We unfold and extend single proteins at a high force and then linearly relax the force to probe their collapse mechanisms. We observe a large variability in the extent of their recoil. Although chain entropy makes a small contribution, we show that the observed variability results from hydrophobic interactions with randomly varying magnitude from protein to protein. This collapse mechanism is common to highly extended proteins, including nonfolding elastomeric proteins like PEVK from titin. O...

  3. Effect of three-body forces on the lattice dynamics of noble metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P R Vyas; C V Pandya; T C Pandya; V B Gohel

    2001-04-01

    A simple method to generate an effective electron–ion interaction pseudopotential from the energy wave number characteristic obtained by first principles calculations has been suggested. This effective potential has been used, in third order perturbation, to study the effect of three-body forces on the lattice dynamics of noble metals. It is found that three-body forces, in these metals, do play an important role. The inclusion of such three-body forces appreciably improves the agreement between the experimental and theoretical phonon dispersion curves.

  4. Precision Measurement of the Casimir Force for Au Using a Dynamic Afm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.-C.; Banishev, A. A.; Castillo-Garza, R.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Mohideen, U.

    2012-07-01

    The gradient of the Casimir force between carefully cleaned Au surfaces of a sphere and a plate is measured using a dynamic atomic force microscope in the frequency modulation regime in high vacuum. The electrostatic calibration of the setup did not reveal any effect of patches or surface contaminants. The experimental data for the force gradient are found to be consistent with theory using the plasma model approach over the entire measurement range. The Drude model approach is excluded by the data at separations from 235 to 400 nm at a 67% confidence level.

  5. Influence of materials' optical response on actuation dynamics by Casimir forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, M.; Broer, W. H.; Van der Veeke, S.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2015-06-01

    The dependence of the Casimir force on the frequency-dependent dielectric functions of interacting materials makes it possible to tailor the actuation dynamics of microactuators. The Casimir force is largest for metallic interacting systems due to the high absorption of conduction electrons in the far-infrared range. For less conductive systems, such as phase change materials or conductive silicon carbide, the reduced force offers the advantage of increased stable operation of MEMS devices against pull-in instabilities that lead to unwanted stiction. Bifurcation analysis with phase portraits has been used to compare the sensitivity of a model actuator when the optical properties are altered.

  6. Dynamics of drag and force distributions for projectile impact in a granular medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ciamarra, M P; Lee, A T; Goldman, D I; Swinney, H L; Ciamarra, Massimo Pica; Lara, Antonio H.; Lee, Andrew T.; Goldman, Daniel I.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2003-01-01

    Our experiments and molecular dynamics simulations on a projectile penetrating a two-dimensional granular medium reveal that the mean deceleration of the projectile is constant and proportional to the impact velocity. Thus, the time taken for a projectile to decelerate to a stop is independent of its impact velocity. The simulations show that the probability distribution function of forces on grains is time-independent during a projectile's penetration of the medium. At all times the force distribution function decreases exponentially for large forces.

  7. Cross talk between matrix elasticity and mechanical force regulates myoblast traction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2013-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that critical cellular processes are profoundly influenced by the cross talk between extracellular nanomechanical forces and the material properties of the cellular microenvironment. Although many studies have examined either the effect of nanomechanical forces or the material properties of the microenvironment on biological processes, few have investigated the influence of both. Here, we performed simultaneous atomic force microscopy and traction force microscopy to demonstrate that muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) rapidly generate a significant increase in traction when stimulated with a local 10 nN force. Cells were cultured and nanomechanically stimulated on hydrogel substrates with controllable local elastic moduli varying from ˜16-89 kPa, as confirmed with atomic force microscopy. Importantly, cellular traction dynamics in response to nanomechanical stimulation only occurred on substrates that were similar to the elasticity of working muscle tissue (˜64-89 kPa) as opposed to substrates mimicking resting tissue (˜16-51 kPa). The traction response was also transient, occurring within 30 s, and dissipating by 60 s, during constant nanomechanical stimulation. The observed biophysical dynamics are very much dependent on rho-kinase and myosin-II activity and likely contribute to the physiology of these cells. Our results demonstrate the fundamental ability of cells to integrate nanoscale information in the cellular microenvironment, such as nanomechanical forces and substrate mechanics, during the process of mechanotransduction.

  8. Force Responses and Sarcomere Dynamics of Cardiac Myofibrils Induced by Rapid Changes in [Pi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, Robert

    2017-01-24

    The second phase of the biphasic force decay upon release of phosphate from caged phosphate was previously interpreted as a signature of kinetics of the force-generating step in the cross-bridge cycle. To test this hypothesis without using caged compounds, force responses and individual sarcomere dynamics upon rapid increases or decreases in concentration of inorganic phosphate [Pi] were investigated in calcium-activated cardiac myofibrils. Rapid increases in [Pi] induced a biphasic force decay with an initial slow decline (phase 1) and a subsequent 3-5-fold faster major decay (phase 2). Phase 2 started with the distinct elongation of a single sarcomere, the so-called sarcomere "give". "Give" then propagated from sarcomere to sarcomere along the myofibril. Propagation speed and rate constant of phase 2 (k+Pi(2)) had a similar [Pi]-dependence, indicating that the kinetics of the major force decay (phase 2) upon rapid increase in [Pi] is determined by sarcomere dynamics. In contrast, no "give" was observed during phase 1 after rapid [Pi]-increase (rate constant k+Pi(1)) and during the single-exponential force rise (rate constant k-Pi) after rapid [Pi]-decrease. The values of k+Pi(1) and k-Pi were similar to the rate constant of mechanically induced force redevelopment (kTR) and Ca(2+)-induced force development (kACT) measured at same [Pi]. These results indicate that the major phase 2 of force decay upon a Pi-jump does not reflect kinetics of the force-generating step but results from sarcomere "give". The other phases of Pi-induced force kinetics that occur in the absence of "give" yield the same information as mechanically and Ca(2+)-induced force kinetics (k+Pi(1) ∼ k-Pi ∼ kTR ∼ kACT). Model simulations indicate that Pi-induced force kinetics neither enable the separation of Pi-release from the rate-limiting transition f into force states nor differentiate whether the "force-generating step" occurs before, along, or after the Pi-release.

  9. Quantifying non-ergodic dynamics of force-free granular gases

    OpenAIRE

    Bodrova, Anna; Chechkin, Aleksei V.; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Brownianmotion is ergodic in the Boltzmann–Khinchin sense that long time averages of physical observables such as the mean squared displacement provide the same information as the corresponding ensemble average, even at out-of-equilibrium conditions. This property is the fundamental prerequisite for single particle tracking and its analysis in simple liquids. We study analytically and by event-driven molecular dynamics simulations the dynamics of force-free cooling granular gases and reveal a...

  10. Unraveling the Secrets of Bacterial Adhesion Organelles Using Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axner, Ove; Björnham, Oscar; Castelain, Mickaël; Koutris, Efstratios; Schedin, Staffan; Fällman, Erik; Andersson, Magnus

    Many types of bacterium express micrometer-long attachment organelles (so-called pili) whose role is to mediate adhesion to host tissue. Until recently, little was known about their function in the adhesion process. Force-measuring optical tweezers (FMOT) have since then been used to unravel the biomechanical properties of various types of pili, primarily those from uropathogenic E. coli, in particular their force-vs.-elongation response, but lately also some properties of the adhesin are situated at the distal end of the pilus. This knowledge provides an understanding of how piliated bacteria can sustain external shear forces caused by rinsing processes, e.g., urine flow. It has been found that many types of pilus exhibit unique and complex force-vs.-elongation responses. It has been conjectured that their dissimilar properties impose significant differences in their ability to sustain external forces and that different types of pilus therefore have dissimilar predisposition to withstand different types of rinsing conditions. An understanding of these properties is of high importance since it can serve as a basis for finding new means to combat bacterial adhesion, including that caused by antibiotic-resistance bacteria. This work presents a review of the current status of the assessment of biophysical properties of individual pili on single bacteria exposed to strain/stress, primarily by the FMOT technique. It also addresses, for the first time, how the elongation and retraction properties of the rod couple to the adhesive properties of the tip adhesin.

  11. An attempt to bridge muscle architecture dynamics and its instantaneous rate of force development using ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jizhou; Zhou, Yongjin; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Li, Guanglin

    2015-08-01

    Muscle force output is an essential index in rehabilitation assessment or physical exams, and could provide considerable insights for various applications such as load monitoring and muscle assessment in sports science or rehabilitation therapy. Besides direct measurement of force output using a dynamometer, electromyography has earlier been used in several studies to quantify muscle force as an indirect means. However, its spatial resolution is easily compromised as a summation of the action potentials from neighboring motor units of electrode site. To explore an alternative method to indirectly estimate the muscle force output, and with better muscle specificity, we started with an investigation on the relationship between architecture dynamics and force output of triceps surae. The muscular architecture dynamics is captured in ultrasonography sequences and estimated using a previously reported motion estimation method. Then an indicator named as the dorsoventrally averaged motion profile (DAMP) is employed. The performance of force output is represented by an instantaneous version of the rate of force development (RFD), namely I-RFD. From experimental results on ten normal subjects, there were significant correlations between the I-RFD and DAMP for triceps surae, both normalized between 0 and 1, with the sum of squares error at 0.0516±0.0224, R-square at 0.7929±0.0931 and root mean squared error at 0.0159±0.0033. The statistical significance results were less than 0.01. The present study suggested that muscle architecture dynamics extracted from ultrasonography during contraction is well correlated to the I-RFD and it can be a promising option for indirect estimation of muscle force output.

  12. Analysis of adhesive binding forces between laminin-1 and C2C12 muscle cell membranes measured via high resolution force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, George; Gilbert, Richard; Ortiz, Christine

    2002-03-01

    Laminins are a family of glycoproteins that regulate cell differentiation, shape, and motility through interactions with various cell surface receptors. Here, we have directly measured the biomolecular adhesive binding forces between a cantilever / probe tip that was covalently attached with laminin-1 and membrane receptors on C2C12 muscle cells using the technique of high-resolution force spectroscopy (HRFS). On retraction of the probe tip away from the membrane surface, discrete, long-range adhesive unbinding events were always observed. Statistical analysis of the data revealed an initial broad distribution of heterogeneous unbinding events (occurring at separation distances, D=0-2µm from the point of maximum compression) of magnitude 92.23±37.87pN followed by a narrow distribution of homogeneous unbinding events (occurring at D > 2µm) of magnitude 38.16±9.10pN, which is suggestive of an individual biomolecular adhesive interaction. On-going studies include loading rate dependence and effect of dystroglycan mutation.

  13. Dynamical role of phosphorylation on serine/threonine-proline Pin1 substrates from constant force molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Hector A; Hamelberg, Donald

    2015-02-21

    Cis-trans isomerization of peptidyl-prolyl bonds of the protein backbone plays an important role in numerous biological processes. Cis-trans isomerization can be the rate-limiting step due its extremely slow dynamics, compared to the millisecond time scale of many processes, and is catalyzed by a widely studied family of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase enzymes. Also, mechanical forces along the peptide chain can speed up the rate of isomerization, resulting in "mechanical catalysis," and have been used to study peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerization and other mechanical properties of proteins. Here, we use constant force molecular dynamics simulations to study the dynamical effects of phosphorylation on serine/threonine-proline protein motifs that are involved in the function of many proteins and have been implicated in many aberrant biological processes. We show that the rate of cis-trans isomerization is slowed down by phosphorylation, in excellent agreement with experiments. We use a well-grounded theory to describe the force dependent rate of isomerization. The calculated rates at zero force are also in excellent agreement with experimentally measured rates, providing additional validation of the models and force field parameters. Our results suggest that the slowdown in the rate upon phosphorylation is mainly due to an increase in the friction along the peptidyl-prolyl bond angle during isomerization. Our results provide a microscopic description of the dynamical effects of post-translational phosphorylation on cis-trans isomerization and insights into the properties of proteins under tension.

  14. Electrostatic Binding and Hydrophobic Collapse of Peptide-Nucleic Acid Aggregates Quantified Using Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Bizarro, Cristiano V; de Loreno, Sara; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Ramsch, Roland; Vilchez, Susana; Solans, Conxita; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Albericio, Fernando; Eritja, Ramon; Giralt, Ernest; Dev, Sukhendu B; Ritort, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction between self-aggregating peptides and nucleic acids or other polyanions is key to the understanding of many aggregation processes underlying several human diseases (e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). Determining the affinity and kinetic steps of such interactions is challenging due to the competition between hydrophobic self-aggregating forces and electrostatic binding forces. Kahalalide F (KF) is an anticancer hydrophobic peptide which contains a single positive charge that confers strong aggregative properties with polyanions. This makes KF an ideal model to elucidate the mechanisms by which self-aggregation competes with binding to a strongly charged polyelectrolyte such as DNA. We use optical tweezers to apply mechanical forces to single DNA molecules and show that KF and DNA interact in a two-step kinetic process promoted by the electrostatic binding of DNA to the aggregate surface followed by the stabilization of the complex due to hydrophobic interact...

  15. Characterization of chemically and enzymatically treated hemp fibres using atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G. [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada); Abboud, Zeinab [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Bressler, David C., E-mail: david.bressler@ualberta.ca [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada)

    2014-09-30

    The mechanical and moisture resistance properties of natural fibre reinforced composites are dependent on the adhesion between the matrix of choice and the fibre. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effect of NaOH swelling of hemp fibres prior to enzymatic treatment and a novel chemical sulfonic acid method on the physical properties of hemp fibres. The colloidal properties of treated hemp fibres were studied exclusively using an atomic force microscope. AFM imaging in tapping mode revealed that each treatment rendered the surface topography of the hemp fibres clean and exposed the individual fibre bundles. Hemp fibres treated with laccase had no effect on the surface adhesion forces measured. Interestingly, mercerization prior to xylanase + cellulase and laccase treatments resulted in greater enzyme access evident in the increased adhesion force measurements. Hemp fibres treated with sulfonic acid showed an increase in surface de-fibrillation and smoothness. A decrease in adhesion forces for 4-aminotoulene-3-sulfonic acid (AT3S) treated fibres suggested a reduction in surface polarity. This work demonstrated that AFM can be used as a tool to estimate the surface forces and roughness for modified fibres and that enzymatic coupled with chemical methods can be used to improve the surface properties of natural fibres for composite applications. Further, this work is one of the first that offers some insight into the effect of mercerization prior to enzymes and the effect on the surface topography. AFM will be used to selectively screen treated fibres for composite applications based on the adhesion forces associated with the colloidal interface between the AFM tip and the fibre surfaces.

  16. Characterization of chemically and enzymatically treated hemp fibres using atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G.; Abboud, Zeinab; Bressler, David C.

    2014-09-01

    The mechanical and moisture resistance properties of natural fibre reinforced composites are dependent on the adhesion between the matrix of choice and the fibre. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effect of NaOH swelling of hemp fibres prior to enzymatic treatment and a novel chemical sulfonic acid method on the physical properties of hemp fibres. The colloidal properties of treated hemp fibres were studied exclusively using an atomic force microscope. AFM imaging in tapping mode revealed that each treatment rendered the surface topography of the hemp fibres clean and exposed the individual fibre bundles. Hemp fibres treated with laccase had no effect on the surface adhesion forces measured. Interestingly, mercerization prior to xylanase + cellulase and laccase treatments resulted in greater enzyme access evident in the increased adhesion force measurements. Hemp fibres treated with sulfonic acid showed an increase in surface de-fibrillation and smoothness. A decrease in adhesion forces for 4-aminotoulene-3-sulfonic acid (AT3S) treated fibres suggested a reduction in surface polarity. This work demonstrated that AFM can be used as a tool to estimate the surface forces and roughness for modified fibres and that enzymatic coupled with chemical methods can be used to improve the surface properties of natural fibres for composite applications. Further, this work is one of the first that offers some insight into the effect of mercerization prior to enzymes and the effect on the surface topography. AFM will be used to selectively screen treated fibres for composite applications based on the adhesion forces associated with the colloidal interface between the AFM tip and the fibre surfaces.

  17. Relationship between jaw opening force and hyoid bone dynamics in healthy elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Hiromichi; Tohara, Haruka; Matsubara, Mariko; Inokuchi, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Nakane, Ayako; Wakasugi, Yoko; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between jaw opening force and hyoid bone dynamics and resting position in elderly individuals based on gender. Subjects were 36 healthy elderly individuals aged ≥65 years without dysphagia (16 men and 20 women; mean age 75.5 years, range 65-88 years). Videofluorographic images during the swallowing of 10 mL of 40% (w/v) barium sulfate were obtained and the degrees of anterior, superior, and hypotenuse displacements of the hyoid bone and maximum/resting hyoid position were evaluated. Jaw opening force was measured three times using a jaw opening force sthenometer; the mean of these three measurements was used for analysis. In men, there was a positive correlation between jaw opening force and resting hyoid position and negative correlations among all the degrees of anterior, superior, and hypotenuse displacements of the hyoid bone. In women, there was no statistically significant correlation between jaw opening force and any of the measurement items. There was no statistically significant correlation between jaw opening force and maximum hyoid position in either men or women. Our findings suggest that low jaw opening force leads to low resting hyoid position only in elderly men, and a lower hyoid position in healthy elderly men results in a larger total amount of hyoid displacement during swallowing. Moreover, a maximum hyoid position in healthy individuals of either gender does not differ depending on their jaw opening force.

  18. Resonant Optical Gradient Force Interaction for Nano-Imaging and-Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-19

    perspective for further resonant enhancement and control of optical forces. 1. Introduction The combination of scanning probemicroscopywith optics... relatively small force variation between 23 fN to 25 fN across the resonance is due to the large broadband offset as a result of  1 2, which is a...ismuchweaker than the case of R6Gbut exhibits a larger relative spectral variation across the resonance from0.2 fN to 1 fN (for z= 2 nm). Irrespective

  19. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  20. Dynamical systems analysis of electrostatic and aerodynamic forced vibrations of a thin flexible electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanu, Sushma Bala

    Transverse vibrations of an electrostatically actuated thin flexible cantilever perturbed by low-speed air flow is studied using both experiments and numerical modeling. In the experiments the dynamic characteristics of the cantilever are studied by supplying a DC voltage with an AC component for electrostatic forcing and a constant uniform air flow around the cantilever system for aerodynamic forcing. The maximum voltage applied varies from 1 - 9 kV and air flow speeds range from 0.224 - 3.58 m/s (0.5 - 8 mile/hr). The Reynolds numbers for these speeds lie in the range of 1000 - 20000. A range of control parameters leading to stable vibrations are established using the Strouhal number as the operating parameter whose inverse values change from 100 - 2500. The Numerical results are validated with experimental results. Assuming the amplitude of vibrations are small, then a non-linear dynamic Euler-Bernoulli beam equation with viscous damping and gravitational effects is used to model the vibrations of the dynamical system. Aerodynamic forcing is modeled as a temporally sinusoidal and uniform force acting perpendicular to the beam length. The forcing amplitude is found to be proportional to square of air flow velocity by obtaining relationship between the experimental amplitude of vibrations and air flow velocity. Numerical results strongly agree with those of experiments predicting accurate vibration amplitudes, displacement frequency and quasi-periodic displacements of the cantilever tip.

  1. Standard practice for verification of constant amplitude dynamic forces in an axial fatigue testing system

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for the dynamic verification of cyclic force amplitude control or measurement accuracy during constant amplitude testing in an axial fatigue testing system. It is based on the premise that force verification can be done with the use of a strain gaged elastic element. Use of this practice gives assurance that the accuracies of forces applied by the machine or dynamic force readings from the test machine, at the time of the test, after any user applied correction factors, fall within the limits recommended in Section 9. It does not address static accuracy which must first be addressed using Practices E 4 or equivalent. 1.2 Verification is specific to a particular test machine configuration and specimen. This standard is recommended to be used for each configuration of testing machine and specimen. Where dynamic correction factors are to be applied to test machine force readings in order to meet the accuracy recommended in Section 9, the verification is also specific to the c...

  2. Characterization of the crystalline structure of cellulose using static and dynamic FT-IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerholm, Margaretha; Hinterstoisser, Barbara; Salmén, Lennart

    2004-02-25

    The cellulose structure is a factor of major importance for the strength properties of wood pulp fibers. The ability to characterize small differences in the crystalline structures of cellulose from fibers of different origins is thus highly important. In this work, dynamic FT-IR spectroscopy has been further explored as a method sensitive to cellulose structure variations. Using a model system of two different celluloses, the relation between spectral information and the relative cellulose Ialpha content was investigated. This relation was then used to determine the relative cellulose Ialpha content in different pulps. The estimated cellulose I allomorph compositions were found to be reasonable for both unbleached and bleached chemical pulps. In addition, it was found that the dynamic FT-IR spectroscopy technique had the potential to indicate possible correlation field splitting peaks of cellulose Ibeta.

  3. Nuclear dynamical correlation effects in X-ray spectroscopy from a time-domain perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Karsten, Sven; Aziz, Saadullah G; Bokarev, Sergey I; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    To date X-ray spectroscopy has become a routine tool that can reveal highly local and element-specific information on the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Here, we focus on nuclear dynamical effects in X-ray spectra and develop a rigorous time-correlation method employing ground state molecular dynamics simulations. The importance of nuclear correlation phenomena is demonstrated by comparison against the results from the conventional sampling approach for gas phase water. In contrast to the first-order absorption, second-order resonant inelastic scattering spectra exhibit pronounced fingerprints of nuclear motions. The developed methodology does not depend on the accompanying electronic structure method in principle as well as on the spectral range and, thus, can be applied to, e.g., UV and X-ray photo-electron and Auger spectroscopies.

  4. Modeling the desired direction in a force-based model for pedestrian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chraibi, Mohcine; Schadschneider, Andreas; Seyfried, Armin

    2012-01-01

    We introduce an enhanced model based on the generalized centrifugal force model. Furthermore, the desired direction of pedestrians is investigated. A new approach leaning on the well-known concept of static and dynamic floor-fields in cellular automata is presented. Numerical results of the model are presented and compared with empirical data.

  5. Dynamics of a Disturbed Sessile Drop Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGuiggan, Patricia M.; Grave, Daniel A.; Wallace, Jay S.; Cheng, Shengfeng; Prosperetti, Andrea; Robbins, Mark O.

    2011-01-01

    A new method for studying the dynamics of a sessile drop by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated. A hydrophobic microsphere (radius, r 20–30 μm) is brought into contact with a small sessile water drop resting on a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface. When the microsphere touches the liq

  6. Dynamical ordering of non-Birkhoff periodic orbits in a forced pendulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro [Teikyo Heisei Univ., Ichihara, Chiba (Japan); Tanikawa, Kiyotaka [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    Forced pendulums induce reversible non-monotone twist mappings. Non-Birkhoff periodic orbits (NBO) are found in these mappings, and hence in the pendulums. The existence of an NBO is equivalent to the non-integrability of the system. Two types of dynamical ordering for NBOs are obtained. (author)

  7. Dynamical Ordering of Non-Birkhoff Periodic Orbits in a Forced Pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Tanikawa, K.

    2001-12-01

    Forced pendulums induce reversible non-monotone twist mappings. Non-Birkhoff periodic orbits (NBO) are found in these mappings, and hence in the pendulums. The existence of an NBO is equivalent to the non-integrability of the system. Two types of dynamical ordering for NBOs are obtained.

  8. Boundedness and vanishing of solutions for a forced delay dynamic equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Douglas R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We give conditions under which all solutions of a time-scale first-order nonlinear variable-delay dynamic equation with forcing term are bounded and vanish at infinity, for arbitrary time scales that are unbounded above. A nontrivial example illustrating an application of the results is provided.

  9. Structure and dynamics in protic ionic liquids: a combined optical Kerr-effect and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, David A; Sonnleitner, Thomas; Ortner, Alex; Walther, Markus; Hefter, Glenn; Seddon, Kenneth R; Stana, Simona; Plechkova, Natalia V; Buchner, Richard; Wynne, Klaas

    2012-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of ionic liquids (ILs) are unusual due to the strong interactions between the ions and counter ions. These microscopic properties determine the bulk transport properties critical to applications of ILs such as advanced fuel cells. The terahertz dynamics and slower relaxations of simple alkylammonium nitrate protic ionic liquids (PILs) are here studied using femtosecond optical Kerr-effect spectroscopy, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The observed dynamics give insight into more general liquid behaviour while comparison with glass-forming liquids reveals an underlying power-law decay and relaxation rates suggest supramolecular structure and nanoscale segregation.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation study of friction force and torque on a rough spherical particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohale, Swapnil C; Khare, Rajesh

    2010-06-21

    Recent developments in techniques of micro- and nanofluidics have led to an increased interest in nanoscale hydrodynamics in confined geometries. In our previous study [S. C. Kohale and R. Khare, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 164706 (2008)], we analyzed the friction force experienced by a smooth spherical particle that is translating in a fluid confined between parallel plates. The magnitude of three effects--velocity slip at particle surface, the presence of confining surfaces, and the cooperative hydrodynamic interactions between periodic images of the moving particle--that determine the friction force was quantified in that work using molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, we have studied the motion of a rough spherical particle in a confined geometry. Specifically, the friction force experienced by a translating particle and the torque experienced by a rotating particle are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results demonstrate that the surface roughness of the particle significantly reduces the slip at the particle surface, thus leading to higher values of the friction force and hence a better agreement with the continuum predictions. The particle size dependence of the friction force and the torque values is shown to be consistent with the expectations from the continuum theory. As was observed for the smooth sphere, the cooperative hydrodynamic interactions between the images of the sphere have a significant effect on the value of the friction force experienced by the translating sphere. On the other hand, the torque experienced by a spherical particle that is rotating at the channel center is insensitive to this effect.

  11. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics in the Ionic Driving Force for GABAA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wright

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly apparent that the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission is dynamic. One parameter that can establish differences in the actions of GABAergic synapses is the ionic driving force for the chloride-permeable GABAA receptor (GABAAR. Here we review some of the sophisticated ways in which this ionic driving force can vary within neuronal circuits. This driving force for GABAARs is subject to tight spatial control, with the distribution of Cl− transporter proteins and channels generating regional variation in the strength of GABAAR signalling across a single neuron. GABAAR dynamics can result from short-term changes in their driving force, which involve the temporary accumulation or depletion of intracellular Cl−. In addition, activity-dependent changes in the expression and function of Cl− regulating proteins can result in long-term shifts in the driving force for GABAARs. The multifaceted regulation of the ionic driving force for GABAARs has wide ranging implications for mature brain function, neural circuit development, and disease.

  12. Hydrophobic, electrostatic, and dynamic polymer forces at silicone surfaces modified with long-chain bolaform surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Michael V; Donaldson, Stephen H; Gebbie, Matthew A; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Gizaw, Yonas; Koenig, Peter; Roiter, Yuri; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-05-06

    Surfactant self-assembly on surfaces is an effective way to tailor the complex forces at and between hydrophobic-water interfaces. Here, the range of structures and forces that are possible at surfactant-adsorbed hydrophobic surfaces are demonstrated: certain long-chain bolaform surfactants-containing a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mid-block domain and two cationic α, ω-quarternary ammonium end-groups-readily adsorb onto thin PDMS films and form dynamically fluctuating nanostructures. Through measurements with the surface forces apparatus (SFA), it is found that these soft protruding nanostructures display polymer-like exploration behavior at the PDMS surface and give rise to a long-ranged, temperature- and rate-dependent attractive bridging force (not due to viscous forces) on approach to a hydrophilic bare mica surface. Coulombic interactions between the cationic surfactant end-groups and negatively-charged mica result in a rate-dependent polymer bridging force during separation as the hydrophobic surfactant mid-blocks are pulled out from the PDMS interface, yielding strong adhesion energies. Thus, (i) the versatile array of surfactant structures that may form at hydrophobic surfaces is highlighted, (ii) the need to consider the interaction dynamics of such self-assembled polymer layers is emphasized, and (iii) it is shown that long-chain surfactants can promote robust adhesion in aqueous solutions.

  13. STUDY ON THE MISCIBILITY OF DYNAMICALLY VULCANIZED EPDM/PP BLEND BY POSITRON ANNIHILATION SPECTROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Jiang; Xue-liang Jiang; Shi-yuan Cheng; Yi-qun Dai; Shao-jie Wang; Bo Wang

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) was utilized to investigate the relationship between the free-volume hole properties and miscibility of dynamically vulcanized EPDM/PP blend. The results showed that the noncrystalline region of PP and EPDM in the blend was partially miscible and the miscibility of the blend became worse when the weight percent of EPDM was <50%. This was also demonstrated by DMTA and mechanical properties of the blends with various compositions.

  14. Dynamics of the Bogie of Maglev Train with Distributed Magnetic Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaozong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic model of the bogie of maglev train with distributed magnetic forces and four identical levitating controllers is formulated. The vertical, pitching, and rolling degree of freedom of the electromagnet modules and their coupling are considered. The frequency responses of the bogie to track irregularity are investigated with numerical simulation. The results tell us that there are resonances related to the first electromagnetic suspension whose frequencies are determined by the control parameters. A comparative analysis has been carried out between the models with distributed or concentrated magnetic forces. The comparison indicates that simplifying the distributed magnetic force to concentrated one degenerates the dynamic behavior of the maglev bogie, especially resulting in overestimated resonances of the first electromagnetic suspension of maglev trains. The results also indicate that those resonances only occur on specific wavelengths of irregularity that relate to the length of the electromagnets.

  15. Dynamic tunneling force microscopy for characterizing electronic trap states in non-conductive surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R.; Williams, C. C., E-mail: clayton@physics.utah.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Dynamic tunneling force microscopy (DTFM) is a scanning probe technique for real space mapping and characterization of individual electronic trap states in non-conductive films with atomic scale spatial resolution. The method is based upon the quantum mechanical tunneling of a single electron back and forth between a metallic atomic force microscopy tip and individual trap states in completely non-conducting surface. This single electron shuttling is measured by detecting the electrostatic force induced on the probe tip at the shuttling frequency. In this paper, the physical basis for the DTFM method is unfolded through a physical model and a derivation of the dynamic tunneling signal as a function of several experimental parameters is shown. Experimental data are compared with the theoretical simulations, showing quantitative consistency and verifying the physical model used. The experimental system is described and representative imaging results are shown.

  16. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  17. Dynamics and Optimal Feet Force Distributions of a Realistic Four-legged Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurav Agarwal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a detailed dynamic modeling of realistic four-legged robot. The direct and inverse kinematic analysis for each leg has been considered in order to develop an overall kinematic model of the robot, when it follows a straight path. This study also aims to estimate optimal feet force distributions of the said robot, which is necessary for its real-time control. Three different approaches namely, minimization of norm of feet forces (approach 1, minimization of norm of joint torques (approach 2 and minimization of norm of joint power (approach 3 have been developed. Simulation result shows that approach 3 is more energy efficient foot force formulation than other two approaches. Lagrange-Euler formulation has been utilized to determine the joint torques. The developed dynamic models have been examined through computer simulation of continuous gait of the four-legged robot.

  18. Modification of 56ACARBO force field for molecular dynamic calculations of chitosan and its derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Vladimir S; Ignatov, Stanislav K

    2017-08-01

    The GROMOS 56ACARBO force field for the description of carbohydrates was modified for calculations of chitosan (poly-1,4-(N-acetyl)-β-D-glucopyranosamine-2) with protonated and non-protonated amino groups and its derivatives. Additional parameterization was developed on the basis of quantum chemical calculations. The modified force field (56ACARBO_CHT) allows performing the molecular dynamic calculations of chitosans with different degrees of protonation corresponding to various acidity of medium. Test calculations of the conformational transitions in the chitosan rings and polymeric chains as well as the chitosan nanocrystal dissolution demonstrate good agreement with experimental data. Graphical abstract The GROMOS 56ACARBO_CHT force field allows performing the molecular dynamic calculations of chitosans with different types of amio-group: free, protonated, substituted.

  19. Ultrafast low-energy dynamics of graphite studied by nonlinear multi-THz spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitenstorfer A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultraintense few-cycle THz pulses are employed to study the nonlinear response of graphite. A phase sensitive 2D spectroscopy setup is capable of detecting pump-induced transient changes as well as multi-wave mixing processes. The observed strong THz-pump THz-probe signals provide insight into ultrafast dynamics and the spectral response of the low-energy carriers. Here we report the observation of a pump-induced transmission in graphite. The relaxation dynamics shows three distinct time scales, which are assigned to carrier thermalization, phonon emission and a slow cooling down back to equilibrium.

  20. Single-order laser high harmonics in XUV for ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular wavepacket dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuho Fushitani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present applications of extreme ultraviolet (XUV single-order laser harmonics to gas-phase ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultrashort XUV pulses at 80 nm are obtained as the 5th order harmonics of the fundamental laser at 400 nm by using Xe or Kr as the nonlinear medium and separated from other harmonic orders by using an indium foil. The single-order laser harmonics is applied for real-time probing of vibrational wavepacket dynamics of I2 molecules in the bound and dissociating low-lying electronic states and electronic-vibrational wavepacket dynamics of highly excited Rydberg N2 molecules.

  1. Coupling between amino acid and water dynamics by broadband dielectric spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Luciana; Cerveny, Silvina

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of proline aqueous solution was investigated for water concentrations from 40 to 60 wt% by dielectric spectroscopy (106 - 109 Hz) in the temperature range from 230 to 300 K, where the solutions remain amorphous. We found two relaxation processes, related with the reorientation of proline and water as previously observed in a higher frequency range at room temperature [1]. We found that both dynamics are strongly coupled, as previously observed in hydrated proteins powders, in spite of the fact that a single amino acid is a molecule much simpler than a protein.

  2. Atomic force microscope with combined FTIR-Raman spectroscopy having a micro thermal analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Samuel D [Aiken, SC; Fondeur, Fernando F [North Augusta, SC

    2011-10-18

    An atomic force microscope is provided that includes a micro thermal analyzer with a tip. The micro thermal analyzer is configured for obtaining topographical data from a sample. A raman spectrometer is included and is configured for use in obtaining chemical data from the sample.

  3. Characterization of novel sufraces by FTIR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy for food pathogen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single molecular detection of pathogens and toxins of interest to food safety is within grasp using technology such as Atomic Force Microscopy. Using antibodies or specific aptamers connected to the AFM tip make it possible to detect a pathogen molecule on a surface. However, it also becomes necess...

  4. Accurate, explicit formulae for higher harmonic force spectroscopy by frequency modulation-AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Sivan, Uri

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear interaction between an AFM tip and a sample gives rise to oscillations of the cantilever at integral multiples (harmonics) of the fundamental resonance frequency. The higher order harmonics have long been recognized to hold invaluable information on short range interactions but their utilization has thus far been relatively limited due to theoretical and experimental complexities. In particular, existing approximations of the interaction force in terms of higher harmonic amplitudes generally require simultaneous measurements of multiple harmonics to achieve satisfactory accuracy. In the present letter we address the mathematical challenge and derive accurate, explicit formulae for both conservative and dissipative forces in terms of an arbitrary single harmonic. Additionally, we show that in frequency modulation-AFM (FM-AFM) each harmonic carries complete information on the force, obviating the need for multi-harmonic analysis. Finally, we show that higher harmonics may indeed be used to reconstruct short range forces more accurately than the fundamental harmonic when the oscillation amplitude is small compared with the interaction range.

  5. Imaging electron dynamics with time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Popova-Gorelova, Daria; Santra, Robin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically study how time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy can be applied for imaging coherent electron dynamics in molecules. We consider a process in which a pump pulse triggers coherent electronic dynamics in a molecule by creating a valence electron hole. An ultrashort extreme ultraviolet (XUV) probe pulse creates a second electron hole in the molecule. Information about the electron dynamics is accessed by analyzing angular distributions of photoemission probabilities at a fixed photoelectron energy. We demonstrate that a rigorous theoretical analysis, which takes into account the indistinguishability of transitions induced by the ultrashort, broadband probe pulse and electron hole correlation effects, is necessary for the interpretation of time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra. We show how a Fourier analysis of time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra from a molecule can be applied to follow its electron dynamics by considering photoelectron distributions from an indol...

  6. Excited state X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Probing both electronic and structural dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Simon P.; Averbukh, Vitali; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectra, simulated using a general method, to properties of molecular excited states. Recently, Averbukh and co-workers [M. Ruberti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 184107 (2014)] introduced an efficient and accurate L 2 method for the calculation of excited state valence photoionization cross-sections based on the application of Stieltjes imaging to the Lanczos pseudo-spectrum of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) representation of the electronic Hamiltonian. In this paper, we report an extension of this method to the calculation of excited state core photoionization cross-sections. We demonstrate that, at the ADC(2)x level of theory, ground state X-ray absorption spectra may be accurately reproduced, validating the method. Significantly, the calculated X-ray absorption spectra of the excited states are found to be sensitive to both geometric distortions (structural dynamics) and the electronic character (electronic dynamics) of the initial state, suggesting that core excitation spectroscopies will be useful probes of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics. We anticipate that the method presented here can be combined with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to simulate the time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of excited state molecular wavepacket dynamics.

  7. Complexity of the tensegrity structure for dynamic energy and force distribution of cytoskeleton during cell spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Jung Chen

    Full Text Available Cytoskeleton plays important roles in intracellular force equilibrium and extracellular force transmission from/to attaching substrate through focal adhesions (FAs. Numerical simulations of intracellular force distribution to describe dynamic cell behaviors are still limited. The tensegrity structure comprises tension-supporting cables and compression-supporting struts that represent the actin filament and microtubule respectively, and has many features consistent with living cells. To simulate the dynamics of intracellular force distribution and total stored energy during cell spreading, the present study employed different complexities of the tensegrity structures by using octahedron tensegrity (OT and cuboctahedron tensegrity (COT. The spreading was simulated by assigning specific connection nodes for radial displacement and attachment to substrate to form FAs. The traction force on each FA was estimated by summarizing the force carried in sounding cytoskeletal elements. The OT structure consisted of 24 cables and 6 struts and had limitations soon after the beginning of spreading by declining energy stored in struts indicating the abolishment of compression in microtubules. The COT structure, double the amount of cables and struts than the OT structure, provided sufficient spreading area and expressed similar features with documented cell behaviors. The traction force pointed inward on peripheral FAs in the spread out COT structure. The complex structure in COT provided further investigation of various FA number during different spreading stages. Before the middle phase of spreading (half of maximum spreading area, cell attachment with 8 FAs obtained minimized cytoskeletal energy. The maximum number of 12 FAs in the COT structure was required to achieve further spreading. The stored energy in actin filaments increased as cells spread out, while the energy stored in microtubules increased at initial spreading, peaked in middle phase, and then

  8. Flexible Piezoelectric Tactile Sensor Array for Dynamic Three-Axis Force Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Liu, Weiting; Gu, Chunxin; Cheng, Xiaoying; Fu, Xin

    2016-06-03

    A new flexible piezoelectric tactile sensor array based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film is proposed for measuring three-axis dynamic contact force distribution. The array consists of six tactile units arranged as a 3 × 2 matrix with spacing 8 mm between neighbor units. In each unit, a PVDF film is sandwiched between four square-shaped upper electrodes and one square-shaped lower electrode, forming four piezoelectric capacitors. A truncated pyramid bump is located above the four piezoelectric capacitors to improve force transmission. A three-axis contact force transmitted from the top of the bump will lead to the four piezoelectric capacitors underneath undergoing different charge changes, from which the normal and shear components of the force can be calculated. A series of dynamic tests have been carried out by exerting sinusoidal forces with amplitudes ranging from 0 to 0.5 N in the x-axis, 0 to 0.5 N in the y-axis, and 0 to 1.5 N in the z-axis, separately. The tactile units show good sensitivities with 14.93, 14.92, and 6.62 pC/N in the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. They can work with good linearity, relatively low coupling effect, high repeatability, and acceptable frequency response in the range of 5-400 Hz to both normal and shear load. In addition, dynamic three-axis force measurement has been conducted for all of the tactile units. The average errors between the applied and calculated forces are 10.68% ± 6.84%. Furthermore, the sensor array can be easily integrated onto a curved surface, such as robotic and prosthetic hands, due to its excellent flexibility.

  9. Mechanically functional amyloid fibrils in the adhesive of a marine invertebrate as revealed by Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Mostaert, Anika; Crockett, Rowena; Kearn, Graham; Cherny, Izhack; Gazit, Ehud; C Serpell, Louise; P Jarvis, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are primarily known in a pathogenic context for their association with a wide range of debilitating human diseases. Here we show a marine invertebrate (Entobdella soleae) utilizes functional amyloid fibrils comparable to those of a unicellular prokaryote (Escherichia coli). Thioflavin-T binding and Raman spectroscopy provided evidence for the presence of amyloid in the adhesive of Entobdella soleae. We elucidated that for these two very different organisms, amyloid fibrils provide adhesive and cohesive strength to their natural adhesives. Comparing the nanoscale mechanical responses of these fibrils with those of pathogenic amyloid by atomic force microscopy revealed that the molecular level origin of the cohesive strength was associated with the generic intermolecular β-sheet structure of amyloid fibrils. Functional adhesive residues were found only in the case of the functional amyloid. Atomic force microscopy provided a useful means to characterize the internal structural forces within individual amyloid fibrils and how these relate to the mechanical performance of both functional and pathogenic amyloid. The mechanistic link of amyloid-based cohesive and adhesive strength could be widespread amongst natural adhesives, irrespective of environment, providing a new strategy for biomimicry and a new source of materials for understanding the formation and stability of amyloid fibrils more generally.

  10. Interaction of an anticancer peptide fragment of azurin with p53 and its isolated domains studied by atomic force spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizzarri AR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Anna Rita Bizzarri1, Simona Santini1, Emilia Coppari1, Monica Bucciantini2, Silvia Di Agostino3, Tohru Yamada4, Craig W Beattie4, Salvatore Cannistraro11Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, CNISM, Facoltà di Scienze, Università della Tuscia, Viterbo, 2Department of Biochemical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, 3Molecular Oncogenesis Laboratory, Experimental Oncology Department, Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: p28 is a 28-amino acid peptide fragment of the cupredoxin azurin derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that preferentially penetrates cancerous cells and arrests their proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Its antitumor activity reportedly arises from post-translational stabilization of the tumor suppressor p53 normally downregulated by the binding of several ubiquitin ligases. This would require p28 to specifically bind to p53 to inhibit specific ligases from initiating proteosome-mediated degradation. In this study, atomic force spectroscopy, a nanotechnological approach, was used to investigate the interaction of p28 with full-length p53 and its isolated domains at the single molecule level. Analysis of the unbinding forces and the dissociation rate constant suggest that p28 forms a stable complex with the DNA-binding domain of p53, inhibiting the binding of ubiquitin ligases other than Mdm2 to reduce proteasomal degradation of p53.Keywords: AFS, cancer physics, unbinding forces

  11. Mori-Zwanzig theory for dissipative forces in coarse-grained dynamics in the Markov limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekov, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    We derive alternative Markov approximations for the projected (stochastic) force and memory function in the coarse-grained (CG) generalized Langevin equation, which describes the time evolution of the center-of-mass coordinates of clusters of particles in the microscopic ensemble. This is done with the aid of the Mori-Zwanzig projection operator method based on the recently introduced projection operator [S. Izvekov, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134106 (2013), 10.1063/1.4795091]. The derivation exploits the "generalized additive fluctuating force" representation to which the projected force reduces in the adopted projection operator formalism. For the projected force, we present a first-order time expansion which correctly extends the static fluctuating force ansatz with the terms necessary to maintain the required orthogonality of the projected dynamics in the Markov limit to the space of CG phase variables. The approximant of the memory function correctly accounts for the momentum dependence in the lowest (second) order and indicates that such a dependence may be important in the CG dynamics approaching the Markov limit. In the case of CG dynamics with a weak dependence of the memory effects on the particle momenta, the expression for the memory function presented in this work is applicable to non-Markov systems. The approximations are formulated in a propagator-free form allowing their efficient evaluation from the microscopic data sampled by standard molecular dynamics simulations. A numerical application is presented for a molecular liquid (nitromethane). With our formalism we do not observe the "plateau-value problem" if the friction tensors for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) are computed using the Green-Kubo relation. Our formalism provides a consistent bottom-up route for hierarchical parametrization of DPD models from atomistic simulations.

  12. Influence of the 3D inverse dynamic method on the joint forces and moments during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, R; Nicol, E; Chèze, L

    2007-10-01

    The joint forces and moments are commonly used in gait analysis. They can be computed by four different 3D inverse dynamic methods proposed in the literature, either based on vectors and Euler angles, wrenches and quaternions, homogeneous matrices, or generalized coordinates and forces. In order to analyze the influence of the inverse dynamic method, the joint forces and moments were computed during gait on nine healthy subjects. A ratio was computed between the relative dispersions (due to the method) and the absolute amplitudes of the gait curves. The influence of the inverse dynamic method was negligible at the ankle (2%) but major at the knee and the hip joints (40%). This influence seems to be due to the dynamic computation rather than the kinematic computation. Compared to the influence of the joint center location, the body segment inertial parameter estimation, and more, the influence of the inverse dynamic method is at least of equivalent importance. This point should be confirmed with other subjects, possibly pathologic, and other movements.

  13. Relationship between maximum dynamic force of inferior members and body balance in strength training apprentices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Martins

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between force and balance show controversy results and has directimplications in exercise prescription practice. The objective was to investigate the relationshipbetween maximum dynamic force (MDF of inferior limbs and the static and dynamic balances.Participated in the study 60 individuals, with 18 to 24 years old, strength training apprentices.The MDF was available by mean the One Maximum Repetition (1MR in “leg press” and “kneeextension” and motor testes to available of static and dynamic balances. The correlation testsand multiple linear regression were applied. The force and balance variables showed correlationin females (p=0.038. The corporal mass and static balance showed correlation for the males(p=0.045. The explication capacity at MDF and practices time were small: 13% for staticbalance in males, 18% and 17%, respectively, for static and dynamic balance in females. Inconclusion: the MDF of inferior limbs showed low predictive capacity for performance in staticand dynamic balances, especially for males.

  14. Dynamic tensile forces drive collective cell migration through three-dimensional extracellular matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; S. Piotrowski, Alexandra; Varner, Victor D.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collective cell migration drives tissue remodeling during development, wound repair, and metastatic invasion. The physical mechanisms by which cells move cohesively through dense three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) remain incompletely understood. Here, we show directly that migration of multicellular cohorts through collagenous matrices occurs via a dynamic pulling mechanism, the nature of which had only been inferred previously in 3D. Tensile forces increase at the invasive front of cohorts, serving a physical, propelling role as well as a regulatory one by conditioning the cells and matrix for further extension. These forces elicit mechanosensitive signaling within the leading edge and align the ECM, creating microtracks conducive to further migration. Moreover, cell movements are highly correlated and in phase with ECM deformations. Migrating cohorts use spatially localized, long-range forces and consequent matrix alignment to navigate through the ECM. These results suggest biophysical forces are critical for 3D collective migration. PMID:26165921

  15. Wheel-rail dynamic forces induced by random vertical track irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiroiu, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    The present paper investigates the wheel-rail dynamic forces produced by railway vehicles in motion, which are an important issue especially for the high-speed rail transport from the point of view of traffic safety, ride quality and undesirable effects on vehicles, on track and on the land in the vicinity of railways. The research is carried out on a model which includes track system, vehicle unsprung mass, vehicle primary suspension and the bogie sprung mass. The wheel-rail dynamic overloads are evaluated assuming random vertical irregularities of the track. The estimation of wheel-rail dynamic forces is made for a range of vehicle speeds up to 300 km/h and the influence of track and vehicle various parameters is investigated.

  16. An Improved Force-Angle Stability Margin for Radial Symmetrical Hexapod Robot Subject to Dynamic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shidong Long

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on stability monitoring for a radial symmetrical hexapod robot under dynamic conditions. The force-angle stability margin (FASM measure method has been chosen as the stability criterion. This is because it is suitable for the stability analysis, in terms of external forces or manipulator loads acting on the body. Considering that a radial symmetrical hexapod robot can tumble along the contact point besides tip-over axis, this paper proposes an improved FASM measure method. Furthermore, it provides the method for calculating the stability angle of contact point and simplifies the algorithm of FASM. To verify the improved FASM measure method, three potential dynamic situations have been simulated. The simulation results confirm that, under dynamic conditions, the improved FASM is efficient, simple in terms of calculation cost and sensitive to manipulator loads and external disturbances. This means it has practical value in on-line controllers.

  17. The Dynamics of Voluntary Force Production in Afferented Muscle Influence Involuntary Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Laine

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force production suffice to generate involuntary tremor. Specifically, participants were asked to produce isometric force with the index finger and use visual feedback to track a sinusoidal target spanning 5 to 9 % of each individual’s maximal voluntary force level. Force fluctuations and EMG activity over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS muscle were recorded and their frequency content was analyzed as a function target phase. Force variability in either the 1 to 5 or 6 to 15 Hz frequency ranges tended to be largest at the peaks and valleys of the target sinusoid. In those same periods, FDS EMG activity was synchronized with force fluctuations. We then constructed a physiologically-realistic computer simulation in which a muscle-tendon complex was set inside of a feedback-driven control loop. Surprisingly, the model sufficed to produce phase-dependent modulation of tremor similar to that observed in humans. Further, the gain of afferent feedback from muscle spindles was critical for appropriately amplifying and shaping this tremor. We suggest that the experimentally-induced tremor may represent the response of a viscoelastic muscle-tendon system to dynamic drive, and therefore does not fall into known categories of tremor generation, such as tremorogenic descending drive, stretch-reflex loop oscillations, motor unit behavior, or mechanical resonance. Our findings motivate future efforts to understand tremor from a perspective that considers neuromechanical coupling within the context of closed-loop control. The strategy of combining experimental recordings with physiologically-sound simulations will

  18. Nanoporous Structure of Bone Matrix at Osteoporosis from Data of Atomic Force Microscopy and IR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gaidash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It was found that in an osteoporotic bone the fraction of nanosized pores decreases, the mineral phase amorphizes, hydrated shells around mineralized particles of the bone matrix thicken, and adhesion forces increase. This contributes to the formation of water clusters similar to bulk water clusters compared to the healthy bone tissue and leads to the accumulation of more viscous liquid with increased intermolecular interaction forces in the pores of the bone matrix. Given this, the rates of chemical reactions proceeding in the water phase of ultrathin channels of general parts of collagen fibrils decrease. Ultimately, nanopores of collagen-apatite interfaces lose, to a certain extent, the capability of catalyzing the hydroxyapatite crystallization.

  19. Spectroscopy of quadrupole and octupole states in rare-earth nuclei from a Gogny force

    CERN Document Server

    Nomura, K; Robledo, L M

    2015-01-01

    Collective quadrupole and octupole states are described in a series of Sm and Gd isotopes within the framework of the interacting boson model (IBM), whose Hamiltonian parameters are deduced from mean field calculations with the Gogny energy density functional. The link between both frameworks is the ($\\beta_2\\beta_3$) potential energy surface computed within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov framework in the case of the Gogny force. The diagonalization of the IBM Hamiltonian provides excitation energies and transition strengths of an assorted set of states including both positive and negative parity states. The resultant spectroscopic properties are compared with the available experimental data and also with the results of the configuration mixing calculations with the Gogny force within the generator coordinate method (GCM). The structure of excited $0^{+}$ states and its connection with double octupole phonons is also addressed. The model is shown to describe the empirical trend of the low-energy quadrupole and o...

  20. Forced extension of P-selectin construct using steered molecular dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Shouqin; LONG Mian

    2004-01-01

    P-selectin, a 70-nm-long cellular adhesive molecule, possesses elastic and extensible properties when neutrophils roll over the activated endotheliam of blood vessel in inflammatory reaction. Transient formation and dissociation of P-selectin/ligand bond on applied force of blood flow induces the extension of P-selectin and relevant ligands. Steered molecular dynamics simulations were performed to stretch a single P-selectin construct consisting of a lectin (Lec) domain and an epithelial growth factor (EGF)-like domain, where P-selectin construct was forced to extend in water with pulling velocities of 0.005-0.05 nm/ps and with constant forces of 1000-2500 pN respectively. Resulting force-extension profiles exhibited a dual-peak pattern on vari- ous velocities, while both plateaus and shoulders appeared in the extension-time profiles on various forces. The force or extension profiles along stretching pathways were correlated to the conformational changes, suggesting that the structural collapses of P-selectin Lec/EGF domains were mainly attributed to the burst of hydrogen bonds within the major βsheet of EGF domain and the disruptions of two hydrophobic cores of Lec domain. This work furthers the understanding of forced dissociation of P-selectin/ligand bond.

  1. Dynamic peripheral traction forces balance stable neurite tension in regenerating Aplysia bag cell neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Callen; Mertz, Aaron F; Forscher, Paul; Dufresne, Eric

    2014-05-14

    Growth cones of elongating neurites exert force against the external environment, but little is known about the role of force in outgrowth or its relationship to the mechanical organization of neurons. We used traction force microscopy to examine patterns of force in growth cones of regenerating Aplysia bag cell neurons. We find that traction is highest in the peripheral actin-rich domain and internal stress reaches a plateau near the transition between peripheral and central microtubule-rich domains. Integrating stress over the area of the growth cone reveals that total scalar force increases with area but net tension on the neurite does not. Tensions fall within a limited range while a substantial fraction of the total force can be balanced locally within the growth cone. Although traction continuously redistributes during extension and retraction of the peripheral domain, tension is stable over time, suggesting that tension is a tightly regulated property of the neurite independent of growth cone dynamics. We observe that redistribution of traction in the peripheral domain can reorient the end of the neurite shaft. This suggests a role for off-axis force in growth cone turning and neuronal guidance.

  2. The force generated by biological membranes on a polymer rod and its response: Statics and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, D. R.; Turner, M. S.

    2004-10-01

    We propose a theory for the force exerted by a fluctuating membrane on a polymer rod tip. Using statistical mechanical methods, the expression for the generated force is written in terms of the distance of the rod tip from the membrane "frame." We apply the theory in calculating the stall force and membrane displacement required to cease the growth of a growing fiber induced by membrane fluctuations, as well as the membrane force and membrane displacement required for rod/fiber buckling. We also consider the dynamics of a growing fiber tip under the influence of a fluctuation-induced membrane force. We discuss the importance of our results in various biological contexts. Finally, we present a method to simultaneously extract both the rigidity of the semiflexible rod and the force applied by, e.g., the membrane from the measurements of the bending fluctuations of the rod. Such a measurement of the force would give information about the thermodynamics of the rod polymerization that involves the usual Brownian ratchet mechanism.

  3. Computational Intelligence Based Data Fusion Algorithm for Dynamic sEMG and Skeletal Muscle Force Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrasekhar Potluri,; Madhavi Anugolu; Marco P. Schoen; D. Subbaram Naidu

    2013-08-01

    In this work, an array of three surface Electrography (sEMG) sensors are used to acquired muscle extension and contraction signals for 18 healthy test subjects. The skeletal muscle force is estimated using the acquired sEMG signals and a Non-linear Wiener Hammerstein model, relating the two signals in a dynamic fashion. The model is obtained from using System Identification (SI) algorithm. The obtained force models for each sensor are fused using a proposed fuzzy logic concept with the intent to improve the force estimation accuracy and resilience to sensor failure or misalignment. For the fuzzy logic inference system, the sEMG entropy, the relative error, and the correlation of the force signals are considered for defining the membership functions. The proposed fusion algorithm yields an average of 92.49% correlation between the actual force and the overall estimated force output. In addition, the proposed fusionbased approach is implemented on a test platform. Experiments indicate an improvement in finger/hand force estimation.

  4. Spectroscopy of F26 to Probe Proton-Neutron Forces Close to the Drip Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepailleur, A.; Sorlin, O.; Caceres, L.; Bastin, B.; Borcea, C.; Borcea, R.; Brown, B. A.; Gaudefroy, L.; Grévy, S.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hagen, G.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Jansen, G. R.; Llidoo, O.; Negoita, F.; de Oliveira, F.; Porquet, M.-G.; Rotaru, F.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Sohler, D.; Stanoiu, M.; Thomas, J. C.

    2013-02-01

    A long-lived Jπ=41+ isomer, T1/2=2.2(1)ms, has been discovered at 643.4(1) keV in the weakly bound F926 nucleus. It was populated at Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds in the fragmentation of a S36 beam. It decays by an internal transition to the Jπ=11+ ground state [82(14)%], by β decay to Ne26, or β-delayed neutron emission to Ne25. From the β-decay studies of the Jπ=11+ and Jπ=41+ states, new excited states have been discovered in Ne25,26. Gathering the measured binding energies of the Jπ=11+-41+ multiplet in F926, we find that the proton-neutron π0d5/2ν0d3/2 effective force used in shell-model calculations should be reduced to properly account for the weak binding of F926. Microscopic coupled cluster theory calculations using interactions derived from chiral effective field theory are in very good agreement with the energy of the low-lying 11+, 21+, 41+ states in F26. Including three-body forces and coupling to the continuum effects improve the agreement between experiment and theory as compared to the use of two-body forces only.

  5. Mapping the positions of beads on a string: dethreading rotaxanes by molecular force spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlop, Alex; Round, Andrew N [H H Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Wattoom, Jirut; Hasan, Erol A; Cosgrove, Terence [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantocks Close, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.round@uea.ac.uk

    2008-08-27

    The direct manipulation by atomic force microscopy (AFM) of individual macrocycles within a rotaxane offers a potential route to a new sequencing tool for complex macromolecules such as polysaccharides, glycoproteins and nucleic acids. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that a sliding contact made between a macrocycle, {alpha}-cyclodextrin, and its polymer axle by an AFM tip can be used to map the positions of specific groups along the polymer as if they were beads along a string, thereby generating sequence information. We find very good agreement (linear fit with slope = 1.03, R{sup 2} 0.968) between the calculated and measured positions of phenylenediamine and benzenetricarboxylic acid groups within polymers of polyethylene oxide (PEO). The rupture force profiles attributable to the dethreading interactions of phenylenediamine and benzenetricarboxylic acid differ observably from each other and, in the latter case, from the rupture of the corresponding host-guest complex. As well as opening the way to a macromolecular sequencing technique, the ability demonstrated by this method to manipulate the dethreading of a rotaxane offers a new tool for investigating the process energetics in a wide array of spontaneously forming and forced rotaxane systems.

  6. Mapping the positions of beads on a string: dethreading rotaxanes by molecular force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Alex; Wattoom, Jirut; Hasan, Erol A.; Cosgrove, Terence; Round, Andrew N.

    2008-08-01

    The direct manipulation by atomic force microscopy (AFM) of individual macrocycles within a rotaxane offers a potential route to a new sequencing tool for complex macromolecules such as polysaccharides, glycoproteins and nucleic acids. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that a sliding contact made between a macrocycle, α-cyclodextrin, and its polymer axle by an AFM tip can be used to map the positions of specific groups along the polymer as if they were beads along a string, thereby generating sequence information. We find very good agreement (linear fit with slope = 1.03, R2 = 0.968) between the calculated and measured positions of phenylenediamine and benzenetricarboxylic acid groups within polymers of polyethylene oxide (PEO). The rupture force profiles attributable to the dethreading interactions of phenylenediamine and benzenetricarboxylic acid differ observably from each other and, in the latter case, from the rupture of the corresponding host-guest complex. As well as opening the way to a macromolecular sequencing technique, the ability demonstrated by this method to manipulate the dethreading of a rotaxane offers a new tool for investigating the process energetics in a wide array of spontaneously forming and forced rotaxane systems.

  7. Investigation of multiaxial molecular dynamics by 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, J H; Hoatson, G L; Vold, R L

    1998-11-01

    The technique of 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy is presented for the investigation of multiaxial molecular dynamics. To evaluate the effects of discrete random reorientation a Lie algebraic formalism based on the stochastic Liouville-von Neumann equation is developed. The solution to the stochastic Liouville-von Neumann equation is obtained both in the presence and absence of rf irradiation. This allows effects of molecular dynamics to be evaluated during rf pulses and extends the applicability of the formalism to arbitrary multiple pulse experiments. Theoretical methods are presented for the description of multiaxial dynamics with particular emphasis on the application of vector parameters to represent molecular rotations. Numerical time and powder integration algorithms are presented that are both efficient and easy to implement computationally. The applicability of 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy for investigating molecular dynamics is evaluated from theoretical spectra. To demonstrate the potential of the technique the dynamics of thiourea-2H4 is investigated experimentally. From a series of variable temperature MAS and quadrupole echo spectra it has been found that the dynamics can be described by composite rotation about the CS and CN bonds. Both experiments are sensitive to the fast CS rotation which is shown to be described by the Arrhenius parameters E(CS) = 46.4 +/- 2.3 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A(CS))= 32.6 +/- 0.9. The MAS experiment represents a significant improvement by simultaneously allowing the dynamics of the slow CN rotation to be fully characterized in terms of E(CN) = 56.3 +/- 3.4 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A(CN)) = 25.3 +/- 1.1.

  8. As Simple As Possible, but Not Simpler: Exploring the Fidelity of Coarse-Grained Protein Models for Simulated Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottler, Jörg; Plotkin, Steven S.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical unfolding of a single domain of loop-truncated superoxide dismutase protein has been simulated via force spectroscopy techniques with both all-atom (AA) models and several coarse-grained models having different levels of resolution: A Gō model containing all heavy atoms in the protein (HA-Gō), the associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AWSEM) which has 3 interaction sites per amino acid, and a Gō model containing only one interaction site per amino acid at the Cα position (Cα-Gō). To systematically compare results across models, the scales of time, energy, and force had to be suitably renormalized in each model. Surprisingly, the HA-Gō model gives the softest protein, exhibiting much smaller force peaks than all other models after the above renormalization. Clustering to render a structural taxonomy as the protein unfolds showed that the AA, HA-Gō, and Cα-Gō models exhibit a single pathway for early unfolding, which eventually bifurcates repeatedly to multiple branches only after the protein is about half-unfolded. The AWSEM model shows a single dominant unfolding pathway over the whole range of unfolding, in contrast to all other models. TM alignment, clustering analysis, and native contact maps show that the AWSEM pathway has however the most structural similarity to the AA model at high nativeness, but the least structural similarity to the AA model at low nativeness. In comparison to the AA model, the sequence of native contact breakage is best predicted by the HA-Gō model. All models consistently predict a similar unfolding mechanism for early force-induced unfolding events, but diverge in their predictions for late stage unfolding events when the protein is more significantly disordered. PMID:27898663

  9. Vehicle Sliding Mode Control with Adaptive Upper Bounds: Static versus Dynamic Allocation to Saturated Tire Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tavasoli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear vehicle control allocation is achieved through distributing the task of vehicle control among individual tire forces, which are constrained to nonlinear saturation conditions. A high-level sliding mode control with adaptive upper bounds is considered to assess the body yaw moment and lateral force for the vehicle motion. The proposed controller only requires the online adaptation of control gains without acquiring the knowledge of upper bounds on system uncertainties. Static and dynamic control allocation approaches have been formulated to distribute high-level control objectives among the system inputs. For static control allocation, the interior-point method is applied to solve the formulated nonlinear optimization problem. Based on the dynamic control allocation method, a dynamic update law is derived to allocate vehicle control to tire forces. The allocated tire forces are fed into a low-level control module, where the applied torque and active steering angle at each wheel are determined through a slip-ratio controller and an inverse tire model. Computer simulations are used to prove the significant effects of the proposed control allocation methods on improving the stability and handling performance. The advantages and limitations of each method have been discussed, and conclusions have been derived.

  10. Elucidation of population and coherence dynamics using cross-peaks in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Y.-C.; Engel, Gregory S. [Department of Chemistry and QB3 Institute, University of California, Berkeley (United States) and Physical Bioscience Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fleming, Graham R. [Department of Chemistry and QB3 Institute, University of California, Berkeley (United States) and Physical Bioscience Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: GRFleming@lbl.gov

    2007-11-15

    In this work, we perform a theoretical study on the dynamics and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of a model trimer system and compare the results to experimental data on the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein. We combine a time-nonlocal quantum master equation formalism and the recently developed method for the efficient calculation of third-order photon echo polarization [M.F. Gelin, D. Egorova, W.J. Domcke, J. Chem. Phys. 123 (2005) 164112] to simulate the 2D electronic spectra of the model system, and compare the time-evolution of the amplitude of cross-peaks to the coherent relaxation dynamics of the system following the excitation by a laser pulse. We show that beats of the upper diagonal peaks in the absolute value 2D spectra provide a direct probe for the coherence dynamics in the system, and the time-evolution of the amplitude of the lower diagonal cross-peaks in the real value 2D spectra can be used to reveal the population transfer among exciton states. Our results verify the intuitive description provided by response functions and demonstrate that the full coherent dynamics in a multichromophoric system can be elucidated using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

  11. Anharmonic force constants extracted from first-principles molecular dynamics: applications to heat transfer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadano, T; Gohda, Y; Tsuneyuki, S

    2014-06-04

    A systematic method to calculate anharmonic force constants of crystals is presented. The method employs the direct-method approach, where anharmonic force constants are extracted from the trajectory of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations at high temperature. The method is applied to Si where accurate cubic and quartic force constants are obtained. We observe that higher-order correction is crucial to obtain accurate force constants from the trajectory with large atomic displacements. The calculated harmonic and anharmonic force constants are, then, combined with the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) methods in calculating the thermal conductivity. The BTE approach successfully predicts the lattice thermal conductivity of bulk Si, whereas NEMD shows considerable underestimates. To evaluate the linear extrapolation method employed in NEMD to estimate bulk values, we analyze the size dependence in NEMD based on BTE calculations. We observe strong nonlinearity in the size dependence of NEMD in Si, which can be ascribed to acoustic phonons having long mean-free-paths and carrying considerable heat. Subsequently, we also apply the whole method to a thermoelectric material Mg2Si and demonstrate the reliability of the NEMD method for systems with low thermal conductivities.

  12. On the Effectiveness of the Dynamic Force Adjustment for Reducing the Scatter of Instrumented Charpy Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, E.

    2008-09-15

    One of the key factors for obtaining reliable instrumented Charpy results is the calibration of the instrumented striker. An interesting alternative to the conventional static calibration recommended by the standards is the Dynamic Force Adjustment (DFA), in which forces and displacements are iteratively adjusted until equality is achieved between absorbed energies calculated under the test record (Wt) and measured by the machine encoder (KV). In this study, this procedure has been applied to the instrumented data obtained by 10 international laboratories using notched and precracked Charpy specimens, in the framework of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP8) of IAEA. DFA is extremely effective in reducing the between-laboratory scatter for both general yield and maximum forces. The effect is less significant for dynamic reference temperatures measured from precracked Charpy specimens using the Master Curve procedure, but a moderate reduction of the standard deviation is anyway observed. It is shown that striker calibration is a prominent contribution to the interlaboratory variability of instrumented impact forces, particularly in the case of maximum forces.

  13. A many-body dissipative particle dynamics study of forced water-oil displacement in capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Zhuang, Lin; Li, Xuefeng; Dong, Jinfeng; Lu, Juntao

    2012-01-17

    The forced water-oil displacement in capillary is a model that has important applications such as the groundwater remediation and the oil recovery. Whereas it is difficult for experimental studies to observe the displacement process in a capillary at nanoscale, the computational simulation is a unique approach in this regard. In the present work, the many-body dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD) method is employed to simulate the process of water-oil displacement in capillary with external force applied by a piston. As the property of all interfaces involved in this system can be manipulated independently, the dynamic displacement process is studied systematically under various conditions of distinct wettability of water in capillary and miscibility between water and oil as well as of different external forces. By analyzing the dependence of the starting force on the properties of water/capillary and water/oil interfaces, we find that there exist two different modes of the water-oil displacement. In the case of stronger water-oil interaction, the water particles cannot displace those oil particles sticking to the capillary wall, leaving a low oil recovery efficiency. To minimize the residual oil content in capillary, enhancing the wettability of water and reducing the external force will be beneficial. This simulation study provides microscopic insights into the water-oil displacement process in capillary and guiding information for relevant applications.

  14. Lateral shear forces applied to cells with single elastic micropillars to influence focal adhesion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heil, Patrick; Spatz, Joachim P, E-mail: spatz@mf.mpg.d [Department of New Materials and Biosystems, Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Biophysical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-05-19

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are important adhesion sites between eukaryotic cells and the extracellular matrix, their size depending on the locally applied force. To quantitatively study the mechanosensitivity of FAs, we induce their growth and disassembly by varying the distribution of intracellular stress. We present a novel method for micromanipulation of living cells to explore the dynamics of focal adhesion (FA) assembly under force. Fibroblasts are sheared laterally to their adhesion surface with single PDMS micropillars in order to apply laterally stretch or compression to focal adhesions. This allows for measuring the shear force exerted by the micropillar and correlates it with FA length and growth velocity. Furthermore, we analyze the resulting dynamics of FA molecules (paxillin) and compare intensity profiles along FAs before and after the application of external force. The responses of stretched and relaxed FAs differ fundamentally: relaxed and compressed FAs disassemble isotropically and show no length variation while stretched FAs grow unisotropically in the direction of the applied force and show protein influx only at their front.

  15. A Comparison of Classical Force-Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Ewen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For the successful development and application of lubricants, a full understanding of their complex nanoscale behavior under a wide range of external conditions is required, but this is difficult to obtain experimentally. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD simulations can be used to yield unique insights into the atomic-scale structure and friction of lubricants and additives; however, the accuracy of the results depend on the chosen force-field. In this study, we demonstrate that the use of an accurate, all-atom force-field is critical in order to; (i accurately predict important properties of long-chain, linear molecules; and (ii reproduce experimental friction behavior of multi-component tribological systems. In particular, we focus on n-hexadecane, an important model lubricant with a wide range of industrial applications. Moreover, simulating conditions common in tribological systems, i.e., high temperatures and pressures (HTHP, allows the limits of the selected force-fields to be tested. In the first section, a large number of united-atom and all-atom force-fields are benchmarked in terms of their density and viscosity prediction accuracy of n-hexadecane using equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD simulations at ambient and HTHP conditions. Whilst united-atom force-fields accurately reproduce experimental density, the viscosity is significantly under-predicted compared to all-atom force-fields and experiments. Moreover, some all-tom force-fields yield elevated melting points, leading to significant overestimation of both the density and viscosity. In the second section, the most accurate united-atom and all-atom force-field are compared in confined NEMD simulations which probe the structure and friction of stearic acid adsorbed on iron oxide and separated by a thin layer of n-hexadecane. The united-atom force-field provides an accurate representation of the structure of the confined stearic acid film; however, friction coefficients are

  16. Combined use of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry for cell surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dague, Etienne; Delcorte, Arnaud; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the surface properties of microbial cells is a major challenge of current microbiological research and a key to efficiently exploit them in biotechnology. Here, we used three advanced surface analysis techniques with different sensitivity, probing depth, and lateral resolution, that is, in situ atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry, to gain insight into the surface properties of the conidia of the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. We show that the native ultrastructure, surface protein and polysaccharide concentrations, and amino acid composition of three mutants affected in hydrophobin production are markedly different from those of the wild-type, thereby providing novel insight into the cell wall architecture of A. fumigatus. The results demonstrate the power of using multiple complementary techniques for probing microbial cell surfaces.

  17. Mobile Charge Generation Dynamics in P3HT:PCBM Observed by Time-Resolved Terahertz Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, D. G.; Krebs, Frederik C; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale.......Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale....

  18. A Database of Force-Field Parameters, Dynamics, and Properties of Antimicrobial Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Malloci

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an on-line database of all-atom force-field parameters and molecular properties of compounds with antimicrobial activity (mostly antibiotics and some beta-lactamase inhibitors. For each compound, we provide the General Amber Force Field parameters for the major species at physiological pH, together with an analysis of properties of interest as extracted from µs-long molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water solution. The properties include number and population of structural clusters, molecular flexibility, hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecular surfaces, the statistics of intraand inter-molecular H-bonds, as well as structural and dynamical properties of solvent molecules within first and second solvation shells. In addition, the database contains several key molecular parameters, such as energy of the frontier molecular orbitals, vibrational properties, rotational constants, atomic partial charges and electric dipole moment, computed by Density Functional Theory. The present database (to our knowledge the first extensive one including dynamical properties is part of a wider project aiming to build-up a database containing structural, physico-chemical and dynamical properties of medicinal compounds using different force-field parameters with increasing level of complexity and reliability. The database is freely accessible at http://www.dsf.unica.it/translocation/db/.

  19. Studying Climate Response to Forcing by the Nonlinear Dynamical Mode Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhin, Dmitry; Gavrilov, Andrey; Loskutov, Evgeny; Feigin, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    An analysis of global climate response to external forcing, both anthropogenic (mainly, CO2 and aerosol) and natural (solar and volcanic), is needed for adequate predictions of global climate change. Being complex dynamical system, the climate reacts to external perturbations exciting feedbacks (both positive and negative) making the response non-trivial and poorly predictable. Thus an extraction of internal modes of climate system, investigation of their interaction with external forcings and further modeling and forecast of their dynamics, are all the problems providing the success of climate modeling. In the report the new method for principal mode extraction from climate data is presented. The method is based on the Nonlinear Dynamical Mode (NDM) expansion [1,2], but takes into account a number of external forcings applied to the system. Each NDM is represented by hidden time series governing the observed variability, which, together with external forcing time series, are mapped onto data space. While forcing time series are considered to be known, the hidden unknown signals underlying the internal climate dynamics are extracted from observed data by the suggested method. In particular, it gives us an opportunity to study the evolution of principal system's mode structure in changing external conditions and separate the internal climate variability from trends forced by external perturbations. Furthermore, the modes so obtained can be extrapolated beyond the observational time series, and long-term prognosis of modes' structure including characteristics of interconnections and responses to external perturbations, can be carried out. In this work the method is used for reconstructing and studying the principal modes of climate variability on inter-annual and decadal time scales accounting the external forcings such as anthropogenic emissions, variations of the solar activity and volcanic activity. The structure of the obtained modes as well as their response to

  20. A novel proof of the DFT formula for the interatomic force field of Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morante, S., E-mail: morante@roma2.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma, “ Tor Vergata ”, INFN, Sezione di Roma 2, Via della Ricerca Scientifica - 00133 Roma (Italy); Rossi, G.C., E-mail: rossig@roma2.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma, “ Tor Vergata ”, INFN, Sezione di Roma 2, Via della Ricerca Scientifica - 00133 Roma (Italy); Centro Fermi-Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche E. Fermi, Compendio del Viminale, Piazza del Viminale 1, I-00184 Rome (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    We give a novel and simple proof of the DFT expression for the interatomic force field that drives the motion of atoms in classical Molecular Dynamics, based on the observation that the ground state electronic energy, seen as a functional of the external potential, is the Legendre transform of the Hohenberg–Kohn functional, which in turn is a functional of the electronic density. We show in this way that the so-called Hellmann–Feynman analytical formula, currently used in numerical simulations, actually provides the exact expression of the interatomic force.

  1. A novel proof of the DFT formula for the interatomic force field of Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morante, S.; Rossi, G. C.

    2017-02-01

    We give a novel and simple proof of the DFT expression for the interatomic force field that drives the motion of atoms in classical Molecular Dynamics, based on the observation that the ground state electronic energy, seen as a functional of the external potential, is the Legendre transform of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional, which in turn is a functional of the electronic density. We show in this way that the so-called Hellmann-Feynman analytical formula, currently used in numerical simulations, actually provides the exact expression of the interatomic force.

  2. Parametrization of a Reactive Force Field (ReaxFF) for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Si Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcaro, Giovanni; Monti, Susanna; Sementa, Luca; Carravetta, Vincenzo

    2017-08-08

    A novel computational approach, based on classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations (RMD) and quantum chemistry (QC) global energy optimizations, is proposed for modeling large Si nanoparticles. The force field parameters, which can describe bond breaking and formation, are derived by reproducing energetic and structural properties of a set of Si clusters increasing in size. These reference models are obtained through a new protocol based on a joint high temperature RMD/low temperature Basin Hopping QC search. The different procedures of estimating optimal force field parameters and their performance are discussed in detail.

  3. Static and dynamic stability of the guidance force in a side-suspended HTS maglev system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dajin; Cui, Chenyu; Zhao, Lifeng; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Xiqing; Zhao, Yong

    2017-02-01

    The static and dynamic stability of the guidance force in a side-suspended HTS-PMG (permanent magnetic guideway) system were studied theoretically and experimentally. It is found that there are two types of guidance force that exist in the HTS-PMG system, which are sensitive to the levitation gap and the arrangement of YBCO bulks around the central axis of the PMG. An optimized YBCO array was used to stabilize the system, which enabled a side-suspended HTS-PMG maglev vehicle to run stably at 102 km h-1 on a circular test track with 6.5 m in diameter.

  4. Prioritized motion-force control of constrained fully-actuated robots: "Task Space Inverse Dynamics"

    OpenAIRE

    Del Prete, Andrea; Nori, Francesco; Metta, Giorgio; Natale, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    We present a new framework for prioritized multi-task motion-force control of fully-actuated robots. This work is established on a careful review and comparison of the state of the art. Some control frameworks are not optimal, that is they do not find the optimal solution for the secondary tasks. Other frameworks are optimal, but they tackle the control problem at kinematic level, hence they neglect the robot dynamics and they do not allow for force control. Still other frameworks are optimal...

  5. MDM2–MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscetti I

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ilaria Moscetti,1 Emanuela Teveroni,2,3 Fabiola Moretti,3 Anna Rita Bizzarri,1 Salvatore Cannistraro1 1Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, Department DEB, Università della Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy; 2Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Università Cattolica di Roma, Roma, Italy; 3Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR, Roma, Italy Abstract: Murine double minute 2 (MDM2 and 4 (MDM4 are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2–MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD in the micromolar range for the MDM2–MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2–MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. Keywords: MDM2, MDM4, atomic force spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance

  6. Real-Time Probing of Electron Dynamics Using Attosecond Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasesha, Krupa; Leone, Stephen R.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-05-01

    Attosecond science has paved the way for direct probing of electron dynamics in gases and solids. This review provides an overview of recent attosecond measurements, focusing on the wealth of knowledge obtained by the application of isolated attosecond pulses in studying dynamics in gases and solid-state systems. Attosecond photoelectron and photoion measurements in atoms reveal strong-field tunneling ionization and a delay in the photoemission from different electronic states. These measurements applied to molecules have shed light on ultrafast intramolecular charge migration. Similar approaches are used to understand photoemission processes from core and delocalized electronic states in metal surfaces. Attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy is used to follow the real-time motion of valence electrons and to measure the lifetimes of autoionizing channels in atoms. In solids, it provides the first measurements of bulk electron dynamics, revealing important phenomena such as the timescales governing the switching from an insulator to a metallic state and carrier-carrier interactions.

  7. Glassy dynamics and physical aging in fucose saccharides as studied by infrared- and broadband dielectric spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossack, Wilhelm; Adrjanowicz, Karolina; Tarnacka, Magdalena; Kipnusu, Wycliffe Kiprop; Dulski, Mateusz; Mapesa, Emmanuel Urandu; Kaminski, Kamil; Pawlus, Sebastian; Paluch, Marian; Kremer, Friedrich

    2013-12-21

    Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS) are combined to study both the intra- and inter-molecular dynamics of two isomers of glass forming fucose, far below and above the calorimetric glass transition temperature, T(g). It is shown that the various IR-active vibrations exhibit in their spectral position and oscillator strength quite different temperature dependencies, proving their specific signature in the course of densification and glass formation. The coupling between intra- and inter molecular dynamics is exemplified by distinct changes in IR active ring vibrations far above the calorimetric glass transition temperature at about 1.16T(g), where the dynamic glass transition (α relaxation) and the secondary β relaxation merge. For physically annealed samples it is demonstrated that upon aging the different moieties show characteristic features as well, proving the necessity of atomistic descriptions beyond coarse-grained models.

  8. Coherence and population dynamics of chlorophyll excitations in FCP complex: Two-dimensional spectroscopy study

    CERN Document Server

    Butkus, Vytautas; Augulis, Ramūnas; Gall, Andrew; Büchel, Claudia; Robert, Bruno; Zigmantas, Donatas; Valkunas, Leonas; Abramavicius, Darius

    2015-01-01

    The energy transfer processes and coherent phenomena in the fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein complex, which is responsible for the light harvesting function in marine algae diatoms, were investigated at 77 K by using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. Experiments performed on the femtosecond and picosecond timescales led to separation of spectral dynamics, witnessing evolutions of coherence and population states of the system in the spectral region of ${\\rm Q}_{y}$ transitions of chlorophylls $a$ and $c$. Analysis of the coherence dynamics allowed us to identify chlorophyll (Chl) $a$ and fucoxanthin intramolecular vibrations dominating over the first few picoseconds. Closer inspection of the spectral region of the ${\\rm Q}_{y}$ transition of Chl $c$ revealed previously not identified mutually non-interacting chlorophyll $c$ states participating in femtosecond or picosecond energy transfer to the Chl $a$ molecules. Consideration of separated coherent and incoherent dynamics allowed us to hypothesize the v...

  9. Coherence and population dynamics of chlorophyll excitations in FCP complex: Two-dimensional spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkus, Vytautas; Gelzinis, Andrius; Augulis, Ramūnas; Gall, Andrew; Büchel, Claudia; Robert, Bruno; Zigmantas, Donatas; Valkunas, Leonas; Abramavicius, Darius

    2015-06-07

    Energy transfer processes and coherent phenomena in the fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein complex, which is responsible for the light harvesting function in marine algae diatoms, were investigated at 77 K by using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. Experiments performed on femtosecond and picosecond timescales led to separation of spectral dynamics, witnessing evolutions of coherence and population states of the system in the spectral region of Qy transitions of chlorophylls a and c. Analysis of the coherence dynamics allowed us to identify chlorophyll (Chl) a and fucoxanthin intramolecular vibrations dominating over the first few picoseconds. Closer inspection of the spectral region of the Qy transition of Chl c revealed previously not identified, mutually non-interacting chlorophyll c states participating in femtosecond or picosecond energy transfer to the Chl a molecules. Consideration of separated coherent and incoherent dynamics allowed us to hypothesize the vibrations-assisted coherent energy transfer between Chl c and Chl a and the overall spatial arrangement of chlorophyll molecules.

  10. Capturing interfacial photoelectrochemical dynamics with picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppl, Stefan; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew; Slaughter, Daniel S; Troy, Tyler; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Ahmed, Musahid; Gul, Sheraz; Rude, Bruce; Zhang, Jin Z; Tremsin, Anton S; Glans, Per-Anders; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Wu, Cheng Hao; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to trace photoinduced processes has the unique potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics in complex systems. Time-domain studies using transient X-ray absorption and emission techniques have proven extremely valuable to investigate electronic and structural dynamics in isolated and solvated molecules. Here, we describe the implementation of a picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) technique at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its application to monitor photoinduced electron dynamics at the technologically pertinent interface formed by N3 dye molecules anchored to nanoporous ZnO. Indications for a dynamical chemical shift of the Ru3d photoemission line originating from the N3 metal centre are observed ∼30 ps after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pump pulse. The transient changes in the TRXPS spectra are accompanied by a characteristic surface photovoltage (SPV) response of the ZnO substrate on a pico- to nanosecond time scale. The interplay between the two phenomena is discussed in the context of possible electronic relaxation and recombination pathways that lead to the neutralisation of the transiently oxidised dye after ultrafast electron injection. A detailed account of the experimental technique is given including an analysis of the chemical modification of the nano-structured ZnO substrate during extended periods of solution-based dye sensitisation and its relevance for studies using surface-sensitive spectroscopy techniques.

  11. Role of trimer-trimer interaction of bacteriorhodopsin studied by optical spectroscopy and high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hayato; Inoue, Keiichi; Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Sasaki, Jun; Kandori, Hideki; Ando, Toshio

    2013-10-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) trimers form a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice in the purple membrane of Halobacterium salinarum. However, the physiological significance of forming the lattice has long been elusive. Here, we study this issue by comparing properties of assembled and non-assembled bR trimers using directed mutagenesis, high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), optical spectroscopy, and a proton pumping assay. First, we show that the bonds formed between W12 and F135 amino acid residues are responsible for trimer-trimer association that leads to lattice assembly; the lattice is completely disrupted in both W12I and F135I mutants. HS-AFM imaging reveals that both crystallized D96N and non-crystallized D96N/W12I mutants undergo a large conformational change (i.e., outward E-F loop displacement) upon light-activation. However, lattice disruption significantly reduces the rate of conformational change under continuous light illumination. Nevertheless, the quantum yield of M-state formation, measured by low-temperature UV-visible spectroscopy, and proton pumping efficiency are unaffected by lattice disruption. From these results, we conclude that trimer-trimer association plays essential roles in providing bound retinal with an appropriate environment to maintain its full photo-reactivity and in maintaining the natural photo-reaction pathway.

  12. Age determination of blood spots in forensic medicine by force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Kada, Gerald; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Peschel, Oliver; Heckl, Wolfgang M; Nerlich, Andreas G; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2007-07-20

    We present a new tool for the estimation of the age of bloodstains, which could probably be used during forensic casework. For this, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) for high-resolution imaging of erythrocytes in a blood sample and the detection of elasticity changes on a nanometer scale. For the analytic procedure we applied a fresh blood spot on a glass slide and started the AFM detection after drying of the blood drop. In a first step, an overview image was generated showing the presence of several red blood cells, which could easily be detected due to their typical "doughnut-like" appearance. The consecutively morphological investigations in a timeframe of 4 weeks could not show any alterations. Secondly, AFM was used to test the elasticity by recording force-distance curves. The measurements were performed immediately after drying, 1.5 h, 30 h and 31 days. The conditions were kept constant at room temperature (20 degrees C) and a humidity of 30%. The obtained elasticity parameters were plotted against a timeline and repeated several times. The elasticity pattern showed a decrease over time, which are most probably influenced by the alteration of the blood spot during the drying and coagulation process. The preliminary data demonstrates the capacity of this method to use it for development of calibration curves, which can be used for estimation of bloodstain ages during forensic investigations.

  13. Multiple unfolding pathways of leucine binding protein (LBP) probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotamarthi, Hema Chandra; Sharma, Riddhi; Narayan, Satya; Ray, Sayoni; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti

    2013-10-02

    Experimental studies on the folding and unfolding of large multi-domain proteins are challenging, given the proteins' complex energy landscapes with multiple intermediates. Here, we report a mechanical unfolding study of a 346-residue, two-domain leucine binding protein (LBP) from the bacterial periplasm. Forced unfolding of LBP is a prerequisite for its translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane into the bacterial periplasm. During the mechanical stretching of LBP, we observe that 38% of the unfolding flux followed a two-state pathway, giving rise to a single unfolding force peak at ~70 pN with an unfolding contour length of 120 nm in constant-velocity single-molecule pulling experiments. The remaining 62% of the unfolding flux followed multiple three-state pathways, with intermediates having unfolding contour lengths in the range ~20-85 nm. These results suggest that the energy landscape of LBP is complex, with multiple intermediate states, and a large fraction of molecules go through intermediate states during the unfolding process. Furthermore, the presence of the ligand leucine increased the unfolding flux through the two-state pathway from 38% to 65%, indicating the influence of ligand binding on the energy landscape. This study suggests that unfolding through parallel pathways might be a general mechanism for the large two-domain proteins that are translocated to the bacterial periplasmic space.

  14. Dynamic force response of spherical hydrostatic journal bearing for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanandres, Luis

    1994-01-01

    Hydrostatic Journal Bearings (HJB's) are reliable and resilient fluid film rotor support elements ideal to replace roller bearings in cryogenic turbomachinery. HJB' will be used for primary space-power applications due to their long lifetime, low friction and wear, large load capacity, large direct stiffness, and damping force coefficients. An analysis for the performance characteristics of turbulent flow, orifice compensated, spherical hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's) is presented. Spherical bearings allow tolerance for shaft misalignment without force performance degradation and have also the ability to support axial loads. The spherical HJB combines these advantages to provide a bearing design which could be used efficiently on high performance turbomachinery. The motion of a barotropic liquid on the thin film bearing lands is described by bulk-flow mass and momentum equations. These equations are solved numerically using an efficient CFD method. Numerical predictions of load capacity and force coefficients for a 6 recess, spherical HJB in a LO2 environment are presented. Fluid film axial forces and force coefficients of a magnitude about 20% of the radial load capacity are predicted for the case analyzed. Fluid inertia effects, advective and centrifugal, are found to affect greatly the static and dynamic force performance of the bearing studied.

  15. Relative dynamics and control of spacecraft formations subject to lorentz force perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Yehia; Shoaib, Muhammad

    A spacecraft that generates an electrostatic charge on its surface in the Earth magnetic field will be subject to a perturbative Lorentz force. The Lorentz force acting on an electrostatically charged spacecraft may provide a useful thrust for controlling a spacecraft’s orbit. We develop Lorentz force as a function of the orbital elements. The orbital perturbations of a charged spacecraft by Lorentz force in the Earth’s magnetic field are investigated using the Gauss variation of the Lagrange planetary Equations. The Earth’s magnetic field is modeled as a tilted dipole. The perturbations in the orbital elements depend on the value of the charge to mass ratio (q/m). The dynamical model of relative motion developed leads to approximate analytical solutions for the motion of a charged spacecraft subject to Lorentz force. The chief spacecraft’s reference orbit is taken to be either circular or elliptical. The deputy spacecraft is capable of accumulating electrostatic charge. The numerical results show that Lorentz force can be used to change the in-track position and plane orbit of the spacecraft. The numerical analysis shows that the target trajectory of the Lorentz spacecraft can be reached by varying the ratio (q/m) in different Low Earth Orbits.

  16. Nonlinear Dynamical Analysis for the Cable Excited with Parametric and Forced Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Z. Qian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the deck vibration effect on the cable in cable-stayed bridge, using nonlinear structure dynamics theory, the nonlinear dynamical equation for the stayed cable excited with deck vibration is proposed. Research shows that the vertical vibration of the deck has a combined parametric and forced excitation effect on the cable when the angle of the cable is taken into consideration. Using multiscale method, the 1/2 principle parametric resonance is studied and the bifurcation equation is obtained. Despite the parameters analysis, the bifurcation characters of the dynamical system are studied. At last, by means of numerical method and software MATHMATIC, the effect rules of system parameters to the dynamical behavior of the system are studied, and some useful conclusions are obtained.

  17. Multipolar Force Fields and Their Effects on Solvent Dynamics around Simple Solutes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Sofie; Bereau, Tristan; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The performance of multipole (MTP) and point charge (PC) force fields in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of condensed-phase systems for both equilibrium and dynamical quantities is compared. MTP electrostatics provides an improved description of the anisotropic electrostatic potential......, which is especially important to describe key, challenging interactions, such as lone pairs, π-interactions, and hydrogen bonds. These chemical environments are probed by focusing on the hydration properties of two molecules: N-methylacetamide and phenyl bromide. Both, equilibrium and dynamical......, quantities are affected by the quality of the electrostatic model. The alteration of the first solvation shell in MTP simulations is validated by comparing with lifetimes and correlation times of solute–solvent interactions from experiment. The improved dynamical behavior found in the MTP simulations...

  18. Dynamic molecular monitoring of retina inflammation by in vivo Raman spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marro, Monica; Taubes, Alice; Abernathy, Alice; Balint, Stephan; Moreno, Beatriz; Sanchez-Dalmau, Bernardo; Martínez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Petrov, Dmitri; Villoslada, Pablo

    2014-09-01

    Retinal tissue is damaged during inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis. We assessed molecular changes in inflamed murine retinal cultures by Raman spectroscopy. Partial Least Squares-Discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was able to classify retina cultures as inflamed with high accuracy. Using Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) analysis, we deconvolved 6 molecular components suffering dynamic changes along inflammatory process. Those include the increase of immune mediators (Lipoxygenase, iNOS and TNFα), changes in molecules involved in energy production (Cytochrome C, phenylalanine and NADH/NAD+) and decrease of Phosphatidylcholine. Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis allows monitoring the evolution of retina inflammation. Copyright © 2014 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Discriminating Intercalative Effects of Threading Intercalator Nogalamycin, from Classical Intercalator Daunomycin, Using Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, T; Banerjee, S; Sett, S; Ghosh, S; Rakshit, T; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2016-01-01

    DNA threading intercalators are a unique class of intercalating agents, albeit little biophysical information is available on their intercalative actions. Herein, the intercalative effects of nogalamycin, which is a naturally-occurring DNA threading intercalator, have been investigated by high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy (AFS). The results have been compared with those of the well-known chemotherapeutic drug daunomycin, which is a non-threading classical intercalator bearing structural similarity to nogalamycin. A comparative AFM assessment revealed a greater increase in DNA contour length over the entire incubation period of 48 h for nogalamycin treatment, whereas the contour length increase manifested faster in case of daunomycin. The elastic response of single DNA molecules to an externally applied force was investigated by the single molecule AFS approach. Characteristic mechanical fingerprints in the overstretching behaviour clearly distinguished the nogalamycin/daunomycin-treated dsDNA from untreated dsDNA-the former appearing less elastic than the latter, and the nogalamycin-treated DNA distinguished from the daunomycin-treated DNA-the classically intercalated dsDNA appearing the least elastic. A single molecule AFS-based discrimination of threading intercalation from the classical type is being reported for the first time.

  20. Discriminating Intercalative Effects of Threading Intercalator Nogalamycin, from Classical Intercalator Daunomycin, Using Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Banerjee

    Full Text Available DNA threading intercalators are a unique class of intercalating agents, albeit little biophysical information is available on their intercalative actions. Herein, the intercalative effects of nogalamycin, which is a naturally-occurring DNA threading intercalator, have been investigated by high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM and spectroscopy (AFS. The results have been compared with those of the well-known chemotherapeutic drug daunomycin, which is a non-threading classical intercalator bearing structural similarity to nogalamycin. A comparative AFM assessment revealed a greater increase in DNA contour length over the entire incubation period of 48 h for nogalamycin treatment, whereas the contour length increase manifested faster in case of daunomycin. The elastic response of single DNA molecules to an externally applied force was investigated by the single molecule AFS approach. Characteristic mechanical fingerprints in the overstretching behaviour clearly distinguished the nogalamycin/daunomycin-treated dsDNA from untreated dsDNA-the former appearing less elastic than the latter, and the nogalamycin-treated DNA distinguished from the daunomycin-treated DNA-the classically intercalated dsDNA appearing the least elastic. A single molecule AFS-based discrimination of threading intercalation from the classical type is being reported for the first time.