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Sample records for dynamic flow-through methods

  1. Dynamic Flow-through Methods for Metal Fractionation in Environmental Solid Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald; Petersen, Roongrat

    occurring processes always take place under dynamic conditions, recent trends have been focused on the development of alternative flow-through dynamic methods aimed at mimicking environmental events more correctly than their classical extraction counterparts. In this lecture particular emphasis is paid......Accummulation of metal ions in different compartments of the biosphere and their possible mobilization under changing environmental conditions induce a pertubation of the ecosystem and may cause adverse health effects. Nowadays, it is widely recognized that the information on total content...... the ecotoxicological significance of metal ions in solid environmental samples. The background of end-over-end fractionation for releasing metal species bound to particular soil phases is initially discussed, its relevant features and limitations being thoroughly described. However, taking into account that naturally...

  2. Nonlinear dynamics in flow through unsaturated fractured porous media: Status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faybishenko, Boris

    2002-01-01

    The need has long been recognized to improve predictions of flow and transport in partially saturated heterogeneous soils and fractured rock of the vadose zone for many practical applications, such as remediation of contaminated sites, nuclear waste disposal in geological formations, and climate predictions. Until recently, flow and transport processes in heterogeneous subsurface media with oscillating irregularities were assumed to be random and were not analyzed using methods of nonlinear dynamics. The goals of this paper are to review the theoretical concepts, present the results, and provide perspectives on investigations of flow and transport in unsaturated heterogeneous soils and fractured rock, using the methods of nonlinear dynamics and deterministic chaos. The results of laboratory and field investigations indicate that the nonlinear dynamics of flow and transport processes in unsaturated soils and fractured rocks arise from the dynamic feedback and competition between various nonlinear physical processes along with complex geometry of flow paths. Although direct measurements of variables characterizing the individual flow processes are not technically feasible, their cumulative effect can be characterized by analyzing time series data using the models and methods of nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Identifying flow through soil or rock as a nonlinear dynamical system is important for developing appropriate short- and long-time predictive models, evaluating prediction uncertainty, assessing the spatial distribution of flow characteristics from time series data, and improving chemical transport simulations. Inferring the nature of flow processes through the methods of nonlinear dynamics could become widely used in different areas of the earth sciences

  3. Nonlinear dynamics in flow through unsaturated fractured-porous media: Status and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, Boris

    2002-11-27

    The need has long been recognized to improve predictions of flow and transport in partially saturated heterogeneous soils and fractured rock of the vadose zone for many practical applications, such as remediation of contaminated sites, nuclear waste disposal in geological formations, and climate predictions. Until recently, flow and transport processes in heterogeneous subsurface media with oscillating irregularities were assumed to be random and were not analyzed using methods of nonlinear dynamics. The goals of this paper are to review the theoretical concepts, present the results, and provide perspectives on investigations of flow and transport in unsaturated heterogeneous soils and fractured rock, using the methods of nonlinear dynamics and deterministic chaos. The results of laboratory and field investigations indicate that the nonlinear dynamics of flow and transport processes in unsaturated soils and fractured rocks arise from the dynamic feedback and competition between various nonlinear physical processes along with complex geometry of flow paths. Although direct measurements of variables characterizing the individual flow processes are not technically feasible, their cumulative effect can be characterized by analyzing time series data using the models and methods of nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Identifying flow through soil or rock as a nonlinear dynamical system is important for developing appropriate short- and long-time predictive models, evaluating prediction uncertainty, assessing the spatial distribution of flow characteristics from time series data, and improving chemical transport simulations. Inferring the nature of flow processes through the methods of nonlinear dynamics could become widely used in different areas of the earth sciences.

  4. DYNAM, Once Through Boiling Flow with Steam Superheat, Laplace Transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlueter, G.; Efferding, L.E.

    1973-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: DYNAM performs a dynamic analysis of once-through boiling flow oscillations with steam superheat. The model describing the superheat regime (single- phase, variable density fluid) for subcritical pressure operation is also applicable to the study of once-through operation using supercritical pressure water. 2 - Method of solution: Linearized partial differential conservation equations are solved using Laplace transformation of the temporal terms and integration of the spatial variations. DYNAM is written in complex variable notation. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 30 intervals used to describe the power distribution in the non-boiling and boiling regions, 29 boiling nodes, 7 intervals and corresponding friction multipliers read in per case, 14 exit qualities read in per case, 40 superheat nodes, 10 coefficients read in for the phi 2 vs, x-polynomial fit, 48 frequencies at which open-loop frequency response is desired, 48 frequencies at which signal output is desired

  5. Radial flow gas dynamic laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, F.C.

    1975-01-01

    The unique gas dynamic laser provides outward radial supersonic flow from a toroidal shaped stacked array of a plurality of nozzles, through a diffuser having ring shaped and/or linear shaped vanes, and through a cavity which is cylindrical and concentric with the stacked array, with the resultant laser beam passing through the housing parallel to the central axis of the diffuser which is coincident with the axis of the gas dynamic laser. Therefore, greater beam extraction flexibility is attainable, because of fewer flow shock disturbances, as compared to the conventional unidirectional flow gas dynamic laser in which unidirectional supersonic flow sweeps through a rectangular cavity and is exhausted through a two-dimensional diffuser. (auth)

  6. Dynamic methods of air traffic flow management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek SKORUPSKI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Air traffic management is a complex hierarchical system. Hierarchy levels can be defined according to decision making time horizon or to analyze area volume. For medium time horizon and wide analysis area, the air traffic flow management services were established. Their main task is to properly co-ordinate air traffic in European airspace, so as to minimize delays arising in congested sectors. Those services have to assure high safety level at the same time. Thus it is a very complex task, with many goals, many decision variables and many constraints.In the paper review of the methods developed for aiding air traffic flow management services is presented. More detailed description of a dynamic method is given. This method is based on stochastic capacity and scenario analysis. Some problems in utilization of presented methods are also pointed out, so are the next research possibilities.

  7. Charging and Transport Dynamics of a Flow-Through Electrode Capacitive Deionization System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yatian; Campbell, Patrick G; Hemmatifar, Ali; Knipe, Jennifer M; Loeb, Colin K; Reidy, John J; Hubert, Mckenzie A; Stadermann, Michael; Santiago, Juan G

    2018-01-11

    We present a study of the interplay among electric charging rate, capacitance, salt removal, and mass transport in "flow-through electrode" capacitive deionization (CDI) systems. We develop two models describing coupled transport and electro-adsorption/desorption which capture salt removal dynamics. The first model is a simplified, unsteady zero-dimensional volume-averaged model which identifies dimensionless parameters and figures of merits associated with cell performance. The second model is a higher fidelity area-averaged model which captures both spatial and temporal responses of charging. We further conducted an experimental study of these dynamics and considered two salt transport regimes: (1) advection-limited regime and (2) dispersion-limited regime. We use these data to validate models. The study shows that, in the advection-limited regime, differential charge efficiency determines the salt adsorption at the early stage of the deionization process. Subsequently, charging transitions to a quasi-steady state where salt removal rate is proportional to applied current scaled by the inlet flow rate. In the dispersion-dominated regime, differential charge efficiency, cell volume, and diffusion rates govern adsorption dynamics and flow rate has little effect. In both regimes, the interplay among mass transport rate, differential charge efficiency, cell capacitance, and (electric) charging current governs salt removal in flow-through electrode CDI.

  8. Information Flow Through Stages of Complex Engineering Design Projects: A Dynamic Network Analysis Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parraguez, Pedro; Eppinger, Steven D.; Maier, Anja

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of information flow through the network of interdependent design activities is thought to be an important determinant of engineering design process results. A previously unexplored aspect of such patterns relates to the temporal dynamics of information transfer between activities...... design process and thus support theory-building toward the evolution of information flows through systems engineering stages. Implications include guidance on how to analyze and predict information flows as well as better planning of information flows in engineering design projects according...

  9. Simple methods for predicting gas leakage flows through cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, D.J.F.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents closed-form approximate analytical formulae with which the flow rate out of a through-wall crack can be estimated. The crack is idealised as a rough, tapering, wedgeshaped channel and the fluid is idealised as an isothermal or polytropically-expanding perfect gas. In practice, uncertainties about the wall friction factor dominate over uncertainties caused by the fluid-dynamics simplifications. The formulae take account of crack taper and for outwardly-diverging cracks they predict flows within 12% of mathematically more accurate one-dimensional numerical models. Upper and lower estimates of wall friction are discussed. (author)

  10. Flow through a Two-Scale Porosity Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Andersson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow through a two-scale porous medium is here investigated by a unique comparison between simulations performed with computational fluid dynamics and the boundary element method with microparticle image velocimetry in model geometries.

  11. Reduction of gas flow nonuniformity in gas turbine engines by means of gas-dynamic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, V.; Baturin, O.; Kolmakova, D.; Popov, G.

    2017-08-01

    Gas flow nonuniformity is one of the main sources of rotor blade vibrations in the gas turbine engines. Usually, the flow circumferential nonuniformity occurs near the annular frames, located in the flow channel of the engine. This leads to the increased dynamic stresses in blades and as a consequence to the blade damage. The goal of the research was to find an acceptable method of reducing the level of gas flow nonuniformity as the source of dynamic stresses in the rotor blades. Two different methods were investigated during this research. Thus, this study gives the ideas about methods of improving the flow structure in gas turbine engine. On the basis of existing conditions (under development or existing engine) it allows the selection of the most suitable method for reducing gas flow nonuniformity.

  12. Analysis of the flow dynamics characteristics of an axial piston pump based on the computational fluid dynamics method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve its working performance, the flow ripple characteristics of an axial piston pump were investigated with software which uses computational fluid dynamics (CFD technology. The simulation accuracy was significantly optimized through the use of the improved compressible fluid model. Flow conditions of the pump were tested using a pump flow ripple test rig, and the simulation results of the CFD model showed good agreement with the experimental data. Additionally, the composition of the flow ripple was analyzed using the improved CFD model, and the results showed that the compression ripple makes up 88% of the flow ripple. The flow dynamics of the piston pump is mainly caused by the pressure difference between the intake and discharge ports of the valve plates and the fluid oil compressibility.

  13. Comparison of Flow-Through Cell and Paddle Methods for Testing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of the flow-through cell apparatus for testing commercial vaginal tablets containing poorly water-soluble clotrimazole. Methods: The effect of experimental conditions (type of dissolution medium, flow rate and positioning of the tablet) on the dissolution profile of clotrimazole were ...

  14. Investigation and Verification of the Aerodynamic Performance of a Fan/Booster with Through-flow Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoheng; Jin, Donghai; Gui, Xingmin

    2018-04-01

    Through-flow method is still widely applied in the revolution of the design of a turbomachinery, which can provide not merely the performance characteristic but also the flow field. In this study, a program based on the through-flow method was proposed, which had been verified by many other numerical examples. So as to improve the accuracy of the calculation, abundant loss and deviation models dependent on the real geometry of engine were put into use, such as: viscous losses, overflow in gaps, leakage from a flow path through seals. By means of this program, the aerodynamic performance of a certain high through-flow commercial fan/booster was investigated. On account of the radial distributions of the relevant parameters, flow deterioration in this machine was speculated. To confirm this surmise, 3-D numerical simulation was carried out with the help of the NUMECA software. Through detailed analysis, the speculation above was demonstrated, which provide sufficient evidence for the conclusion that the through-flow method is an essential and effective method for the performance prediction of the fan/booster.

  15. Flow-through dynamic microextraction system for automatic in vitro assessment of chyme bioaccessibility in food commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Lais A; Rosende, María; Korn, Maria Graças A; Miró, Manuel

    2018-10-05

    An automatic flow-through dynamic extraction method is proposed for the first time for in vitro exploration, with high temporal resolution, of the transit of the chyme from the gastric to the duodenal compartment using the Versantvoort's fed-state physiologically relevant extraction test. The flow manifold was coupled on-line to an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP OES) for real-time elucidation of the bioaccessible elemental fraction of micronutrients (viz., Cu, Fe and Mn) in food commodities across the gastrointestinal tract. The simulated intestinal and bile biofluid (added to the gastric phase) was successively pumped at 1.0 mL min -1 through a large-bore column (maintained at 37.0 ± 2.0 °C) initially loaded with a weighed amount of linseed (250 mg) using a PVDF filter membrane (5.0 μm pore size) for retaining of the solid sample and in-line filtration of the extracts. The lack of bias (trueness) of the on-line gastrointestinal extraction method coupled to ICP OES was confirmed using mass balance validation following microwave assisted digestion of the residual (non-bioaccessible) elemental fraction. Mass balance validation yielded absolute recoveries spanning from 79 to 121% for the overall analytes and samples. On-line dynamic extraction was critically appraised against batch counterparts for both gastric and gastrointestinal compartments. Due to the lack of consensus in the literature regarding the agitation method for batch oral bioaccessibility testing, several extraction approaches (viz., magnetic stirring, end-over-end rotation and orbital shaking) were evaluated. Improved gastric extractability of Fe along with bioaccessible data comparable to the dynamic counterpart based on the continuous displacement of the extraction equilibrium was obtained with batchwise magnetic stirring, which is deemed most appropriate for ascertaining worst-case/maximum bioaccessibility scenarios. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All

  16. Test Methodologies for Hydrogen Sensor Performance Assessment: Chamber vs. Flow Through Test Apparatus: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hartmann, Kevin S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schmidt, Kara [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cebolla, Rafeal O [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Weidner, Eveline [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Bonato, Christian [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands

    2017-11-06

    Certification of hydrogen sensors to standards often prescribes using large-volume test chambers [1, 2]. However, feedback from stakeholders such as sensor manufacturers and end-users indicate that chamber test methods are often viewed as too slow and expensive for routine assessment. Flow through test methods potentially are an efficient, cost-effective alternative for sensor performance assessment. A large number of sensors can be simultaneously tested, in series or in parallel, with an appropriate flow through test fixture. The recent development of sensors with response times of less than 1s mandates improvements in equipment and methodology to properly capture the performance of this new generation of fast sensors; flow methods are a viable approach for accurate response and recovery time determinations, but there are potential drawbacks. According to ISO 26142 [1], flow through test methods may not properly simulate ambient applications. In chamber test methods, gas transport to the sensor can be dominated by diffusion which is viewed by some users as mimicking deployment in rooms and other confined spaces. Alternatively, in flow through methods, forced flow transports the gas to the sensing element. The advective flow dynamics may induce changes in the sensor behaviour relative to the quasi-quiescent condition that may prevail in chamber test methods. One goal of the current activity in the JRC and NREL sensor laboratories [3, 4] is to develop a validated flow through apparatus and methods for hydrogen sensor performance testing. In addition to minimizing the impact on sensor behaviour induced by differences in flow dynamics, challenges associated with flow through methods include the ability to control environmental parameters (humidity, pressure and temperature) during the test and changes in the test gas composition induced by chemical reactions with upstream sensors. Guidelines on flow through test apparatus design and protocols for the evaluation of

  17. DPD simulation on the dynamics of a healthy and infected red blood cell in flow through a constricted channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Sazid Zamal; Anand, D. Vijay; Patnaik, B. S. V.

    2017-11-01

    The state of the red blood cell (either healthy or infected RBC) will influence its deformation dynamics. Since the pathological condition related to RBC, primarily originates from a single cell infection, therefore, it is important to relate the deformation dynamics to the mechanical properties (such as, bending rigidity and membrane elasticity). In the present study, numerical simulation of a healthy and malaria infected RBC in a constricted channel is analyzed. The flow simulations are carried out using finite sized dissipative particle dynamics (FDPD) method in conjunction with a discrete model that represents the membrane of the RBC. The numerical equivalent of optical tweezers test is validated against the experimental studies. Two different types of constrictions, viz., a converging-diverging type tapered channel and a stenosed microchannel are considered for the simulation. The effect of degree of constriction and the flow rate effect on the RBC is investigated. It was observed that, as the flow rate decreases, the infected RBC completely blocks the micro vessel. The transit time for infected cell drastically increases compared to healthy RBC. Our simulations indicate that, there is a critical flow rate below which infected RBC cannot pass through the micro capillary.

  18. Development of quantification methods for the myocardial blood flow using ensemble independent component analysis for dynamic H215O PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Il; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Won Jun; Lee, Jong Jin; Kim, Soo Jin; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Choi, Seung Jin

    2004-01-01

    Factor analysis and independent component analysis (lCA) has been used for handling dynamic image sequences. Theoretical advantages of a newly suggested ICA method, ensemble ICA, leaded us to consider applying this method to the analysis of dynamic myocardial H 2 15 O PET data. In this study, we quantified patients, blood flow using the ensemble ICA method. Twenty subjects underwent H 2 15 O PET scans using ECAT EXACT 47 scanner and myocardial perfusion SPECT using Vertex scanner. After transmission scanning, dynamic emission scans were initiated simultaneously with the injection of 555∼740 MBq H 2 15 O. Hidden independent components can be extracted from the observed mixed data (PET image) by means of ICA algorithms. Ensemble learning is a variational Bayesian method that provides an analytical approximation to the parameter posterior using a tractable distribution. Variational approximation forms a lower bound on the ensemble likelihood and the maximization of the lower bound is achieved through minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the true posterior and the variational posterior. In this study, posterior pdf was approximated by a rectified Gaussian distribution to incorporate non-negativity constraint, which is suitable to dynamic images in nuclear medicine. Blood flow was measured in 9 regions - apex, four areas in mid wall, and four areas in base wall. Myocardial perfusion SPECT score and angiography results were compared with the regional blood flow. Major cardiac components were separated successfully by the ensemble ICA method and blood flow could be estimated in 15 among 20 patients. Mean myocardial blood flow was 1.2±0.40 ml/min/g in rest, 1.85±1.12 ml/min/g in stress state. Blood flow values obtained by an operator in two different occasion were highly correlated (r=0.99). In myocardium component image, the image contrast between left ventricle and myocardium was 1:2.7 in average. Perfusion reserve was significantly different between

  19. Simulations of fluid flow through porous media based on cellular automata and non-linear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulson, K V

    1992-05-15

    A study is being carried out to apply cellular automata and non-linear dynamics in the construction of efficient and accurate computer simulations of multiphase fluid flow through porous media, with the objective of application to reservoir modelling for hydrocarbon recovery. An algorithm based on Boolean operations has been developed which transforms a PC clone into a highly efficient vector processor capable of cellular automata simulation of single fluid flow through two-dimensional rock matrix models of varying porosities. Macroscopic flow patterns have been established through spatial and temporal averaging with no floating point operations. Permeabilities of the different models have been calculated. Hardware allows the algorithm to function on dual processors on a PC platform using a video recording and editing facility. Very encouraging results have been obtained. 4 figs.

  20. Dynamic Modeling Strategy for Flow Regime Transition in Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regimes has been widely used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are flow regime dependent. Current nuclear reactor safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5, classify flow regimes using flow regime maps or transition criteria that were developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows. As two-phase flows are dynamic in nature, it is important to model the flow regime transitions dynamically to more accurately predict the two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy to determine flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation of the interfacial area, fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet disintegration, boiling and evaporation, and the destruction of the interfacial area, fluid particle coalescence and condensation. For flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shapes, namely group-1 and group-2 bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identify the flow regimes is discussed, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration. The flow regime predicted with this method shows good agreement with the experimental observations.

  1. Metamorphosis of plasma turbulence-shear-flow dynamics through a transcritical bifurcation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.; Dewar, R.L.; Sugama, H.

    2002-01-01

    The structural properties of an economical model for a confined plasma turbulence governor are investigated through bifurcation and stability analyses. A close relationship is demonstrated between the underlying bifurcation framework of the model and typical behavior associated with low- to high-confinement transitions such as shear-flow stabilization of turbulence and oscillatory collective action. In particular, the analysis evinces two types of discontinuous transition that are qualitatively distinct. One involves classical hysteresis, governed by viscous dissipation. The other is intrinsically oscillatory and nonhysteretic, and thus provides a model for the so-called dithering transitions that are frequently observed. This metamorphosis, or transformation, of the system dynamics is an important late side-effect of symmetry breaking, which manifests as an unusual nonsymmetric transcritical bifurcation induced by a significant shear-flow drive

  2. Numerical Simulation Of Flow Through An Artificial Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Stuart; Kutler, Paul; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Centin

    1991-01-01

    Research in both artificial hearts and fluid dynamics benefits from computational studies. Algorithm that implements Navier-Stokes equations of flow extended to simulate flow of viscous, incompressible blood through articifial heart. Ability to compute details of such flow important for two reasons: internal flows with moving boundaries of academic interest in their own right, and many of deficiencies of artificial hearts attributable to dynamics of flow.

  3. System and method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Srinivasan, Shiva; York, William David

    2016-11-29

    A system for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes an end cap that extends radially across the combustor and includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A combustion chamber is downstream of the end cap, and tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface. Each tube provides fluid communication through the end cap to the combustion chamber. The system further includes means for reducing combustion dynamics in the combustor. A method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes flowing a working fluid through tubes that extend axially through an end cap that extends radially across the combustor and obstructing at least a portion of the working fluid flowing through a first set of the tubes.

  4. System and method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Zuo, Baifang; York, William David

    2013-08-20

    A system for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes an end cap having an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface, and tube bundles extend through the end cap. A diluent supply in fluid communication with the end cap provides diluent flow to the end cap. Diluent distributors circumferentially arranged inside at least one tube bundle extend downstream from the downstream surface and provide fluid communication for the diluent flow through the end cap. A method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes flowing fuel through tube bundles that extend axially through an end cap, flowing a diluent through diluent distributors into a combustion chamber, wherein the diluent distributors are circumferentially arranged inside at least one tube bundle and each diluent distributor extends downstream from the end cap, and forming a diluent barrier in the combustion chamber between at least one pair of adjacent tube bundles.

  5. An inverse method to estimate the flow through a levee breach

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Oria, Marco; Mignosa, Paolo; Tanda, Maria Giovanna

    2015-08-01

    We propose a procedure to estimate the flow through a levee breach based on water levels recorded in river stations downstream and/or upstream of the failure site. The inverse problem is solved using a Bayesian approach and requires the execution of several forward unsteady flow simulations. For this purpose, we have used the well-known 1-D HEC-RAS model, but any unsteady flow model could be adopted in the same way. The procedure has been tested using four synthetic examples. Levee breaches with different characteristics (free flow, flow with tailwater effects, etc.) have been simulated to collect the synthetic level data used at a later stage in the inverse procedure. The method was able to accurately reproduce the flow through the breach in all cases. The practicability of the procedure was then confirmed applying it to the inundation of the Polesine Region (Northern Italy) which occurred in 1951 and was caused by three contiguous and almost simultaneous breaches on the left embankment of the Po River.

  6. Gas-Dynamic Methods to Reduce Gas Flow Nonuniformity from the Annular Frames of Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmakova, D.; Popov, G.

    2018-01-01

    Gas flow nonuniformity is one of the main sources of rotor blade vibrations in the gas turbine engines. Usually, the flow circumferential nonuniformity occurs near the annular frames, located in the flow channel of the engine. This leads to the increased dynamic stresses in blades and consequently to the blade damage. The goal of the research was to find an acceptable method of reducing the level of gas flow nonuniformity. Two different methods were investigated during this research. Thus, this study gives the ideas about methods of improving the flow structure in gas turbine engine. Based on existing conditions (under development or existing engine) it allows the selection of the most suitable method for reducing gas flow nonuniformity.

  7. Comparison and Validation of Hydrological E-Flow Methods through Hydrodynamic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriqi, Alban; Rivaes, Rui; Sordo-Ward, Alvaro; Pinheiro, António N.; Garrote, Luis

    2017-04-01

    Flow regime determines physical habitat conditions and local biotic configuration. The development of environmental flow guidelines to support the river integrity is becoming a major concern in water resources management. In this study, we analysed two sites located in southern part of Portugal, respectively at Odelouca and Ocreza Rivers, characterised by the Mediterranean climate. Both rivers are almost in pristine condition, not regulated by dams or other diversion construction. This study presents an analysis of the effect on fish habitat suitability by the implementation of different hydrological e-flow methods. To conduct this study we employed certain hydrological e-flow methods recommended by the European Small Hydropower Association (ESHA). River hydrology assessment was based on approximately 30 years of mean daily flow data, provided by the Portuguese Water Information System (SNIRH). The biological data, bathymetry, physical and hydraulic features, and the Habitat Suitability Index for fish species were collected from extensive field works. We followed the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) to assess the flow-habitat relationship taking into account the habitat suitability of different instream flow releases. Initially, we analysed fish habitat suitability based on natural conditions, and we used it as reference condition for other scenarios considering the chosen hydrological e-flow methods. We accomplished the habitat modelling through hydrodynamic analysis by using River-2D model. The same methodology was applied to each scenario by considering as input the e-flows obtained from each of the hydrological method employed in this study. This contribution shows the significance of ecohydrological studies in establishing a foundation for water resources management actions. Keywords: ecohydrology, e-flow, Mediterranean rivers, river conservation, fish habitat, River-2D, Hydropower.

  8. Simulating Engineering Flows through Complex Porous Media via the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesselin Krassimirov Krastev

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, recent achievements in the application of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM to complex fluid flows are reported. More specifically, we focus on flows through reactive porous media, such as the flow through the substrate of a selective catalytic reactor (SCR for the reduction of gaseous pollutants in the automotive field; pulsed-flow analysis through heterogeneous catalyst architectures; and transport and electro-chemical phenomena in microbial fuel cells (MFC for novel waste-to-energy applications. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first known application of LBM modeling to the study of MFCs, which represents by itself a highly innovative and challenging research area. The results discussed here essentially confirm the capabilities of the LBM approach as a flexible and accurate computational tool for the simulation of complex multi-physics phenomena of scientific and technological interest, across physical scales.

  9. Reconstruction of dynamical equations for traffic flow

    OpenAIRE

    Kriso, S.; Friedrich, R.; Peinke, J.; Wagner, P.

    2001-01-01

    Traffic flow data collected by an induction loop detector on the highway close to Koeln-Nord are investigated with respect to their dynamics including the stochastic content. In particular we present a new method, with which the flow dynamics can be extracted directly from the measured data. As a result a Langevin equation for the traffic flow is obtained. From the deterministic part of the flow dynamics, stable fixed points are extracted and set into relation with common features of the fund...

  10. Hepatic blood flow mapping by dynamic CT method in liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, Shigeo; Mizuyosi, Hideo; Okajima, Tsugio; Ishii, Kouji; Abei, Tohru; Machida, Keiichi

    1986-01-01

    Two parameters of dynamic CT, peak time (PT) and first moment (M1), were compared among healthy control, chronic hepatitis (CH) and liver cirrhosis (LC). The means of PT and M1 in each 9 (3 x 3) pixels on a slice of hepatic CT were computed and converted to gray spots by gray scale, so that deep gray represented high values and light gray low values of these parameters. The distribution of these gray spots in each pixels was depicted on the slice as a blood flow mapping, and it was compared among the groups. In normal control, dynamic CT showed the shortest PT and deep gray spots were distributed diffusely in the slice. In CH, where PT was longer than control, lighter gray spots were diffusely seen. LC had the longest PT and its mapping showed mottles of light gray and black, the latter indicating the presence of spots with scanty blood flow, scattering throughout the slice. The mapping of M1 gave almost the same picture as PT for each group, revieling that the disappearring time of the media in CH and LC was impaired in the same manner as in PT. This method of hepatic blood flow mapping was thought to be useful to add evidences for the understanding of abnormal blood flow in liver diseases. (author)

  11. Isotopic method of testing the dynamics of melt flow through a sedimentation tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazaniak, Z.; Chamer, R.; Stec, J.; Przybytniak, W.

    1981-01-01

    The isotopic method of a simultaneous measurement of copper matte and slag flow parameters is discussed. For marking Cu-64 and Zr 95/97, isotopes characterized by various gamma radiation energy are used. The chemical form of copper and zirconium compounds was chosen from the viewpoint of assuring a selective solubility in the tested phases. To interpret the results of isotopic tests, the Wolf-Resnick model was made. The obtained results have confirmed the hypothesis of a possible occurrence of the copper matte flotation effect. In order to reduce of copper uplifted with the shaft slag, a redesigning is suggested of the sedimentation tank that would assure a reduction of the ideal mixing participation and an increase of the zone characterized by the piston flow. (author)

  12. Flow-pattern identification and nonlinear dynamics of gas-liquid two-phase flow in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhongke; Jin, Ningde

    2009-06-01

    The identification of flow pattern is a basic and important issue in multiphase systems. Because of the complexity of phase interaction in gas-liquid two-phase flow, it is difficult to discern its flow pattern objectively. In this paper, we make a systematic study on the vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow using complex network. Three unique network construction methods are proposed to build three types of networks, i.e., flow pattern complex network (FPCN), fluid dynamic complex network (FDCN), and fluid structure complex network (FSCN). Through detecting the community structure of FPCN by the community-detection algorithm based on K -mean clustering, useful and interesting results are found which can be used for identifying five vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow patterns. To investigate the dynamic characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow, we construct 50 FDCNs under different flow conditions, and find that the power-law exponent and the network information entropy, which are sensitive to the flow pattern transition, can both characterize the nonlinear dynamics of gas-liquid two-phase flow. Furthermore, we construct FSCN and demonstrate how network statistic can be used to reveal the fluid structure of gas-liquid two-phase flow. In this paper, from a different perspective, we not only introduce complex network theory to the study of gas-liquid two-phase flow but also indicate that complex network may be a powerful tool for exploring nonlinear time series in practice.

  13. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart And Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum discusses computations of flow of blood through artificial heart and through tilting-disk artificial heart valve. Represents further progress in research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478). One purpose of research to exploit advanced techniques of computational fluid dynamics and capabilities of supercomputers to gain understanding of complicated internal flows of viscous, essentially incompressible fluids like blood. Another to use understanding to design better artificial hearts and valves.

  14. Rarefield gas dynamics fundamentals, simulations and micro flows

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Ching

    2006-01-01

    This book elucidates the methods of molecular gas dynamics or rarefied gas dynamics which treat the problems of gas flows when the discrete molecular effects of the gas prevail under the circumstances of low density, the emphasis being on the basis of the methods, the direct simulation Monte Carlo method applied to the simulation of non-equilibrium effects and the frontier subjects related to low speed microscale rarefied gas flows. It provides a solid basis for the study of molecular gas dynamics for senior students and graduates in the aerospace and mechanical engineering departments of universities and colleges. It gives a general acquaintance of modern developments of rarefied gas dynamics in various regimes and leads to the frontier topics of non-equilibrium rarefied gas dynamics and low speed microscale gas dynamics. It will be also of benefit to the scientific and technical researchers engaged in aerospace high altitude aerodynamic force and heating design and in the research on gas flow in MEMS.

  15. Operator splitting method for simulation of dynamic flows in natural gas pipeline networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachenko, Sergey A.; Zlotnik, Anatoly; Korotkevich, Alexander O.; Chertkov, Michael

    2017-12-01

    We develop an operator splitting method to simulate flows of isothermal compressible natural gas over transmission pipelines. The method solves a system of nonlinear hyperbolic partial differential equations (PDEs) of hydrodynamic type for mass flow and pressure on a metric graph, where turbulent losses of momentum are modeled by phenomenological Darcy-Weisbach friction. Mass flow balance is maintained through the boundary conditions at the network nodes, where natural gas is injected or withdrawn from the system. Gas flow through the network is controlled by compressors boosting pressure at the inlet of the adjoint pipe. Our operator splitting numerical scheme is unconditionally stable and it is second order accurate in space and time. The scheme is explicit, and it is formulated to work with general networks with loops. We test the scheme over range of regimes and network configurations, also comparing its performance with performance of two other state of the art implicit schemes.

  16. Autogenic dynamics of debris-flow fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Wilco; de Haas, Tjalling; Braat, Lisanne; Kleinhans, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    Alluvial fans develop their semi-conical shape by cyclic avulsion of their geomorphologically active sector from a fixed fan apex. These cyclic avulsions have been attributed to both allogenic and autogenic forcings and processes. Autogenic dynamics have been extensively studied on fluvial fans through physical scale experiments, and are governed by cyclic alternations of aggradation by unconfined sheet flow, fanhead incision leading to channelized flow, channel backfilling and avulsion. On debris-flow fans, however, autogenic dynamics have not yet been directly observed. We experimentally created debris-flow fans under constant extrinsic forcings, and show that autogenic dynamics are a fundamental intrinsic process on debris-flow fans. We found that autogenic cycles on debris-flow fans are driven by sequences of backfilling, avulsion and channelization, similar to the cycles on fluvial fans. However, the processes that govern these sequences are unique for debris-flow fans, and differ fundamentally from the processes that govern autogenic dynamics on fluvial fans. We experimentally observed that backfilling commenced after the debris flows reached their maximum possible extent. The next debris flows then progressively became shorter, driven by feedbacks on fan morphology and flow-dynamics. The progressively decreasing debris-flow length caused in-channel sedimentation, which led to increasing channel overflow and wider debris flows. This reduced the impulse of the liquefied flow body to the flow front, which then further reduced flow velocity and runout length, and induced further in-channel sedimentation. This commenced a positive feedback wherein debris flows became increasingly short and wide, until the channel was completely filled and the apex cross-profile was plano-convex. At this point, there was no preferential transport direction by channelization, and the debris flows progressively avulsed towards the steepest, preferential, flow path. Simultaneously

  17. Three dimensional simulation of compressible and incompressible flows through the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Gustavo Koury

    2004-11-01

    Although incompressible fluid flows can be regarded as a particular case of a general problem, numerical methods and the mathematical formulation aimed to solve compressible and incompressible flows have their own peculiarities, in such a way, that it is generally not possible to attain both regimes with a single approach. In this work, we start from a typically compressible formulation, slightly modified to make use of pressure variables and, through augmenting the stabilising parameters, we end up with a simplified model which is able to deal with a wide range of flow regimes, from supersonic to low speed gas flows. The resulting methodology is flexible enough to allow for the simulation of liquid flows as well. Examples using conservative and pressure variables are shown and the results are compared to those published in the literature, in order to validate the method. (author)

  18. AN OVERVIEW ON PULSATILE FLOW DYNAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    Çarpinlioğlu, Melda Özdinç

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile flow dynamics in reference to the relevant experimental research on the manner between the time periods of 1997- 2015 is presented in this paper. The flow field under discussion is generated through a rigid circular cross-sectional pipe as an axial slightly- compressible and sinusoidal one in a controlled range of the oscillation parameters. Laminar and turbulent flow regimes are considered with a particular emphasis devoted to the transitional characteristics of laminar pulsatile f...

  19. Dynamic self-organization in particle-laden channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernardus J.; Vreman, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    We study dynamic flow-structuring and mean-flow properties of turbulent particle-laden riser-flow at significant particle volume fractions of about 1.5%. We include particle–particle as well as particle–fluid interactions through inelastic collisions and drag forces, in a so-called four-way coupled

  20. Dynamics of flexible fibers transported in confined viscous flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Jean; Duprat, Camille; Du Roure, Olivia; Nagel, Mathias; Gallaire, François; Lindner, Anke

    2017-11-01

    The dynamics of elongated objects has been extensively studied in unbounded media as for example the sedimentation of fibers at low Reynolds numbers. It has recently been shown that these transport dynamics are strongly modified by bounding walls. Here we focus on the dynamics of flexible fibers confined by the top and bottom walls of a microchannel and transported in pressure-driven flows. We combine well-controlled microfluidic experiments and simulations using modified Brinkmann equations. We control shape, orientation, and mechanical properties of our fibers using micro-fabrication techniques and in-situ characterization methods. These elastic fibers can be deformed by viscous and pressure forces leading to very rich transport dynamics coupling lateral drift with shape evolution. We show that the bending of a perpendicular fiber is proportional to an elasto-viscous number and we fully characterize the influence of the confinement on the deformation of the fiber. Experiments on parallel flexible fibers reveal the existence of a buckling threshold. The European Research Council is acknowledged for funding the work through a consolidator Grant (ERC PaDyFlow 682367).

  1. Multiphase Flow Dynamics 2 Mechanical Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2012-01-01

    Multi-phase flows are part of our natural environment such as tornadoes, typhoons, air and water pollution and volcanic activities as well as part of industrial technology such as power plants, combustion engines, propulsion systems, or chemical and biological industry. The industrial use of multi-phase systems requires analytical and numerical strategies for predicting their behavior. .In its fourth extended edition the successful monograph package “Multiphase Flow Daynmics” contains theory, methods and practical experience for describing complex transient multi-phase processes in arbitrary geometrical configurations, providing a systematic presentation of the theory and practice of numerical multi-phase fluid dynamics. In the present second volume the methods for describing the mechanical interactions in multiphase dynamics are provided. This fourth edition includes various updates, extensions, improvements and corrections.   "The literature in the field of multiphase flows is numerous. Therefore, it i...

  2. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation of Aqueous C60 Nanoparticles with Size Determination by Dynamic Light Scattering and Quantification by Liquid Chromatography Atmospheric Pressure Photo-Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A size separation method was developed for aqueous C60 fullerene aggregates (aqu/C60) using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a dynamic light scattering detector in flow through mode. Surfactants, which are commonly used in AF4, were avoided as they may al...

  3. A proposed through-flow inverse method for the design of mixed-flow pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Joao Eduardo

    1991-01-01

    A through-flow (hub-to-shroud) truly inverse method is proposed and described. It uses an imposition of mean swirl, i.e., radius times mean tangential velocity, given throughout the meridional section of the turbomachine as an initial design specification. In the present implementation, it is assumed that the fluid is inviscid, incompressible, and irrotational at inlet and that the blades are supposed to have zero thickness. Only blade rows that impart to the fluid a constant work along the space are considered. An application of this procedure to design the rotor of a mixed-flow pump is described in detail. The strategy used to find a suitable mean swirl distribution and the other design inputs is also described. The final blade shape and pressure distributions on the blade surface are presented, showing that it is possible to obtain feasible designs using this technique. Another advantage of this technique is the fact that it does not require large amounts of CPU time.

  4. Automatic flow-through dynamic extraction: A fast tool to evaluate char-based remediation of multi-element contaminated mine soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosende, María; Beesley, Luke; Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo; Miró, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    An automatic in-vitro bioaccessibility test based upon dynamic microcolumn extraction in a programmable flow setup is herein proposed as a screening tool to evaluate bio-char based remediation of mine soils contaminated with trace elements as a compelling alternative to conventional phyto-availability tests. The feasibility of the proposed system was evaluated by extracting the readily bioaccessible pools of As, Pb and Zn in two contaminated mine soils before and after the addition of two biochars (9% (w:w)) of diverse source origin (pine and olive). Bioaccessible fractions under worst-case scenarios were measured using 0.001 mol L(-1) CaCl2 as extractant for mimicking plant uptake, and analysis of the extracts by inductively coupled optical emission spectrometry. The t-test of comparison of means revealed an efficient metal (mostly Pb and Zn) immobilization by the action of olive pruning-based biochar against the bare (control) soil at the 0.05 significance level. In-vitro flow-through bioaccessibility tests are compared for the first time with in-vivo phyto-toxicity assays in a microcosm soil study. By assessing seed germination and shoot elongation of Lolium perenne in contaminated soils with and without biochar amendments the dynamic flow-based bioaccessibility data proved to be in good agreement with the phyto-availability tests. Experimental results indicate that the dynamic extraction method is a viable and economical in-vitro tool in risk assessment explorations to evaluate the feasibility of a given biochar amendment for revegetation and remediation of metal contaminated soils in a mere 10 min against 4 days in case of phyto-toxicity assays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Multiphase Flow Dynamics 3 Thermal Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2012-01-01

    Multi-phase flows are part of our natural environment such as tornadoes, typhoons, air and water pollution and volcanic activities as well as part of industrial technology such as power plants, combustion engines, propulsion systems, or chemical and biological industry. The industrial use of multi-phase systems requires analytical and numerical strategies for predicting their behavior. .In its fourth extended edition the successful monograph package “Multiphase Flow Daynmics” contains theory, methods and practical experience for describing complex transient multi-phase processes in arbitrary geometrical configurations, providing a systematic presentation of the theory and practice of numerical multi-phase fluid dynamics. In the present third volume methods for describing of the thermal interactions in multiphase dynamics are provided. In addition a large number of valuable experiments is collected and predicted using the methods introduced in this monograph. In this way the accuracy of the methods is reve...

  6. Coupled finite difference and boundary element methods for fluid flow through a vessel with multibranches in tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiang; Wu, Guo Xiong

    2013-03-01

    A mathematical model and a numerical solution procedure are developed to simulate flow field through a 3D permeable vessel with multibranches embedded in a solid tumour. The model is based on Poisseuille's law for the description of the flow through the vessels, Darcy's law for the fluid field inside the tumour interstitium, and Starling's law for the flux transmitted across the vascular walls. The solution procedure is based on a coupled method, in which the finite difference method is used for the flow in the vessels and the boundary element method is used for the flow in the tumour. When vessels meet each other at a junction, the pressure continuity and mass conservation are imposed at the junction. Three typical representative structures within the tumour vasculature, symmetrical dichotomous branching, asymmetrical bifurcation with uneven radius of daughter vessels and trifurcation, are investigated in detail as case studies. These results have demonstrated the features of tumour flow environment by the pressure distributions and flow velocity field. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Dissipative particle dynamics simulation of fluid motion through an unsaturated fracture and fracture junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Moubin; Meakin, Paul; Huang Hai

    2007-01-01

    Multiphase fluid motion in unsaturated fractures and fracture networks involves complicated fluid dynamics, which is difficult to model using grid-based continuum methods. In this paper, the application of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), a relatively new mesoscale method to simulate fluid motion in unsaturated fractures is described. Unlike the conventional DPD method that employs a purely repulsive conservative (non-dissipative) particle-particle interaction to simulate the behavior of gases, we used conservative particle-particle interactions that combine short-range repulsive and long-range attractive interactions. This new conservative particle-particle interaction allows the behavior of multiphase systems consisting of gases, liquids and solids to be simulated. Our simulation results demonstrate that, for a fracture with flat parallel walls, the DPD method with the new interaction potential function is able to reproduce the hydrodynamic behavior of fully saturated flow, and various unsaturated flow modes including thin film flow, wetting and non-wetting flow. During simulations of flow through a fracture junction, the fracture junction can be fully or partially saturated depending on the wetting property of the fluid, the injection rate and the geometry of the fracture junction. Flow mode switching from a fully saturated flow to a thin film flow can also be observed in the fracture junction

  8. Nephron blood flow dynamics measured by laser speckle contrast imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Sosnovtseva, Olga V; Pavlov, Alexey N

    2011-01-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) has an important role in autoregulation of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Because of the characteristics of signal transmission in the feedback loop, the TGF undergoes self-sustained oscillations in single-nephron blood flow, GFR, and tubular...... simultaneously. The interacting nephron fields are likely to be more extensive. We have turned to laser speckle contrast imaging to measure the blood flow dynamics of 50-100 nephrons simultaneously on the renal surface of anesthetized rats. We report the application of this method and describe analytic...... pressure and flow. Nephrons interact by exchanging electrical signals conducted electrotonically through cells of the vascular wall, leading to synchronization of the TGF-mediated oscillations. Experimental studies of these interactions have been limited to observations on two or at most three nephrons...

  9. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (2), flow dynamics calculations for determining mixing factors and mass transfer coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Yasushi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    In order to predict and mitigate flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel piping in PWR and BWR secondary systems, computer program packages for evaluating FAC have been developed by coupling one through three dimensional (1-3D) computational flow dynamics (CFD) models and corrosion models. To evaluate corrosive conditions, e.g., oxygen concentration and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) along the flow path, flow pattern and temperature in each elemental volume were obtained with 1D computational flow dynamics (CFD) codes. Precise flow turbulence and mass transfer coefficients at the structure surface were calculated with 3D CFD codes to determine wall thinning rates. One of the engineering options is application of k-ε calculation as a 3D CFD code, which has limitation of detail evaluation of flow distribution at very surface of large scale piping. A combination of k-ε calculation and wall function was proposed to evaluate precise distribution of mass transfer coefficients with reasonable CPU volume and computing time and, at the same time, reasonable accuracy. (author)

  10. Flow Mode Dependent Partitioning Processes of Preferential Flow Dynamics in Unsaturated Fractures - Findings From Analogue Percolation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordilla, J.; Noffz, T.; Dentz, M.; Sauter, M.

    2017-12-01

    To assess the vulnerability of an aquifer system it is of utmost importance to recognize the high potential for a rapid mass transport offered by ow through unsaturated fracture networks. Numerical models have to reproduce complex effects of gravity-driven flow dynamics to generate accurate predictions of flow and transport. However, the non-linear characteristics of free surface flow dynamics and partitioning behaviour at unsaturated fracture intersections often exceed the capacity of classical volume-effective modelling approaches. Laboratory experiments that manage to isolate single aspects of the mass partitioning process can enhance the understanding of underlying dynamics, which ultimately influence travel time distributions on multiple scales. Our analogue fracture network consists of synthetic cubes with dimensions of 20 x 20 x 20 cm creating simple geometries of a single or a cascade of consecutive horizontal fractures. Gravity-driven free surface flow (droplets; rivulets) is established via a high precision multichannel dispenser at flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 4.5 ml/min. Single-inlet experiments show the influence of variable flow rate, atmospheric pressure and temperature on the stability of flow modes and allow to delineate a droplet and rivulet regime. The transition between these regimes exhibits mixed flow characteristics. In addition, multi-inlet setups with constant total infow rates decrease the variance induced by erratic free-surface flow dynamics. We investigate the impacts of variable aperture widths, horizontal offsets of vertical fracture surfaces, and alternating injection methods for both flow regimes. Normalized fracture inflow rates allow to demonstrate and compare the effects of variable geometric features. Firstly, the fracture filling can be described by plug flow. At later stages it transitions into a Washburn-type flow, which we compare to an analytical solution for the case of rivulet flow. Observations show a considerably

  11. Modeling of Unsteady Flow through the Canals by Semiexact Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Ehsani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of free-surface and pressurized water flows in channels has many interesting application, one of the most important being the modeling of the phenomena in the area of natural water systems (rivers, estuaries as well as in that of man-made systems (canals, pipes. For the development of major river engineering projects, such as flood prevention and flood control, there is an essential need to have an instrument that be able to model and predict the consequences of any possible phenomenon on the environment and in particular the new hydraulic characteristics of the system. The basic equations expressing hydraulic principles were formulated in the 19th century by Barre de Saint Venant and Valentin Joseph Boussinesq. The original hydraulic model of the Saint Venant equations is written in the form of a system of two partial differential equations and it is derived under the assumption that the flow is one-dimensional, the cross-sectional velocity is uniform, the streamline curvature is small and the pressure distribution is hydrostatic. The St. Venant equations must be solved with continuity equation at the same time. Until now no analytical solution for Saint Venant equations is presented. In this paper the Saint Venant equations and continuity equation are solved with homotopy perturbation method (HPM and comparison by explicit forward finite difference method (FDM. For decreasing the present error between HPM and FDM, the st.venant equations and continuity equation are solved by HAM. The homotopy analysis method (HAM contains the auxiliary parameter ħ that allows us to adjust and control the convergence region of solution series. The study has highlighted the efficiency and capability of HAM in solving Saint Venant equations and modeling of unsteady flow through the rectangular canal that is the goal of this paper and other kinds of canals.

  12. Cardiovascular fluid dynamics. Methods for flow and pressure field analysis from magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbers, T.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular blood flow is highly complex and incompletely understood. Blood flow patterns are expected to influence the opening and closing of normal and prosthetic heart valves, the efficiency of cardiac filling and ejection, and the resistance to thrombus formation within the heart. Conventional diagnostic techniques are poorly suited to the study of the three-dimensional (3D) blood flow patterns in the heart chambers and large vessels. Noninvasive methods have also been inadequate in studying intracardiac pressure differences, which are the driving force of flow and are critical in the evaluation of many cardiovascular abnormalities. This thesis focuses on the development of non-invasive methods for analysis of 3D cardiovascular blood flow. Simultaneous study of cardiovascular fluid dynamics allowed knowledge exchange across the two disciplines, facilitating the development process and broadening the applicability of the methods. A time-resolved 3D phase-contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique was used to acquire the velocity vector field in a 3D volume encompassing the entire heart or a large vessel. Cardiovascular blood flow patterns were visualized by use of particle traces, which revealed, for instance, vortical flow patterns in the left atrium. By applying the Navier-Stokes equation along a user-defined line in the 3D velocity vector field, the relative pressure could be obtained as an excellent supplement to the flow pattern visualization. Using a delineation of the blood pool, the time-varying 3D relative pressure field in the human left ventricle was obtained from the velocity field by use of the pressure Poisson equation. A delineation of the heart muscle, a task that is almost impossible to perform on 3D MRI either automatically or manually, was also achieved by usage of particle traces. This segmentation allows automatic calculation of the 3D relative pressure field, as well as calculation of well-established parameters such as

  13. Cardiovascular fluid dynamics. Methods for flow and pressure field analysis from magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbers, T

    2001-05-01

    Cardiovascular blood flow is highly complex and incompletely understood. Blood flow patterns are expected to influence the opening and closing of normal and prosthetic heart valves, the efficiency of cardiac filling and ejection, and the resistance to thrombus formation within the heart. Conventional diagnostic techniques are poorly suited to the study of the three-dimensional (3D) blood flow patterns in the heart chambers and large vessels. Noninvasive methods have also been inadequate in studying intracardiac pressure differences, which are the driving force of flow and are critical in the evaluation of many cardiovascular abnormalities. This thesis focuses on the development of non-invasive methods for analysis of 3D cardiovascular blood flow. Simultaneous study of cardiovascular fluid dynamics allowed knowledge exchange across the two disciplines, facilitating the development process and broadening the applicability of the methods. A time-resolved 3D phase-contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique was used to acquire the velocity vector field in a 3D volume encompassing the entire heart or a large vessel. Cardiovascular blood flow patterns were visualized by use of particle traces, which revealed, for instance, vortical flow patterns in the left atrium. By applying the Navier-Stokes equation along a user-defined line in the 3D velocity vector field, the relative pressure could be obtained as an excellent supplement to the flow pattern visualization. Using a delineation of the blood pool, the time-varying 3D relative pressure field in the human left ventricle was obtained from the velocity field by use of the pressure Poisson equation. A delineation of the heart muscle, a task that is almost impossible to perform on 3D MRI either automatically or manually, was also achieved by usage of particle traces. This segmentation allows automatic calculation of the 3D relative pressure field, as well as calculation of well-established parameters such as

  14. Multiscale Modeling of Blood Flow: Coupling Finite Elements with Smoothed Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas; Vignal, Philippe; Li, Jun; Calo, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    A variational multi scale approach to model blood flow through arteries is proposed. A finite element discretization to represent the coarse scales (macro size), is coupled to smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that captures the fine scale features (micro scale). Blood is assumed to be incompressible, and flow is described through the Navier Stokes equation. The proposed cou- pling is tested with two benchmark problems, in fully coupled systems. Further refinements of the model can be incorporated in order to explicitly include blood constituents and non-Newtonian behavior. The suggested algorithm can be used with any particle-based method able to solve the Navier-Stokes equation.

  15. Multiscale Modeling of Blood Flow: Coupling Finite Elements with Smoothed Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    A variational multi scale approach to model blood flow through arteries is proposed. A finite element discretization to represent the coarse scales (macro size), is coupled to smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that captures the fine scale features (micro scale). Blood is assumed to be incompressible, and flow is described through the Navier Stokes equation. The proposed cou- pling is tested with two benchmark problems, in fully coupled systems. Further refinements of the model can be incorporated in order to explicitly include blood constituents and non-Newtonian behavior. The suggested algorithm can be used with any particle-based method able to solve the Navier-Stokes equation.

  16. Dynamic subgrid scale model of large eddy simulation of cross bundle flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Y.A.; Barsamian, H.R.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamic subgrid scale closure model of Germano et. al (1991) is used in the large eddy simulation code GUST for incompressible isothermal flows. Tube bundle geometries of staggered and non-staggered arrays are considered in deep bundle simulations. The advantage of the dynamic subgrid scale model is the exclusion of an input model coefficient. The model coefficient is evaluated dynamically for each nodal location in the flow domain. Dynamic subgrid scale results are obtained in the form of power spectral densities and flow visualization of turbulent characteristics. Comparisons are performed among the dynamic subgrid scale model, the Smagorinsky eddy viscosity model (that is used as the base model for the dynamic subgrid scale model) and available experimental data. Spectral results of the dynamic subgrid scale model correlate better with experimental data. Satisfactory turbulence characteristics are observed through flow visualization

  17. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method for interfacial flows with insoluble surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng

    Interfacial flows, fluid flows involving two or more fluids that do not mix, are common in many natural and industrial processes such as rain drop formation, crude oil recovery, polymer blending, fuel spray formation, and so on. Surfactants (surface active substances) play an important role in such processes because they significantly change the interfacial dynamics. In this thesis, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method has been developed to numerically simulate interfacial flows with insoluble surfactants. The interface is captured using a coupled level set and volume of fluid method. To evolve the surfactant concentration, the method directly tracks the surfactant mass and the interfacial area. The surfactant concentration, which determines the local surface tension through an equation of state, is then computed as surfactant mass per interfacial area. By directly tracking the surfactant mass, the method conserves the surfactant mass exactly. To accurately approximate the interfacial area, the fluid interface is reconstructed using piecewise parabolas. The evolution of the level set function, volume fraction, interfacial area, and the surfactant mass is performed using an ALE approach. The fluid flow is governed by Stokes equations, which are solved using a finite element method. The surface forces are included in the momentum equation using a continuum surface stress formulation. To efficiently resolve the complex interfacial dynamics, interfacial regions of high surface curvature, and near contact regions between two interacting interfaces, the grid near the interface is adaptively refined. The method is extendible to axisymmetric and 3D spaces, and can be coupled with other flow solvers, such as Navier-Stokes and viscoelastic flow solvers, as well. The method has been applied to study the effect of surfactants on drop deformation and breakup in an extensional flow. Drop deformation results are compared with available experimental and theoretical

  18. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: Quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling.

  19. VISUALIZATION METHODS OF VORTICAL FLOWS IN COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Volkov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with conceptions and methods for visual representation of research numerical results in the problems of fluid mechanics and gas. The three-dimensional nature of unsteady flow being simulated creates significant difficulties for the visual representation of results. It complicates control and understanding of numerical data, and exchange and processing of obtained information about the flow field. Approaches to vortical flows visualization with the usage of gradients of primary and secondary scalar and vector fields are discussed. An overview of visualization techniques for vortical flows using different definitions of the vortex and its identification criteria is given. Visualization examples for some solutions of gas dynamics problems related to calculations of jets and cavity flows are presented. Ideas of the vortical structure of the free non-isothermal jet and the formation of coherent vortex structures in the mixing layer are developed. Analysis of formation patterns for spatial flows inside large-scale vortical structures within the enclosed space of the cubic lid-driven cavity is performed. The singular points of the vortex flow in a cubic lid-driven cavity are found based on the results of numerical simulation; their type and location are identified depending on the Reynolds number. Calculations are performed with fine meshes and modern approaches to the simulation of vortical flows (direct numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation. Paradigm of graphical programming and COVISE virtual environment are used for the visual representation of computational results. Application that implements the visualization of the problem is represented as a network which links are modules and each of them is designed to solve a case-specific problem. Interaction between modules is carried out by the input and output ports (data receipt and data transfer giving the possibility to use various input and output devices.

  20. Numerical investigations on flow dynamics of prismatic granular materials using the discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, W.; Weatherley, D.; Wruck, B.; Chitombo, G. P.

    2012-04-01

    The flow dynamics of granular materials is of broad interest in both the geosciences (e.g. landslides, fault zone evolution, and brecchia pipe formation) and many engineering disciplines (e.g chemical engineering, food sciences, pharmaceuticals and materials science). At the interface between natural and human-induced granular media flow, current underground mass-mining methods are trending towards the induced failure and subsequent gravitational flow of large volumes of broken rock, a method known as cave mining. Cave mining relies upon the undercutting of a large ore body, inducement of fragmentation of the rock and subsequent extraction of ore from below, via hopper-like outlets. Design of such mines currently relies upon a simplified kinematic theory of granular flow in hoppers, known as the ellipsoid theory of mass movement. This theory assumes that the zone of moving material grows as an ellipsoid above the outlet of the silo. The boundary of the movement zone is a shear band and internal to the movement zone, the granular material is assumed to have a uniformly high bulk porosity compared with surrounding stagnant regions. There is however, increasing anecdotal evidence and field measurements suggesting this theory fails to capture the full complexity of granular material flow within cave mines. Given the practical challenges obstructing direct measurement of movement both in laboratory experiments and in-situ, the Discrete Element Method (DEM [1]) is a popular alternative to investigate granular media flow. Small-scale DEM studies (c.f. [3] and references therein) have confirmed that movement within DEM silo flow models matches that predicted by ellipsoid theory, at least for mono-disperse granular material freely outflowing at a constant rate. A major draw-back of these small-scale DEM studies is that the initial bulk porosity of the simulated granular material is significantly higher than that of broken, prismatic rock. In this investigation, more

  1. Numerical simulation of the flow through a compressor-valve model using an immersed-boundary method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Barbi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hermetic reciprocating compressors are widely used in small- and medium-size refrigeration systems based on the vapor-compression cycle. One of the main parts of this type of compressor is the automatic valve system used to control the suction and discharge processes. As the suction and discharge losses represent a large amount of the total thermodynamic losses (47%, a small improvement in the suction and discharge processes can produce expressive increases in the thermodynamic efficiency of the compressor. In this work, a new numerical methodology is applied to solve the flow through reed-type valves. The numerical results were experimentally validated through the pressure distribution acting on the frontal disk of a radial diffuser, which is a geometry usually used to model this type of valve. The numerical results for the velocity and pressure fields were comprehensively explored during the opening and closing movement imposed to the reed. The good quality of these results show that the numerical methodology is very promising in terms of solving the flow in the actual dynamics of reed-type valves.

  2. On the evaluation of debris flows dynamics by means of mathematical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arattano

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of debris flow dynamic characteristics in a debris flow prone torrent is generally made through the investigation of past events. This investigation can be carried out through a survey of the marks left by past debris flows along the channel and through a detailed analysis of the type and shape of the deposits found on the debris fan. The rheological behaviour of future debris flows can then be inferred from the results of these surveys and their dynamic characteristics can be estimated applying well known formulas proposed in literature. These latter will make use of the assumptions on the rheological behaviour previously made. This type of estimation has been performed for a debris flow occurred in an instrumented basin, on the North-Eastern Italian Alps, in 1996 and the results have been compared to those obtained by means of a mathematical simulation. For the calibration of the mathematical model the limnographs recorded by three different ultrasonic gauges installed along a torrent reach on the fan were used. The comparison evidenced the importance of time data recordings for a correct prediction of the debris flows dynamics. Without the availability of data recordings, the application of formulas based only on assumptions derived from field analysis could be misleading.

  3. Lattice gas automata simulations of flow through porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukuma, Yosuke; Abe, Yutaka; Adachi, Hiromichi; Takahashi, Ryoichi

    1998-01-01

    In the course of a severe accident, a debris bed may be formed from once- molten and fragmented fuel elements. In order to avoid further degradation of the reactor core, it is necessary to remove the heat from the debris bed since the debris bed still release the decay heat. So as to predict the coolability of the debris bed, it is important to precisely estimate flow patterns through complex geometry of debris bed in microscopic level. Lattice gas automata could be powerful tool to simulate such a complex geometry. As a first step of the study, fundamental numerical simulation were conducted in two dimensional systems by using the lattice gas automata method to clarify single phase flow patterns through porous media in mesoscopic level. Immiscible lattice gas model is one of the lattice gas automata method and utilized for spinodal decomposition simulation of binary fluids. This model was applied to generate the complex flow geometry simulating porous media. It was approved that the complex flow geometries were successfully generated by the present method. Flow concentration was observed in specified flow channels for lower Reynolds number. Two dimensional flow concentration was caused by the irregular flow geometry generated by the present method, since the flow selects the channels of lower friction. Two dimensional pressure distribution was observed relating to the concentrations of flow in specified channels. The simulating results of the flow through the porous media by the present method qualitatively agree with the Ergun's equation. Quantitatively, the present results approach to Ergun's equation in higher Reynolds number than 10, although concentration of the flow in a specified flow channels were observed in lower Reynolds number than 10. It can be concluded that this technique is useful is useful to simulate flow through complex geometry like porous media. (author)

  4. Standard practice for measurement of the glass dissolution rate using the single-pass flow-through test method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes a single-pass flow-through (SPFT) test method that can be used to measure the dissolution rate of a homogeneous silicate glass, including nuclear waste glasses, in various test solutions at temperatures less than 100°C. Tests may be conducted under conditions in which the effects from dissolved species on the dissolution rate are minimized to measure the forward dissolution rate at specific values of temperature and pH, or to measure the dependence of the dissolution rate on the concentrations of various solute species. 1.2 Tests are conducted by pumping solutions in either a continuous or pulsed flow mode through a reaction cell that contains the test specimen. Tests must be conducted at several solution flow rates to evaluate the effect of the flow rate on the glass dissolution rate. 1.3 This practice excludes static test methods in which flow is simulated by manually removing solution from the reaction cell and replacing it with fresh solution. 1.4 Tests may be conducted wit...

  5. Energy and ancillary service dispatch through dynamic optimal power flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.L.; Costa, A. Simoes

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an approach based on dynamic optimal power flow (DOPF) to clear both energy and spinning reserve day-ahead markets. A competitive environment is assumed, where agents can offer active power for both demand supply and ancillary services. The DOPF jointly determines the optimal solutions for both energy dispatch and reserve allocation. A non-linear representation for the electrical network is employed, which is able to take transmission losses and power flow limits into account. An attractive feature of the proposed approach is that the final optimal solution will automatically meet physical constraints such as generating limits and ramp rate restrictions. In addition, the proposed framework allows the definition of multiple zones in the network for each time interval, in order to ensure a more adequate distribution of reserves throughout the power system. (author)

  6. Experimental quantification of solute transport through the vadose zone under dynamic boundary conditions with dye tracers and optical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of subsurface solute transport processes is vital to investigate e.g. groundwater contamination, nutrient uptake by plant roots and to implement remediation strategies. Beside field measurements and numerical simulations, physical laboratory experiments represent a way to establish process understanding and furthermore validate numerical schemes. Atmospheric forcings, such as erratically varying infiltration and evaporation cycles, subject the shallow subsurface to local and temporal variations in water content and associated hydraulic conductivity of the prevailing porous media. Those variations in material properties can cause flow paths to differ between upward and downward flow periods. Thereby, the unsaturated subsurface presents a highly complicated, dynamic system. Following an extensive systematical numerical investigation of flow and transport through bimodal, unsaturated porous media under dynamic boundary conditions (Cremer et al., 2016), we conduct physical laboratory experiments in a 22 cm x 8 cm x 1 cm flow cell where we introduce structural heterogeneity in the form sharp material interfaces between different porous media. In all experiments, a constant pressure head is implemented at the lower boundary, while cyclic infiltration-evaporation phases are applied at the soil surface. As a reference case a stationary infiltration with a rate corresponding to the cycle-averaged infiltration rate is applied. By initial application of dye tracers, solute transport within the domain is visualized such that transport paths and redistribution processes can be observed in a qualitative manner. Solute leaching is quantified at the bottom outlet, where breakthrough curves are obtained via spectroscopy. Liquid and vapor flow in and out of the domain is obtained from multiple balances. Thereby, the interplay of material structural heterogeneity and alternating flow (transport) directions and flow (transport) paths is investigated. Results show lateral

  7. Shroud leakage flow models and a multi-dimensional coupling CFD (computational fluid dynamics) method for shrouded turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Zhengping; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Weihao; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Multi-dimensional coupling simulation is an effective approach for evaluating the flow and aero-thermal performance of shrouded turbines, which can balance the simulation accuracy and computing cost effectively. In this paper, 1D leakage models are proposed based on classical jet theories and dynamics equations, which can be used to evaluate most of the main features of shroud leakage flow, including the mass flow rate, radial and circumferential momentum, temperature and the jet width. Then, the 1D models are expanded to 2D distributions on the interface by using a multi-dimensional scaling method. Based on the models and multi-dimensional scaling, a multi-dimensional coupling simulation method for shrouded turbines is developed, in which, some boundary source and sink are set on the interface between the shroud and the main flow passage. To verify the precision, some simulations on the design point and off design points of a 1.5 stage turbine are conducted. It is indicated that the models and methods can give predictions with sufficient accuracy for most of the flow field features and will contribute to pursue deeper understanding and better design methods of shrouded axial turbines, which are the important devices in energy engineering. - Highlights: • Free and wall attached jet theories are used to model the leakage flow in shrouds. • Leakage flow rate is modeled by virtual labyrinth number and residual-energy factor. • A scaling method is applied to 1D model to obtain 2D distributions on interfaces. • A multi-dimensional coupling CFD method for shrouded turbines is proposed. • The proposed coupling method can give accurate predictions with low computing cost.

  8. Investigation on thermo-acoustic instability dynamic characteristics of hydrocarbon fuel flowing in scramjet cooling channel based on wavelet entropy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Hao; Li, Haowei; Jiang, Yuguang; Wu, Meng; Zhou, Weixing; Bao, Wen

    2018-06-01

    As part of our efforts to find ways and means to further improve the regenerative cooling technology in scramjet, the experiments of thermo-acoustic instability dynamic characteristics of hydrocarbon fuel flowing have been conducted in horizontal circular tubes at different conditions. The experimental results indicate that there is a developing process from thermo-acoustic stability to instability. In order to have a deep understanding on the developing process of thermo-acoustic instability, the method of Multi-scale Shannon Wavelet Entropy (MSWE) based on Wavelet Transform Correlation Filter (WTCF) and Multi-Scale Shannon Entropy (MSE) is adopted in this paper. The results demonstrate that the developing process of thermo-acoustic instability from noise and weak signals is well detected by MSWE method and the differences among the stability, the developing process and the instability can be identified. These properties render the method particularly powerful for warning thermo-acoustic instability of hydrocarbon fuel flowing in scramjet cooling channels. The mass flow rate and the inlet pressure will make an influence on the developing process of the thermo-acoustic instability. The investigation on thermo-acoustic instability dynamic characteristics at supercritical pressure based on wavelet entropy method offers guidance on the control of scramjet fuel supply, which can secure stable fuel flowing in regenerative cooling system.

  9. Physically-based interactive Schlieren flow visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mccormick, Patrick S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brownlee, Carson S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pegoraro, Vincent [UNIV OF UTAH; Shankar, Siddharth [UNIV OF UTAH; Hansen, Charles D [UNIV OF UTAH

    2009-01-01

    Understanding fluid flow is a difficult problem and of increasing importance as computational fluid dynamics produces an abundance of simulation data. Experimental flow analysis has employed techniques such as shadowgraph and schlieren imaging for centuries which allow empirical observation of inhomogeneous flows. Shadowgraphs provide an intuitive way of looking at small changes in flow dynamics through caustic effects while schlieren cutoffs introduce an intensity gradation for observing large scale directional changes in the flow. The combination of these shading effects provides an informative global analysis of overall fluid flow. Computational solutions for these methods have proven too complex until recently due to the fundamental physical interaction of light refracting through the flow field. In this paper, we introduce a novel method to simulate the refraction of light to generate synthetic shadowgraphs and schlieren images of time-varying scalar fields derived from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data. Our method computes physically accurate schlieren and shadowgraph images at interactive rates by utilizing a combination of GPGPU programming, acceleration methods, and data-dependent probabilistic schlieren cutoffs. Results comparing this method to previous schlieren approximations are presented.

  10. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of an assembly of tubes under transverse fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaufils, B.; Axisa, F.; Antunes, J.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical vibrations induced by a transverse fluid flow passing through an assembly of cylindrical tubes is investigated. Studies on the numerical modeling of such phenomena are presented. The purpose of the work is to allow the evaluation of the risks induced by the vibrations in industrial heat exchangers. The methods for the analysis of nonlinear problems and numerical calculations of the nonlinear dynamic behavior are performed [fr

  11. Chaotic-Dynamical Conceptual Model to Describe Fluid Flow and Contaminant Transport in a Fractured Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faybishenko, Boris; Doughty, Christine; Geller, Jil T.

    1999-01-01

    DOE faces the remediation of numerous contaminated sites, such as those at Hanford, INEEL, LLNL, and LBNL, where organic and/or radioactive wastes were intentionally or accidentally released to the vadose zone from surface spills, underground tanks, cribs, shallow ponds, and deep wells. Migration of these contaminants through the vadose zone has led to the contamination of (or threatens to contaminate) underlying groundwater. A key issue in choosing a corrective action plan to clean up contaminated sites is the determination of the location, total mass, mobility and travel time to receptors for contaminants moving in the vadose zone. These problems are difficult to solve in a technically defensible and accurate manner because contaminants travel downward intermittently, through narrow pathways, driven by variations in environmental conditions. These preferential flow pathways can be difficult to find and predict. The primary objective of this project is to determine if and when dynamical chaos theory can be used to investigate infiltration of fluid and contaminant transport in heterogeneous soils and fractured rocks. The objective of this project is being achieved through the following activities: Development of multi scale conceptual models and mathematical and numerical algorithms for flow and transport, which incorporate both (a) the spatial variability of heterogeneous porous and fractured media and (b) the temporal dynamics of flow and transport; Development of appropriate experimental field and laboratory techniques needed to detect diagnostic parameters for chaotic behavior of flow; Evaluation of chaotic behavior of flow in laboratory and field experiments using methods from non-linear dynamics; Evaluation of the impact these dynamics may have on contaminant transport through heterogeneous fractured rocks and soils and remediation efforts. This approach is based on the consideration of multi scale spatial heterogeneity and flow phenomena that are affected by

  12. Instantaneous aerosol dynamics in a turbulent flow

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2012-01-01

    Dibutyl phthalate aerosol particles evolution dynamics in a turbulent mixing layer is simulated by means of direct numerical simulation for the flow field and the direct quadrature method of moments for the aerosol evolution. Most par

  13. Dynamic flow-through approaches for metal fractionation in environmentally relevant solid samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald; Chomchoei, Roongrat

    2005-01-01

    generations of flow-injection analysis. Special attention is also paid to a novel, robust, non-invasive approach for on-site continuous sampling of soil solutions, capitalizing on flow-through microdialysis, which presents itself as an appealing complementary approach to the conventional lysimeter experiments...

  14. Estimating the arterial input function from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data with compensation for flow enhancement (I): Theory, method, and phantom experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Jeroen J N; Lavini, Cristina; van Vliet, Lucas J; Vos, Frans M

    2018-05-01

    The arterial input function (AIF) represents the time-dependent arterial contrast agent (CA) concentration that is used in pharmacokinetic modeling. To develop a novel method for estimating the AIF from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI data, while compensating for flow enhancement. Signal simulation and phantom measurements. Time-intensity curves (TICs) were simulated for different numbers of excitation pulses modeling flow effects. A phantom experiment was performed in which a solution (without CA) was passed through a straight tube, at constant flow velocity. Dynamic fast spoiled gradient echo (FSPGRs) at 3T MRI, both in the simulations and in the phantom experiment. TICs were generated for a duration of 373 seconds and sampled at intervals of 1.247 seconds (300 timepoints). The proposed method first estimates the number of pulses that spins have received, and then uses this knowledge to accurately estimate the CA concentration. The difference between the median of the estimated number of pulses and the true value was determined, as well as the interquartile range (IQR) of the estimations. The estimated CA concentrations were evaluated in the same way. The estimated number of pulses was also used to calculate flow velocity. The difference between the median estimated and reference number of pulses varied from -0.005 to -1.371 (corresponding IQRs: 0.853 and 48.377) at true values of 10 and 180 pulses, respectively. The difference between the median estimated CA concentration and the reference value varied from -0.00015 to 0.00306 mmol/L (corresponding IQRs: 0.01989 and 1.51013 mmol/L) at true values of 0.5 and 8.0 mmol/l, respectively, at an intermediate value of 100 pulses. The estimated flow velocities in the phantom were within 10% of the reference value. The proposed method accurately corrects the MRI signal affected by the inflow effect. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:1190-1196. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic

  15. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A simplified method of calculating heat flow through a two-phase heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohanis, Y.G. [Thermal Systems Engineering Group, Faculty of Engineering, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, Co Antrim, BT37 0QB Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: yg.yohanis@ulster.ac.uk; Popel, O.S. [Non-traditional Renewable Energy Sources, Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/19 Izhorskaya str., IVTAN, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Frid, S.E. [Non-traditional Renewable Energy Sources, Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/19 Izhorskaya str., IVTAN, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2005-10-01

    A simplified method of calculating the heat flow through a heat exchanger in which one or both heat carrying media are undergoing a phase change is proposed. It is based on enthalpies of the heat carrying media rather than their temperatures. The method enables the determination of the maximum rate of heat flow provided the thermodynamic properties of both heat-carrying media are known. There will be no requirement to separately simulate each part of the system or introduce boundaries within the heat exchanger if one or both heat-carrying media undergo a phase change. The model can be used at the pre-design stage, when the parameters of the heat exchangers may not be known, i.e., to carry out an assessment of a complex energy scheme such as a steam power plant. One such application of this model is in thermal simulation exercises within the TRNSYS modeling environment.

  17. A simplified method of calculating heat flow through a two-phase heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yohanis, Y.G.; Popel, O.S.; Frid, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    A simplified method of calculating the heat flow through a heat exchanger in which one or both heat carrying media are undergoing a phase change is proposed. It is based on enthalpies of the heat carrying media rather than their temperatures. The method enables the determination of the maximum rate of heat flow provided the thermodynamic properties of both heat-carrying media are known. There will be no requirement to separately simulate each part of the system or introduce boundaries within the heat exchanger if one or both heat-carrying media undergo a phase change. The model can be used at the pre-design stage, when the parameters of the heat exchangers may not be known, i.e., to carry out an assessment of a complex energy scheme such as a steam power plant. One such application of this model is in thermal simulation exercises within the TRNSYS modeling environment

  18. Synchrotron 4-dimensional imaging of two-phase flow through porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, F H; Penumadu, D; Patel, P; Xiao, X; Garboczi, E J; Moylan, S P; Donmez, M A

    2016-01-01

    Near real-time visualization of complex two-phase flow in a porous medium was demonstrated with dynamic 4-dimensional (4D) (3D + time) imaging at the 2-BM beam line of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Advancing fluid fronts through tortuous flow paths and their interactions with sand grains were clearly captured, and formations of air bubbles and capillary bridges were visualized. The intense X-ray photon flux of the synchrotron facility made 4D imaging possible, capturing the dynamic evolution of both solid and fluid phases. Computed Tomography (CT) scans were collected every 12 s with a pixel size of 3.25 µm. The experiment was carried out to improve understanding of the physics associated with two-phase flow. The results provide a source of validation data for numerical simulation codes such as Lattice-Boltzmann, which are used to model multi-phase flow through porous media.

  19. The study of sheath flow dark zone phenomenon in dynamic individual cells scattering measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Hong; Wang, Xiaopin; Zhang, Weiguang

    2008-09-01

    Dynamic cells scattering is one of the most efficient approaches exploring in measurements of cells size, morphology and growth states. This technique can be widely applied in real-time detection for pharmaceutical industry, food industry, liquor industry and other biological fields. A novel method named dynamic individual cells scattering measurement is designed in this paper, which can make cells pass through quartz glass measurement zone one by one with sheath flow driving force. During the experiments, an obvious phenomenon has been found which is called sheath flow dark zone phenomenon (SFDZ). Under the influence of SFDZ, sheath flow forming detection becomes very difficult. In this paper, the causes giving rise to SFDZ have been analyzed. And an improved method is put forward, in which the orifice inside the measurement zone is set as an optical system. Then the illuminating system is redesigned. In this way, almost all the illuminating light can enter orifice so that the total reflection energy decreases substantially. A comparison experiments have been done, which proves the efficiency of this redesigned optical system and its sound effects on SFDZ avoiding.

  20. Multiphase flow dynamics 1 fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2015-01-01

    In its fifth extended edition the successful monograph package “Multiphase Flow Dynamics” contains theory, methods and practical experience for describing complex transient multi-phase processes in arbitrary geometrical configurations, providing a systematic presentation of the theory and practice of numerical multi-phase fluid dynamics. In the present first volume the local volume and time averaging is used to derive a complete set of conservation equations for three fluids each of them having multi components as constituents. Large parts of the book are devoted on the design of successful numerical methods for solving the obtained system of partial differential equations. Finally the analysis is repeated for boundary fitted curvilinear coordinate systems designing methods applicable for interconnected multi-blocks. This fifth edition includes various updates, extensions, improvements and corrections, as well as  a completely new chapter containing the basic physics describing the multi-phase flow in tu...

  1. Pressure drop calculation using a one-dimensional mathematical model for two-phase flow through an orifice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkov, K.P.; Puton, M; Madsen, Søren Peder

    2014-01-01

    are accounted for through both friction and acceleration as in a conventional formulation. However, in this analysis the acceleration term is both attributed geometrical effects through the area change and fluid dynamic effects through the expansion of the two-phase flow. The comparison of numerical...... is a one dimensional formulation in space and the equations incorporates the change in tubes and orifice diameter as formulated in (S. Madsen et.al., Dynamic Modeling of Phase Crossings in Two-Phase Flow, Communications in Computational Physics 12 (4), 1129-1147). The pressure changes in the flow...

  2. Measurement of absolute myocardial blood flow in humans using dynamic cardiac SPECT and99mTc-tetrofosmin: Method and validation

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, U; Sciammarella, M; Alhassen, F; Yeghiazarians, Y; Ellin, J; Verdin, E; Boyle, A; Seo, Y; Botvinick, EH; Gullberg, GT

    2017-01-01

    © 2015, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology. Background: The objective of this study was to measure myocardial blood flow (MBF) in humans using 99m Tc-tetrofosmin and dynamic single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods: Dynamic SPECT using 99m Tc-tetrofosmin and dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on a group of 16 patients. The SPECT data were reconstructed using a 4D-spatiotemporal iterative reconstruction method. The data corresponding to 9 patients w...

  3. Experimental research on intraocular aqueous flow by PIV method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongyu; Song, Hongfang; Mei, Xi; Li, Lin; Fu, Xineng; Zhang, Mindi; Liu, Zhicheng

    2013-10-21

    Aqueous humor flows regularly from posterior chamber to anterior chamber, and this flow much involves intraocular pressure, the eye tissue nutrition and metabolism. To visualize and measure the intraocular flow regular pattern of aqueous humor. Intraocular flow in the vitro eyeball is driven to simulate the physiological aqueous humor flow, and the flow field is measured by Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV). Fluorescent particle solution of a certain concentration was infused into the root of Posterior Chamber(PC) of vitro rabbit eye to simulate the generation of aqueous and was drained out at a certain hydrostatic pressure from the angle of Anterior Chamber(AC) to represent the drainage of aqueous. PIV method was used to record and calculate the flow on the midsagittal plane of the eyeball. Velocity vector distribution in AC has been obtained, and the distribution shows symmetry feature to some extent. Fluorescent particle solution first fills the PC as it is continuously infused, then surges into AC through the pupil, flows upwards toward the central cornea, reflecting and scattering, and eventually converges along the inner cornea surface towards the outflow points at the periphery of the eyeball. Velocity values around the pupillary margin are within the range of 0.008-0.012 m/s, which are close to theoretical values of 0.0133 m/s, under the driving rate of 100 μl/min. Flow field of aqueous humor can be measured by PIV method, which makes it possible to study the aqueous humor dynamics by experimental method. Our study provides a basis for experimental research on aqueous humor flow; further, it possibly helps to diagnose and treat eye diseases as shear force damage of ocular tissues and destructions on corneal endothelial cells from the point of intraocular flow field.

  4. Multiphase Flow Dynamics 5 Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2012-01-01

    The present Volume 5 of the successful book package "Multiphase Flow Dynamics" is devoted to nuclear thermal hydraulics which is a substantial part of nuclear reactor safety. It provides knowledge and mathematical tools for adequate description of the process of transferring the fission heat released in materials due to nuclear reactions into its environment. It step by step introduces into the heat release inside the fuel, temperature fields in the fuels, the "simple" boiling flow in a pipe described using ideas of different complexity like equilibrium, non equilibrium, homogeneity, non homogeneity. Then the "simple" three-fluid boiling flow in a pipe is described by gradually involving the mechanisms like entrainment and deposition, dynamic fragmentation, collisions, coalescence, turbulence. All heat transfer mechanisms are introduced gradually discussing their uncertainty. Different techniques are introduced like boundary layer treatments or integral methods. Comparisons with experimental data at each step...

  5. Multiphase flow dynamics 5 nuclear thermal hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2015-01-01

    This Volume 5 of the successful book package "Multiphase Flow Dynamics" is devoted to nuclear thermal hydraulics which is a substantial part of nuclear reactor safety. It provides knowledge and mathematical tools for adequate description of the process of transferring the fission heat released in materials due to nuclear reactions into its environment. It step by step introduces into the heat release inside the fuel, temperature fields in the fuels, the "simple" boiling flow in a pipe described using ideas of different complexity like equilibrium, non equilibrium, homogeneity, non homogeneity. Then the "simple" three-fluid boiling flow in a pipe is described by gradually involving the mechanisms like entrainment and deposition, dynamic fragmentation, collisions, coalescence, turbulence. All heat transfer mechanisms are introduced gradually discussing their uncertainty. Different techniques are introduced like boundary layer treatments or integral methods. Comparisons with experimental data at each step demons...

  6. Flow Dynamics of green sand in the DISAMATIC moulding process using Discrete element method (DEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovad, E; Walther, J H; Thorborg, J; Hattel, J H; Larsen, P

    2015-01-01

    The DISAMATIC casting process production of sand moulds is simulated with DEM (discrete element method). The main purpose is to simulate the dynamics of the flow of green sand, during the production of the sand mould with DEM. The sand shot is simulated, which is the first stage of the DISAMATIC casting process. Depending on the actual casting geometry the mould can be geometrically quite complex involving e.g. shadowing effects and this is directly reflected in the sand flow during the moulding process. In the present work a mould chamber with “ribs” at the walls is chosen as a baseline geometry to emulate some of these important conditions found in the real moulding process. The sand flow is simulated with the DEM and compared with corresponding video footages from the interior of the chamber during the moulding process. The effect of the rolling resistance and the static friction coefficient is analysed and discussed in relation to the experimental findings. (paper)

  7. Theoretical Study on the Dynamic Behavior of Pipes Conveying Gas-Liquid Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Ortiz-Vidal L.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behavior of clamped-clamped straight pipes conveying gas-liquid two-phase flow is theoretically investigated, specifically the effect of the flow parameters on the frequency of the system. First, the equation of motion is derived based on the classic Païdoussis formulation. Assuming Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, small-deflection approximation and no-slip homogeneous model, a coupled fluid-structure fourth-order partial differential equation (PDE is obtained. Then, the equation of motion is rendered dimensionless and discretized through Galerkin’s method. That method transforms the PDE into a set of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs. The system frequency is obtained by solving the system of ODEs by allowing the determinant to be equal to zero. System frequencies for different geometries, structural properties and flow conditions have been calculated. The results show that the system frequency decreases with increasing two-phase flow velocity. By contrast, the former increases with increasing homogeneous void fraction. These theoretical results are in agreement with experimental findings reported in the literature. Furthermore, even for typical two phase flow conditions, the system can become unstable for inadequate chooses of geometry or material of the pipe.

  8. ON THE ANALYSIS OF IMPEDANCE-DRIVEN REVERSE FLOW DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEE V. C.-C.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Impedance pump is a simple valve-less pumping mechanism, where an elastic tube is joined to a more rigid tube, at both ends. By inducing a periodic asymmetrical compression on the elastic tube will produce a unidirectional flow within the system. This pumping concept offers a low energy, low noise alternative, which makes it an effective driving mechanism, especially for micro-fluidic systems. In addition, the wave-based mechanism through which pumping occurs infers many benefits in terms of simplicity of design and manufacturing. Adjustment of simple parameters such as the excitation frequencies or compression locations will reverse the direction of flow, providing a very versatile range of flow outputs. This paper describes the experimental analysis of such impedance-driven flow with emphasis on the dynamical study of the reverse flow in open-loop environment. In this study, tapered section with converging steps is introduced at both ends of the elastic tube to amplify the magnitude of reverse flow. Study conducted shows that the reverse peak flow is rather significant with estimate of 23% lower than the forward peak flow. The flow dynamics on the other hand has shown to exhibit different characteristics as per the forward peak flow. The flow characteristics is then studied and showed that the tapered sections altered the impedance within the system and hence induce a higher flow in the reverse direction.

  9. Dynamic ADMM for Real-time Optimal Power Flow: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall-Anese, Emiliano [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-23

    This paper considers distribution networks featuring distributed energy resources (DERs), and develops a dynamic optimization method to maximize given operational objectives in real time while adhering to relevant network constraints. The design of the dynamic algorithm is based on suitable linearizations of the AC power flow equations, and it leverages the so-called alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). The steps of the ADMM, however, are suitably modified to accommodate appropriate measurements from the distribution network and the DERs. With the aid of these measurements, the resultant algorithm can enforce given operational constraints in spite of inaccuracies in the representation of the AC power flows, and it avoids ubiquitous metering to gather the state of non-controllable resources. Optimality and convergence of the propose algorithm are established in terms of tracking of the solution of a convex surrogate of the AC optimal power flow problem.

  10. Quantifying Compressibility and Slip in Multiparticle Collision (MPC Flow Through a Local Constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmina Akhter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow of a compressible fluid with slip through a cylinder with an asymmetric local constriction has been considered both numerically, as well as analytically. For the numerical work, a particle-based method whose dynamics is governed by the multiparticle collision (MPC rule has been used together with a generalized boundary condition that allows for slip at the wall. Since it is well known that an MPC system corresponds to an ideal gas and behaves like a compressible, viscous flow on average, an approximate analytical solution has been derived from the compressible Navier–Stokes equations of motion coupled to an ideal gas equation of state using the Karman–Pohlhausen method. The constriction is assumed to have a polynomial form, and the location of maximum constriction is varied throughout the constricted portion of the cylinder. Results for centerline densities and centerline velocities have been compared for various Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers, wall slip values and flow geometries.

  11. Online traffic flow model applying dynamic flow-density relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation describes a new approach of the online traffic flow modelling based on the hydrodynamic traffic flow model and an online process to adapt the flow-density relation dynamically. The new modelling approach was tested based on the real traffic situations in various homogeneous motorway sections and a motorway section with ramps and gave encouraging simulation results. This work is composed of two parts: first the analysis of traffic flow characteristics and second the development of a new online traffic flow model applying these characteristics. For homogeneous motorway sections traffic flow is classified into six different traffic states with different characteristics. Delimitation criteria were developed to separate these states. The hysteresis phenomena were analysed during the transitions between these traffic states. The traffic states and the transitions are represented on a states diagram with the flow axis and the density axis. For motorway sections with ramps the complicated traffic flow is simplified and classified into three traffic states depending on the propagation of congestion. The traffic states are represented on a phase diagram with the upstream demand axis and the interaction strength axis which was defined in this research. The states diagram and the phase diagram provide a basis for the development of the dynamic flow-density relation. The first-order hydrodynamic traffic flow model was programmed according to the cell-transmission scheme extended by the modification of flow dependent sending/receiving functions, the classification of cells and the determination strategy for the flow-density relation in the cells. The unreasonable results of macroscopic traffic flow models, which may occur in the first and last cells in certain conditions are alleviated by applying buffer cells between the traffic data and the model. The sending/receiving functions of the cells are determined dynamically based on the classification of the

  12. Lattice Boltzmann simulations for wall-flow dynamics in porous ceramic diesel particulate filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da Young; Lee, Gi Wook; Yoon, Kyu; Chun, Byoungjin; Jung, Hyun Wook

    2018-01-01

    Flows through porous filter walls of wall-flow diesel particulate filter are investigated using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The microscopic model of the realistic filter wall is represented by randomly overlapped arrays of solid spheres. The LB simulation results are first validated by comparison to those from previous hydrodynamic theories and constitutive models for flows in porous media with simple regular and random solid-wall configurations. We demonstrate that the newly designed randomly overlapped array structures of porous walls allow reliable and accurate simulations for the porous wall-flow dynamics in a wide range of solid volume fractions from 0.01 to about 0.8, which is beyond the maximum random packing limit of 0.625. The permeable performance of porous media is scrutinized by changing the solid volume fraction and particle Reynolds number using Darcy's law and Forchheimer's extension in the laminar flow region.

  13. Multiphase Flow Dynamics 1 Fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2012-01-01

    Multi-phase flows are part of our natural environment such as tornadoes, typhoons, air and water pollution and volcanic activities as well as part of industrial technology such as power plants, combustion engines, propulsion systems, or chemical and biological industry. The industrial use of multi-phase systems requires analytical and numerical strategies for predicting their behavior. In its fourth extended edition the successful monograph package “Multiphase Flow Dynmics” contains theory, methods and practical experience for describing complex transient multi-phase processes in arbitrary geometrical configurations, providing a systematic presentation of the theory and practice of numerical multi-phase fluid dynamics. In the present first volume the local volume and time averaging is used to derive a complete set of conservation equations for three fluids each of them having multi components as constituents. Large parts of the book are devoted on the design of successful numerical methods for solving the...

  14. Progress in lattice Boltzmann methods for magnetohydrodynamic flows relevant to fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattison, M.J.; Premnath, K.N.; Morley, N.B.; Abdou, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, an approach to simulating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is presented. The dynamics of the flow are simulated using a so-called multiple relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE), in which a source term is included for the Lorentz force. The evolution of the magnetic induction is represented by introducing a vector distribution function and then solving an appropriate lattice kinetic equation for this function. The solution of both distribution functions are obtained through a simple, explicit, and computationally efficient stream-and-collide procedure. The use of the MRT collision term enhances the numerical stability over that of a single relaxation time approach. To apply the methodology to solving practical problems, a new extrapolation-based method for imposing magnetic boundary conditions is introduced and a technique for simulating steady-state flows with low magnetic Prandtl number is developed. In order to resolve thin layers near the walls arising in the presence of high magnetic fields, a non-uniform gridding strategy is introduced through an interpolated-streaming step applied to both distribution functions. These advances are particularly important for applications in fusion engineering where liquid metal flows with low magnetic Prandtl numbers and high Hartmann numbers are introduced. A number of MHD benchmark problems, under various physical and geometrical conditions are presented, including 3-D MHD lid driven cavity flow, high Hartmann number flows and turbulent MHD flows, with good agreement with prior data. Due to the local nature of the method, the LBM also demonstrated excellent performance on parallel machines, with almost linear scaling up to 128 processors for a MHD flow problem

  15. Comparative study of incompressible and isothermal compressible flow solvers for cavitating flow dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun Ho [Korea Maritime and Ocean University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Shin Hyung [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Incompressible flow solvers are generally used for numerical analysis of cavitating flows, but with limitations in handling compressibility effects on vapor phase. To study compressibility effects on vapor phase and cavity interface, pressure-based incompressible and isothermal compressible flow solvers based on a cell-centered finite volume method were developed using the OpenFOAM libraries. To validate the solvers, cavitating flow around a hemispherical head-form body was simulated and validated against the experimental data. The cavity shedding behavior, length of a re-entrant jet, drag history, and the Strouhal number were compared between the two solvers. The results confirmed that computations of the cavitating flow including compressibility effects improved the reproduction of cavitation dynamics.

  16. Large eddy simulation of the flow through a swirl generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Stephen

    1998-12-01

    The advances made in computer technology over recent years have led to a great increase in the engineering problems that can be studied using CFD. The computation of flows over and through complex geometries at relatively high Reynolds numbers is becoming more common using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique. Direct numerical simulations of such flows is still beyond the capacity of todays fastest supercomputers, requiring excessive computational times and memory. In addition, traditional Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) methods are known to have limited applicability in a wide range of engineering flow situations. In this thesis LES has been used to simulate the flow through a cascade of guidance vanes, more commonly known as a swirl generator, positioned at the inlet to a gas turbine combustion chamber. This flow case is of interest because of the complex flow phenomena which occur within the swirl generator, which include compressibility effects, different types of flow instabilities, transition, laminar and turbulent separation and near wall turbulence. It is also of interest because it fits very well into the range of engineering applications that can be studied using LES. Two computational grids with different resolutions and two subgrid scale stress models were used in the study. The effects of separation and transition are investigated. A vortex shedding frequency from the guidance vanes is determined which is seen to be dependent on the angle of incident air flow. Interaction between the movement of the separation region and the shedding frequency is also noted. Such vortex shedding phenomena can directly affect the quality of fuel and air mixing within the combustion chamber and can in some cases induce vibrations in the gas turbine structure. Comparisons between the results obtained using different grid resolutions with an implicit and a dynamic divergence (DDM) subgrid scale stress models are also made 32 refs, 35 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Dynamic modeling of renal blood flow in Dahl hypertensive and normotensive rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben; Elmer, Henrik; Knudsen, Morten H

    2004-01-01

    A method is proposed in this paper which allows characterization of renal autoregulatory dynamics and efficiency using quantitative mathematical methods. Based on data from rat experiments, where arterial blood pressure and renal blood flow are measured, a quantitative model for renal blood flow...

  18. Application of system reliability analytical method, GO-FLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Fukuto, Junji; Mitomo, Nobuo; Miyazaki, Keiko; Matsukura, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Michiyuki

    1999-01-01

    The Ship Research Institute proceed a developmental study on GO-FLOW method with various advancing functionalities for the system reliability analysis method occupying main parts of PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment). Here was attempted to intend to upgrade functionality of the GO-FLOW method, to develop an analytical function integrated with dynamic behavior analytical function, physical behavior and probable subject transfer, and to prepare a main accident sequence picking-out function. In 1997 fiscal year, in dynamic event-tree analytical system, an analytical function was developed by adding dependency between headings. In simulation analytical function of the accident sequence, main accident sequence of MRX for improved ship propulsion reactor became possible to be covered perfectly. And, input data for analysis was prepared with a function capable easily to set by an analysis operator. (G.K.)

  19. Comparative study of the discrete velocity and lattice Boltzmann methods for rarefied gas flows through irregular channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Lindsay, Scott; Liu, Haihu; Wu, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Rooted from the gas kinetics, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a powerful tool in modeling hydrodynamics. In the past decade, it has been extended to simulate rarefied gas flows beyond the Navier-Stokes level, either by using the high-order Gauss-Hermite quadrature, or by introducing the relaxation time that is a function of the gas-wall distance. While the former method, with a limited number of discrete velocities (e.g., D2Q36), is accurate up to the early transition flow regime, the latter method (especially the multiple relaxation time (MRT) LBM), with the same discrete velocities as those used in simulating hydrodynamics (i.e., D2Q9), is accurate up to the free-molecular flow regime in the planar Poiseuille flow. This is quite astonishing in the sense that less discrete velocities are more accurate. In this paper, by solving the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook kinetic equation accurately via the discrete velocity method, we find that the high-order Gauss-Hermite quadrature cannot describe the large variation in the velocity distribution function when the rarefaction effect is strong, but the MRT-LBM can capture the flow velocity well because it is equivalent to solving the Navier-Stokes equations with an effective shear viscosity. Since the MRT-LBM has only been validated in simple channel flows, and for complex geometries it is difficult to find the effective viscosity, it is necessary to assess its performance for the simulation of rarefied gas flows. Our numerical simulations based on the accurate discrete velocity method suggest that the accuracy of the MRT-LBM is reduced significantly in the simulation of rarefied gas flows through the rough surface and porous media. Our simulation results could serve as benchmarking cases for future development of the LBM for modeling and simulation of rarefied gas flows in complex geometries.

  20. Comparative study of the discrete velocity and lattice Boltzmann methods for rarefied gas flows through irregular channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Lindsay, Scott; Liu, Haihu; Wu, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Rooted from the gas kinetics, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a powerful tool in modeling hydrodynamics. In the past decade, it has been extended to simulate rarefied gas flows beyond the Navier-Stokes level, either by using the high-order Gauss-Hermite quadrature, or by introducing the relaxation time that is a function of the gas-wall distance. While the former method, with a limited number of discrete velocities (e.g., D2Q36), is accurate up to the early transition flow regime, the latter method (especially the multiple relaxation time (MRT) LBM), with the same discrete velocities as those used in simulating hydrodynamics (i.e., D2Q9), is accurate up to the free-molecular flow regime in the planar Poiseuille flow. This is quite astonishing in the sense that less discrete velocities are more accurate. In this paper, by solving the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook kinetic equation accurately via the discrete velocity method, we find that the high-order Gauss-Hermite quadrature cannot describe the large variation in the velocity distribution function when the rarefaction effect is strong, but the MRT-LBM can capture the flow velocity well because it is equivalent to solving the Navier-Stokes equations with an effective shear viscosity. Since the MRT-LBM has only been validated in simple channel flows, and for complex geometries it is difficult to find the effective viscosity, it is necessary to assess its performance for the simulation of rarefied gas flows. Our numerical simulations based on the accurate discrete velocity method suggest that the accuracy of the MRT-LBM is reduced significantly in the simulation of rarefied gas flows through the rough surface and porous media. Our simulation results could serve as benchmarking cases for future development of the LBM for modeling and simulation of rarefied gas flows in complex geometries.

  1. Simulation-Based Dynamic Passenger Flow Assignment Modelling for a Schedule-Based Transit Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangming Yao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The online operation management and the offline policy evaluation in complex transit networks require an effective dynamic traffic assignment (DTA method that can capture the temporal-spatial nature of traffic flows. The objective of this work is to propose a simulation-based dynamic passenger assignment framework and models for such applications in the context of schedule-based rail transit systems. In the simulation framework, travellers are regarded as individual agents who are able to obtain complete information on the current traffic conditions. A combined route selection model integrated with pretrip route selection and entrip route switch is established for achieving the dynamic network flow equilibrium status. The train agent is operated strictly with the timetable and its capacity limitation is considered. A continuous time-driven simulator based on the proposed framework and models is developed, whose performance is illustrated through a large-scale network of Beijing subway. The results indicate that more than 0.8 million individual passengers and thousands of trains can be simulated simultaneously at a speed ten times faster than real time. This study provides an efficient approach to analyze the dynamic demand-supply relationship for large schedule-based transit networks.

  2. Separation Dynamics of Controlled Internal Flow in an Adverse Pressure Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, C. J.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    2017-11-01

    The effects of fluidic actuation on the dynamic evolution of aggressive internal flow separation is investigated at speeds up to M = 0.4 within a constant-width diffuser branching off of a primary flow duct. It is shown that a spanwise array of fluidic actuators upstream of the separation actively controls the flow constriction (and losses) within the diffuser and consequently the local pressure gradient at its entrance. The effectiveness of the actuation, as may be measured by the increased flow rate that is diverted through the diffuser, scales with its flow rate coefficient. In the presence of actuation (0.7% mass fraction), the mass flow rate in the primary duct increases by 10% while the fraction of the diverted mass flow rate in the diffuser increases by more than 45%. The flow dynamics near separation in the absence and presence of actuation are characterized using high speed particle image velocimetry and analyzed using proper orthogonal and spectral decompositions. In particular, the spectral contents of the incipient boundary layer separation are compared in the absence and presence of actuation with emphasis on the changes in local dynamics near separation as the characteristic cross stream scale of the boundary layer increases with separation delay.

  3. Aortic blood flow subtraction: an alternative method for measuring total renal blood flow in conscious dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandgaard, N C F; Andersen, J L; Holstein-Rathlou, N-H

    2002-01-01

    We have measured total renal blood flow (TRBF) as the difference between signals from ultrasound flow probes implanted around the aorta above and below the renal arteries. The repeatability of the method was investigated by repeated, continuous infusions of angiotensin II and endothelin-1 seven...... arterial blood pressure by 49% and decreased TRBF by 12%, providing an increase in renal vascular resistance of 69%. Dynamic analysis showed autoregulation of renal blood flow in the frequency range ... of TRBF by aortic blood flow subtraction is a practical and reliable method that allows direct comparison of excretory function and renal blood flow from two kidneys. The method also allows direct comparison between TRBF and flow in the caudal aorta....

  4. Simulation of unsteady flows through stator and rotor blades of a gas turbine using the Chimera method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, S.; Scott, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    A two-dimensional model to solve compressible Navier-Stokes equations for the flow through stator and rotor blades of a turbine is developed. The flow domains for the stator and rotor blades are coupled by the Chimera method that makes grid generation easy and enhances accuracy because the area of the grid that have high turning of grid lines or high skewness can be eliminated from the computational domain after the grids are generated. The results of flow computations show various important features of unsteady flows including the acoustic waves interacting with boundary layers, Karman vortex shedding from the trailing edge of the stator blades, pulsating incoming flow to a rotor blade from passing stator blades, and flow separation from both suction and pressure sides of the rotor blades.

  5. Validation of the flow-through chamber (FTC and steady-state (SS methods for clearance rate measurements in bivalves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poul S. Larsen

    2011-09-01

    To obtain precise and reliable laboratory clearance rate (filtration rate measurements with the ‘flow-through chamber method’ (FTC the design must ensure that only inflow water reaches the bivalve's inhalant aperture and that exit flow is fully mixed. As earlier recommended these prerequisites can be checked by a plot of clearance rate (CR versus increasing through-flow (Fl to reach a plateau, which is the true CR, but we also recommend to plot percent particles cleared versus reciprocal through-flow where the plateau becomes the straight line CR/Fl, and we emphasize that the percent of particles cleared is in itself neither a criterion for valid CR measurement, nor an indicator of appropriate ‘chamber geometry’ as hitherto adapted in many studies. For the ‘steady-state method’ (SS, the design must ensure that inflow water becomes fully mixed with the bivalve's excurrent flow to establish a uniform chamber concentration prevailing at its incurrent flow and at the chamber outlet. These prerequisites can be checked by a plot of CR versus increasing Fl, which should give the true CR at all through-flows. Theoretically, the experimental uncertainty of CR for a given accuracy of concentration measurements depends on the percent reduction in particle concentration (100×P from inlet to outlet of the ideal ‘chamber geomety’. For FTC, it decreases with increasing values of P while for SS it first decreases but then increases again, suggesting the use of an intermediate value of P. In practice, the optimal value of P may depend on the given ‘chamber geometry’. The fundamental differences between the FTC and the SS methods and practical guidelines for their use are pointed out, and new data on CR for the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, illustrate a design and use of the SS method which may be employed in e.g. long-term growth experiments at constant algal concentrations.

  6. A numerical method to calculate flow-induced vibrations in a turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadaoka, Noriyuki; Umegaki, Kikuo

    1993-01-01

    An unsteady fluid force on structures in a turbulent flow can cause their vibration. The phenomenon is the most important among various flow-induced vibrations and it is an important subject in design nuclear plant components such as heat exchangers. A new approach to simulate flow-induced vibrations is introduced. A fully coupled analysis of fluid-structure interaction has been realized in a turbulent flow field by integrating the following calculational steps: (a) solving turbulent flow by a direct simulation method where the ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian) type approximation is adopted to take account of structure displacements; (b) estimating fluid force on structures by integrating fluid pressure and shear stress; (c) calculating dynamic response of structures and determining the amount of displacement; (d) regenerate curvilinear grids for new geometry using the boundary-fitted coordinate transformation method. Forced vibration of a circular cylinder in a cross flow were successfully simulated and the synchronization phenomena between Karman-vortices and cylinder vibrations were clearly seen

  7. Zonal methods and computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atta, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in developing numerical algorithms for solving fluid flow problems, and the continuing improvement in the speed and storage of large scale computers have made it feasible to compute the flow field about complex and realistic configurations. Current solution methods involve the use of a hierarchy of mathematical models ranging from the linearized potential equation to the Navier Stokes equations. Because of the increasing complexity of both the geometries and flowfields encountered in practical fluid flow simulation, there is a growing emphasis in computational fluid dynamics on the use of zonal methods. A zonal method is one that subdivides the total flow region into interconnected smaller regions or zones. The flow solutions in these zones are then patched together to establish the global flow field solution. Zonal methods are primarily used either to limit the complexity of the governing flow equations to a localized region or to alleviate the grid generation problems about geometrically complex and multicomponent configurations. This paper surveys the application of zonal methods for solving the flow field about two and three-dimensional configurations. Various factors affecting their accuracy and ease of implementation are also discussed. From the presented review it is concluded that zonal methods promise to be very effective for computing complex flowfields and configurations. Currently there are increasing efforts to improve their efficiency, versatility, and accuracy

  8. Measurement of absolute myocardial blood flow in humans using dynamic cardiac SPECT and 99mTc-tetrofosmin: Method and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Uttam; Sciammarella, Maria; Alhassen, Fares; Yeghiazarians, Yerem; Ellin, Justin; Verdin, Emily; Boyle, Andrew; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H; Gullberg, Grant T

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to measure myocardial blood flow (MBF) in humans using 99m Tc-tetrofosmin and dynamic single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Dynamic SPECT using 99m Tc-tetrofosmin and dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on a group of 16 patients. The SPECT data were reconstructed using a 4D-spatiotemporal iterative reconstruction method. The data corresponding to 9 patients were used to determine the flow-extraction curve for 99m Tc-tefrofosmin while data from the remaining 7 patients were used for method validation. The nonlinear tracer correction parameters A and B for 99m Tc-tefrofosmin were estimated for the 9 patients by fitting the flow-extraction curve [Formula: see text] for K 1 values estimated with 99m Tc-tefrofosmin using SPECT and MBF values estimated with 13 N-NH 3 using PET. These parameters were then used to calculate MBF and coronary flow reserve (CFR) in three coronary territories (LAD, RCA, and LCX) using SPECT for an independent cohort of 7 patients. The results were then compared with that estimated with 13 N-NH 3 PET. The flow-dependent permeability surface-area product (PS) for 99m Tc-tefrofosmin was also estimated. The estimated flow-extraction parameters for 99m Tc-tefrofosmin were found to be A = 0.91 ± 0.11, B = 0.34 ± 0.20 (R 2  = 0.49). The range of MBF in LAD, RCA, and LCX was 0.44-3.81 mL/min/g. The MBF between PET and SPECT in the group of independent cohort of 7 patients showed statistically significant correlation, r = 0.71 (P < .001). However, the corresponding CFR correlation was moderate r = 0.39 yet statistically significant (P = .037). The PS for 99m Tc-tefrofosmin was (0.019 ± 0.10)*MBF + (0.32 ± 0.16). Dynamic cardiac SPECT using 99m Tc-tetrofosmin and a clinical two-headed SPECT/CT scanner can be a useful tool for estimation of MBF.

  9. Dynamics of water absorption through superabsorbent polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sooyoung; Kim, Wonjung

    2017-11-01

    Superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) consist of hydrophilic cross-linked polymer networks that can absorb and retain a great amount of water relative to their own mass, so that they are widely used for disposable diapers and holding soil moisture in agriculture. SAPs are typically available in the form of submillimeter-sized particles, and the water absorption is driven by capillary flows between particles as well as diffusion that entail swelling. Although the control of water absorption of SAPs is important in engineering applications, but the dynamics of water absorption in SAP particles has not been fully understood. We examine the dynamics of the water absorption of sodium polyacrylate, one of the most common SAP. We experimentally measured the water absorption of sodium polyacrylate particles in one-dimensional confined channel. The water flows through the particles were analyzed by capillarity dominant at the early stage and by diffusion involving volume expansion critical at a later stage. The results provide a quantitative basis of the hydrodynamic analysis of the water flow through SAP particles from a macroscopic point of view, facilitating the prediction of water uptake of SAPs in hygienic and agricultural applications. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No.2015R1A2A2A04006181).

  10. Information flow dynamics in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Afraimovich, Valentin S.; Bick, Christian; Varona, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    Timing and dynamics of information in the brain is a hot field in modern neuroscience. The analysis of the temporal evolution of brain information is crucially important for the understanding of higher cognitive mechanisms in normal and pathological states. From the perspective of information dynamics, in this review we discuss working memory capacity, language dynamics, goal-dependent behavior programming and other functions of brain activity. In contrast with the classical description of information theory, which is mostly algebraic, brain flow information dynamics deals with problems such as the stability/instability of information flows, their quality, the timing of sequential processing, the top-down cognitive control of perceptual information, and information creation. In this framework, different types of information flow instabilities correspond to different cognitive disorders. On the other hand, the robustness of cognitive activity is related to the control of the information flow stability. We discuss these problems using both experimental and theoretical approaches, and we argue that brain activity is better understood considering information flows in the phase space of the corresponding dynamical model. In particular, we show how theory helps to understand intriguing experimental results in this matter, and how recent knowledge inspires new theoretical formalisms that can be tested with modern experimental techniques.

  11. Well balanced finite volume methods for nearly hydrostatic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botta, N.; Klein, R.; Langenberg, S.; Luetzenkirchen, S.

    2004-01-01

    In numerical approximations of nearly hydrostatic flows, a proper representation of the dominant hydrostatic balance is of crucial importance: unbalanced truncation errors can induce unacceptable spurious motions, e.g., in dynamical cores of models for numerical weather prediction (NWP) in particular near steep topography. In this paper we develop a new strategy for the construction of discretizations that are 'well-balanced' with respect to dominant hydrostatics. The classical idea of formulating the momentum balance in terms of deviations of pressure from a balanced background distribution is realized here through local, time dependent hydrostatic reconstructions. Balanced discretizations of the pressure gradient and of the gravitation source term are achieved through a 'discrete Archimedes' buoyancy principle'. This strategy is applied to extend an explicit standard finite volume Godunov-type scheme for compressible flows with minimal modifications. The resulting method has the following features: (i) It inherits its conservation properties from the underlying base scheme. (ii) It is exactly balanced, even on curvilinear grids, for a large class of near-hydrostatic flows. (iii) It solves the full compressible flow equations without reference to a background state that is defined for an entire vertical column of air. (iv) It is robust with respect to details of the implementation, such as the choice of slope limiting functions, or the particularities of boundary condition discretizations

  12. Decay correction methods in dynamic PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.; Reiman, E.; Lawson, M.

    1995-01-01

    In order to reconstruct positron emission tomography (PET) images in quantitative dynamic studies, the data must be corrected for radioactive decay. One of the two commonly used methods ignores physiological processes including blood flow that occur at the same time as radioactive decay; the other makes incorrect use of time-accumulated PET counts. In simulated dynamic PET studies using 11 C-acetate and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), these methods are shown to result in biased estimates of the time-activity curve (TAC) and model parameters. New methods described in this article provide significantly improved parameter estimates in dynamic PET studies

  13. A Newton--Galerkin Method for Fluid Flow Exhibiting Uncertain Periodic Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Schick, M.; Heuveline, V.; Le Ma, O. P.

    2014-01-01

    The determination of stable limit-cycles plays an important role in quantifying the characteristics of dynamical systems. In practice, exact knowledge of model parameters is rarely available leading to parameter uncertainties, which can be modeled as an input of random variables. This has the effect that the limit-cycles become stochastic themselves, resulting in almost surely time-periodic solutions with a stochastic period. In this paper we introduce a novel numerical method for the computation of stable stochastic limit-cycles based on the spectral stochastic finite element method using polynomial chaos (PC). We are able to overcome the difficulties of PC regarding its well-known convergence breakdown for long term integration. To this end, we introduce a stochastic time scaling which treats the stochastic period as an additional random variable and controls the phase-drift of the stochastic trajectories, keeping the necessary PC order low. Based on the rescaled governing equations, we aim at determining an initial condition and a period such that the trajectories close after completion of one stochastic cycle. Furthermore, we verify the numerical method by computation of a vortex shedding of a flow around a circular domain with stochastic inflow boundary conditions as a benchmark problem. The results are verified by comparison to purely deterministic reference problems and demonstrate high accuracy up to machine precision in capturing the stochastic variations of the limit-cycle.

  14. Multiphase flow dynamics 1 fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2004-01-01

    Multi-phase flows are part of our natural environment such as tornadoes, typhoons, air and water pollution and volcanic activities as well as part of industrial technology such as power plants, combustion engines, propulsion systems, or chemical and biological industry. The industrial use of multi-phase systems requires analytical and numerical strategies for predicting their behavior. In its third extended edition this monograph contains theory, methods and practical experience for describing complex transient multi-phase processes in arbitrary geometrical configurations, providing a systematic presentation of the theory and practice of numerical multi-phase fluid dynamics. In the present first volume the fundamentals of multiphase dynamics are provided. This third edition includes various updates, extensions and improvements in all book chapters.

  15. Dynamics and rheology under continuous shear flow studied by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluerasu, Andrei [Brookhaven National Laboratory, NSLS-II, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Kwasniewski, Pawel; Caronna, Chiara; Madsen, Anders [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, ID10 (Troika), Grenoble 38043 (France); Destremaut, Fanny; Salmon, Jean-Baptiste [LOF, UMR 5258 CNRS-Rhodia Bordeaux 1, 33608 Pessac (France)], E-mail: fluerasu@bnl.gov

    2010-03-15

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) has emerged as a unique technique allowing the measurement of dynamics of materials on mesoscopic lengthscales. One of the most common problems associated with the use of bright x-ray beams is beam-induced radiation damage, and this is likely to become an even more limiting factor at future synchrotron and free-electron laser sources. Flowing the sample during data acquisition is one of the simplest methods allowing the radiation damage to be limited. In addition to distributing the dose over many different scatterers, the method also enables new functionalities such as time-resolved studies. Here, we further develop a recently proposed experimental technique that combines XPCS and continuously flowing samples. More specifically, we use a model colloidal suspension to show how the macroscopic advective response to flow and the microscopic dissipative dynamics (diffusion) can be quantified from the x-ray data. Our results show very good quantitative agreement with a Poisseuille-flow hydrodynamical model combined with Brownian mechanics. The method has many potential applications, e.g. in the study of dynamics of glasses and gels under continuous shear/flow, protein aggregation processes and the interplay between dynamics and rheology in complex fluids.

  16. An Analysis of Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Cognitive Structures through Flow Map Method: The Subject of Oxidation and Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Senar

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to analyse prospective chemistry teachers' cognitive structures related to the subject of oxidation and reduction through a flow map method. Purposeful sampling method was employed in this study, and 8 prospective chemistry teachers from a group of students who had taken general chemistry and analytical chemistry courses were…

  17. Lattice fluid dynamics from perfect discretizations of continuum flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, E.; Wiese, U.

    1998-01-01

    We use renormalization group methods to derive equations of motion for large scale variables in fluid dynamics. The large scale variables are averages of the underlying continuum variables over cubic volumes and naturally exist on a lattice. The resulting lattice dynamics represents a perfect discretization of continuum physics, i.e., grid artifacts are completely eliminated. Perfect equations of motion are derived for static, slow flows of incompressible, viscous fluids. For Hagen-Poiseuille flow in a channel with a square cross section the equations reduce to a perfect discretization of the Poisson equation for the velocity field with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The perfect large scale Poisson equation is used in a numerical simulation and is shown to represent the continuum flow exactly. For nonsquare cross sections one can use a numerical iterative procedure to derive flow equations that are approximately perfect. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  18. Symplectic Integrators to Stochastic Hamiltonian Dynamical Systems Derived from Composition Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Misawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available “Symplectic” schemes for stochastic Hamiltonian dynamical systems are formulated through “composition methods (or operator splitting methods” proposed by Misawa (2001. In the proposed methods, a symplectic map, which is given by the solution of a stochastic Hamiltonian system, is approximated by composition of the stochastic flows derived from simpler Hamiltonian vector fields. The global error orders of the numerical schemes derived from the stochastic composition methods are provided. To examine the superiority of the new schemes, some illustrative numerical simulations on the basis of the proposed schemes are carried out for a stochastic harmonic oscillator system.

  19. Inertia-dependent dynamics of three-dimensional vesicles and red blood cells in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zheng Yuan; Wang, Shu Qi; He, Long; Xu, Feng; Bai, Bo Feng

    2013-10-28

    A three-dimensional (3D) simulation study of the effect of inertia on the dynamics of vesicles and red blood cells (RBCs) has not been reported. Here, we developed a 3D model based on the front tracking method to investigate how inertia affects the dynamics of spherical/non-spherical vesicles and biconcave-shaped RBCs with the Reynolds number ranging from 0.1 to 10. The results showed that inertia induced non-spherical vesicles transitioned from tumbling to swinging, which was not observed in previous 2D models. The critical viscosity ratio of inner/outer fluids for the tumbling–swinging transition remarkably increased with an increasing Reynolds number. The deformation of vesicles was greatly enhanced by inertia, and the frequency of tumbling and tank-treading was significantly decreased by inertia. We also found that RBCs can transit from tumbling to steady tank-treading through the swinging regime when the Reynolds number increased from 0.1 to 10. These results indicate that inertia needs to be considered at moderate Reynolds number (Re ~ 1) in the study of blood flow in the human body and the flow of deformable particle suspension in inertial microfluidic devices. The developed 3D model provided new insights into the dynamics of RBCs under shear flow, thus holding great potential to better understand blood flow behaviors under normal/disease conditions.

  20. Flow of pedestrians through narrow doors with different competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcimartín, A; Pastor, J M; Zuriguel, I; Parisi, D R; Martín-Gómez, C

    2016-01-01

    We report a thorough analysis of the intermittent flow of pedestrians through a narrow door. The observations include five different sets of evacuation drills with which we have investigated the effect of door size and competitiveness on the flow dynamics. Although the outcomes are in general compatible with the existence of the faster-is-slower effect, the temporal evolution of the instantaneous flow rate provides evidence of new features. These stress the crucial role of the number of people performing the tests, which has an influence on the obtained results. Once the transients at the beginning and end of the evacuation are removed, we have found that the time lapses between the passage of two consecutive pedestrians display heavy-tailed distributions in all the scenarios studied. Meanwhile, the distribution of burst sizes decays exponentially; this can be linked to a constant probability of finding a long-lasting clog during the evacuation process. Based on these results, a discussion is presented on the caution that should be exercised when measuring or describing the intermittent flow of pedestrians through narrow doors. (paper: interdisciplinary statistical mechanics)

  1. Numerical methods for two-phase flow with contact lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Clauido

    2012-07-01

    This thesis focuses on numerical methods for two-phase flows, and especially flows with a moving contact line. Moving contact lines occur where the interface between two fluids is in contact with a solid wall. At the location where both fluids and the wall meet, the common continuum descriptions for fluids are not longer valid, since the dynamics around such a contact line are governed by interactions at the molecular level. Therefore the standard numerical continuum models have to be adjusted to handle moving contact lines. In the main part of the thesis a method to manipulate the position and the velocity of a contact line in a two-phase solver, is described. The Navier-Stokes equations are discretized using an explicit finite difference method on a staggered grid. The position of the interface is tracked with the level set method and the discontinuities at the interface are treated in a sharp manner with the ghost fluid method. The contact line is tracked explicitly and its dynamics can be described by an arbitrary function. The key part of the procedure is to enforce a coupling between the contact line and the Navier-Stokes equations as well as the level set method. Results for different contact line models are presented and it is demonstrated that they are in agreement with analytical solutions or results reported in the literature.The presented Navier-Stokes solver is applied as a part in a multiscale method to simulate capillary driven flows. A relation between the contact angle and the contact line velocity is computed by a phase field model resolving the micro scale dynamics in the region around the contact line. The relation of the microscale model is then used to prescribe the dynamics of the contact line in the macro scale solver. This approach allows to exploit the scale separation between the contact line dynamics and the bulk flow. Therefore coarser meshes can be applied for the macro scale flow solver compared to global phase field simulations

  2. Development of numerical simulation method for gas migration through highly-compacted bentonite using model of two-phase flow through deformable porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yukihisa

    2011-01-01

    In the current concept of repository for radioactive waste disposal, compacted bentonite will be used as an engineered barrier mainly for inhibiting migration of radioactive nuclides. Hydrogen gas can be generated inside of the engineered barrier by anaerobic corrosion of metals used for containers, etc. It is expected to be not easy for gas to entering into the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase because the pore of compacted bentonite is so minute. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the effect of gas pressure generation and gas migration on the engineered barrier, peripheral facilities and ground. In this study, a method for simulating gas migration through the compacted bentonite is proposed. The proposed method can analyze coupled hydrological-mechanical processes using the model of two-phase flow through deformable porous media. Validity of the proposed analytical method is examined by comparing gas migration test results with the calculated results, which revealed that the proposed method can simulate gas migration behavior through compacted bentonite with accuracy. (author)

  3. Experimental quantification of the fluid dynamics in blood-processing devices through 4D-flow imaging: A pilot study on a real oxygenator/heat-exchanger module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatti, Filippo; Palumbo, Maria Chiara; Consolo, Filippo; Pluchinotta, Francesca; Greiser, Andreas; Sturla, Francesco; Votta, Emiliano; Siryk, Sergii V; Vismara, Riccardo; Fiore, Gianfranco Beniamino; Lombardi, Massimo; Redaelli, Alberto

    2018-02-08

    The performance of blood-processing devices largely depends on the associated fluid dynamics, which hence represents a key aspect in their design and optimization. To this aim, two approaches are currently adopted: computational fluid-dynamics, which yields highly resolved three-dimensional data but relies on simplifying assumptions, and in vitro experiments, which typically involve the direct video-acquisition of the flow field and provide 2D data only. We propose a novel method that exploits space- and time-resolved magnetic resonance imaging (4D-flow) to quantify the complex 3D flow field in blood-processing devices and to overcome these limitations. We tested our method on a real device that integrates an oxygenator and a heat exchanger. A dedicated mock loop was implemented, and novel 4D-flow sequences with sub-millimetric spatial resolution and region-dependent velocity encodings were defined. Automated in house software was developed to quantify the complex 3D flow field within the different regions of the device: region-dependent flow rates, pressure drops, paths of the working fluid and wall shear stresses were computed. Our analysis highlighted the effects of fine geometrical features of the device on the local fluid-dynamics, which would be unlikely observed by current in vitro approaches. Also, the effects of non-idealities on the flow field distribution were captured, thanks to the absence of the simplifying assumptions that typically characterize numerical models. To the best of our knowledge, our approach is the first of its kind and could be extended to the analysis of a broad range of clinically relevant devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A dissipative particle dynamics method for arbitrarily complex geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Bian, Xin; Tang, Yu-Hang; Karniadakis, George Em

    2018-02-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is an effective Lagrangian method for modeling complex fluids in the mesoscale regime but so far it has been limited to relatively simple geometries. Here, we formulate a local detection method for DPD involving arbitrarily shaped geometric three-dimensional domains. By introducing an indicator variable of boundary volume fraction (BVF) for each fluid particle, the boundary of arbitrary-shape objects is detected on-the-fly for the moving fluid particles using only the local particle configuration. Therefore, this approach eliminates the need of an analytical description of the boundary and geometry of objects in DPD simulations and makes it possible to load the geometry of a system directly from experimental images or computer-aided designs/drawings. More specifically, the BVF of a fluid particle is defined by the weighted summation over its neighboring particles within a cutoff distance. Wall penetration is inferred from the value of the BVF and prevented by a predictor-corrector algorithm. The no-slip boundary condition is achieved by employing effective dissipative coefficients for liquid-solid interactions. Quantitative evaluations of the new method are performed for the plane Poiseuille flow, the plane Couette flow and the Wannier flow in a cylindrical domain and compared with their corresponding analytical solutions and (high-order) spectral element solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. We verify that the proposed method yields correct no-slip boundary conditions for velocity and generates negligible fluctuations of density and temperature in the vicinity of the wall surface. Moreover, we construct a very complex 3D geometry - the "Brown Pacman" microfluidic device - to explicitly demonstrate how to construct a DPD system with complex geometry directly from loading a graphical image. Subsequently, we simulate the flow of a surfactant solution through this complex microfluidic device using the new method. Its

  5. Imposed Work of Breathing for Flow Meters with In-Line versus Flow-Through Technique during Simulated Neonatal Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldsson, Snorri; Falk, Markus; Jonsson, Baldvin; Drevhammar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The ability to determine airflow during nasal CPAP (NCPAP) treatment without adding dead space or resistance would be useful when investigating the physiologic effects of different NCPAP systems on breathing. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect on pressure stability of different flow measuring devices at the in-line and flow-through position, using simulated neonatal breathing. Six different flow measure devices were evaluated by recording pressure changes and imposed work of breathing for breaths with 16 and 32 ml tidal volumes. The tests were performed initially with the devices in an in line position and with 5 and 10 L/min using flow through technique, without CPAP. The flow meters were then subsequently tested with an Infant Flow CPAP system at 3, 5 and 8 cm H2O pressure using flow through technique. The quality of the recorded signals was compared graphically. The resistance of the measuring devices generated pressure swings and imposed work of breathing. With bias flow, the resistance also generated CPAP pressure. Three of the devices had low resistance and generated no changes in pressure stability or CPAP pressure. The two devices intended for neonatal use had the highest measured resistance. The importance of pressure stability and increased work of breathing during non-invasive respiratory support are insufficiently studied. Clinical trials using flow-through technique have not focused on pressure stability. Our results indicate that a flow-through technique might be a way forward in obtaining a sufficiently high signal quality without the added effects of rebreathing and increased work of breathing. The results should stimulate further research and the development of equipment for dynamic flow measurements in neonates.

  6. Tokamak turbulence in self-regulated differentially rotating flow and L-H transition dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.; Carreras, B.A.; Sidikman, K.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical study of turbulence in the presence of turbulently generated differentially rotating flow is presented as a paradigm for fluctuation dynamics in L- and H-mode plasmas. Using a drift wave model, the role of both flow shear and flow curvature (second radial derivative of the poloidal ExB flow) is detailed in linear and saturated turbulence phases. In the strong turbulence saturated state, finite amplitude-induced modification of the fluctuation structure near low order rational surfaces strongly inhibits flow shear suppression. Suppression by curvature is not diminished, but it occurs through a frequency shift. A description of L-H mode transition dynamics based on the self-consistent linking of turbulence suppression by differentially rotating flow and generation of flow by turbulent momentum transport is presented. In this model, rising edge temperature triggers a transition characterized by spontaneous generation of differentially rotating flow and decreasing turbulence intensity

  7. A level set method for vapor bubble dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Can, E.; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a finite-difference computational method suitable for the simulation of vapor–liquid (or gas–liquid) flows in which the dynamical effects of the vapor can be approximated by a time-dependent, spatially uniform pressure acting on the interface. In such flows it is not necessary

  8. Supercritical droplet dynamics and emission in low speed cross-flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, J. W.; Yang, H. S.; Yoon, W. S.

    2008-01-01

    Droplet dynamics and emission of a supercritical droplet in crossing gas stream are numerically investigated. Effects of ambient pressure and velocity of nitrogen gas on the dynamics of the supercritical oxygen droplet are parametrically examined. Unsteady conservative axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations in curvilinear coordinates are preconditioned and solved by dual-time stepping method. A unified property evaluation scheme based on a fundamental equation of state and extended corresponding-state principle is established to deal with thermodynamic non-idealities and transport anomalies. At lower pressures and velocities of nitrogen cross flows, both the diffusion and the convection are important in determining the droplet dynamics. Relative flow motion causes a secondary breakup and cascading vortices, and the droplet lifetime is reduced with increasing in ambient pressure. At higher ambient pressures and velocities, however, the droplet dynamics become convection-controlled while the secondary breakup is hindered by reduced diffusivity of the oxygen. Gas-phase mixing depends on the convection and diffusion velocities in conjunction with corresponding droplet deformation and flow interaction. Supercritical droplet dynamics and emission is not similar with respect to the pressure and velocity of the ambient gas and thus provides no scale

  9. Dynamic behaviors of cavitation bubble for the steady cavitating flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun; Huai, Xiulan; Li, Xunfeng

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, by introducing the flow velocity item into the classical Rayleigh-Plesset dynamic equation, a new equation, which does not involve the time term and can describe the motion of cavitation bubble in the steady cavitating flow, has been obtained. By solving the new motion equation using Runge-Kutta fourth order method with adaptive step size control, the dynamic behaviors of cavitation bubble driven by the varying pressure field downstream of a venturi cavitation reactor are numerically simulated. The effects of liquid temperature (corresponding to the saturated vapor pressure of liquid), cavitation number and inlet pressure of venturi on radial motion of bubble and pressure pulse due to the radial motion are analyzed and discussed in detail. Some dynamic behaviors of bubble different from those in previous papers are displayed. In addition, the internal relationship between bubble dynamics and process intensification is also discussed. The simulation results reported in this work reveal the variation laws of cavitation intensity with the flow conditions of liquid, and will lay a foundation for the practical application of hydrodynamic cavitation technology.

  10. Detecting dynamic causal inference in nonlinear two-phase fracture flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faybishenko, Boris

    2017-08-01

    Identifying dynamic causal inference involved in flow and transport processes in complex fractured-porous media is generally a challenging task, because nonlinear and chaotic variables may be positively coupled or correlated for some periods of time, but can then become spontaneously decoupled or non-correlated. In his 2002 paper (Faybishenko, 2002), the author performed a nonlinear dynamical and chaotic analysis of time-series data obtained from the fracture flow experiment conducted by Persoff and Pruess (1995), and, based on the visual examination of time series data, hypothesized that the observed pressure oscillations at both inlet and outlet edges of the fracture result from a superposition of both forward and return waves of pressure propagation through the fracture. In the current paper, the author explores an application of a combination of methods for detecting nonlinear chaotic dynamics behavior along with the multivariate Granger Causality (G-causality) time series test. Based on the G-causality test, the author infers that his hypothesis is correct, and presents a causation loop diagram of the spatial-temporal distribution of gas, liquid, and capillary pressures measured at the inlet and outlet of the fracture. The causal modeling approach can be used for the analysis of other hydrological processes, for example, infiltration and pumping tests in heterogeneous subsurface media, and climatic processes, for example, to find correlations between various meteorological parameters, such as temperature, solar radiation, barometric pressure, etc.

  11. Vesicle dynamics in a confined Poiseuille flow: from steady state to chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouane, Othmane; Thiébaud, Marine; Benyoussef, Abdelilah; Wagner, Christian; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2014-09-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are the major component of blood, and the flow of blood is dictated by that of RBCs. We employ vesicles, which consist of closed bilayer membranes enclosing a fluid, as a model system to study the behavior of RBCs under a confined Poiseuille flow. We extensively explore two main parameters: (i) the degree of confinement of vesicles within the channel and (ii) the flow strength. Rich and complex dynamics for vesicles are revealed, ranging from steady-state shapes (in the form of parachute and slipper shapes) to chaotic dynamics of shape. Chaos occurs through a cascade of multiple periodic oscillations of the vesicle shape. We summarize our results in a phase diagram in the parameter plane (degree of confinement and flow strength). This finding highlights the level of complexity of a flowing vesicle in the small Reynolds number where the flow is laminar in the absence of vesicles and can be rendered turbulent due to elasticity of vesicles.

  12. Numerical study on flow rate limitation of open capillary channel flow through a wedge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The flow characteristics of slender-column flow in wedge-shaped channel under microgravity condition are investigated in this work. The one-dimensional theoretical model is applied to predict the critical flow rate and surface contour of stable flow. However, the one-dimensional model overestimates the critical flow rate for not considering the extra pressure loss. Then, we develop a three-dimensional simulation method with OpenFOAM, a computational fluid dynamics tool, to simulate various phenomena in wedge channels with different lengths. The numerical results are verified with the capillary channel flow experimental data on the International Space Station. We find that the three-dimensional simulation perfectly predicts the critical flow rates and surface contours under various flow conditions. Meanwhile, the general behaviors in subcritical, critical, and supercritical flow are studied in three-dimensional simulation considering variations of flow rate and open channel length. The numerical techniques for three-dimensional simulation is validated for a wide range of configurations and is hopeful to provide valuable guidance for capillary channel flow experiment and efficient liquid management in space.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of a lithium/thionyl chloride battery with electrolyte flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, W.B.; Wang, C.Y.; Weidner, J.W.; Jungst, R.G.; Nagasubramanian, G.

    2000-02-01

    A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery. As in earlier one-dimensional models, the model accounts for transport of species and charge, and electrode porosity variations and electrolyte flow induced by the volume reduction caused by electrochemical reactions. Numerical simulations are performed using a finite volume method of computational fluid dynamics. The predicted discharge curves for various temperatures show good agreement with published experimental data, and are essentially identical to results published for one-dimensional models. The detailed two-dimensional flow simulations show that the electrolyte is replenished from the cell head space predominantly through the separator into the front of the cathode during most parts of the discharge, especially for higher cell temperatures.

  14. Deterministic chaotic dynamics of Raba River flow (Polish Carpathian Mountains)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kędra, Mariola

    2014-02-01

    Is the underlying dynamics of river flow random or deterministic? If it is deterministic, is it deterministic chaotic? This issue is still controversial. The application of several independent methods, techniques and tools for studying daily river flow data gives consistent, reliable and clear-cut results to the question. The outcomes point out that the investigated discharge dynamics is not random but deterministic. Moreover, the results completely confirm the nonlinear deterministic chaotic nature of the studied process. The research was conducted on daily discharge from two selected gauging stations of the mountain river in southern Poland, the Raba River.

  15. Domain decomposition methods for fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerc, S.

    1995-01-01

    A domain decomposition method for steady-state, subsonic fluid dynamics calculations, is proposed. The method is derived from the Schwarz alternating method used for elliptic problems, extended to non-linear hyperbolic problems. Particular emphasis is given on the treatment of boundary conditions. Numerical results are shown for a realistic three-dimensional two-phase flow problem with the FLICA-4 code for PWR cores. (from author). 4 figs., 8 refs

  16. Imposed Work of Breathing for Flow Meters with In-Line versus Flow-Through Technique during Simulated Neonatal Breathing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snorri Donaldsson

    Full Text Available The ability to determine airflow during nasal CPAP (NCPAP treatment without adding dead space or resistance would be useful when investigating the physiologic effects of different NCPAP systems on breathing. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect on pressure stability of different flow measuring devices at the in-line and flow-through position, using simulated neonatal breathing.Six different flow measure devices were evaluated by recording pressure changes and imposed work of breathing for breaths with 16 and 32 ml tidal volumes. The tests were performed initially with the devices in an in line position and with 5 and 10 L/min using flow through technique, without CPAP. The flow meters were then subsequently tested with an Infant Flow CPAP system at 3, 5 and 8 cm H2O pressure using flow through technique. The quality of the recorded signals was compared graphically.The resistance of the measuring devices generated pressure swings and imposed work of breathing. With bias flow, the resistance also generated CPAP pressure. Three of the devices had low resistance and generated no changes in pressure stability or CPAP pressure. The two devices intended for neonatal use had the highest measured resistance.The importance of pressure stability and increased work of breathing during non-invasive respiratory support are insufficiently studied. Clinical trials using flow-through technique have not focused on pressure stability. Our results indicate that a flow-through technique might be a way forward in obtaining a sufficiently high signal quality without the added effects of rebreathing and increased work of breathing. The results should stimulate further research and the development of equipment for dynamic flow measurements in neonates.

  17. Methods and systems for Raman and optical cross-interrogation in flow-through silicon membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Letant, Sonia E.

    2014-09-09

    Cross-interrogating photonic detection systems and methods are shown. A flow through photonic crystal membrane with a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate is provided with pores which are distributed along multiple regions. The pores of one region have walls to which a first type of target specific anchor can be attached, while pores of another region have walls to which a second type of target specific anchor can be attached. An optical arrangement out-of-plane to the SERS substrate is also provided for enhanced sensitivity and identification of target organisms.

  18. Minimum cost dynamic flows: The series-parallel case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinz, Bettina; Woeginger, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic network consists of a directed graph with capacities, costs, and integral transit times on the arcs. In the minimum-cost dynamic flow problem (MCDFP), the goal is to compute, for a given dynamic network with source s, sink t, and two integers v and T, a feasible dynamic flow from s to t of

  19. Chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doughty, C.; Dragila, M.I.; Faybishenko, B.; Podgorney, R.K.; Stoops, T.M.; Wheatcraft, S.W.; Wood, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    'DOE faces the remediation of numerous contaminated sites, such as those at Hanford, INEEL, LLNL, and LBNL, where organic and/or radioactive wastes were intentionally or accidentally released to the vadose zone from surface spills, underground tanks, cribs, shallow ponds, and deep wells. Migration of these contaminants through the vadose zone has lead to the contamination of or threatens to contaminate underlying groundwater. A key issue in choosing a corrective action plan to clean up contaminated sites is to determine the location, total mass, mobility and travel time to receptors for contaminants moving in the vadose zone. These problems are difficult to solve in a technically defensible and accurate manner because contaminants travel downward intermittently through narrow pathways driven by variations in environmental conditions. These preferential pathways can be difficult to find and predict. The primary objective of this project is to determine if and when dynamical chaos theory can be used to investigate infiltration of fluid and contaminant transport in heterogeneous soils and fractured rocks. The objective of this project is being achieved through the following Activities (1) Evaluation of chaotic behavior of flow in laboratory and field experiments using methods from non-linear dynamics; (2) Evaluation of the impact these dynamics may have on contaminant transport through heterogeneous fractured rocks and soils, and how it can be used to guide remediation efforts; (3) Development of a conceptual model and mathematical and numerical algorithms for flow and transport, which incorporate both: (a) the spatial variability of heterogeneous porous and fractured media, and (b) the description of the temporal dynamics of flow and transport, which may be chaotic; and (4) Development of appropriate experimental field and laboratory techniques needed to detect diagnostic parameters for chaotic behavior of flow. This approach is based on the assumption that spatial

  20. Flow dynamics and energy efficiency of flow in the left ventricle during myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Vivek; Low, Adriel Jia Jun; Annamalai, Sarayu Parimal; Sampath, Smita; Poh, Kian Keong; Totman, Teresa; Mazlan, Muhammad; Croft, Grace; Richards, A Mark; de Kleijn, Dominique P V; Chin, Chih-Liang; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2017-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, where myocardial infarction (MI) is a major category. After infarction, the heart has difficulty providing sufficient energy for circulation, and thus, understanding the heart's energy efficiency is important. We induced MI in a porcine animal model via circumflex ligation and acquired multiple-slice cine magnetic resonance (MR) images in a longitudinal manner-before infarction, and 1 week (acute) and 4 weeks (chronic) after infarction. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were performed based on MR images to obtain detailed fluid dynamics and energy dynamics of the left ventricles. Results showed that energy efficiency flow through the heart decreased at the acute time point. Since the heart was observed to experience changes in heart rate, stroke volume and chamber size over the two post-infarction time points, simulations were performed to test the effect of each of the three parameters. Increasing heart rate and stroke volume were found to significantly decrease flow energy efficiency, but the effect of chamber size was inconsistent. Strong complex interplay was observed between the three parameters, necessitating the use of non-dimensional parameterization to characterize flow energy efficiency. The ratio of Reynolds to Strouhal number, which is a form of Womersley number, was found to be the most effective non-dimensional parameter to represent energy efficiency of flow in the heart. We believe that this non-dimensional number can be computed for clinical cases via ultrasound and hypothesize that it can serve as a biomarker for clinical evaluations.

  1. Flow Characterization and Dynamic Analysis of a Radial Compressor with Passive Method of Surge Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillou, Erwann

    Due to recent emission regulations, the use of turbochargers for force induction of internal combustion engines has increased. Actually, the trend in diesel engines is to downsize the engine by use of turbochargers that operate at higher pressure ratio. Unfortunately, increasing the rotational speed tends to reduce the turbocharger radial compressor range of operation which is limited at low mass flow rate by the occurrence of surge. In order to extent the operability of turbochargers, compressor housings can be equipped with a passive surge control device also known as ported shroud. This specific casing treatment has been demonstrated to enhance surge margin with minor negative impact on the compressor efficiency. However, the actual working mechanisms of the bypass system remain not well understood. In order to optimize the design of the ported shroud, it is then crucial to identify the dynamic flow changes induced by the implementation of the device to control instabilities. Experimental methods were used to assess the development of instabilities from stable, stall and eventually surge regimes of a ported shroud centrifugal compressor. Systematic comparison was conducted with the same compressor design without ported shroud. Hence, the full pressure dynamic survey of both compressors' performance characteristics converged toward two different and probably interrelated driving mechanisms to the development and/or propagation of unsteadiness within each compressor. One related the pressure disturbances at the compressor inlet, and notably the more apparent development of perturbations in the non-ported compressor impeller, whereas the other was attributed to the pressure distortions induced by the presence of the tongue in the asymmetric design of the compressor volute. Specific points of operation were selected to carry out planar flow measurements. At normal working, both standard and stereoscopic particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed

  2. In vivo in vitro correlations for a poorly soluble drug, danazol, using the flow-through dissolution method with biorelevant dissolution media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, Vibeke Hougaard; Pedersen, Betty Lomstein; Kristensen, Henning Gjelstrup

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to design dissolution tests that were able to distinguish between the behaviour of danazol under fasted and fed conditions, by using biorelevant media. In vitro dissolution of 100mg danazol capsules was performed using the flow-through dissolution method. Flow rates w...

  3. Estimating the arterial input function from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data with compensation for flow enhancement (I): Theory, method, and phantom experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, Jeroen J. N.; Lavini, Cristina; van Vliet, Lucas J.; Vos, Frans M.

    2017-01-01

    The arterial input function (AIF) represents the time-dependent arterial contrast agent (CA) concentration that is used in pharmacokinetic modeling. To develop a novel method for estimating the AIF from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI data, while compensating for flow enhancement. Signal

  4. Study on flow rate measurement and visualization of helium-air exchange flow through a small opening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumizawa, Motoo

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with an experimental investigation on buoyancy-driven exchange flows through horizontal and inclined openings. The method of the mass increment was developed to measure the flow rate in helium-air system and a displacement fringe technique was adopted in Mach-Zehnder interferometer to visualize the flow. As the result, the followings were obtained: Flow visualization results indicate that the upward and downward plumes of helium and air break through the opening intermittently, and they swing in the lateral direction through the horizontal opening. It is clearly visualized that the exchange flows through the inclined openings take place smoothly and stably in the separated passages. The inclination angle for the maximum Froude number decreases with increasing length-to-diameter ratio in the helium-air system, on the contrary to Mercer's experimental results in the water-brine system indicating that the angle remains almost constant. (author)

  5. A coupled overlapping domain method for the computation of transitional flow through artificial heart valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, A.C.; Bogaerds, A.C.B.; Storti, F.; Van De Vosse, F.N.

    2012-01-01

    When blood is pumped through the aortic valves, it has a time dependent flow with a relatively high speed, resulting in Reynolds numbers between 1500 and 3000. Hence, flow is in the transitional regime between laminar and turbulent flow. Transitional flow contains small scale fluctuations, see

  6. Clearance gap flow: Simulations by discontinuous Galerkin method and experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hála, Jindřich; Luxa, Martin; Bublík, O.; Prausová, H.; Vimmr, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 92, May (2016), 02073-02073 ISSN 2100-014X. [EFM14 – Experimental Fluid Mechanics 2014. Český Krumlov, 18.11.2014-21.11.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : compressible fluid flow * narrow channel flow * discontinuous Galerkin finite element method Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  7. A 3D velocimetry study of the flow through prosthetic heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, R.; Zenit, R.; Pulos, G.; Sanchez, E.; Juarez, A.

    2006-11-01

    Blood damage commonly appears in medical valve prothesis. It is a mayor concern for the designers and surgeons. It is well known that this damage and other complications result from the modified fluid dynamics through the replacement valve. To evaluate the performance of prosthetic heart valves, it is necessary to study the flow through them. To conduct this study , we have built a flow channel that emulates cardiac conditions and allows optical access such that a 3D-PIV velocimetry system could be used. The experiments are aimed to reconstruct the downstream structure of the flow through a mechanical and a bio-material tricuspid heart valve prothesis. Preliminary results show that the observed coherent structures can be related with haemolysis and trombosis, illnesses commonly found in valve prothesis recipients. The mean flow, the levels of strain rate and the turbulence intensity generated by the valves can also be directly related to blood damage. In general, bio-material made valves tend to reduce these complications.

  8. Approaching multiphase flows from the perspective of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banas, A.O.

    1992-01-01

    Thermalhydraulic simulation methodologies based on subchannel and porous-medium concepts are briefly reviewed and contrasted with the general approach of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). An outline of the advanced CFD methods for single-phase turbulent flows is followed by a short discussion of the unified formulation of averaged equations for turbulent and multiphase flows. Some of the recent applications of CFD at Chalk River Laboratories are discussed, and the complementary role of CFD with regard to the established thermalhydraulic methods of analysis is indicated. (author). 8 refs

  9. Thermo-Fluid Dynamics of Two-Phase Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, Mamrou

    2011-01-01

    "Thermo-fluid Dynamics of Two-Phase Flow, Second Edition" is focused on the fundamental physics of two-phase flow. The authors present the detailed theoretical foundation of multi-phase flow thermo-fluid dynamics as they apply to: Nuclear reactor transient and accident analysis; Energy systems; Power generation systems; Chemical reactors and process systems; Space propulsion; Transport processes. This edition features updates on two-phase flow formulation and constitutive equations and CFD simulation codes such as FLUENT and CFX, new coverage of the lift force model, which is of part

  10. A multi-scale network method for two-phase flow in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khayrat, Karim, E-mail: khayratk@ifd.mavt.ethz.ch; Jenny, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Pore-network models of porous media are useful in the study of pore-scale flow in porous media. In order to extract macroscopic properties from flow simulations in pore-networks, it is crucial the networks are large enough to be considered representative elementary volumes. However, existing two-phase network flow solvers are limited to relatively small domains. For this purpose, a multi-scale pore-network (MSPN) method, which takes into account flow-rate effects and can simulate larger domains compared to existing methods, was developed. In our solution algorithm, a large pore network is partitioned into several smaller sub-networks. The algorithm to advance the fluid interfaces within each subnetwork consists of three steps. First, a global pressure problem on the network is solved approximately using the multiscale finite volume (MSFV) method. Next, the fluxes across the subnetworks are computed. Lastly, using fluxes as boundary conditions, a dynamic two-phase flow solver is used to advance the solution in time. Simulation results of drainage scenarios at different capillary numbers and unfavourable viscosity ratios are presented and used to validate the MSPN method against solutions obtained by an existing dynamic network flow solver.

  11. A multi-scale network method for two-phase flow in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayrat, Karim; Jenny, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Pore-network models of porous media are useful in the study of pore-scale flow in porous media. In order to extract macroscopic properties from flow simulations in pore-networks, it is crucial the networks are large enough to be considered representative elementary volumes. However, existing two-phase network flow solvers are limited to relatively small domains. For this purpose, a multi-scale pore-network (MSPN) method, which takes into account flow-rate effects and can simulate larger domains compared to existing methods, was developed. In our solution algorithm, a large pore network is partitioned into several smaller sub-networks. The algorithm to advance the fluid interfaces within each subnetwork consists of three steps. First, a global pressure problem on the network is solved approximately using the multiscale finite volume (MSFV) method. Next, the fluxes across the subnetworks are computed. Lastly, using fluxes as boundary conditions, a dynamic two-phase flow solver is used to advance the solution in time. Simulation results of drainage scenarios at different capillary numbers and unfavourable viscosity ratios are presented and used to validate the MSPN method against solutions obtained by an existing dynamic network flow solver.

  12. Numerical investigations of two-phase flow with dynamic capillary pressure in porous media via a moving mesh method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Zegeling, Paul Andries

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by observations of saturation overshoot, this paper investigates numerical modeling of two-phase flow in porous media incorporating dynamic capillary pressure. The effects of the dynamic capillary coefficient, the infiltrating flux rate and the initial and boundary values are systematically studied using a traveling wave ansatz and efficient numerical methods. The traveling wave solutions may exhibit monotonic, non-monotonic or plateau-shaped behavior. Special attention is paid to the non-monotonic profiles. The traveling wave results are confirmed by numerically solving the partial differential equation using an accurate adaptive moving mesh solver. Comparisons between the computed solutions using the Brooks-Corey model and the laboratory measurements of saturation overshoot verify the effectiveness of our approach.

  13. From Pore Scale to Turbulent Flow with the Unstructured Lattice Boltzmann Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matin, Rastin

    Abstract: The lattice Boltzmann method is a class of methods in computational fluid dynamics for simulating fluid flow. Implementations on unstructured grids are particularly relevant for various engineering applications, where geometric flexibility or high resolution near a body or a wall...... is required. The main topic of this thesis is to further develop unstructured lattice Boltzmann methods for simulations of Newtonian fluid flow in three dimensions, in particular porous flow. Two methods are considered in this thesis based on the finite volume method and finite element method, respectively...

  14. A particle-based method for granular flow simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yuanzhang; Bao, Kai; Zhu, Jian; Wu, Enhua

    2012-01-01

    We present a new particle-based method for granular flow simulation. In the method, a new elastic stress term, which is derived from a modified form of the Hooke's law, is included in the momentum governing equation to handle the friction of granular materials. Viscosity force is also added to simulate the dynamic friction for the purpose of smoothing the velocity field and further maintaining the simulation stability. Benefiting from the Lagrangian nature of the SPH method, large flow deformation can be well handled easily and naturally. In addition, a signed distance field is also employed to enforce the solid boundary condition. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and efficient for handling the flow of granular materials, and different kinds of granular behaviors can be well simulated by adjusting just one parameter. © 2012 Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  15. A particle-based method for granular flow simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yuanzhang

    2012-03-16

    We present a new particle-based method for granular flow simulation. In the method, a new elastic stress term, which is derived from a modified form of the Hooke\\'s law, is included in the momentum governing equation to handle the friction of granular materials. Viscosity force is also added to simulate the dynamic friction for the purpose of smoothing the velocity field and further maintaining the simulation stability. Benefiting from the Lagrangian nature of the SPH method, large flow deformation can be well handled easily and naturally. In addition, a signed distance field is also employed to enforce the solid boundary condition. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and efficient for handling the flow of granular materials, and different kinds of granular behaviors can be well simulated by adjusting just one parameter. © 2012 Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  16. System and method for reducing combustion dynamics and NO.sub.x in a combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong H.; Johnson, Thomas Edward

    2015-11-20

    A system for reducing combustion dynamics and NO.sub.x in a combustor includes a tube bundle that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor, wherein the tube bundle comprises an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A shroud circumferentially surrounds the upstream and downstream surfaces. A plurality of tubes extends through the tube bundle from the upstream surface through the downstream surface, wherein the downstream surface is stepped to produce tubes having different lengths through the tube bundle. A method for reducing combustion dynamics and NO.sub.x in a combustor includes flowing a working fluid through a plurality of tubes radially arranged between an upstream surface and a downstream surface of an end cap that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor, wherein the downstream surface is stepped.

  17. Low-angle dunes in the Changjiang (Yangtze) Estuary: Flow and sediment dynamics under tidal influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Wei, Taoyuan; Yang, Zhongyong; Hackney, Christopher R.; Parsons, Daniel R.

    2018-05-01

    It has long been highlighted that important feedbacks exist between river bed morphology, sediment transport and the turbulent flow field and that these feedbacks change in response to forcing mechanisms. However, our current understanding of bedform dynamics is largely based on studies of steady flow environments and cohesionless bed conditions. Few investigations have been made under rapidly changing flows. Here, we examine flow and sediment dynamics over low-angle dunes in unsteady flows in the Changjiang (Yangtze) Estuary, China. Topography, flow and sediment data were collected over a reach ca 1.8 km long through a semi-diurnal tidal cycle in a moderate tide of flood season. The results show that: (1) roughness length derived from the upper flow changes little with the flow reversing and displays the same value on both the ebb and flood tide. Moreover, the variability of individual bedform features plays an important role in roughness length variation. (2) Shear stress over the crest of low-angle dunes roughly represents the total spatially averaged stress over dunes in this study area, which has significant implications for advancing numerical models. (3) Changes in morphology, flow and sediment dynamics over dunes through time reveal how low-angle dunes evolve within a tidal cycle. (4) The clockwise hysteresis loops between flow dynamics and bedform features (height and aspect ratio) are also observed. The combination of suspended sediment transport and bedload transport on dune transformation and migration attributes to the clockwise hysteresis. The specific sediment composition of the riverbed, in some extent, affects the mechanism of sediment transport related to the exchange between suspended sediment and riverbed, but further investigation is needed to figure out the mechanism behind this for extended series of tides, such as spring/neap tide and tides in flooding and dry season.

  18. PIV-measured versus CFD-predicted flow dynamics in anatomically realistic cerebral aneurysm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Matthew D; Nikolov, Hristo N; Milner, Jaques S; Lownie, Stephen P; Demont, Edwin M; Kalata, Wojciech; Loth, Francis; Holdsworth, David W; Steinman, David A

    2008-04-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of nominally patient-specific cerebral aneurysms is increasingly being used as a research tool to further understand the development, prognosis, and treatment of brain aneurysms. We have previously developed virtual angiography to indirectly validate CFD-predicted gross flow dynamics against the routinely acquired digital subtraction angiograms. Toward a more direct validation, here we compare detailed, CFD-predicted velocity fields against those measured using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). Two anatomically realistic flow-through phantoms, one a giant internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm and the other a basilar artery (BA) tip aneurysm, were constructed of a clear silicone elastomer. The phantoms were placed within a computer-controlled flow loop, programed with representative flow rate waveforms. PIV images were collected on several anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) planes. CFD simulations were then carried out using a well-validated, in-house solver, based on micro-CT reconstructions of the geometries of the flow-through phantoms and inlet/outlet boundary conditions derived from flow rates measured during the PIV experiments. PIV and CFD results from the central AP plane of the ICA aneurysm showed a large stable vortex throughout the cardiac cycle. Complex vortex dynamics, captured by PIV and CFD, persisted throughout the cardiac cycle on the central LAT plane. Velocity vector fields showed good overall agreement. For the BA, aneurysm agreement was more compelling, with both PIV and CFD similarly resolving the dynamics of counter-rotating vortices on both AP and LAT planes. Despite the imposition of periodic flow boundary conditions for the CFD simulations, cycle-to-cycle fluctuations were evident in the BA aneurysm simulations, which agreed well, in terms of both amplitudes and spatial distributions, with cycle-to-cycle fluctuations measured by PIV in the same geometry. The overall good agreement

  19. Comparing flow-through and static ice cave models for Shoshone Ice Cave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaj E. Williams

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we suggest a new ice cave type: the “flow-through” ice cave. In a flow-through ice cave external winds blow into the cave and wet cave walls chill the incoming air to the wet-bulb temperature, thereby achieving extra cooling of the cave air. We have investigated an ice cave in Idaho, located in a lava tube that is reported to have airflow through porous wet end-walls and could therefore be a flow-through cave. We have instrumented the site and collected data for one year. In order to determine the actual ice cave type present at Shoshone, we have constructed numerical models for static and flow-through caves (dynamic is not relevant here. The models are driven with exterior measurements of air temperature, relative humidity and wind speed. The model output is interior air temperature and relative humidity. We then compare the output of both models to the measured interior air temperatures and relative humidity. While both the flow-through and static cave models are capable of preserving ice year-round (a net zero or positive ice mass balance, both models show very different cave air temperature and relative humidity output. We find the empirical data support a hybrid model of the static and flow-through models: permitting a static ice cave to have incoming air chilled to the wet-bulb temperature fits the data best for the Shoshone Ice Cave.

  20. Visualization and PIV measurement of unsteady flow around a darrieus wind turbine in dynamic stall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuya, Satoshi; Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Takano, Tsuyoshi [Dept. of Mechanical and Production Engineering, Niigata Univ., Niigata (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Flow around a Darrieus wind turbine in dynamic stall is studied by flow visualization and PIV (particle image velocimeter) measurement in a rotating frame of reference, which allows the successive observation of the dynamic stall over the blade. The qualitative features of the flow field in dynamic stall observed by the flow visualization, such as the formation and shedding of the stall vortices, are quantitatively reproduced in the instantaneous velocity distributions near the blade by using PIV. These results indicate that two pairs of stall vortices are generated from the blade during one rotation of the blade and that the size and the generating blade angle of the stall vortices are enlarged as the tip-speed ratio decreases. These stall vortices are produced by the in-flow motion from the outer surface to the inner surface through the trailing edge of the blade and the flow separation over the inner surface of the blade. (author)

  1. Estimation of vessel diameter and blood flow dynamics from laser speckle images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, Dmitry D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckle imaging is a rapidly developing method to study changes of blood velocity in the vascular networks. However, to assess blood flow and vascular responses it is crucial to measure vessel diameter in addition to blood velocity dynamics. We suggest an algorithm that allows for dynamical...

  2. Simulation of turbulent flow over staggered tube bundles using multi-relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Woon; Choi, Hyun Gyung

    2014-01-01

    A turbulent fluid flow over staggered tube bundles is of great interest in many engineering fields including nuclear fuel rods, heat exchangers and especially a gas cooled reactor lower plenum. Computational methods have evolved for the simulation of such flow for decades and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is one of the attractive methods due to its sound physical basis and ease of computerization including parallelization. In this study to find computational performance of the LBM in turbulent flows over staggered tubes, a fluid flow analysis code employing multi-relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method (MRT-LBM) is developed based on a 2-dimensional D2Q9 lattice model and classical sub-grid eddy viscosity model of Smagorinsky. As a first step, fundamental performance MRT-LBM is investigated against a standard problem of a flow past a cylinder at low Reynolds number in terms of drag forces. As a major step, benchmarking of the MRT-LBM is performed over a turbulent flow through staggered tube bundles at Reynolds number of 18,000. For a flow past a single cylinder, the accuracy is validated against existing experimental data and previous computations in terms of drag forces on the cylinder. Mainly, the MRT-LBM computation for a flow through staggered tube bundles is performed and compared with experimental data and general purpose computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses with standard k-ω turbulence and large eddy simulation (LES) equipped with turbulence closures of Smagrinsky-Lilly and wall-adapting local eddy-viscosity (WALE) model. The agreement between the experimental and the computational results from the present MRT-LBM is found to be reasonably acceptable and even comparable to the LES whereas the computational efficiency is superior. (orig.)

  3. Simulation of turbulent flow over staggered tube bundles using multi-relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Woon; Choi, Hyun Gyung [Dongguk Univ., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of). Nuclear and Energy Engineering Dept.

    2014-02-15

    A turbulent fluid flow over staggered tube bundles is of great interest in many engineering fields including nuclear fuel rods, heat exchangers and especially a gas cooled reactor lower plenum. Computational methods have evolved for the simulation of such flow for decades and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is one of the attractive methods due to its sound physical basis and ease of computerization including parallelization. In this study to find computational performance of the LBM in turbulent flows over staggered tubes, a fluid flow analysis code employing multi-relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method (MRT-LBM) is developed based on a 2-dimensional D2Q9 lattice model and classical sub-grid eddy viscosity model of Smagorinsky. As a first step, fundamental performance MRT-LBM is investigated against a standard problem of a flow past a cylinder at low Reynolds number in terms of drag forces. As a major step, benchmarking of the MRT-LBM is performed over a turbulent flow through staggered tube bundles at Reynolds number of 18,000. For a flow past a single cylinder, the accuracy is validated against existing experimental data and previous computations in terms of drag forces on the cylinder. Mainly, the MRT-LBM computation for a flow through staggered tube bundles is performed and compared with experimental data and general purpose computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses with standard k-ω turbulence and large eddy simulation (LES) equipped with turbulence closures of Smagrinsky-Lilly and wall-adapting local eddy-viscosity (WALE) model. The agreement between the experimental and the computational results from the present MRT-LBM is found to be reasonably acceptable and even comparable to the LES whereas the computational efficiency is superior. (orig.)

  4. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, M. N. K.; Zuradzman, M. Razlan; Hazry, D.; Khairunizam, Wan; Shahriman, A. B.; Yaacob, S.; Ahmed, S. Faiz; Hussain, Abadalsalam T.

    2014-12-01

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  5. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, M. N. K.; Zuradzman, M. Razlan; Hazry, D.; Khairunizam, Wan; Shahriman, A. B.; Yaacob, S.; Ahmed, S. Faiz

    2014-01-01

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity

  6. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, M. N. K., E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Zuradzman, M. Razlan, E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Hazry, D., E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Khairunizam, Wan, E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Shahriman, A. B., E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Yaacob, S., E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Ahmed, S. Faiz, E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my [Centre of Excellence for Unmanned Aerial Systems, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); and others

    2014-12-04

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  7. Discrete event dynamic system (DES)-based modeling for dynamic material flow in the pyroprocess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyo Jik; Kim, Kiho; Kim, Ho Dong; Lee, Han Soo

    2011-01-01

    A modeling and simulation methodology was proposed in order to implement the dynamic material flow of the pyroprocess. Since the static mass balance provides the limited information on the material flow, it is hard to predict dynamic behavior according to event. Therefore, a discrete event system (DES)-based model named, PyroFlow, was developed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). PyroFlow is able to calculate dynamic mass balance and also show various dynamic operational results in real time. By using PyroFlow, it is easy to rapidly predict unforeseeable results, such as throughput in unit process, accumulated product in buffer and operation status. As preliminary simulations, bottleneck analyses in the pyroprocess were carried out and consequently it was presented that operation strategy had influence on the productivity of the pyroprocess.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Discrete Element Method (CFD-DEM) Study of Mass-Transfer Mechanisms in Riser Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos Varas, Álvaro E; Peters, E A J F; Kuipers, J A M

    2017-05-17

    We report a computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method (CFD-DEM) simulation study on the interplay between mass transfer and a heterogeneous catalyzed chemical reaction in cocurrent gas-particle flows as encountered in risers. Slip velocity, axial gas dispersion, gas bypassing, and particle mixing phenomena have been evaluated under riser flow conditions to study the complex system behavior in detail. The most important factors are found to be directly related to particle cluster formation. Low air-to-solids flux ratios lead to more heterogeneous systems, where the cluster formation is more pronounced and mass transfer more influenced. Falling clusters can be partially circumvented by the gas phase, which therefore does not fully interact with the cluster particles, leading to poor gas-solid contact efficiencies. Cluster gas-solid contact efficiencies are quantified at several gas superficial velocities, reaction rates, and dilution factors in order to gain more insight regarding the influence of clustering phenomena on the performance of riser reactors.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizwan-uddin

    1986-01-01

    Unstable flow conditions can occur in a wide variety of laboratory and industry equipment that involve two-phase flow. Instabilities in industrial equipment, which include boiling water reactor (BWR) cores, steam generators, heated channels, cryogenic fluid heaters, heat exchangers, etc., are related to their nonlinear dynamics. These instabilities can be of static (Ledinegg instability) or dynamic (density wave oscillations) type. Determination of regions in parameters space where these instabilities can occur and knowledge of system dynamics in or near these regions is essential for the safe operation of such equipment. Many two-phase flow engineering components can be modeled as heated channels. The set of partial differential equations that describes the dynamics of single- and two-phase flow, for the special case of uniform heat flux along the length of the channel, can be reduced to a set of two coupled ordinary differential equations [in inlet velocity v/sub i/(t) and two-phase residence time tau(t)] involving history integrals: a nonlinear ordinary functional differential equation and an integral equation. Hence, to solve these equations, the dependent variables must be specified for -(nu + tau) ≤ t ≤ 0, where nu is the single-phase residence time. This system of nonlinear equations has been solved analytically using asymptotic expansion series for finite but small perturbations and numerically using finite difference techniques

  10. Development of a dynamic flow imaging phantom for dynamic contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, B.; Keller, H.; Coolens, C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) studies with modeling of blood flow and tissue perfusion are becoming more prevalent in the clinic, with advances in wide volume CT scanners allowing the imaging of an entire organ with sub-second image frequency and sub-millimeter accuracy. Wide-spread implementation of perfusion DCE-CT, however, is pending fundamental validation of the quantitative parameters that result from dynamic contrast imaging and perfusion modeling. Therefore, the goal of this work was to design and construct a novel dynamic flow imaging phantom capable of producing typical clinical time-attenuation curves (TACs) with the purpose of developing a framework for the quantification and validation of DCE-CT measurements and kinetic modeling under realistic flow conditions. Methods: The phantom is based on a simple two-compartment model and was printed using a 3D printer. Initial analysis of the phantom involved simple flow measurements and progressed to DCE-CT experiments in order to test the phantoms range and reproducibility. The phantom was then utilized to generate realistic input TACs. A phantom prediction model was developed to compute the input and output TACs based on a given set of five experimental (control) parameters: pump flow rate, injection pump flow rate, injection contrast concentration, and both control valve positions. The prediction model is then inversely applied to determine the control parameters necessary to generate a set of desired input and output TACs. A protocol was developed and performed using the phantom to investigate image noise, partial volume effects and CT number accuracy under realistic flow conditionsResults: This phantom and its surrounding flow system are capable of creating a wide range of physiologically relevant TACs, which are reproducible with minimal error between experiments (σ/μ 2 ) for the input function between 0.95 and 0.98, while the maximum enhancement differed by no more than 3.3%. The

  11. Prediction of two-phase choked-flow through safety valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnulfo, G; Bertani, C; De Salve, M

    2014-01-01

    Different models of two-phase choked flow through safety valves are applied in order to evaluate their capabilities of prediction in different thermal-hydraulic conditions. Experimental data available in the literature for two-phase fluid and subcooled liquid upstream the safety valve have been compared with the models predictions. Both flashing flows and non-flashing flows of liquid and incondensable gases have been considered. The present paper shows that for flashing flows good predictions are obtained by using the two-phase valve discharge coefficient defined by Lenzing and multiplying it by the critical flow rate in an ideal nozzle evaluated by either Omega Method or the Homogeneous Non-equilibrium Direct Integration. In case of non-flashing flows of water and air, Leung/Darby formulation of the two-phase valve discharge coefficient together with the Omega Method is more suitable to the prediction of flow rate.

  12. Dynamic response characteristics of dual flow-path integrally bladed rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Joseph A.; Brown, Jeffrey M.; Scott-Emuakpor, Onome E.; Cross, Charles J.; Slater, Joseph C.

    2015-02-01

    New turbine engine designs requiring secondary flow compression often look to dual flow-path integrally bladed rotors (DFIBRs) since these stages have the ability to perform work on the secondary, or bypassed, flow-field. While analogous to traditional integrally bladed rotor stages, DFIBR designs have many differences that result in unique dynamic response characteristics that must be understood to avoid fatigue. This work investigates these characteristics using reduced-order models (ROMs) that incorporate mistuning through perturbations to blade frequencies. This work provides an alternative to computationally intensive geometric-mistuning approaches for DFIBRs by utilizing tuned blade mode reductions and substructure coupling in cyclic coordinates. Free and forced response results are compared to full finite element model (FEM) solutions to determine if any errors are related to the reduced-order model formulation reduction methods. It is shown that DFIBRs have many more frequency veering regions than their single flow-path integrally blade rotor (IBR) counterparts. Modal families are shown to transition between system, inner-blade, and outer-blade motion. Furthermore, findings illustrate that while mode localization of traditional IBRs is limited to a single or small subset of blades, DFIBRs can have modal energy localized to either an inner- or outer-blade set resulting in many blades responding above tuned levels. Lastly, ROM forced response predictions compare well to full FEM predictions for the two test cases shown.

  13. A new particle-like method for high-speed flows with chemical non-equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Rodrigues Guzzo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work is concerned with the numerical simulation of hypersonic blunt body flows with chemical non-equilibrium. New theoretical and numerical formulations for coupling the chemical reaction to the fluid dynamics are presented and validated. The fluid dynamics is defined for a stationary unstructured mesh and the chemical reaction process is defined for “finite quantities” moving through the stationary mesh. The fluid dynamics is modeled by the Euler equations and the chemical reaction rates by the Arrhenius law. Ideal gases are considered. The thermodynamical data are based on JANNAF tables and Burcat’s database. The algorithm proposed by Liou, known as AUSM+, is implemented in a cell-centered based finite volume method and in an unstructured mesh context. Multidimensional limited MUSCL interpolation method is used to perform property reconstructions and to achieve second-order accuracy in space. The minmod limiter is used. The second order accuracy, five stage, Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme is employed to perform the time march for the fluid dynamics. The numerical code VODE, which is part of the CHEMKIN-II package, is adopted to perform the time integration for the chemical reaction equations. The freestream reacting fluid is composed of H2 and air at the stoichiometric ratio. The emphasis of the present paper is on the description of the new methodology for handling the coupling of chemical and fluid mechanic processes, and its validation by comparison with the standard time-splitting procedure. The configurations considered are the hypersonic flow over a wedge, in which the oblique detonation wave is induced by an oblique shock wave, and the hypersonic flow over a blunt body. Differences between the solutions obtained with each formulation are presented and discussed, including the effects of grid refinement in each case. The primary objective of such comparisons is the validation of the proposed methodology. Moreover, for

  14. A numerical method for simulating the dynamics of 3D axisymmetric vesicles suspended in viscous flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerapaneni, Shravan K.; Gueyffier, Denis; Biros, George; Zorin, Denis

    2009-10-01

    We extend [Shravan K. Veerapaneni, Denis Gueyffier, Denis Zorin, George Biros, A boundary integral method for simulating the dynamics of inextensible vesicles suspended in a viscous fluid in 2D, Journal of Computational Physics 228(7) (2009) 2334-2353] to the case of three-dimensional axisymmetric vesicles of spherical or toroidal topology immersed in viscous flows. Although the main components of the algorithm are similar in spirit to the 2D case—spectral approximation in space, semi-implicit time-stepping scheme—the main differences are that the bending and viscous force require new analysis, the linearization for the semi-implicit schemes must be rederived, a fully implicit scheme must be used for the toroidal topology to eliminate a CFL-type restriction and a novel numerical scheme for the evaluation of the 3D Stokes single layer potential on an axisymmetric surface is necessary to speed up the calculations. By introducing these novel components, we obtain a time-scheme that experimentally is unconditionally stable, has low cost per time step, and is third-order accurate in time. We present numerical results to analyze the cost and convergence rates of the scheme. To verify the solver, we compare it to a constrained variational approach to compute equilibrium shapes that does not involve interactions with a viscous fluid. To illustrate the applicability of method, we consider a few vesicle-flow interaction problems: the sedimentation of a vesicle, interactions of one and three vesicles with a background Poiseuille flow.

  15. Method of solution for the determination of the velocity profiles in turbulent flow through annular tobes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmal, M; Russo, Q [Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia; Almeida, M S; Bozzo, S [Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    1975-03-01

    A method of solutions is presented for the determination of the velocity profiles in turbulent flow through annular tubes, based on the Von Karman similarity theory developed by Quarmby. The parameters found by Quarmby appearing in the velocity profiles and determined experimentally by different authors were approximated by polynonial functions of variable degree, as function of the Reynolds numbers. The Runge-Kutta-Nystrom method was used in the integration of the differential equations and the systematic of solution is presented in a computer program. The calculated results were compared to the experimental date and presented a deviation of 10/sup -2/%.

  16. Investigation of Swirling Flow in Rod Bundle Subchannels Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, Mary V.; Beasley, Donald E.; Conner, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    The fluid dynamics for turbulent flow through rod bundles representative of those used in pressurized water reactors is examined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The rod bundles of the pressurized water reactor examined in this study consist of a square array of parallel rods that are held on a constant pitch by support grids spaced axially along the rod bundle. Split-vane pair support grids are often used to create swirling flow in the rod bundle in an effort to improve the heat transfer characteristics for the rod bundle during both normal operating conditions and in accident condition scenarios. Computational fluid dynamics simulations for a two subchannel portion of the rod bundle were used to model the flow downstream of a split-vane pair support grid. A high quality computational mesh was used to investigate the choice of turbulence model appropriate for the complex swirling flow in the rod bundle subchannels. Results document a central swirling flow structure in each of the subchannels downstream of the split-vane pairs. Strong lateral flows along the surface of the rods, as well as impingement regions of lateral flow on the rods are documented. In addition, regions of lateral flow separation and low axial velocity are documented next to the rods. Results of the CFD are compared to experimental particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements documenting the lateral flow structures downstream of the split-vane pairs. Good agreement is found between the computational simulation and experimental measurements for locations close to the support grid. (authors)

  17. Application of a Modular Particle-Continuum Method to Partially Rarefied, Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschenes, Timothy R.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2011-05-01

    The Modular Particle-Continuum (MPC) method is used to simulate partially-rarefied, hypersonic flow over a sting-mounted planetary probe configuration. This hybrid method uses computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to solve the Navier-Stokes equations in regions that are continuum, while using direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) in portions of the flow that are rarefied. The MPC method uses state-based coupling to pass information between the two flow solvers and decouples both time-step and mesh densities required by each solver. It is parallelized for distributed memory systems using dynamic domain decomposition and internal energy modes can be consistently modeled to be out of equilibrium with the translational mode in both solvers. The MPC results are compared to both full DSMC and CFD predictions and available experimental measurements. By using DSMC in only regions where the flow is nonequilibrium, the MPC method is able to reproduce full DSMC results down to the level of velocity and rotational energy probability density functions while requiring a fraction of the computational time.

  18. Comparison of two methods to determine fan performance curves using computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onma, Patinya; Chantrasmi, Tonkid

    2018-01-01

    This work investigates a systematic numerical approach that employs Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to obtain performance curves of a backward-curved centrifugal fan. Generating the performance curves requires a number of three-dimensional simulations with varying system loads at a fixed rotational speed. Two methods were used and their results compared to experimental data. The first method incrementally changes the mass flow late through the inlet boundary condition while the second method utilizes a series of meshes representing the physical damper blade at various angles. The generated performance curves from both methods are compared with an experiment setup in accordance with the AMCA fan performance testing standard.

  19. Improved dynamic CT angiography visualization by flow territory masking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Christensen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Purpose: Computerized tomography (CT perfusion (or CTP source images from CT scanners with small detector widths can be used to create a dynamic CT angiogram (CTA similar to digital subtraction angiography (DSA. Because CTP studies use a single intravenous injection, all arterial territories enhance simultaneously, and individual arterial territories [i.e., anterior cerebral artery (ACA, middle cerebral artery (MCA, and posterior cerebral artery (PCA] cannot be delineated. This limits the ability to assess collateral flow patterns on dynamic CTAs. The aim of this study was to devise and test a postprocessing method to selectively color-label the major arterial territories on dynamic CTA. Materials and Methods: We identified 22 acute-stroke patients who underwent CTP on a 320-slice CT scanner within 6 h from symptom onset. For each case, two investigators independently generated an arterial territory map from CTP bolus arrival maps using a semiautomated method. The volumes of the arterial territories were calculated for each map and the average relative difference between these volumes was calculated for each case as a measure of interrater agreement. Arterial territory maps were superimposed on the dynamic CTA to create a vessel-selective dynamic CTA with color-coding of the main arterial territories. Two experts rated the arterial territory maps and the color-coded CTAs for consistency with expected arterial territories on a 3-point scale (excellent, moderate, poor. Results: Arterial territory maps were generated for all 22 patients. The median difference in arterial territory volumes between investigators was 2.2% [interquartile range (IQR 0.6-8.5%]. Based on expert review, the arterial territory maps and the vessel-selective dynamic CTAs showed excellent consistency with the expected arterial territories in 18 of 22 patients, moderate consistency in 2 patients, and poor consistency in another 2 patients. Conclusion: Using a

  20. Dynamic leaching and fractionation of trace elements from environmental solids exploiting a novel circulating-flow platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masanobu; Nakano, Koji; Sasaki, Masaya; Shinozaki, Haruka; Suzuki, Shiho; Okawara, Chitose; Miró, Manuel; Itabashi, Hideyuki

    2016-02-01

    A dynamic flow-through microcolumn extraction system based on extractant re-circulation is herein proposed as a novel analytical approach for simplification of bioaccessibility tests of trace elements in sediments. On-line metal leaching is undertaken in the format of all injection (AI) analysis, which is a sequel of flow injection analysis, but involving extraction under steady-state conditions. The minimum circulation times and flow rates required to determine the maximum bioaccessible pools of target metals (viz., Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) from lake and river sediment samples were estimated using Tessier's sequential extraction scheme and an acid single extraction test. The on-line AIA method was successfully validated by mass balance studies of CRM and real sediment samples. Tessier's test in on-line AI format demonstrated to be carried out by one third of extraction time (6h against more than 17 h by the conventional method), with better analytical precision (15% by the conventional method) and significant decrease in blank readouts as compared with the manual batch counterpart. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of free boundary problem of flow through porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares Junior, H.M.; Souza, A.J. de

    1989-01-01

    This paper deals with a free boundary problem of flow through porous media, which is solved by simplicial method conbined with mesh refinement. Variational method on fixed domain is utilized. (author)

  2. The promising gas-dynamic schemes of vacuum deposition from the supersonic gas mixture flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maltsev, R V; Rebrov, A K

    2008-01-01

    Gas jet deposition (GJD) becomes promising method of thin film and nanoparticle deposition. This paper is focused on elaboration of new methods of GJD based on different gas dynamic schemes of flow formation and interaction with substrate. Using direct statistical simulation method, the analysis was performed for: a) interaction of the jet from the sonic nozzle with a substrate; b) fan flow in the result of interaction of two opposite jets; c) convergent flow from the ring nozzle, directional to the axis; d) interaction of the jet after convergent flow with the substrate; e) fan flow in the result of interaction of two opposite jets after convergent expansion

  3. Modeling axisymmetric flows dynamics of films, jets, and drops

    CERN Document Server

    Middleman, Stanley

    1995-01-01

    This concise book is intended to fulfill two purposes: to provide an important supplement to classic texts by carrying fluid dynamics students on into the realm of free boundary flows; and to demonstrate the art of mathematical modeling based on knowledge, intuition, and observation. In the authors words, the overall goal is make the complex simple, without losing the essence--the virtue--of the complexity.Modeling Axisymmetric Flows: Dynamics of Films, Jets, and Drops is the first book to cover the topics of axisymmetric laminar flows; free-boundary flows; and dynamics of drops, jets, and films. The text also features comparisons of models to experiments, and it includes a large selection of problems at the end of each chapter.Key Features* Contains problems at the end of each chapter* Compares real-world experimental data to theory* Provides one of the first comprehensive examinations of axisymmetric laminar flows, free-boundary flows, and dynamics of drops, jets, and films* Includes development of basic eq...

  4. Vesicle dynamics in shear and capillary flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    The deformation of vesicles in flow is studied by a mesoscopic simulation technique, which combines multi-particle collision dynamics for the solvent with a dynamically triangulated surface model for the membrane. Shape transitions are investigated both in simple shear flows and in cylindrical capillary flows. We focus on reduced volumes, where the discocyte shape of fluid vesicles is stable, and the prolate shape is metastable. In simple shear flow at low membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from discocyte to prolate with increasing shear rate, while at high membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from prolate to discocyte, or tumbling motion accompanied by oscillations between these two morphologies. In capillary flow, at small flow velocities the symmetry axis of the discocyte is found not to be oriented perpendicular to the cylinder axis. With increasing flow velocity, a transition to a prolate shape occurs for fluid vesicles, while vesicles with shear-elastic membranes (like red blood cells) transform into a coaxial parachute-like shape

  5. The Dynamics of Controlled Flow Separation within a Diverter Duct Diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, C. J.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    2016-11-01

    The evolution and receptivity to fluidic actuation of the flow separation within a rectangular, constant-width, diffuser that is branched off of a primary channel is investigated experimentally at speeds up to M = 0.4. The coupling between the diffuser's adverse pressure gradient and the internal separation that constricts nearly half of the flow passage through the duct is controlled using a spanwise array of fluidic actuators on the surface upstream of the diffuser's inlet plane. The dynamics of the separating surface vorticity layer in the absence and presence of actuation are investigated using high-speed particle image velocimetry combined with surface pressure measurements and total pressure distributions at the primary channel's exit plane. It is shown that the actuation significantly alters the incipient dynamics of the separating vorticity layer as the characteristic cross stream scales of the boundary layer upstream of separation and of the ensuing vorticity concentrations within the separated flow increase progressively with actuation level. It is argued that the dissipative (high frequency) actuation alters the balance between large- and small-scale motions near separation by intensifying the large-scale motions and limiting the small-scale dynamics. Controlling separation within the diffuser duct also has a profound effect on the global flow. In the presence of actuation, the mass flow rate in the primary duct increases 10% while the fraction of the diverted mass flow rate in the diffuser increases by more than 45% at 0.7% actuation mass fraction. Supported by the Boeing Company.

  6. Dynamic baseline detection method for power data network service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes a dynamic baseline Traffic detection Method which is based on the historical traffic data for the Power data network. The method uses Cisco's NetFlow acquisition tool to collect the original historical traffic data from network element at fixed intervals. This method uses three dimensions information including the communication port, time, traffic (number of bytes or number of packets) t. By filtering, removing the deviation value, calculating the dynamic baseline value, comparing the actual value with the baseline value, the method can detect whether the current network traffic is abnormal.

  7. Flow vibrations and dynamic instability of heat exchanger tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granger, S.; Langre, E. de

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a review of external-flow-induced vibration of heat exchanger tube bundles. Attention is focused on a dynamic instability, known as ''fluidelastic instability'', which can develop when flow is transverse to the tube axis. The main physical models proposed in the literature are successively reviewed in a critical way. As a consequence, some concepts are clarified, some a priori plausible misinterpretations are rejected and finally, certain basic mechanisms, induced by the flow-structure interaction and responsible for the ultimate onset of fluidelastic instability, are elucidated. Design tools and methods for predictive analysis of industrial cases are then presented. The usual design tool is the ''stability map'', i.e. an empirical correlation which must be interpreted in a conservative way. Of course, when using this approach, the designer must also consider reasonable safety margins. In the area of predictive analysis, the ''unsteady semi-analytical models'' seem to be a promising and efficient methodology. A modern implementation of these ideas mix an original experimental approach for taking fluid dynamic forces into account, together with non-classical numerical methods of mechanical vibration. (authors). 20 refs., 9 figs

  8. Water Flow in Karst Aquifer Considering Dynamically Variable Saturation Conduit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chaoqun; Hu, Bill X.

    2017-04-01

    The karst system is generally conceptualized as dual-porosity system, which is characterized by low conductivity and high storage continuum matrix and high conductivity and quick flow conduit networks. And so far, a common numerical model for simulating flow in karst aquifer is MODFLOW2005-CFP, which is released by USGS in 2008. However, the steady-state approach for conduit flow in CFP is physically impractical when simulating very dynamic hydraulics with variable saturation conduit. So, we adopt the method proposed by Reimann et al. (2011) to improve current model, in which Saint-Venant equations are used to model the flow in conduit. Considering the actual background that the conduit is very big and varies along flow path and the Dirichlet boundary varies with rainfall in our study area in Southwest China, we further investigate the influence of conduit diameter and outflow boundary on numerical model. And we also analyze the hydraulic process in multi-precipitation events. We find that the numerical model here corresponds well with CFP for saturated conduit, and it could depict the interaction between matrix and conduit during very dynamic hydraulics pretty well compare with CFP.

  9. Dynamic fluid connectivity during steady-state multiphase flow in a sandstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Catriona A; Menke, Hannah; Andrew, Matthew; Blunt, Martin J; Krevor, Samuel

    2017-08-01

    The current conceptual picture of steady-state multiphase Darcy flow in porous media is that the fluid phases organize into separate flow pathways with stable interfaces. Here we demonstrate a previously unobserved type of steady-state flow behavior, which we term "dynamic connectivity," using fast pore-scale X-ray imaging. We image the flow of N 2 and brine through a permeable sandstone at subsurface reservoir conditions, and low capillary numbers, and at constant fluid saturation. At any instant, the network of pores filled with the nonwetting phase is not necessarily connected. Flow occurs along pathways that periodically reconnect, like cars controlled by traffic lights. This behavior is consistent with an energy balance, where some of the energy of the injected fluids is sporadically converted to create new interfaces.

  10. Magnetic resonance velocity mapping of 3D cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in hydrocephalus: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas; Salomonowitz, Erich; Brenneis, Christian; Ungersboeck, Karl; Riet, Wilma van der; Buchfelder, Michael; Ganslandt, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the detectability of CSF flow alterations in the ventricular system of patients with hydrocephalus using time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping. MR velocity mapping was performed in 21 consecutive hydrocephalus patients and 21 age-matched volunteers using a 3D phase-contrast (PC) sequence. Velocity vectors and particle path lines were calculated for visualisation of flow dynamics. CSF flow was classified as ''hypomotile flow'' if it showed attenuated dynamics and as ''hypermotile flow'' if it showed increased dynamics compared with volunteers. Diagnostic efficacy was compared with routine 2D cine PC-MRI. Seven patients showed hypomotile CSF flow: six had non-communicating hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis. One showed oscillating flow between the lateral ventricles after craniotomy for intracranial haemorrhage. Seven patients showed normal flow: six had hydrocephalus ex vacuo due to brain atrophy. One patient who underwent ventriculostomy 10 years ago showed a flow path through the opening. Seven patients showed hypermotile flow: three had normal pressure hydrocephalus, three had dementia, and in one the diagnosis remained unclear. The diagnostic efficacy of velocity mapping was significantly higher except for that of aqueductal stenosis. Our approach may be useful for diagnosis, therapy planning, and follow-up of different kinds of hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance velocity mapping of 3D cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in hydrocephalus: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, St. Poelten (Austria); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany); Salomonowitz, Erich [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, St. Poelten (Austria); Brenneis, Christian [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Department of Neurology, St. Poelten (Austria); Ungersboeck, Karl [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Department of Neurosurgery, St. Poelten (Austria); Riet, Wilma van der [European MRI Consultancy (EMRIC), Strasbourg (France); Buchfelder, Michael; Ganslandt, Oliver [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    To investigate the detectability of CSF flow alterations in the ventricular system of patients with hydrocephalus using time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping. MR velocity mapping was performed in 21 consecutive hydrocephalus patients and 21 age-matched volunteers using a 3D phase-contrast (PC) sequence. Velocity vectors and particle path lines were calculated for visualisation of flow dynamics. CSF flow was classified as ''hypomotile flow'' if it showed attenuated dynamics and as ''hypermotile flow'' if it showed increased dynamics compared with volunteers. Diagnostic efficacy was compared with routine 2D cine PC-MRI. Seven patients showed hypomotile CSF flow: six had non-communicating hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis. One showed oscillating flow between the lateral ventricles after craniotomy for intracranial haemorrhage. Seven patients showed normal flow: six had hydrocephalus ex vacuo due to brain atrophy. One patient who underwent ventriculostomy 10 years ago showed a flow path through the opening. Seven patients showed hypermotile flow: three had normal pressure hydrocephalus, three had dementia, and in one the diagnosis remained unclear. The diagnostic efficacy of velocity mapping was significantly higher except for that of aqueductal stenosis. Our approach may be useful for diagnosis, therapy planning, and follow-up of different kinds of hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  12. Study of dynamics of two-phase flow through a minichannel by means of recurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litak, Grzegorz; Górski, Grzegorz; Mosdorf, Romuald; Rysak, Andrzej

    2017-05-01

    By changing air and water flow rates in the two-phase (air-water) flow through a minichannel, we observed the evolution of air bubbles and slugs patterns. This spatiotemporal behaviour was identified qualitatively by using a digital camera. Simultaneously, we provided a detailed analysis of these phenomena by using the corresponding sequences of light transmission time series recorded with a laser-phototransistor sensor. To distinguish particular patterns, we used recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis. Finally, we showed that the maxima of various recurrence quantificators obtained from the laser time series could follow the bubble and slugs patterns in studied ranges of air and water flows.

  13. Physically-Based Interactive Flow Visualization Based on Schlieren and Interferometry Experimental Techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Brownlee, C.

    2011-11-01

    Understanding fluid flow is a difficult problem and of increasing importance as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) produces an abundance of simulation data. Experimental flow analysis has employed techniques such as shadowgraph, interferometry, and schlieren imaging for centuries, which allow empirical observation of inhomogeneous flows. Shadowgraphs provide an intuitive way of looking at small changes in flow dynamics through caustic effects while schlieren cutoffs introduce an intensity gradation for observing large scale directional changes in the flow. Interferometry tracks changes in phase-shift resulting in bands appearing. The combination of these shading effects provides an informative global analysis of overall fluid flow. Computational solutions for these methods have proven too complex until recently due to the fundamental physical interaction of light refracting through the flow field. In this paper, we introduce a novel method to simulate the refraction of light to generate synthetic shadowgraph, schlieren and interferometry images of time-varying scalar fields derived from computational fluid dynamics data. Our method computes physically accurate schlieren and shadowgraph images at interactive rates by utilizing a combination of GPGPU programming, acceleration methods, and data-dependent probabilistic schlieren cutoffs. Applications of our method to multifield data and custom application-dependent color filter creation are explored. Results comparing this method to previous schlieren approximations are finally presented. © 2011 IEEE.

  14. Dynamic Transitions and Baroclinic Instability for 3D Continuously Stratified Boussinesq Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şengül, Taylan; Wang, Shouhong

    2018-02-01

    The main objective of this article is to study the nonlinear stability and dynamic transitions of the basic (zonal) shear flows for the three-dimensional continuously stratified rotating Boussinesq model. The model equations are fundamental equations in geophysical fluid dynamics, and dynamics associated with their basic zonal shear flows play a crucial role in understanding many important geophysical fluid dynamical processes, such as the meridional overturning oceanic circulation and the geophysical baroclinic instability. In this paper, first we derive a threshold for the energy stability of the basic shear flow, and obtain a criterion for local nonlinear stability in terms of the critical horizontal wavenumbers and the system parameters such as the Froude number, the Rossby number, the Prandtl number and the strength of the shear flow. Next, we demonstrate that the system always undergoes a dynamic transition from the basic shear flow to either a spatiotemporal oscillatory pattern or circle of steady states, as the shear strength of the basic flow crosses a critical threshold. Also, we show that the dynamic transition can be either continuous or catastrophic, and is dictated by the sign of a transition number, fully characterizing the nonlinear interactions of different modes. Both the critical shear strength and the transition number are functions of the system parameters. A systematic numerical method is carried out to explore transition in different flow parameter regimes. In particular, our numerical investigations show the existence of a hypersurface which separates the parameter space into regions where the basic shear flow is stable and unstable. Numerical investigations also yield that the selection of horizontal wave indices is determined only by the aspect ratio of the box. We find that the system admits only critical eigenmodes with roll patterns aligned with the x-axis. Furthermore, numerically we encountered continuous transitions to multiple

  15. Development of evaluation method on flow-induced vibration and corrosion of components in two-phase flow by coupled analysis. 1. Evaluation of effects of flow-induced vibration on structural material integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Masanori; Uchida, Shunsuke; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Ninokata, Hisashi; Anahara, Naoki; Dosaki, Koji; Katono, Kenichi; Akiyama, Minoru; Saitoh, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. An innovative method for flow induced vibration of structures in two phase flow by combined analyses of three dimensional flow dynamics and structures is to be introduced. (author)

  16. The art and science of flow control - case studies using flow visualization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, F. S.; Cattafesta, L. N., III

    2010-04-01

    Active flow control (AFC) has been the focus of significant research in the last decade. This is mainly due to the potentially substantial benefits it affords. AFC applications range from the subsonic to the supersonic (and beyond) regime for both internal and external flows. These applications are wide and varied, such as controlling flow transition and separation over various external components of the aircraft to active management of separation and flow distortion in engine components and over turbine and compressor blades. High-speed AFC applications include control of flow oscillations in cavity flows, supersonic jet screech, impinging jets, and jet-noise control. In this paper we review some of our recent applications of AFC through a number of case studies that illustrate the typical benefits as well as limitations of present AFC methods. The case studies include subsonic and supersonic canonical flowfields such as separation control over airfoils, control of supersonic cavity flows and impinging jets. In addition, properties of zero-net mass-flux (ZNMF) actuators are also discussed as they represent one of the most widely studied actuators used for AFC. In keeping with the theme of this special issue, the flowfield properties and their response to actuation are examined through the use of various qualitative and quantitative flow visualization methods, such as smoke, shadowgraph, schlieren, planar-laser scattering, and Particle image velocimetry (PIV). The results presented here clearly illustrate the merits of using flow visualization to gain significant insight into the flow and its response to AFC.

  17. Energy flow theory of nonlinear dynamical systems with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, Jing Tang

    2015-01-01

    This monograph develops a generalised energy flow theory to investigate non-linear dynamical systems governed by ordinary differential equations in phase space and often met in various science and engineering fields. Important nonlinear phenomena such as, stabilities, periodical orbits, bifurcations and chaos are tack-led and the corresponding energy flow behaviors are revealed using the proposed energy flow approach. As examples, the common interested nonlinear dynamical systems, such as, Duffing’s oscillator, Van der Pol’s equation, Lorenz attractor, Rössler one and SD oscillator, etc, are discussed. This monograph lights a new energy flow research direction for nonlinear dynamics. A generalised Matlab code with User Manuel is provided for readers to conduct the energy flow analysis of their nonlinear dynamical systems. Throughout the monograph the author continuously returns to some examples in each chapter to illustrate the applications of the discussed theory and approaches. The book can be used as ...

  18. Modeling dynamic stall on wind turbine blades under rotationally augmented flow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guntur, S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schreck, S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sorensen, N. N. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Bergami, L. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-04-22

    It is well known that airfoils under unsteady flow conditions with a periodically varying angle of attack exhibit aerodynamic characteristics different from those under steady flow conditions, a phenomenon commonly known as dynamic stall. It is also well known that the steady aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils in the inboard region of a rotating blade differ from those under steady two-dimensional (2D) flow conditions, a phenomenon commonly known as rotational augmentation. This paper presents an investigation of these two phenomena together in the inboard parts of wind turbine blades. This analysis is carried out using data from three sources: (1) the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phase VI experimental data, including constant as well as continuously pitching blade conditions during axial operation, (2) data from unsteady Delayed Detached Eddy Simulations (DDES) carried out using the Technical University of Denmark’s in-house flow solver Ellipsys3D, and (3) data from a simplified model based on the blade element momentum method with a dynamic stall subroutine that uses rotationally augmented steady-state polars obtained from steady Phase VI experimental sequences, instead of the traditional 2D nonrotating data. The aim of this work is twofold. First, the blade loads estimated by the DDES simulations are compared to three select cases of the N sequence experimental data, which serves as a validation of the DDES method. Results show reasonable agreement between the two data in two out of three cases studied. Second, the dynamic time series of the lift and the moment polars obtained from the experiments are compared to those from the dynamic stall subroutine that uses the rotationally augmented steady polars. This allowed the differences between the stall phenomenon on the inboard parts of harmonically pitching blades on a rotating wind turbine and the classic dynamic stall representation in 2D flow to be

  19. Full Equations (FEQ) model for the solution of the full, dynamic equations of motion for one-dimensional unsteady flow in open channels and through control structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Delbert D.; Melching, Charles S.

    1997-01-01

    The Full EQuations (FEQ) model is a computer program for solution of the full, dynamic equations of motion for one-dimensional unsteady flow in open channels and through control structures. A stream system that is simulated by application of FEQ is subdivided into stream reaches (branches), parts of the stream system for which complete information on flow and depth are not required (dummy branches), and level-pool reservoirs. These components are connected by special features; that is, hydraulic control structures, including junctions, bridges, culverts, dams, waterfalls, spillways, weirs, side weirs, and pumps. The principles of conservation of mass and conservation of momentum are used to calculate the flow and depth throughout the stream system resulting from known initial and boundary conditions by means of an implicit finite-difference approximation at fixed points (computational nodes). The hydraulic characteristics of (1) branches including top width, area, first moment of area with respect to the water surface, conveyance, and flux coefficients and (2) special features (relations between flow and headwater and (or) tail-water elevations, including the operation of variable-geometry structures) are stored in function tables calculated in the companion program, Full EQuations UTiLities (FEQUTL). Function tables containing other information used in unsteady-flow simulation (boundary conditions, tributary inflows or outflows, gate settings, correction factors, characteristics of dummy branches and level-pool reservoirs, and wind speed and direction) are prepared by the user as detailed in this report. In the iterative solution scheme for flow and depth throughout the stream system, an interpolation of the function tables corresponding to the computational nodes throughout the stream system is done in the model. FEQ can be applied in the simulation of a wide range of stream configurations (including loops), lateral-inflow conditions, and special features. The

  20. A dynamic model of renal blood flow autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Marsh, D J

    1994-01-01

    To test whether a mathematical model combining dynamic models of the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism and the myogenic mechanism was sufficient to explain dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow, we compared model simulations with experimental data. To assess the dynamic characteristics...... of renal autoregulation, a broad band perturbation of the arterial pressure was employed in both the simulations and the experiments. Renal blood flow and tubular pressure were used as response variables in the comparison. To better approximate the situation in vivo where a large number of individual...... data, which shows a unimodal curve for the admittance phase. The ability of the model to reproduce the experimental data supports the hypothesis that dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow is due to the combined action of TGF and the myogenic response....

  1. Predicting the onset of dynamic instability of a cylindrical plate under axial flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcum, W.R., E-mail: marcumw@engr.orst.edu [Oregon State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, 116 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States); Woods, B.G. [Oregon State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, 116 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A semi-numerical flow induced vibration model is developed of a cylindrical plate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Test case results are presented and agree well with previous studies data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model identifies a relationship between forces and the plate natural frequency. - Abstract: The dynamic mechanical stability of a single cylindrical plate under flow conditions is considered herein. Numerous plate-type research reactors such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) comprise fuel elements which contain arrays of concentrically aligned cylindrical plates. Several of these reactors are licensed to operate at extreme heat fluxes; as a corollary their hydraulic designs require large flow rates sufficient to remove this heat. These flow rates may reach superficial velocities upwards of 15 m/s through individual flow channels. Given that fuel plates typically found in such research reactors are relatively long ({approx}1.2573 m), wide ({approx}0.1397 m), and extremely thin ({approx}0.00127 m) concern is drawn toward the susceptibility of flow induced vibration (FIV). In an attempt to gain a more comprehensive understanding toward the dynamic mechanical limit of stability of cylindrical plates, a FIV model was developed using semi-numerical methods. The FIV model was developed in two separate modules; a plate stability module, and a flow module. These modules were then coupled together to produce a FIV model. In this study, a set of test cases are presented on the plate stability module under free vibration conditions, comparing well against known available information from previous studies. Results are similarly presented on the flow module and compared against a RELAP5-3D model. Lastly, results of these coupled modules are presented and discussion is given toward the relationship between plate natural frequency, geometry, and plate membrane pressures.

  2. Debris flow analysis with a one dimensional dynamic run-out model that incorporates entrained material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Byron Quan; Remaître, Alexandre; van Asch, Theo; Malet, Jean-Philippe; van Westen, Cees

    2010-05-01

    Estimating the magnitude and the intensity of rapid landslides like debris flows is fundamental to evaluate quantitatively the hazard in a specific location. Intensity varies through the travelled course of the flow and can be described by physical features such as deposited volume, velocities, height of the flow, impact forces and pressures. Dynamic run-out models are able to characterize the distribution of the material, its intensity and define the zone where the elements will experience an impact. These models can provide valuable inputs for vulnerability and risk calculations. However, most dynamic run-out models assume a constant volume during the motion of the flow, ignoring the important role of material entrained along its path. Consequently, they neglect that the increase of volume enhances the mobility of the flow and can significantly influence the size of the potential impact area. An appropriate erosion mechanism needs to be established in the analyses of debris flows that will improve the results of dynamic modeling and consequently the quantitative evaluation of risk. The objective is to present and test a simple 1D debris flow model with a material entrainment concept based on limit equilibrium considerations and the generation of excess pore water pressure through undrained loading of the in situ bed material. The debris flow propagation model is based on a one dimensional finite difference solution of a depth-averaged form of the Navier-Stokes equations of fluid motions. The flow is treated as a laminar one phase material, which behavior is controlled by a visco-plastic Coulomb-Bingham rheology. The model parameters are evaluated and the model performance is tested on a debris flow event that occurred in 2003 in the Faucon torrent (Southern French Alps).

  3. Modelling flow dynamics in water distribution networks using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One such approach is the Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) technique. The advantage of ANNs is that they are robust and can be used to model complex linear and non-linear systems without making implicit assumptions. ANNs can be trained to forecast flow dynamics in a water distribution network. Such flow dynamics ...

  4. Nonlinear transport processes and fluid dynamics: Cylindrical Couette flow of Lennard-Jones fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayat, R.E.; Eu, B.C.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we report on calculations of flow profiles for cylindrical Couette flow of a Lennard-Jones fluid. The flow is subjected to a temperature gradient and thermoviscous effects are taken into consideration. We apply the generalized fluid dynamic equations which are provided by the modified moment method for the Boltzmann equation reported previously. The results of calculations are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo direct simulation method by K. Nanbu [Phys. Fluids 27, 2632 (1984)] for most of Knudsen numbers for which the simulation data are available

  5. Development of one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code 'GFLOW' for groundwater flow and contaminant transport analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahatgaonkar, P. S.; Datta, D.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of groundwater movement and contaminant transport in soil is an important problem in many branches of science and engineering. This includes groundwater hydrology, environmental engineering, soil science, agricultural engineering and also nuclear engineering. Specifically, in nuclear engineering it is applicable in the design of spent fuel storage pools and waste management sites in the nuclear power plants. Ground water modeling involves the simulation of flow and contaminant transport by groundwater flow. In the context of contaminated soil and groundwater system, numerical simulations are typically used to demonstrate compliance with regulatory standard. A one-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics code GFLOW had been developed based on the Finite Difference Method for simulating groundwater flow and contaminant transport through saturated and unsaturated soil. The code is validated with the analytical model and the benchmarking cases available in the literature. (authors)

  6. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Stewart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses computations of blood flow through prosthetic tilting disk valve. Computational procedure developed in simulation used to design better artificial hearts and valves by reducing or eliminating following adverse flow characteristics: large pressure losses, which prevent hearts from working efficiently; separated and secondary flows, which causes clotting; and high turbulent shear stresses, which damages red blood cells. Report reiterates and expands upon part of NASA technical memorandum "Computed Flow Through an Artificial Heart and Valve" (ARC-12983). Also based partly on research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478).

  7. OTSGI--a program analysing two-phase flow instabilities in helical tubes of once-through steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shaoping; Zhou Fangde; Wang Maohua

    1998-01-01

    The author has studied the two-phases flow instabilities of the helical tubes of once-through steam generator. Using liner-frequency-domain analytical method, the authors have derived out a mathematical model and designed the program. In this model, the authors also have considered the thermal dynamic characteristics of the tube's wall. The program is used to calculate the threshold of the stability and the influences of some factors, such as entrance throttling coefficient, system pressure, entrance supercooling degree, et al. The outcomes are compared with other studies

  8. Dynamic flow control strategies of vehicle SCR Urea Dosing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Zhang, Youtong; Asif, Malik

    2015-03-01

    Selective Catalyst Reduction(SCR) Urea Dosing System(UDS) directly affects the system accuracy and the dynamic response performance of a vehicle. However, the UDS dynamic response is hard to keep up with the changes of the engine's operating conditions. That will lead to low NO X conversion efficiency or NH3 slip. In order to optimize the injection accuracy and the response speed of the UDS in dynamic conditions, an advanced control strategy based on an air-assisted volumetric UDS is presented. It covers the methods of flow compensation and switching working conditions. The strategy is authenticated on an UDS and tested in different dynamic conditions. The result shows that the control strategy discussed results in higher dynamic accuracy and faster dynamic response speed of UDS. The inject deviation range is improved from being between -8% and 10% to -4% and 2% and became more stable than before, and the dynamic response time was shortened from 200 ms to 150 ms. The ETC cycle result shows that after using the new strategy the NH3 emission is reduced by 60%, and the NO X emission remains almost unchanged. The trade-off between NO X conversion efficiency and NH3 slip is mitigated. The studied flow compensation and switching working conditions can improve the dynamic performance of the UDS significantly and make the UDS dynamic response keep up with the changes of the engine's operating conditions quickly.

  9. [Application of optical flow dynamic texture in land use/cover change detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Gong, Yi-Long; Zhang, Yi; Duan, Wei

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, a novel change detection approach for high resolution remote sensing images is proposed based on the optical flow dynamic texture (OFDT), which could achieve the land use & land cover change information automatically with a dynamic description of ground-object changes. This paper describes the ground-object gradual change process from the principle using optical flow theory, which breaks the ground-object sudden change hypothesis in remote sensing change detection methods in the past. As the steps of this method are simple, it could be integrated in the systems and software such as Land Resource Management and Urban Planning software that needs to find ground-object changes. This method takes into account the temporal dimension feature between remote sensing images, which provides a richer set of information for remote sensing change detection, thereby improving the status that most of the change detection methods are mainly dependent on the spatial dimension information. In this article, optical flow dynamic texture is the basic reflection of changes, and it is used in high resolution remote sensing image support vector machine post-classification change detection, combined with spectral information. The texture in the temporal dimension which is considered in this article has a smaller amount of data than most of the textures in the spatial dimensions. The highly automated texture computing has only one parameter to set, which could relax the onerous manual evaluation present status. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is evaluated with the 2011 and 2012 QuickBird datasets covering Duerbert Mongolian Autonomous County of Daqing City, China. Then, the effects of different optical flow smooth coefficient and the impact on the description of the ground-object changes in the method are deeply analyzed: The experiment result is satisfactory, with an 87.29% overall accuracy and an 0.850 7 Kappa index, and the method achieves better

  10. Numerical methods for multi-scale modeling of non-Newtonian flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeonidis, Vasileios

    This work presents numerical methods for the simulation of Non-Newtonian fluids in the continuum as well as the mesoscopic level. The former is achieved with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) spectral h/p methods, while the latter employs the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) technique. Physical results are also presented as a motivation for a clear understanding of the underlying numerical approaches. The macroscopic simulations employ two non-Newtonian models, namely the Reiner-Ravlin (RR) and the viscoelastic FENE-P model. (1) A spectral viscosity method defined by two parameters ε, M is used to stabilize the FENE-P conformation tensor c. Convergence studies are presented for different combinations of these parameters. Two boundary conditions for the tensor c are also investigated. (2) Agreement is achieved with other works for Stokes flow of a two-dimensional cylinder in a channel. Comparison of the axial normal stress and drag coefficient on the cylinder is presented. Further, similar results from unsteady two- and three-dimensional turbulent flows past a flat plate in a channel are shown. (3) The RR problem is formulated for nearly incompressible flows, with the introduction of a mathematically equivalent tensor formulation. A spectral viscosity method and polynomial over-integration are studied. Convergence studies, including a three-dimensional channel flow with a parallel slot, investigate numerical problems arising from elemental boundaries and sharp corners. (4) The round hole pressure problem is presented for Newtonian and RR fluids in geometries with different hole sizes. Comparison with experimental data is made for the Newtonian case. The flaw in the experimental assumptions of undisturbed pressure opposite the hole is revealed, while good agreement with the data is shown. The Higashitani-Pritchard kinematical theory for RR, fluids is recovered for round holes and an approximate formula for the RR Stokes hole pressure is presented. The mesoscopic

  11. Predicting Flow Reversals in a Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulated Thermosyphon Using Data Assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, Andrew J; Dubief, Yves; Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Danforth, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    A thermal convection loop is a annular chamber filled with water, heated on the bottom half and cooled on the top half. With sufficiently large forcing of heat, the direction of fluid flow in the loop oscillates chaotically, dynamics analogous to the Earth's weather. As is the case for state-of-the-art weather models, we only observe the statistics over a small region of state space, making prediction difficult. To overcome this challenge, data assimilation (DA) methods, and specifically ensemble methods, use the computational model itself to estimate the uncertainty of the model to optimally combine these observations into an initial condition for predicting the future state. Here, we build and verify four distinct DA methods, and then, we perform a twin model experiment with the computational fluid dynamics simulation of the loop using the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF) to assimilate observations and predict flow reversals. We show that using adaptively shaped localized covariance outperforms static localized covariance with the ETKF, and allows for the use of less observations in predicting flow reversals. We also show that a Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) of the temperature and velocity fields recovers the low dimensional system underlying reversals, finding specific modes which together are predictive of reversal direction.

  12. Predicting Flow Reversals in a Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulated Thermosyphon Using Data Assimilation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Reagan

    Full Text Available A thermal convection loop is a annular chamber filled with water, heated on the bottom half and cooled on the top half. With sufficiently large forcing of heat, the direction of fluid flow in the loop oscillates chaotically, dynamics analogous to the Earth's weather. As is the case for state-of-the-art weather models, we only observe the statistics over a small region of state space, making prediction difficult. To overcome this challenge, data assimilation (DA methods, and specifically ensemble methods, use the computational model itself to estimate the uncertainty of the model to optimally combine these observations into an initial condition for predicting the future state. Here, we build and verify four distinct DA methods, and then, we perform a twin model experiment with the computational fluid dynamics simulation of the loop using the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF to assimilate observations and predict flow reversals. We show that using adaptively shaped localized covariance outperforms static localized covariance with the ETKF, and allows for the use of less observations in predicting flow reversals. We also show that a Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD of the temperature and velocity fields recovers the low dimensional system underlying reversals, finding specific modes which together are predictive of reversal direction.

  13. A method of solution for the determination of the velocity profiles in turbulent flow through annular tobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmal, M.; Russo, Q.; Almeida, M.S.; Bozzo, S.

    1975-01-01

    A method of solutions is presented for the determination of the velocity profiles in turbulent flow through annular tubes, based on the Von Karman similarity theory developed by Quarmby. The parameters found by Quarmby appearing in the velocity profiles and determined experimentally by different authors were approximated by polynonial functions of variable degree, as function of the Reynolds numbers. The Runge-Kutta-Nystrom method was used in the integration of the differential equations and the systematic of solution is presented in a computer program. The calculated results were compared to the experimental date and presented a deviation of 10 -2 % [pt

  14. A hydrothermal flow-through apparatus to simulate leaching of nuclear waste forms under quasi-dynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimann, R.B.

    1985-03-01

    A hydrothermal flow-through apparatus has been designed that will allow the testing of individual waste package components, as well as combinations of these, under a wide range of environmental conditions. The maximum permissible temperature is 700 degrees C, while the maximum pressure is 300 MPa. Flow rates can be adjusted by sequential operation of a pneumatically operated valve with preset pause and working cycles. The main applications of the apparatus to nuclear fuel waste management research are: (i) the study of migration of ionic species through a rock column at specified hydraulic head, and (ii) the study of the rate of leaching of radionuclides from waste forms under disposal vault conditions in the presence of groundwater with variable flow rates

  15. Numerical modeling of turbulent swirling flow in a multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor using dynamic DDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, James C.; Liu, Zhenping; Fox, Rodney O.; Passalacqua, Alberto; Olsen, Michael G.

    2015-11-01

    The multi-inlet vortex reactor (MIVR) has been developed to provide a platform for rapid mixing in the application of flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) for manufacturing functional nanoparticles. Unfortunately, commonly used RANS methods are unable to accurately model this complex swirling flow. Large eddy simulations have also been problematic, as expensive fine grids to accurately model the flow are required. These dilemmas led to the strategy of applying a Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES) method to the vortex reactor. In the current work, the turbulent swirling flow inside a scaled-up MIVR has been investigated by using a dynamic DDES model. In the DDES model, the eddy viscosity has a form similar to the Smagorinsky sub-grid viscosity in LES and allows the implementation of a dynamic procedure to determine its coefficient. The complex recirculating back flow near the reactor center has been successfully captured by using this dynamic DDES model. Moreover, the simulation results are found to agree with experimental data for mean velocity and Reynolds stresses.

  16. Analysis of liver blood flow by dynamic hepatic scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Tianhao; Jia Shiquan

    1996-01-01

    Liver blood flow was studied in 45 patients with solitary malignant liver cancer, 17 patients with multiple liver metastases, 18 patients with benign liver tumor and 20 control subjects by dynamic hepatic scintigraphy. The hepatic perfusion index (HPI) in control subjects, patients with liver malignant cancer and benign tumor was 0.33 +- 0.069, 0.589 +- 0.084, 0.384 +-0.046 respectively, and the mesenteric fraction (MF) was 0.56 +- 0.054, 0.246 +- 0.064, 0.524 +- 0.086 respectively. In conclusion, flow scintigraphy is a non-invasive, sensitive and repeatable method for detection of liver tumor

  17. Effect of fluid friction on interstitial fluid flow coupled with blood flow through solid tumor microvascular network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefidgar, Mostafa; Soltani, M; Raahemifar, Kaamran; Bazmara, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    A solid tumor is investigated as porous media for fluid flow simulation. Most of the studies use Darcy model for porous media. In Darcy model, the fluid friction is neglected and a few simplified assumptions are implemented. In this study, the effect of these assumptions is studied by considering Brinkman model. A multiscale mathematical method which calculates fluid flow to a solid tumor is used in this study to investigate how neglecting fluid friction affects the solid tumor simulation. The mathematical method involves processes such as blood flow through vessels and solute and fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. The sprouting angiogenesis model is used for generating capillary network and then fluid flow governing equations are implemented to calculate blood flow through the tumor-induced capillary network. Finally, the two models of porous media are used for modeling fluid flow in normal and tumor tissues in three different shapes of tumors. Simulations of interstitial fluid transport in a solid tumor demonstrate that the simplifications used in Darcy model affect the interstitial velocity and Brinkman model predicts a lower value for interstitial velocity than the values that Darcy model predicts.

  18. Methods of measurement signal acquisition from the rotational flow meter for frequency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Świsulski Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the simplest and commonly used instruments for measuring the flow of homogeneous substances is the rotational flow meter. The main part of such a device is a rotor (vane or screw rotating at a speed which is the function of the fluid or gas flow rate. A pulse signal with a frequency proportional to the speed of the rotor is obtained at the sensor output. For measurements in dynamic conditions, a variable interval between pulses prohibits the analysis of the measuring signal. Therefore, the authors of the article developed a method involving the determination of measured values on the basis of the last inter-pulse interval preceding the moment designated by the timing generator. For larger changes of the measured value at a predetermined time, the value can be determined by means of extrapolation of the two adjacent interpulse ranges, assuming a linear change in the flow. The proposed methods allow analysis which requires constant spacing between measurements, allowing for an analysis of the dynamics of changes in the test flow, eg. using a Fourier transform. To present the advantages of these methods simulations of flow measurement were carried out with a DRH-1140 rotor flow meter from the company Kobold.

  19. Flow visualization through particle image velocimetry in realistic model of rhesus monkey's upper airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Woong; Phuong, Nguyen Lu; Aramaki, Shin-Ichiro; Ito, Kazuhide

    2018-05-01

    Studies concerning inhalation toxicology and respiratory drug-delivery systems require biological testing involving experiments performed on animals. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is an effective in vitro technique that reveals detailed inhalation flow patterns, thereby assisting analyses of inhalation exposure to various substances. A realistic model of a rhesus-monkey upper airway was developed to investigate flow patterns in its oral and nasal cavities through PIV experiments performed under steady-state constant inhalation conditions at various flow rates-4, 10, and 20 L/min. Flow rate of the fluid passing through the inlet into the trachea was measured to obtain characteristic flow mechanisms, and flow phenomena in the model were confirmed via characterized flow fields. It was observed that increase in flow rate leads to constant velocity profiles in upper and lower trachea regions. It is expected that the results of this study would contribute to future validation of studies aimed at developing in silico models, especially those involving computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Flow dynamics of volume-heated boiling pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Jones, O.C.; Chen, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Safety analyses of fast breeder reactors require understanding of the two-phase fluid dynamic and heat transfer characteristics of volume-heated boiling pool systems. Design of direct contact three-phase boilers, of practical interest in the chemical industries also requires understanding of the fundamental two-phase flow and heat transfer behavior of volume boiling systems. Several experiments have been recently reported relevant to the boundary heat-loss mechanisms of boiling pool systems. Considerably less is known about the two-phase fluid dynamic behavior of such systems. This paper describes an experimental investigation of the steady-state flow dynamics of volume-heated boiling pool systems

  1. A New Method to Simulate Free Surface Flows for Viscoelastic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Free surface flows arise in a variety of engineering applications. To predict the dynamic characteristics of such problems, specific numerical methods are required to accurately capture the shape of free surface. This paper proposed a new method which combined the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE technique with the Finite Volume Method (FVM to simulate the time-dependent viscoelastic free surface flows. Based on an open source CFD toolbox called OpenFOAM, we designed an ALE-FVM free surface simulation platform. In the meantime, the die-swell flow had been investigated with our proposed platform to make a further analysis of free surface phenomenon. The results validated the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed method for free surface simulation in both Newtonian fluid and viscoelastic fluid.

  2. Dynamic Model for the Stocks and Release Flows of Engineered Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Runsheng; Qin, Yuwei; Suh, Sangwon; Keller, Arturo A

    2017-11-07

    Most existing life-cycle release models for engineered nanomaterials (ENM) are static, ignoring the dynamics of stock and flows of ENMs. Our model, nanoRelease, estimates the annual releases of ENMs from manufacturing, use, and disposal of a product explicitly taking stock and flow dynamics into account. Given the variabilities in key parameters (e.g., service life of products and annual release rate during use) nanoRelease is designed as a stochastic model. We apply nanoRelease to three ENMs (TiO 2 , SiO 2 and FeO x ) used in paints and coatings through seven product applications, including construction and building, household and furniture, and automotive for the period from 2000 to 2020 using production volume and market projection information. We also consider model uncertainties using Monte Carlo simulation. Compared with 2016, the total annual releases of ENMs in 2020 will increase by 34-40%, and the stock will increase by 28-34%. The fraction of the end-of-life release among total release flows will increase from 11% in 2002 to 43% in 2020. As compared to static models, our dynamic model predicts about an order of magnitude lower values for the amount of ENM released from this sector in the near-term while stock continues to build up in the system.

  3. Study of Dynamic Flow and Mixing Performances of Tri-Screw Extruders with Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    X. Z. Zhu; G. Wang; Y. D. He; Z. F. Cheng

    2013-01-01

    There is a special circumfluence in the center region of cross-section for a tri-screw extruder. To study the effect of the dynamic center region on the flow and mixing mechanism of the tri-screw extruder, 2D finite element modeling was used to reduce the axial effects. Based on the particle tracking technology, the nonlinear dynamics of a typical particle motions in the center region was carried out and the mixing process in the tri-screw extruder was analyzed with Poincaré maps. Moreover, m...

  4. Numerical simulation of strongly swirling turbulent flows through an abrupt expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, Joongcheol; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-01-01

    Turbulent swirling flow through an abrupt axisymmetric expansion is investigated numerically using detached-eddy simulation at Reynolds numbers = 3.0 x 10 4 and 1.0 x 10 5 . The effects of swirl intensity on the coherent dynamics of the flow are systematically studied by carrying out numerical simulations over a range of swirl numbers from 0.17 to 1.23. Comparison of the computed solutions with the experimental measurements of shows that the numerical simulations resolve both the axial and swirl mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles with very good accuracy. Our simulations show that, along with moderate mesh refinement, critical prerequisite for accurate predictions of the flow downstream of the expansion is the specification of inlet conditions at a plane sufficiently far upstream of the expansion in order to avoid the spurious suppression of the low-frequency, large-scale precessing of the vortex core. Coherent structure visualizations with the q-criterion, friction lines and Lagrangian particle tracking are used to elucidate the rich dynamics of the flow as a function of the swirl number with emphasis on the onset of the spiral vortex breakdown, the onset and extent of the on-axis recirculation region and the large-scale instabilities along the shear layers and the pipe wall.

  5. Dynamic imaging through turbid media based on digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiping; Zhong, Jingang

    2014-03-01

    Imaging through turbid media using visible or IR light instead of harmful x ray is still a challenging problem, especially in dynamic imaging. A method of dynamic imaging through turbid media using digital holography is presented. In order to match the coherence length between the dynamic object wave and the reference wave, a cw laser is used. To solve the problem of difficult focusing in imaging through turbid media, an autofocus technology is applied. To further enhance the image contrast, a spatial filtering technique is used. A description of digital holography and experiments of imaging the objects hidden in turbid media are presented. The experimental result shows that dynamic images of the objects can be achieved by the use of digital holography.

  6. An autonomous dynamical system captures all LCSs in three-dimensional unsteady flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oettinger, David; Haller, George

    2016-10-01

    Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) are material surfaces that shape the finite-time tracer patterns in flows with arbitrary time dependence. Depending on their deformation properties, elliptic and hyperbolic LCSs have been identified from different variational principles, solving different equations. Here we observe that, in three dimensions, initial positions of all variational LCSs are invariant manifolds of the same autonomous dynamical system, generated by the intermediate eigenvector field, ξ 2 (x 0 ), of the Cauchy-Green strain tensor. This ξ 2 -system allows for the detection of LCSs in any unsteady flow by classical methods, such as Poincaré maps, developed for autonomous dynamical systems. As examples, we consider both steady and time-aperiodic flows, and use their dual ξ 2 -system to uncover both hyperbolic and elliptic LCSs from a single computation.

  7. Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linkis, P; Jørgensen, L G; Olesen, H L

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity. J. Appl. Physiol. 78(1): 12-16, 1995.--Anterior (ACA) and middle (MCA) cerebral artery mean flow velocities (Vmean) and pulsatility indexes were determined using transcranial Doppler in 14 subjects during dynamic exercise afte...

  8. Research on the Method of Traffic Organization and Optimization Based on Dynamic Traffic Flow Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-bin Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern transportation system is becoming sluggish by traffic jams, so much so that it can harm the economic and society in our country. One of the reasons is the surging vehicles day by day. Another reason is the shortage of the traffic supply seriously. But the most important reason is that the traffic organization and optimization hardly met the conditions of modern transport development. In this paper, the practical method of the traffic organization and optimization used in regional area is explored by the dynamic traffic network analysis method. Firstly, the operational states of the regional traffic network are obtained by simulation method based on the self-developed traffic simulation software DynaCHINA, in which the improved traffic flow simulation model was proposed in order to be more suitable for actual domestic urban transport situation. Then the appropriated optimization model and algorithm were proposed according to different optimized content and organization goals, and the traffic simulation processes more suitable to regional optimization were designed exactly. Finally, a regional network in Tai’an city was selected as an example. The simulation results show that the proposed method is effective and feasible. It can provide strong scientific and technological support for the traffic management department.

  9. Instantaneous aerosol dynamics in a turbulent flow

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2012-01-01

    Dibutyl phthalate aerosol particles evolution dynamics in a turbulent mixing layer is simulated by means of direct numerical simulation for the flow field and the direct quadrature method of moments for the aerosol evolution. Most par-ticles are nucleated in a thin layer region corresponding to a specific narrow temperature range near the cool stream side. However, particles undergo high growth rate on the hot stream side due to condensation. Coagulation decreases the total particle number density at a rate which is highly correlated to the in-stantaneous number density.

  10. Research on Dynamic Dissolving Model and Experiment for Rock Salt under Different Flow Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinrong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing deep rock salt cavern is not only a widely recognized energy reserve method but also a key development direction for implementing the energy strategic reserve plan. And rock salt cavern adopts solution mining techniques to realize building cavity. In view of this, the paper, based on the dissolving properties of rock salt, being simplified and hypothesized the dynamic dissolving process of rock salt, combined conditions between dissolution effect and seepage effect in establishing dynamic dissolving models of rock salt under different flow quantities. Devices were also designed to test the dynamic dissolving process for rock salt samples under different flow quantities and then utilized the finite-difference method to find the numerical solution of the dynamic dissolving model. The artificial intelligence algorithm, Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (PSO, was finally introduced to conduct inverse analysis of parameters on the established model, whose calculation results coincide with the experimental data.

  11. Fiber optic liquid mass flow sensor and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Gregory, Don Allen (Inventor); Wiley, John T. (Inventor); Pedersen, Kevin W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for sensing the mass flow rate of a fluid flowing through a pipe. A light beam containing plural individual wavelengths is projected from one side of the pipe across the width of the pipe so as to pass through the fluid under test. Fiber optic couplers located at least two positions on the opposite side of the pipe are used to detect the light beam. A determination is then made of the relative strengths of the light beam for each wavelength at the at least two positions and based at least in part on these relative strengths, the mass flow rate of the fluid is determined.

  12. Spatial statistics for predicting flow through a rock fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coakley, K.J.

    1989-03-01

    Fluid flow through a single rock fracture depends on the shape of the space between the upper and lower pieces of rock which define the fracture. In this thesis, the normalized flow through a fracture, i.e. the equivalent permeability of a fracture, is predicted in terms of spatial statistics computed from the arrangement of voids, i.e. open spaces, and contact areas within the fracture. Patterns of voids and contact areas, with complexity typical of experimental data, are simulated by clipping a correlated Gaussian process defined on a N by N pixel square region. The voids have constant aperture; the distance between the upper and lower surfaces which define the fracture is either zero or a constant. Local flow is assumed to be proportional to local aperture cubed times local pressure gradient. The flow through a pattern of voids and contact areas is solved using a finite-difference method. After solving for the flow through simulated 10 by 10 by 30 pixel patterns of voids and contact areas, a model to predict equivalent permeability is developed. The first model is for patterns with 80% voids where all voids have the same aperture. The equivalent permeability of a pattern is predicted in terms of spatial statistics computed from the arrangement of voids and contact areas within the pattern. Four spatial statistics are examined. The change point statistic measures how often adjacent pixel alternate from void to contact area (or vice versa ) in the rows of the patterns which are parallel to the overall flow direction. 37 refs., 66 figs., 41 tabs

  13. State-Resolved Metal Nanoparticle Dynamics Viewed through the Combined Lenses of Ultrafast and Magneto-optical Spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tian; Herbert, Patrick J; Zheng, Hongjun; Knappenberger, Kenneth L

    2018-05-08

    of transient, excited states, providing quantification of important parameters such as spin and orbital angular momenta as well as the energy gaps that separate electronic fine structure states. Ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) can be used to understand how these details influence state-to-state carrier dynamics. In combination, VTVH and 2DES methods can provide chemists with detailed information regarding the structure-dependent and state-specific flow of energy through metal nanoclusters. In this Account, we highlight recent advances toward understanding structure-dependent carrier dynamics for metals spanning the sub-nanometer to tens of nanometers length scale. We demonstrate the use of UCLEM methods for arresting interband scattering effects. For sub-nanometer thiol-protected nanoclusters, we discuss the effectiveness of VTVH for distinguishing state-specific radiative recombination originating from a gold core versus organometallic protecting layers. This state specificity is refined further using femtosecond 2DES and two-color methods to isolate so-called superatom state dynamics and vibrationally mediated spin-conversion and emission processes. Finally, we discuss prospects for merging VTVH and 2DES methods into a single platform.

  14. Magma flow through elastic-walled dikes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, Onno; Woods, A.W.; de Boer, A

    2005-01-01

    A convection–diffusion model for the averaged flow of a viscous, incompressible magma through an elastic medium is considered. The magma flows through a dike from a magma reservoir to the Earth’s surface; only changes in dike width and velocity over large vertical length scales relative to the

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Lithium/Thionyl Chloride Battery with Electrolyte Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, W.B.; Jungst, Rudolph G.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Wang, C.Y.; Weidner, John.

    1999-06-11

    A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery. The model accounts for not only transport of species and charge, but also the electrode porosity variations and the electrolyte flow induced by the volume reduction caused by electrochemical reactions. Numerical simulations are performed using a finite volume method of computational fluid dynamics. The predicted discharge curves for various temperatures are compared to the experimental data with excellent agreement. Moreover, the simulation results. in conjunction with computer visualization and animation techniques, confirm that cell utilization in the temperature and current range of interest is limited by pore plugging or clogging of the front side of the cathode as a result of LiCl precipitation. The detailed two-dimensional flow simulation also shows that the electrolyte is replenished from the cell header predominantly through the separator into the front of the cathode during most parts of the discharge, especially for higher cell temperatures.

  16. Narrowing the gap between eye care needs and service provision: a model to dynamically regulate the flow of personnel through a multiple entry and exit training programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masnick Keith

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is to present a complex yet transparent, computable model to simulate the regulation of the flow of personnel through a previously described multiple-entry, multiple-exit eye care training scheme linked to the health workforce. This methodology should be a useful tool for the planner; it can address changes and feedbacks over time and be sensitive to any unexpected consequences of the interactions. The same model template can be applied to calculate the finances associated with the personnel flow. Presentation of the hypothesis The worth of any model or set of concepts of human resources for health is considerably enhanced by actual field application. However, implementation involves the selection of one set of parameters and a large, long-term commitment of resources. A far less expensive and time-consuming, yet still effective, method of testing assumptions and ideas would be to simulate their application using a variety of possible inputs, structural configurations and/or desired outcomes. To that end, this paper presents a computable, dynamic model of personnel flows within a health system. Testing the hypothesis Some testing of the model has been demonstrated in a previous paper. However, the value of the model is that all stakeholders can enter their own data and parameter assumptions and readily review the outcomes. Implications of the hypothesis The complex yet easy-to-use model presented in this paper opens the debate on current and future policy to any stakeholder. A very wide range of scenarios can be considered and a selected option can be monitored and changed dynamically over time.

  17. A dynamic discretization method for reliability inference in Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jiandao; Collette, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The material and modeling parameters that drive structural reliability analysis for marine structures are subject to a significant uncertainty. This is especially true when time-dependent degradation mechanisms such as structural fatigue cracking are considered. Through inspection and monitoring, information such as crack location and size can be obtained to improve these parameters and the corresponding reliability estimates. Dynamic Bayesian Networks (DBNs) are a powerful and flexible tool to model dynamic system behavior and update reliability and uncertainty analysis with life cycle data for problems such as fatigue cracking. However, a central challenge in using DBNs is the need to discretize certain types of continuous random variables to perform network inference while still accurately tracking low-probability failure events. Most existing discretization methods focus on getting the overall shape of the distribution correct, with less emphasis on the tail region. Therefore, a novel scheme is presented specifically to estimate the likelihood of low-probability failure events. The scheme is an iterative algorithm which dynamically partitions the discretization intervals at each iteration. Through applications to two stochastic crack-growth example problems, the algorithm is shown to be robust and accurate. Comparisons are presented between the proposed approach and existing methods for the discretization problem. - Highlights: • A dynamic discretization method is developed for low-probability events in DBNs. • The method is compared to existing approaches on two crack growth problems. • The method is shown to improve on existing methods for low-probability events

  18. Water flow through the polypropylene-based geotextiles.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Patanaik, A

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available of incompressible non-Newto- nian fluid through the pores of nonwoven geotextiles can be solved by Navier-Stokes equation15,16 along with Darcy’s law. The Navier-Stokes equation for fluid flow is given by: q @u @t �r h ruþ ruð Þ T � �h i þ q u � Dð Þuþ Dp..., L. Paper Presented in Finite Element Modeling of Textiles and Textile Composites Conference, St-Petersburg, Russia, Septem- ber 26–28, 2007. 15. Gresho, P. M.; Sani, R. L. Incompressible Flow and the Finite Element Method; Wiley: New York, 2000...

  19. Dynamic Characteristics of The DSI-Type Constant-Flow Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yuan; Hu, Sheng-Yan; Chou, Hsien-Chin; Lee, Hsing-Han

    Constant flow valves have been presented in industrial applications or academic studies, which compensate recess pressures of a hydrostatic bearing to resist load fluctuating. The flow rate of constant-flow valves can be constant in spite of the pressure changes in recesses, however the design parameters must be specified. This paper analyzes the dynamic responses of DSI-type constant-flow valves that is designed as double pistons on both ends of a spool with single feedback of working pressure and regulating restriction at inlet. In this study the static analysis presents the specific relationships among design parameters for constant flow rate and the dynamic analyses give the variations around the constant flow rate as the working pressure fluctuates.

  20. Parameterizing Coefficients of a POD-Based Dynamical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Virginia L.

    2010-01-01

    A method of parameterizing the coefficients of a dynamical system based of a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) representing the flow dynamics of a viscous fluid has been introduced. (A brief description of POD is presented in the immediately preceding article.) The present parameterization method is intended to enable construction of the dynamical system to accurately represent the temporal evolution of the flow dynamics over a range of Reynolds numbers. The need for this or a similar method arises as follows: A procedure that includes direct numerical simulation followed by POD, followed by Galerkin projection to a dynamical system has been proven to enable representation of flow dynamics by a low-dimensional model at the Reynolds number of the simulation. However, a more difficult task is to obtain models that are valid over a range of Reynolds numbers. Extrapolation of low-dimensional models by use of straightforward Reynolds-number-based parameter continuation has proven to be inadequate for successful prediction of flows. A key part of the problem of constructing a dynamical system to accurately represent the temporal evolution of the flow dynamics over a range of Reynolds numbers is the problem of understanding and providing for the variation of the coefficients of the dynamical system with the Reynolds number. Prior methods do not enable capture of temporal dynamics over ranges of Reynolds numbers in low-dimensional models, and are not even satisfactory when large numbers of modes are used. The basic idea of the present method is to solve the problem through a suitable parameterization of the coefficients of the dynamical system. The parameterization computations involve utilization of the transfer of kinetic energy between modes as a function of Reynolds number. The thus-parameterized dynamical system accurately predicts the flow dynamics and is applicable to a range of flow problems in the dynamical regime around the Hopf bifurcation. Parameter

  1. Computation of transitional flow past a circular cylinder using multiblock lattice Boltzmann method with a dynamic subgrid scale model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premnath, Kannan N; Pattison, Martin J; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2013-01-01

    Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a kinetic based numerical scheme for the simulation of fluid flow. While the approach has attracted considerable attention during the last two decades, there is a need for systematic investigation of its applicability for complex canonical turbulent flow problems of engineering interest, where the nature of the numerical properties of the underlying scheme plays an important role for their accurate solution. In this paper, we discuss and evaluate a LBM based on a multiblock approach for efficient large eddy simulation of three-dimensional external flow past a circular cylinder in the transitional regime characterized by the presence of multiple scales. For enhanced numerical stability at higher Reynolds numbers, a multiple relaxation time formulation is considered. The effect of subgrid scales is represented by means of a Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity model, where the model coefficient is computed locally by means of a dynamic procedure, providing better representation of flow physics with reduced empiricism. Simulations are performed for a Reynolds number of 3900 based on the free stream velocity and cylinder diameter for which prior data is available for comparison. The presence of laminar boundary layer which separates into a pair of shear layers that evolve into turbulent wakes impose particular challenge for numerical methods for this condition. The relatively low numerical dissipation introduced by the inherently parallel and second-order accurate LBM is an important computational asset in this regard. Computations using five different grid levels, where the various blocks are suitably aligned to resolve multiscale flow features show that the structure of the recirculation region is well reproduced and the statistics of the mean flow and turbulent fluctuations are in satisfactory agreement with prior data. (paper)

  2. Computation of transitional flow past a circular cylinder using multiblock lattice Boltzmann method with a dynamic subgrid scale model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premnath, Kannan N [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado Denver, 1200 Larimer Street, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); Pattison, Martin J [HyPerComp Inc., 2629 Townsgate Road, Suite 105, Westlake Village, CA 91361 (United States); Banerjee, Sanjoy, E-mail: kannan.premnath@ucdenver.edu, E-mail: kannan.np@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY 10031 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a kinetic based numerical scheme for the simulation of fluid flow. While the approach has attracted considerable attention during the last two decades, there is a need for systematic investigation of its applicability for complex canonical turbulent flow problems of engineering interest, where the nature of the numerical properties of the underlying scheme plays an important role for their accurate solution. In this paper, we discuss and evaluate a LBM based on a multiblock approach for efficient large eddy simulation of three-dimensional external flow past a circular cylinder in the transitional regime characterized by the presence of multiple scales. For enhanced numerical stability at higher Reynolds numbers, a multiple relaxation time formulation is considered. The effect of subgrid scales is represented by means of a Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity model, where the model coefficient is computed locally by means of a dynamic procedure, providing better representation of flow physics with reduced empiricism. Simulations are performed for a Reynolds number of 3900 based on the free stream velocity and cylinder diameter for which prior data is available for comparison. The presence of laminar boundary layer which separates into a pair of shear layers that evolve into turbulent wakes impose particular challenge for numerical methods for this condition. The relatively low numerical dissipation introduced by the inherently parallel and second-order accurate LBM is an important computational asset in this regard. Computations using five different grid levels, where the various blocks are suitably aligned to resolve multiscale flow features show that the structure of the recirculation region is well reproduced and the statistics of the mean flow and turbulent fluctuations are in satisfactory agreement with prior data. (paper)

  3. Rotor wake and flow analysis using a coupled Eulerian–Lagrangian method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjie Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A coupled Eulerian–Lagrangian methodology was developed in this paper in order to provide an efficient and accurate tool for rotor wake and flow prediction. A Eulerian-based Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS solver was employed to simulate the grid-covered near-body zone, and a grid-free Lagrangian-based viscous wake method (VWM was implemented to model the complicated rotor-wake dynamics in the off-body wake zone. A carefully designed coupling strategy was developed to pass the flow variables between two solvers. A sample case of a forward flying rotor was performed first in order to show the capabilities of the VWM for wake simulations. Next, the coupled method was applied to rotors in several representative flight conditions. Excellent agreement regarding wake geometry, chordwise pressure distribution and sectional normal force with available experimental data demonstrated the validity of the method. In addition, a comparison with the full computational fluid dynamics (CFD method is presented to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed coupled method.

  4. Single phase and two-phase flow pressure losses through restrictions, expansions and inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenat, P.; Solignac, P.

    1984-11-01

    We give a selection of methods to predict pressure losses through retrictions, expansions and inserts. In single phase flow, we give the classical method based on the one-dimensional momentum and mass balances. In two-phase flow, we propose the method given by Harshe et al. and an empirical approach suggested by Chisholm. We notice the distinction between long and short inserts depends upon wether or not the vena contracta lies within insert. Finally, we propose three correlations to calculate void fraction through the singularities which have been considered [fr

  5. Simulation of granular and gas-solid flows using discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyalakuntla, Dhanunjay S.

    2003-10-01

    In recent years there has been increased research activity in the experimental and numerical study of gas-solid flows. Flows of this type have numerous applications in the energy, pharmaceuticals, and chemicals process industries. Typical applications include pulverized coal combustion, flow and heat transfer in bubbling and circulating fluidized beds, hopper and chute flows, pneumatic transport of pharmaceutical powders and pellets, and many more. The present work addresses the study of gas-solid flows using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques and discrete element simulation methods (DES) combined. Many previous studies of coupled gas-solid flows have been performed assuming the solid phase as a continuum with averaged properties and treating the gas-solid flow as constituting of interpenetrating continua. Instead, in the present work, the gas phase flow is simulated using continuum theory and the solid phase flow is simulated using DES. DES treats each solid particle individually, thus accounting for its dynamics due to particle-particle interactions, particle-wall interactions as well as fluid drag and buoyancy. The present work involves developing efficient DES methods for dense granular flow and coupling this simulation to continuum simulations of the gas phase flow. Simulations have been performed to observe pure granular behavior in vibrating beds. Benchmark cases have been simulated and the results obtained match the published literature. The dimensionless acceleration amplitude and the bed height are the parameters governing bed behavior. Various interesting behaviors such as heaping, round and cusp surface standing waves, as well as kinks, have been observed for different values of the acceleration amplitude for a given bed height. Furthermore, binary granular mixtures (granular mixtures with two particle sizes) in a vibrated bed have also been studied. Gas-solid flow simulations have been performed to study fluidized beds. Benchmark 2D

  6. A robust bi-orthogonal/dynamically-orthogonal method using the covariance pseudo-inverse with application to stochastic flow problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaee, Hessam; Choi, Minseok; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-09-01

    We develop a new robust methodology for the stochastic Navier-Stokes equations based on the dynamically-orthogonal (DO) and bi-orthogonal (BO) methods [1-3]. Both approaches are variants of a generalized Karhunen-Loève (KL) expansion in which both the stochastic coefficients and the spatial basis evolve according to system dynamics, hence, capturing the low-dimensional structure of the solution. The DO and BO formulations are mathematically equivalent [3], but they exhibit computationally complimentary properties. Specifically, the BO formulation may fail due to crossing of the eigenvalues of the covariance matrix, while both BO and DO become unstable when there is a high condition number of the covariance matrix or zero eigenvalues. To this end, we combine the two methods into a robust hybrid framework and in addition we employ a pseudo-inverse technique to invert the covariance matrix. The robustness of the proposed method stems from addressing the following issues in the DO/BO formulation: (i) eigenvalue crossing: we resolve the issue of eigenvalue crossing in the BO formulation by switching to the DO near eigenvalue crossing using the equivalence theorem and switching back to BO when the distance between eigenvalues is larger than a threshold value; (ii) ill-conditioned covariance matrix: we utilize a pseudo-inverse strategy to invert the covariance matrix; (iii) adaptivity: we utilize an adaptive strategy to add/remove modes to resolve the covariance matrix up to a threshold value. In particular, we introduce a soft-threshold criterion to allow the system to adapt to the newly added/removed mode and therefore avoid repetitive and unnecessary mode addition/removal. When the total variance approaches zero, we show that the DO/BO formulation becomes equivalent to the evolution equation of the Optimally Time-Dependent modes [4]. We demonstrate the capability of the proposed methodology with several numerical examples, namely (i) stochastic Burgers equation: we

  7. Myocardial blood flow estimates from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: three quantitative methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrazzo, Cristian; Galea, Nicola; Pacilio, Massimiliano; Altabella, Luisa; Preziosi, Enrico; Carnì, Marco; Ciolina, Federica; Vullo, Francesco; Francone, Marco; Catalano, Carlo; Carbone, Iacopo

    2018-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging can be used to quantitatively assess the myocardial blood flow (MBF), recovering the tissue impulse response function for the transit of a gadolinium bolus through the myocardium. Several deconvolution techniques are available, using various models for the impulse response. The method of choice may influence the results, producing differences that have not been deeply investigated yet. Three methods for quantifying myocardial perfusion have been compared: Fermi function modelling (FFM), the Tofts model (TM) and the gamma function model (GF), with the latter traditionally used in brain perfusion MRI. Thirty human subjects were studied at rest as well as under cold pressor test stress (submerging hands in ice-cold water), and a single bolus of gadolinium weighing 0.1  ±  0.05 mmol kg-1 was injected. Perfusion estimate differences between the methods were analysed by paired comparisons with Student’s t-test, linear regression analysis, and Bland-Altman plots, as well as also using the two-way ANOVA, considering the MBF values of all patients grouped according to two categories: calculation method and rest/stress conditions. Perfusion estimates obtained by various methods in both rest and stress conditions were not significantly different, and were in good agreement with the literature. The results obtained during the first-pass transit time (20 s) yielded p-values in the range 0.20-0.28 for Student’s t-test, linear regression analysis slopes between 0.98-1.03, and R values between 0.92-1.01. From the Bland-Altman plots, the paired comparisons yielded a bias (and a 95% CI)—expressed as ml/min/g—for FFM versus TM, -0.01 (-0.20, 0.17) or 0.02 (-0.49, 0.52) at rest or under stress respectively, for FFM versus GF, -0.05 (-0.29, 0.20) or  -0.07 (-0.55, 0.41) at rest or under stress, and for TM versus GF, -0.03 (-0.30, 0.24) or  -0.09 (-0.43, 0.26) at rest or under stress. With the

  8. A novel method for unsteady flow field segmentation based on stochastic similarity of direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omata, Noriyasu; Shirayama, Susumu

    2018-04-01

    Recent developments in fluid dynamics research have opened up the possibility for the detailed quantitative understanding of unsteady flow fields. However, the visualization techniques currently in use generally provide only qualitative insights. A method for dividing the flow field into physically relevant regions of interest can help researchers quantify unsteady fluid behaviors. Most methods at present compare the trajectories of virtual Lagrangian particles. The time-invariant features of an unsteady flow are also frequently of interest, but the Lagrangian specification only reveals time-variant features. To address these challenges, we propose a novel method for the time-invariant spatial segmentation of an unsteady flow field. This segmentation method does not require Lagrangian particle tracking but instead quantitatively compares the stochastic models of the direction of the flow at each observed point. The proposed method is validated with several clustering tests for 3D flows past a sphere. Results show that the proposed method reveals the time-invariant, physically relevant structures of an unsteady flow.

  9. A finite element method for flow problems in blast loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestier, A.; Lepareux, M.

    1984-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical method which describes fast dynamic problems in flow transient situations as in nuclear plants. A finite element formulation has been chosen; it is described by a preprocessor in CASTEM system: GIBI code. For these typical flow problems, an A.L.E. formulation for physical equations is used. So, some applications are presented: the well known problem of shock tube, the same one in 2D case and a last application to hydrogen detonation

  10. Probabilistic Power Flow Method Considering Continuous and Discrete Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuexia Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a probabilistic power flow (PPF method considering continuous and discrete variables (continuous and discrete power flow, CDPF for power systems. The proposed method—based on the cumulant method (CM and multiple deterministic power flow (MDPF calculations—can deal with continuous variables such as wind power generation (WPG and loads, and discrete variables such as fuel cell generation (FCG. In this paper, continuous variables follow a normal distribution (loads or a non-normal distribution (WPG, and discrete variables follow a binomial distribution (FCG. Through testing on IEEE 14-bus and IEEE 118-bus power systems, the proposed method (CDPF has better accuracy compared with the CM, and higher efficiency compared with the Monte Carlo simulation method (MCSM.

  11. Influence of cerebrovascular resistance on the dynamic relationship between blood pressure and cerebral blood flow in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirl, J D; Tzeng, Y C; Monteleone, B J; Ainslie, P N

    2014-06-15

    We examined the hypothesis that changes in the cerebrovascular resistance index (CVRi), independent of blood pressure (BP), will influence the dynamic relationship between BP and cerebral blood flow in humans. We altered CVRi with (via controlled hyperventilation) and without [via indomethacin (INDO, 1.2 mg/kg)] changes in PaCO2. Sixteen subjects (12 men, 27 ± 7 yr) were tested on two occasions (INDO and hypocapnia) separated by >48 h. Each test incorporated seated rest (5 min), followed by squat-stand maneuvers to increase BP variability and improve assessment of the pressure-flow dynamics using linear transfer function analysis (TFA). Beat-to-beat BP, middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv), posterior cerebral artery velocity (PCAv), and end-tidal Pco2 were monitored. Dynamic pressure-flow relations were quantified using TFA between BP and MCAv/PCAv in the very low and low frequencies through the driven squat-stand maneuvers at 0.05 and 0.10 Hz. MCAv and PCAv reductions by INDO and hypocapnia were well matched, and CVRi was comparably elevated (P flow dynamics. These findings are consistent with the concept of CVRi being a key factor that should be considered in the correct interpretation of cerebral pressure-flow dynamics as indexed using TFA metrics. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Assessment of Electromagnetic Stirrer Agitated Liquid Metal Flows by Dynamic Neutron Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ščepanskis, Mihails; Sarma, Mārtiņš; Vontobel, Peter; Trtik, Pavel; Thomsen, Knud; Jakovičs, Andris; Beinerts, Toms

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents qualitative and quantitative characterization of two-phase liquid metal flows agitated by the stirrer on rotating permanent magnets. The stirrer was designed to fulfill various eddy flows, which may have different rates of solid particle entrapment from the liquid surface and their homogenization. The flow was characterized by visualization of the tailored tracer particles by means of dynamic neutron radiography, an experimental method well suited for liquid metal flows due to low opacity of some metals for neutrons. The rather high temporal resolution of the image acquisition (32 Hz image acquisition rate) allows for the quantitative investigation of the flows up to 30 cm/s using neutron particle image velocimetry. In situ visualization of the two-phase liquid metal flow is also demonstrated.

  13. Void fraction measurement in two-phase flow processes via symbolic dynamic filtering of ultrasonic signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Subhadeep; Keller, Eric; Talley, Justin; Srivastav, Abhishek; Ray, Asok; Kim, Seungjin

    2009-01-01

    This communication introduces a non-intrusive method for void fraction measurement and identification of two-phase flow regimes, based on ultrasonic sensing. The underlying algorithm is built upon the recently reported theory of a statistical pattern recognition method called symbolic dynamic filtering (SDF). The results of experimental validation, generated on a laboratory test apparatus, show a one-to-one correspondence between the flow measure derived from SDF and the void fraction measured by a conductivity probe. A sharp change in the slope of flow measure is found to be in agreement with a transition from fully bubbly flow to cap-bubbly flow. (rapid communication)

  14. Formulation of improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics through diffusion theory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspari, Roberto; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2008-06-28

    In this work a new method is proposed for the choice of basis functions in diffusion theory (DT) calculations. This method, named hybrid basis approach (HBA), combines the two previously adopted long time sorting procedure (LTSP) and maximum correlation approximation (MCA) techniques; the first emphasizing contributions from the long time dynamics, the latter being based on the local correlations along the chain. In order to fulfill this task, the HBA procedure employs a first order basis set corresponding to a high order MCA one and generates upper order approximations according to LTSP. A test of the method is made first on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers where HBA and LTSP are compared in terms of efficiency. Both convergence properties and numerical stability are improved by the use of the HBA basis set whose performance is evaluated on local dynamics, by computing the correlation times of selected bond vectors along the chain, and on global ones, through the eigenvalues of the diffusion operator L. Further use of the DT with a HBA basis set has been made on a 71-mer of syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene in toluene solution, whose dynamical properties have been computed with a high order calculation and compared to the "numerical experiment" provided by the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in explicit solvent. The necessary equilibrium averages have been obtained by a vacuum trajectory of the chain where solvent effects on conformational properties have been reproduced with a proper screening of the nonbonded interactions, corresponding to a definite value of the mean radius of gyration of the polymer in vacuum. Results show a very good agreement between DT calculations and the MD numerical experiment. This suggests a further use of DT methods with the necessary input quantities obtained by the only knowledge of some experimental values, i.e., the mean radius of gyration of the chain and the viscosity of the solution, and by a suitable vacuum

  15. One-dimensional calculation of flow branching using the method of characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, R.W.; Gido, R.G.

    1978-05-01

    In one-dimensional flow systems, the flow often branches, such as at a tee or manifold. The study develops a formulation for calculating the flow through branch points with one-dimensional method of characteristics equations. The resultant equations were verified by comparison with experimental measurements

  16. Non-invasive and non-intrusive gas flow measurement based on the dynamic thermal characteristics of a pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zichuan; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing

    2012-10-01

    This paper proposes a non-intrusive and non-invasive method for measuring the gas flow rate in pneumatic industry. A heater unit is fixed on the partial circumference of the external wall of a pipeline and emits specific thermal pulses in a predetermined mode. Two sensors attached to the external wall detect the upstream temperature, and the gas flow can be measured according to the relationship between the flow rate and the dynamic thermal characteristics of the pipeline. To determine the preferable relationship, the temperature field model of the measurement system is built. Then, based on the measurement modes and the corresponding simulations, the objective functions for the gas flow specified on different dynamic thermal characteristics are established. Additionally, the minimum measurement time of the method, named reference time scale, is proposed. Further, robustness tests of the measurement method are derived by considering the influences of multiple factors on the objective functions. The experiments confirm that this method does not need to open the pipeline and disturb the flow regime in order to obtain the data; this method also avoids the typical time-consuming and complex operations, resists ambient temperature disturbance and achieves approximately acceptable results.

  17. Non-invasive and non-intrusive gas flow measurement based on the dynamic thermal characteristics of a pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Zichuan; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a non-intrusive and non-invasive method for measuring the gas flow rate in pneumatic industry. A heater unit is fixed on the partial circumference of the external wall of a pipeline and emits specific thermal pulses in a predetermined mode. Two sensors attached to the external wall detect the upstream temperature, and the gas flow can be measured according to the relationship between the flow rate and the dynamic thermal characteristics of the pipeline. To determine the preferable relationship, the temperature field model of the measurement system is built. Then, based on the measurement modes and the corresponding simulations, the objective functions for the gas flow specified on different dynamic thermal characteristics are established. Additionally, the minimum measurement time of the method, named reference time scale, is proposed. Further, robustness tests of the measurement method are derived by considering the influences of multiple factors on the objective functions. The experiments confirm that this method does not need to open the pipeline and disturb the flow regime in order to obtain the data; this method also avoids the typical time-consuming and complex operations, resists ambient temperature disturbance and achieves approximately acceptable results. (paper)

  18. IN-CYLINDER MASS FLOW ESTIMATION AND MANIFOLD PRESSURE DYNAMICS FOR STATE PREDICTION IN SI ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojnar Sławomir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present a simple model of the intake manifold dynamics of a spark ignition (SI engine and its possible application for estimation and control purposes. We focus on pressure dynamics, which may be regarded as the foundation for estimating future states and for designing model predictive control strategies suitable for maintaining the desired air fuel ratio (AFR. The flow rate measured at the inlet of the intake manifold and the in-cylinder flow estimation are considered as parts of the proposed model. In-cylinder flow estimation is crucial for engine control, where an accurate amount of aspired air forms the basis for computing the manipulated variables. The solutions presented here are based on the mean value engine model (MVEM approach, using the speed-density method. The proposed in-cylinder flow estimation method is compared to measured values in an experimental setting, while one-step-ahead prediction is illustrated using simulation results.

  19. A variational multiscale method for particle-cloud tracking in turbomachinery flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, A.; Rispoli, F.; Sheard, A. G.; Takizawa, K.; Tezduyar, T. E.; Venturini, P.

    2014-11-01

    We present a computational method for simulation of particle-laden flows in turbomachinery. The method is based on a stabilized finite element fluid mechanics formulation and a finite element particle-cloud tracking method. We focus on induced-draft fans used in process industries to extract exhaust gases in the form of a two-phase fluid with a dispersed solid phase. The particle-laden flow causes material wear on the fan blades, degrading their aerodynamic performance, and therefore accurate simulation of the flow would be essential in reliable computational turbomachinery analysis and design. The turbulent-flow nature of the problem is dealt with a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes model and Streamline-Upwind/Petrov-Galerkin/Pressure-Stabilizing/Petrov-Galerkin stabilization, the particle-cloud trajectories are calculated based on the flow field and closure models for the turbulence-particle interaction, and one-way dependence is assumed between the flow field and particle dynamics. We propose a closure model utilizing the scale separation feature of the variational multiscale method, and compare that to the closure utilizing the eddy viscosity model. We present computations for axial- and centrifugal-fan configurations, and compare the computed data to those obtained from experiments, analytical approaches, and other computational methods.

  20. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  1. Elucidating dynamic metabolic physiology through network integration of quantitative time-course metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Yurkovich, James T.; Paglia, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    The increasing availability of metabolomics data necessitates novel methods for deeper data analysis and interpretation. We present a flux balance analysis method that allows for the computation of dynamic intracellular metabolic changes at the cellular scale through integration of time-course ab......The increasing availability of metabolomics data necessitates novel methods for deeper data analysis and interpretation. We present a flux balance analysis method that allows for the computation of dynamic intracellular metabolic changes at the cellular scale through integration of time...

  2. Axial-Flow Turbine Rotor Discharge-Flow Overexpansion and Limit-Loading Condition, Part I: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Cheng S.

    2017-01-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) investigation is conducted over a two-dimensional axial-flow turbine rotor blade row to study the phenomena of turbine rotor discharge flow overexpansion at subcritical, critical, and supercritical conditions. Quantitative data of the mean-flow Mach numbers, mean-flow angles, the tangential blade pressure forces, the mean-flow mass flux, and the flow-path total pressure loss coefficients, averaged or integrated across the two-dimensional computational domain encompassing two blade-passages, are obtained over a series of 14 inlet-total to exit-static pressure ratios, from 1.5 (un-choked; subcritical condition) to 10.0 (supercritical with excessively high pressure ratio.) Detailed flow features over the full domain-of-computation, such as the streamline patterns, Mach contours, pressure contours, blade surface pressure distributions, etc. are collected and displayed in this paper. A formal, quantitative definition of the limit loading condition based on the channel flow theory is proposed and explained. Contrary to the comments made in the historical works performed on this subject, about the deficiency of the theoretical methods applied in analyzing this phenomena, using modern CFD method for the study of this subject appears to be quite adequate and successful. This paper describes the CFD work and its findings.

  3. Investigation on the Flow in a Rotor-Stator Cavity with Centripetal Through-Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Hu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Daily and Nece distinguished four flow regimes in an enclosed rotor-stator cavity, which are dependent on the circumferential Reynolds number and dimensionless axial gap width. A diagram of the different flow regimes including the respective mean profiles for both tangential and radial velocity was developed. The coefficients for the different flow regimes have also been correlated. In centrifugal pumps and turbines, the centripetal through-flow is quite common from the outer radius of the impeller to the impeller eye, which has a strong influence on the radial pressure distribution, axial thrust and frictional torque. The influence of the centripetal through-flow on the cavity flow with different circumferential Reynolds numbers and dimensionless axial gap width is not sufficiently investigated. It is also quite important to convert the 2D Daily and Nece diagram into 3D by introducing the through-flow coefficient. In order to investigate the impact of the centripetal through-flow, a test rig is designed and built up at the University of Duisburg-Essen. The design of the test rig is described. The impact of the above mentioned parameters on the velocity profile, pressure distribution, axial thrust and frictional torque are presented and analyzed in this paper. The 3D Daily and Nece diagram introducing the through-flow coefficient is also organized in this paper.

  4. Communication: A method to compute the transport coefficient of pure fluids diffusing through planar interfaces from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermorel, Romain; Oulebsir, Fouad; Galliero, Guillaume

    2017-09-14

    The computation of diffusion coefficients in molecular systems ranks among the most useful applications of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. However, when dealing with the problem of fluid diffusion through vanishingly thin interfaces, classical techniques are not applicable. This is because the volume of space in which molecules diffuse is ill-defined. In such conditions, non-equilibrium techniques allow for the computation of transport coefficients per unit interface width, but their weak point lies in their inability to isolate the contribution of the different physical mechanisms prone to impact the flux of permeating molecules. In this work, we propose a simple and accurate method to compute the diffusional transport coefficient of a pure fluid through a planar interface from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, in the form of a diffusion coefficient per unit interface width. In order to demonstrate its validity and accuracy, we apply our method to the case study of a dilute gas diffusing through a smoothly repulsive single-layer porous solid. We believe this complementary technique can benefit to the interpretation of the results obtained on single-layer membranes by means of complex non-equilibrium methods.

  5. The Dynamic Behavior of Water Flowing Through Packed Bed of Different Particle Shapes and Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneen Ahmed Jasim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted on pressure drop of water flow through vertical cylindrical packed beds in turbulent region and the influence of the operating parameters on its behavior. The bed packing was made of spherical and non-spherical particles (spheres, Rasching rings and intalox saddle with aspect ratio range 3.46 D/dp 8.486 obtaining bed porosities 0.396 0.84 and Reynolds number 1217 21758. The system is consisted of 5 cm inside diameter Perspex column, 50 cm long; distilled water was pumped through the bed with flow rate 875, 1000, 1125, 1250,1375 and 1500 l/h and inlet water temperature 20, 30, 40 and 50 ˚C. The packed bed system was monitored by using LabVIEW program, were the results have been obtained from Data Acquisition Adaptor (DAQ.

  6. An evaluation of Dynamic TOPMODEL for low flow simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxon, G.; Freer, J. E.; Quinn, N.; Woods, R. A.; Wagener, T.; Howden, N. J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrological models are essential tools for drought risk management, often providing input to water resource system models, aiding our understanding of low flow processes within catchments and providing low flow predictions. However, simulating low flows and droughts is challenging as hydrological systems often demonstrate threshold effects in connectivity, non-linear groundwater contributions and a greater influence of water resource system elements during low flow periods. These dynamic processes are typically not well represented in commonly used hydrological models due to data and model limitations. Furthermore, calibrated or behavioural models may not be effectively evaluated during more extreme drought periods. A better understanding of the processes that occur during low flows and how these are represented within models is thus required if we want to be able to provide robust and reliable predictions of future drought events. In this study, we assess the performance of dynamic TOPMODEL for low flow simulation. Dynamic TOPMODEL was applied to a number of UK catchments in the Thames region using time series of observed rainfall and potential evapotranspiration data that captured multiple historic droughts over a period of several years. The model performance was assessed against the observed discharge time series using a limits of acceptability framework, which included uncertainty in the discharge time series. We evaluate the models against multiple signatures of catchment low-flow behaviour and investigate differences in model performance between catchments, model diagnostics and for different low flow periods. We also considered the impact of surface water and groundwater abstractions and discharges on the observed discharge time series and how this affected the model evaluation. From analysing the model performance, we suggest future improvements to Dynamic TOPMODEL to improve the representation of low flow processes within the model structure.

  7. Numerical simulation of 3D unsteady flow in a rotating pump by dynamic mesh technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S; Guo, J; Yang, F X

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the numerical simulation of unsteady flow for three kinds of typical rotating pumps, roots blower, roto-jet pump and centrifugal pump, were performed using the three-dimensional Dynamic Mesh technique. In the unsteady simulation, all the computational domains, as stationary, were set in one inertial reference frame. The motions of the solid boundaries were defined by the Profile file in FLUENT commercial code, in which the rotational orientation and speed of the rotors were specified. Three methods (Spring-based Smoothing, Dynamic Layering and Local Re-meshing) were used to achieve mesh deformation and re-meshing. The unsteady solutions of flow field and pressure distribution were solved. After a start-up stage, the flow parameters exhibit time-periodic behaviour corresponding to blade passing frequency of rotor. This work shows that Dynamic Mesh technique could achieve numerical simulation of three-dimensional unsteady flow field in various kinds of rotating pumps and have a strong versatility and broad application prospects

  8. Sodium flow rate measurement method of annular linear induction pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araseki, Hideo; Kirillov, Igor R.; Preslitsky, Gennady V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We found a new method of flow rate monitoring of electromagnetic pump. ► The method is very simple and does not require a large space. ► The method was verified with an experiment and a numerical analysis. ► The experimental data and the numerical results are in good agreement. - Abstract: The present paper proposes a method for measuring sodium flow rate of annular linear induction pumps. The feature of the method lies in measuring the leaked magnetic field with measuring coils near the stator end on the outlet side and in correlating it with the sodium flow rate. This method is verified through an experiment and a numerical analysis. The data obtained in the experiment reveals that the correlation between the leaked magnetic field and the sodium flow rate is almost linear. The result of the numerical analysis agrees with the experimental data. The present method will be particularly effective to sodium flow rate monitoring of each one of plural annular linear induction pumps arranged in parallel in a vessel which forms a large-scale pump unit.

  9. Making Sense of Dynamic Systems: How Our Understanding of Stocks and Flows Depends on a Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Helen; Gonzalez, Cleotilde

    2016-01-01

    Stocks and flows (SF) are building blocks of dynamic systems: Stocks change through inflows and outflows, such as our bank balance changing with withdrawals and deposits, or atmospheric CO[subscript 2] with absorptions and emissions. However, people make systematic errors when trying to infer the behavior of dynamic systems, termed SF failure,…

  10. Characterization of Flow Dynamics and Reduced-Order Description of Experimental Two-Phase Pipe Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggiano, Bianca; SkjæRaasen, Olaf; Tutkun, Murat; Cal, Raul Bayoan

    2017-11-01

    Multiphase pipe flow is investigated using proper orthogonal decomposition for tomographic X-ray data, where holdup, cross sectional phase distributions and phase interface characteristics are obtained. Instantaneous phase fractions of dispersed flow and slug flow are analyzed and a reduced order dynamical description is generated. The dispersed flow displays coherent structures in the first few modes near the horizontal center of the pipe, representing the liquid-liquid interface location while the slug flow case shows coherent structures that correspond to the cyclical formation and breakup of the slug in the first 10 modes. The reconstruction of the fields indicate that main features are observed in the low order dynamical descriptions utilizing less than 1 % of the full order model. POD temporal coefficients a1, a2 and a3 show interdependence for the slug flow case. The coefficients also describe the phase fraction holdup as a function of time for both dispersed and slug flow. These flows are highly applicable to petroleum transport pipelines, hydroelectric power and heat exchanger tubes to name a few. The mathematical representations obtained via proper orthogonal decomposition will deepen the understanding of fundamental multiphase flow characteristics.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Visualisation of Coastal Flows in Tidal Channels Supporting Ocean Energy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enayatollah Zangiabadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow characteristics in coastal regions are strongly influenced by the topography of the seabed and understanding the fluid dynamics is necessary before installation of tidal stream turbines (TST. In this paper, the bathymetry of a potential TST deployment site is used in the development of the a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics model. The steady state k-ϵ and transient Large Eddy Simulation (LES turbulence methods are employed and compared. The simulations are conducted with a fixed representation of the ocean surface, i.e., a rigid lid representation. In the vicinity of Horse Rock a study of the pressure difference shows that the small change in height of the water column is negligible, providing confidence in the simulation results. The stream surface method employed to visualise the results has important inherent characteristics that can enhance the visual perception of complex flow structures. The results of all cases are compared with the flow data transect gathered by an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP. It has been understood that the k-ϵ method can predict the flow pattern relatively well near the main features of the domain and the LES model has the ability to simulate some important flow patterns caused by the bathymetry.

  12. Flow through a cylindrical pipe with a periodic array of fractal orifices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Melick, P.A.J.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2013-01-01

    We apply direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the incompressible Navier–Stokes equations to predict flow through a cylindrical pipe in which a periodic array of orifice plates with a fractal perimeter is mounted. The flow is simulated using a volume penalization immersed boundary method with which

  13. Flow through a cylindrical pipe with a periodic array of fractal orifices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Melick, P.A.J.; Geurts, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    We apply direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations to predict flow through a cylindrical pipe in which a periodic array of orifice plates with a fractal perimeter is mounted. The flow is simulated using a volume penalization immersed boundary method with which

  14. New method dynamically models hydrocarbon fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesler, M.G.; Weissbrod, J.M.; Sheth, B.V. [Kesler Engineering, East Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    1995-10-01

    A new method for calculating distillation column dynamics can be used to model time-dependent effects of independent disturbances for a range of hydrocarbon fractionation. It can model crude atmospheric and vacuum columns, with relatively few equilibrium stages and a large number of components, to C{sub 3} splitters, with few components and up to 300 equilibrium stages. Simulation results are useful for operations analysis, process-control applications and closed-loop control in petroleum, petrochemical and gas processing plants. The method is based on an implicit approach, where the time-dependent variations of inventory, temperatures, liquid and vapor flows and compositions are superimposed at each time step on the steady-state solution. Newton-Raphson (N-R) techniques are then used to simultaneously solve the resulting finite-difference equations of material, equilibrium and enthalpy balances that characterize distillation dynamics. The important innovation is component-aggregation and tray-aggregation to contract the equations without compromising accuracy. This contraction increases the N-R calculations` stability. It also significantly increases calculational speed, which is particularly important in dynamic simulations. This method provides a sound basis for closed-loop, supervisory control of distillation--directly or via multivariable controllers--based on a rigorous, phenomenological column model.

  15. A new algorithm for extended nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of mixed flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunt, T.A.; Hunt, Thomas A.; Bernardi, Stefano; Todd, B.D.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we develop a new algorithm for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics of fluids under planar mixed flow, a linear combination of planar elongational flow and planar Couette flow. To date, the only way of simulating mixed flow using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics techniques was to impose

  16. Petrological Geodynamics of Mantle Melting I. AlphaMELTS + Multiphase Flow: Dynamic Equilibrium Melting, Method and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Tirone

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The complex process of melting in the Earth's interior is studied by combining a multiphase numerical flow model with the program AlphaMELTS which provides a petrological description based on thermodynamic principles. The objective is to address the fundamental question of the effect of the mantle and melt dynamics on the composition and abundance of the melt and the residual solid. The conceptual idea is based on a 1-D description of the melting process that develops along an ideal vertical column where local chemical equilibrium is assumed to apply at some level in space and time. By coupling together the transport model and the chemical thermodynamic model, the evolution of the melting process can be described in terms of melt distribution, temperature, pressure and solid and melt velocities but also variation of melt and residual solid composition and mineralogical abundance at any depth over time. In this first installment of a series of three contributions, a two-phase flow model (melt and solid assemblage is developed under the assumption of complete local equilibrium between melt and a peridotitic mantle (dynamic equilibrium melting, DEM. The solid mantle is also assumed to be completely dry. The present study addresses some but not all the potential factors affecting the melting process. The influence of permeability and viscosity of the solid matrix are considered in some detail. The essential features of the dynamic model and how it is interfaced with AlphaMELTS are clearly outlined. A detailed and explicit description of the numerical procedure should make this type of numerical models less obscure. The general observation that can be made from the outcome of several simulations carried out for this work is that the melt composition varies with depth, however the melt abundance not necessarily always increases moving upwards. When a quasi-steady state condition is achieved, that is when melt abundance does not varies significantly

  17. Increasing the Dynamic Range of Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    images. The emissions for the two imaging modes are interleaved 1-to-1 ratio, providing a high frame rate equal to the effective pulse repetition frequency of each imaging mode. The direction of the flow is estimated, and the velocity is then determined in that direction. This method Works for all angles...... standard deviations are 1.59% and 6.12%, respectively. The presented method can improve the estimates by synthesizing a lower pulse repetition frequency, thereby increasing the dynamic range of the vector velocity imaging....

  18. Identifying Structural Flow Defects in Disordered Solids Using Machine-Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubuk, E. D.; Schoenholz, S. S.; Rieser, J. M.; Malone, B. D.; Rottler, J.; Durian, D. J.; Kaxiras, E.; Liu, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    We use machine-learning methods on local structure to identify flow defects—or particles susceptible to rearrangement—in jammed and glassy systems. We apply this method successfully to two very different systems: a two-dimensional experimental realization of a granular pillar under compression and a Lennard-Jones glass in both two and three dimensions above and below its glass transition temperature. We also identify characteristics of flow defects that differentiate them from the rest of the sample. Our results show it is possible to discern subtle structural features responsible for heterogeneous dynamics observed across a broad range of disordered materials.

  19. Boundary control of fluid flow through porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasan, Agus; Foss, Bjarne; Sagatun, Svein Ivar

    2010-01-01

    The flow of fluids through porous media can be described by the Boussinesq’s equation with mixed boundary conditions; a Neumann’s boundary condition and a nonlinear boundary condition. The nonlinear boundary condition provides a means to control the fluid flow through porous media. In this paper,......, some stabilizing controllers are constructed for various cases using Lyapunov design.......The flow of fluids through porous media can be described by the Boussinesq’s equation with mixed boundary conditions; a Neumann’s boundary condition and a nonlinear boundary condition. The nonlinear boundary condition provides a means to control the fluid flow through porous media. In this paper...

  20. Finite element simulation of dynamic wetting flows as an interface formation process

    KAUST Repository

    Sprittles, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    A mathematically challenging model of dynamic wetting as a process of interface formation has been, for the first time, fully incorporated into a numerical code based on the finite element method and applied, as a test case, to the problem of capillary rise. The motivation for this work comes from the fact that, as discovered experimentally more than a decade ago, the key variable in dynamic wetting flows - the dynamic contact angle - depends not just on the velocity of the three-phase contact line but on the entire flow field/geometry. Hence, to describe this effect, it becomes necessary to use the mathematical model that has this dependence as its integral part. A new physical effect, termed the \\'hydrodynamic resist to dynamic wetting\\', is discovered where the influence of the capillary\\'s radius on the dynamic contact angle, and hence on the global flow, is computed. The capabilities of the numerical framework are then demonstrated by comparing the results to experiments on the unsteady capillary rise, where excellent agreement is obtained. Practical recommendations on the spatial resolution required by the numerical scheme for a given set of non-dimensional similarity parameters are provided, and a comparison to asymptotic results available in limiting cases confirms that the code is converging to the correct solution. The appendix gives a user-friendly step-by-step guide specifying the entire implementation and allowing the reader to easily reproduce all presented results, including the benchmark calculations. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  1. On computations of temperature dependent incompressible flows by high order methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pech, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 114, 02089 (2016) ISSN 2100-014X. [Experimental Fluid Mechanics 2015 /10./. Praha, 17.11.2015-20.11.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : heated flow * spectral methods * separation angle Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/epjconf/201611402089

  2. Dynamics of zonal flows and self-regulating drift-wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Fleischer, J.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Hinton, F.L.; Malkov, M.; Smolyakov, A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a theory of zonal flow - drift wave dynamics. Zonal flows are generated by modulational instability of a drift wave spectrum, and are damped by collisions. Drift waves undergo random shearing-induced refraction, resulting in increased mean square radial wavenumber. Drift waves and zonal flows together form a simple dynamical system, which has a single stable fixed point. In this state, the fluctuation intensity and turbulent diffusivity are ultimately proportional to the collisional zonal flow damping. The implications of these results for transport models is discussed. (author)

  3. Dynamics of zonal flows and self-regulating drift-wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Fleischer, J.; Rosenbluth, M.; Hinton, F.L.; Malkov, M.; Smolyakov, A.

    2001-01-01

    We present a theory of zonal flow - drift wave dynamics. Zonal flows are generated by modulational instability of a drift wave spectrum, and are damped by collisions. Drift waves undergo random shearing-induced refraction, resulting in increased mean square radial wavenumber. Drift waves and zonal flows together form a simple dynamical system, which has a single stable fixed point. In this state, the fluctuation intensity and turbulent diffusivity are ultimately proportional to the collisional zonal flow damping. The implications of these results for transport models is discussed. (author)

  4. Dynamic subgrid scale model used in a deep bundle turbulence prediction using the large eddy simulation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsamian, H.R.; Hassan, Y.A.

    1996-01-01

    Turbulence is one of the most commonly occurring phenomena of engineering interest in the field of fluid mechanics. Since most flows are turbulent, there is a significant payoff for improved predictive models of turbulence. One area of concern is the turbulent buffeting forces experienced by the tubes in steam generators of nuclear power plants. Although the Navier-Stokes equations are able to describe turbulent flow fields, the large number of scales of turbulence limit practical flow field calculations with current computing power. The dynamic subgrid scale closure model of Germano et. al (1991) is used in the large eddy simulation code GUST for incompressible isothermal flows. Tube bundle geometries of staggered and non-staggered arrays are considered in deep bundle simulations. The advantage of the dynamic subgrid scale model is the exclusion of an input model coefficient. The model coefficient is evaluated dynamically for each nodal location in the flow domain. Dynamic subgrid scale results are obtained in the form of power spectral densities and flow visualization of turbulent characteristics. Comparisons are performed among the dynamic subgrid scale model, the Smagorinsky eddy viscosity model (Smagorinsky, 1963) (that is used as the base model for the dynamic subgrid scale model) and available experimental data. Spectral results of the dynamic subgrid scale model correlate better with experimental data. Satisfactory turbulence characteristics are observed through flow visualization

  5. An Investigation of Parallel Post-Laminar Flow through Coarse Granular Porous Media with the Wilkins Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashes Banerjee

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Behaviour of flow resistance with velocity is still undefined for post-laminar flow through coarse granular media. This can cause considerable errors during flow measurements in situations like rock fill dams, water filters, pumping wells, oil and gas exploration, and so on. Keeping the non-deviating nature of Wilkins coefficients with the hydraulic radius of media in mind, the present study further explores their behaviour to independently varying media size and porosity, subjected to parallel post-laminar flow through granular media. Furthermore, an attempt is made to simulate the post-laminar flow conditions with the help of a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD Model in ANSYS FLUENT, since conducting large-scale experiments are often costly and time-consuming. The model output and the experimental results are found to be in good agreement. Percentage deviations between the experimental and numerical results are found to be in the considerable range. Furthermore, the simulation results are statistically validated with the experimental results using the standard ‘Z-test’. The output from the model advocates the importance and applicability of CFD modelling in understanding post-laminar flow through granular media.

  6. Identification of Dynamic Flow Stress Curves Using the Virtual Fields Methods: Theoretical Feasibility Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Dohyun; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Barlat, Frédéric; Song, Jung Han; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2018-03-01

    An inverse approach based on the virtual fields method (VFM) is presented to identify the material hardening parameters under dynamic deformation. This dynamic-VFM (D-VFM) method does not require load information for the parameter identification. Instead, it utilizes acceleration fields in a specimen's gage region. To investigate the feasibility of the proposed inverse approach for dynamic deformation, the virtual experiments using dynamic finite element simulations were conducted. The simulation could provide all the necessary data for the identification such as displacement, strain, and acceleration fields. The accuracy of the identification results was evaluated by changing several parameters such as specimen geometry, velocity, and traction boundary conditions. The analysis clearly shows that the D-VFM which utilizes acceleration fields can be a good alternative to the conventional identification procedure that uses load information. Also, it was found that proper deformation conditions are required for generating sufficient acceleration fields during dynamic deformation to enhance the identification accuracy with the D-VFM.

  7. Complete energetic description of hydrokinetic turbine impact on flow channel dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseale, E.; Kawase, M.

    2016-02-01

    Energy budget analysis on tidal channels quantifies and demarcates the impacts of marine renewables on environmental fluid dynamics. Energy budget analysis assumes the change in total kinetic energy within a volume of fluid can be described by the work done by each force acting on the flow. In a numerically simulated channel, the balance between energy change and work done has been validated up to 5% error.The forces doing work on the flow include pressure, turbulent dissipation, and stress from the estuary floor. If hydrokinetic turbines are installed in an estuarine channel to convert tidal energy into usable power, the dynamics of the channel change. Turbines provide additional pressure work against the flow of the channel which will slow the current and lessen turbulent dissipation and bottom stress. These losses may negatively impact estuarine circulation, seafloor scour, and stratification.The environmental effects of turbine deployment have been quantified using a three dimensional, Reynolds-averaged, Navier-Stokes model of an idealized flow channel situated between the ocean and a large estuarine basin. The channel is five kilometers wide, twenty kilometers long and fifty meters deep, and resolved to a grid size of 10 meters by 10 meters by 1 meter. Tidal currents are simulated by an initial difference in sea surface height across the channel of 160 centimeters from the channel entrance to the channel exit. This creates a pressure gradient which drives flow through the channel. Tidal power turbines are represented as disks that force the channel in proportion to the strength of the current. Three tidal turbines twenty meters in diameters have been included in the model to simulate the impacts of a pilot scale test deployment.This study is the first to appreciate the energetic impact of marine renewables in a three dimensional model through the energy equation's constituent terms. This study provides groundwork for understanding and predicting the

  8. Dynamic Phase Boundary Estimation in Two-phase Flows Based on Electrical Impedance Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Seong; Muhammada, Nauman Malik; Kim, Kyung Youn; Kim, Sin

    2008-01-01

    For the dynamic visualization of the phase boundary in two-phase flows, the electrical impedance tomography (EIT) technique is introduced. In EIT, a set of predetermined electrical currents is injected through the electrodes placed on the boundary of the flow passage and the induced electrical potentials are measured on the electrodes. With the relationship between the injected currents and the induced voltages, the electrical conductivity distribution across the flow domain is estimated through the image reconstruction algorithm where the conductivity distribution corresponds to the phase distribution. In the application of EIT to two-phase flows where there are only two conductivity values, the conductivity distribution estimation problem can be transformed into the boundary estimation problem. This paper considers phase boundary estimation with EIT in annular two-phase flows. As the image reconstruction algorithm, the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is adopted since from the control theory it is reported that the UKF shows better performance than the extended Kalman filter (EKF) that has been commonly used. For the present problem, the formulation of UKF algorithm involved its incorporation in the adopted image reconstruction algorithm. Also, phantom experiments have been conducted to evaluate the improvement reported by UKF

  9. Sodium flow rate measurement method of annular linear induction pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araseki, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a method for measuring sodium flow rate of annular linear induction pumps arranged in parallel and its verification result obtained through an experiment and a numerical analysis. In the method, the leaked magnetic field is measured with measuring coils at the stator end on the outlet side and is correlated with the sodium flow rate. The experimental data and the numerical result indicate that the leaked magnetic field at the stator edge keeps almost constant when the sodium flow rate changes and that the leaked magnetic field change arising from the flow rate change is small compared with the overall leaked magnetic field. It is shown that the correlation between the leaked magnetic field and the sodium flow rate is almost linear due to this feature of the leaked magnetic field, which indicates the applicability of the method to small-scale annular linear induction pumps. (author)

  10. A method for predicting fuel maintenance in once-through MSRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridley, Gavin; Chvala, Ondrej

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Novel method to control LEU-fueled MSR reactivity and chemistry is developed. •The method relies on adjusting material flows only. •Ten year full power depletion of a FLiBe core demonstrates the method. •Material flows and reactor physics data are presented. •Graphite lifetime and trifluoride actinide limits are satisfied. -- Abstract: Liquid fuel molten salt reactors allow reactivity control by material addition. This paper presents a method to adjust material flows in a molten salt reactor to keep the core critical, and to maintain desired reduction-oxidation potential in the core salt melt. The method is aimed at low-enriched uranium fueled thermal systems. It is developed as a Python library and uses Serpent2 Monte-Carlo transport and depletion code. A toy 300 MW(th) reactor with a FLiBe carrier salt is employed to demonstrate the performance of the method over 10 full power years. Results of the calculation are presented, including material flows, conversion ratio, effective delayed neutron fraction, and expected limits on trifluoride concentrations and graphite lifetime are investigated. This method lays a foundation for future studies including fuel cycle performance of molten salt reactors and dynamic behavior of the core during depletion.

  11. Visualization study of helium-air counter flow through a small opening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumizawa, Motoo

    2007-01-01

    Buoyancy-driven counter flows of helium-air were investigated through horizontal and inclined small openings. Counter flows may occur following a window opening as ventilation, fire in the room as well as a pipe rupture accident in a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The experiment has carried out by a test chamber filled with helium and flow was visualized by the smoke wire method. The flow behavior has recorded by a high-speed camera with a computer system. The image of the flow was transferred to the digital data, thus the flow velocity was measured by PTV software. The mass fraction in the test chamber was measured by electronic balance. The detected data was arranged by the densimetric Floude number of the counter flow rate that derived from the dimensional analysis. The method of mass increment was developed and applied to measure the counter flow rate. By removing the cover plate placed on the top of the opening, the counter flow initiated. Air enters the test chamber and the mass of the gas mixture in the test chamber increased. The volumetric counter flow rate was evaluated from the mass increment data. In the case of inclination openings, the results of both methods were compared. The inclination angle for maximum densimetric Floude number decreased with increasing length-to-diameter ratio of the opening. For a horizontal opening, the results from the method of mass increment agreed with those obtained by other authors for a water-brine system. (author)

  12. Recent progress in flow control for practical flows results of the STADYWICO and IMESCON projects

    CERN Document Server

    Barakos, George; Luczak, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the outcomes on flow control research activities carried out within the framework of two EU-funded projects focused on training-through-research of Marie Sklodowska-Curie doctoral students. The main goal of the projects described in this monograph is to assess the potential of the passive- and active-flow control methods for reduction of fuel consumption by a helicopter. The research scope encompasses the fields of structural dynamics, fluid flow dynamics, and actuators with control. Research featured in this volume demonstrates an experimental and numerical approach with a strong emphasis on the verification and validation of numerical models. The book is ideal for engineers, students, and researchers interested in the multidisciplinary field of flow control. Provides highly relevant and up-to-date information on the topic of flow control; Includes assessments of a wide range of flow-control technologies and application examples for fixed and rotary-wing configurations; Reinforces reader u...

  13. Fundamental characteristics and simplified evaluation method of dynamic earth pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nukui, Y.; Inagaki, Y.; Ohmiya, Y.

    1989-01-01

    In Japan, a method is commonly used in the evaluation of dynamic earth pressure acting on the underground walls of a deeply embedded nuclear reactor building. However, since this method was developed on the basis of the limit state of soil supported by retaining walls, the behavior of dynamic earth pressure acting on the embedded part of a nuclear reactor building may differ from the estimated by this method. This paper examines the fundamental characteristics of dynamic earth pressure through dynamic soil-structure interaction analysis. A simplified method to evaluate dynamic earth pressure for the design of underground walls of a nuclear reactor building is described. The dynamic earth pressure is fluctuating earth pressure during earthquake

  14. Unified solver for fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics in isentropic gas flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont, Arnau; Codina, Ramon; Baiges, Joan; Guasch, Oriol

    2018-06-01

    The high computational cost of solving numerically the fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations, together with the poor performance of most numerical formulations for compressible flow in the low Mach number regime, has led to the necessity for more affordable numerical models for Computational Aeroacoustics. For low Mach number subsonic flows with neither shocks nor thermal coupling, both flow dynamics and wave propagation can be considered isentropic. Therefore, a joint isentropic formulation for flow and aeroacoustics can be devised which avoids the need for segregating flow and acoustic scales. Under these assumptions density and pressure fluctuations are directly proportional, and a two field velocity-pressure compressible formulation can be derived as an extension of an incompressible solver. Moreover, the linear system of equations which arises from the proposed isentropic formulation is better conditioned than the homologous incompressible one due to the presence of a pressure time derivative. Similarly to other compressible formulations the prescription of boundary conditions will have to deal with the backscattering of acoustic waves. In this sense, a separated imposition of boundary conditions for flow and acoustic scales which allows the evacuation of waves through Dirichlet boundaries without using any tailored damping model will be presented.

  15. Resolution of through tubing fluid flow and behind casing fluid flow in multiple completion wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, D.M.

    1977-01-01

    A method is provided for resolving undesired fluid flow in cement channels behind casing in one producing zone of a multi zone completion well operating on gas lift from the fluid flow from lower producing zones in the same well which is contained in production tubing passing through the producing zone being investigated. Gamma rays which are characteristic of the decay of the unstable isotope nitrogen 16 produced by activation of elemental oxygen nuclei comprising the molecular structure of both the tubing fluid flow and the undesired fluid flow are detected in at least two energy bonds at two longitudinally spaced detectors in a well borehole. By appropriately combining the four count rate signals so producing according to predetermined relationships the two fluid flow components in the same direction may be uniquely distinguished on the basis of their differing distances from the gamma ray detectors. 9 claims, 17 figures

  16. Microtubules Nonlinear Models Dynamics Investigations through the exp(−Φ(ξ-Expansion Method Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Alam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research article, we present exact solutions with parameters for two nonlinear model partial differential equations(PDEs describing microtubules, by implementing the exp(−Φ(ξ-Expansion Method. The considered models, describing highly nonlinear dynamics of microtubules, can be reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations. While the first PDE describes the longitudinal model of nonlinear dynamics of microtubules, the second one describes the nonlinear model of dynamics of radial dislocations in microtubules. The acquired solutions are then graphically presented, and their distinct properties are enumerated in respect to the corresponding dynamic behavior of the microtubules they model. Various patterns, including but not limited to regular, singular kink-like, as well as periodicity exhibiting ones, are detected. Being the method of choice herein, the exp(−Φ(ξ-Expansion Method not disappointing in the least, is found and declared highly efficient.

  17. Nonlinear analysis of gas-water/oil-water two-phase flow in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of multi-phase flows has been a challenge in the fields of nonlinear dynamics and fluid mechanics. This chapter reviews our work on two-phase flow dynamics in combination with complex network theory. We systematically carried out gas-water/oil-water two-phase flow experiments for measuring the time series of flow signals which is studied in terms of the mapping from time series to complex networks. Three network mapping methods were proposed for the analysis and identification of flow patterns, i.e. Flow Pattern Complex Network (FPCN), Fluid Dynamic Complex Network (FDCN) and Fluid Structure Complex Network (FSCN). Through detecting the community structure of FPCN based on K-means clustering, distinct flow patterns can be successfully distinguished and identified. A number of FDCN’s under different flow conditions were constructed in order to reveal the dynamical characteristics of two-phase flows. The FDCNs exhibit universal power-law degree distributions. The power-law exponent ...

  18. Pulsatile spiral blood flow through arterial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linge, Fabian; Hye, Md Abdul; Paul, Manosh C

    2014-11-01

    Pulsatile spiral blood flow in a modelled three-dimensional arterial stenosis, with a 75% cross-sectional area reduction, is investigated by using numerical fluid dynamics. Two-equation k-ω model is used for the simulation of the transitional flow with Reynolds numbers 500 and 1000. It is found that the spiral component increases the static pressure in the vessel during the deceleration phase of the flow pulse. In addition, the spiral component reduces the turbulence intensity and wall shear stress found in the post-stenosis region of the vessel in the early stages of the flow pulse. Hence, the findings agree with the results of Stonebridge et al. (2004). In addition, the results of the effects of a spiral component on time-varying flow are presented and discussed along with the relevant pathological issues.

  19. Low-order dynamical system model of a fully developed turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nicholas; Tutkun, Murat; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2017-06-01

    A reduced order model of a turbulent channel flow is composed from a direct numerical simulation database hosted at the Johns Hopkins University. Snapshot proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is used to identify the Hilbert space from which the reduced order model is obtained, as the POD basis is defined to capture the optimal energy content by mode. The reduced order model is defined by coupling the evolution of the dynamic POD mode coefficients through their respective time derivative with a least-squares polynomial fit of terms up to third order. Parameters coupling the dynamics of the POD basis are defined in analog to those produced in the classical Galerkin projection. The resulting low-order dynamical system is tested for a range of basis modes demonstrating that the non-linear mode interactions do not lead to a monotonic decrease in error propagation. A basis of five POD modes accounts for 50% of the integrated turbulence kinetic energy but captures only the largest features of the turbulence in the channel flow and is not able to reflect the anticipated flow dynamics. Using five modes, the low-order model is unable to accurately reproduce Reynolds stresses, and the root-mean-square error of the predicted stresses is as great as 30%. Increasing the basis to 28 modes accounts for 90% of the kinetic energy and adds intermediate scales to the dynamical system. The difference between the time derivatives of the random coefficients associated with individual modes and their least-squares fit is amplified in the numerical integration leading to unstable long-time solutions. Periodic recalibration of the dynamical system is undertaken by limiting the integration time to the range of the sampled data and offering the dynamical system new initial conditions. Renewed initial conditions are found by pushing the mode coefficients in the end of the integration time toward a known point along the original trajectories identified through a least-squares projection. Under

  20. Bioaugmentation of flow-through sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Elin Djurhuus

    for degradation performances in flow-through sand columns, with the aim of identifying a suitable inoculant strain for future environmental applications. Another aim was to identify a suitable genetic marker to monitor phenoxy acid degradation in strain Sphingobium sp. PM2. We were not able to link motility...... and biofilm formation to the strains´ ability to adhere to sand. Nevertheless, a correlation was found between cell surface hydrophobicity and adhesion and overall degradation performances in flow-through sand columns. We identified S phingobium sp. PM2 as a promising inoculant strain, displaying efficient...... MCPA degradation for prolonged periods in flow-through sand columns. In an expression study of catabolic genes with putative roles in phenoxy acid degradation, we observed a marked upregulation of catabolic genes cadA and tfdC upon exposure to MCPA, 2,4-D, dichlorprop and mecoprop in strain PM2, which...

  1. Dynamic Infrared Thermography Study of Blood Flow Relative to Lower Limp Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, I.; Skouroliakou, K.; Michail, C.; Valais, I.

    2015-09-01

    Thermography is an established method for studying skin temperature distribution. Temperature distribution on body surface is influenced by a variety of physiological mechanisms and has been proven a reliable indicator of various physiological disorders. Blood flow is an important factor that influences body heat diffusion and skin temperature. In an attempt to validate and further elucidate thermal models characterizing the human skin, dynamic thermography of the lower limp in horizontal and vertical position was performed, using a FLIR T460 thermographic camera. Temporal variation of temperature was recorded on five distinct points of the limp. Specific points were initially cooled by the means of an ice cube and measurements of the skin temperature were obtained every 30 seconds as the skin temperature was locally reduced and afterwards restored at its initial value. The return to thermal balance followed roughly the same pattern for all points of measurement, although the heating rate was faster when the foot was in horizontal position. Thermal balance was achieved faster at the spots that were positioned on a vein passage. Our results confirm the influence of blood flow on the thermal regulation of the skin. Spots located over veins exhibit different thermal behaviour due to thermal convection through blood flow. Changing the position of the foot from vertical to horizontal, effectively affects blood perfusion as in the vertical position blood circulation is opposed by gravity.

  2. Investigation of the Dynamic Contact Angle Using a Direct Numerical Simulation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangpu; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Hai; Li, Aifen; Shams, Bilal

    2016-11-15

    A large amount of residual oil, which exists as isolated oil slugs, remains trapped in reservoirs after water flooding. Numerous numerical studies are performed to investigate the fundamental flow mechanism of oil slugs to improve flooding efficiency. Dynamic contact angle models are usually introduced to simulate an accurate contact angle and meniscus displacement of oil slugs under a high capillary number. Nevertheless, in the oil slug flow simulation process, it is unnecessary to introduce the dynamic contact angle model because of a negligible change in the meniscus displacement after using the dynamic contact angle model when the capillary number is small. Therefore, a critical capillary number should be introduced to judge whether the dynamic contact model should be incorporated into simulations. In this study, a direct numerical simulation method is employed to simulate the oil slug flow in a capillary tube at the pore scale. The position of the interface between water and the oil slug is determined using the phase-field method. The capacity and accuracy of the model are validated using a classical benchmark: a dynamic capillary filling process. Then, different dynamic contact angle models and the factors that affect the dynamic contact angle are analyzed. The meniscus displacements of oil slugs with a dynamic contact angle and a static contact angle (SCA) are obtained during simulations, and the relative error between them is calculated automatically. The relative error limit has been defined to be 5%, beyond which the dynamic contact angle model needs to be incorporated into the simulation to approach the realistic displacement. Thus, the desired critical capillary number can be determined. A three-dimensional universal chart of critical capillary number, which functions as static contact angle and viscosity ratio, is given to provide a guideline for oil slug simulation. Also, a fitting formula is presented for ease of use.

  3. Large-Eddy Simulation of Internal Flow through Human Vocal Folds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasota, Martin; Šidlof, Petr

    2018-06-01

    The phonatory process occurs when air is expelled from the lungs through the glottis and the pressure drop causes flow-induced oscillations of the vocal folds. The flow fields created in phonation are highly unsteady and the coherent vortex structures are also generated. For accuracy it is essential to compute on humanlike computational domain and appropriate mathematical model. The work deals with numerical simulation of air flow within the space between plicae vocales and plicae vestibulares. In addition to the dynamic width of the rima glottidis, where the sound is generated, there are lateral ventriculus laryngis and sacculus laryngis included in the computational domain as well. The paper presents the results from OpenFOAM which are obtained with a large-eddy simulation using second-order finite volume discretization of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Large-eddy simulations with different subgrid scale models are executed on structured mesh. In these cases are used only the subgrid scale models which model turbulence via turbulent viscosity and Boussinesq approximation in subglottal and supraglottal area in larynx.

  4. Large-Eddy Simulation of Internal Flow through Human Vocal Folds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasota Martin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The phonatory process occurs when air is expelled from the lungs through the glottis and the pressure drop causes flow-induced oscillations of the vocal folds. The flow fields created in phonation are highly unsteady and the coherent vortex structures are also generated. For accuracy it is essential to compute on humanlike computational domain and appropriate mathematical model. The work deals with numerical simulation of air flow within the space between plicae vocales and plicae vestibulares. In addition to the dynamic width of the rima glottidis, where the sound is generated, there are lateral ventriculus laryngis and sacculus laryngis included in the computational domain as well. The paper presents the results from OpenFOAM which are obtained with a large-eddy simulation using second-order finite volume discretization of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Large-eddy simulations with different subgrid scale models are executed on structured mesh. In these cases are used only the subgrid scale models which model turbulence via turbulent viscosity and Boussinesq approximation in subglottal and supraglottal area in larynx.

  5. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Swirling Flow Reduction by Using Anti-Vortex Baffle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; Peugeot, John W.; West, Jeff S.

    2017-01-01

    An anti-vortex baffle is a liquid propellant management device placed adjacent to an outlet of the propellant tank. Its purpose is to substantially reduce or eliminate the formation of free surface dip and vortex, as well as prevent vapor ingestion into the outlet, as the liquid drains out through the flight. To design an effective anti-vortex baffle, Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations were undertaken for the NASA Ares I vehicle LOX tank subjected to the simulated flight loads with and without the anti-vortex baffle. The Six Degree-Of-Freedom (6-DOF) dynamics experienced by the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) during ascent were modeled by modifying the momentum equations in a CFD code to accommodate the extra body forces from the maneuvering in a non-inertial frame. The present analysis found that due to large moments, the CLV maneuvering has a significant impact on the vortical flow generation inside the tank. Roll maneuvering and side loading due to pitch and yaw are shown to induce swirling flow. The vortical flow due to roll is symmetrical with respect to the tank centerline, while those induced by pitch and yaw maneuverings showed two vortices side by side. The study found that without the anti-vortex baffle, the swirling flow caused surface dip during the late stage of drainage and hence early vapor ingestion. The flow can also be non-uniform in the drainage pipe as the secondary swirling flow velocity component can be as high as 10% of the draining velocity. An analysis of the vortex dynamics shows that the swirling flow in the drainage pipe during the Upper Stage burn is mainly the result of residual vortices inside the tank due to the conservation of angular momentum. The study demonstrated that the swirling flow in the drainage pipe can be effectively suppressed by employing the anti-vortex baffle.

  6. Hydrodynamics of free surface flows modelling with the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Hervouet, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    A definitive guide for accurate state-of-the-art modelling of free surface flows Understanding the dynamics of free surface flows is the starting point of many environmental studies, impact studies, and waterworks design. Typical applications, once the flows are known, are water quality, dam impact and safety, pollutant control, and sediment transport. These studies used to be done in the past with scale models, but these are now being replaced by numerical simulation performed by software suites called "hydro-informatic systems". The Telemac system is the leading software package worldwide, and has been developed by Electricité de France and Jean-Michel Hervouet, who is the head and main developer of the Telemac project. Written by a leading authority on Computational Fluid Dynamics, the book aims to provide environmentalists, hydrologists, and engineers using hydro-informatic systems such as Telemac and the finite element method, with the knowledge of the basic principles, capabilities, different hypothese...

  7. Rapid flow imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelc, N.J.; Spritzer, C.E.; Lee, J.N.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid, phase-contrast, MR imaging method of imaging flow has been implemented. The method, called VIGRE (velocity imaging with gradient recalled echoes), consists of two interleaved, narrow flip angle, gradient-recalled acquisitions. One is flow compensated while the second has a specified flow encoding (both peak velocity and direction) that causes signals to contain additional phase in proportion to velocity in the specified direction. Complex image data from the first acquisition are used as a phase reference for the second, yielding immunity from phase accumulation due to causes other than motion. Images with pixel values equal to MΔΘ where M is the magnitude of the flow compensated image and ΔΘ is the phase difference at the pixel, are produced. The magnitude weighting provides additional vessel contrast, suppresses background noise, maintains the flow direction information, and still allows quantitative data to be retrieved. The method has been validated with phantoms and is undergoing initial clinical evaluation. Early results are extremely encouraging

  8. Effect of Dynamic Flow on the Structure of Inhibition Layer in Hot-dip Galvanizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Young Sool; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Su Young [POSCO Technical Research Labs., Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Doo Jin [POSCO Kwangyang Steel Works, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The effect of dynamic flow or forced convection were investigated and compared on the formation of inhibition layer, galvanizing and galvannealing reactions through the hot-dip galvanizing simulator with the oscillation of specimen in zinc bath, continuous galvanizing pilot plant with zinc pumping system through the snout and continuous galvanizing operation with Dynamic Galvanizing{sup TR} system. The interfacial Al pick-up was not consistent between the results of simulator, pilot plant and line operation, but the morphology of inhibition layer became compact and refined by the forced convection. The growth of Fe-Zn intermetallics at the interface was inhibited by the forced convection, whereas the galvannealing rate would be a little promoted.

  9. Effect of Dynamic Flow on the Structure of Inhibition Layer in Hot-dip Galvanizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Young Sool; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Su Young; Paik, Doo Jin

    2011-01-01

    The effect of dynamic flow or forced convection were investigated and compared on the formation of inhibition layer, galvanizing and galvannealing reactions through the hot-dip galvanizing simulator with the oscillation of specimen in zinc bath, continuous galvanizing pilot plant with zinc pumping system through the snout and continuous galvanizing operation with Dynamic Galvanizing TR system. The interfacial Al pick-up was not consistent between the results of simulator, pilot plant and line operation, but the morphology of inhibition layer became compact and refined by the forced convection. The growth of Fe-Zn intermetallics at the interface was inhibited by the forced convection, whereas the galvannealing rate would be a little promoted

  10. A novel acoustic method for gas flow measurement using correlation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuuttila, M. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland). Industrial Physics

    1997-12-31

    The study demonstrates a new kind of acoustic method for gas flow measurement. The method uses upstream and downstream propagating low frequency plane wave and correlation techniques for volume flow rate determination. The theory of propagating low frequency plane waves in the pipe is introduced and is proved empirically to be applicable for flow measurement. The flow profile dependence of the method is verified and found to be negligible at least in the region of moderate perturbations. The physical principles of the method were applied in practice in the form of a flowmeter with new design concepts. The developed prototype meters were verified against the reference standard of NMI (Nederlands Meetinstituut), which showed that a wide dynamic range of 1:80 is achievable with total expanded uncertainty below 0.3 %. Also the requirements used for turbine meters of linearity, weighted mean error and stability were shown to be well fulfilled. A brief comparison with other flowmeter types shows the new flowmeter to be competitive. The advantages it offers are a small pressure drop over the meter, no blockage of flow in possible malfunction, no pulsation to flow, essentially no moving parts, and the possibility for bidirectional measurements. The introduced flowmeter is also capable of using the telephone network or a radio-modem to read the consumption of gas and report its operation to the user. (orig.) 51 refs.

  11. An attempt of modelling debris flows characterised by strong inertial effects through Cellular Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovine, G.; D'Ambrosio, D.

    2003-04-01

    Cellular Automata models do represent a valid method for the simulation of complex phenomena, when these latter can be described in "a-centric" terms - i.e. through local interactions within a discrete time-space. In particular, flow-type landslides (such as debris flows) can be viewed as a-centric dynamical system. SCIDDICA S4b, the last release of a family of two-dimensional hexagonal Cellular Automata models, has recently been developed for simulating debris flows characterised by strong inertial effects. It has been derived by progressively enriching an initial simplified CA model, originally derived for simulating very simple cases of slow-moving flow-type landslides. In S4b, by applying an empirical strategy, the inertial characters of the flowing mass have been translated into CA terms. In the transition function of the model, the distribution of landslide debris among the cells is computed by considering the momentum of the debris which move among the cells of the neighbourhood, and privileging the flow direction. By properly setting the value of one of the global parameters of the model (the "inertial factor"), the mechanism of distribution of the landslide debris among the cells can be influenced in order to emphasise the inertial effects, according to the energy of the flowing mass. Moreover, the high complexity of both the model and of the phenomena to be simulated (e.g. debris flows characterised by severe erosion along their path, and by strong inertial effects) suggested to employ an automated technique of evaluation, for the determination of the best set of global parameters. Accordingly, the calibration of the model has been performed through Genetic Algorithms, by considering several real cases of study: these latter have been selected among the population of landslides triggered in Campania (Southern Italy) in May 1998 and December 1999. Obtained results are satisfying: errors computed by comparing the simulations with the map of the real

  12. Choked flow through cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feburie, V.; Giot, M.; Granger, S.; Seynhaeve, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The leaks through steam-generator cracks are the subject of a research carried out in cooperation between EDF and UCL. A software called ECREVISSE to predict the mass flow rate has been developed and has been successfully validated. The purpose of the paper is to present the mathematical model used in ECREVISSE as well as some comparison between the results and the presently available data. The model takes into account the persistence of some metastable liquid in the crack and the special flow pattern which appears in such particular geometry. Although the model involves the use of several correlations (friction, heat transfer), no adjustment of parameters against the data has been needed, neither in the single-phase part of the flow, or in the two-phase part. (authors). 8 figs., 1 tab., 20 refs

  13. Understanding dynamic capabilities through knowledge management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Paarup

    2006-01-01

    In the paper eight knowledge management activities are identified; knowledge creation, acquisition, capture, assembly, sharing, integration, leverage and exploitation. These activities are assembled into the three dynamic capabilities of knowledge development, knowledge (re......)combination and knowledge use. The dynamic capabilities and the associated knowledge management activities create flows to and from the firm’s stock of knowledge and they support the creation and use of organizational capabilities....

  14. Bifurcation analysis of incompressible flow in a driven cavity by the Newton–Picard method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiesinga, G; Wubs, FW; Veldman, AEP

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of the transition point of steady to periodic flow is becoming increasingly important in the study of laminar–turbulent flow transition or fluid–structure interaction. Such knowledge becomes available through the Newton–Picard method, a method related to the recursive projection method.

  15. State diagram for adhesion dynamics of deformable capsules under shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zheng Yuan; Bai, Bo Feng

    2016-08-17

    Due to the significance of understanding the underlying mechanisms of cell adhesion in biological processes and cell capture in biomedical applications, we numerically investigate the adhesion dynamics of deformable capsules under shear flow by using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model. This model is based on the coupling of the front tracking-finite element method for elastic mechanics of the capsule membrane and the adhesion kinetics simulation for adhesive interactions between capsules and functionalized surfaces. Using this model, three distinct adhesion dynamic states are predicted, such as detachment, rolling and firm-adhesion. Specifically, the effects of capsule deformability quantified by the capillary number on the transitions of these three dynamic states are investigated by developing an adhesion dynamic state diagram for the first time. At low capillary numbers (e.g. Ca state no longer appears, since capsules exhibit large deviation from the spherical shape.

  16. Particle algorithms for population dynamics in flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlekar, Prasad; Toschi, Federico; Benzi, Roberto; Pigolotti, Simone

    2011-01-01

    We present and discuss particle based algorithms to numerically study the dynamics of population subjected to an advecting flow condition. We discuss few possible variants of the algorithms and compare them in a model compressible flow. A comparison against appropriate versions of the continuum stochastic Fisher equation (sFKPP) is also presented and discussed. The algorithms can be used to study populations genetics in fluid environments.

  17. Computational methods for fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferziger, Joel H

    2002-01-01

    In its 3rd revised and extended edition the book offers an overview of the techniques used to solve problems in fluid mechanics on computers and describes in detail those most often used in practice. Included are advanced methods in computational fluid dynamics, like direct and large-eddy simulation of turbulence, multigrid methods, parallel computing, moving grids, structured, block-structured and unstructured boundary-fitted grids, free surface flows. The 3rd edition contains a new section dealing with grid quality and an extended description of discretization methods. The book shows common roots and basic principles for many different methods. The book also contains a great deal of practical advice for code developers and users, it is designed to be equally useful to beginners and experts. The issues of numerical accuracy, estimation and reduction of numerical errors are dealt with in detail, with many examples. A full-feature user-friendly demo-version of a commercial CFD software has been added, which ca...

  18. Dynamic behaviour of high-pressure natural-gas flow in pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gato, L.M.C.; Henriques, J.C.C.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the numerical modelling of the dynamic behaviour of high-pressure natural-gas flow in pipelines. The numerical simulation was performed by solving the conservation equations, for one-dimensional compressible flow, using the Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin method, with third-order approximation in space and time. The boundary conditions were imposed using a new weak formulation based on the characteristic variables. The occurrence of pressure oscillations in natural-gas pipelines was studied as a result of the compression wave originated by the rapid closure of downstream shut-off valves. The effect of the partial reflection of pressure waves was also analyzed in the transition between pipes of different cross-sectional areas

  19. Dynamic behaviour of high-pressure natural-gas flow in pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gato, L.M.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: lgato@mail.ist.utl.pt; Henriques, J.C.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: jcch@mail.ist.utl.pt

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present study is the numerical modelling of the dynamic behaviour of high-pressure natural-gas flow in pipelines. The numerical simulation was performed by solving the conservation equations, for one-dimensional compressible flow, using the Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin method, with third-order approximation in space and time. The boundary conditions were imposed using a new weak formulation based on the characteristic variables. The occurrence of pressure oscillations in natural-gas pipelines was studied as a result of the compression wave originated by the rapid closure of downstream shut-off valves. The effect of the partial reflection of pressure waves was also analyzed in the transition between pipes of different cross-sectional areas.

  20. Investigation of analytical methods in thermal stratification analysis. Evaluation of flow rates through flow holes for normal and scram conditions of 40% power operation with AQUA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Yoshihiro; Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    1997-08-01

    Thermal stratification phenomena are observed in an upper plenum of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) under reactor scram conditions, which give rise to thermal stress on structural components. Therefore it is important to evaluate characteristics of phenomena in the design of the internal structure in an LMFBR plenum. To evaluate flow rates through flow holes of the prototype fast breeder reactor, MONJU, numerical analyses were carried out with AQUA code for normal and scram conditions with 40% power operation. Through comparison of analysis results and measured temperature, thermal stratification phenomena in 300 second period after the scram was evaluated. Flow rate through the upper flow holes, the lower flow holes and annular gap between the inner barrel and the reactor vessel were evaluated with the measured temperature and the analysis results individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. Mode decomposition methods for flows in high-contrast porous media. A global approach

    KAUST Repository

    Ghommem, Mehdi; Calo, Victor M.; Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2014-01-01

    We apply dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) methods to flows in highly-heterogeneous porous media to extract the dominant coherent structures and derive reduced-order models via Galerkin projection. Permeability fields with high contrast are considered to investigate the capability of these techniques to capture the main flow features and forecast the flow evolution within a certain accuracy. A DMD-based approach shows a better predictive capability due to its ability to accurately extract the information relevant to long-time dynamics, in particular, the slowly-decaying eigenmodes corresponding to largest eigenvalues. Our study enables a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the applicability of these techniques for flows in high-contrast porous media. Furthermore, we discuss the robustness of DMD- and POD-based reduced-order models with respect to variations in initial conditions, permeability fields, and forcing terms. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  2. Method of draining water through a solid waste site without leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treat, Russell L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Whyatt, Greg A.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a method of preventing water from leaching solid waste sites by preventing atmospheric precipitation from contacting waste as the water flows through a solid waste site. The method comprises placing at least one drain hole through the solid waste site. The drain hole is seated to prevent waste material from entering the drain hole, and the solid waste site cover material is layered and graded to direct water to flow toward the drain hole and to soil beneath the waste site.

  3. Overview of multifluid-flow-calculation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, H.B.

    1981-01-01

    Two categories of numerical methods which may be useful in multiphase flow research are discussed. The first category includes methods which are specifically intended for accurate computation of discontinuities, such as the method of characteristics, particle-in-cell method, flux-corrected transport, and random choice methods. Methods in this category could be applied to research on rocket exhaust plumes and interior ballistics. The second category includes methods for smooth, subsonic flows, such as fractional step methods, semi-implicit method, and methods which treat convection implicitly. The subsonic flow methods could be of interest for ice flows

  4. On the peculiarities of LDA method in two-phase flows with high concentrations of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplavski, S. V.; Boiko, V. M.; Nesterov, A. U.

    2016-10-01

    Popular applications of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) in gas dynamics are reviewed. It is shown that the most popular method cannot be used in supersonic flows and two-phase flows with high concentrations of particles. A new approach to implementation of the known LDA method based on direct spectral analysis, which offers better prospects for such problems, is presented. It is demonstrated that the method is suitable for gas-liquid jets. Owing to the progress in laser engineering, digital recording of spectra, and computer processing of data, the method is implemented at a higher technical level and provides new prospects of diagnostics of high-velocity dense two-phase flows.

  5. Methods and models for accelerating dynamic simulation of fluid power circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaman, R.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this dissertation is to improve the dynamic simulation of fluid power circuits. A fluid power circuit is a typical way to implement power transmission in mobile working machines, e.g. cranes, excavators etc. Dynamic simulation is an essential tool in developing controllability and energy-efficient solutions for mobile machines. Efficient dynamic simulation is the basic requirement for the real-time simulation. In the real-time simulation of fluid power circuits there exist numerical problems due to the software and methods used for modelling and integration. A simulation model of a fluid power circuit is typically created using differential and algebraic equations. Efficient numerical methods are required since differential equations must be solved in real time. Unfortunately, simulation software packages offer only a limited selection of numerical solvers. Numerical problems cause noise to the results, which in many cases leads the simulation run to fail. Mathematically the fluid power circuit models are stiff systems of ordinary differential equations. Numerical solution of the stiff systems can be improved by two alternative approaches. The first is to develop numerical solvers suitable for solving stiff systems. The second is to decrease the model stiffness itself by introducing models and algorithms that either decrease the highest eigenvalues or neglect them by introducing steady-state solutions of the stiff parts of the models. The thesis proposes novel methods using the latter approach. The study aims to develop practical methods usable in dynamic simulation of fluid power circuits using explicit fixed-step integration algorithms. In this thesis, two mechanisms which make the system stiff are studied. These are the pressure drop approaching zero in the turbulent orifice model and the volume approaching zero in the equation of pressure build-up. These are the critical areas to which alternative methods for modelling and numerical simulation

  6. Helium-air exchange flows through partitioned opening and two-opening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, T. I.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes experimental investigations of helium-air exchange flows through partitioned opening and two-opening. Such exchange flows may occur following rupture accident of stand pipe in high temperature engineering test reactor. A test vessel with the two types of small opening on top of test cylinder is used for experiments. An estimation method of mass increment is developed to measure the exchange flow rate. Upward flow of the helium and downward flow of the air in partitioned opening system interact out of entrance and exit of the opening. Therefore, an experiment with two-opening system is made to investigate effect of the fluids interaction of partitioned opening system. As a result of comparison of the exchange flow rates between two types of the opening system, it is demonstrated that the exchange flow rate of the two-opening system is larger than that of the partitioned opening system because of absence of the effect of fluids interaction. (author)

  7. Spatiotemporal evolution of cavitation dynamics exhibited by flowing microbubbles during ultrasound exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, James J; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasound and microbubble-based therapies utilize cavitation to generate bioeffects, yet cavitation dynamics during individual pulses and across consecutive pulses remain poorly understood under physiologically relevant flow conditions. SonoVue(®) microbubbles were made to flow (fluid velocity: 10-40 mm/s) through a vessel in a tissue-mimicking material and were exposed to ultrasound [frequency: 0.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure (PRP): 150-1200 kPa, pulse length: 1-100,000 cycles, pulse repetition frequency (PRF): 1-50 Hz, number of pulses: 10-250]. Radiated emissions were captured on a linear array, and passive acoustic mapping was used to spatiotemporally resolve cavitation events. At low PRPs, stable cavitation was maintained throughout several pulses, thus generating a steady rise in energy with low upstream spatial bias within the focal volume. At high PRPs, inertial cavitation was concentrated in the first 6.3 ± 1.3 ms of a pulse, followed by an energy reduction and high upstream bias. Multiple pulses at PRFs below a flow-dependent critical rate (PRF(crit)) produced predictable and consistent cavitation dynamics. Above the PRF(crit), energy generated was unpredictable and spatially biased. In conclusion, key parameters in microbubble-seeded flow conditions were matched with specific types, magnitudes, distributions, and durations of cavitation; this may help in understanding empirically observed in vivo phenomena and guide future pulse sequence designs.

  8. Development of dynamic PIV for droplet jet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, K.; Hong, S. D.; Bi, W. T.; Sugii, Y.; Madarame, H.; Hayami, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) can capture velocity vector fields with high spatial resolution. In this study, the Dynamic PIV system up to 10kHz temporal resolution was developed with combining the High-speed camera and high speed Laser with Double pulse option. The 1024 x 1024 pixel images with frame straddling were captured in 2kHz. Also, PIV data were measured in 512 x 256 pixel in 10kHz. The system had been applied to capture the water droplet flow. The transient characteristics of the droplet flow can be clearly captured using the developed Dynamic PIV System

  9. Topological fluid dynamics of interfacial flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    1994-01-01

    The topological description of flows in the vicinity of a solid boundary, that is familiar from the aerodynamics literature, has recently been extended to the case of flow at a liquid–gas interface or a free surface by Lugt [Phys. Fluids 30, 3647 (1987)]. Lugt's work is revisited in a more general...... setting, including nonconstant curvature of the interface and gradients of surface tension, using tools of modern nonlinear dynamics. Bifurcations of the flow pattern occur at degenerate configurations. Using the theory of unfolding, this paper gives a complete description of the bifurcations that depend...... on terms up to the second order. The general theory of this paper is applied to the topology of streamlines during the breaking of a wave and to the flow below a stagnant surface film. Physics of Fluids is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  10. Geometric Optimization for Non-Thrombogenicity of a Centrifugal Blood Pump through Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi

    A monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump has been developed in our laboratory. The flow patterns within the pump should be carefully examined in order to prevent thrombogenesis, especially around the pivot bearing. Therefore, the effects of the pump geometry on the local flow were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics together with the experimental flow visualization. The engineering goal was to reduce the area of stagnation around the pivot in order to prevent thrombus formation. As a result, the stagnation area and the flow rate through the washout holes were found to be highly affected by the size and geometry of the washout holes. Secondary flow was revealed to form a jet-like wash against the pivot, thus preventing thrombus formation. The flow rate through the washout holes was estimated to be up to one fifth of the pump flow rate, depending on the cross-sectional areas of the washout holes. Furthermore, an anti-thrombogenic effect was attained by removing a small gap between the male and female pivots.

  11. Diffuse-Interface Capturing Methods for Compressible Two-Phase Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurel, Richard; Pantano, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Simulation of compressible flows became a routine activity with the appearance of shock-/contact-capturing methods. These methods can determine all waves, particularly discontinuous ones. However, additional difficulties may appear in two-phase and multimaterial flows due to the abrupt variation of thermodynamic properties across the interfacial region, with discontinuous thermodynamical representations at the interfaces. To overcome this difficulty, researchers have developed augmented systems of governing equations to extend the capturing strategy. These extended systems, reviewed here, are termed diffuse-interface models, because they are designed to compute flow variables correctly in numerically diffused zones surrounding interfaces. In particular, they facilitate coupling the dynamics on both sides of the (diffuse) interfaces and tend to the proper pure fluid-governing equations far from the interfaces. This strategy has become efficient for contact interfaces separating fluids that are governed by different equations of state, in the presence or absence of capillary effects, and with phase change. More sophisticated materials than fluids (e.g., elastic-plastic materials) have been considered as well.

  12. Experimental Measurements and Mathematical Modeling of Static and Dynamic Characteristics of Water Flow in a Long Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonska, J.; Kozubkova, M.

    2017-08-01

    Static and dynamic characteristics of flow in technical practice are very important and serious problem and can be solved by experimental measurement or mathematical modeling. Unsteady flow presents time changes of the flow and water hammer can be an example of this phenomenon. Water hammer is caused by rapid changes in the water flow by means the closure or opening of the control valve. The authors deal with by hydraulic hammer at the multiphase flow (water and air), its one-dimensional modeling (Matlab SimHydraulics) and modeling with the use of the finite volume method (Ansys Fluent) in article. The circuit elements are defined by static and dynamic characteristics. The results are verified with measurements. The article evaluates different approaches, their advantages, disadvantages and specifics in solving of water hammer.

  13. Nonlinear vacuum gas flow through a short tube due to pressure and temperature gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantazis, Sarantis; Naris, Steryios; Tantos, Christos [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece); Valougeorgis, Dimitris, E-mail: diva@mie.uth.gr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece); André, Julien; Millet, Francois; Perin, Jean Paul [Service des Basses Températures, UMR-E CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, Grenoble, F-38054 (France)

    2013-10-15

    The flow of a rarefied gas through a tube due to both pressure and temperature gradients has been studied numerically. The main objective is to investigate the performance of a mechanical vacuum pump operating at low temperatures in order to increase the pumped mass flow rate. This type of pump is under development at CEA-Grenoble. The flow is modelled by the Shakhov kinetic model equation, which is solved by the discrete velocity method. Results are presented for certain geometry and flow parameters. Since according to the pump design the temperature driven flow is in the opposite direction than the main pressure driven flow, it has been found that for the operating pressure range studied here the net mass flow rate through the pump may be significantly reduced.

  14. Nonlinear vacuum gas flow through a short tube due to pressure and temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantazis, Sarantis; Naris, Steryios; Tantos, Christos; Valougeorgis, Dimitris; André, Julien; Millet, Francois; Perin, Jean Paul

    2013-01-01

    The flow of a rarefied gas through a tube due to both pressure and temperature gradients has been studied numerically. The main objective is to investigate the performance of a mechanical vacuum pump operating at low temperatures in order to increase the pumped mass flow rate. This type of pump is under development at CEA-Grenoble. The flow is modelled by the Shakhov kinetic model equation, which is solved by the discrete velocity method. Results are presented for certain geometry and flow parameters. Since according to the pump design the temperature driven flow is in the opposite direction than the main pressure driven flow, it has been found that for the operating pressure range studied here the net mass flow rate through the pump may be significantly reduced

  15. Advantages of a Dynamic RGGG Method in Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seung Ki; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Various researches have been conducted in order to analyze dynamic interactions among components and process variables in nuclear power plants which cannot be handled by static reliability analysis methods such as conventional fault tree and event tree techniques. A dynamic reliability graph with general gates (RGGG) method was proposed for an intuitive modeling of dynamic systems and it enables one to easily analyze huge and complex systems. In this paper, advantages of the dynamic RGGG method are assessed through two stages: system modeling and quantitative analysis. And then a software tool for dynamic RGGG method is introduced and an application to a real dynamic system is accompanied

  16. Simulation of Intra-Aneurysmal Blood Flow by Different Numerical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Weichert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The occlusional performance of sole endoluminal stenting of intracranial aneurysms is controversially discussed in the literature. Simulation of blood flow has been studied to shed light on possible causal attributions. The outcome, however, largely depends on the numerical method and various free parameters. The present study is therefore conducted to find ways to define parameters and efficiently explore the huge parameter space with finite element methods (FEMs and lattice Boltzmann methods (LBMs. The goal is to identify both the impact of different parameters on the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD and their advantages and disadvantages. CFD is applied to assess flow and aneurysmal vorticity in 2D and 3D models. To assess and compare initial simulation results, simplified 2D and 3D models based on key features of real geometries and medical expert knowledge were used. A result obtained from this analysis indicates that a combined use of the different numerical methods, LBM for fast exploration and FEM for a more in-depth look, may result in a better understanding of blood flow and may also lead to more accurate information about factors that influence conditions for stenting of intracranial aneurysms.

  17. Fluid dynamics characterization of riser in a FCC cold flow model using gas radiotracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Valdemir A. dos; Lima, Emerson A.O.

    2013-01-01

    Was carried out the characterization of a diameter small riser of a cold flow model of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB), with aid of a radioactive tracer. Compressed air and catalytic cracking of petroleum flow through solids pneumatic transport regime, made of transparent material (glass, acrylic, PVC, polycarbonate) for study of problems in Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) unit and development of methods of measurement of fluid dynamic parameters. The CFB model consisted of a mixer component solid-gas (compressed air at 25 deg C and 200 kN/m 2 ; cracking catalyst with an average diameter of 72μm and specific mass of 1,500 kg/m 3 ), comprising a riser pipe glass 0.02m internal diameter and 1.8m height, a gas solid separation vessel by flash effect, with the filter in the gas outlet, and a return column (a glass tube with an internal diameter of 0.0254m) to redirect the catalyst for the riser base. Recorded data allowed studies on residence time distribution of the gaseous phase in the riser, with the identification and characterization of the flow of gas-solid components in the CFB riser of small diameter. A plug flow type with deviations due to back mixing of catalyst close to the walls, associated with the density difference between this component was observed. (author)

  18. Stochastic Rotation Dynamics simulations of wetting multi-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Thomas; Sanchez de La Lama, Marta; Brinkmann, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Multi-color Stochastic Rotation Dynamics (SRDmc) has been introduced by Inoue et al. [1,2] as a particle based simulation method to study the flow of emulsion droplets in non-wetting microchannels. In this work, we extend the multi-color method to also account for different wetting conditions. This is achieved by assigning the color information not only to fluid particles but also to virtual wall particles that are required to enforce proper no-slip boundary conditions. To extend the scope of the original SRDmc algorithm to e.g. immiscible two-phase flow with viscosity contrast we implement an angular momentum conserving scheme (SRD+mc). We perform extensive benchmark simulations to show that a mono-phase SRDmc fluid exhibits bulk properties identical to a standard SRD fluid and that SRDmc fluids are applicable to a wide range of immiscible two-phase flows. To quantify the adhesion of a SRD+mc fluid in contact to the walls we measure the apparent contact angle from sessile droplets in mechanical equilibrium. For a further verification of our wettability implementation we compare the dewetting of a liquid film from a wetting stripe to experimental and numerical studies of interfacial morphologies on chemically structured surfaces.

  19. Movable shark scales act as a passive dynamic micro-roughness to control flow separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Amy W; Bradshaw, Michael T; Smith, Jonathon A; Wheelus, Jennifer N; Motta, Philip J; Habegger, Maria L; Hueter, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Shark scales on fast-swimming sharks have been shown to be movable to angles in excess of 50°, and we hypothesize that this characteristic gives this shark skin a preferred flow direction. During the onset of separation, flow reversal is initiated close to the surface. However, the movable scales would be actuated by the reversed flow thereby causing a greater resistance to any further flow reversal and this mechanism would disrupt the process leading to eventual flow separation. Here we report for the first time experimental evidence of the separation control capability of real shark skin through water tunnel testing. Using skin samples from a shortfin mako Isurus oxyrinchus, we tested a pectoral fin and flank skin attached to a NACA 4412 hydrofoil and separation control was observed in the presence of movable shark scales under certain conditions in both cases. We hypothesize that the scales provide a passive, flow-actuated mechanism acting as a dynamic micro-roughness to control flow separation. (paper)

  20. A ghost-cell immersed boundary method for flow in complex geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Y.-H.; Ferziger, Joel H.

    2003-01-01

    An efficient ghost-cell immersed boundary method (GCIBM) for simulating turbulent flows in complex geometries is presented. A boundary condition is enforced through a ghost cell method. The reconstruction procedure allows systematic development of numerical schemes for treating the immersed boundary while preserving the overall second-order accuracy of the base solver. Both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions can be treated. The current ghost cell treatment is both suitable for staggered and non-staggered Cartesian grids. The accuracy of the current method is validated using flow past a circular cylinder and large eddy simulation of turbulent flow over a wavy surface. Numerical results are compared with experimental data and boundary-fitted grid results. The method is further extended to an existing ocean model (MITGCM) to simulate geophysical flow over a three-dimensional bump. The method is easily implemented as evidenced by our use of several existing codes

  1. Flux schemes based finite volume method for internal transonic flow with condensation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halama, Jan; Benkhaldoun, F.; Fořt, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 8 (2011), s. 953-968 ISSN 0271-2091 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : VFFC flux * SRNH flux * two-phase homogeneous flow * fractional step method * condensation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.176, year: 2011

  2. Magnetohydrodynamics Nanofluid Flow Containing Gyrotactic Microorganisms Propagating Over a Stretching Surface by Successive Taylor Series Linearization Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, A.; Zhou, Z.; Bhatti, M. M.; Tripathi, D.

    2018-03-01

    Nanofluid dynamics with magnetohydrodynamics has tremendously contributed in industrial applications recently since presence of nanoparticle in base fluids enhances the specific chemical and physical properties. Owing to the relevance of nanofluid dynamics, we analyze the nanofluid flow in the presence of gyrotactic microorganism and magnetohydrodynamics through a stretching/shrinking plate. The impacts of chemical reaction and thermal radiation on flow characteristics are also studied. To simplify the governing equations of microorganisms, velocity, concentration and temperature, the similarity transformations are employed. The couple governing equations are numerically solved using Successive Taylor Series Linearization Method (STSLM). The velocity profile, motile microorganism density profile, concentration profile, temperature profile as well as Nusselt number, skin friction coefficient, Sherwood number and density number of motile microorganisms are discussed using tables and graphs against all the sundry parameters. A numerical comparison is also given for Nusselt number, Sherwood number, skin friction, and density number of motile microorganisms with previously published results to validate the present model. The results show that Nusselt number, Sherwood number and density number diminish with increasing the magnetic field effects.

  3. Calculation of the dynamic air flow resistivity of fibre materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1997-01-01

    The acoustic attenuation of acoustic fiber materials is mainly determined by the dynamic resistivity to an oscillating air flow. The dynamic resistance is calculated for a model with geometry close to the geometry of real fibre material. The model constists of parallel cylinders placed randomly.......The second procedure is an extension to oscillating air flow of the Brinkman self-consistent procedure for dc flow. The procedures are valid for volume concentrations of cylinders less than 0.1. The calculations show that for the density of fibers of interest for acoustic fibre materials the simple self...

  4. Visualizing electron dynamics in organic materials: Charge transport through molecules and angular resolved photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmel, Stephan

    Being able to visualize the dynamics of electrons in organic materials is a fascinating perspective. Simulations based on time-dependent density functional theory allow to realize this hope, as they visualize the flow of charge through molecular structures in real-space and real-time. We here present results on two fundamental processes: Photoemission from organic semiconductor molecules and charge transport through molecular structures. In the first part we demonstrate that angular resolved photoemission intensities - from both theory and experiment - can often be interpreted as a visualization of molecular orbitals. However, counter-intuitive quantum-mechanical electron dynamics such as emission perpendicular to the direction of the electrical field can substantially alter the picture, adding surprising features to the molecular orbital interpretation. In a second study we calculate the flow of charge through conjugated molecules. The calculations show in real time how breaks in the conjugation can lead to a local buildup of charge and the formation of local electrical dipoles. These can interact with neighboring molecular chains. As a consequence, collections of ''molecular electrical wires'' can show distinctly different characteristics than ''classical electrical wires''. German Science Foundation GRK 1640.

  5. Review of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) researches on nano fluid flow through micro channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Satish Kumar

    2018-05-01

    Nanofluid is becoming a promising heat transfer fluids due to its improved thermo-physical properties and heat transfer performance. Micro channel heat transfer has potential application in the cooling high power density microchips in CPU system, micro power systems and many such miniature thermal systems which need advanced cooling capacity. Use of nanofluids enhances the effectiveness of t=scu systems. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a very powerful tool in computational analysis of the various physical processes. It application to the situations of flow and heat transfer analysis of the nano fluids is catching up very fast. Present research paper gives a brief account of the methodology of the CFD and also summarizes its application on nano fluid and heat transfer for microchannel cases.

  6. Critical assessment of radioisotopic methods used in the evaluation of pherispheral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, P.; Camargo, E.E.; Wolosker, M.; Dias Neto, A.L.; Carvalho, N.; Leao, L.E.P.

    1974-01-01

    A critical analysis of the radioisotope methods for studying peripheral blood flow is made. Methods using muscle injection of tracer and other ones using both the venous and the arterial routes of injection are discussed. Emphasys in the use of hippuran- 131 I for evaluating of the peripheral circulation dynamics is given [pt

  7. Three dimensional simulation of compressible and incompressible flows through the finite element method; Simulacao tridimensional de escoamentos compressiveis e incompressiveis atraves do metodo dos elementos finitos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Gustavo Koury

    2004-11-15

    Although incompressible fluid flows can be regarded as a particular case of a general problem, numerical methods and the mathematical formulation aimed to solve compressible and incompressible flows have their own peculiarities, in such a way, that it is generally not possible to attain both regimes with a single approach. In this work, we start from a typically compressible formulation, slightly modified to make use of pressure variables and, through augmenting the stabilising parameters, we end up with a simplified model which is able to deal with a wide range of flow regimes, from supersonic to low speed gas flows. The resulting methodology is flexible enough to allow for the simulation of liquid flows as well. Examples using conservative and pressure variables are shown and the results are compared to those published in the literature, in order to validate the method. (author)

  8. Hydro-dynamic damping theory in flowing water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monette, C.; Nennemann, B.; Seeley, C.; Coutu, A.; Marmont, H.

    2014-03-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) has a major impact on the dynamic response of the structural components of hydroelectric turbines. On mid-head to high-head Francis runners, the rotor-stator interaction (RSI) phenomenon always has to be considered carefully during the design phase to avoid operational issues later on. The RSI dynamic response amplitudes are driven by three main factors: (1) pressure forcing amplitudes, (2) excitation frequencies in relation to natural frequencies and (3) damping. The prediction of the two first factors has been largely documented in the literature. However, the prediction of fluid damping has received less attention in spite of being critical when the runner is close to resonance. Experimental damping measurements in flowing water on hydrofoils were presented previously. Those results showed that the hydro-dynamic damping increased linearly with the flow. This paper presents development and validation of a mathematical model, based on momentum exchange, to predict damping due to fluid structure interaction in flowing water. The model is implemented as an analytical procedure for simple structures, such as cantilever beams, but is also implemented in more general ways using three different approaches for more complex structures such as runner blades: a finite element procedure, a CFD modal work based approach and a CFD 1DOF approach. The mathematical model and all three implementation approaches are shown to agree well with experimental results.

  9. Transient integral boundary layer method to calculate the translesional pressure drop and the fractional flow reserve in myocardial bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Möhlenkamp Stefan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pressure drop – flow relations in myocardial bridges and the assessment of vascular heart disease via fractional flow reserve (FFR have motivated many researchers the last decades. The aim of this study is to simulate several clinical conditions present in myocardial bridges to determine the flow reserve and consequently the clinical relevance of the disease. From a fluid mechanical point of view the pathophysiological situation in myocardial bridges involves fluid flow in a time dependent flow geometry, caused by contracting cardiac muscles overlying an intramural segment of the coronary artery. These flows mostly involve flow separation and secondary motions, which are difficult to calculate and analyse. Methods Because a three dimensional simulation of the haemodynamic conditions in myocardial bridges in a network of coronary arteries is time-consuming, we present a boundary layer model for the calculation of the pressure drop and flow separation. The approach is based on the assumption that the flow can be sufficiently well described by the interaction of an inviscid core and a viscous boundary layer. Under the assumption that the idealised flow through a constriction is given by near-equilibrium velocity profiles of the Falkner-Skan-Cooke (FSC family, the evolution of the boundary layer is obtained by the simultaneous solution of the Falkner-Skan equation and the transient von-Kármán integral momentum equation. Results The model was used to investigate the relative importance of several physical parameters present in myocardial bridges. Results have been obtained for steady and unsteady flow through vessels with 0 – 85% diameter stenosis. We compare two clinical relevant cases of a myocardial bridge in the middle segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD. The pressure derived FFR of fixed and dynamic lesions has shown that the flow is less affected in the dynamic case, because the distal

  10. Validation of a Multimodality Flow Phantom and Its Application for Assessment of Dynamic SPECT and PET Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrani-Juma, Hanif; Clarkin, Owen J; Pourmoghaddas, Amir; Driscoll, Brandon; Wells, R Glenn; deKemp, Robert A; Klein, Ran

    2017-01-01

    Simple and robust techniques are lacking to assess performance of flow quantification using dynamic imaging. We therefore developed a method to qualify flow quantification technologies using a physical compartment exchange phantom and image analysis tool. We validate and demonstrate utility of this method using dynamic PET and SPECT. Dynamic image sequences were acquired on two PET/CT and a cardiac dedicated SPECT (with and without attenuation and scatter corrections) systems. A two-compartment exchange model was fit to image derived time-activity curves to quantify flow rates. Flowmeter measured flow rates (20-300 mL/min) were set prior to imaging and were used as reference truth to which image derived flow rates were compared. Both PET cameras had excellent agreement with truth ( [Formula: see text]). High-end PET had no significant bias (p > 0.05) while lower-end PET had minimal slope bias (wash-in and wash-out slopes were 1.02 and 1.01) but no significant reduction in precision relative to high-end PET ( 0.3). SPECT (without scatter and attenuation corrections) slope biases were noted (0.85 and 1.32) and attributed to camera saturation in early time frames. Analysis of wash-out rates from non-saturated, late time frames resulted in excellent agreement with truth ( [Formula: see text], slope = 0.97). Attenuation and scatter corrections did not significantly impact SPECT performance. The proposed phantom, software and quality assurance paradigm can be used to qualify imaging instrumentation and protocols for quantification of kinetic rate parameters using dynamic imaging.

  11. Dynamics of nuclear fuel assemblies in vertical flow channels: computer modelling and associated studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, V.A.; Pettigrew, M.J.; Lelli, G.; Kates, L.; Reimer, E.

    1978-10-01

    A computer model, designed to predict the dynamic behaviour of nuclear fuel assemblies in axial flow, is described in this report. The numerical methods used to construct and solve the matrix equations of motion in the model are discussed together with an outline of the method used to interpret the fuel assembly stability data. The mathematics developed for forced response calculations are described in detail. Certain structural and hydrodynamic modelling parameters must be determined by experiment. These parameters are identified and the methods used for their evaluation are briefly described. Examples of typical applications of the dynamic model are presented towards the end of the report. (author)

  12. A level-set method for two-phase flows with soluble surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Jun; Shi, Weidong; Lai, Ming-Chih

    2018-01-01

    A level-set method is presented for solving two-phase flows with soluble surfactant. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved along with the bulk surfactant and the interfacial surfactant equations. In particular, the convection-diffusion equation for the bulk surfactant on the irregular moving domain is solved by using a level-set based diffusive-domain method. A conservation law for the total surfactant mass is derived, and a re-scaling procedure for the surfactant concentrations is proposed to compensate for the surfactant mass loss due to numerical diffusion. The whole numerical algorithm is easy for implementation. Several numerical simulations in 2D and 3D show the effects of surfactant solubility on drop dynamics under shear flow.

  13. A Finite Element Method for Free-Surface Flows of Incompressible Fluids in Three Dimensions, Part II: Dynamic Wetting Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, T.A.; Cairncross, R.A.; Rao, R.R.; Sackinger, P.A.; Schunk, P.R.

    1999-01-29

    To date, few researchers have solved three-dimensional free-surface problems with dynamic wetting lines. This paper extends the free-surface finite element method described in a companion paper [Cairncross, R.A., P.R. Schunk, T.A. Baer, P.A. Sackinger, R.R. Rao, "A finite element method for free surface flows of incompressible fluid in three dimensions, Part I: Boundary-Fitted mesh motion.", to be published (1998)] to handle dynamic wetting. A generalization of the technique used in two dimensional modeling to circumvent double-valued velocities at the wetting line, the so-called kinematic paradox, is presented for a wetting line in three dimensions. This approach requires the fluid velocity normal to the contact line to be zero, the fluid velocity tangent to the contact line to be equal to the tangential component of web velocity, and the fluid velocity into the web to be zero. In addition, slip is allowed in a narrow strip along the substrate surface near the dynamic contact line. For realistic wetting-line motion, a contact angle which varies with wetting speed is required because contact lines in three dimensions typically advance or recede a different rates depending upon location and/or have both advancing and receding portions. The theory is applied to capillary rise of static fluid in a corner, the initial motion of a Newtonian droplet down an inclined plane, and extrusion of a Newtonian fluid from a nozzle onto a moving substrate. The extrusion results are compared to experimental visualization. Subject Categories

  14. Transformation of Commercial Flows into Physical Flows of Electricity – Flow Based Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adamec

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We are witnesses of large – scale electricity transport between European countries under the umbrella of the UCTE organization. This is due to the inabilyof generators to satisfy the growing consumption in some regions. In this content, we distinguish between two types of flow. The first type is physical flow, which causes costs in the transmission grid, whilst the second type is commercial flow, which provides revenues for the market participants. The old methods for allocating transfer capacity fail to take this duality into account. The old methods that allocate transmission border capacity to “virtual” commercial flows which, in fact, will not flow over this border, do not lead to optimal allocation. Some flows are uselessly rejected and conversely, some accepted flows can cause congestion on another border. The Flow Based Allocation method (FBA is a method which aims to solve this problem.Another goal of FBA is to ensure sustainable development of expansion of transmission capacity. Transmission capacity is important, because it represents a way to establish better transmission system stability, and it provides a distribution channel for electricity to customers abroad. For optimal development, it is necessary to ensure the right division of revenue allocation among the market participants.This paper contains a brief description of the FBA method. Problems of revenue maximization and optimal revenue distribution are mentioned. 

  15. Spatio-temporal organization of dynamics in a two-dimensional periodically driven vortex flow: A Lagrangian flow network perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Michael; Donner, Reik V

    2017-03-01

    We study the Lagrangian dynamics of passive tracers in a simple model of a driven two-dimensional vortex resembling real-world geophysical flow patterns. Using a discrete approximation of the system's transfer operator, we construct a directed network that describes the exchange of mass between distinct regions of the flow domain. By studying different measures characterizing flow network connectivity at different time-scales, we are able to identify the location of dynamically invariant structures and regions of maximum dispersion. Specifically, our approach allows us to delimit co-existing flow regimes with different dynamics. To validate our findings, we compare several network characteristics to the well-established finite-time Lyapunov exponents and apply a receiver operating characteristic analysis to identify network measures that are particularly useful for unveiling the skeleton of Lagrangian chaos.

  16. Viscous slip coefficients for binary gas mixtures measured from mass flow rates through a single microtube

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, H.; Takamori, K.; Perrier, P.; Graur, I.; Matsuda, Y.; Niimi, T.

    2016-01-01

    The viscous slip coefficient for helium-argon binary gas mixture is extracted from the experimental values of the mass flow rate through a microtube. The mass flow rate is measured by the constant-volume method. The viscous slip coefficient was obtained by identifying the measured mass flow rate through a microtube with the corresponding analytical expression, which is a function of the Knudsen number. The measurements were carried out in the slip flow regime where the first-order slip bounda...

  17. Advanced numerical methods for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toumi, I. [Laboratoire d`Etudes Thermiques des Reacteurs, Gif sur Yvette (France); Caruge, D. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    1997-07-01

    This paper is devoted to new numerical methods developed for both one and three dimensional two-phase flow calculations. These methods are finite volume numerical methods and are based on the use of Approximate Riemann Solvers concepts to define convective fluxes versus mean cell quantities. The first part of the paper presents the numerical method for a one dimensional hyperbolic two-fluid model including differential terms as added mass and interface pressure. This numerical solution scheme makes use of the Riemann problem solution to define backward and forward differencing to approximate spatial derivatives. The construction of this approximate Riemann solver uses an extension of Roe`s method that has been successfully used to solve gas dynamic equations. As far as the two-fluid model is hyperbolic, this numerical method seems very efficient for the numerical solution of two-phase flow problems. The scheme was applied both to shock tube problems and to standard tests for two-fluid computer codes. The second part describes the numerical method in the three dimensional case. The authors discuss also some improvements performed to obtain a fully implicit solution method that provides fast running steady state calculations. Such a scheme is not implemented in a thermal-hydraulic computer code devoted to 3-D steady-state and transient computations. Some results obtained for Pressurised Water Reactors concerning upper plenum calculations and a steady state flow in the core with rod bow effect evaluation are presented. In practice these new numerical methods have proved to be stable on non staggered grids and capable of generating accurate non oscillating solutions for two-phase flow calculations.

  18. Advanced numerical methods for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumi, I.; Caruge, D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is devoted to new numerical methods developed for both one and three dimensional two-phase flow calculations. These methods are finite volume numerical methods and are based on the use of Approximate Riemann Solvers concepts to define convective fluxes versus mean cell quantities. The first part of the paper presents the numerical method for a one dimensional hyperbolic two-fluid model including differential terms as added mass and interface pressure. This numerical solution scheme makes use of the Riemann problem solution to define backward and forward differencing to approximate spatial derivatives. The construction of this approximate Riemann solver uses an extension of Roe's method that has been successfully used to solve gas dynamic equations. As far as the two-fluid model is hyperbolic, this numerical method seems very efficient for the numerical solution of two-phase flow problems. The scheme was applied both to shock tube problems and to standard tests for two-fluid computer codes. The second part describes the numerical method in the three dimensional case. The authors discuss also some improvements performed to obtain a fully implicit solution method that provides fast running steady state calculations. Such a scheme is not implemented in a thermal-hydraulic computer code devoted to 3-D steady-state and transient computations. Some results obtained for Pressurised Water Reactors concerning upper plenum calculations and a steady state flow in the core with rod bow effect evaluation are presented. In practice these new numerical methods have proved to be stable on non staggered grids and capable of generating accurate non oscillating solutions for two-phase flow calculations

  19. In-Vivo High Dynamic Range Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2015-01-01

    example with a high dynamic velocity range. Velocities with an order of magnitude apart are detected on the femoral artery of a 41 years old healthy individual. Three distinct heart cycles are captured during a 3 secs acquisition. The estimated vector velocities are compared against each other within...... the heart cycle. The relative standard deviation of the measured velocity magnitude between the three peak systoles was found to be 5.11% with a standard deviation on the detected angle of 1.06◦ . In the diastole, it was 1.46% and 6.18◦ , respectively. Results proves that the method is able to estimate flow...

  20. Comparison between continuous and localized methods to evaluate the flow rate through containment concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason, L., E-mail: ludovic.jason@cea.fr [Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), DEN, DANS, DM2S, SEMT, Mechanics and System Simulation Laboratory (LM2S), F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); LaMSID, UMR CNRS-EDF-CEA 8193, F-92141 Clamart (France); Masson, B. [Electricité de France (EDF), SEPTEN, F-69628 Villeurbanne (France)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • The contribution focuses on the gas transfer through reinforced concrete structures. • A continuous approach with a damage–permeability law is investigated. • It is significant, for this case, only when the damage variable crosses the section. • In this case, two localized approaches are compared. • It helps at evaluating a “reference” crack opening for engineering laws. - Abstract: In this contribution, different techniques are compared to evaluate the gas flow rate through a representative section of a reinforced and prestressed concrete containment structure. A continuous approach is first applied which is based on the evaluation of the gas permeability as a function of the damage variable. The calculations show that the flow rate becomes significant only when the damage variable crosses the section. But in this situation, the continuous approach is no longer fully valid. That is why localized approaches, based on a fine description of the crack openings, are then investigated. A comparison between classical simplified laws (Poiseuille flow) and a more refined model which takes into account the evolution of the crack opening in the depth of the section enables to define the validity domain of the simplified laws and especially the definition of the associated “reference opening”.

  1. Dynamic membrane filtration in tangential flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Oil-containing waste water is produced in many cleaning processes and also on production of compressed air. Dynamic membrane filtration in the tangential flow mode has proved effective in the treatment of these stable emulsions. The possible applications of ceramic membrane filters are illustrated for a variety of examples. (orig.) [de

  2. Dynamics of flow behind backward-facing step in a narrow channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uruba V.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The results and their analysis from experiments obtained by TR-PIV are presented on the model of backward-facing step in a narrow channel. The recirculation zone is studied in details. Mean structures are evaluated from fluctuating velocity fields. Then dynamics of the flow is characterized with help of POD (BOD technique. Substantial differences in high energy dynamical structures behaviour within the back-flow region and further downstream behind the flow reattachment have been found.

  3. Substance flows through the economy and environment of a region : Part I: Systems definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Voet, Ester; Kleijn, René; Van Oers, Lauran; Heijungs, Reinout; Huele, Ruben; Mulder, Paul

    1995-01-01

    In the tradition of the study of materials flows through society, the Substance Flow Analysis (SFA) method is presented. SFA aims at providing the relevant information for a country’s overall management strategy regarding single substances or coherent groups of substances. This article is dedicated

  4. Chemical and biological activity in open flows: A dynamical system approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tel, Tamas; Moura, Alessandro de; Grebogi, Celso; Karolyi, Gyoergy

    2005-01-01

    Chemical and biological processes often take place in fluid flows. Many of them, like environmental or microfluidical ones, generate filamentary patterns which have a fractal structure, due to the presence of chaos in the underlying advection dynamics. In such cases, hydrodynamical stirring strongly couples to the reactivity of the advected species: the outcome of the reaction is then typically different from that of the same reaction taking place in a well-mixed environment. Here we review recent progress in this field, which became possible due to the application of methods taken from dynamical system theory. We place special emphasis on the derivation of effective rate equations which contain singular terms expressing the fact that the reaction takes place on a moving fractal catalyst, on the unstable foliation of the reaction free advection dynamics

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamic Pressure Drop Estimation of Flow between Parallel Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hyung Min; Yang, Soo Hyung; Park, Jong Hark [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Many pool type reactors have forced downward flows inside the core during normal operation; there is a chance of flow inversion when transients occur. During this phase, the flow undergo transition between turbulent and laminar regions where drastic changes take place in terms of momentum and heat transfer, and the decrease in safety margin is usually observed. Additionally, for high Prandtl number fluids such as water, an effect of the velocity profile inside the channel on the temperature distribution is more pronounced over the low Prandtl number ones. This makes the checking of its pressure drop estimation accuracy less important, assuming the code verification is complete. With an advent of powerful computer hardware, engineering applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have become quite common these days. Especially for a fully-turbulent and single phase convective heat transfer, the predictability of the commercial codes has matured enough so that many well-known companies adopt those to accelerate a product development cycle and to realize an increased profitability. In contrast to the above, the transition models for the CFD code are still under development, and the most of the models show limited generality and prediction accuracy. Unlike the system codes, the CFD codes estimate the pressure drop from the velocity profile which is obtained by solving momentum conservation equations, and the resulting friction factor can be a representative parameter for a constant cross section channel flow. In addition, the flow inside a rectangular channel with a high span to gap ratio can be approximated by flow inside parallel plates. The computational fluid dynamics simulation on the flow between parallel plates showed reasonable prediction capability for the laminar and the turbulent regime.

  6. Development of flow-through and dip-stick immunoassays for screening of sulfonamide residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Shuo

    2008-08-20

    Two formats of membrane-based competitive enzyme immunoassays (flow-through and dip-stick) have been developed for the screening of sulfonamide residues in pig muscle and milk. Membrane was coated with anti-sulfonamide antibody and a sulfonamide hapten D2-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugant was used as the labeled antigen for competitive assay of sulfonamides. Visual detection limits of the flow-through or dip-stick assay were 1-5 microg L(-1) or 1-10 microg L(-1) in buffer for seven sulfonamides, respectively. Assay validation was performed using samples spiked with single sulfonamide, spiked samples were tested using the developed strip assays and results were compared with those obtained by a validated high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) method. Results showed that the two strip assays were correlated well with HPLC, respectively. With assay times of 5 min (flow-through) and 15 min (dip-stick), these rapid tests could offer simple, rapid and cost-effective on-site screening tools to detect sulfonamides in pig muscle (flow-through or dip-stick) or milk (only dip-stick).

  7. Understanding Fast and Robust Thermo-osmotic Flows through Carbon Nanotube Membranes: Thermodynamics Meets Hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li; Merabia, Samy; Joly, Laurent

    2018-04-19

    Following our recent theoretical prediction of the giant thermo-osmotic response of the water-graphene interface, we explore the practical implementation of waste heat harvesting with carbon-based membranes, focusing on model membranes of carbon nanotubes (CNT). To that aim, we combine molecular dynamics simulations and an analytical model considering the details of hydrodynamics in the membrane and at the tube entrances. The analytical model and the simulation results match quantitatively, highlighting the need to take into account both thermodynamics and hydrodynamics to predict thermo-osmotic flows through membranes. We show that, despite viscous entrance effects and a thermal short-circuit mechanism, CNT membranes can generate very fast thermo-osmotic flows, which can overcome the osmotic pressure of seawater. We then show that in small tubes confinement has a complex effect on the flow and can even reverse the flow direction. Beyond CNT membranes, our analytical model can guide the search for other membranes to generate fast and robust thermo-osmotic flows.

  8. Dynamics of a two-phase flow through a minichannel: Transition from churn to slug flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Grzegorz; Litak, Grzegorz; Mosdorf, Romuald; Rysak, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    The churn-to-slug flow bifurcations of two-phase (air-water) flow patterns in a 2mm diameter minichannel were investigated. With increasing a water flow rate, we observed the transition of slugs to bubbles of different sizes. The process was recorded by a digital camera. The sequences of light transmission time series were recorded by a laser-phototransistor sensor, and then analyzed using the recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis (RQA). Due to volume dependence of bubbles velocities, we observed the formation of periodic modulations in the laser signal.

  9. Modeling of hyaluronan clearance with application to estimation of lymph flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rössler, Andreas; Goswami, Nandu; Fink, Martin; Batzel, Jerry J

    2011-01-01

    One of the important factors in blood pressure regulation is the maintenance of the level of blood volume, which depends on several factors including the rate of lymph flow. Lymph flow can be measured directly using cannulation of lymphatic vessels, which is not clinically feasible, or indirectly by the tracer appearance rate, which is the rate at which macromolecules appear into the blood from the peritoneal cavity. However, indirect lymph flow measurements do not always provide consistent results. Through its contribution to osmotic pressure and resistance to flow, the macromolecule hyaluronan takes part in the regulation of tissue hydration and the maintenance of water and protein homeostasis. It arrives in blood plasma through lymph flow. Lymphatic hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan) concentration is several times higher than that in plasma, suggesting that the lymphatic route may account for the majority of HA found in plasma. Furthermore, circulating levels of HA reflect the dynamic state between delivery to—and removal from—the bloodstream. To develop an accurate estimation of the fluid volume distribution and dynamics, the rate of lymph flow needs to be taken into account and hyaluronan could be used as a marker in estimating this flow. To examine the HA distribution and system fluid dynamics, a six-compartment model, which could reflect both the steady-state relationships and qualitative characteristics of the dynamics, was developed. This was then applied to estimate fluid shifts from the interstitial space via the lymphatic system to the plasma during different physiological stresses (orthostatic stress and the stress of ultrafiltration during dialysis). Sensitivity analysis shows that during ultrafiltration, lymph flow is a key parameter influencing the total HA level, thus suggesting that the model may find applications in addressing the problem of estimating lymph flow. Since the fluid balance between interstitium and plasma is maintained by lymph

  10. Numerical modeling of supercritical carbon dioxide flow in see-through labyrinth seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Haomin; Pidaparti, Sandeep; Wolf, Mathew; Edlebeck, John; Anderson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The supercritical carbon dioxide properties were implemented in an open source CFD code OpenFOAM. • Labyrinth seal was simulated with supercritical carbon dioxide to provide guidance for seal design for compressor. • Two-phase capability was implemented to handle the possible appearance of two-phase carbon dioxide. - Abstract: This paper presents a numerical study of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO_2) flow in see-through labyrinth seals. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation of this scenario is performed under the framework of OpenFOAM. Properties of sCO_2 are implemented into OpenFOAM with a user-defined interface. A test facility was constructed to measure the leakage rate and pressure drop of sCO_2 in see-through labyrinth seals. Various designs and conditions have been tested to study the flow characteristic and provide validation data for the numerical model. The primary goal is to verify the model's capability to predict leakage rate, with a secondary goal focused on using the code to optimize the seal design for sCO_2. This research concludes with some guidelines for the see-through labyrinth seal optimization.

  11. Numerical modeling of supercritical carbon dioxide flow in see-through labyrinth seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Haomin, E-mail: hyuan8@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Pidaparti, Sandeep, E-mail: sandeep.pidaparti@gmail.com [Georgia Institute of Technology, 495 Tech Way NW, CNES Building, Atlanta, GA 30318 (United States); Wolf, Mathew, E-mail: mpwolf44@gmail.com [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Edlebeck, John, E-mail: jpedlebeck@gmail.com [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Anderson, Mark, E-mail: manderson@engr.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • The supercritical carbon dioxide properties were implemented in an open source CFD code OpenFOAM. • Labyrinth seal was simulated with supercritical carbon dioxide to provide guidance for seal design for compressor. • Two-phase capability was implemented to handle the possible appearance of two-phase carbon dioxide. - Abstract: This paper presents a numerical study of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO{sub 2}) flow in see-through labyrinth seals. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation of this scenario is performed under the framework of OpenFOAM. Properties of sCO{sub 2} are implemented into OpenFOAM with a user-defined interface. A test facility was constructed to measure the leakage rate and pressure drop of sCO{sub 2} in see-through labyrinth seals. Various designs and conditions have been tested to study the flow characteristic and provide validation data for the numerical model. The primary goal is to verify the model's capability to predict leakage rate, with a secondary goal focused on using the code to optimize the seal design for sCO{sub 2}. This research concludes with some guidelines for the see-through labyrinth seal optimization.

  12. Fluid dynamics of cryogenic two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, K.; Jahn, W.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the flow behavior of a methane hydrate/methane-liquid hydrogen dispersed two-phase fluid through a given design of a moderator chamber for the ESS target system. The calculations under simplified conditions, e.g., taking no account of heat input from outside, have shown that the computer code used, CFX, was able to simulate the behavior of the two-phase flow through the moderator chamber, producing reasonable results up to a certain level of the solid phase fraction, that allowed a continuous flow process through the chamber. Inlet flows with larger solid phase fractions than 40 vol% were found to be a ''problem'' for the computer code. From the computer runs based on fractions between 20 and 40 vol%, it was observed that with increasing solid phase fraction at the inlet, the resulting flow pattern revealed a strong tendency for blockage within the chamber, supported by the ''heavy weight'' of the pellets compared to the carrying liquid. Locations which are prone to the development of such uneven flow behavior are the areas around the turning points in the semispheres and near the exit of the moderator. The considered moderator chamber with horizontal inlet and outlet flow for a solid-liquid two-phase fluid does not seem to be an appropriate design. (orig.)

  13. Visual Analysis of Inclusion Dynamics in Two-Phase Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, Grzegorz Karol; Beck, Fabian; Ertl, Moritz; Meister, Christian; Schulte, Kathrin; Weigand, Bernhard; Ertl, Thomas; Sadlo, Filip

    2018-05-01

    In single-phase flow visualization, research focuses on the analysis of vector field properties. In two-phase flow, in contrast, analysis of the phase components is typically of major interest. So far, visualization research of two-phase flow concentrated on proper interface reconstruction and the analysis thereof. In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique that enables the investigation of complex two-phase flow phenomena with respect to the physics of breakup and coalescence of inclusions. On the one hand, we adapt dimensionless quantities for a localized analysis of phase instability and breakup, and provide detailed inspection of breakup dynamics with emphasis on oscillation and its interplay with rotational motion. On the other hand, we present a parametric tightly linked space-time visualization approach for an effective interactive representation of the overall dynamics. We demonstrate the utility of our approach using several two-phase CFD datasets.

  14. Study of ion flow dynamics in an inertial electrostatic confinement device through sequential grid construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murali, S. Krupakar; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were performed to understand the dynamics of the ion flow in an inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device. This was done by monitoring the fusion rate as the symmetry of the grid was increased starting with a single loop all the way until the entire grid is constructed. The fusion rate was observed to increase with grid symmetry and eventually saturate. A single loop grid was observed to generate a cylindrical (∼line) fusion source. The ion flow distribution was measured by introducing fine wires across a single loop of the grid in the form of a chord of a circle (chord wires). This study revealed that with increased symmetry of the cathode grid wires the convergence of the ions improves. The chord wires provided electrons for ionization even at low pressures (∼6.67 mPa) and helped sustain the plasma. The impinging ions heat these wires locally and the temperature of the wires was measured using an infrared thermometer that was used to understand the ion flow distribution across the cathode grid. The presence of the grid wires seems to affect the fusion rate more drastically than previously thought (was assumed to be uniform around the central grid). Most of the fusion reactions were observed to occur in the ion microchannels that form in gaps between the cathode wires. This work helps understand the fusion source regimes and calibrate the IEC device.

  15. A Gas-kinetic Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Viscous Flow Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hongwei; Xu, Kun

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) method for viscous flow computation. The construction of the RKDG method is based on a gas-kinetic formulation, which not only couples the convective and dissipative terms together, but also includes both discontinuous and continuous representation in the flux evaluation at the cell interface through a simple hybrid gas distribution function. Due to the intrinsic connection between the gaskinetic BGK model and the Navier-Stokes equations, the Navier-Stokes flux is automatically obtained by the present method. Numerical examples for both one dimensional (10) and two dimensional(20) compressible viscous flows are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and shock capturing capability of the current RKDG method

  16. Method of measuring blood flow by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gildenberg, P.L.

    1977-01-01

    A method of measuring relative blood flow through at least a part of the body using penetrating radiation comprises transmitting a plurality of rays at an initial angle or initial mean angle through a planar slice of the body to define a first set of rays, transmitting a plurality of further sets of rays at angles or mean angles different from each other and from the initial angle or initial mean angle through the same planar slice of the body to define by the intersection of all such rays a two-dimensional matrix of elements of the body in the slice, measuring for each ray emerging from the body a number of over the period of time at least equal to a pulse interval representing the momentary sum of the transmissions or absorptions of the element of the body intersected by the ray, determining from the momentary signals momentary signals a difference signal representing the maximum difference between the momentary signals for each ray over the period of time, deriving sets of discrete difference signals corresponding to the sets of rays, the difference signals being indicative of the transmission or absorption of blood flowing through each element of the body in the matrix, and calculating from the difference signals resultant signals representing the transmissions or absorptions due to blood flow in the elements of the matrix. These resultant signals may be visually depicted on a cathode ray tube display, as a digital print-out, or as a photograph. 30 claims, 8 figures

  17. Flow Equation Approach to the Statistics of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, J. B.; Hastings, M. B.

    2005-03-01

    The probability distribution function of non-linear dynamical systems is governed by a linear framework that resembles quantum many-body theory, in which stochastic forcing and/or averaging over initial conditions play the role of non-zero . Besides the well-known Fokker-Planck approach, there is a related Hopf functional methodootnotetextUriel Frisch, Turbulence: The Legacy of A. N. Kolmogorov (Cambridge University Press, 1995) chapter 9.5.; in both formalisms, zero modes of linear operators describe the stationary non-equilibrium statistics. To access the statistics, we investigate the method of continuous unitary transformationsootnotetextS. D. Glazek and K. G. Wilson, Phys. Rev. D 48, 5863 (1993); Phys. Rev. D 49, 4214 (1994). (also known as the flow equation approachootnotetextF. Wegner, Ann. Phys. 3, 77 (1994).), suitably generalized to the diagonalization of non-Hermitian matrices. Comparison to the more traditional cumulant expansion method is illustrated with low-dimensional attractors. The treatment of high-dimensional dynamical systems is also discussed.

  18. CFD simulation of an internal spin-filter: evidence of lateral migration and exchange flow through the mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo-Cardero, Alvio; Chico, Ernesto; Castilho, Leda R; Medronho, Ricardo A

    2009-11-01

    In the present work Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used to study the flow field and particle dynamics in an internal spin-filter (SF) bioreactor system. Evidence of a radial exchange flow through the filter mesh was detected, with a magnitude up to 130-fold higher than the perfusion flow, thus significantly contributing to radial drag. The exchange flow magnitude was significantly influenced by the filter rotation rate, but not by the perfusion flow, within the ranges evaluated. Previous reports had only given indirect evidences of this exchange flow phenomenon in spin-filters, but the current simulations were able to quantify and explain it. Flow pattern inside the spin-filter bioreactor resembled a typical Taylor-Couette flow, with vortices being formed in the annular gap and eventually penetrating the internal volume of the filter, thus being the probable reason for the significant exchange flow observed. The simulations also showed that cells become depleted in the vicinity of the mesh due to lateral particle migration. Cell concentration near the filter was approximately 50% of the bulk concentration, explaining why cell separation achieved in SFs is not solely due to size exclusion. The results presented indicate the power of CFD techniques to study and better understand spin-filter systems, aiming at the establishment of effective design, operation and scale-up criteria.

  19. Dynamic evolution process of turbulent channel flow after opposition control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Mingwei; Tian, De; Yongqian, Liu, E-mail: gmwncepu@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources (North China Electric Power University), Beijing102206 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Dynamic evolution of turbulent channel flow after application of opposition control (OC), together with the mechanism of drag reduction, is studied through direct numerical simulation (DNS). In the simulation, the pressure gradient is kept constant, and the flow rate increases due to drag reduction. In the transport of mean kinetic energy (MKE), one part of the energy from the external pressure is dissipated by the mean shear, and the other part is transported to the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) through a TKE production term (TKP). It is found that the increase of MKE is mainly induced by the reduction of TKP that is directly affected by OC. Further analysis shows that the suppression of the redistribution term of TKE in the wall normal direction plays a key role in drag reduction, which represses the wall normal velocity fluctuation and then reduces TKP through the attenuation of its main production term. When OC is suddenly applied, an acute imbalance of energy in space is induced by the wall blowing and suction. Both the skin-friction and TKP terms exhibit a transient growth in the initial phase of OC, which can be attributed to the local effect of 〈 v ′ v ′〉 and 〈− u ′ v ′〉 in the viscous sublayer. (paper)

  20. Advantages of frequency-domain modeling in dynamic-susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance cerebral blood flow quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jean J; Smith, Michael R; Frayne, Richard

    2005-03-01

    In dynamic-susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) is estimated from the tissue residue function obtained through deconvolution of the contrast concentration functions. However, the reliability of CBF estimates obtained by deconvolution is sensitive to various distortions including high-frequency noise amplification. The frequency-domain Fourier transform-based and the time-domain singular-value decomposition-based (SVD) algorithms both have biases introduced into their CBF estimates when noise stability criteria are applied or when contrast recirculation is present. The recovery of the desired signal components from amid these distortions by modeling the residue function in the frequency domain is demonstrated. The basic advantages and applicability of the frequency-domain modeling concept are explored through a simple frequency-domain Lorentzian model (FDLM); with results compared to standard SVD-based approaches. The performance of the FDLM method is model dependent, well representing residue functions in the exponential family while less accurately representing other functions. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Dynamics and statistics of heavy particles in turbulent flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cencini, M.; Bec, J.; Biferale, L.; Boffetta, G.; Celani, A.; Lanotte, A.; Musacchio, S.; Toschi, F.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent flows seeded with millions of passive inertial particles. The maximum Reynolds number is Re¿~ 200. We consider particles much heavier than the carrier flow in the limit when the Stokes drag force dominates their dynamical

  2. Advanced numerical methods for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumi, I.; Gallo, D.; Royer, E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is devoted to new numerical methods developed for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations. These methods are finite volume numerical methods. They are based on an extension of Roe's approximate Riemann solver to define convective fluxes versus mean cell quantities. To go forward in time, a linearized conservative implicit integrating step is used, together with a Newton iterative method. We also present here some improvements performed to obtain a fully implicit solution method that provides fast running steady state calculations. This kind of numerical method, which is widely used for fluid dynamic calculations, is proved to be very efficient for the numerical solution to two-phase flow problems. This numerical method has been implemented for the three dimensional thermal-hydraulic code FLICA-4 which is mainly dedicated to core thermal-hydraulic transient and steady-state analysis. Hereafter, we will also find some results obtained for the EPR reactor running in a steady-state at 60% of nominal power with 3 pumps out of 4, and a thermal-hydraulic core analysis for a 1300 MW PWR at low flow steam-line-break conditions. (author)

  3. Correlation Networks from Flows. The Case of Forced and Time-Dependent Advection-Diffusion Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liubov Tupikina

    Full Text Available Complex network theory provides an elegant and powerful framework to statistically investigate different types of systems such as society, brain or the structure of local and long-range dynamical interrelationships in the climate system. Network links in climate networks typically imply information, mass or energy exchange. However, the specific connection between oceanic or atmospheric flows and the climate network's structure is still unclear. We propose a theoretical approach for verifying relations between the correlation matrix and the climate network measures, generalizing previous studies and overcoming the restriction to stationary flows. Our methods are developed for correlations of a scalar quantity (temperature, for example which satisfies an advection-diffusion dynamics in the presence of forcing and dissipation. Our approach reveals that correlation networks are not sensitive to steady sources and sinks and the profound impact of the signal decay rate on the network topology. We illustrate our results with calculations of degree and clustering for a meandering flow resembling a geophysical ocean jet.

  4. Coupling-constant flows and dynamical symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Coleman-Weinberg theory is reformulated in terms of flows in coupling-constant space. It is shown that the existence of dynamical symmetry breaking is governed essentially by the b functions. An application is made to the massless Weinberg-Salam model

  5. An improved ghost-cell immersed boundary method for compressible flow simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Chi, Cheng

    2016-05-20

    This study presents an improved ghost-cell immersed boundary approach to represent a solid body in compressible flow simulations. In contrast to the commonly used approaches, in the present work ghost cells are mirrored through the boundary described using a level-set method to farther image points, incorporating a higher-order extra/interpolation scheme for the ghost cell values. A sensor is introduced to deal with image points near the discontinuities in the flow field. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to improve the representation of the geometry efficiently in the Cartesian grid system. The improved ghost-cell method is validated against four test cases: (a) double Mach reflections on a ramp, (b) smooth Prandtl-Meyer expansion flows, (c) supersonic flows in a wind tunnel with a forward-facing step, and (d) supersonic flows over a circular cylinder. It is demonstrated that the improved ghost-cell method can reach the accuracy of second order in L1 norm and higher than first order in L∞ norm. Direct comparisons against the cut-cell method demonstrate that the improved ghost-cell method is almost equally accurate with better efficiency for boundary representation in high-fidelity compressible flow simulations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Towards a dynamic assessment of raw materials criticality: Linking agent-based demand — With material flow supply modelling approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoeri, Christof; Wäger, Patrick A.; Stamp, Anna; Althaus, Hans-Joerg; Weil, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technologies such as information and communication-, photovoltaic- or battery technologies are expected to increase significantly the demand for scarce metals in the near future. The recently developed methods to evaluate the criticality of mineral raw materials typically provide a ‘snapshot’ of the criticality of a certain material at one point in time by using static indicators both for supply risk and for the impacts of supply restrictions. While allowing for insights into the mechanisms behind the criticality of raw materials, these methods cannot account for dynamic changes in products and/or activities over time. In this paper we propose a conceptual framework intended to overcome these limitations by including the dynamic interactions between different possible demand and supply configurations. The framework integrates an agent-based behaviour model, where demand emerges from individual agent decisions and interaction, into a dynamic material flow model, representing the materials' stocks and flows. Within the framework, the environmental implications of substitution decisions are evaluated by applying life-cycle assessment methodology. The approach makes a first step towards a dynamic criticality assessment and will enhance the understanding of industrial substitution decisions and environmental implications related to critical metals. We discuss the potential and limitation of such an approach in contrast to state-of-the-art methods and how it might lead to criticality assessments tailored to the specific circumstances of single industrial sectors or individual companies. - Highlights: ► Current criticality assessment methods provide a ‘snapshot’ at one point in time. ► They do not account for dynamic interactions between demand and supply. ► We propose a conceptual framework to overcomes these limitations. ► The framework integrates an agent-based behaviour model with a dynamic material flow model. ► The approach proposed makes

  7. Flow through the nasal cavity of the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm-Davis, L. L.; Fish, F. E.

    2015-12-01

    The nasal cavity of spiny dogfish is a blind capsule with no internal connection to the oral cavity. Water is envisioned to flow through the cavity in a smooth, continuous flow pattern; however, this assumption is based on previous descriptions of the morphology of the olfactory cavity. No experimentation on the flow through the internal nasal cavity has been reported. Morphology of the head of the spiny dogfish ( Squalus acanthias) does not suggest a close external connection between the oral and nasal systems. However, dye visualization showed that there was flow through the nasal apparatus and from the excurrent nostril to the mouth when respiratory flows were simulated. The hydrodynamic flow through the nasal cavity was observed from flow tank experiments. The dorsum of the nasal cavity of shark heads from dead animals was exposed by dissection and a glass plate was glued over of the exposed cavity. When the head was placed in a flow, dye was observed to be drawn passively into the cavity showing a complex, three-dimensional hydrodynamic flow. Dye entered the incurrent nostril, flowed through the nasal lamellae, crossed over and under the nasal valve, and circulated around the nasal valve before exiting the excurrent nostril. When the nasal valve was removed, the dye became stagnant and back flowed out through the incurrent nostril. The single nasal valve has a hydrodynamic function that organizes a coherent flow of water through the cavity without disruption. The results suggest that the morphology of the nasal apparatus in concert with respiratory flow and ambient flows from active swimming can be used to draw water through the olfactory cavity of the shark.

  8. Visualization and analysis of flow patterns of human carotid bifurcation by computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yunjing; Gao Peiyi; Lin Yan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate flow patterns at carotid bifurcation in vivo by combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD)and MR angiography imaging. Methods: Seven subjects underwent contrast-enhanced MR angiography of carotid artery in Siemens 3.0 T MR. Flow patterns of the carotid artery bifurcation were calculated and visualized by combining MR vascular imaging post-processing and CFD. Results: The flow patterns of the carotid bifurcations in 7 subjects were varied with different phases of a cardiac cycle. The turbulent flow and back flow occurred at bifurcation and proximal of internal carotid artery (ICA) and external carotid artery (ECA), their occurrence and conformation were varied with different phase of a cardiac cycle. The turbulent flow and back flow faded out quickly when the blood flow to the distal of ICA and ECA. Conclusion: CFD combined with MR angiography can be utilized to visualize the cyclical change of flow patterns of carotid bifurcation with different phases of a cardiac cycle. (authors)

  9. The optimization of essential oils supercritical CO2 extraction from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic steps procedure and semi-continuous technique using response surface method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Hossein; Aminimoghadamfarouj, Noushin; Golmakani, Ebrahim; Nematollahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine and evaluate crucial variables in essential oils extraction process from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic and semi-continuous techniques using response surface method. Materials and Methods: Essential oil components were extracted from Lavandula hybrida (Lavandin) flowers using supercritical carbon dioxide via static-dynamic steps (SDS) procedure, and semi-continuous (SC) technique. Results: Using response surface method the optimum extraction yield (4.768%) was obtained via SDS at 108.7 bar, 48.5°C, 120 min (static: 8×15), 24 min (dynamic: 8×3 min) in contrast to the 4.620% extraction yield for the SC at 111.6 bar, 49.2°C, 14 min (static), 121.1 min (dynamic). Conclusion: The results indicated that a substantial reduction (81.56%) solvent usage (kg CO2/g oil) is observed in the SDS method versus the conventional SC method. PMID:25598636

  10. An adaptative finite element method for turbulent flow simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoux-Guisse, F.; Bonnin, O.; Leal de Sousa, L.; Nicolas, G.

    1995-05-01

    After outlining the space and time discretization methods used in the N3S thermal hydraulic code developed at EDF/NHL, we describe the possibilities of the peripheral version, the Adaptative Mesh, which comprises two separate parts: the error indicator computation and the development of a module subdividing elements usable by the solid dynamics code ASTER and the electromagnetism code TRIFOU also developed by R and DD. The error indicators implemented in N3S are described. They consist of a projection indicator quantifying the space error in laminar or turbulent flow calculations and a Navier-Stokes residue indicator calculated on each element. The method for subdivision of triangles into four sub-triangles and tetrahedra into eight sub-tetrahedra is then presented with its advantages and drawbacks. It is illustrated by examples showing the efficiency of the module. The last concerns the 2 D case of flow behind a backward-facing step. (authors). 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  11. On approximation of non-Newtonian fluid flow by the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svácek, Petr

    2008-08-01

    In this paper the problem of numerical approximation of non-Newtonian fluid flow with free surface is considered. Namely, the flow of fresh concrete is addressed. Industrial mixtures often behaves like non-Newtonian fluids exhibiting a yield stress that needs to be overcome for the flow to take place, cf. [R.B. Bird, R.C. Armstrong, O. Hassager, Dynamics of Polymeric Liquids, vol. 1, Fluid Mechanics, Wiley, New York, 1987; R.P. Chhabra, J.F. Richardson, Non-Newtonian Flow in the Process Industries, Butterworth-Heinemann, London, 1999]. The main interest is paid to the mathematical formulation of the problem and to discretization with the aid of finite element method. The described numerical procedure is applied onto the solution of several problems.

  12. Computational study of duct and pipe flows using the method of pseudocompressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    A viscous, three-dimensional, incompressible, Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics code employing pseudocompressibility is used for the prediction of laminar primary and secondary flows in two 90-degree bends of constant cross section. Under study are a square cross section duct bend with 2.3 radius ratio and a round cross section pipe bend with 2.8 radius ratio. Sensitivity of predicted primary and secondary flow to inlet boundary conditions, grid resolution, and code convergence is investigated. Contour and velocity versus spanwise coordinate plots comparing prediction to experimental data flow components are shown at several streamwise stations before, within, and after the duct and pipe bends. Discussion includes secondary flow physics, computational method, computational requirements, grid dependence, and convergence rates.

  13. Differences in dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow between SHR and WKY rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y M; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1993-01-01

    by chaotic fluctuations. We sought to determine whether this change was associated with a change in the dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow. In halothane-anesthetized 250- to 320-g SHR and WKY rats, renal blood flow was measured during "white noise" forcing of arterial blood pressure. The frequency...... conclude that the change in the dynamics of TGF leads to a change in the dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow between SHR and WKY rats. This change results in a more efficient dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow in the SHR compared with the WKY rats. The functional consequences of this......In halothane-anesthetized Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats the single-nephron blood flow and the proximal tubule pressure oscillate at a frequency of 35-50 mHz because of the operation of the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism. In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) the oscillations are replaced...

  14. Instabilities and vortex dynamics in shear flow of magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; Morrison, P.J.; Schutkeker, J.; Kamimura, T.; Mima, K.; Abe, Y.

    1990-03-01

    Gradient-driven instabilities and the subsequent nonlinear evolution of generated vortices in sheared E x B flows are investigated for magnetized plasmas with and without gravity (magnetic curvature) and magnetic shear by using theory and implicit particle simulations. In the linear eigenmode analysis, the instabilities considered are the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability and the resistive interchange instability. The presence of the shear flow can stabilize these instabilities. The dynamics of the K-H instability and the vortex dynamics can be uniformly described by the initial flow pattern with a vorticity localization parameter ε. The observed growth of the K-H modes is exponential in time for linearly unstable modes, secular for marginal mode, and absent until driven nonlinearly for linearly stable modes. The distance between two vortex centers experiences rapid merging while the angle θ between the axis of vortices and the external shear flow increases. These vortices proceed toward their overall coalescence, while shedding small-scale vortices and waves. The main features of vortex dynamics of the nonlinear coalescence and the tilt or the rotational instabilities of vortices are shown to be given by using a low dimension Hamiltonian representation for interacting vortex cores in the shear flow. 24 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  15. Real time simulation method for fast breeder reactors dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Tetsushi; Mineo, Yoshiyuki; Ogino, Takamichi; Kishida, Koji; Furuichi, Kenji.

    1985-01-01

    The development of multi-purpose real time simulator models with suitable plant dynamics was made; these models can be used not only in training operators but also in designing control systems, operation sequences and many other items which must be studied for the development of new type reactors. The prototype fast breeder reactor ''Monju'' is taken as an example. Analysis is made on various factors affecting the accuracy and computer load of its dynamic simulation. A method is presented which determines the optimum number of nodes in distributed systems and time steps. The oscillations due to the numerical instability are observed in the dynamic simulation of evaporators with a small number of nodes, and a method to cancel these oscillations is proposed. It has been verified through the development of plant dynamics simulation codes that these methods can provide efficient real time dynamics models of fast breeder reactors. (author)

  16. Are international fund flows related to exchange rate dynamics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Suxiao; de Haan, Jakob; Scholtens, Bert

    2018-01-01

    Employing monthly data for 53 countries between 1996 and 2015, we investigate the relationship between international fund flows and exchange rate dynamics. We find strong co-movement between funds flows (as measured with the EPFR Global data base) and bilateral real exchange rates vis-à-vis the USD.

  17. Universal dynamics in the onset of a Hagen-Poiseuille flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Bruus, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics in the onset of a Hagen-Poiseuille flow of an incompressible liquid in a channel of circular cross section is well-studied theoretically. We use an eigenfunction expansion in a Hilbert space formalism to generalize the results to channels of an arbitrary cross section. We find that t...... that the steady state is reached after a characteristic time scale tau=(A/P)(2)(1/nu), where A and P are the cross-sectional area and perimeter, respectively, and nu is the kinematic viscosity of the liquid. For the initial dynamics of the flow rate Q for t......The dynamics in the onset of a Hagen-Poiseuille flow of an incompressible liquid in a channel of circular cross section is well-studied theoretically. We use an eigenfunction expansion in a Hilbert space formalism to generalize the results to channels of an arbitrary cross section. We find...

  18. Thermodynamics, maximum power, and the dynamics of preferential river flow structures at the continental scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kleidon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The organization of drainage basins shows some reproducible phenomena, as exemplified by self-similar fractal river network structures and typical scaling laws, and these have been related to energetic optimization principles, such as minimization of stream power, minimum energy expenditure or maximum "access". Here we describe the organization and dynamics of drainage systems using thermodynamics, focusing on the generation, dissipation and transfer of free energy associated with river flow and sediment transport. We argue that the organization of drainage basins reflects the fundamental tendency of natural systems to deplete driving gradients as fast as possible through the maximization of free energy generation, thereby accelerating the dynamics of the system. This effectively results in the maximization of sediment export to deplete topographic gradients as fast as possible and potentially involves large-scale feedbacks to continental uplift. We illustrate this thermodynamic description with a set of three highly simplified models related to water and sediment flow and describe the mechanisms and feedbacks involved in the evolution and dynamics of the associated structures. We close by discussing how this thermodynamic perspective is consistent with previous approaches and the implications that such a thermodynamic description has for the understanding and prediction of sub-grid scale organization of drainage systems and preferential flow structures in general.

  19. Vortex flows in the solar chromosphere. I. Automatic detection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Y.; Wedemeyer, S.

    2017-05-01

    Solar "magnetic tornadoes" are produced by rotating magnetic field structures that extend from the upper convection zone and the photosphere to the corona of the Sun. Recent studies show that these kinds of rotating features are an integral part of atmospheric dynamics and occur on a large range of spatial scales. A systematic statistical study of magnetic tornadoes is a necessary next step towards understanding their formation and their role in mass and energy transport in the solar atmosphere. For this purpose, we develop a new automatic detection method for chromospheric swirls, meaning the observable signature of solar tornadoes or, more generally, chromospheric vortex flows and rotating motions. Unlike existing studies that rely on visual inspections, our new method combines a line integral convolution (LIC) imaging technique and a scalar quantity that represents a vortex flow on a two-dimensional plane. We have tested two detection algorithms, based on the enhanced vorticity and vorticity strength quantities, by applying them to three-dimensional numerical simulations of the solar atmosphere with CO5BOLD. We conclude that the vorticity strength method is superior compared to the enhanced vorticity method in all aspects. Applying the method to a numerical simulation of the solar atmosphere reveals very abundant small-scale, short-lived chromospheric vortex flows that have not been found previously by visual inspection.

  20. Reverse flow through a large scale multichannel nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duignan, M.R.; Nash, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    A database was developed for the flow of water through a scaled nozzle of a Savannah River Site reactor inlet plenum. The water flow in the nozzle was such that it ranged from stratified to water solid conditions. Data on the entry of air into the nozzle and plenum as a function of water flow are of interest in loss-of-coolant studies. The scaled nozzle was 44 cm long, had an entrance diameter of 95 mm, an exit opening of 58 mm x 356 mm, and an exit hydraulic diameter approximately equal to that of the inlet. Within the nozzle were three flow-straightening vanes which divided the flow path into four channels. All data were taken at steady-state and isothermal (300 K ± 1.5 K) conditions. During the reverse flow of water through the nozzle the point at which air begins to enter was predicted within 90% by a critical weir-flow calculation. The point of air entry into the plenum itself was found to be a function of flow conditions

  1. New method to improve dynamic stiffness of electro-hydraulic servo systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yanhong; Quan, Long

    2013-09-01

    Most current researches working on improving stiffness focus on the application of control theories. But controller in closed-loop hydraulic control system takes effect only after the controlled position is deviated, so the control action is lagged. Thus dynamic performance against force disturbance and dynamic load stiffness can’t be improved evidently by advanced control algorithms. In this paper, the elementary principle of maintaining piston position unchanged under sudden external force load change by charging additional oil is analyzed. On this basis, the conception of raising dynamic stiffness of electro hydraulic position servo system by flow feedforward compensation is put forward. And a scheme using double servo valves to realize flow feedforward compensation is presented, in which another fast response servo valve is added to the regular electro hydraulic servo system and specially utilized to compensate the compressed oil volume caused by load impact in time. The two valves are arranged in parallel to control the cylinder jointly. Furthermore, the model of flow compensation is derived, by which the product of the amplitude and width of the valve’s pulse command signal can be calculated. And determination rules of the amplitude and width of pulse signal are concluded by analysis and simulations. Using the proposed scheme, simulations and experiments at different positions with different force changes are conducted. The simulation and experimental results show that the system dynamic performance against load force impact is largely improved with decreased maximal dynamic position deviation and shortened settling time. That is, system dynamic load stiffness is evidently raised. This paper proposes a new method which can effectively improve the dynamic stiffness of electro-hydraulic servo systems.

  2. Two-phase flow through small branches in a horizontal pipe with stratified flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smoglie, C.

    1984-12-01

    This report presents the description and results of experiments designed to determine the mass flow rate and quality through a small break at the bottom, the top or the side of a main pipe with stratified gas-liquid flow. If the interface level is far below (above) the branch, only single-phase gas (liquid) flow enters the branch. For smaller distances the interface is locally deformed because of the pressure decrease due to the fluid acceleration near the branch inlet (Bernoulli effect) and liquid (gas) can be entrained. This report contains photographs illustrating the flow phenomena as well as a general correlation to determine the beginning of entrainment. Results are presented on the branch mass flow rate and quality as a function of a normalized distance between the interface and the branch inlet. A model was developed which enables to predict the branch quality and mass flux. Results from air-water flow through horizontal branches, were extrapolated for steam water flow at high pressure with critical branch mass flux. (orig./HP) [de

  3. The Impact of Dynamic Lighting in Classrooms. A Review on Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ellen Kathrine; Nielsen, Stine Maria Louring; Georgieva, Diana Zdravkova

    2018-01-01

    In order to understand how research can support lighting designs to improve nurturing environments for learning, a literature review was carried out. The review examined lighting research methods and parameters used for evaluating the effect of dynamic lighting in classrooms. The test parameter...... and designed holistically through a mixed method approach. It is suggested that the potentials of dynamic lighting in learning environments are explored through design driven innovation and the use of mixed methods, in order to be able to put more emphasis on the students’ and teachers’ needs for dynamic...... gaining most attention in the studies is academic performance; whereas qualitative test parameters, such as behaviour and mood, are addressed in less than a third of the selected studies. The analysis of these methods leads to a conclusion that learning environments to a broader extent should be studied...

  4. An Improved Ghost-cell Immersed Boundary Method for Compressible Inviscid Flow Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Chi, Cheng

    2015-05-01

    This study presents an improved ghost-cell immersed boundary approach to represent a solid body in compressible flow simulations. In contrast to the commonly used approaches, in the present work ghost cells are mirrored through the boundary described using a level-set method to farther image points, incorporating a higher-order extra/interpolation scheme for the ghost cell values. In addition, a shock sensor is in- troduced to deal with image points near the discontinuities in the flow field. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to improve the representation of the geometry efficiently. The improved ghost-cell method is validated against five test cases: (a) double Mach reflections on a ramp, (b) supersonic flows in a wind tunnel with a forward- facing step, (c) supersonic flows over a circular cylinder, (d) smooth Prandtl-Meyer expansion flows, and (e) steady shock-induced combustion over a wedge. It is demonstrated that the improved ghost-cell method can reach the accuracy of second order in L1 norm and higher than first order in L∞ norm. Direct comparisons against the cut-cell method demonstrate that the improved ghost-cell method is almost equally accurate with better efficiency for boundary representation in high-fidelity compressible flow simulations. Implementation of the improved ghost-cell method in reacting Euler flows further validates its general applicability for compressible flow simulations.

  5. Traffic flow dynamics data, models and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Treiber, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This textbook provides a comprehensive and instructive coverage of vehicular traffic flow dynamics and modeling. It makes this fascinating interdisciplinary topic, which to date was only documented in parts by specialized monographs, accessible to a broad readership. Numerous figures and problems with solutions help the reader to quickly understand and practice the presented concepts. This book is targeted at students of physics and traffic engineering and, more generally, also at students and professionals in computer science, mathematics, and interdisciplinary topics. It also offers material for project work in programming and simulation at college and university level. The main part, after presenting different categories of traffic data, is devoted to a mathematical description of the dynamics of traffic flow, covering macroscopic models which describe traffic in terms of density, as well as microscopic many-particle models in which each particle corresponds to a vehicle and its driver. Focus chapters on ...

  6. Quantification of myocardial blood flow using dynamic 320-row multi-detector CT as compared with 15O-H2O PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yasuka; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Kudo, Kohsuke; Naya, Masanao; Manabe, Osamu; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Tamaki, Nagara; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Katoh, Chietsugu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces a method to calculate myocardium blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) using the relatively low-dose dynamic 320-row multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), validates the method against 15 O-H 2 O positron-emission tomography (PET) and assesses the CFRs of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Thirty-two subjects underwent both dynamic CT perfusion (CTP) and PET perfusion imaging at rest and during pharmacological stress. In 12 normal subjects (pilot group), the calculation method for MBF and CFR was established. In the other 13 normal subjects (validation group), MBF and CFR obtained by dynamic CTP and PET were compared. Finally, the CFRs obtained by dynamic CTP and PET were compared between the validation group and CAD patients (n = 7). Correlation between MBF of MDCT and PET was strong (r = 0.95, P CT in the CAD group (2.3 ± 0.8) was significantly lower than that in the validation group (5.2 ± 1.8) (P = 0.0011). We established a method for measuring MBF and CFR with the relatively low-dose dynamic MDCT. Lower CFR was well demonstrated in CAD patients by dynamic CTP. (orig.)

  7. Dynamics of blood flow and thrombus formation in a multi-bypass microfluidic ladder network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; Sylman, Joanna L; Lakshmanan, Hari H S; McCarty, Owen J T; Maddala, Jeevan

    2017-02-01

    The reaction dynamics of a complex mixture of cells and proteins, such as blood, in branched circulatory networks within the human microvasculature or extravascular therapeutic devices such as extracorporeal oxygenation machine (ECMO) remains ill-defined. In this report we utilize a multi-bypass microfluidics ladder network design with dimensions mimicking venules to study patterns of blood platelet aggregation and fibrin formation under complex shear. Complex blood fluid dynamics within multi-bypass networks under flow were modeled using COMSOL. Red blood cells and platelets were assumed to be non-interacting spherical particles transported by the bulk fluid flow, and convection of the activated coagulation factor II, thrombin, was assumed to be governed by mass transfer. This model served as the basis for predicting formation of local shear rate gradients, stagnation points and recirculation zones as dictated by the bypass geometry. Based on the insights from these models, we were able to predict the patterns of blood clot formation at specific locations in the device. Our experimental data was then used to adjust the model to account for the dynamical presence of thrombus formation in the biorheology of blood flow. The model predictions were then compared to results from experiments using recalcified whole human blood. Microfluidic devices were coated with the extracellular matrix protein, fibrillar collagen, and the initiator of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation, tissue factor. Blood was perfused through the devices at a flow rate of 2 µL/min, translating to physiologically relevant initial shear rates of 300 and 700 s -1 for main channels and bypasses, respectively. Using fluorescent and light microscopy, we observed distinct flow and thrombus formation patterns near channel intersections at bypass points, within recirculation zones and at stagnation points. Findings from this proof-of-principle ladder network model suggest a specific correlation between

  8. A novel method for calculating the dynamic capillary force and correcting the pressure error in micro-tube experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuoliang; Liu, Pengcheng; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Yuan

    2017-11-29

    Micro-tube experiment has been implemented to understand the mechanisms of governing microcosmic fluid percolation and is extensively used in both fields of micro electromechanical engineering and petroleum engineering. The measured pressure difference across the microtube is not equal to the actual pressure difference across the microtube. Taking into account the additional pressure losses between the outlet of the micro tube and the outlet of the entire setup, we propose a new method for predicting the dynamic capillary pressure using the Level-set method. We first demonstrate it is a reliable method for describing microscopic flow by comparing the micro-model flow-test results against the predicted results using the Level-set method. In the proposed approach, Level-set method is applied to predict the pressure distribution along the microtube when the fluids flow along the microtube at a given flow rate; the microtube used in the calculation has the same size as the one used in the experiment. From the simulation results, the pressure difference across a curved interface (i.e., dynamic capillary pressure) can be directly obtained. We also show that dynamic capillary force should be properly evaluated in the micro-tube experiment in order to obtain the actual pressure difference across the microtube.

  9. Calculation of incompressible fluid flow through cambered blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C. C.

    1970-01-01

    Conformal mapping technique yields linear, approximate solutions for calculating flow of an incompressible fluid through staggered array of cambered blades for the cases of flow with partial cavitation and supercavitation. Lift and drag coefficients, cavitation number, cavity shape, and exit flow conditions can be determined.

  10. Flow regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liles, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Internal boundaries in multiphase flow greatly complicate fluid-dynamic and heat-transfer descriptions. Different flow regimes or topological configurations can have radically dissimilar interfacial and wall mass, momentum, and energy exchanges. To model the flow dynamics properly requires estimates of these rates. In this paper the common flow regimes for gas-liquid systems are defined and the techniques used to estimate the extent of a particular regime are described. Also, the current computer-code procedures are delineated and introduce a potentially better method is introduced

  11. Energy flow in plate assembles by hierarchical version of finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachulec, Marcin; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    method has been proposed. In this paper a modified hierarchical version of finite element method is used for modelling of energy flow in plate assembles. The formulation includes description of in-plane forces so that planes lying in different planes can be modelled. Two examples considered are: L......The dynamic analysis of structures in medium and high frequencies are usually focused on frequency and spatial averages of energy of components, and not the displacement/velocity fields. This is especially true for structure-borne noise modelling. For the analysis of complicated structures...... the finite element method has been used to study the energy flow. The finite element method proved its usefulness despite the computational expense. Therefore studies have been conducted in order to simplify and reduce the computations required. Among others, the use of hierarchical version of finite element...

  12. Trends in the use of flow-through shares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    Flow-through shares financing is considered the most cost effective equity-based financing option for non-tax-paying exploration companies, a form of financing that has helped a very large number of resource-based companies start, stay alive and grow in a very competitive financial marketplace. This paper provides a brief historical review of the flow-though shares concept, outlines developments in recent legislation, changes in the Income Tax Act, and trends in financial structures, and reviews flow-through shares from a tax perspective of the investor and the issuer

  13. An inverse method for identification of a distributed random excitation acting on a vibrating structure flow-induced vibration application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perotin, L.; Granger, S.

    1997-01-01

    In order to improve the prediction of wear problems due to flow-induced vibration in PWR components, an inverse method for identifying a distributed random excitation acting on a dynamical system has been developed at EDF. This method, whose applications go far beyond the flow-induced vibration field, has been implemented into the MEIDEE software. This method is presented. (author)

  14. A Dynamic Growth Model for Flows of Foreign Direct Investment

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Hui Chiang; Yiming Li; Chih-Young Hung

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we for the first time study the dynamic flows of the foreign direct investment (FDI) with a dynamic growth theory. We define the FDI flow as a process which transmits throughout a given social system by way of diverse communication channels. In model formulation, seven assumptions are thus proposed and the foreign capital policy of the host country is considered as an external influence; in addition, the investment policy of the investing country is modeled as an internal influe...

  15. Non-Adiabatic Molecular Dynamics Methods for Materials Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furche, Filipp [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Parker, Shane M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Muuronen, Mikko J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Roy, Saswata [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2017-04-04

    The flow of radiative energy in light-driven materials such as photosensitizer dyes or photocatalysts is governed by non-adiabatic transitions between electronic states and cannot be described within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation commonly used in electronic structure theory. The non-adiabatic molecular dynamics (NAMD) methods based on Tully surface hopping and time-dependent density functional theory developed in this project have greatly extended the range of molecular materials that can be tackled by NAMD simulations. New algorithms to compute molecular excited state and response properties efficiently were developed. Fundamental limitations of common non-linear response methods were discovered and characterized. Methods for accurate computations of vibronic spectra of materials such as black absorbers were developed and applied. It was shown that open-shell TDDFT methods capture bond breaking in NAMD simulations, a longstanding challenge for single-reference molecular dynamics simulations. The methods developed in this project were applied to study the photodissociation of acetaldehyde and revealed that non-adiabatic effects are experimentally observable in fragment kinetic energy distributions. Finally, the project enabled the first detailed NAMD simulations of photocatalytic water oxidation by titania nanoclusters, uncovering the mechanism of this fundamentally important reaction for fuel generation and storage.

  16. Experimental study on an IC engine in-cylinder flow using different steady-state flow benches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El-Adawy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In-cylinder air flow structures are known to strongly impact on the performance and combustion of internal combustion engines (ICE. Therefore the aim of this paper is to experimentally study an IC engine in-cylinder flow under steady-state conditions. Different methods can be used to characterize the in-cylinder flow which are optical engines and laser diagnostics, computational fluid dynamic and steady-state flow bench. Here we are concentrating on two different types of flow benches. The first (Ricardo uses the impulse torque meter method while the other (FEV uses the paddle wheel technique. The experiments were carried out on the same cylinder head and the same pressure difference across the inlet valves of 600 mmH2O in order to compare the results. The experimental results are presented in terms of the measured air flow rate, flow coefficient, discharge coefficient and non-dimensional rig tumble. Moreover, number of modifications were conducted on the FEV flow bench in order to apply particle image velocimetry measurements on the vertical tumble plane, which passing through the middle of the cylinder at different valve lifts. The results show that a reasonably good level of agreement can be achieved between both methods, providing the methods of calculations of the various parameters are consistent. Keywords: In-cylinder flow, Flow bench, Tumble motion, Flow coefficient, Particle image velocimetry

  17. Nonlinear Slewing Spacecraft Control Based on Exergy, Power Flow, and Static and Dynamic Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinett, Rush D.; Wilson, David G.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a new nonlinear control methodology for slewing spacecraft, which provides both necessary and sufficient conditions for stability by identifying the stability boundaries, rigid body modes, and limit cycles. Conservative Hamiltonian system concepts, which are equivalent to static stability of airplanes, are used to find and deal with the static stability boundaries: rigid body modes. The application of exergy and entropy thermodynamic concepts to the work-rate principle provides a natural partitioning through the second law of thermodynamics of power flows into exergy generator, dissipator, and storage for Hamiltonian systems that is employed to find the dynamic stability boundaries: limit cycles. This partitioning process enables the control system designer to directly evaluate and enhance the stability and performance of the system by balancing the power flowing into versus the power dissipated within the system subject to the Hamiltonian surface (power storage). Relationships are developed between exergy, power flow, static and dynamic stability, and Lyapunov analysis. The methodology is demonstrated with two illustrative examples: (1) a nonlinear oscillator with sinusoidal damping and (2) a multi-input-multi-output three-axis slewing spacecraft that employs proportional-integral-derivative tracking control with numerical simulation results.

  18. Evaluation methods for corrosion damage of components in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by coupling analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (1). Major targets and development strategies of the evaluation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Masanori; Uchida, Shunsuke; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Ninokata, Hisashi; Hiranuma, Naoki; Dosaki, Koji; Nishida, Koji; Akiyama, Minoru; Saitoh, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration and corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, future problems for structural materials should be predicted based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and they should be mitigated before becoming serious issues for plant operation. Three approaches have been prepared for predicting future problems in structural materials: 1. Computer program packages for predicting future corrosion fatigue on structural materials, 2. Computer program packages for predicting future corrosion damage on structural materials, and 3. Computer program packages for predicting wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion. General features of evaluation methods and their computer packages, technical innovations required for their development, and application plans for the developed approaches for plant operation are introduced in this paper. (author)

  19. Development of an advanced fluid-dynamic analysis code: α-flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mamoru

    1990-01-01

    A Project for development of large scale three-dimensional fluid-dynamic analysis code, α-FLOW, coping with the recent advancement of supercomputers and workstations, has been in progress. This project is called the α-Project, which has been promoted by the Association for Large Scale Fluid Dynamics Analysis Code comprising private companies and research institutions such as universities. The developmental period for the α-FLOW is four years, March 1989 to March 1992. To date, the major portions of basic design and program preparation have been completed and the project is in the stage of testing each module. In this paper, the present status of the α-Project, design policy and outline of α-FLOW are described. (author)

  20. Numerical simulation of unsteady free surface flow and dynamic performance for a Pelton turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Y X; Wang, Z W; Yan, Z G; Cui, T

    2012-01-01

    Different from the reaction turbines, the hydraulic performance of the Pelton turbine is dynamic due to the unsteady free surface flow in the rotating buckets in time and space. This paper aims to present the results of investigations conducted on the free surface flow in a Pelton turbine rotating buckets. The unsteady numerical simulations were performed with the CFX code by using the Realizable k-ε turbulence model coupling the two-phase flow volume of fluid method. The unsteady free surface flow patterns and torque varying with the bucket rotating were analysed. The predicted relative performance at five operating conditions was compared with the field test results. The study was also conducted the interactions between the bucket rear and the water jet.

  1. Numerical simulation of unsteady free surface flow and dynamic performance for a Pelton turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Y. X.; Cui, T.; Wang, Z. W.; Yan, Z. G.

    2012-11-01

    Different from the reaction turbines, the hydraulic performance of the Pelton turbine is dynamic due to the unsteady free surface flow in the rotating buckets in time and space. This paper aims to present the results of investigations conducted on the free surface flow in a Pelton turbine rotating buckets. The unsteady numerical simulations were performed with the CFX code by using the Realizable k-ε turbulence model coupling the two-phase flow volume of fluid method. The unsteady free surface flow patterns and torque varying with the bucket rotating were analysed. The predicted relative performance at five operating conditions was compared with the field test results. The study was also conducted the interactions between the bucket rear and the water jet.

  2. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of hot air flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation of air flow distribution, air velocity and pressure field pattern as it will affect moisture transient in a cabinet tray dryer is performed using SolidWorks Flow Simulation (SWFS) 2014 SP 4.0 program. The model used for the drying process in this experiment was designed with Solid ...

  3. Emerging insights into the dynamics of submarine debris flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Elverhøi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and theoretical work on the dynamics of submarine debris flows is summarized. Hydroplaning was first discovered in laboratory flows and later shown to likely occur in natural debris flows as well. It is a prime mechanism for explaining the extremely long runout distances observed in some natural debris flows even of over-consolidated clay materials. Moreover, the accelerations and high velocities reached by the flow head in a short time appear to fit well with the required initial conditions of observed tsunamis as obtained from back-calculations. Investigations of high-speed video recordings of laboratory debris flows were combined with measurements of total and pore pressure. The results are pointing towards yet another important role of ambient water: Water that intrudes from the water cushion underneath the hydroplaning head and through cracks in the upper surface of the debris flow may drastically soften initially stiff clayey material in the 'neck' of the flow, where significant stretching occurs due to the reduced friction at the bottom of the hydroplaning head. This self-reinforcing process may lead to the head separating from the main body and becoming an 'outrunner' block as clearly observed in several natural debris flows. Comparison of laboratory flows with different material composition indicates a gradual transition from hydroplaning plug flows of stiff clay-rich material, with a very low suspension rate, to the strongly agitated flow of sandy materials that develop a pronounced turbidity current. Statistical analysis of the great number of distinguishable lobes in the Storegga slide complex reveals power-law scaling behavior of the runout distance with the release mass over many orders of magnitude. Mathematical flow models based on viscoplastic material behavior (e.g. BING successfully reproduce the observed scaling behavior only for relatively small clay-rich debris flows while granular (frictional models

  4. Non-linear hydrotectonic phenomena: Part I - fluid flow in open fractures under dynamical stress loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archambeau, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    A fractured solid under stress loading (or unloading) can be viewed as behaving macroscopically as a medium with internal, hidden, degrees of freedom, wherein changes in fracture geometry (i.e. opening, closing and extension) and flow of fluid and gas within fractures will produce major changes in stresses and strains within the solid. Likewise, the flow process within fractures will be strongly coupled to deformation within the solid through boundary conditions on the fracture surfaces. The effects in the solid can, in part, be phenomenologically represented as inelastic or plastic processes in the macroscopic view. However, there are clearly phenomena associated with fracture growth and open fracture fluid flows that produce effects that can not be described using ordinary inelastic phenomenology. This is evident from the fact that a variety of energy release phenomena can occur, including seismic emissions of previously stored strain energy due to fracture growth, release of disolved gas from fluids in the fractures resulting in enhanced buoyancy and subsequent energetic flows of gas and fluids through the fracture system which can produce raid extension of old fractures and the creation of new ones. Additionally, the flows will be modulated by the opening and closing of fractures due to deformation in the solid, so that the flow process is strongly coupled to dynamical processes in the surrounding solid matrix, some of which are induced by the flow itself

  5. Flow-through shares for power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howie, K.D.

    1999-01-01

    Financial advantages will occur to power producers in Ontario provided that they are innovative in raising capital needed to take advantage of opportunities offered by the Energy Competition Act of 1998. In the new electricity regime, the availability of long term non-recourse debt financing supported by long term power purchasing from Ontario Hydro will probably decrease. The issuance of flow-through shares is a form of financing that could by available to them for certain projects, and there is the probability that greater equity financing will be needed. These flow-through shares can give investors immediate tax savings, a potential favorable return on their equity investment, and a means of financing certain kinds of power projects

  6. A theoretical analysis of the weak shock waves propagating through a bubbly flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Gu Sik; Kim, Heuy Dong; Baek, Seung Cheol

    2004-01-01

    Two-phase flow of liquid and gas through pipe lines are frequently encountered in nuclear power plant or industrial facility. Pressure waves which can be generated by a valve operation or any other cause in pipe lines propagate through the two-phase flow, often leading to severe noise and vibration problems or fatigue failure of pipe line system. It is of practical importance to predict the propagation characteristics of the pressure waves for the safety design for the pipe line. In the present study, a theoretical analysis is performed to understand the propagation characteristics of a weak shock wave in a bubbly flow. A wave equation is developed using a small perturbation method to analyze the weak shock wave through a bubbly flow with comparably low void fractions. It is known that the elasticity of pipe and void fraction significantly affect the propagation speed of shock wave, but the frequency of relaxation oscillation which is generated behind the shock wave is not strongly influenced by the elasticity of pipe. The present analytical results are in close agreement with existing experimental data

  7. Gas and Oil Flow through Wellbore Flaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatambeigi, M.; Anwar, I.; Reda Taha, M.; Bettin, G.; Chojnicki, K. N.; Stormont, J.

    2017-12-01

    We have measured gas and oil flow through laboratory samples that represent two important potential flow paths in wellbores associated with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR): cement-steel interfaces (microannuli) and cement fractures. Cement fractures were created by tensile splitting of cement cores. Samples to represent microannuli were created by placing thin steel sheets within split cement cores so flow is channeled along the cement-steel interface. The test sequence included alternating gas and oil flow measurements. The test fluids were nitrogen and silicone oil with properties similar to a typical crude oil stored in the SPR. After correcting for non-linear (inertial) flow when necessary, flows were interpreted as effective permeability and hydraulic aperture using the cubic law. For both samples with cement fractures and those with cement-steel interfaces, initial gas and oil permeabilities were comparable. Once saturated with oil, a displacement pressure had to be overcome to establish gas flow through a sample, and the subsequent gas permeability were reduced by more than 50% compared to its initial value. Keywords: wellbore integrity, leakage, fracture, microannulus, SPR. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of NTESS/Honeywell, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2017-8168 A

  8. POD- Mapping and analysis of hydroturbine exit flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Morten; Finstad, Pal Henrik

    2012-11-01

    Pairwise radial dynamic measurements of the swirling draft tube flow have been made at the 25 MW Svorka power plant in Surnadal operating at 48% load at 6 radial and 7 angular positions. The data is analyzed with traditional methods as well as with POD. The measurements were made in the turbine draft tube/exit flow in an axial measurement plane about 1200mm downstream the turbine runner. The draft tube diameter in the measurement plane is about 1300mm. The flow rate during measurements was close to 5.8m3/s. Two probes were used; both of length Le=700 mm and made of stainless steel with an outer diameter of Do=20 mm and inner diameter Di=4mm. At the end of each probe a full bridge cylindrical KULITE xcl152, 0-3.5, was mounted. 90 seconds samples at 10 kS/s were taken. The POD analysis largely follows that of Tutkun et al. (see e.g. AIAA J., 45,5,2008). The analysis shows that 26% of the pressure pulsation energy can be addressed to azimuthal mode 1. The work has been supported by Energy Norway.

  9. Comparison of platelet activation through hinge vs bulk flow in mechanical heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Borazjani, Iman

    2017-11-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves increase the risk of thrombus formation in patients which is believed to be initiated by platelet activation. Platelets can be activated by the elevated shear stresses in the bulk flow during the systole phase or the flow through the hinge during the diastole. However, the importance of platelet activation by the bulk flow vs the hinge in MHVs has yet to be studied. Here, we investigate the contribution of each of the above mechanisms to the activation of platelets in MHs by performing simulation of the flow through a 25mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in a straight aorta. Two different gap sizes (250 and 150 micrometer) are used in this study. The simulations are done using a sharp interface curvilinear immersed boundary method along with a strong-coupling algorithm for FSI solver on overset grids. The platelet activation through the hinge for different gap sizes is compared to the activation in the bulk flow using two platelet activation models to ensure the consistency of the results. Our results for all gap sizes using different activation models show that the integration of platelet activation caused by the bulk flow is several times higher in comparison to the activation through the hinge. This work is supported by the American Heart Association Grant 13SDG17220022, and the computational resources were partly provided by Center for Computational Research (CCR) at University at Buffalo.

  10. Evaluation of steady flow torques and pressure losses in a rotary flow control valve by means of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okhotnikov, Ivan; Noroozi, Siamak; Sewell, Philip; Godfrey, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel design of a rotary flow control valve driven by a stepper motor is proposed. • The intended use of the valve in the high flow rate independent metering hydraulic system is suggested. • Pressure drops, steady flow torques of the valve for various flow rates and orifice openings are studied by means of computational fluid dynamics. • The discharge coefficient and flow jet angles dependencies on the orifice opening are obtained. • A design method to decrease the flow forces without reducing the flow rate in single-staged valves is demonstrated. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel design of a rotary hydraulic flow control valve has been presented for high flow rate fluid power systems. High flow rates in these systems account for substantial flow forces acting on the throttling elements of the valves and cause the application of mechanically sophisticated multi-staged servo valves for flow regulation. The suggested design enables utilisation of single-stage valves in power hydraulics operating at high flow rates regimes. A spool driver and auxiliary mechanisms of the proposed valve design were discussed and selection criteria were suggested. Analytical expressions for metering characteristics as well as steady flow torques have been derived. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of steady state flow regimes was conducted to evaluate the hydraulic behaviour of the proposed valve. This study represents a special case of an independent metering concept applied to the design of power hydraulic systems with direct proportional valve control operating at flow rates above 150 litres per minute. The result gained using parametric CFD simulations predicted the induced torque and the pressure drops due to a steady flow. Magnitudes of these values prove that by minimising the number of spool's mobile metering surfaces it is possible to reduce the flow-generated forces in the new generation of hydraulic valves proposed in this study

  11. A comparative study of scale-adaptive and large-eddy simulations of highly swirling turbulent flow through an abrupt expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javadi, Ardalan; Nilsson, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    The strongly swirling turbulent flow through an abrupt expansion is investigated using highly resolved LES and SAS, to shed more light on the stagnation region and the helical vortex breakdown. The vortex breakdown in an abrupt expansion resembles the so-called vortex rope occurring in hydro power draft tubes. It is known that the large-scale helical vortex structures can be captured by regular RANS turbulence models. However, the spurious suppression of the small-scale structures should be avoided using less diffusive methods. The present work compares LES and SAS results with the experimental measurement of Dellenback et al. (1988). The computations are conducted using a general non-orthogonal finite-volume method with a fully collocated storage available in the OpenFOAM-2.1.x CFD code. The dynamics of the flow is studied at two Reynolds numbers, Re=6.0×10 4 and Re=10 5 , at the almost constant high swirl numbers of Sr=1.16 and Sr=1.23, respectively. The time-averaged velocity and pressure fields and the root mean square of the velocity fluctuations, are captured and investigated qualitatively. The flow with the lower Reynolds number gives a much weaker outburst although the frequency of the structures seems to be constant for the plateau swirl number

  12. Edge Sheared Flows and Blob Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myra, J.; D' Ippolito, D.; Russell, D., E-mail: jrmyra@lodestar.com [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder (United States); Davis, W. M.; Zweben, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (United States); Terry, J.; LaBombard, B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: A study of sheared flows in the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) and their interaction with blob-filaments is presented. Edge sheared flows are believed to be important for the L-H, and H-L transitions. Blob generation and dynamics impacts both the (near-separatrix) scrape-off-layer (SOL) width critical for power handling in the divertor, and the interaction of plasma in the far SOL with plasma-facing components. These topics are critical for ITER and future devices. A fluid-based 2D curvature-interchange model embedded in the SOLT code is employed to study these issues. Sheared binormal flows both regulate the power flux crossing the separatrix and control the character of emitted turbulence structures such as blob-filaments. At a critical power level (depending on parameters) the laminar flows containing intermittent, but bound, structures give way to full-blown blob emissions signifying a transition from quasi-diffusive to convective transport. In order to diagnose sheared flows in experiments and assess their interaction with blobs, a blob-tracking algorithm has been developed and applied to both NSTX and Alcator C-Mod data. Blob motion and ellipticity can be affected by sheared flows, and are diagnosed and compared with seeded blob simulations. A picture of the interaction of blobs and sheared flows is emerging from advances in the theory and simulation of edge turbulence, combined with ever-improving capabilities for edge diagnostics and their analysis. (author)

  13. Simulation of plume dynamics by the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Peter; Yuen, David A.

    2017-09-01

    The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is a semi-microscopic method to simulate fluid mechanics by modelling distributions of particles moving and colliding on a lattice. We present 2-D simulations using the LBM of a fluid in a rectangular box being heated from below, and cooled from above, with a Rayleigh of Ra = 108, similar to current estimates of the Earth's mantle, and a Prandtl number of 5000. At this Prandtl number, the flow is found to be in the non-inertial regime where the inertial terms denoted I ≪ 1. Hence, the simulations presented lie within the regime of relevance for geodynamical problems. We obtain narrow upwelling plumes with mushroom heads and chutes of downwelling fluid as expected of a flow in the non-inertial regime. The method developed demonstrates that the LBM has great potential for simulating thermal convection and plume dynamics relevant to geodynamics, albeit with some limitations.

  14. Methods for estimating peak-flow frequencies at ungaged sites in Montana based on data through water year 2011: Chapter F in Montana StreamStats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Roy; Sando, Steven K.; McCarthy, Peter M.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-04-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, completed a study to update methods for estimating peak-flow frequencies at ungaged sites in Montana based on peak-flow data at streamflow-gaging stations through water year 2011. The methods allow estimation of peak-flow frequencies (that is, peak-flow magnitudes, in cubic feet per second, associated with annual exceedance probabilities of 66.7, 50, 42.9, 20, 10, 4, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.2 percent) at ungaged sites. The annual exceedance probabilities correspond to 1.5-, 2-, 2.33-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals, respectively.Regional regression analysis is a primary focus of Chapter F of this Scientific Investigations Report, and regression equations for estimating peak-flow frequencies at ungaged sites in eight hydrologic regions in Montana are presented. The regression equations are based on analysis of peak-flow frequencies and basin characteristics at 537 streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana and were developed using generalized least squares regression or weighted least squares regression.All of the data used in calculating basin characteristics that were included as explanatory variables in the regression equations were developed for and are available through the USGS StreamStats application (http://water.usgs.gov/osw/streamstats/) for Montana. StreamStats is a Web-based geographic information system application that was created by the USGS to provide users with access to an assortment of analytical tools that are useful for water-resource planning and management. The primary purpose of the Montana StreamStats application is to provide estimates of basin characteristics and streamflow characteristics for user-selected ungaged sites on Montana streams. The regional regression equations presented in this report chapter can be conveniently solved using the Montana StreamStats application.Selected results from

  15. Nonlinear Dynamics of Non-uniform Current-Vortex Sheets in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, C.; Nishihara, K.; Sano, T.

    2017-04-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe fully nonlinear dynamics of interfaces in two-dimensional MHD flows based on an idea of non-uniform current-vortex sheet. Application of vortex sheet model to MHD flows has a crucial difficulty because of non-conservative nature of magnetic tension. However, it is shown that when a magnetic field is initially parallel to an interface, the concept of vortex sheet can be extended to MHD flows (current-vortex sheet). Two-dimensional MHD flows are then described only by a one-dimensional Lagrange parameter on the sheet. It is also shown that bulk magnetic field and velocity can be calculated from their values on the sheet. The model is tested by MHD Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with sinusoidal vortex sheet strength. Two-dimensional ideal MHD simulations show that the nonlinear dynamics of a shocked interface with density stratification agrees fairly well with that for its corresponding potential flow. Numerical solutions of the model reproduce properly the results of the ideal MHD simulations, such as the roll-up of spike, exponential growth of magnetic field, and its saturation and oscillation. Nonlinear evolution of the interface is found to be determined by the Alfvén and Atwood numbers. Some of their dependence on the sheet dynamics and magnetic field amplification are discussed. It is shown by the model that the magnetic field amplification occurs locally associated with the nonlinear dynamics of the current-vortex sheet. We expect that our model can be applicable to a wide variety of MHD shear flows.

  16. Compressible flow modelling in unstructured mesh topologies using numerical methods developed for incompressible flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, A.; Mechitoua, N.; Duplex, J.

    1995-01-01

    The R and D thermal hydraulic codes, notably the finite difference codes Melodie (2D) and ESTET (3D) or the 2D and 3D versions of the finite element code N3S were initially developed for incompressible, possibly dilatable, turbulent flows, i.e. those where density is not pressure-dependent. Subsequent minor modifications to these finite difference code algorithms enabled extension of their scope to subsonic compressible flows. The first applications in both single-phase and two flow contexts have now been completed. This paper presents the techniques used to adapt these algorithms for the processing of compressible flows in an N3S type finite element code, whereby complex geometries normally difficult to model in finite difference meshes could be successfully dealt with. The development of version 3.0 of he N3S code led to dilatable flow calculations at lower cost. On this basis, a 2-D prototype version of N3S was programmed, tested and validated, drawing maximum benefit from Cray vectorization possibilities and from physical, numerical or data processing experience with other fluid dynamics codes, such as Melodie, ESTET or TELEMAC. The algorithms are the same as those used in finite difference codes, but their formulation is variational. The first part of the paper deals with the fundamental equations involved, expressed in basic form, together with the associated digital method. The modifications to the k-epsilon turbulence model extended to compressible flows are also described. THe second part presents the algorithm used, indicating the additional terms required by the extension. The third part presents the equations in integral form and the associated matrix systems. The solutions adopted for calculation of the compressibility related terms are indicated. Finally, a few representative applications and test cases are discussed. These include subsonic, but also transsonic and supersonic cases, showing the shock responses of the digital method. The application of

  17. Calculating residual flows through a multiple-inlet system: the conundrum of the tidal period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Matute, Matias; Gerkema, Theo

    2015-11-01

    The concept of residual, i.e., tidally-averaged, flows through a multiple inlet system is reappraised. The evaluation of the residual through-flow depends on the time interval over which is integrated, in other words, on how one defines the tidal period. It is demonstrated that this definition is ambiguous and that different definitions (based on, e.g., high waters, slack tides, etc.) yield very different results for the residual, also in terms of their long-term statistical properties (median and standard deviation). A basin-wide applicable method of defining the tidal period, in terms of enclosed water volume, is analyzed. We compare the different methods on the basis of high-resolution model results for the Western Dutch Wadden Sea. The multitude of tidal constituents together with wind variability creates broad distributions for the residuals, with standard deviations much larger than the mean or median residual flows.

  18. Singularities in Free Surface Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thete, Sumeet Suresh

    Free surface flows where the shape of the interface separating two or more phases or liquids are unknown apriori, are commonplace in industrial applications and nature. Distribution of drop sizes, coalescence rate of drops, and the behavior of thin liquid films are crucial to understanding and enhancing industrial practices such as ink-jet printing, spraying, separations of chemicals, and coating flows. When a contiguous mass of liquid such as a drop, filament or a film undergoes breakup to give rise to multiple masses, the topological transition is accompanied with a finite-time singularity . Such singularity also arises when two or more masses of liquid merge into each other or coalesce. Thus the dynamics close to singularity determines the fate of about-to-form drops or films and applications they are involved in, and therefore needs to be analyzed precisely. The primary goal of this thesis is to resolve and analyze the dynamics close to singularity when free surface flows experience a topological transition, using a combination of theory, experiments, and numerical simulations. The first problem under consideration focuses on the dynamics following flow shut-off in bottle filling applications that are relevant to pharmaceutical and consumer products industry, using numerical techniques based on Galerkin Finite Element Methods (GFEM). The second problem addresses the dual flow behavior of aqueous foams that are observed in oil and gas fields and estimates the relevant parameters that describe such flows through a series of experiments. The third problem aims at understanding the drop formation of Newtonian and Carreau fluids, computationally using GFEM. The drops are formed as a result of imposed flow rates or expanding bubbles similar to those of piezo actuated and thermal ink-jet nozzles. The focus of fourth problem is on the evolution of thinning threads of Newtonian fluids and suspensions towards singularity, using computations based on GFEM and experimental

  19. Two-phase flow through small branches in a horizontal pipe with stratified flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smoglie, C.

    1985-02-01

    In the field of reactor safety the occurrence of a small break in a horizontal primary coolant pipe is of great importance. This report presents the description and results of experiments designed to determine the mass flow rate and quality through a small break at the bottom, the top or the side of a main pipe with stratified gas-liquid flow. If the interface level is far below (above) the branch, only single-phase gas (liquid) flow enters the branch. For smaller distances the interface is locally deformed because of the pressure decrease due to the fluid acceleration near the branch inlet (Bernoulli effect) and liquid (gas) can be entrained. This report contains photographs illustrating the flow phenomena as well as a general correlation to determine the beginning of entrainment. Results are presented on the branch mass flow rate and quality as a function of a normalized distance between the interface and the branch inlet. A model was developed which enables to predict the branch quality and mass flux. Results from air-water flow through horizontal branches, were extrapolated for steam water flow at high pressure with critical branch mass flux. (orig./HS) [de

  20. Application of network methods for understanding evolutionary dynamics in discrete habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Gili; Fefferman, Nina H

    2017-06-01

    In populations occupying discrete habitat patches, gene flow between habitat patches may form an intricate population structure. In such structures, the evolutionary dynamics resulting from interaction of gene-flow patterns with other evolutionary forces may be exceedingly complex. Several models describing gene flow between discrete habitat patches have been presented in the population-genetics literature; however, these models have usually addressed relatively simple settings of habitable patches and have stopped short of providing general methodologies for addressing nontrivial gene-flow patterns. In the last decades, network theory - a branch of discrete mathematics concerned with complex interactions between discrete elements - has been applied to address several problems in population genetics by modelling gene flow between habitat patches using networks. Here, we present the idea and concepts of modelling complex gene flows in discrete habitats using networks. Our goal is to raise awareness to existing network theory applications in molecular ecology studies, as well as to outline the current and potential contribution of network methods to the understanding of evolutionary dynamics in discrete habitats. We review the main branches of network theory that have been, or that we believe potentially could be, applied to population genetics and molecular ecology research. We address applications to theoretical modelling and to empirical population-genetic studies, and we highlight future directions for extending the integration of network science with molecular ecology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A dynamic globalization model for large eddy simulation of complex turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hae Cheon; Park, No Ma; Kim, Jin Seok [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    A dynamic subgrid-scale model is proposed for large eddy simulation of turbulent flows in complex geometry. The eddy viscosity model by Vreman [Phys. Fluids, 16, 3670 (2004)] is considered as a base model. A priori tests with the original Vreman model show that it predicts the correct profile of subgrid-scale dissipation in turbulent channel flow but the optimal model coefficient is far from universal. Dynamic procedures of determining the model coefficient are proposed based on the 'global equilibrium' between the subgrid-scale dissipation and viscous dissipation. An important feature of the proposed procedures is that the model coefficient determined is globally constant in space but varies only in time. Large eddy simulations with the present dynamic model are conducted for forced isotropic turbulence, turbulent channel flow and flow over a sphere, showing excellent agreements with previous results.

  2. Analytical effective tensor for flow-through composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviercoski, Rosangela De Fatima [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-06-19

    A machine, method and computer-usable medium for modeling an average flow of a substance through a composite material. Such a modeling includes an analytical calculation of an effective tensor K.sup.a suitable for use with a variety of media. The analytical calculation corresponds to an approximation to the tensor K, and follows by first computing the diagonal values, and then identifying symmetries of the heterogeneity distribution. Additional calculations include determining the center of mass of the heterogeneous cell and its angle according to a defined Cartesian system, and utilizing this angle into a rotation formula to compute the off-diagonal values and determining its sign.

  3. Numerical methodologies for investigation of moderate-velocity flow using a hybrid computational fluid dynamics - molecular dynamics simulation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Soon Heum; Kim, Na Yong; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.; Moldovan, Dorel; Jha, Shantenu

    2014-01-01

    Numerical approaches are presented to minimize the statistical errors inherently present due to finite sampling and the presence of thermal fluctuations in the molecular region of a hybrid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) - molecular dynamics (MD) flow solution. Near the fluid-solid interface the hybrid CFD-MD simulation approach provides a more accurate solution, especially in the presence of significant molecular-level phenomena, than the traditional continuum-based simulation techniques. It also involves less computational cost than the pure particle-based MD. Despite these advantages the hybrid CFD-MD methodology has been applied mostly in flow studies at high velocities, mainly because of the higher statistical errors associated with low velocities. As an alternative to the costly increase of the size of the MD region to decrease statistical errors, we investigate a few numerical approaches that reduce sampling noise of the solution at moderate-velocities. These methods are based on sampling of multiple simulation replicas and linear regression of multiple spatial/temporal samples. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each technique in the perspective of solution accuracy and computational cost.

  4. Dynamic simulation of a pilot scale vacuum gas oil hydrocracking unit by the space-time CE/SE method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadighi, S.; Ahmad, A. [Institute of Hydrogen Economy, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Shirvani, M. [Faculty of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    This work introduces a modified space-time conservation element/solution element (CE/SE) method for the simulation of the dynamic behavior of a pilot-scale hydrocracking reactor. With this approach, a four-lump dynamic model including vacuum gas oil (VGO), middle distillate, naphtha and gas is solved. The proposed method is capable of handling the stiffness of the partial differential equations resulting from the hydrocracking reactions. To have a better judgment, the model is also solved by the finite difference method (FDM), and the results from both approaches are compared. Initially, the absolute average deviation of the cold dynamic simulation using the CE/SE approach is 8.98 %, which is better than that obtained using the FDM. Then, the stability analysis proves that for achieving an appropriate response from the dynamic model, the Courant number, which is a function of the time step size, mesh size and volume flow rate through the catalytic bed, should be less than 1. Finally, it is found that, following a careful selection of these parameters, the CE/SE solutions to the hydrocracking model can produce higher accuracy than the FDM results. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Effects of Active and Passive Control Techniques on Mach 1.5 Cavity Flow Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selin Aradag

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic flow over cavities has been of interest since 1960s because cavities represent the bomb bays of aircraft. The flow is transient, turbulent, and complicated. Pressure fluctuations inside the cavity can impede successful weapon release. The objective of this study is to use active and passive control methods on supersonic cavity flow numerically to decrease or eliminate pressure oscillations. Jet blowing at several locations on the front and aft walls of the cavity configuration is used as an active control method. Several techniques are used for passive control including using a cover plate to separate the flow dynamics inside and outside of the cavity, trailing edge wall modifications, such as inclination of the trailing edge, and providing curvature to the trailing edge wall. The results of active and passive control techniques are compared with the baseline case in terms of pressure fluctuations, sound pressure levels at the leading edge, trailing edge walls, and cavity floor and in terms of formation of the flow structures and the results are presented. It is observed from the results that modification of the trailing edge wall is the most effective of the control methods tested leading to up to 40 dB reductions in cavity tones.

  6. A method for the interpretation of flow cytometry data using genetic algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Angeletti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flow cytometry analysis is the method of choice for the differential diagnosis of hematologic disorders. It is typically performed by a trained hematopathologist through visual examination of bidimensional plots, making the analysis time-consuming and sometimes too subjective. Here, a pilot study applying genetic algorithms to flow cytometry data from normal and acute myeloid leukemia subjects is described. Subjects and Methods: Initially, Flow Cytometry Standard files from 316 normal and 43 acute myeloid leukemia subjects were transformed into multidimensional FITS image metafiles. Training was performed through introduction of FITS metafiles from 4 normal and 4 acute myeloid leukemia in the artificial intelligence system. Results: Two mathematical algorithms termed 018330 and 025886 were generated. When tested against a cohort of 312 normal and 39 acute myeloid leukemia subjects, both algorithms combined showed high discriminatory power with a receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve of 0.912. Conclusions: The present results suggest that machine learning systems hold a great promise in the interpretation of hematological flow cytometry data.

  7. Analysis methods for fast impurity ion dynamics data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Almagri, A.F.; Prager, S.C.; Fonck, R.J.

    1994-08-01

    A high resolution spectrometer has been developed and used on the MST reversed-field pinch (RFP) to measure passively impurity ion temperatures and flow velocities with 10 μs temporal resolution. Such measurements of MHD-scale fluctuations are particularly relevant in the RFP because the flow velocity fluctuation induced transport of current (the ''MHD dynamo'') may produce the magnetic field reversal characteristic of an RFP. This instrument will also be used to measure rapid changes in the equilibrium flow velocity, such as occur during locking and H-mode transition. The precision of measurements made to date is <0.6 km/s. The authors are developing accurate analysis techniques appropriate to the reduction of this fast ion dynamics data. Moment analysis and curve-fitting routines have been evaluated for noise sensitivity and robustness. Also presented is an analysis method which correctly separates the flux-surface average of the correlated fluctuations in u and B from the fluctuations due to rigid shifts of the plasma column

  8. K-FIX, Transient 2 Phase Flow Hydrodynamic in 2-D Planar or Cylindrical Geometry, Eulerian Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, W. C.; Torrey, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The transient dynamics of two- dimensional, two-phase flow with interfacial exchange are calculated at all flow speeds. Each phase is described in terms of its own density, velocity, and temperature. Separate sets of field equations govern the gas and liquid phase dynamics. The six field equations for the two phases couple through mass, momentum, and energy exchange. 2 - Method of solution: The equations are solved using an Eulerian finite difference technique that implicitly couples the rates of phase transitions, momentum, and energy exchange to determination of the pressure, density, and velocity fields. The implicit solution is accomplished iteratively using a point relaxation technique without linearizing the equations, thus eliminating the need for numerous derivative terms. Solutions can be obtained in one and two space dimensions in plane geometry and in cylindrical geometry with axial symmetry and zero azimuthal velocity. Solutions in spherical geometry can also be obtained in one space dimension. The geometric region of interest is divided into many finite-sized, space-fixed zones called cells which form the computing mesh. In plane geometry the cells are rectangular cylinders, in cylindrical geometry they are toroids with rectangular cross section, and in spherical geometry they are spherical shells

  9. Wind flow through shrouded wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Aeroflow 5-hole probe, which took various measurements at multiple planes of each model. Flow visualization tests, including oil and tufts, were also...through an Aeroflow 5-hole probe, which took various measurements at multiple planes of each model. Flow visualization tests, including oil and tufts...facilities by 2025. This meets a larger DOD mandate, Title 10 USC § 2911, which directs at least 25 percent of any DOD facility’s energy consumption come

  10. Predicting debris-flow initiation and run-out with a depth-averaged two-phase model and adaptive numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D. L.; Iverson, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Numerically simulating debris-flow motion presents many challenges due to the complicated physics of flowing granular-fluid mixtures, the diversity of spatial scales (ranging from a characteristic particle size to the extent of the debris flow deposit), and the unpredictability of the flow domain prior to a simulation. Accurately predicting debris-flows requires models that are complex enough to represent the dominant effects of granular-fluid interaction, while remaining mathematically and computationally tractable. We have developed a two-phase depth-averaged mathematical model for debris-flow initiation and subsequent motion. Additionally, we have developed software that numerically solves the model equations efficiently on large domains. A unique feature of the mathematical model is that it includes the feedback between pore-fluid pressure and the evolution of the solid grain volume fraction, a process that regulates flow resistance. This feature endows the model with the ability to represent the transition from a stationary mass to a dynamic flow. With traditional approaches, slope stability analysis and flow simulation are treated separately, and the latter models are often initialized with force balances that are unrealistically far from equilibrium. Additionally, our new model relies on relatively few dimensionless parameters that are functions of well-known material properties constrained by physical data (eg. hydraulic permeability, pore-fluid viscosity, debris compressibility, Coulomb friction coefficient, etc.). We have developed numerical methods and software for accurately solving the model equations. By employing adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), the software can efficiently resolve an evolving debris flow as it advances through irregular topography, without needing terrain-fit computational meshes. The AMR algorithms utilize multiple levels of grid resolutions, so that computationally inexpensive coarse grids can be used where the flow is absent, and

  11. Gas dynamic improvement of the axial compressor design for reduction of the flow non-uniformity level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, V. N.; Baturin, O. V.; Kolmakova, D. A.; Popov, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    Circumferential nonuniformity of gas flow is one of the main problems in the gas turbine engine. Usually, the flow circumferential nonuniformity appears near the annular frame located in the flow passage of the engine. The presence of circumferential nonuniformity leads to the increased dynamic stresses in the blade rows and the blade damage. The goal of this research was to find the ways of the flow non-uniformity reduction, which would not require a fundamental changing of the engine design. A new method for reducing the circumferential nonuniformity of the gas flow was proposed that allows the prediction of the pressure peak values of the rotor blades without computationally expensive CFD calculations.

  12. Non-linear dynamics and alternating 'flip' solutions in ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmeyer, Sebastian

    2018-04-01

    This study treats with the influence of a symmetry-breaking transversal magnetic field on the nonlinear dynamics of ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette flow - flow confined between two concentric independently rotating cylinders. We detected alternating 'flip' solutions which are flow states featuring typical characteristics of slow-fast-dynamics in dynamical systems. The flip corresponds to a temporal change in the axial wavenumber and we find them to appear either as pure 2-fold axisymmetric (due to the symmetry-breaking nature of the applied transversal magnetic field) or involving non-axisymmetric, helical modes in its interim solution. The latter ones show features of typical ribbon solutions. In any case the flip solutions have a preferential first axial wavenumber which corresponds to the more stable state (slow dynamics) and second axial wavenumber, corresponding to the short appearing more unstable state (fast dynamics). However, in both cases the flip time grows exponential with increasing the magnetic field strength before the flip solutions, living on 2-tori invariant manifolds, cease to exist, with lifetime going to infinity. Further we show that ferrofluidic flow turbulence differ from the classical, ordinary (usually at high Reynolds number) turbulence. The applied magnetic field hinders the free motion of ferrofluid partials and therefore smoothen typical turbulent quantities and features so that speaking of mildly chaotic dynamics seems to be a more appropriate expression for the observed motion.

  13. Numerical Investigation of the Turbulent Wind Flow Through Elevated Windbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashish; Irtaza, Hassan

    2018-04-01

    Analysis of airflow through elevated windbreaks is presented in this paper. Permeable nets and impermeable film increases considerable wind forces on the windbreaks which is susceptible to damage during high wind. A comprehensive numerical investigation has been carried out to analyze the effects of wind on standalone elevated windbreak clad with various permeable nets and an impermeable film. The variation of airflow behavior around and through permeable nets and airflow behavior around impermeable film were also been investigated. Computational fluid dynamics techniques using Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations has been used to predict the wind force coefficient and thus wind forces on panels supporting permeable nets and impermeable film for turbulent wind flow. Elevated windbreak panels were analyzed for seven different permeable nets having various solidity ratio, specific permeability and aerodynamic resistant coefficients. The permeable nets were modelled as porous jump media obeying Forchheimer's law and an impermeable film modelled as rigid wall.

  14. Numerical Investigation of the Turbulent Wind Flow Through Elevated Windbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashish; Irtaza, Hassan

    2018-06-01

    Analysis of airflow through elevated windbreaks is presented in this paper. Permeable nets and impermeable film increases considerable wind forces on the windbreaks which is susceptible to damage during high wind. A comprehensive numerical investigation has been carried out to analyze the effects of wind on standalone elevated windbreak clad with various permeable nets and an impermeable film. The variation of airflow behavior around and through permeable nets and airflow behavior around impermeable film were also been investigated. Computational fluid dynamics techniques using Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations has been used to predict the wind force coefficient and thus wind forces on panels supporting permeable nets and impermeable film for turbulent wind flow. Elevated windbreak panels were analyzed for seven different permeable nets having various solidity ratio, specific permeability and aerodynamic resistant coefficients. The permeable nets were modelled as porous jump media obeying Forchheimer's law and an impermeable film modelled as rigid wall.

  15. Effective star tracking method based on optical flow analysis for star trackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ting; Xing, Fei; Wang, Xiaochu; Li, Jin; Wei, Minsong; You, Zheng

    2016-12-20

    Benefiting from rapid development of imaging sensor technology, modern optical technology, and a high-speed computing chip, the star tracker's accuracy, dynamic performance, and update rate have been greatly improved with low power consumption and miniature size. The star tracker is currently one of the most competitive attitude measurement sensors. However, due to restrictions of the optical imaging system, difficulties still exist in moving star spot detection and star tracking when in special motion conditions. An effective star tracking method based on optical flow analysis for star trackers is proposed in this paper. Spot-based optical flow, based on a gray gradient between two adjacent star images, is analyzed to distinguish the star spot region and obtain an accurate star spot position so that the star tracking can keep continuous under high dynamic conditions. The obtained star vectors and extended Kalman filter (EKF) are then combined to conduct an angular velocity estimation to ensure region prediction of the star spot; this can be combined with the optical flow analysis result. Experiment results show that the method proposed in this paper has advantages in conditions of large angular velocity and large angular acceleration, despite the presence of noise. Higher functional density and better performance can be achieved; thus, the star tracker can be more widely applied in small satellites, remote sensing, and other complex space missions.

  16. Validation of a simple method for predicting the disinfection performance in a flow-through contactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Valentin; Barbeau, Benoit

    2014-02-01

    Despite its shortcomings, the T10 method introduced by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1989 is currently the method most frequently used in North America to calculate disinfection performance. Other methods (e.g., the Integrated Disinfection Design Framework, IDDF) have been advanced as replacements, and more recently, the USEPA suggested the Extended T10 and Extended CSTR (Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor) methods to improve the inactivation calculations within ozone contactors. To develop a method that fully considers the hydraulic behavior of the contactor, two models (Plug Flow with Dispersion and N-CSTR) were successfully fitted with five tracer tests results derived from four Water Treatment Plants and a pilot-scale contactor. A new method based on the N-CSTR model was defined as the Partially Segregated (Pseg) method. The predictions from all the methods mentioned were compared under conditions of poor and good hydraulic performance, low and high disinfectant decay, and different levels of inactivation. These methods were also compared with experimental results from a chlorine pilot-scale contactor used for Escherichia coli inactivation. The T10 and Extended T10 methods led to large over- and under-estimations. The Segregated Flow Analysis (used in the IDDF) also considerably overestimated the inactivation under high disinfectant decay. Only the Extended CSTR and Pseg methods produced realistic and conservative predictions in all cases. Finally, a simple implementation procedure of the Pseg method was suggested for calculation of disinfection performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of a method for analysis for wind turbines horizontal shaft by a method of fluid dynamics computational (CFD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farinnas Wong, E. Y.; Jauregui Rigo, S.; Betancourt Mena, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe different approaches to solving problems computational fluid dynamics using the finite element method, there is a perspective what are the different problems that must be addressed when choose a path to develop a code that solves the problems of boundary layer and turbulence to simulate the transport equipment and fluid handling. In principle, the turbulent flow is governed by the equations of dynamics fluids. The nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations, make the solution analytical is only possible in a few very specific cases and for senior Reynolds numbers the flow equations become a more complex, for it is necessary to use certain models dependent on some settings, usually obtained experimentally. Existing in the powerful techniques present numerical resolution of these equations such as the direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large eddy simulation or vertices (RES), discussed for use in solving problems flow machines. (author)

  18. Dynamic analysis of the pump system based on MOC–CFD coupled method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Wu, Dazhuan; Yan, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • MOC–CFD coupled method was proposed to get the pump internal and external characteristics. • The coupled strategy and procedure were explained. • Some typical simulation cases were made for different factors. • The pump head deviation grows with the severity of the transient. • Valve closure law in linear and longer pipeline will cause higher pump head deviation. - Abstract: The dynamic characteristics of pump response to transient events were investigated by combining the Method of Characteristic (MOC) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) together. In a typical pump–pipeline–valve system, similar to the reactor system, the pump is treated as three-dimensional CFD model using Fluent code, whereas the rest is represented by one-dimensional components using MOC. A description of the coupling theory and procedure ensuring proper communication within the two codes is given. Several transient flow operations have been carried out. In the initial steady-state simulation, the coupled method could accurately find the operating condition of the pump when the valve is fully open. When the valve is closed rapidly, preliminary comparative calculations demonstrate that the coupled method is efficient in simulating the dynamic behavior of the pump and capable of getting detailed fluid field evolutions inside the pump. Deviation between the dynamic pump head and the value given by the steady-state curve at the same instantaneous flow-rate was established, and the cause of the deviation was further explained by the comparison of pump internal and external characteristics. Furthermore, it was found that the deviation grows with the severity of the transient. In addition, the effects of valve closure laws and pipe length on the pump dynamic performances were evaluated. All the results showed that MOC–CFD is an efficient and promising way for simulating the interaction between pump model and piping system

  19. CrossFlow: Cross-Organizational Workflow Management in Dynamic Virtual Enterprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Aberer, Karl; Hoffner, Yigal; Ludwig, Heiko

    In this report, we present the approach to cross-organizational workflow management of the CrossFlow project. CrossFlow is a European research project aiming at the support of cross-organizational workflows in dynamic virtual enterprises. The cooperation in these virtual enterprises is based on

  20. CrossFlow : cross-organizational workflow management in dynamic virtual enterprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Aberer, K.; Hoffner, Y.

    2000-01-01

    This paper gives a detailed overview of the approach to cross-organizational workflow management developed in the CrossFlow project. CrossFlow is a European research project aiming at the support of cross-organizational workflows in dynamic virtual enterprises. The cooperation in these virtual

  1. Relationship between quantitative and descriptive methods of studying blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Joseph W; Elliott, Jonathan E; Laurie, Steven S; Voelkel, Thomas; Gladstone, Igor M; Fish, Mathews B; Lovering, Andrew T

    2017-09-01

    Several methods exist to study intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVA) in humans. Transthoracic saline contrast echocardiography (TTSCE), i.e., bubble scores, is minimally-invasive, but cannot be used to quantify the magnitude of blood flow through IPAVA (Q IPAVA ). Radiolabeled macroaggregates of albumin ( 99m Tc-MAA) have been used to quantify Q IPAVA in humans, but this requires injection of radioactive particles. Previous work has shown agreement between 99m Tc-MAA and TTSCE, but this has not been tested simultaneously in the same group of subjects. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between Q IPAVA quantified with 99m Tc-MAA and bubble scores obtained with TTSCE. To test this, we used 99m Tc-MAA and TTSCE to quantify and detect Q IPAVA at rest and during exercise in humans. Q IPAVA significantly increased from rest to exercise using 99m Tc-MAA and TTSCE and there was a moderately-strong, but significant relationship between methods. Our data suggest that high bubble scores generally correspond with large Q IPAVA quantified with 99m Tc-MAA during exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Oil-in-water emulsions flow through constricted micro-capillarities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Oswaldo Robles; Carvalho, Marcio da Silveira [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The effect of the oil concentration and the drop size distribution on the characteristics of the flow of an emulsion through a constricted capillary was experimentally analyzed and quantified by the ratio of the pressure drop of the continuous phase flow to the pressure drop of the emulsion flow, at the same flow rate. The results confirm that the ratio between the capillary constriction diameter and the oil drop size is one of the most important parameters for this flow. For large oil drop size emulsions, the deformation of the drop as it flows through the constriction leads to a high extra pressure drop at low capillary numbers. For small oil drop size emulsions, the extra pressure drop is a function of the viscosity ratio and the disperse phase concentration. (author)

  3. FDM Analysis for Blood Flow through Stenosed Tapered Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar DS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A computational model is developed to analyze the unsteady flow of blood through stenosed tapered narrow arteries, treating blood as a two-fluid model with the suspension of all the erythrocytes in the core region as Herschel-Bulkley fluid and the plasma in the peripheral layer as Newtonian fluid. The finite difference method is employed to solve the resulting system of nonlinear partial differential equations. The effects of stenosis height, peripheral layer thickness, yield stress, viscosity ratio, angle of tapering and power law index on the velocity, wall shear stress, flow rate and the longitudinal impedance are analyzed. It is found that the velocity and flow rate increase with the increase of the peripheral layer thickness and decrease with the increase of the angle of tapering and depth of the stenosis. It is observed that the flow rate decreases nonlinearly with the increase of the viscosity ratio and yield stress. The estimates of the increase in the longitudinal impedance to flow are considerably lower for the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model compared with those of the single-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. Hence, it is concluded that the presence of the peripheral layer helps in the functioning of the diseased arterial system.

  4. CALCULATION METHODS OF OPTIMAL ADJUSTMENT OF CONTROL SYSTEM THROUGH DISTURBANCE CHANNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Golinko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of automatic control system debugging the great attention is paid to determining formulas’ parameters of optimal dynamic adjustment of regulators, taking into account the dynamics of Objects control. In most cases the known formulas are oriented on design of automatic control system through channel “input-output definition”. But practically in all continuous processes the main task of all regulators is stabilization of output parameters. The Methods of parameters calculation for dynamic adjustment of regulations were developed. These methods allow to optimize the analog and digital regulators, taking into account minimization of regulated influences. There were suggested to use the fact of detuning and maximum value of regulated influence. As the automatic control system optimization with proportional plus reset controllers on disturbance channel is an unimodal task, the main algorithm of optimization is realized by Hooke – Jeeves method. For controllers optimization through channel external disturbance there were obtained functional dependences of parameters calculations of dynamic proportional plus reset controllers from dynamic characteristics of Object control. The obtained dependences allow to improve the work of controllers (regulators of automatic control on external disturbance channel and so it allows to improve the quality of regulation of transient processes. Calculation formulas provide high accuracy and convenience in usage. In suggested method there are no nomographs and this fact expels subjectivity of investigation in determination of parameters of dynamic adjustment of proportional plus reset controllers. Functional dependences can be used for calculation of adjustment of PR controllers in a great range of change of dynamic characteristics of Objects control.

  5. Self-sustained oscillations in blood flow through a honeycomb capillary network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J M; Pozrikidis, C

    2014-09-01

    Numerical simulations of unsteady blood flow through a honeycomb network originating at multiple inlets and terminating at multiple outlets are presented and discussed under the assumption that blood behaves as a continuum with variable constitution. Unlike a tree network, the honeycomb network exhibits both diverging and converging bifurcations between branching capillary segments. Numerical results based on a finite difference method demonstrate that as in the case of tree networks considered in previous studies, the cell partitioning law at diverging bifurcations is an important parameter in both steady and unsteady flow. Specifically, a steady flow may spontaneously develop self-sustained oscillations at critical conditions by way of a Hopf bifurcation. Contrary to tree-like networks comprised entirely of diverging bifurcations, the critical parameters for instability in honeycomb networks depend weakly on the system size. The blockage of one or more network segments due to the presence of large cells or the occurrence of capillary constriction may cause flow reversal or trigger a transition to unsteady flow.

  6. The Dynamics of the Impact of Past Performance on Mutual Fund Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goriaev, A.P.; Nijman, T.E.; Werker, B.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    This study reconsiders the determinants of flows into US growth funds, focusing in particular on the dynamics of the impact of past performance on flows.We model the flow-performance relationship at the monthly frequency, allowing for dependence of the sensitivity of flows to past performance on

  7. Numerical Study on Couette Flow in Nanostructured Channel using Molecular-continuum Hybrid Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngjin; Jeong, Myunggeun; Ha, Man Yeong [Pusan Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    A molecular-continuum hybrid method was developed to simulate microscale and nanoscale fluids where continuum fluidic cannot be used to predict Couette flow. Molecular dynamics simulation is used near the solid surface where the flow cannot be predicted by continuum fluidic, and Navier-Stokes equations are used in the other regions. Numerical simulation of Couette flow was performed using the hybrid method to investigate the effect of solid-liquid interaction and surface roughness in a nanochannel. It was found that the solid-liquid interaction and surface roughness influence the boundary condition. When the surface energy is low, slippage occurs near the solid surface, and the magnitude of slippage decreases with increase in surface energy. When the surface energy is high, a locking boundary condition is formed. The roughness disturbs slippage near the solid surface and promotes the locking boundary condition.

  8. Flow development through HP & LP turbines, Part II: Effects of the hub endwall secondary sealing air flow on the turbine's mainstream flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jialin; Du, Qiang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Pei; Liu, Guang; Liu, Hongrui; Du, Meimei

    2017-08-01

    Although many literatures have been focused on the underneath flow and loss mechanism, very few experiments and simulations have been done under the engines' representative working conditions or considering the real cavity structure as a whole. This paper aims at realizing the goal of design of efficient turbine and scrutinizing the velocity distribution in the vicinity of the rim seal. With the aid of numerical method, a numerical model describing the flow pattern both in the purge flow spot and within the mainstream flow path is established, fluid migration and its accompanied flow mechanism within the realistic cavity structure (with rim seal structure and considering mainstream & secondary air flow's interaction) is used to evaluate both the flow pattern and the underneath flow mechanism within the inward rotating cavity. Meanwhile, the underneath flow and loss mechanism are also studied in the current paper. The computational results show that the sealing air flow's ingestion and ejection are highly interwound with each other in both upstream and downstream flow of the rim seal. Both the down-stream blades' potential effects as well as the upstream blades' wake trajectory can bring about the ingestion of the hot gas flow within the cavity, abrupt increase of the static pressure is believed to be the main reason. Also, the results indicate that sealing air flow ejected through the rear cavity will cause unexpected loss near the outlet section of the blades in the downstream of the HP rotor passages.

  9. Review of various dynamic modeling methods and development of an intuitive modeling method for dynamic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seung Ki; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2008-01-01

    Conventional static reliability analysis methods are inadequate for modeling dynamic interactions between components of a system. Various techniques such as dynamic fault tree, dynamic Bayesian networks, and dynamic reliability block diagrams have been proposed for modeling dynamic systems based on improvement of the conventional modeling methods. In this paper, we review these methods briefly and introduce dynamic nodes to the existing Reliability Graph with General Gates (RGGG) as an intuitive modeling method to model dynamic systems. For a quantitative analysis, we use a discrete-time method to convert an RGGG to an equivalent Bayesian network and develop a software tool for generation of probability tables

  10. Computed tomography for the quantitative characterization of flow through a porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auzerais, F.M.; Dussan, E.B.; Reischer, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray computer tomography (CT) has become an increasingly popular research tool in petroleum engineering for characterizing porous media. Its highly detailed images have been used to construct maps of porosity, saturation and atomic composition, and to visualize the displacement of fluids. However, extracting data necessary to characterize flow through porous media is both time consuming and dependent on the availability of extensive computational resources - - a consequence of the large size of the image files. The authors of this paper applied to known technique, based upon the ability to recognize regions with similar features, which avoids these difficulties. It allows the authors to substitute for the image, the pixel location of the boundaries of the recognized regions, reducing considerably the computer storage requirements. The authors this technique to study the dynamics of two miscible liquids of different densities flowing through a porous medium where buoyancy plays an important role. The authors' specific concern is the movement of mud filtrate as it penetrates a permeable formation in the vicinity of a recently drilled wellbore. The authors quantify the manner in which impermeable horizontal barriers influence the movement of the filtrate

  11. Valveless pumping mechanics of the embryonic heart during cardiac looping: Pressure and flow through micro-PIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bark, D L; Johnson, B; Garrity, D; Dasi, L P

    2017-01-04

    Cardiovascular development is influenced by the flow-induced stress environment originating from cardiac biomechanics. To characterize the stress environment, it is necessary to quantify flow and pressure. Here, we quantify the flow field in a developing zebrafish heart during the looping stage through micro-particle imaging velocimetry and by analyzing spatiotemporal plots. We further build upon previous methods to noninvasively quantify the pressure field at a low Reynolds number using flow field data for the first time, while also comparing the impact of viscosity models. Through this method, we show that the atrium builds up pressure to ~0.25mmHg relative to the ventricle during atrial systole and that atrial expansion creates a pressure difference of ~0.15mmHg across the atrium, resulting in efficient cardiac pumping. With these techniques, it is possible to noninvasively fully characterize hemodynamics during heart development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Transient gas flow through layered porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, F.A. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Low Reynolds number isothermal flow of an ideal gas through layered porous material was investigated analytically. Relations governing the transient flow in one dimension are obtained. An implicit, iterative, unconditionally stable finite difference scheme is developed for calculation of such flows. A computer code, SIROCCO, employing this technique has been written and implemented on the LLL computer system. A listing of the code is included. This code may be effectively applied to the evaluation of stemming plans for underground nuclear experiments. (U.S.)

  13. Complex network analysis of phase dynamics underlying oil-water two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cai, Qing; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the complicated flow behaviors arising from high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows is an important problem of significant challenge. We design a high-speed cycle motivation conductance sensor and carry out experiments for measuring the local flow information from different oil-in-water flow patterns. We first use multivariate time-frequency analysis to probe the typical features of three flow patterns from the perspective of energy and frequency. Then we infer complex networks from multi-channel measurements in terms of phase lag index, aiming to uncovering the phase dynamics governing the transition and evolution of different oil-in-water flow patterns. In particular, we employ spectral radius and weighted clustering coefficient entropy to characterize the derived unweighted and weighted networks and the results indicate that our approach yields quantitative insights into the phase dynamics underlying the high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows. PMID:27306101

  14. Low-flow frequency and flow-duration characteristics of selected streams in Alabama through March 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaster, Toby D.; Lee, Kathyrn G.

    2017-08-28

    Low-flow statistics are needed by water-resource engineers, planners, and managers to protect and manage the water resources of Alabama. The accuracy of these statistics is influenced by such factors as length of record and specific hydrologic conditions measured in those records. As such, it is generally recommended that flow statistics be updated about every 10 years to provide improved and representative low-flow characteristics. The previous investigation of low-flow characteristics for Alabama included data through September 1990. Since that time, Alabama has experienced several historic droughts highlighting the need to update the low-flow characteristics at U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging stations. Consequently, this investigation was undertaken in cooperation with a number of State and local agencies to update low-flow frequency and flow-duration statistics at 210 continuous-record streamgaging stations in Alabama and 67 stations from basins that are shared with surrounding States. The flow characteristics were computed on the basis of available data through March 2014.

  15. Effect of flow rate on environmental variables and phytoplankton dynamics: results from field enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiping; Chen, Ruihong; Li, Feipeng; Chen, Ling

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effects of flow rate on phytoplankton dynamics and related environment variables, a set of enclosure experiments with different flow rates were conducted in an artificial lake. We monitored nutrients, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity, turbidity, chlorophyll- a and phytoplankton levels. The lower biomass in all flowing enclosures showed that flow rate significantly inhibited the growth of phytoplankton. A critical flow rate occurred near 0.06 m/s, which was the lowest relative inhibitory rate. Changes in flow conditions affected algal competition for light, resulting in a dramatic shift in phytoplankton composition, from blue-green algae in still waters to green algae in flowing conditions. These findings indicate that critical flow rate can be useful in developing methods to reduce algal bloom occurrence. However, flow rate significantly enhanced the inter-relationships among environmental variables, in particular by inducing higher water turbidity and vegetative reproduction of periphyton ( Spirogyra). These changes were accompanied by a decrease in underwater light intensity, which consequently inhibited the photosynthetic intensity of phytoplankton. These results warn that a universal critical flow rate might not exist, because the effect of flow rate on phytoplankton is interlinked with many other environmental variables.

  16. Flow dynamics around downwelling submarine canyons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Spurgin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow dynamics around a downwelling submarine canyon were analysed with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model. Blanes Canyon (northwestern Mediterranean was used for topographic and initial forcing conditions. Fourteen scenarios were modelled with varying forcing conditions. Rossby and Burger numbers were used to determine the significance of Coriolis acceleration and stratification (respectively and their impacts on flow dynamics. A new non-dimensional parameter (χ was introduced to determine the significance of vertical variations in stratification. Some simulations do see brief periods of upwards displacement of water during the 10-day model period; however, the presence of the submarine canyon is found to enhance downwards advection of density in all model scenarios. High Burger numbers lead to negative vorticity and a trapped anticyclonic eddy within the canyon, as well as an increased density anomaly. Low Burger numbers lead to positive vorticity, cyclonic circulation, and weaker density anomalies. Vertical variations in stratification affect zonal jet placement. Under the same forcing conditions, the zonal jet is pushed offshore in more uniformly stratified domains. The offshore jet location generates upwards density advection away from the canyon, while onshore jets generate downwards density advection everywhere within the model domain. Increasing Rossby values across the canyon axis, as well as decreasing Burger values, increase negative vertical flux at shelf break depth (150 m. Increasing Rossby numbers lead to stronger downwards advection of a passive tracer (nitrate, as well as stronger vorticity within the canyon. Results from previous studies are explained within this new dynamic framework.

  17. Dynamic Power Management for Portable Hybrid Power-Supply Systems Utilizing Approximate Dynamic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooyoung Park

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the optimization of power flows in portable hybrid power-supply systems (HPSSs has become an important issue with the advent of a variety of mobile systems and hybrid energy technologies. In this paper, a control strategy is considered for dynamically managing power flows in portable HPSSs employing batteries and supercapacitors. Our dynamic power management strategy utilizes the concept of approximate dynamic programming (ADP. ADP methods are important tools in the fields of stochastic control and machine learning, and the utilization of these tools for practical engineering problems is now an active and promising research field. We propose an ADP-based procedure based on optimization under constraints including the iterated Bellman inequalities, which can be solved by convex optimization carried out offline, to find the optimal power management rules for portable HPSSs. The effectiveness of the proposed procedure is tested through dynamic simulations for smartphone workload scenarios, and simulation results show that the proposed strategy can successfully cope with uncertain workload demands.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics incompressible turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kajishima, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents numerical solution techniques for incompressible turbulent flows that occur in a variety of scientific and engineering settings including aerodynamics of ground-based vehicles and low-speed aircraft, fluid flows in energy systems, atmospheric flows, and biological flows. This book encompasses fluid mechanics, partial differential equations, numerical methods, and turbulence models, and emphasizes the foundation on how the governing partial differential equations for incompressible fluid flow can be solved numerically in an accurate and efficient manner. Extensive discussions on incompressible flow solvers and turbulence modeling are also offered. This text is an ideal instructional resource and reference for students, research scientists, and professional engineers interested in analyzing fluid flows using numerical simulations for fundamental research and industrial applications. • Introduces CFD techniques for incompressible flow and turbulence with a comprehensive approach; • Enr...

  19. Applications of Sharp Interface Method for Flow Dynamics, Scattering and Control Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    Reynolds number, Advances in Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, to appear. 17. K. Ito and K. Kunisch, Optimal Control of Parabolic Variational ...provides more precise and detailed sensitivity of the solution and describes the dynamical change due to the variation in the Reynolds number. The immersed... Inequalities , Journal de Math. Pures et Appl, 93 (2010), no. 4, 329-360. 18. K. Ito and K. Kunisch, Semi-smooth Newton Methods for Time-Optimal Control for a

  20. Vortex-based spatiotemporal characterization of nonlinear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Gregory A.

    Although the ubiquity of vortices in nature has been recognized by artists for over seven centuries, it was the work of artist and scientist Leonardo da Vinci that provided the monumental transition from an aesthetic form to a scientific tool. DaVinci used vortices to describe the motions he observed in air currents, flowing water and blood flow in the human heart. Five centuries later, the Navier-Stokes equations allow us to recreate the swirling motions of fluid observed in nature. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations have provided a lens through which to study the role of vortices in a wide variety of modern day applications. The research summarized below represents an effort to look through this lens and bring into focus the practical use of vortices in describing nonlinear flows. Vortex-based spatiotemporal characterizations are obtained using two specific mathematical tools: vortex core lines (VCL) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). By applying these tools, we find that vortices continue to provide new insights in the realm of biofluids, urban flows and the phase space of dynamical systems. The insights we have gained are described in this thesis. Our primary focus is on biofluids. Specifically, we seek to gain new insights into the connection between vortices and vascular diseases in order to provide more effective methods for clinical diagnosis and treatment. We highlight several applications in which VCL and POD are used to characterize the flow conditions in a heart pump, identify stenosis in carotid arteries and validate numerical models against PIV-based experimental data. Next, we quantify the spatial complexity and temporal stability of hemodynamics generated by a database of 210 patient-specific aneurysm geometries. Visual classifications of the hemodynamics are compared to the automated, quantitative classifications. The quantities characterizing the hemodynamics are then compared to clinical data to determine conditions that are

  1. Effect of deformability on fluid flow through a fractured-porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.; Noorishad, J.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    A permeable geologic medium containing interstitial fluids generally undergoes deformation as the fluid pressure changes. Depending on the nature of the medium, the strain ranges from infinitesimal to finite quantities. This response is the result of a coupled hydraulic-mechanical phenomenon which can basically be formulated in the generalized three-dimensional theory of consolidation. Dealing mainly with media of little deformability, traditional hydrogeology accounts for medium deformability as far as it affects the volume of pore spaces, through the introduction of a coefficient of specific storage in the fluid flow equation. This treatment can be justified on the basis of a one-dimensional effective stress law and the assumption of homogeneity of the total stress field throughout the medium. The present paper uses a numerical model called ROCMAS (Noorishad et al., 1982; Noorishad e al., 1984) which was developed to calculate fluid flow through a deformable fractured-porous medium. The code employs the Finite Element Method based on a variational approach. It has been verified against a number of simple analytic solutions. In this work, the code is used to address the role of medium deformability in continuous and pulse testing techniques. The errors that may result because of application of traditional fluid flow methods are discussed. It is found that low pressure continuous well testing or pulse testing procedures can reduce such errors. 16 references, 9 figures, 1 table

  2. Double diffusive unsteady convective micropolar flow past a vertical porous plate moving through binary mixture using modified Boussinesq approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Lare Animasaun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of unsteady convective with thermophoresis, chemical reaction and radiative heat transfer in a micropolar fluid flow past a vertical porous surface moving through binary mixture considering temperature dependent dynamic viscosity and constant vortex viscosity has been investigated theoretically. For proper and correct analysis of fluid