WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamic computational model

  1. Computer Modelling of Dynamic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rybakin

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of numerical modeling of dynamic problems are summed in the article up. These problems are characteristic for various areas of human activity, in particular for problem solving in ecology. The following problems are considered in the present work: computer modeling of dynamic effects on elastic-plastic bodies, calculation and determination of performances of gas streams in gas cleaning equipment, modeling of biogas formation processes.

  2. Modeling Computer Virus and Its Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Peng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on that the computer will be infected by infected computer and exposed computer, and some of the computers which are in suscepitible status and exposed status can get immunity by antivirus ability, a novel coumputer virus model is established. The dynamic behaviors of this model are investigated. First, the basic reproduction number R0, which is a threshold of the computer virus spreading in internet, is determined. Second, this model has a virus-free equilibrium P0, which means that the infected part of the computer disappears, and the virus dies out, and P0 is a globally asymptotically stable equilibrium if R01 then this model has only one viral equilibrium P*, which means that the computer persists at a constant endemic level, and P* is also globally asymptotically stable. Finally, some numerical examples are given to demonstrate the analytical results.

  3. Direct modeling for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun

    2015-06-01

    All fluid dynamic equations are valid under their modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path and mean collision time scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and its aim is to get the accurate solution of these governing equations. Under such a CFD practice, it is hard to develop a unified scheme that covers flow physics from kinetic to hydrodynamic scales continuously because there is no such governing equation which could make a smooth transition from the Boltzmann to the NS modeling. The study of fluid dynamics needs to go beyond the traditional numerical partial differential equations. The emerging engineering applications, such as air-vehicle design for near-space flight and flow and heat transfer in micro-devices, do require further expansion of the concept of gas dynamics to a larger domain of physical reality, rather than the traditional distinguishable governing equations. At the current stage, the non-equilibrium flow physics has not yet been well explored or clearly understood due to the lack of appropriate tools. Unfortunately, under the current numerical PDE approach, it is hard to develop such a meaningful tool due to the absence of valid PDEs. In order to construct multiscale and multiphysics simulation methods similar to the modeling process of constructing the Boltzmann or the NS governing equations, the development of a numerical algorithm should be based on the first principle of physical modeling. In this paper, instead of following the traditional numerical PDE path, we introduce direct modeling as a principle for CFD algorithm development. Since all computations are conducted in a discretized space with limited cell resolution, the flow physics to be modeled has to be done in the mesh size and time step scales. Here, the CFD is more or less a direct

  4. Dynamical Models for Computer Viruses Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R. C. Piqueira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, digital computer systems and networks are the main engineering tools, being used in planning, design, operation, and control of all sizes of building, transportation, machinery, business, and life maintaining devices. Consequently, computer viruses became one of the most important sources of uncertainty, contributing to decrease the reliability of vital activities. A lot of antivirus programs have been developed, but they are limited to detecting and removing infections, based on previous knowledge of the virus code. In spite of having good adaptation capability, these programs work just as vaccines against diseases and are not able to prevent new infections based on the network state. Here, a trial on modeling computer viruses propagation dynamics relates it to other notable events occurring in the network permitting to establish preventive policies in the network management. Data from three different viruses are collected in the Internet and two different identification techniques, autoregressive and Fourier analyses, are applied showing that it is possible to forecast the dynamics of a new virus propagation by using the data collected from other viruses that formerly infected the network.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal Article Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Four different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Despite the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways of the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. This greater deposition of spores in the upper airways in the human resulted in lower penetration and deposition in the tracheobronchial airways and the deep lung than that predict

  6. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards 'digital patient' or 'virtual physiological human' representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  7. Computational modeling of intraocular gas dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noohi, P; Abdekhodaie, M J; Cheng, Y L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computational model to simulate the dynamics of intraocular gas behavior in pneumatic retinopexy (PR) procedure. The presented model predicted intraocular gas volume at any time and determined the tolerance angle within which a patient can maneuver and still gas completely covers the tear(s). Computational fluid dynamics calculations were conducted to describe PR procedure. The geometrical model was constructed based on the rabbit and human eye dimensions. SF_6 in the form of pure and diluted with air was considered as the injected gas. The presented results indicated that the composition of the injected gas affected the gas absorption rate and gas volume. After injection of pure SF_6, the bubble expanded to 2.3 times of its initial volume during the first 23 h, but when diluted SF_6 was used, no significant expansion was observed. Also, head positioning for the treatment of retinal tear influenced the rate of gas absorption. Moreover, the determined tolerance angle depended on the bubble and tear size. More bubble expansion and smaller retinal tear caused greater tolerance angle. For example, after 23 h, for the tear size of 2 mm the tolerance angle of using pure SF_6 is 1.4 times more than that of using diluted SF_6 with 80% air. Composition of the injected gas and conditions of the tear in PR may dramatically affect the gas absorption rate and gas volume. Quantifying these effects helps to predict the tolerance angle and improve treatment efficiency. (paper)

  8. Computational social dynamic modeling of group recruitment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Nina M.; Lee, Marinna; Pickett, Marc; Turnley, Jessica Glicken (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Smrcka, Julianne D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Ko, Teresa H.; Moy, Timothy David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wu, Benjamin C.

    2004-01-01

    The Seldon software toolkit combines concepts from agent-based modeling and social science to create a computationally social dynamic model for group recruitment. The underlying recruitment model is based on a unique three-level hybrid agent-based architecture that contains simple agents (level one), abstract agents (level two), and cognitive agents (level three). This uniqueness of this architecture begins with abstract agents that permit the model to include social concepts (gang) or institutional concepts (school) into a typical software simulation environment. The future addition of cognitive agents to the recruitment model will provide a unique entity that does not exist in any agent-based modeling toolkits to date. We use social networks to provide an integrated mesh within and between the different levels. This Java based toolkit is used to analyze different social concepts based on initialization input from the user. The input alters a set of parameters used to influence the values associated with the simple agents, abstract agents, and the interactions (simple agent-simple agent or simple agent-abstract agent) between these entities. The results of phase-1 Seldon toolkit provide insight into how certain social concepts apply to different scenario development for inner city gang recruitment.

  9. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2010-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  10. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    Models in sheet cavitation in cryogenic fluids are developed for use in Euler and Navier-Stokes codes. The models are based upon earlier potential-flow models but enable the cavity inception point, length, and shape to be determined as part of the computation. In the present paper, numerical solutions are compared with experimental measurements for both pressure distribution and cavity length. Comparisons between models are also presented. The CFD model provides a relatively simple modification to an existing code to enable cavitation performance predictions to be included. The analysis also has the added ability of incorporating thermodynamic effects of cryogenic fluids into the analysis. Extensions of the current two-dimensional steady state analysis to three-dimensions and/or time-dependent flows are, in principle, straightforward although geometrical issues become more complicated. Linearized models, however offer promise of providing effective cavitation modeling in three-dimensions. This analysis presents good potential for improved understanding of many phenomena associated with cavity flows.

  11. Computational modeling of turn-taking dynamics in spoken conversations

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Shammur Absar

    2017-01-01

    The study of human interaction dynamics has been at the center for multiple research disciplines in- cluding computer and social sciences, conversational analysis and psychology, for over decades. Recent interest has been shown with the aim of designing computational models to improve human-machine interaction system as well as support humans in their decision-making process. Turn-taking is one of the key aspects of conversational dynamics in dyadic conversations and is an integral part of hu...

  12. Computational model of cellular metabolic dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yanjun; Solomon, Thomas; Haus, Jacob M

    2010-01-01

    of the cytosol and mitochondria. The model simulated skeletal muscle metabolic responses to insulin corresponding to human hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies. Insulin-mediated rate of glucose disposal was the primary model input. For model validation, simulations were compared with experimental data......: intracellular metabolite concentrations and patterns of glucose disposal. Model variations were simulated to investigate three alternative mechanisms to explain insulin enhancements: Model 1 (M.1), simple mass action; M.2, insulin-mediated activation of key metabolic enzymes (i.e., hexokinase, glycogen synthase......, by application of mechanism M.3, the model predicts metabolite concentration changes and glucose partitioning patterns consistent with experimental data. The reaction rate fluxes quantified by this detailed model of insulin/glucose metabolism provide information that can be used to evaluate the development...

  13. Modelling Emission from Building Materials with Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Nielsen, Peter V.; Heiselberg, Per

    This paper presents a numerical model that by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is capable of dealing with both pollutant transport across the boundary layer and internal diffusion in the source without prior knowledge of which is the limiting process. The model provides the concentration...

  14. Computational Psychometrics for Modeling System Dynamics during Stressful Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Cipresso

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Disasters can be very stressful events. However, computational models of stress require data that might be very difficult to collect during disasters. Moreover, personal experiences are not repeatable, so it is not possible to collect bottom-up information when building a coherent model. To overcome these problems, we propose the use of computational models and virtual reality integration to recreate disaster situations, while examining possible dynamics in order to understand human behavior and relative consequences. By providing realistic parameters associated with disaster situations, computational scientists can work more closely with emergency responders to improve the quality of interventions in the future.

  15. Computational Models of Human Organizational Dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Courand, Gregg

    2000-01-01

    .... ThIs is the final report for our Phase II SBIR project, conducted over three years. Our research program has contributed theory, methodology, and technology for organizational modeling and analysis...

  16. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of displacement natural ventilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Yingchun

    2005-01-01

    Natural ventilation is widely recognised as contributing towards low-energy building design. The requirement to reduce energy usage in new buildings has rejuvenated interest in natural ventilation. This thesis deals with computer modelling of natural displacement ventilation driven either by buoyancy or buoyancy combined with wind forces. Two benchmarks have been developed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in order to evaluate the accuracy with which CFD is able to mo...

  17. A Parameter Estimation Method for Dynamic Computational Cognitive Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thilakarathne, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    A dynamic computational cognitive model can be used to explore a selected complex cognitive phenomenon by providing some features or patterns over time. More specifically, it can be used to simulate, analyse and explain the behaviour of such a cognitive phenomenon. It generates output data in the

  18. Cardioplegia heat exchanger design modelling using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, M R

    2000-11-01

    A new cardioplegia heat exchanger has been developed by Sorin Biomedica. A three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) model was optimized using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling. CFD optimization techniques have commonly been applied to velocity flow field analysis, but CFD analysis was also used in this study to predict the heat exchange performance of the design before prototype fabrication. The iterative results of the optimization and the actual heat exchange performance of the final configuration are presented in this paper. Based on the behaviour of this model, both the water and blood fluid flow paths of the heat exchanger were optimized. The simulation predicted superior heat exchange performance using an optimal amount of energy exchange surface area, reducing the total contact surface area, the device priming volume and the material costs. Experimental results confirm the empirical results predicted by the CFD analysis.

  19. Modeling Techniques for a Computational Efficient Dynamic Turbofan Engine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory A. Roberts

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A transient two-stream engine model has been developed. Individual component models developed exclusively in MATLAB/Simulink including the fan, high pressure compressor, combustor, high pressure turbine, low pressure turbine, plenum volumes, and exit nozzle have been combined to investigate the behavior of a turbofan two-stream engine. Special attention has been paid to the development of transient capabilities throughout the model, increasing physics model, eliminating algebraic constraints, and reducing simulation time through enabling the use of advanced numerical solvers. The lessening of computation time is paramount for conducting future aircraft system-level design trade studies and optimization. The new engine model is simulated for a fuel perturbation and a specified mission while tracking critical parameters. These results, as well as the simulation times, are presented. The new approach significantly reduces the simulation time.

  20. A paradigm for modeling and computation of gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Liu, Chang

    2017-02-01

    In the continuum flow regime, the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are usually used for the description of gas dynamics. On the other hand, the Boltzmann equation is applied for the rarefied flow. These two equations are based on distinguishable modeling scales for flow physics. Fortunately, due to the scale separation, i.e., the hydrodynamic and kinetic ones, both the Navier-Stokes equations and the Boltzmann equation are applicable in their respective domains. However, in real science and engineering applications, they may not have such a distinctive scale separation. For example, around a hypersonic flying vehicle, the flow physics at different regions may correspond to different regimes, where the local Knudsen number can be changed significantly in several orders of magnitude. With a variation of flow physics, theoretically a continuous governing equation from the kinetic Boltzmann modeling to the hydrodynamic Navier-Stokes dynamics should be used for its efficient description. However, due to the difficulties of a direct modeling of flow physics in the scale between the kinetic and hydrodynamic ones, there is basically no reliable theory or valid governing equations to cover the whole transition regime, except resolving flow physics always down to the mean free path scale, such as the direct Boltzmann solver and the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. In fact, it is an unresolved problem about the exact scale for the validity of the NS equations, especially in the small Reynolds number cases. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is usually based on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and it targets on the recovering of the exact solution of the PDEs as mesh size and time step converging to zero. This methodology can be hardly applied to solve the multiple scale problem efficiently because there is no such a complete PDE for flow physics through a continuous variation of scales. For the non-equilibrium flow study, the direct

  1. Computational model of lightness perception in high dynamic range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Grzegorz; Myszkowski, Karol; Seidel, Hans-Peter

    2006-02-01

    An anchoring theory of lightness perception by Gilchrist et al. [1999] explains many characteristics of human visual system such as lightness constancy and its spectacular failures which are important in the perception of images. The principal concept of this theory is the perception of complex scenes in terms of groups of consistent areas (frameworks). Such areas, following the gestalt theorists, are defined by the regions of common illumination. The key aspect of the image perception is the estimation of lightness within each framework through the anchoring to the luminance perceived as white, followed by the computation of the global lightness. In this paper we provide a computational model for automatic decomposition of HDR images into frameworks. We derive a tone mapping operator which predicts lightness perception of the real world scenes and aims at its accurate reproduction on low dynamic range displays. Furthermore, such a decomposition into frameworks opens new grounds for local image analysis in view of human perception.

  2. Nano-Modeling and Computation in Bio and Brain Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Di Sia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of brain dynamics currently utilizes the new features of nanobiotechnology and bioengineering. New geometric and analytical approaches appear very promising in all scientific areas, particularly in the study of brain processes. Efforts to engage in deep comprehension lead to a change in the inner brain parameters, in order to mimic the external transformation by the proper use of sensors and effectors. This paper highlights some crossing research areas of natural computing, nanotechnology, and brain modeling and considers two interesting theoretical approaches related to brain dynamics: (a the memory in neural network, not as a passive element for storing information, but integrated in the neural parameters as synaptic conductances; and (b a new transport model based on analytical expressions of the most important transport parameters, which works from sub-pico-level to macro-level, able both to understand existing data and to give new predictions. Complex biological systems are highly dependent on the context, which suggests a “more nature-oriented” computational philosophy.

  3. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokkam, Ram [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  4. Modeling Behavior Dynamics using Computational Psychometrics within Virtual Worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eCipresso

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In case of fire in a building, how will people behave in the crowd? The behavior of each individual affects the behavior of others and, conversely, each one behaves considering the crowd as a whole and the individual others. In this article, I propose a three-step method to explore a brand new way to study behavior dynamics. The first step relies on the creation of specific situations with standard techniques (such as mental imagery, text, video and audio and an advanced technique (Virtual Reality to manipulate experimental settings. The second step concerns the measurement of behavior in one, two or many individuals focusing on parameters extractions to provide information about the behavior dynamics. Finally, the third step, which uses the parameters collected and measured in the previous two steps in order to simulate possible scenarios to forecast through computational models, understand and explain behavior dynamics at the social level. An experimental study was also included to demonstrate the three-step method and a possible scenario.

  5. Modeling behavior dynamics using computational psychometrics within virtual worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipresso, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    In case of fire in a building, how will people behave in the crowd? The behavior of each individual affects the behavior of others and, conversely, each one behaves considering the crowd as a whole and the individual others. In this article, I propose a three-step method to explore a brand new way to study behavior dynamics. The first step relies on the creation of specific situations with standard techniques (such as mental imagery, text, video, and audio) and an advanced technique [Virtual Reality (VR)] to manipulate experimental settings. The second step concerns the measurement of behavior in one, two, or many individuals focusing on parameters extractions to provide information about the behavior dynamics. Finally, the third step, which uses the parameters collected and measured in the previous two steps in order to simulate possible scenarios to forecast through computational models, understand, and explain behavior dynamics at the social level. An experimental study was also included to demonstrate the three-step method and a possible scenario.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for Saltstone Vault 4 Vapor Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Si Young

    2005-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to estimate the flow patterns for vapor space inside the Saltstone Vault No.4 under different operating scenarios. The purpose of this work is to examine the gas motions inside the vapor space under the current vault configurations. A CFD model took three-dimensional transient momentum-energy coupled approach for the vapor space domain of the vault. The modeling calculations were based on prototypic vault geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Solidification Engineering. The modeling analysis was focused on the air flow patterns near the ventilated corner zones of the vapor space inside the Saltstone vault. The turbulence behavior and natural convection mechanism used in the present model were benchmarked against the literature information and theoretical results. The verified model was applied to the Saltstone vault geometry for the transient assessment of the air flow patterns inside the vapor space of the vault region using the boundary conditions as provided by the customer. The present model considered two cases for the estimations of the flow patterns within the vapor space. One is the reference baseline case. The other is for the negative temperature gradient between the roof inner and top grout surface temperatures intended for the potential bounding condition. The flow patterns of the vapor space calculated by the CFD model demonstrate that the ambient air comes into the vapor space of the vault through the lower-end ventilation hole, and it gets heated up by the Benard-cell type circulation before leaving the vault via the higher-end ventilation hole. The calculated results are consistent with the literature information

  7. Privacy context model for dynamic privacy adaptation in ubiquitous computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub, Florian; Koenings, Bastian; Dietzel, Stefan; Weber, M.; Kargl, Frank

    Ubiquitous computing is characterized by the merger of physical and virtual worlds as physical artifacts gain digital sensing, processing, and communication capabilities. Maintaining an appropriate level of privacy in the face of such complex and often highly dynamic systems is challenging. We argue

  8. Development of a dynamic computational model of social cognitive theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William T; Martin, Cesar A; Rivera, Daniel E; Hekler, Eric B; Adams, Marc A; Buman, Matthew P; Pavel, Misha; King, Abby C

    2016-12-01

    Social cognitive theory (SCT) is among the most influential theories of behavior change and has been used as the conceptual basis of health behavior interventions for smoking cessation, weight management, and other health behaviors. SCT and other behavior theories were developed primarily to explain differences between individuals, but explanatory theories of within-person behavioral variability are increasingly needed as new technologies allow for intensive longitudinal measures and interventions adapted from these inputs. These within-person explanatory theoretical applications can be modeled as dynamical systems. SCT constructs, such as reciprocal determinism, are inherently dynamical in nature, but SCT has not been modeled as a dynamical system. This paper describes the development of a dynamical system model of SCT using fluid analogies and control systems principles drawn from engineering. Simulations of this model were performed to assess if the model performed as predicted based on theory and empirical studies of SCT. This initial model generates precise and testable quantitative predictions for future intensive longitudinal research. Dynamic modeling approaches provide a rigorous method for advancing health behavior theory development and refinement and for guiding the development of more potent and efficient interventions.

  9. Critical Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification Models. Part II: Kinetic and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Żogała

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: This paper presents state of art in the field of coal gasification modeling using kinetic and computational fluid dynamics approach. The paper also presents own comparative analysis (concerned with mathematical formulation, input data and parameters, basic assumptions, obtained results etc. of the most important models of underground coal gasification.

  10. Computational Modelling of Piston Ring Dynamics in 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dlugoš Jozef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced computational models of a piston assembly based on the level of virtual prototypes require a detailed description of piston ring behaviour. Considering these requirements, the piston rings operate in regimes that cannot, in general, be simplified into an axisymmetric model. The piston and the cylinder liner do not have a perfect round shape, mainly due to machining tolerances and external thermo-mechanical loads. If the ring cannot follow the liner deformations, a local loss of contact occurs resulting in blow-by and increased consumption of lubricant oil in the engine. Current computational models are unable to implement such effects. The paper focuses on the development of a flexible 3D piston ring model based on the Timoshenko beam theory using the multibody system (MBS. The MBS model is compared to the finite element method (FEM solution.

  11. Modeling fires in adjacent ship compartments with computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Cole, J.K.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the thermal effects on radioactive (RAM) transportation pack ages with a fire in an adjacent compartment. An assumption for this analysis is that the adjacent hold fire is some sort of engine room fire. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis tools were used to perform the analysis in order to include convective heat transfer effects. The analysis results were compared to experimental data gathered in a series of tests on the United States Coast Guard ship Mayo Lykes located at Mobile, Alabama. (authors)

  12. Computational fluid dynamics in fire engineering theory, modelling and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Yuen, Kwok Kit

    2009-01-01

    Fire and combustion presents a significant engineering challenge to mechanical, civil and dedicated fire engineers, as well as specialists in the process and chemical, safety, buildings and structural fields. We are reminded of the tragic outcomes of 'untenable' fire disasters such as at King's Cross underground station or Switzerland's St Gotthard tunnel. In these and many other cases, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is at the forefront of active research into unravelling the probable causes of fires and helping to design structures and systems to ensure that they are less likely in the f

  13. Advances in engineering turbulence modeling. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, T.-H.

    1992-01-01

    Some new developments in two equation models and second order closure models are presented. In this paper, modified two equation models are proposed to remove shortcomings such as computing flows over complex geometries and the ad hoc treatment near the separation and reattachment points. The calculations using various two equation models are compared with direct numerical solutions of channel flows and flat plate boundary layers. Development of second order closure models will also be discussed with emphasis on the modeling of pressure related correlation terms and dissipation rates in the second moment equations. All existing models poorly predict the normal stresses near the wall and fail to predict the three dimensional effect of mean flow on the turbulence. The newly developed second order near-wall turbulence model to be described in this paper is capable of capturing the near-wall behavior of turbulence as well as the effect of three dimension mean flow on the turbulence.

  14. An Accurate and Dynamic Computer Graphics Muscle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, David Asher

    1997-01-01

    A computer based musculo-skeletal model was developed at the University in the departments of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering. This model accurately represents human shoulder kinematics. The result of this model is the graphical display of bones moving through an appropriate range of motion based on inputs of EMGs and external forces. The need existed to incorporate a geometric muscle model in the larger musculo-skeletal model. Previous muscle models did not accurately represent muscle geometries, nor did they account for the kinematics of tendons. This thesis covers the creation of a new muscle model for use in the above musculo-skeletal model. This muscle model was based on anatomical data from the Visible Human Project (VHP) cadaver study. Two-dimensional digital images from the VHP were analyzed and reconstructed to recreate the three-dimensional muscle geometries. The recreated geometries were smoothed, reduced, and sliced to form data files defining the surfaces of each muscle. The muscle modeling function opened these files during run-time and recreated the muscle surface. The modeling function applied constant volume limitations to the muscle and constant geometry limitations to the tendons.

  15. Modeling centrifugal cell washers using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellet, Beth E; Han, Binbing; Dandy, David S; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil

    2004-11-01

    Reinfusion of shed blood during surgery could avoid the need for blood transfusions. Prior to reinfusion of the red blood cells, the shed blood must be washed in order to remove leukocytes, platelets, and other contaminants. Further, the hematocrit of the washed blood must be increased. The feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to guide the design of better centrifuges for processing shed blood is explored here. The velocity field within a centrifuge bowl and the rate of protein removal from the shed blood has been studied. The results obtained indicate that CFD could help screen preliminary centrifuge bowl designs, thus reducing the number of initial experimental tests required when developing new centrifuge bowls. Although the focus of this work is on washing shed blood, the methods developed here are applicable to the design of centrifuge bowls for other blood-processing applications.

  16. Simulation of Tailrace Hydrodynamics Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2001-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to investigate hydrodynamic flow fields surrounding the tailrace zone below large hydraulic structures. Previous and ongoing studies using CFD tools to simulate gradually varied flow with multiple constituents and forebay/intake hydrodynamics have shown that CFD tools can provide valuable information for hydraulic and biological evaluation of fish passage near hydraulic structures. These studies however are incapable of simulating the rapidly varying flow fields that involving breakup of the free-surface, such as those through and below high flow outfalls and spillways. Although the use of CFD tools for these types of flow are still an active area of research, initial applications discussed in this report show that these tools are capable of simulating the primary features of these highly transient flow fields.

  17. Qweak Data Analysis for Target Modeling Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael; Covrig, Silviu

    2015-04-01

    The 2.5 kW liquid hydrogen (LH2) target used in the Qweak parity violation experiment is the highest power LH2 target in the world and the first to be designed with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) at Jefferson Lab. The Qweak experiment determined the weak charge of the proton by measuring the parity-violating elastic scattering asymmetry of longitudinally polarized electrons from unpolarized liquid hydrogen at small momentum transfer (Q2 = 0 . 025 GeV2). This target met the design goals of bench-marked with the Qweak target data. This work is an essential ingredient in future designs of very high power low noise targets like MOLLER (5 kW, target noise asymmetry contribution < 25 ppm) and MESA (4.5 kW).

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myeong, Hyeon Guk

    1999-06-01

    This book deals with computational fluid dynamics with basic and history of numerical fluid dynamics, introduction of finite volume method using one-dimensional heat conduction equation, solution of two-dimensional heat conduction equation, solution of Navier-Stokes equation, fluid with heat transport, turbulent flow and turbulent model, Navier-Stokes solution by generalized coordinate system such as coordinate conversion, conversion of basic equation, program and example of calculation, application of abnormal problem and high speed solution of numerical fluid dynamics.

  19. Modelling the WWER-type reactor dynamics using a hybrid computer. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpeta, C.

    Results of simulation studies into reactor and steam generator dynamics of a WWER type power plant are presented. Spatial kinetics of the reactor core is described by a nodal approximation to diffusion equations, xenon poisoning equations and heat transfer equations. The simulation of the reactor model dynamics was performed on a hybrid computer. Models of both a horizontal and a vertical steam generator were developed. The dynamics was investigated over a large range of power by computing the transients on a digital computer. (author)

  20. Integrating aerodynamic surface modeling for computational fluid dynamics with computer aided structural analysis, design, and manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Scott A.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the development of a NASA Geometry Exchange Specification for transferring aerodynamic surface geometry between LeRC systems and grid generation software used for computational fluid dynamics research. The proposed specification is based on a subset of the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES). The presentation will include discussion of how the NASA-IGES standard will accommodate improved computer aided design inspection methods and reverse engineering techniques currently being developed. The presentation is in viewgraph format.

  1. An Educational Approach to Computationally Modeling Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodroff, Leah; O'Neal, Tim M.; Long, David A.; Hemkin, Sheryl

    2009-01-01

    Chemists have used computational science methodologies for a number of decades and their utility continues to be unabated. For this reason we developed an advanced lab in computational chemistry in which students gain understanding of general strengths and weaknesses of computation-based chemistry by working through a specific research problem.…

  2. Dynamical Trust and Reputation Computation Model for B2C E-Commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Tian; Kecheng Liu; Yuanzhong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Trust is one of the most important factors that influence the successful application of network service environments, such as e-commerce, wireless sensor networks, and online social networks. Computation models associated with trust and reputation have been paid special attention in both computer societies and service science in recent years. In this paper, a dynamical computation model of reputation for B2C e-commerce is proposed. Firstly, conceptions associated with trust and reputation are...

  3. Unsteady Vibration Aerodynamic Modeling and Evaluation of Dynamic Derivatives Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsteady aerodynamic system modeling is widely used to solve the dynamic stability problems encountering aircraft design. In this paper, single degree-of-freedom (SDF vibration model and forced simple harmonic motion (SHM model for dynamic derivative prediction are developed on the basis of modified Etkin model. In the light of the characteristics of SDF time domain solution, the free vibration identification methods for dynamic stability parameters are extended and applied to the time domain numerical simulation of blunted cone calibration model examples. The dynamic stability parameters by numerical identification are no more than 0.15% deviated from those by experimental simulation, confirming the correctness of SDF vibration model. The acceleration derivatives, rotary derivatives, and combination derivatives of Army-Navy Spinner Rocket are numerically identified by using unsteady N-S equation and solving different SHV patterns. Comparison with the experimental result of Army Ballistic Research Laboratories confirmed the correctness of the SHV model and dynamic derivative identification. The calculation result of forced SHM is better than that by the slender body theory of engineering approximation. SDF vibration model and SHM model for dynamic stability parameters provide a solution to the dynamic stability problem encountering aircraft design.

  4. A computational fluid dynamics model for designing heat exchangers based on natural convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkse, M.H.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Walle, van der T.; Speetjens, S.L.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2006-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics model was created for the design of a natural convection shell-and-tube heat exchanger with baffles. The flow regime proved to be turbulent and this was modelled using the k¿¿ turbulence model. The features of the complex geometry were simplified considerably resulting

  5. New weighted sum of gray gases model applicable to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of oxy-fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Johansen, Lars Christian Riis; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2010-01-01

    gases model (WSGGM) is derived, which is applicable to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of both air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion. First, a computer code is developed to evaluate the emissivity of any gas mixture at any condition by using the exponential wide band model (EWBM...

  6. Dynamics of Charged Particulate Systems Modeling, Theory and Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Zohdi, Tarek I

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this monograph is to provide a concise introduction to the dynamics of systems comprised of charged small-scale particles. Flowing, small-scale, particles ("particulates'') are ubiquitous in industrial processes and in the natural sciences. Applications include electrostatic copiers, inkjet printers, powder coating machines, etc., and a variety of manufacturing processes. Due to their small-scale size, external electromagnetic fields can be utilized to manipulate and control charged particulates in industrial processes in order to achieve results that are not possible by purely mechanical means alone. A unique feature of small-scale particulate flows is that they exhibit a strong sensitivity to interparticle near-field forces, leading to nonstandard particulate dynamics, agglomeration and cluster formation, which can strongly affect manufactured product quality. This monograph also provides an introduction to the mathematically-related topic of the dynamics of swarms of interacting objects, ...

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Of Scaled Hanford Double Shell Tank Mixing - CFD Modeling Sensitivity Study Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, V.L.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  8. Bayesian model calibration of computational models in velocimetry diagnosed dynamic compression experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Justin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hund, Lauren [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic compression experiments are being performed on complicated materials using increasingly complex drivers. The data produced in these experiments are beginning to reach a regime where traditional analysis techniques break down; requiring the solution of an inverse problem. A common measurement in dynamic experiments is an interface velocity as a function of time, and often this functional output can be simulated using a hydrodynamics code. Bayesian model calibration is a statistical framework to estimate inputs into a computational model in the presence of multiple uncertainties, making it well suited to measurements of this type. In this article, we apply Bayesian model calibration to high pressure (250 GPa) ramp compression measurements in tantalum. We address several issues speci c to this calibration including the functional nature of the output as well as parameter and model discrepancy identi ability. Speci cally, we propose scaling the likelihood function by an e ective sample size rather than modeling the autocorrelation function to accommodate the functional output and propose sensitivity analyses using the notion of `modularization' to assess the impact of experiment-speci c nuisance input parameters on estimates of material properties. We conclude that the proposed Bayesian model calibration procedure results in simple, fast, and valid inferences on the equation of state parameters for tantalum.

  9. A Model for the Acceptance of Cloud Computing Technology Using DEMATEL Technique and System Dynamics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyyed mohammad zargar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new method to provide computing resources and increase computing power in organizations. Despite the many benefits this method shares, it has not been universally used because of some obstacles including security issues and has become a concern for IT managers in organization. In this paper, the general definition of cloud computing is presented. In addition, having reviewed previous studies, the researchers identified effective variables on technology acceptance and, especially, cloud computing technology. Then, using DEMATEL technique, the effectiveness and permeability of the variable were determined. The researchers also designed a model to show the existing dynamics in cloud computing technology using system dynamics approach. The validity of the model was confirmed through evaluation methods in dynamics model by using VENSIM software. Finally, based on different conditions of the proposed model, a variety of scenarios were designed. Then, the implementation of these scenarios was simulated within the proposed model. The results showed that any increase in data security, government support and user training can lead to the increase in the adoption and use of cloud computing technology.

  10. DNA Self-Assembly and Computation Studied with a Coarse-grained Dynamic Bonded Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Fellermann, Harold; Rasmussen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    We utilize a coarse-grained directional dynamic bonding DNA model [C. Svaneborg, Comp. Phys. Comm. (In Press DOI:10.1016/j.cpc.2012.03.005)] to study DNA self-assembly and DNA computation. In our DNA model, a single nucleotide is represented by a single interaction site, and complementary sites can...

  11. Teachers' Use of Computational Tools to Construct and Explore Dynamic Mathematical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel; Reyes-Rodriguez, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    To what extent does the use of computational tools offer teachers the possibility of constructing dynamic models to identify and explore diverse mathematical relations? What ways of reasoning or thinking about the problems emerge during the model construction process that involves the use of the tools? These research questions guided the…

  12. Application of computational fluid dynamics modelling to an ozone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The turbulence effect induced by the gas injection was modelled by increasing the level of turbulence intensity at the ozone contactor inlet. The simulated tracer response corresponded closely to the experimental results. The framework of ozone reaction modelling was subsequently investigated using values of rate ...

  13. Dynamical Trust and Reputation Computation Model for B2C E-Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Tian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Trust is one of the most important factors that influence the successful application of network service environments, such as e-commerce, wireless sensor networks, and online social networks. Computation models associated with trust and reputation have been paid special attention in both computer societies and service science in recent years. In this paper, a dynamical computation model of reputation for B2C e-commerce is proposed. Firstly, conceptions associated with trust and reputation are introduced, and the mathematical formula of trust for B2C e-commerce is given. Then a dynamical computation model of reputation is further proposed based on the conception of trust and the relationship between trust and reputation. In the proposed model, classical varying processes of reputation of B2C e-commerce are discussed. Furthermore, the iterative trust and reputation computation models are formulated via a set of difference equations based on the closed-loop feedback mechanism. Finally, a group of numerical simulation experiments are performed to illustrate the proposed model of trust and reputation. Experimental results show that the proposed model is effective in simulating the dynamical processes of trust and reputation for B2C e-commerce.

  14. Application of computational fluid dynamics modelling to an ozone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driniev

    2004-01-01

    Jan 1, 2004 ... Turbulent kinetic energy m2·s-2 km. Disinfection rate constant for .... modelling the kinetic reactions to achieve the most efficient use of the ozone dosed to the system. The USEPA techniques .... be globally categorised into off-gas losses, consumption, and loss by self-decomposition. (Bredtmann, 1982).

  15. Dynamic Computation of Change Operations in Version Management of Business Process Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küster, Jochen Malte; Gerth, Christian; Engels, Gregor

    Version management of business process models requires that changes can be resolved by applying change operations. In order to give a user maximal freedom concerning the application order of change operations, position parameters of change operations must be computed dynamically during change resolution. In such an approach, change operations with computed position parameters must be applicable on the model and dependencies and conflicts of change operations must be taken into account because otherwise invalid models can be constructed. In this paper, we study the concept of partially specified change operations where parameters are computed dynamically. We provide a formalization for partially specified change operations using graph transformation and provide a concept for their applicability. Based on this, we study potential dependencies and conflicts of change operations and show how these can be taken into account within change resolution. Using our approach, a user can resolve changes of business process models without being unnecessarily restricted to a certain order.

  16. Computational fluid-dynamic model of laser-induced breakdown in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dors, Ivan G.; Parigger, Christian G.

    2003-01-01

    Temperature and pressure profiles are computed by the use of a two-dimensional, axially symmetric, time-accurate computational fluid-dynamic model for nominal 10-ns optical breakdown laser pulses. The computational model includes a kinetics mechanism that implements plasma equilibrium kinetics in ionized regions and nonequilibrium, multistep, finite-rate reactions in nonionized regions. Fluid-physics phenomena following laser-induced breakdown are recorded with high-speed shadowgraph techniques. The predicted fluid phenomena are shown by direct comparison with experimental records to agree with the flow patterns that are characteristic of laser spark decay

  17. A Dynamic Object Behavior Model and Implementation Based on Computational Reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Cheng-wan; HE Fei; HE Ke-qing

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic object behavior model based on computational reflection is proposed. This model consists of function level and meta level, the meta objects in meta level manage the base objects and behaviors in function level, including dynamic binding and unbinding of base object and behavior.We implement this model with RoleJava Language, which is our self linguistic extension of the Java Language. Meta Objects are generated automatically at compile-time, this makes the reflecton mechanism transparent to programmers. Finally an example applying this model to a banking system is presented.

  18. Dynamics of nuclear fuel assemblies in vertical flow channels: computer modelling and associated studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, V.A.; Pettigrew, M.J.; Lelli, G.; Kates, L.; Reimer, E.

    1978-10-01

    A computer model, designed to predict the dynamic behaviour of nuclear fuel assemblies in axial flow, is described in this report. The numerical methods used to construct and solve the matrix equations of motion in the model are discussed together with an outline of the method used to interpret the fuel assembly stability data. The mathematics developed for forced response calculations are described in detail. Certain structural and hydrodynamic modelling parameters must be determined by experiment. These parameters are identified and the methods used for their evaluation are briefly described. Examples of typical applications of the dynamic model are presented towards the end of the report. (author)

  19. Computational electrochemo-fluid dynamics modeling in a uranium electrowinning cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.R.; Choi, S.Y.; Kim, S.H.; Shim, J.B.; Paek, S.; Kim, I.T.

    2014-01-01

    A computational electrochemo-fluid dynamics model has been developed to describe the electrowinning behavior in an electrolyte stream through a planar electrode cell system. Electrode reaction of the uranium electrowinning process from a molten-salt electrolyte stream was modeled to illustrate the details of the flow-assisted mass transport of ions to the cathode. This modeling approach makes it possible to represent variations of the convective diffusion limited current density by taking into account the concentration profile at the electrode surface as a function of the flow characteristics and applied current density in a commercially available computational fluid dynamics platform. It was possible to predict the conventional current-voltage relation in addition to details of electrolyte fluid dynamics and electrochemical variables, such as the flow field, species concentrations, potential, and current distributions throughout the galvanostatic electrolysis cell. (author)

  20. Research Summary 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Model Of The Human Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the human respiratory system that allows for the simulation of particulate based contaminant deposition and clearance, while being adaptable for age, ethnicity,...

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics model of stratified atmospheric boundary-layer flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman; Bechmann, Andreas; Sogachev, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on computational fluid dynamics models of the neutrally stratified surface-layer. So far, physical processes that are important to the whole atmospheric boundary-layer, such as the Coriolis effect, buoyancy forces and heat...

  2. The performance model of dynamic virtual organization (VO) formations within grid computing context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Liangxiu

    2009-01-01

    Grid computing aims to enable 'resource sharing and coordinated problem solving in dynamic, multi-institutional virtual organizations (VOs)'. Within the grid computing context, successful dynamic VO formations mean a number of individuals and institutions associated with certain resources join together and form new VOs in order to effectively execute tasks within given time steps. To date, while the concept of VOs has been accepted, few research has been done on the impact of effective dynamic virtual organization formations. In this paper, we develop a performance model of dynamic VOs formation and analyze the effect of different complex organizational structures and their various statistic parameter properties on dynamic VO formations from three aspects: (1) the probability of a successful VO formation under different organizational structures and statistic parameters change, e.g. average degree; (2) the effect of task complexity on dynamic VO formations; (3) the impact of network scales on dynamic VO formations. The experimental results show that the proposed model can be used to understand the dynamic VO formation performance of the simulated organizations. The work provides a good path to understand how to effectively schedule and utilize resources based on the complex grid network and therefore improve the overall performance within grid environment.

  3. Perspectives for the application of computer models to forest dynamics forecasting in bieszczadzki national park (Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozak Ihor

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the perspectives for application of computer models in forecasting the dynamics of forest development on example of Moczarne area, in Bieszczadzki National Park, based on authors’ computer models. First, the possibilities for forecasting the dynamics of forest development in a local scale, i.e. within single rectangular or circular study plot, are presented. For this purpose, a computer prognostic model FORKOM E has been applied, using both general mathematical relationships functioning within a forest ecosystem and empirical ones, characteristic for tree stands at analysed plots. Additionally, a layer of 3D visualisation of a tree stand, which is an integral part of the mentioned model, is also presented. Presented also are the possibilities for forecasting the dynamics of forest development at landscape scale, applying the theory of cellular automata. For this purpose, a prognostic computer model CELLAUT was used in which the whole analysed tree stand is understood as a set of single cells, where stages of landscape development dominating within those cells are considered as also the influence of particular cells upon their neighbours. The paper also describes the perspectives for application of self-learning neural networks in the process of supplementation and verification of some parameters of a tree stand, calculated by the above-mentioned models.

  4. Vascular dynamics aid a coupled neurovascular network learn sparse independent features: A computational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Thomas Philips

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vascular dynamics are generally thought to be controlled by neural activity in a unidirectional fashion. However, both computational modeling and experimental evidence point to the feedback effects of vascular dynamics on neural activity. Vascular feedback in the form of glucose and oxygen controls neuronal ATP, either directly or via the agency of astrocytes, which in turn modulates neural firing. Recently, a detailed model of the neuron-astrocyte-vessel system has shown how vasomotion can modulate neural firing. Similarly, arguing from known cerebrovascular physiology, an approach known as `hemoneural hypothesis' postulates functional modulation of neural activity by vascular feedback. To instantiate this perspective, we present a computational model in which a network of `vascular units' supplies energy to a neural network. The complex dynamics of the vascular network, modeled by a network of oscillators, turns neurons ON and OFF randomly. The informational consequence of such dynamics is explored in the context of an auto-encoder network. In the proposed model, each vascular unit supplies energy to a subset of hidden neurons of an autoencoder network, which constitutes its `projective field'. Neurons that receive adequate energy in a given trial have reduced threshold, and thus are prone to fire. Dynamics of the vascular network are governed by changes in the reconstruction error of the auto-encoder network, interpreted as the neuronal demand. Vascular feedback causes random inactivation of a subset of hidden neurons in every trial. We observe that, under conditions of desynchronized vascular dynamics, the output reconstruction error is low and the feature vectors learnt are sparse and independent. Our earlier modeling study highlighted the link between desynchronized vascular dynamics and efficient energy delivery in skeletal muscle. We now show that desynchronized vascular dynamics leads to efficient training in an auto

  5. Neural dynamics as sampling: a model for stochastic computation in recurrent networks of spiking neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesing, Lars; Bill, Johannes; Nessler, Bernhard; Maass, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    The organization of computations in networks of spiking neurons in the brain is still largely unknown, in particular in view of the inherently stochastic features of their firing activity and the experimentally observed trial-to-trial variability of neural systems in the brain. In principle there exists a powerful computational framework for stochastic computations, probabilistic inference by sampling, which can explain a large number of macroscopic experimental data in neuroscience and cognitive science. But it has turned out to be surprisingly difficult to create a link between these abstract models for stochastic computations and more detailed models of the dynamics of networks of spiking neurons. Here we create such a link and show that under some conditions the stochastic firing activity of networks of spiking neurons can be interpreted as probabilistic inference via Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. Since common methods for MCMC sampling in distributed systems, such as Gibbs sampling, are inconsistent with the dynamics of spiking neurons, we introduce a different approach based on non-reversible Markov chains that is able to reflect inherent temporal processes of spiking neuronal activity through a suitable choice of random variables. We propose a neural network model and show by a rigorous theoretical analysis that its neural activity implements MCMC sampling of a given distribution, both for the case of discrete and continuous time. This provides a step towards closing the gap between abstract functional models of cortical computation and more detailed models of networks of spiking neurons.

  6. A meta-model for computer executable dynamic clinical safety checklists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Shan; Van Gorp, Pieter; Lu, Xudong; Kaymak, Uzay; Korsten, Hendrikus; Vdovjak, Richard; Duan, Huilong

    2017-12-12

    Safety checklist is a type of cognitive tool enforcing short term memory of medical workers with the purpose of reducing medical errors caused by overlook and ignorance. To facilitate the daily use of safety checklists, computerized systems embedded in the clinical workflow and adapted to patient-context are increasingly developed. However, the current hard-coded approach of implementing checklists in these systems increase the cognitive efforts of clinical experts and coding efforts for informaticists. This is due to the lack of a formal representation format that is both understandable by clinical experts and executable by computer programs. We developed a dynamic checklist meta-model with a three-step approach. Dynamic checklist modeling requirements were extracted by performing a domain analysis. Then, existing modeling approaches and tools were investigated with the purpose of reusing these languages. Finally, the meta-model was developed by eliciting domain concepts and their hierarchies. The feasibility of using the meta-model was validated by two case studies. The meta-model was mapped to specific modeling languages according to the requirements of hospitals. Using the proposed meta-model, a comprehensive coronary artery bypass graft peri-operative checklist set and a percutaneous coronary intervention peri-operative checklist set have been developed in a Dutch hospital and a Chinese hospital, respectively. The result shows that it is feasible to use the meta-model to facilitate the modeling and execution of dynamic checklists. We proposed a novel meta-model for the dynamic checklist with the purpose of facilitating creating dynamic checklists. The meta-model is a framework of reusing existing modeling languages and tools to model dynamic checklists. The feasibility of using the meta-model is validated by implementing a use case in the system.

  7. Modeling near-road air quality using a computational fluid dynamics model, CFD-VIT-RIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Jason; Zhang, K Max

    2009-10-15

    It is well recognized that dilution is an important mechanism governing the near-road air pollutant concentrations. In this paper, we aim to advance our understanding of turbulent mixing mechanisms on and near roadways using computation fluid dynamics. Turbulent mixing mechanisms can be classified into three categories according to their origins: vehicle-induced turbulence (VIT), road-induced turbulence (RIT), and atmospheric boundary layer turbulence. RIT includes the turbulence generated by road embankment, road surface thermal effects, and roadside structures. Both VIT and RIT are affected by the roadway designs. We incorporate the detailed treatment of VIT and RIT into the CFD (namely CFD-VIT-RIT) and apply the model in simulating the spatial gradients of carbon monoxide near two major highways with different traffic mix and roadway configurations. The modeling results are compared to the field measurements and those from CALINE4 and CFD without considering VIT and RIT. We demonstrate that the incorporation of VIT and RIT considerably improves the modeling predictions, especially on vertical gradients and seasonal variations of carbon monoxide. Our study implies that roadway design can significantly influence the near-road air pollution. Thus we recommend that mitigating near-road air pollution through roadway designs be considered in the air quality and transportation management In addition, thanks to the rigorous representation of turbulent mixing mechanisms, CFD-VIT-RIT can become valuable tools in the roadway designs process.

  8. Topics in Modeling of Cochlear Dynamics: Computation, Response and Stability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filo, Maurice G.

    This thesis touches upon several topics in cochlear modeling. Throughout the literature, mathematical models of the cochlea vary according to the degree of biological realism to be incorporated. This thesis casts the cochlear model as a continuous space-time dynamical system using operator language. This framework encompasses a wider class of cochlear models and makes the dynamics more transparent and easier to analyze before applying any numerical method to discretize space. In fact, several numerical methods are investigated to study the computational efficiency of the finite dimensional realizations in space. Furthermore, we study the effects of the active gain perturbations on the stability of the linearized dynamics. The stability analysis is used to explain possible mechanisms underlying spontaneous otoacoustic emissions and tinnitus. Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) is introduced as a useful tool to analyze the response of nonlinear cochlear models. Cochlear response features are illustrated using DMD which has the advantage of explicitly revealing the spatial modes of vibrations occurring in the Basilar Membrane (BM). Finally, we address the dynamic estimation problem of BM vibrations using Extended Kalman Filters (EKF). Due to the limitations of noninvasive sensing schemes, such algorithms are inevitable to estimate the dynamic behavior of a living cochlea.

  9. Computational neurogenetic modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Benuskova, Lubica

    2010-01-01

    Computational Neurogenetic Modeling is a student text, introducing the scope and problems of a new scientific discipline - Computational Neurogenetic Modeling (CNGM). CNGM is concerned with the study and development of dynamic neuronal models for modeling brain functions with respect to genes and dynamic interactions between genes. These include neural network models and their integration with gene network models. This new area brings together knowledge from various scientific disciplines, such as computer and information science, neuroscience and cognitive science, genetics and molecular biol

  10. Modeling the economic costs of disasters and recovery: analysis using a dynamic computable general equilibrium model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W.; Li, N.; Wu, J.-D.; Hao, X.-L.

    2014-04-01

    Disaster damages have negative effects on the economy, whereas reconstruction investment has positive effects. The aim of this study is to model economic causes of disasters and recovery involving the positive effects of reconstruction activities. Computable general equilibrium (CGE) model is a promising approach because it can incorporate these two kinds of shocks into a unified framework and furthermore avoid the double-counting problem. In order to factor both shocks into the CGE model, direct loss is set as the amount of capital stock reduced on the supply side of the economy; a portion of investments restores the capital stock in an existing period; an investment-driven dynamic model is formulated according to available reconstruction data, and the rest of a given country's saving is set as an endogenous variable to balance the fixed investment. The 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake is selected as a case study to illustrate the model, and three scenarios are constructed: S0 (no disaster occurs), S1 (disaster occurs with reconstruction investment) and S2 (disaster occurs without reconstruction investment). S0 is taken as business as usual, and the differences between S1 and S0 and that between S2 and S0 can be interpreted as economic losses including reconstruction and excluding reconstruction, respectively. The study showed that output from S1 is found to be closer to real data than that from S2. Economic loss under S2 is roughly 1.5 times that under S1. The gap in the economic aggregate between S1 and S0 is reduced to 3% at the end of government-led reconstruction activity, a level that should take another four years to achieve under S2.

  11. A Computational Fluid Dynamic Model for a Novel Flash Ironmaking Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Fontes, Silvia E.; Sohn, Hong Yong; Olivas-Martinez, Miguel

    A computational fluid dynamic model for a novel flash ironmaking process based on the direct gaseous reduction of iron oxide concentrates is presented. The model solves the three-dimensional governing equations including both gas-phase and gas-solid reaction kinetics. The turbulence-chemistry interaction in the gas-phase is modeled by the eddy dissipation concept incorporating chemical kinetics. The particle cloud model is used to track the particle phase in a Lagrangian framework. A nucleation and growth kinetics rate expression is adopted to calculate the reduction rate of magnetite concentrate particles. Benchmark experiments reported in the literature for a nonreacting swirling gas jet and a nonpremixed hydrogen jet flame were simulated for validation. The model predictions showed good agreement with measurements in terms of gas velocity, gas temperature and species concentrations. The relevance of the computational model for the analysis of a bench reactor operation and the design of an industrial-pilot plant is discussed.

  12. Developing a computationally efficient dynamic multilevel hybrid optimization scheme using multifidelity model interactions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, Patricia Diane (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Gray, Genetha Anne (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Castro, Joseph Pete Jr. (; .); Giunta, Anthony Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Many engineering application problems use optimization algorithms in conjunction with numerical simulators to search for solutions. The formulation of relevant objective functions and constraints dictate possible optimization algorithms. Often, a gradient based approach is not possible since objective functions and constraints can be nonlinear, nonconvex, non-differentiable, or even discontinuous and the simulations involved can be computationally expensive. Moreover, computational efficiency and accuracy are desirable and also influence the choice of solution method. With the advent and increasing availability of massively parallel computers, computational speed has increased tremendously. Unfortunately, the numerical and model complexities of many problems still demand significant computational resources. Moreover, in optimization, these expenses can be a limiting factor since obtaining solutions often requires the completion of numerous computationally intensive simulations. Therefore, we propose a multifidelity optimization algorithm (MFO) designed to improve the computational efficiency of an optimization method for a wide range of applications. In developing the MFO algorithm, we take advantage of the interactions between multi fidelity models to develop a dynamic and computational time saving optimization algorithm. First, a direct search method is applied to the high fidelity model over a reduced design space. In conjunction with this search, a specialized oracle is employed to map the design space of this high fidelity model to that of a computationally cheaper low fidelity model using space mapping techniques. Then, in the low fidelity space, an optimum is obtained using gradient or non-gradient based optimization, and it is mapped back to the high fidelity space. In this paper, we describe the theory and implementation details of our MFO algorithm. We also demonstrate our MFO method on some example problems and on two applications: earth penetrators and

  13. Global dynamics of a novel multi-group model for computer worms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Yong-Wang; Song Yu-Rong; Jiang Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study worm dynamics in computer networks composed of many autonomous systems. A novel multi-group SIQR (susceptible-infected-quarantined-removed) model is proposed for computer worms by explicitly considering anti-virus measures and the network infrastructure. Then, the basic reproduction number of worm R 0 is derived and the global dynamics of the model are established. It is shown that if R 0 is less than or equal to 1, the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable and the worm dies out eventually, whereas, if R 0 is greater than 1, one unique endemic equilibrium exists and it is globally asymptotically stable, thus the worm persists in the network. Finally, numerical simulations are given to illustrate the theoretical results. (general)

  14. APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELLING TO A HORIZONTAL SEDIMENTATION TANK IN IRAQ

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Hadi GHAWI

    2017-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling has been applied to examine the hydrodynamic behavior of water treatment sedimentation tanks at Baghdad Water Works, operated by Alkurech Water in Baghdad in Iraq. The existing tanks perform poorly at current flows and flow is unevenly split among online tanks, Therefore, CFD was used to investigate velocity profiles at current and projected loadings for the existing basins. Results from the CFD analysis were used to develop retrofit strategies to improve...

  15. Dynamic computer model for the metallogenesis and tectonics of the Circum-North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotese, Christopher R.; Nokleberg, Warren J.; Monger, James W.H.; Norton, Ian O.; Parfenov, Leonid M.; Khanchuk, Alexander I.; Bundtzen, Thomas K.; Dawson, Kenneth M.; Eremin, Roman A.; Frolov, Yuri F.; Fujita, Kazuya; Goryachev, Nikolai A.; Pozdeev, Anany I.; Ratkin, Vladimir V.; Rodinov, Sergey M.; Rozenblum, Ilya S.; Scholl, David W.; Shpikerman, Vladimir I.; Sidorov, Anatoly A.; Stone, David B.

    2001-01-01

    The digital files on this report consist of a dynamic computer model of the metallogenesis and tectonics of the Circum-North Pacific, and background articles, figures, and maps. The tectonic part of the dynamic computer model is derived from a major analysis of the tectonic evolution of the Circum-North Pacific which is also contained in directory tectevol. The dynamic computer model and associated materials on this CD-ROM are part of a project on the major mineral deposits, metallogenesis, and tectonics of the Russian Far East, Alaska, and the Canadian Cordillera. The project provides critical information on bedrock geology and geophysics, tectonics, major metalliferous mineral resources, metallogenic patterns, and crustal origin and evolution of mineralizing systems for this region. The major scientific goals and benefits of the project are to: (1) provide a comprehensive international data base on the mineral resources of the region that is the first, extensive knowledge available in English; (2) provide major new interpretations of the origin and crustal evolution of mineralizing systems and their host rocks, thereby enabling enhanced, broad-scale tectonic reconstructions and interpretations; and (3) promote trade and scientific and technical exchanges between North America and Eastern Asia.

  16. A Computation Fluid Dynamic Model for Gas Lift Process Simulation in a Vertical Oil Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadivar Arash

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous gas-lift in a typical oil well was simulated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD technique. A multi fluid model based on the momentum transfer between liquid and gas bubbles was employed to simulate two-phase flow in a vertical pipe. The accuracy of the model was investigated through comparison of numerical predictions with experimental data. The model then was used to study the dynamic behaviour of the two-phase flow around injection point in details. The predictions by the model were compared with other empirical correlations, as well. To obtain an optimum condition of gas-lift, the influence of the effective parameters including the quantity of injected gas, tubing diameter and bubble size distribution were investigated. The results revealed that increasing tubing diameter, the injected gas rate and decreasing bubble diameter improve gas-lift performance.

  17. CSDMS2.0: Computational Infrastructure for Community Surface Dynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvitski, J. P.; Hutton, E.; Peckham, S. D.; Overeem, I.; Kettner, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Community Surface Dynamic Modeling System (CSDMS) is an NSF-supported, international and community-driven program that seeks to transform the science and practice of earth-surface dynamics modeling. CSDMS integrates a diverse community of more than 850 geoscientists representing 360 international institutions (academic, government, industry) from 60 countries and is supported by a CSDMS Interagency Committee (22 Federal agencies), and a CSDMS Industrial Consortia (18 companies). CSDMS presently distributes more 200 Open Source models and modeling tools, access to high performance computing clusters in support of developing and running models, and a suite of products for education and knowledge transfer. CSDMS software architecture employs frameworks and services that convert stand-alone models into flexible "plug-and-play" components to be assembled into larger applications. CSDMS2.0 will support model applications within a web browser, on a wider variety of computational platforms, and on other high performance computing clusters to ensure robustness and sustainability of the framework. Conversion of stand-alone models into "plug-and-play" components will employ automated wrapping tools. Methods for quantifying model uncertainty are being adapted as part of the modeling framework. Benchmarking data is being incorporated into the CSDMS modeling framework to support model inter-comparison. Finally, a robust mechanism for ingesting and utilizing semantic mediation databases is being developed within the Modeling Framework. Six new community initiatives are being pursued: 1) an earth - ecosystem modeling initiative to capture ecosystem dynamics and ensuing interactions with landscapes, 2) a geodynamics initiative to investigate the interplay among climate, geomorphology, and tectonic processes, 3) an Anthropocene modeling initiative, to incorporate mechanistic models of human influences, 4) a coastal vulnerability modeling initiative, with emphasis on deltas and

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Supersonic Nozzle and Integration into a Variable Cycle Engine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Friedlander, David; Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic simulation for a variable cycle turbofan engine and nozzle that can be integrated with an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. A previously developed variable cycle turbofan engine model is used for this study and is enhanced here to include variable guide vanes allowing for operation across the supersonic flight regime. The primary focus of this study is to improve the fidelity of the model's thrust response by replacing the simple choked flow equation convergent-divergent nozzle model with a MacCormack method based quasi-1D model. The dynamic response of the nozzle model using the MacCormack method is verified by comparing it against a model of the nozzle using the conservation element/solution element method. A methodology is also presented for the integration of the MacCormack nozzle model with the variable cycle engine.

  19. The Modeling and Complexity of Dynamical Systems by Means of Computation and Information Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Logozar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the modeling of dynamical systems and finding of their complexity indicators by the use of concepts from computation and information theories, within the framework of J. P. Crutchfield's theory of  ε-machines. A short formal outline of the  ε-machines is given. In this approach, dynamical systems are analyzed directly from the time series that is received from a properly adjusted measuring instrument. The binary strings are parsed through the parse tree, within which morphologically and probabilistically unique subtrees or morphs are recognized as system states. The outline and precise interrelation of the information-theoretic entropies and complexities emanating from the model is given. The paper serves also as a theoretical foundation for the future presentation of the DSA program that implements the  ε-machines modeling up to the stochastic finite automata level.

  20. The comparisons of computational models of pavement due to the dynamic load act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valašková Veronika

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element method (FEM is frequently used to solve current problems of the structural mechanics in engineering practice. The dynamic interaction of the two systems is one of the topics that can be solved using FEM. To simplify the solution of the interaction, it is possible to divide the system in two independent subsystems, vehicle and pavement. Computing software ADINA, based on the principles of the finite element modelling, was adopted to solve the given problem. The results from the first computational model can be used as the inputs for the second model. To analyse stress state of the pavement with different composition, three specific types of pavements were selected – concrete pavement, semi-rigid pavement and flexible pavement. The pavements represent the typical pavement types used for the regular road structures. This article is focused on the analysis of the stress state and the displacements of the pavement induced by the moving load from the traffic.

  1. Finite-element-model updating using computational intelligence techniques applications to structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Marwala, Tshilidzi

    2010-01-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) are widely used to understand the dynamic behaviour of various systems. FEM updating allows FEMs to be tuned better to reflect measured data and may be conducted using two different statistical frameworks: the maximum likelihood approach and Bayesian approaches. Finite Element Model Updating Using Computational Intelligence Techniques applies both strategies to the field of structural mechanics, an area vital for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering. Vibration data is used for the updating process. Following an introduction a number of computational intelligence techniques to facilitate the updating process are proposed; they include: • multi-layer perceptron neural networks for real-time FEM updating; • particle swarm and genetic-algorithm-based optimization methods to accommodate the demands of global versus local optimization models; • simulated annealing to put the methodologies into a sound statistical basis; and • response surface methods and expectation m...

  2. A discrete force allocation algorithm for modelling wind turbines in computational fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2012-01-01

    at the position of the wind turbine rotor to estimate correctly the power production and the rotor loading. The method proposed in this paper solves this issue by spreading the force on the direct neighbouring cells and applying an equivalent pressure jump at the cell faces. This can potentially open......This paper describes an algorithm for allocating discrete forces in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Discrete forces are useful in wind energy CFD. They are used as an approximation of the wind turbine blades’ action on the wind (actuator disc/line), to model forests and to model turbulent...

  3. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P.; Russell, MacKenzie R.; Jones, Robert M.; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A.; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport is used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations, both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. Results show that local topography and wind velocity profiles are the major factors that control deposition. PMID:25621085

  4. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P; Russell, MacKenzie R; Jones, Robert M; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A; Sáez, A Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport is used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations, both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. Results show that local topography and wind velocity profiles are the major factors that control deposition.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of mixed convection flows in buildings enclosures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayne, Alexander; Agarwal, Ramesh K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In recent years Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are increasingly used to model the air circulation and temperature environment inside the rooms of residential and office buildings to gain insight into the relative energy consumptions of various HVAC systems for cooling/heating for climate control and thermal comfort. This requires accurate simulation of turbulent flow and heat transfer for various types of ventilation systems using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations of fluid dynamics. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) or Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of Navier-Stokes equations is computationally intensive and expensive for simulations of this kind. As a result, vast majority of CFD simulations employ RANS equations in conjunction with a turbulence model. In order to assess the modeling requirements (mesh, numerical algorithm, turbulence model etc.) for accurate simulations, it is critical to validate the calculations against the experimental data. For this purpose, we use three well known benchmark validation cases, one for natural convection in 2D closed vertical cavity, second for forced convection in a 2D rectangular cavity and the third for mixed convection in a 2D square cavity. The simulations are performed on a number of meshes of different density using a number of turbulence models. It is found that k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model with a second-order algorithm on a reasonable mesh gives the best results. This information is then used to determine the modeling requirements (mesh, numerical algorithm, turbulence model etc.) for flows in 3D enclosures with different ventilation systems. In particular two cases are considered for which the experimental data is available. These cases are (1) air flow and heat transfer in a naturally ventilated room and (2) airflow and temperature distribution in an atrium. Good agreement with the experimental data and computations of other investigators is obtained.

  6. Dynamics of global supply chain and electric power networks: Models, pricing analysis, and computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsypura, Dmytro

    In this dissertation, I develop a new theoretical framework for the modeling, pricing analysis, and computation of solutions to electric power supply chains with power generators, suppliers, transmission service providers, and the inclusion of consumer demands. In particular, I advocate the application of finite-dimensional variational inequality theory, projected dynamical systems theory, game theory, network theory, and other tools that have been recently proposed for the modeling and analysis of supply chain networks (cf. Nagurney (2006)) to electric power markets. This dissertation contributes to the extant literature on the modeling, analysis, and solution of supply chain networks, including global supply chains, in general, and electric power supply chains, in particular, in the following ways. It develops a theoretical framework for modeling, pricing analysis, and computation of electric power flows/transactions in electric power systems using the rationale for supply chain analysis. The models developed include both static and dynamic ones. The dissertation also adds a new dimension to the methodology of the theory of projected dynamical systems by proving that, irrespective of the speeds of adjustment, the equilibrium of the system remains the same. Finally, I include alternative fuel suppliers, along with their behavior into the supply chain modeling and analysis framework. This dissertation has strong practical implications. In an era in which technology and globalization, coupled with increasing risk and uncertainty, complicate electricity demand and supply within and between nations, the successful management of electric power systems and pricing become increasingly pressing topics with relevance not only for economic prosperity but also national security. This dissertation addresses such related topics by providing models, pricing tools, and algorithms for decentralized electric power supply chains. This dissertation is based heavily on the following

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Lithium/Thionyl Chloride Battery with Electrolyte Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, W.B.; Jungst, Rudolph G.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Wang, C.Y.; Weidner, John.

    1999-06-11

    A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery. The model accounts for not only transport of species and charge, but also the electrode porosity variations and the electrolyte flow induced by the volume reduction caused by electrochemical reactions. Numerical simulations are performed using a finite volume method of computational fluid dynamics. The predicted discharge curves for various temperatures are compared to the experimental data with excellent agreement. Moreover, the simulation results. in conjunction with computer visualization and animation techniques, confirm that cell utilization in the temperature and current range of interest is limited by pore plugging or clogging of the front side of the cathode as a result of LiCl precipitation. The detailed two-dimensional flow simulation also shows that the electrolyte is replenished from the cell header predominantly through the separator into the front of the cathode during most parts of the discharge, especially for higher cell temperatures.

  8. Computable Types for Dynamic Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Collins (Pieter); K. Ambos-Spies; B. Loewe; W. Merkle

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we develop a theory of computable types suitable for the study of dynamic systems in discrete and continuous time. The theory uses type-two effectivity as the underlying computational model, but we quickly develop a type system which can be manipulated abstractly, but for

  9. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  10. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS (CFD) MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations provide a number of unique opportunities for expanding and improving capabilities for modeling exposures to environmental pollutants. The US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has been c...

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of Hydraulics and Sedimentation in Process Reactors During Aeration Tank Settling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Jensen, Mette; Ingildsen, Pernille; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Aeration Tank Settling is a control method alowing settling in the process tank during high hydraulic load. The control method is patented. Aeration Tank Settling has been applied in several waste water treatment plant's using present design of the process tanks. Some process tank designs have...... shown to be more effective than others. To improve the design of less effective plants Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation has been applied. The paper discusses the results at one particular plant experiencing problems with partly short-circuiting of the inlet...

  12. Optimization of a new flow design for solid oxide cells using computational fluid dynamics modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duhn, Jakob Dragsbæk; Jensen, Anker Degn; Wedel, Stig

    2016-01-01

    Design of a gas distributor to distribute gas flow into parallel channels for Solid Oxide Cells (SOC) is optimized, with respect to flow distribution, using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling. The CFD model is based on a 3d geometric model and the optimized structural parameters include...... the width of the channels in the gas distributor and the area in front of the parallel channels. The flow of the optimized design is found to have a flow uniformity index value of 0.978. The effects of deviations from the assumptions used in the modelling (isothermal and non-reacting flow) are evaluated...... and it is found that a temperature gradient along the parallel channels does not affect the flow uniformity, whereas a temperature difference between the channels does. The impact of the flow distribution on the maximum obtainable conversion during operation is also investigated and the obtainable overall...

  13. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of a lithium/thionyl chloride battery with electrolyte flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, W.B.; Wang, C.Y.; Weidner, J.W.; Jungst, R.G.; Nagasubramanian, G.

    2000-02-01

    A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery. As in earlier one-dimensional models, the model accounts for transport of species and charge, and electrode porosity variations and electrolyte flow induced by the volume reduction caused by electrochemical reactions. Numerical simulations are performed using a finite volume method of computational fluid dynamics. The predicted discharge curves for various temperatures show good agreement with published experimental data, and are essentially identical to results published for one-dimensional models. The detailed two-dimensional flow simulations show that the electrolyte is replenished from the cell head space predominantly through the separator into the front of the cathode during most parts of the discharge, especially for higher cell temperatures.

  14. Reduced-Order Computational Model for Low-Frequency Dynamics of Automobiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arnoux

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A reduced-order model is constructed to predict, for the low-frequency range, the dynamical responses in the stiff parts of an automobile constituted of stiff and flexible parts. The vehicle has then many elastic modes in this range due to the presence of many flexible parts and equipment. A nonusual reduced-order model is introduced. The family of the elastic modes is not used and is replaced by an adapted vector basis of the admissible space of global displacements. Such a construction requires a decomposition of the domain of the structure in subdomains in order to control the spatial wave length of the global displacements. The fast marching method is used to carry out the subdomain decomposition. A probabilistic model of uncertainties is introduced. The parameters controlling the level of uncertainties are estimated solving a statistical inverse problem. The methodology is validated with a large computational model of an automobile.

  15. LION: A dynamic computer model for the low-latitude ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Bittencourt

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A realistic fully time-dependent computer model, denominated LION (Low-latitude Ionospheric model, that simulates the dynamic behavior of the low-latitude ionosphere is presented. The time evolution and spatial distribution of the ionospheric particle densities and velocities are computed by numerically solving the time-dependent, coupled, nonlinear system of continuity and momentum equations for the ions O+, O2+, NO+, N2+ and N+, taking into account photoionization of the atmospheric species by the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation, chemical and ionic production and loss reactions, and plasma transport processes, including the ionospheric effects of thermospheric neutral winds, plasma diffusion and electromagnetic E×B plasma drifts. The Earth's magnetic field is represented by a tilted centered magnetic dipole. This set of coupled nonlinear equations is solved along a given magnetic field line in a Lagrangian frame of reference moving vertically, in the magnetic meridian plane, with the electromagnetic E×B plasma drift velocity. The spatial and time distribution of the thermospheric neutral wind velocities and the pattern of the electromagnetic drifts are taken as known quantities, given through specified analytical or empirical models. The model simulation results are presented in the form of computer-generated color maps and reproduce the typical ionization distribution and time evolution normally observed in the low-latitude ionosphere, including details of the equatorial Appleton anomaly dynamics. The specific effects on the ionosphere due to changes in the thermospheric neutral winds and the electromagnetic plasma drifts can be investigated using different wind and drift models, including the important longitudinal effects associated with magnetic declination dependence and latitudinal separation between geographic and

  16. LION: A dynamic computer model for the low-latitude ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Bittencourt

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A realistic fully time-dependent computer model, denominated LION (Low-latitude Ionospheric model, that simulates the dynamic behavior of the low-latitude ionosphere is presented. The time evolution and spatial distribution of the ionospheric particle densities and velocities are computed by numerically solving the time-dependent, coupled, nonlinear system of continuity and momentum equations for the ions O+, O2+, NO+, N2+ and N+, taking into account photoionization of the atmospheric species by the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation, chemical and ionic production and loss reactions, and plasma transport processes, including the ionospheric effects of thermospheric neutral winds, plasma diffusion and electromagnetic E×B plasma drifts. The Earth's magnetic field is represented by a tilted centered magnetic dipole. This set of coupled nonlinear equations is solved along a given magnetic field line in a Lagrangian frame of reference moving vertically, in the magnetic meridian plane, with the electromagnetic E×B plasma drift velocity. The spatial and time distribution of the thermospheric neutral wind velocities and the pattern of the electromagnetic drifts are taken as known quantities, given through specified analytical or empirical models. The model simulation results are presented in the form of computer-generated color maps and reproduce the typical ionization distribution and time evolution normally observed in the low-latitude ionosphere, including details of the equatorial Appleton anomaly dynamics. The specific effects on the ionosphere due to changes in the thermospheric neutral winds and the electromagnetic plasma drifts can be investigated using different wind and drift models, including the important longitudinal effects associated with magnetic declination dependence and latitudinal separation between geographic and geomagnetic equators. The model runs in a normal personal computer (PC and generates color maps illustrating the

  17. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation in process reactors during aeration tank settling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M D; Ingildsen, P; Rasmussen, M R; Laursen, J

    2006-01-01

    Aeration tank settling is a control method allowing settling in the process tank during high hydraulic load. The control method is patented. Aeration tank settling has been applied in several waste water treatment plants using the present design of the process tanks. Some process tank designs have shown to be more effective than others. To improve the design of less effective plants, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation has been applied. This paper discusses the results at one particular plant experiencing problems with partly short-circuiting of the inlet and outlet causing a disruption of the sludge blanket at the outlet and thereby reducing the retention of sludge in the process tank. The model has allowed us to establish a clear picture of the problems arising at the plant during aeration tank settling. Secondly, several process tank design changes have been suggested and tested by means of computational fluid dynamics modelling. The most promising design changes have been found and reported.

  18. Computational model to simulate the interplay effect in dynamic IMRT delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoganathan, S A; Maria Das, K J; Kumar, Shaleen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and experimentally verify a patient specific model for simulating the interplay effect in a DMLC based IMRT delivery. A computational model was developed using MATLAB program to incorporate the interplay effect in a 2D beams eye view fluence of dynamic IMRT fields. To simulate interplay effect, the model requires two inputs: IMRT field (DMLC file with dose rate and MU) and the patient specific respiratory motion. The interplay between the DMLC leaf motion and target was simulated for three lung patients. The target trajectory data was acquired using RPM system during the treatment simulation. The model was verified experimentally for the same patients using Imatrix 2D array device placed over QUASAR motion platform in CL2100 linac. The simulated fluences and measured fluences were compared with the TPS generated static fluence (no motion) using an in-house developed gamma evaluation program (2%/2mm). The simulated results were well within agreement with the measured. Comparison of the simulated and measured fluences with the TPS static fluence resulted 55.3% and 58.5% pixels passed the gamma criteria. A patient specific model was developed and validated for simulating the interplay effect in the dynamic IMRT delivery. This model can be clinically used to quantify the dosimetric uncertainty due to the interplay effect prior to the treatment delivery.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of coal/biomass co-firing in pulverised fuel boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghtaderi, B.; Meesri, C. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). CRC for Coal in Sustainable Development, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2002-07-01

    The present study is concerned with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of coal/biomass blends co-fired under conditions pertinent to pulverised fuel (PF) boilers. The attention is particularly focused on the near burner zone to examine the impact of biomass on the flame geometry and temperature. The predictions are obtained by numerical solution of the conservation equations for the gas and particle phases. The gas phase is solved in the Eulerian domain using steady-state time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations while the solution of the particle phase is obtained from a series of Lagrangian particle tracking equations. Turbulence is modelled using the {kappa}-{epsilon} and Reynolds Stress models. The comparison between the predictions and experimental measurement reported in the literature resulted in a good agreement. Other influences of biomass co-firing are observed for fuel devolatilisation and burnout. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling for High Rate Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) to Blast Furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Chenn

    2008-01-01

    Pulverized coal injection (PCI) into the blast furnace (BF) has been recognized as an effective way to decrease the coke and total energy consumption along with minimization of environmental impacts. However, increasing the amount of coal injected into the BF is currently limited by the lack of knowledge of some issues related to the process. It is therefore important to understand the complex physical and chemical phenomena in the PCI process. Due to the difficulty in attaining trus BF measurements, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been identified as a useful technology to provide such knowledge. CFD simulation is powerful for providing detailed information on flow properties and performing parametric studies for process design and optimization. In this project, comprehensive 3-D CFD models have been developed to simulate the PCI process under actual furnace conditions. These models provide raceway size and flow property distributions. The results have provided guidance for optimizing the PCI process

  1. A computational growth model for measuring dynamic cortical development in the first year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jingxin; Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2012-10-01

    Human cerebral cortex develops extremely fast in the first year of life. Quantitative measurement of cortical development during this early stage plays an important role in revealing the relationship between cortical structural and high-level functional development. This paper presents a computational growth model to simulate the dynamic development of the cerebral cortex from birth to 1 year old by modeling the cerebral cortex as a deformable elastoplasticity surface driven via a growth model. To achieve a high accuracy, a guidance model is also incorporated to estimate the growth parameters and cortical shapes at later developmental stages. The proposed growth model has been applied to 10 healthy subjects with longitudinal brain MR images acquired at every 3 months from birth to 1 year old. The experimental results show that our proposed method can capture the dynamic developmental process of the cortex, with the average surface distance error smaller than 0.6 mm compared with the ground truth surfaces, and the results also show that 1) the curvedness and sharpness decrease from 2 weeks to 12 months and 2) the frontal lobe shows rapidly increasing cortical folding during this period, with relatively slower increase of the cortical folding in the occipital and parietal lobes.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Human Pulmonary Arteries with Experimental Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordones, Alifer D; Leroux, Matthew; Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Wu, Yu-An; Chen, Chia-Yuan; Finol, Ender A

    2018-05-21

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a chronic progressive disease characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure, caused by an increase in pulmonary arterial impedance. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to identify metrics representative of the stage of PH disease. However, experimental validation of CFD models is often not pursued due to the geometric complexity of the model or uncertainties in the reproduction of the required flow conditions. The goal of this work is to validate experimentally a CFD model of a pulmonary artery phantom using a particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Rapid prototyping was used for the construction of the patient-specific pulmonary geometry, derived from chest computed tomography angiography images. CFD simulations were performed with the pulmonary model with a Reynolds number matching those of the experiments. Flow rates, the velocity field, and shear stress distributions obtained with the CFD simulations were compared to their counterparts from the PIV flow visualization experiments. Computationally predicted flow rates were within 1% of the experimental measurements for three of the four branches of the CFD model. The mean velocities in four transversal planes of study were within 5.9 to 13.1% of the experimental mean velocities. Shear stresses were qualitatively similar between the two methods with some discrepancies in the regions of high velocity gradients. The fluid flow differences between the CFD model and the PIV phantom are attributed to experimental inaccuracies and the relative compliance of the phantom. This comparative analysis yielded valuable information on the accuracy of CFD predicted hemodynamics in pulmonary circulation models.

  3. Preliminary analysis of the MER magnetic properties experiment using a computational fluid dynamics model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, K.M.; Merrison, J.P.; Gunnlaugsson, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by questions raised by the magnetic properties experiments on the NASA Mars Pathfinder and Mars Exploration Rover (MER) missions, we have studied in detail the capture of airborne magnetic dust by permanent magnets using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model supported by laboratory...... simulations. The magnets studied are identical to the capture magnet and filter magnet on MER, though results are more generally applicable. The dust capture process is found to be dependent upon wind speed, dust magnetization, dust grain size and dust grain mass density. Here we develop an understanding...... of how these parameters affect dust capture rates and patterns on the magnets and set bounds for these parameters based on MER data and results from the numerical model. This results in a consistent picture of the dust as containing varying amounts of at least two separate components with different...

  4. Validation of a multidimensional computational fluid dynamics model for subcooled flow boiling analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Caldeira, Alexandre D.; Borges, Eduardo M., E-mail: fbraz@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: alexdc@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: eduardo@ieav.cta.b [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    In a heated vertical channel, the subcooled flow boiling regime occurs when the bulk fluid temperature is lower than the saturation temperature, but the fluid temperature reaches the saturation point near the channel wall. This phenomenon produces a significant increase in heat flux, limited by the critical heat flux. This study is particularly important to the thermal-hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactors. The purpose of this work is the validation of a multidimensional model to analyze the subcooled flow boiling comparing the results with experimental data found in literature. The computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT was used with Eulerian multiphase model option. The calculated values of wall temperature in the liquid-solid interface presented an excellent agreement when compared to the experimental data. Void fraction calculations presented satisfactory results in relation to the experimental data in pressures of 15, 30 and 45 bars. (author)

  5. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of bun baking process under different oven load conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, A; Chhanwal, N; Indrani, D; Anandharamakrishnan, C

    2014-09-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to study the temperature profile of the bun during baking process. Evaporation-condensation mechanism and effect of the latent heat during phase change of water was incorporated in this model to represent actual bun baking process. Simulation results were validated with experimental measurements of bun temperature at two different positions. Baking process is completed within 20 min, after the temperature of crumb become stable at 98 °C. Further, this study was extended to investigate the effect of partially (two baking trays) loaded and fully loaded (eight baking trays) oven on temperature profile of bun. Velocity and temperature profile differs in partially loaded and fully loaded oven. Bun placed in top rack showed rapid baking while bun placed in bottom rack showed slower baking due to uneven temperature distribution in the oven. Hence, placement of bun inside the oven affects temperature of bun and consequently, the quality of the product.

  6. Surface Modeling, Grid Generation, and Related Issues in Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Yung K. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Steering Committee for Surface Modeling and Grid Generation (SMAGG) sponsored a workshop on surface modeling, grid generation, and related issues in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions at Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, May 9-11, 1995. The workshop provided a forum to identify industry needs, strengths, and weaknesses of the five grid technologies (patched structured, overset structured, Cartesian, unstructured, and hybrid), and to exchange thoughts about where each technology will be in 2 to 5 years. The workshop also provided opportunities for engineers and scientists to present new methods, approaches, and applications in SMAGG for CFD. This Conference Publication (CP) consists of papers on industry overview, NASA overview, five grid technologies, new methods/ approaches/applications, and software systems.

  7. Validation of a multidimensional computational fluid dynamics model for subcooled flow boiling analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Caldeira, Alexandre D.; Borges, Eduardo M.

    2011-01-01

    In a heated vertical channel, the subcooled flow boiling regime occurs when the bulk fluid temperature is lower than the saturation temperature, but the fluid temperature reaches the saturation point near the channel wall. This phenomenon produces a significant increase in heat flux, limited by the critical heat flux. This study is particularly important to the thermal-hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactors. The purpose of this work is the validation of a multidimensional model to analyze the subcooled flow boiling comparing the results with experimental data found in literature. The computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT was used with Eulerian multiphase model option. The calculated values of wall temperature in the liquid-solid interface presented an excellent agreement when compared to the experimental data. Void fraction calculations presented satisfactory results in relation to the experimental data in pressures of 15, 30 and 45 bars. (author)

  8. Computational Model and Numerical Simulation for Submerged Mooring Monitoring Platform’s Dynamical Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Kongde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational model and numerical simulation for submerged mooring monitoring platform were formulated aimed at the dynamical response by the action of flow force, which based on Hopkinson impact load theory, taken into account the catenoid effect of mooring cable and revised the difference of tension and tangential direction action force by equivalent modulus of elasticity. Solved the equation by hydraulics theory and structural mechanics theory of oceaneering, studied the response of buoy on flow force. The validity of model were checked and the results were in good agreement; the result show the buoy will engender biggish heave and swaying displacement, but the swaying displacement got stable quickly and the heaven displacement cause vibration for the vortex-induced action by the flow.

  9. HIGH-FIDELITY SIMULATION-DRIVEN MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR COARSE-GRAINED COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, Botros N.; Dinh, Nam T.; Bolotnov, Igor A.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear reactor safety analysis requires identifying various credible accident scenarios and determining their consequences. For a full-scale nuclear power plant system behavior, it is impossible to obtain sufficient experimental data for a broad range of risk-significant accident scenarios. In single-phase flow convective problems, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) can provide us with high fidelity results when physical data are unavailable. However, these methods are computationally expensive and cannot be afforded for simulation of long transient scenarios in nuclear accidents despite extraordinary advances in high performance scientific computing over the past decades. The major issue is the inability to make the transient computation parallel, thus making number of time steps required in high-fidelity methods unaffordable for long transients. In this work, we propose to apply a high fidelity simulation-driven approach to model sub-grid scale (SGS) effect in Coarse Grained Computational Fluid Dynamics CG-CFD. This approach aims to develop a statistical surrogate model instead of the deterministic SGS model. We chose to start with a turbulent natural convection case with volumetric heating in a horizontal fluid layer with a rigid, insulated lower boundary and isothermal (cold) upper boundary. This scenario of unstable stratification is relevant to turbulent natural convection in a molten corium pool during a severe nuclear reactor accident, as well as in containment mixing and passive cooling. The presented approach demonstrates how to create a correction for the CG-CFD solution by modifying the energy balance equation. A global correction for the temperature equation proves to achieve a significant improvement to the prediction of steady state temperature distribution through the fluid layer.

  10. Modeling of temperature profiles in an environmental transmission electron microscope using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mølgaard Mortensen, Peter; Willum Hansen, Thomas; Birkedal Wagner, Jakob; Degn Jensen, Anker

    2015-01-01

    The temperature and velocity field, pressure distribution, and the temperature variation across the sample region inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) have been modeled by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Heating the sample area by a furnace type TEM holder gives rise to temperature gradients over the sample area. Three major mechanisms have been identified with respect to heat transfer in the sample area: radiation from the grid, conduction in the grid, and conduction in the gas. A parameter sensitivity analysis showed that the sample temperature was affected by the conductivity of the gas, the emissivity of the sample grid, and the conductivity of the grid. Ideally the grid should be polished and made from a material with good conductivity, e.g. copper. With hydrogen gas, which has the highest conductivity of the gases studied, the temperature difference over the TEM grid is less than 5 °C, at what must be considered typical conditions, and it is concluded that the conditions on the sample grid in the ETEM can be considered as isothermal during general use. - Highlights: • Computational fluid dynamics used for mapping flow and temperature in ETEM setup. • Temperature gradient across TEM grid in furnace based heating holder very small in ETEM. • Conduction from TEM grid and gas in addition to radiation from TEM grid most important. • Pressure drop in ETEM limited to the pressure limiting apertures

  11. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Turbulence, Radiation, and Combustion Models for Natural Gas Combustion Burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yik Siang Pang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD study of a natural gas combustion burner focusing on the effect of combustion, thermal radiation and turbulence models on the temperature and chemical species concentration fields. The combustion was modelled using the finite rate/eddy dissipation (FR/EDM and partially premixed flame models. Detailed chemistry kinetics CHEMKIN GRI-MECH 3.0 consisting of 325 reactions was employed to model the methane combustion. Discrete ordinates (DO and spherical harmonics (P1 model were employed to predict the thermal radiation. The gas absorption coefficient dependence on the wavelength is resolved by the weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model (WSGGM. Turbulence flow was simulated using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS based models. The findings showed that a combination of partially premixed flame, P1 and standard k-ε (SKE gave the most accurate prediction with an average deviation of around 7.8% of combustion temperature and 15.5% for reactant composition (methane and oxygen. The results show the multi-step chemistry in the partially premixed model is more accurate than the two-step FR/EDM. Meanwhile, inclusion of thermal radiation has a minor effect on the heat transfer and species concentration. SKE turbulence model yielded better prediction compared to the realizable k-ε (RKE and renormalized k-ε (RNG. The CFD simulation presented in this work may serve as a useful tool to evaluate a performance of a natural gas combustor. Copyright © 2018 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 26th July 2017; Revised: 9th October 2017; Accepted: 30th October 2017; Available online: 22nd January 2018; Published regularly: 2nd April 2018 How to Cite: Pang, Y.S., Law, W.P., Pung, K.Q., Gimbun, J. (2018. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Turbulence, Radiation, and Combustion Models for Natural Gas Combustion Burner. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 13 (1: 155-169 (doi:10.9767/bcrec

  12. International Conference on Computer Modelling of Seas and Coastal Regions and Boundary Elements and Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Partridge, P; Boundary Elements in Fluid Dynamics

    1992-01-01

    This book Boundary Elements in Fluid Dynamics is the second volume of the two volume proceedings of the International Conference on Computer Modelling of Seas and Coastal Regions and Boundary Elements and Fluid Dynamics, held in Southampton, U.K., in April 1992. The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is now fully established as an ac­ curate and successful technique for solving engineering problems in a wide range of fields. The success of the method is due to its advantages in data reduction, as only the boundary of the region is modelled. Thus moving boundaries may be more easily handled, which is not the case if domain methods are used. In addition, the method is easily able to model regions to extending to infinity. Fluid mechanics is traditionally one of the most challenging areas of engi­ neering, the simulation of fluid motion, particularly in three dimensions, is always a serious test for any numerical method, and is an area in which BEM analysis may be used taking full advantage of its special character...

  13. Dynamic modelling of an adsorption storage tank using a hybrid approach combining computational fluid dynamics and process simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, J.P.B.; Esteves, I.A.A.C.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2004-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package has been coupled with the dynamic process simulator of an adsorption storage tank for methane fuelled vehicles. The two solvers run as independent processes and handle non-overlapping portions of the computational domain. The codes exchange data on the boundary interface of the two domains to ensure continuity of the solution and of its gradient. A software interface was developed to dynamically suspend and activate each process as necessary, and be responsible for data exchange and process synchronization. This hybrid computational tool has been successfully employed to accurately simulate the discharge of a new tank design and evaluate its performance. The case study presented here shows that CFD and process simulation are highly complementary computational tools, and that there are clear benefits to be gained from a close integration of the two. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models of lava flow simulation for hazard assessment, forecasting, and risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi; Richardson, Jacob A.; Cashman, Katharine V.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, designing flow mitigation measures, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, COMSOL, and MOLASSES. We model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal planes, sloping surfaces, and into topographic obstacles. We compare model results to physical observations made during well-controlled analogue and molten basalt experiments, and to analytical theory when available. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and OpenFOAM and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We assess the goodness-of-fit of the simulation results and the computational cost. Our results guide the selection of numerical simulation codes for different applications, including inferring emplacement conditions of past lava flows, modeling the temporal evolution of ongoing flows during eruption, and probabilistic assessment of lava flow hazard prior to eruption. Finally, we outline potential experiments and desired key observational data from future flows that would extend existing benchmarking data sets.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrey Ioilev; Maskhud Samigulin; Vasily Ustinenko; Simon Lo; Adrian Tentner

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The goal of this project is to develop an advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer code (CFD-BWR) that allows the detailed analysis of the two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel bundle under various operating conditions. This code will include more fundamental physical models than the current generation of sub-channel codes and advanced numerical algorithms for improved computational accuracy, robustness, and speed. It is highly desirable to understand the detailed two-phase flow phenomena inside a BWR fuel bundle. These phenomena include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for the analysis of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is still too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Recent progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), coupled with the rapidly increasing computational power of massively parallel computers, shows promising potential for the fine-mesh, detailed simulation of fuel assembly two-phase flow phenomena. However, the phenomenological models available in the commercial CFD programs are not as advanced as those currently being used in the sub-channel codes used in the nuclear industry. In particular, there are no models currently available which are able to reliably predict the nature of the flow regimes, and use the appropriate sub-models for those flow regimes. The CFD-BWR code is being developed as a customized module built on the foundation of the commercial CFD Code STAR-CD which provides general two-phase flow modeling capabilities. The paper describes the model development strategy which has been adopted by the development team for the

  16. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of Bacillus anthracis spore deposition in rabbit and human respiratory airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, S.; Suffield, S. R.; Recknagle, K. P.; Jacob, R. E.; Einstein, D. R.; Kuprat, A. P.; Carson, J. P.; Colby, S. M.; Saunders, J. H.; Hines, S. A.; Teeguarden, J. G.; Straub, T. M.; Moe, M.; Taft, S. C.; Corley, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived respectively from computed tomography (CT) and µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation–exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Two different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the nasal sinus compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. In contrast, higher spore deposition was predicted in the lower conducting airways of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology for deposition.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis Spore Deposition in Rabbit and Human Respiratory Airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, Senthil; Suffield, Sarah R.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Jacob, Rick E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Colby, Sean M.; Saunders, James H.; Hines, Stephanie; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Straub, Tim M.; Moe, M.; Taft, Sarah; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-09-30

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. The highest exposure concentration was modeled in the rabbit based upon prior acute inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulation was also conducted at the same concentration. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. As a result, higher particle deposition was predicted in the conducting airways and deep lung of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology.

  18. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaper, Tasso J., E-mail: tasso@bu.edu; Kramer, Mark A., E-mail: mak@bu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Rotstein, Horacio G., E-mail: horacio@njit.edu [Department of Mathematical Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases.

  19. Modeling Juvenile Salmon Egress Conditions in The Dalles Dam Tailrace using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Serkowski, John A.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Schlenker, Stephen J.

    2009-07-27

    At The Dalles Dam, located between Oregon and Washington on the Columbia River, juvenile salmon passing over the spillway have a survival rate that is below acceptable levels. An important factor affecting survival is the egress route fish take through the immediate tailrace of the dam. Passage through the high-energy spillway and stilling basin environment can leave fish disoriented and vulnerable to predators. Egress conditions can be improved through structural and operational modifications that provide flow paths that move fish more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. We used the results from free-surface computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling combined with Lagrangian particle tracking to evaluate the tailrace egress conditions at The Dalles Dam for different alignments of a proposed guidance wall and for different spillway discharge scenarios.

  20. Modeling of temperature profiles in an environmental transmission electron microscope using computational fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Jensen, Anker Degn; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    The temperature and velocity field, pressure distribution, and the temperature variation across the sample region inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) have been modeled by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Heating the sample area by a furnace type TEM holder...... gives rise to temperature gradients over the sample area. Three major mechanisms have been identified with respect to heat transfer in the sample area: radiation from the grid, conduction in the grid, and conduction in the gas. A parameter sensitivity analysis showed that the sample temperature...... was affected by the conductivity of the gas, the emissivity of the sample grid, and the conductivity of the grid. Ideally the grid should be polished and made from a material with good conductivity, e.g. copper. With hydrogen gas, which has the highest conductivity of the gases studied, the temperature...

  1. Moving on to the modeling and simulation using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norasalwa Zakaria; Rohyiza Baan; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus

    2006-01-01

    The heat is on but not at the co-combustor plant. Using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), modeling and simulation of an incinerator has been made easy and possible from the comfort of cozy room. CFD has become an important design tool in nearly every industrial field because it provides understanding of flow patterns. CFD provide values for fluid velocity, fluid temperature, pressure and species concentrations throughout a flow domain. MINT has acquired a complete CFD software recently, consisting of GAMBIT, which is use to build geometry and meshing, and FLUENT as the processor or solver. This paper discusses on several trial runs that was carried out on several parts of the co-combustor plant namely the under fire section and the mixing chamber section

  2. Assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Models for Shock Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBonis, James R.; Oberkampf, William L.; Wolf, Richard T.; Orkwis, Paul D.; Turner, Mark G.; Babinsky, Holger

    2011-01-01

    A workshop on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) prediction of shock boundary-layer interactions (SBLIs) was held at the 48th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. As part of the workshop numerous CFD analysts submitted solutions to four experimentally measured SBLIs. This paper describes the assessment of the CFD predictions. The assessment includes an uncertainty analysis of the experimental data, the definition of an error metric and the application of that metric to the CFD solutions. The CFD solutions provided very similar levels of error and in general it was difficult to discern clear trends in the data. For the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes methods the choice of turbulence model appeared to be the largest factor in solution accuracy. Large-eddy simulation methods produced error levels similar to RANS methods but provided superior predictions of normal stresses.

  3. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaper, Tasso J.; Kramer, Mark A.; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2013-01-01

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases

  4. Leatherbacks swimming in silico: modeling and verifying their momentum and heat balance using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Peter N; Bonazza, Riccardo; Jones, T Todd; Wyneken, Jeanette; Porter, Warren P

    2014-01-01

    As global temperatures increase throughout the coming decades, species ranges will shift. New combinations of abiotic conditions will make predicting these range shifts difficult. Biophysical mechanistic niche modeling places bounds on an animal's niche through analyzing the animal's physical interactions with the environment. Biophysical mechanistic niche modeling is flexible enough to accommodate these new combinations of abiotic conditions. However, this approach is difficult to implement for aquatic species because of complex interactions among thrust, metabolic rate and heat transfer. We use contemporary computational fluid dynamic techniques to overcome these difficulties. We model the complex 3D motion of a swimming neonate and juvenile leatherback sea turtle to find power and heat transfer rates during the stroke. We combine the results from these simulations and a numerical model to accurately predict the core temperature of a swimming leatherback. These results are the first steps in developing a highly accurate mechanistic niche model, which can assists paleontologist in understanding biogeographic shifts as well as aid contemporary species managers about potential range shifts over the coming decades.

  5. Leatherbacks swimming in silico: modeling and verifying their momentum and heat balance using computational fluid dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter N Dudley

    Full Text Available As global temperatures increase throughout the coming decades, species ranges will shift. New combinations of abiotic conditions will make predicting these range shifts difficult. Biophysical mechanistic niche modeling places bounds on an animal's niche through analyzing the animal's physical interactions with the environment. Biophysical mechanistic niche modeling is flexible enough to accommodate these new combinations of abiotic conditions. However, this approach is difficult to implement for aquatic species because of complex interactions among thrust, metabolic rate and heat transfer. We use contemporary computational fluid dynamic techniques to overcome these difficulties. We model the complex 3D motion of a swimming neonate and juvenile leatherback sea turtle to find power and heat transfer rates during the stroke. We combine the results from these simulations and a numerical model to accurately predict the core temperature of a swimming leatherback. These results are the first steps in developing a highly accurate mechanistic niche model, which can assists paleontologist in understanding biogeographic shifts as well as aid contemporary species managers about potential range shifts over the coming decades.

  6. Analytical and Computational Modeling of Mechanical Waves in Microscale Granular Crystals: Nonlinearity and Rotational Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Samuel P.

    Granular media are one of the most common, yet least understood forms of matter on earth. The difficulties in understanding the physics of granular media stem from the fact that they are typically heterogeneous and highly disordered, and the grains interact via nonlinear contact forces. Historically, one approach to reducing these complexities and gaining new insight has been the study of granular crystals, which are ordered arrays of similarly-shaped particles (typically spheres) in Hertzian contact. Using this setting, past works explored the rich nonlinear dynamics stemming from contact forces, and proposed avenues where such granular crystals could form designer, dynamically responsive materials, which yield beneficial functionality in dynamic regimes. In recent years, the combination of self-assembly fabrication methods and laser ultrasonic experimental characterization have enabled the study of granular crystals at microscale. While our intuition may suggest that these microscale granular crystals are simply scaled-down versions of their macroscale counterparts, in fact, the relevant physics change drastically; for example, short-range adhesive forces between particles, which are negligible at macroscale, are several orders of magnitude stronger than gravity at microscale. In this thesis, we present recent advances in analytical and computational modeling of microscale granular crystals, in particular concerning the interplay of nonlinearity, shear interactions, and particle rotations, which have previously been either absent, or included separately at macroscale. Drawing inspiration from past works on phononic crystals and nonlinear lattices, we explore problems involving locally-resonant metamaterials, nonlinear localized modes, amplitude-dependent energy partition, and other rich dynamical phenomena. This work enhances our understanding of microscale granular media, which may find applicability in fields such as ultrasonic wave tailoring, signal processing

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Zinc Slag Fuming Process in Top-Submerged Lance Smelting Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Nazmul; Naser, Jamal; Brooks, Geoffrey; Reuter, Markus A.; Matusewicz, Robert W.

    2012-02-01

    Slag fuming is a reductive treatment process for molten zinciferous slags for extracting zinc in the form of metal vapor by injecting or adding a reductant source such as pulverized coal or lump coal and natural gas. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model was developed to study the zinc slag fuming process from imperial smelting furnace (ISF) slag in a top-submerged lance furnace and to investigate the details of fluid flow, reaction kinetics, and heat transfer in the furnace. The model integrates combustion phenomena and chemical reactions with the heat, mass, and momentum interfacial interaction between the phases present in the system. A commercial CFD package AVL Fire 2009.2 (AVL, Graz, Austria) coupled with a number of user-defined subroutines in FORTRAN programming language were used to develop the model. The model is based on three-dimensional (3-D) Eulerian multiphase flow approach, and it predicts the velocity and temperature field of the molten slag bath, generated turbulence, and vortex and plume shape at the lance tip. The model also predicts the mass fractions of slag and gaseous components inside the furnace. The model predicted that the percent of ZnO in the slag bath decreases linearly with time and is consistent broadly with the experimental data. The zinc fuming rate from the slag bath predicted by the model was validated through macrostep validation process against the experimental study of Waladan et al. The model results predicted that the rate of ZnO reduction is controlled by the mass transfer of ZnO from the bulk slag to slag-gas interface and rate of gas-carbon reaction for the specified simulation time studied. Although the model is based on zinc slag fuming, the basic approach could be expanded or applied for the CFD analysis of analogous systems.

  8. Use of the FDA nozzle model to illustrate validation techniques in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Prasanna; D'Souza, Gavin A; Horner, Marc; Morrison, Tina M; Malinauskas, Richard A; Myers, Matthew R

    2017-01-01

    A "credible" computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has the potential to provide a meaningful evaluation of safety in medical devices. One major challenge in establishing "model credibility" is to determine the required degree of similarity between the model and experimental results for the model to be considered sufficiently validated. This study proposes a "threshold-based" validation approach that provides a well-defined acceptance criteria, which is a function of how close the simulation and experimental results are to the safety threshold, for establishing the model validity. The validation criteria developed following the threshold approach is not only a function of Comparison Error, E (which is the difference between experiments and simulations) but also takes in to account the risk to patient safety because of E. The method is applicable for scenarios in which a safety threshold can be clearly defined (e.g., the viscous shear-stress threshold for hemolysis in blood contacting devices). The applicability of the new validation approach was tested on the FDA nozzle geometry. The context of use (COU) was to evaluate if the instantaneous viscous shear stress in the nozzle geometry at Reynolds numbers (Re) of 3500 and 6500 was below the commonly accepted threshold for hemolysis. The CFD results ("S") of velocity and viscous shear stress were compared with inter-laboratory experimental measurements ("D"). The uncertainties in the CFD and experimental results due to input parameter uncertainties were quantified following the ASME V&V 20 standard. The CFD models for both Re = 3500 and 6500 could not be sufficiently validated by performing a direct comparison between CFD and experimental results using the Student's t-test. However, following the threshold-based approach, a Student's t-test comparing |S-D| and |Threshold-S| showed that relative to the threshold, the CFD and experimental datasets for Re = 3500 were statistically similar and the model could be

  9. CO2, energy and economy interactions: A multisectoral, dynamic, computable general equilibrium model for Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yoonyoung

    While vast resources have been invested in the development of computational models for cost-benefit analysis for the "whole world" or for the largest economies (e.g. United States, Japan, Germany), the remainder have been thrown together into one model for the "rest of the world." This study presents a multi-sectoral, dynamic, computable general equilibrium (CGE) model for Korea. This research evaluates the impacts of controlling COsb2 emissions using a multisectoral CGE model. This CGE economy-energy-environment model analyzes and quantifies the interactions between COsb2, energy and economy. This study examines interactions and influences of key environmental policy components: applied economic instruments, emission targets, and environmental tax revenue recycling methods. The most cost-effective economic instrument is the carbon tax. The economic effects discussed include impacts on main macroeconomic variables (in particular, economic growth), sectoral production, and the energy market. This study considers several aspects of various COsb2 control policies, such as the basic variables in the economy: capital stock and net foreign debt. The results indicate emissions might be stabilized in Korea at the expense of economic growth and with dramatic sectoral allocation effects. Carbon dioxide emissions stabilization could be achieved to the tune of a 600 trillion won loss over a 20 year period (1990-2010). The average annual real GDP would decrease by 2.10% over the simulation period compared to the 5.87% increase in the Business-as-Usual. This model satisfies an immediate need for a policy simulation model for Korea and provides the basic framework for similar economies. It is critical to keep the central economic question at the forefront of any discussion regarding environmental protection. How much will reform cost, and what does the economy stand to gain and lose? Without this model, the policy makers might resort to hesitation or even blind speculation. With

  10. Dynamic behaviour of raft and pile foundations tests and computational models. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betbeder, J.; Garnier, J.C.; Gauvain, J.; Jeandidier, C.

    1981-01-01

    Pile foundations are commonly used for many types of buildings where the bearing capacity of soil is poor. For nuclear power plants buildings, however, there seems to be a fairly general reluctancy to accept design on piles, as it is considered difficult to demonstrate the safety of these foundations with respect to earthquakes, due to the relative lack of validation of the currently available aseismic design methods. Being conscious that pile foundations might be worth considering for future nuclear sites in France and that the reliability of design methods should be backed by experimental data, ELECTRICITE DE FRANCE decided in 1978 to undertake a series of tests, aimed at assessing the validity of computational models for seismic behaviour of pile foundations and trying to define better models if necessary. These tests on reduced scale structure, including various types of raft and pile foundations and different kinds of dynamic excitation (harmonic, earthquake simulation, impulsive release of a static force) have been made at the NICE airport site. The present paper deals with the general description of the tests and the first part of interpretation work, limited to in-structure harmonic excitation and earthquake simulation tests analyzed by simple spring -dashpot analytical models. The two following papers (K5-6 and K5-7) are devoted to specialized topics in relation with the interpretation of tests, i-e ground motions analysis for earthquake simulation and research work on a new computational model. Although preliminary conclusions can be drawn from the results obtained so far, further work will be necessary to reach a conclusive assessment on this difficult subject. (orig.)

  11. Physical and computational fluid dynamics models for the hemodynamics of the artiodactyl carotid rete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Haley D; Bourke, Jason

    2015-12-07

    In the mammalian order Artiodactyla, the majority of arterial blood entering the intracranial cavity is supplied by a large arterial meshwork called the carotid rete. This vascular structure functionally replaces the internal carotid artery. Extensive experimentation has demonstrated that the artiodactyl carotid rete drives one of the most effective selective brain cooling mechanisms among terrestrial vertebrates. Less well understood is the impact that the unique morphology of the carotid rete may have on the hemodynamics of blood flow to the cerebrum. It has been hypothesized that, relative to the tubular internal carotid arteries of most other vertebrates, the highly convoluted morphology of the carotid rete may increase resistance to flow during extreme changes in cerebral blood pressure, essentially protecting the brain by acting as a resistor. We test this hypothesis by employing simple and complex physical models to a 3D surface rendering of the carotid rete of the domestic goat, Capra hircus. First, we modeled the potential for increased resistance across the carotid rete using an electrical circuit analog. The extensive branching of the rete equates to a parallel circuit that is bound in series by single tubular arteries, both upstream and downstream. This method calculated a near-zero increase in resistance across the rete. Because basic equations do not incorporate drag, shear-stress, and turbulence, we used computational fluid dynamics to simulate the impact of these computationally intensive factors on resistance. Ultimately, both simple and complex models demonstrated negligible changes in resistance and blood pressure across the arterial meshwork. We further tested the resistive potential of the carotid rete by simulating blood pressures known to occur in giraffes. Based on these models, we found resistance (and blood pressure mitigation as a whole) to be an unlikely function for the artiodactyl carotid rete. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. Advanced computational multi-fluid dynamics: a new model for understanding electrokinetic phenomena in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulamali, M. Y.; Saunders, J. H.; Jackson, M. D.; Pain, C. C.

    2009-04-01

    We present results from a new computational multi-fluid dynamics code, designed to model the transport of heat, mass and chemical species during flow of single or multiple immiscible fluid phases through porous media, including gravitational effects and compressibility. The model also captures the electrical phenomena which may arise through electrokinetic, electrochemical and electrothermal coupling. Building on the advanced computational technology of the Imperial College Ocean Model, this new development leads the way towards a complex multiphase code using arbitrary unstructured and adaptive meshes, and domains decomposed to run in parallel over a cluster of workstations or a dedicated parallel computer. These facilities will allow efficient and accurate modelling of multiphase flows which capture large- and small-scale transport phenomena, while preserving the important geology and/or surface topology to make the results physically meaningful and realistic. Applications include modelling of contaminant transport in aquifers, multiphase flow during hydrocarbon production, migration of carbon dioxide during sequestration, and evaluation of the design and safety of nuclear reactors. Simulations of the streaming potential resulting from multiphase flow in laboratory- and field-scale models demonstrate that streaming potential signals originate at fluid fronts, and at geologic boundaries where fluid saturation changes. This suggests that downhole measurements of streaming potential may be used to inform production strategies in oil and gas reservoirs. As water encroaches on an oil production well, the streaming-potential signal associated with the water front encompasses the well even when the front is up to 100 m away, so the potential measured at the well starts to change significantly relative to a distant reference electrode. Variations in the geometry of the encroaching water front could be characterized using an array of electrodes positioned along the well

  13. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 1: Theory and Computational Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, B.D.; Mueller, C.; Necker, G.A.; Travis, J.R.; Spore, J.W.; Lam, K.L.; Royl, P.; Redlinger, R.; Wilson, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best-estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containments and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior (1) in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and (2) during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of left valvular heart diseases during atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Scarsoglio

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although atrial fibrillation (AF, a common arrhythmia, frequently presents in patients with underlying valvular disease, its hemodynamic contributions are not fully understood. The present work aimed to computationally study how physical conditions imposed by pathologic valvular anatomy act on AF hemodynamics. Methods: We simulated AF with different severity grades of left-sided valvular diseases and compared the cardiovascular effects that they exert during AF, compared to lone AF. The fluid dynamics model used here has been recently validated for lone AF and relies on a lumped parameterization of the four heart chambers, together with the systemic and pulmonary circulation. The AF modelling involves: (i irregular, uncorrelated and faster heart rate; (ii atrial contractility dysfunction. Three different grades of severity (mild, moderate, severe were analyzed for each of the four valvulopathies (AS, aortic stenosis, MS, mitral stenosis, AR, aortic regurgitation, MR, mitral regurgitation, by varying–through the valve opening angle–the valve area. Results: Regurgitation was hemodynamically more relevant than stenosis, as the latter led to inefficient cardiac flow, while the former introduced more drastic fluid dynamics variation. Moreover, mitral valvulopathies were more significant than aortic ones. In case of aortic valve diseases, proper mitral functioning damps out changes at atrial and pulmonary levels. In the case of mitral valvulopathy, the mitral valve lost its regulating capability, thus hemodynamic variations almost equally affected regions upstream and downstream of the valve. In particular, the present study revealed that both mitral and aortic regurgitation strongly affect hemodynamics, followed by mitral stenosis, while aortic stenosis has the least impact among the analyzed valvular diseases. Discussion: The proposed approach can provide new mechanistic insights as to which valvular pathologies merit more aggressive

  15. Computational fluid dynamics and population balance modelling of nucleate boiling of cryogenic liquids: Theoretical developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Heng Yeoh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main focus in the analysis of pool or flow boiling in saturated or subcooled conditions is the basic understanding of the phase change process through the heat transfer and wall heat flux partitioning at the heated wall and the two-phase bubble behaviours in the bulk liquid as they migrate away from the heated wall. This paper reviews the work in this rapid developing area with special reference to modelling nucleate boiling of cryogenic liquids in the context of computational fluid dynamics and associated theoretical developments. The partitioning of the wall heat flux at the heated wall into three components – single-phase convection, transient conduction and evaporation – remains the most popular mechanistic approach in predicting the heat transfer process during boiling. Nevertheless, the respective wall heat flux components generally require the determination of the active nucleation site density, bubble departure diameter and nucleation frequency, which are crucial to the proper prediction of the heat transfer process. Numerous empirical correlations presented in this paper have been developed to ascertain these three important parameters with some degree of success. Albeit the simplicity of empirical correlations, they remain applicable to only a narrow range of flow conditions. In order to extend the wall heat flux partitioning approach to a wider range of flow conditions, the fractal model proposed for the active nucleation site density, force balance model for bubble departing from the cavity and bubble lifting off from the heated wall and evaluation of nucleation frequency based on fundamental theory depict the many enhancements that can improve the mechanistic model predictions. The macroscopic consideration of the two-phase boiling in the bulk liquid via the two-fluid model represents the most effective continuum approach in predicting the volume fraction and velocity distributions of each phase. Nevertheless, the

  16. Coupled in silico platform: Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulović, Aleksandra; Šušteršič, Tijana; Cvijić, Sandra; Ibrić, Svetlana; Filipović, Nenad

    2018-02-15

    One of the critical components of the respiratory drug delivery is the manner in which the inhaled aerosol is deposited in respiratory tract compartments. Depending on formulation properties, device characteristics and breathing pattern, only a certain fraction of the dose will reach the target site in the lungs, while the rest of the drug will deposit in the inhalation device or in the mouth-throat region. The aim of this study was to link the Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling in order to predict aerolisolization of different dry powder formulations, and estimate concomitant in vivo deposition and absorption of amiloride hydrochloride. Drug physicochemical properties were experimentally determined and used as inputs for the CFD simulations of particle flow in the generated 3D geometric model of Aerolizer® dry powder inhaler (DPI). CFD simulations were used to simulate air flow through Aerolizer® inhaler and Discrete Phase Method (DPM) was used to simulate aerosol particles deposition within the fluid domain. The simulated values for the percent emitted dose were comparable to the values obtained using Andersen cascade impactor (ACI). However, CFD predictions indicated that aerosolized DPI have smaller particle size and narrower size distribution than assumed based on ACI measurements. Comparison with the literature in vivo data revealed that the constructed drug-specific PBPK model was able to capture amiloride absorption pattern following oral and inhalation administration. The PBPK simulation results, based on the CFD generated particle distribution data as input, illustrated the influence of formulation properties on the expected drug plasma concentration profiles. The model also predicted the influence of potential changes in physiological parameters on the extent of inhaled amiloride absorption. Overall, this study demonstrated the potential of the combined CFD-PBPK approach to model inhaled drug

  17. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) using porous media modeling predicts recurrence after coiling of cerebral aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Yasuyuki; Ishida, Fujimaro; Tsuji, Masanori; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Shiba, Masato; Yasuda, Ryuta; Toma, Naoki; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to predict recurrence after coil embolization of unruptured cerebral aneurysms with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) using porous media modeling (porous media CFD). A total of 37 unruptured cerebral aneurysms treated with coiling were analyzed using follow-up angiograms, simulated CFD prior to coiling (control CFD), and porous media CFD. Coiled aneurysms were classified into stable or recurrence groups according to follow-up angiogram findings. Morphological parameters, coil packing density, and hemodynamic variables were evaluated for their correlations with aneurysmal recurrence. We also calculated residual flow volumes (RFVs), a novel hemodynamic parameter used to quantify the residual aneurysm volume after simulated coiling, which has a mean fluid domain > 1.0 cm/s. Follow-up angiograms showed 24 aneurysms in the stable group and 13 in the recurrence group. Mann-Whitney U test demonstrated that maximum size, dome volume, neck width, neck area, and coil packing density were significantly different between the two groups (P CFD and larger RFVs in the porous media CFD. Multivariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that RFV was the only independently significant factor (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.11; P = 0.016). The study findings suggest that RFV collected under porous media modeling predicts the recurrence of coiled aneurysms.

  18. Environmental Factors Affecting Computer Assisted Language Learning Success: A Complex Dynamic Systems Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Michael W.; Wu, Wen-Chi Vivian

    2014-01-01

    This conceptual, interdisciplinary inquiry explores Complex Dynamic Systems as the concept relates to the internal and external environmental factors affecting computer assisted language learning (CALL). Based on the results obtained by de Rosnay ["World Futures: The Journal of General Evolution", 67(4/5), 304-315 (2011)], who observed…

  19. The Theory of Reasoned Action as Parallel Constraint Satisfaction: Towards a Dynamic Computational Model of Health Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Orr, Mark G.; Thrush, Roxanne; Plaut, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The reasoned action approach, although ubiquitous in health behavior theory (e.g., Theory of Reasoned Action/Planned Behavior), does not adequately address two key dynamical aspects of health behavior: learning and the effect of immediate social context (i.e., social influence). To remedy this, we put forth a computational implementation of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) using artificial-neural networks. Our model re-conceptualized behavioral intention as arising from a dynamic constrain...

  20. Essential Computational Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    This book serves as a complete and self-contained introduction to the principles of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis. It is deliberately short (at approximately 300 pages) and can be used as a text for the first part of the course of applied CFD followed by a software tutorial. The main objectives of this non-traditional format are: 1) To introduce and explain, using simple examples where possible, the principles and methods of CFD analysis and to demystify the `black box’ of a CFD software tool, and 2) To provide a basic understanding of how CFD problems are set and

  1. Accidental release of chlorine in Chicago: Coupling of an exposure model with a Computational Fluid Dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, E. Y.; Colman Lerner, J. E.; Porta, A.; Jacovkis, P. M.

    2013-01-01

    The adverse health effects of the release of hazardous substances into the atmosphere continue being a matter of concern, especially in densely populated urban regions. Emergency responders need to have estimates of these adverse health effects in the local population to aid planning, emergency response, and recovery efforts. For this purpose, models that predict the transport and dispersion of hazardous materials are as necessary as those that estimate the adverse health effects in the population. In this paper, we present the results obtained by coupling a Computational Fluid Dynamics model, FLACS (FLame ACceleration Simulator), with an exposure model, DDC (Damage Differential Coupling). This coupled model system is applied to a scenario of hypothetical release of chlorine with obstacles, such as buildings, and the results show how it is capable of predicting the atmospheric dispersion of hazardous chemicals, and the adverse health effects in the exposed population, to support decision makers both in charge of emergency planning and in charge of real-time response. The results obtained show how knowing the influence of obstacles in the trajectory of the toxic cloud and in the diffusion of the pollutants transported, and obtaining dynamic information of the potentially affected population and of associated symptoms, contribute to improve the planning of the protection and response measures.

  2. Computational fluid dynamics model of avian tracheal temperature control as a model for extant and extinct animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlova, N S; Arkali, F; Witzel, U; Perry, S F

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory evaporative cooling is an important mechanism of temperature control in bird. A computational simulation of the breathing cycle, heat and water loss in anatomical avian trachea/air sac model has not previously been conducted. We report a first attempt to simulate a breathing cycle in a three-dimensional model of avian trachea and air sacs (domestic fowl) using transient computational fluid dynamics. The airflow in the trachea of the model is evoked by changing the volume of the air sacs based on the measured tidal volume and inspiratory/expiratory times for the domestic fowl. We compare flow parameters and heat transfer results with in vivo data and with our previously reported results for a two-dimensional model. The total respiratory heat loss corresponds to about 13-19% of the starvation metabolic rate of domestic fowl. The present study can lend insight into a possible thermoregulatory function in species with long necks and/or a very long trachea, as found in swans and birds of paradise. Assuming the structure of the sauropod dinosaur respiratory system was close to avian, the simulation of the respiratory temperature control (using convective and evaporative cooling) in the extensively experimentally studied domestic fowl may also help in making simulations of respiratory heat control in these extinct animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Computational fluid dynamic model for glycerol gasification in supercritical water in a tee junction shaped cylindrical reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yukananto, Riza; Pozarlik, Artur K.; Brem, Gerrit

    2018-01-01

    Gasification in supercritical water is a very promising technology to process wet biomass into a valuable gas. Providing insight of the process behavior is therefore very important. In this research a computational fluid dynamic model is developed to investigate glycerol gasification in

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study on the Effects of RATO Timing on the Scale Model Acoustic Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tanner; Williams, B.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The SLS lift off configuration consists of four RS-25 liquid thrusters on the core stage, with two solid boosters connected to each side. Past experience with scale model testing at MSFC (in ER42), has shown that there is a delay in the ignition of the Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motor, which is used as the 5% scale analog of the solid boosters, after the signal to ignite is given. This delay can range from 0 to 16.5ms. While this small of a delay maybe insignificant in the case of the full scale SLS, it can significantly alter the data obtained during the SMAT due to the much smaller geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs during full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is much smaller allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust duct, through the trench, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. To better understand the effect of the RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT IOP test data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed using the Loci/CHEM CFD software program. Five different timing offsets, based on RATO ignition delay statistics, were simulated. A variety of results and comparisons will be given, assessing the overall effect of RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT overpressure environment.

  5. Characterization of the Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Environment using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The pressure waves that propagate from the mobile launcher (ML) exhaust hole are defined as the ignition overpressure (IOP), while the portion of the pressure waves that exit the duct or trench are the duct overpressure (DOP). Distinguishing the IOP and DOP in scale model test data has been difficult in past experiences and in early SMAT results, due to the effects of scaling the geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs in full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is twenty times smaller, allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust hole, through the trench and duct, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. The DOP waves impact portions of the vehicle at the same time as the IOP waves, making it difficult to distinguish the different waves and fully understand the data. To better understand the SMAT data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed with a fictitious geometry that isolates the IOP and DOP. The upper and lower portions of the domain were segregated to accomplish the isolation in such a way that the flow physics were not significantly altered. The Loci/CHEM CFD software program was used to perform this analysis.

  6. Dynamics of Information as Natural Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Dodig Crnkovic

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Processes considered rendering information dynamics have been studied, among others in: questions and answers, observations, communication, learning, belief revision, logical inference, game-theoretic interactions and computation. This article will put the computational approaches into a broader context of natural computation, where information dynamics is not only found in human communication and computational machinery but also in the entire nature. Information is understood as representing the world (reality as an informational web for a cognizing agent, while information dynamics (information processing, computation realizes physical laws through which all the changes of informational structures unfold. Computation as it appears in the natural world is more general than the human process of calculation modeled by the Turing machine. Natural computing is epitomized through the interactions of concurrent, in general asynchronous computational processes which are adequately represented by what Abramsky names “the second generation models of computation” [1] which we argue to be the most general representation of information dynamics.

  7. Application of Computer Systems of Dynamic Modeling for Evaluation of Protection Behavior of Electric Power Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Romaniouk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems pertaining to mathematical modeling of a transformer substation with protected electric power lines. It is proposed to use systems of dynamic modeling for investigations applying a method of calculative experiment with the purpose to evaluate behavior of protection and automation at short circuits. The paper contains comparison of results obtained with the help of program-simulated complex on the basis of a complex mathematical model of an object and with the help of dynamic modeling system – MathLab.

  8. Deriving Behaviour of Hodgkin Huxley model with fever dynamics: A computational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan ESKALEN

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A single neuron can be modeled by the set of differential equations. Hodgkin-Huxley (HH model, the one of the most famous neuron model, can be considered as a dynamical system with four independent variables. Here we studied to reduce the number of differential equation required for conductance based HH model under strong inhibitory noise. Exponential Integrate and Fire (EIF model, one independent variable, is used as a reduced model of HH model by using current-voltage (I-V curve of the original model. The required reduction parameters are determined from this curve. The behaviour of HH model and its reduced EIF (rEIF model are in good agreement in sub-threshold level. Above-threshold behaviour of reduced EIF model and original model compared in terms of threshold voltage under strong inhibitory noise. Our numerical simulations clearly show that sub-threshold behaviour of HH model perfectly reduced to rEIF model.

  9. The theory of reasoned action as parallel constraint satisfaction: towards a dynamic computational model of health behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Mark G; Thrush, Roxanne; Plaut, David C

    2013-01-01

    The reasoned action approach, although ubiquitous in health behavior theory (e.g., Theory of Reasoned Action/Planned Behavior), does not adequately address two key dynamical aspects of health behavior: learning and the effect of immediate social context (i.e., social influence). To remedy this, we put forth a computational implementation of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) using artificial-neural networks. Our model re-conceptualized behavioral intention as arising from a dynamic constraint satisfaction mechanism among a set of beliefs. In two simulations, we show that constraint satisfaction can simultaneously incorporate the effects of past experience (via learning) with the effects of immediate social context to yield behavioral intention, i.e., intention is dynamically constructed from both an individual's pre-existing belief structure and the beliefs of others in the individual's social context. In a third simulation, we illustrate the predictive ability of the model with respect to empirically derived behavioral intention. As the first known computational model of health behavior, it represents a significant advance in theory towards understanding the dynamics of health behavior. Furthermore, our approach may inform the development of population-level agent-based models of health behavior that aim to incorporate psychological theory into models of population dynamics.

  10. The theory of reasoned action as parallel constraint satisfaction: towards a dynamic computational model of health behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark G Orr

    Full Text Available The reasoned action approach, although ubiquitous in health behavior theory (e.g., Theory of Reasoned Action/Planned Behavior, does not adequately address two key dynamical aspects of health behavior: learning and the effect of immediate social context (i.e., social influence. To remedy this, we put forth a computational implementation of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA using artificial-neural networks. Our model re-conceptualized behavioral intention as arising from a dynamic constraint satisfaction mechanism among a set of beliefs. In two simulations, we show that constraint satisfaction can simultaneously incorporate the effects of past experience (via learning with the effects of immediate social context to yield behavioral intention, i.e., intention is dynamically constructed from both an individual's pre-existing belief structure and the beliefs of others in the individual's social context. In a third simulation, we illustrate the predictive ability of the model with respect to empirically derived behavioral intention. As the first known computational model of health behavior, it represents a significant advance in theory towards understanding the dynamics of health behavior. Furthermore, our approach may inform the development of population-level agent-based models of health behavior that aim to incorporate psychological theory into models of population dynamics.

  11. A computationally exact method of Dawson's model for hole dynamics of one-dimensional plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Kazuo; Tanno, Kohki; Takada, Toshio; Hatori, Tadatsugu; Urata, Kazuhiro; Irie, Haruyuki; Nambu, Mitsuhiro; Saeki, Kohichi.

    1990-01-01

    We show a simple but computationally exact solution of the one-dimensional plasma model, so-called 'Dawson's model'. Using this solution, we can describe the evolution of the plasma and find the relative stabilization of a big hole after the instability of two streams. (author)

  12. Moving domain computational fluid dynamics to interface with an embryonic model of cardiac morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhyun Lee

    Full Text Available Peristaltic contraction of the embryonic heart tube produces time- and spatial-varying wall shear stress (WSS and pressure gradients (∇P across the atrioventricular (AV canal. Zebrafish (Danio rerio are a genetically tractable system to investigate cardiac morphogenesis. The use of Tg(fli1a:EGFP (y1 transgenic embryos allowed for delineation and two-dimensional reconstruction of the endocardium. This time-varying wall motion was then prescribed in a two-dimensional moving domain computational fluid dynamics (CFD model, providing new insights into spatial and temporal variations in WSS and ∇P during cardiac development. The CFD simulations were validated with particle image velocimetry (PIV across the atrioventricular (AV canal, revealing an increase in both velocities and heart rates, but a decrease in the duration of atrial systole from early to later stages. At 20-30 hours post fertilization (hpf, simulation results revealed bidirectional WSS across the AV canal in the heart tube in response to peristaltic motion of the wall. At 40-50 hpf, the tube structure undergoes cardiac looping, accompanied by a nearly 3-fold increase in WSS magnitude. At 110-120 hpf, distinct AV valve, atrium, ventricle, and bulbus arteriosus form, accompanied by incremental increases in both WSS magnitude and ∇P, but a decrease in bi-directional flow. Laminar flow develops across the AV canal at 20-30 hpf, and persists at 110-120 hpf. Reynolds numbers at the AV canal increase from 0.07±0.03 at 20-30 hpf to 0.23±0.07 at 110-120 hpf (p< 0.05, n=6, whereas Womersley numbers remain relatively unchanged from 0.11 to 0.13. Our moving domain simulations highlights hemodynamic changes in relation to cardiac morphogenesis; thereby, providing a 2-D quantitative approach to complement imaging analysis.

  13. A computational fluid dynamics modeling study of guide walls for downstream fish passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kevin; Towler, Brett; Haro, Alexander J.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2017-01-01

    A partial-depth, impermeable guidance structure (or guide wall) for downstream fish passage is typically constructed as a series of panels attached to a floating boom and anchored across a water body (e.g. river channel, reservoir, or power canal). The downstream terminus of the wall is generally located nearby to a fish bypass structure. If guidance is successful, the fish will avoid entrainment in a dangerous intake structure (i.e. turbine intakes) while passing from the headpond to the tailwater of a hydroelectric facility through a safer passage route (i.e. the bypass). The goal of this study is to determine the combination of guide wall design parameters that will most likely increase the chance of surface-oriented fish being successfully guided to the bypass. To evaluate the flow field immediately upstream of a guide wall, a parameterized computational fluid dynamics model of an idealized power canal was constructed in © ANSYS Fluent v 14.5 (ANSYS Inc., 2012). The design parameters investigated were the angle and depth of the guide wall and the average approach velocity in the power canal. Results call attention to the importance of the downward to sweeping flow ratio and demonstrate how a change in guide wall depth and angle can affect this important hydraulic cue to out-migrating fish. The key findings indicate that a guide wall set at a small angle (15° is the minimum in this study) and deep enough such that sweeping flow dominant conditions prevail within the expected vertical distribution of fish approaching the structure will produce hydraulic conditions that are more likely to result in effective passage.

  14. Computer modeling of the dynamic processes in the Maryland University Training Reactor - (MUTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Bernard H. IV; Ebert, David

    1988-01-01

    The simulator described in this paper models the behaviour of the Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR). The reactor is a 250 kW, TRIGA reactor. The computer model is based on a system of five primary equations and eight auxiliary equations. The primary equations consist of the prompt jump approximation, a heat balance equation for the fuel and the moderator, and iodine and xenon buildup equations. For the comparison with the computer program, data from the reactor was acquired by using a personal computer (pc) which contained a Strawberry Tree data acquisition Card, connected to the reactor. The systems monitored by the pc were: two neutron detectors, fuel temperature, water temperature, three control rod positions and the period meter. The time differenced equations were programmed in the basic language. It has been shown by this paper, that the MUTR power rise from low power critical to high power, can be modelled by a relatively simple computer program. The program yields accurate agreement considering the simplicity of the program. The steady state error between the reactor and computer power is 4.4%. The difference in steady state temperatures, 112 deg. C and 117 deg. C, of the reactor and computer program, respectively, also yields a 4.5% error. Further fine tuning of the coefficients will yield higher accuracies

  15. A control method for agricultural greenhouses heating based on computational fluid dynamics and energy prediction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jiaoliao; Xu, Fang; Tan, Dapeng; Shen, Zheng; Zhang, Libin; Ai, Qinglin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel control method for the heating greenhouse with SWSHPS is proposed. • CFD is employed to predict the priorities of FCU loops for thermal performance. • EPM is act as an on-line tool to predict the total energy demand of greenhouse. • The CFD–EPM-based method can save energy and improve control accuracy. • The energy savings potential is between 8.7% and 15.1%. - Abstract: As energy heating is one of the main production costs, many efforts have been made to reduce the energy consumption of agricultural greenhouses. Herein, a novel control method of greenhouse heating using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and energy prediction model (EPM) is proposed for energy savings and system performance. Based on the low-Reynolds number k–ε turbulence principle, a CFD model of heating greenhouse is developed, applying the discrete ordinates model for the radiative heat transfers and porous medium approach for plants considering plants sensible and latent heat exchanges. The CFD simulations have been validated, and used to analyze the greenhouse thermal performance and the priority of fan coil units (FCU) loops under the various heating conditions. According to the heating efficiency and temperature uniformity, the priorities of each FCU loop can be predicted to generate a database with priorities for control system. EPM is built up based on the thermal balance, and used to predict and optimize the energy demand of the greenhouse online. Combined with the priorities of FCU loops from CFD simulations offline, we have developed the CFD–EPM-based heating control system of greenhouse with surface water source heat pumps system (SWSHPS). Compared with conventional multi-zone independent control (CMIC) method, the energy savings potential is between 8.7% and 15.1%, and the control temperature deviation is decreased to between 0.1 °C and 0.6 °C in the investigated greenhouse. These results show the CFD–EPM-based method can improve system

  16. Comparison of Iterative Methods for Computing the Pressure Field in a Dynamic Network Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kristian; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Banerjee, Srilekha

    1999-01-01

    In dynamic network models, the pressure map (the pressure in the pores) must be evaluated at each time step. This calculation involves the solution of a large number of nonlinear algebraic systems of equations and accounts for more than 80 of the total CPU-time. Each nonlinear system requires...

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engine Flowfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daines, Russell L.; Merkle, Charles L.

    1994-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamic techniques are used to study the flowfield of a fixed geometry Rocket Based Combined Cycle engine operating in rocket ejector mode. Heat addition resulting from the combustion of injected fuel causes the subsonic engine flow to choke and go supersonic in the slightly divergent combustor-mixer section. Reacting flow computations are undertaken to predict the characteristics of solutions where the heat addition is determined by the flowfield. Here, adaptive gridding is used to improve resolution in the shear layers. Results show that the sonic speed is reached in the unheated portions of the flow first, while the heated portions become supersonic later. Comparison with results from another code show reasonable agreement. The coupled solutions show that the character of the combustion-based thermal choking phenomenon can be controlled reasonably well such that there is opportunity to optimize the length and expansion ratio of the combustor-mixer.

  18. Quantitative comparison of hemodynamics in simulated and 3D angiography models of cerebral aneurysms by use of computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saho, Tatsunori; Onishi, Hideo

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated hemodynamics using simulated models and determined how cerebral aneurysms develop in simulated and patient-specific models based on medical images. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was analyzed by use of OpenFOAM software. Flow velocity, stream line, and wall shear stress (WSS) were evaluated in a simulated model aneurysm with known geometry and in a three-dimensional angiographic model. The ratio of WSS at the aneurysm compared with that at the basilar artery was 1:10 in simulated model aneurysms with a diameter of 10 mm and 1:18 in the angiographic model, indicating similar tendencies. Vortex flow occurred in both model aneurysms, and the WSS decreased in larger model aneurysms. The angiographic model provided accurate CFD information, and the tendencies of simulated and angiographic models were similar. These findings indicate that hemodynamic effects are involved in the development of aneurysms.

  19. What can be learned from computer modeling? Comparing expository and modeling approaches to teaching dynamic systems behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Borkulo, S.P.; van Joolingen, W.R.; Savelsbergh, E.R.; de Jong, T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer modeling has been widely promoted as a means to attain higher order learning outcomes. Substantiating these benefits, however, has been problematic due to a lack of proper assessment tools. In this study, we compared computer modeling with expository instruction, using a tailored assessment

  20. Computational neuropharmacology: dynamical approaches in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, Ildiko; Erdi, Péter

    2006-05-01

    Computational approaches that adopt dynamical models are widely accepted in basic and clinical neuroscience research as indispensable tools with which to understand normal and pathological neuronal mechanisms. Although computer-aided techniques have been used in pharmaceutical research (e.g. in structure- and ligand-based drug design), the power of dynamical models has not yet been exploited in drug discovery. We suggest that dynamical system theory and computational neuroscience--integrated with well-established, conventional molecular and electrophysiological methods--offer a broad perspective in drug discovery and in the search for novel targets and strategies for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric diseases.

  1. Model implementation for dynamic computation of system cost for advanced life support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levri, J. A.; Vaccari, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Life support system designs for long-duration space missions have a multitude of requirements drivers, such as mission objectives, political considerations, cost, crew wellness, inherent mission attributes, as well as many other influences. Evaluation of requirements satisfaction can be difficult, particularly at an early stage of mission design. Because launch cost is a critical factor and relatively easy to quantify, it is a point of focus in early mission design. The method used to determine launch cost influences the accuracy of the estimate. This paper discusses the appropriateness of dynamic mission simulation in estimating the launch cost of a life support system. This paper also provides an abbreviated example of a dynamic simulation life support model and possible ways in which such a model might be utilized for design improvement. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Global analysis of dynamical decision-making models through local computation around the hidden saddle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Trotta

    Full Text Available Bistable dynamical switches are frequently encountered in mathematical modeling of biological systems because binary decisions are at the core of many cellular processes. Bistable switches present two stable steady-states, each of them corresponding to a distinct decision. In response to a transient signal, the system can flip back and forth between these two stable steady-states, switching between both decisions. Understanding which parameters and states affect this switch between stable states may shed light on the mechanisms underlying the decision-making process. Yet, answering such a question involves analyzing the global dynamical (i.e., transient behavior of a nonlinear, possibly high dimensional model. In this paper, we show how a local analysis at a particular equilibrium point of bistable systems is highly relevant to understand the global properties of the switching system. The local analysis is performed at the saddle point, an often disregarded equilibrium point of bistable models but which is shown to be a key ruler of the decision-making process. Results are illustrated on three previously published models of biological switches: two models of apoptosis, the programmed cell death and one model of long-term potentiation, a phenomenon underlying synaptic plasticity.

  3. Electricity demand and spot price forecasting using evolutionary computation combined with chaotic nonlinear dynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsihuay-Vila, C.; Zambroni de Souza, A.C.; Marangon-Lima, J.W.; Balestrassi, P.P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a new hybrid approach based on nonlinear chaotic dynamics and evolutionary strategy to forecast electricity loads and prices. The main idea is to develop a new training or identification stage in a nonlinear chaotic dynamic based predictor. In the training stage five optimal parameters for a chaotic based predictor are searched through an optimization model based on evolutionary strategy. The objective function of the optimization model is the mismatch minimization between the multi-step-ahead forecasting of predictor and observed data such as it is done in identification problems. The first contribution of this paper is that the proposed approach is capable of capturing the complex dynamic of demand and price time series considered resulting in a more accuracy forecasting. The second contribution is that the proposed approach run on-line manner, i.e. the optimal set of parameters and prediction is executed automatically which can be used to prediction in real-time, it is an advantage in comparison with other models, where the choice of their input parameters are carried out off-line, following qualitative/experience-based recipes. A case study of load and price forecasting is presented using data from New England, Alberta, and Spain. A comparison with other methods such as autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) and artificial neural network (ANN) is shown. The results show that the proposed approach provides a more accurate and effective forecasting than ARIMA and ANN methods. (author)

  4. Physical models and numerical methods of the reactor dynamic computer program RETRAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamelander, G.; Woloch, F.; Sdouz, G.; Koinig, H.

    1984-03-01

    This report describes the physical models and the numerical methods of the reactor dynamic code RETRAN simulating reactivity transients in Light-Water-Reactors. The neutron-physical part of RETRAN bases on the two-group-diffusion equations which are solved by discretization similar to the TWIGL-method. An exponential transformation is applied and the inner iterations are accelerated by a coarse-mesh-rebalancing procedure. The thermo-hydraulic model approximates the equation of state by a built-in steam-water-table and disposes of options for the calculation of heat-conduction coefficients and heat transfer coefficients. (Author) [de

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bubbling in a Viscous Fluid for Validation of Waste Glass Melter Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, Alexander William [Idaho National Laboratory; Guillen, Donna Post [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    At the Hanford site, radioactive waste stored in underground tanks is slated for vitrification for final disposal. A comprehensive knowledge of the glass batch melting process will be useful in optimizing the process, which could potentially reduce the cost and duration of this multi-billion dollar cleanup effort. We are developing a high-fidelity heat transfer model of a Joule-heated ceramic lined melter to improve the understanding of the complex, inter-related processes occurring with the melter. The glass conversion rates in the cold cap layer are dependent on promoting efficient heat transfer. In practice, heat transfer is augmented by inserting air bubblers into the molten glass. However, the computational simulations must be validated to provide confidence in the solutions. As part of a larger validation procedure, it is beneficial to split the physics of the melter into smaller systems to validate individually. The substitution of molten glass for a simulant liquid with similar density and viscosity at room temperature provides a way to study mixing through bubbling as an isolated effect without considering the heat transfer dynamics. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained by the Vitreous State Laboratory at the Catholic University of America using bubblers placed within a large acrylic tank that is similar in scale to a pilot glass waste melter. Comparisons are made for surface area of the rising air bubbles between experiments and CFD simulations for a variety of air flow rates and bubble injection depths. Also, computed bubble rise velocity is compared to a well-accepted expression for bubble terminal velocity.

  6. Computational models to determine fluid dynamical transients due to condensation induced water hammer (CIWH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swidersky, H.; Schaffrath, A.; Dudlik, A.

    2011-01-01

    Condensation induced water hammer (CIWH) represent a dangerous phenomenon in pipings, which can endanger the pipe integrity. If they cannot be excluded, they have to be taken into account for the integrity proof of components and pipe structures. Up to now, there exists no substantiated model, which sufficiently determines loads due to CIWH. Within the framework of the research alliance CIWA, a tool for estimating the potential and the amount of pressure loads will be developed based on theoretical work and supported by experimental results. This first study discusses used computational models, compares their results against experimental observations and gives an outlook onto future techniques. (author)

  7. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of momentum transport in rotating wall perfused bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N; Tığli, R Seda; Beşkardeş, Işil Gerçek; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe; Colak, Uner

    2010-11-01

    In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of a rotating-wall perfused-vessel (RWPV) bioreactor is performed to characterize the complex hydrodynamic environment for the simulation of cartilage development in RWPV bioreactor in the presence of tissue-engineered cartilage constructs, i.e., cell-chitosan scaffolds. Shear stress exerted on chitosan scaffolds in bioreactor was calculated for different rotational velocities in the range of 33-38 rpm. According to the calculations, the lateral and lower surfaces were exposed to 0.07926-0.11069 dyne/cm(2) and 0.05974-0.08345 dyne/cm(2), respectively, while upper surfaces of constructs were exposed to 0.09196-0.12847 dyne/cm(2). Results validate adequate hydrodynamic environment for scaffolds in RWPV bioreactor for cartilage tissue development which concludes the suitability of operational conditions of RWPV bioreactor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Energy saving during bulb storage applying modeling with computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapounas, A.A.; Campen, J.B.; Wildschut, J.; Bot, G.P. [Wageningen UR Greenhouse Horticutlure and Applied Plant Research, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    Tulip bulbs are stored in ventilated containers to avoid high ethylene concentration between the bulbs. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code was used in this study to examine the distribution of air flow between the containers and the potential energy saving by applying simple solutions concerning the design of the air inlet area and the adjustment of the ventilation rate. The variation in container ventilation was calculated to be between 60 and 180 per cent, with 100 per cent being the average flow through the containers. Various improvement measures were examined. The study showed that 7 per cent energy can be saved by smoothing the sharp corners of the entrance channels of the ventilation wall. The most effective and simple improvement was to cover the open top containers. In this case, the variation was between 80 and 120 per cent. The energy saving was about 38 per cent by adjusting the overall ventilation to the container with the minimal acceptable air flow.

  9. Computational cognitive modeling of the temporal dynamics of fatigue from sleep loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Matthew M; Gunzelmann, Glenn; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2017-12-01

    Computational models have become common tools in psychology. They provide quantitative instantiations of theories that seek to explain the functioning of the human mind. In this paper, we focus on identifying deep theoretical similarities between two very different models. Both models are concerned with how fatigue from sleep loss impacts cognitive processing. The first is based on the diffusion model and posits that fatigue decreases the drift rate of the diffusion process. The second is based on the Adaptive Control of Thought - Rational (ACT-R) cognitive architecture and posits that fatigue decreases the utility of candidate actions leading to microlapses in cognitive processing. A biomathematical model of fatigue is used to control drift rate in the first account and utility in the second. We investigated the predicted response time distributions of these two integrated computational cognitive models for performance on a psychomotor vigilance test under conditions of total sleep deprivation, simulated shift work, and sustained sleep restriction. The models generated equivalent predictions of response time distributions with excellent goodness-of-fit to the human data. More importantly, although the accounts involve different modeling approaches and levels of abstraction, they represent the effects of fatigue in a functionally equivalent way: in both, fatigue decreases the signal-to-noise ratio in decision processes and decreases response inhibition. This convergence suggests that sleep loss impairs psychomotor vigilance performance through degradation of the quality of cognitive processing, which provides a foundation for systematic investigation of the effects of sleep loss on other aspects of cognition. Our findings illustrate the value of treating different modeling formalisms as vehicles for discovery.

  10. Irrigant flow in the root canal: experimental validation of an unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics model using high-speed imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutsioukis, C; Verhaagen, B; Versluis, M; Kastrinakis, E; van der Sluis, L W M

    2010-05-01

    To compare the results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of the irrigant flow within a prepared root canal, during final irrigation with a syringe and a needle, with experimental high-speed visualizations and theoretical calculations of an identical geometry and to evaluate the effect of off-centre positioning of the needle inside the root canal. A CFD model was created to simulate irrigant flow from a side-vented needle inside a prepared root canal. Calculations were carried out for four different positions of the needle inside a prepared root canal. An identical root canal model was made from poly-dimethyl-siloxane (PDMS). High-speed imaging of the flow seeded with particles and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) were combined to obtain the velocity field inside the root canal experimentally. Computational, theoretical and experimental results were compared to assess the validity of the computational model. Comparison between CFD computations and experiments revealed good agreement in the velocity magnitude and vortex location and size. Small lateral displacements of the needle inside the canal had a limited effect on the flow field. High-speed imaging experiments together with PIV of the flow inside a simulated root canal showed a good agreement with the CFD model, even though the flow was unsteady. Therefore, the CFD model is able to predict reliably the flow in similar domains.

  11. Computational modeling of seizure dynamics using coupled neuronal networks: factors shaping epileptiform activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Naze

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic seizure dynamics span multiple scales in space and time. Understanding seizure mechanisms requires identifying the relations between seizure components within and across these scales, together with the analysis of their dynamical repertoire. Mathematical models have been developed to reproduce seizure dynamics across scales ranging from the single neuron to the neural population. In this study, we develop a network model of spiking neurons and systematically investigate the conditions, under which the network displays the emergent dynamic behaviors known from the Epileptor, which is a well-investigated abstract model of epileptic neural activity. This approach allows us to study the biophysical parameters and variables leading to epileptiform discharges at cellular and network levels. Our network model is composed of two neuronal populations, characterized by fast excitatory bursting neurons and regular spiking inhibitory neurons, embedded in a common extracellular environment represented by a slow variable. By systematically analyzing the parameter landscape offered by the simulation framework, we reproduce typical sequences of neural activity observed during status epilepticus. We find that exogenous fluctuations from extracellular environment and electro-tonic couplings play a major role in the progression of the seizure, which supports previous studies and further validates our model. We also investigate the influence of chemical synaptic coupling in the generation of spontaneous seizure-like events. Our results argue towards a temporal shift of typical spike waves with fast discharges as synaptic strengths are varied. We demonstrate that spike waves, including interictal spikes, are generated primarily by inhibitory neurons, whereas fast discharges during the wave part are due to excitatory neurons. Simulated traces are compared with in vivo experimental data from rodents at different stages of the disorder. We draw the conclusion

  12. Modelling of plasma processes based on the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package FLUENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazhin, S.S.

    1995-01-01

    Traditional applications of the commercial CFD package FLUENT include modelling of gas and liquid flows, combustion processes, thermal radiation exchange, particle dynamics and related processes of industrial interest. Recently, however, the area of applications of this package has been extended to modelling of new processes such as CO 2 laser discharges and the solution of the Boltzmann equation. Results of this modelling were reported at XXI International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized gases in Bochum and were later published in a number of research papers. The aim of this report is to summarize some further latest developments of the FLUENT package aimed to adjust it to the needs of modelling of plasma processes including those in ionized gases. The simplest way to modify this package is to include Amper force into Navier-Stokes equation and Ohm heating term into the enthalpy equation. In most cases, however, electric currents and electric and magnetic fields used in these equations cannot be assumed to be a priori known as they depend on plasma dynamics (distribution of velocities and pressures) and thermodynamics (distribution of temperatures) which implicitly enter into Maxwell or any equivalent electromagnetic equations. This makes it necessary to include these electromagnetic equations into the general iteration loop used in FLUENT

  13. Computational Modeling | Bioenergy | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    cell walls and are the source of biofuels and biomaterials. Our modeling investigates their properties . Quantum Mechanical Models NREL studies chemical and electronic properties and processes to reduce barriers Computational Modeling Computational Modeling NREL uses computational modeling to increase the

  14. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) in the rat kidney and application to acute renal failure models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Isao; Saito, Tadashi; Ishii, Hirofumi; Bansho, Junichi; Koyama, Yukinori; Tobita, Akira

    1995-01-01

    Renal dynamic CT scanning is suitable for determining the excretion of contrast medium in the cortex and medulla of the kidney, which is valuable for understanding the pathogenesis of disease processes in various conditions. This form of scanning would be convenient for use, if a method of application to the rat kidney were available. Therefore, we developed a method of applying renal dynamic CT to rats and evaluated the cortical and medullary curves, e.g., the corticomedullary junction time which is correlated to creatinine clearance, in various rat models of acute renal failure. The rat was placed in a 10deg oblique position and a bilateral hilar slice was obtained before and 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160 and 180 sec after administering 0.5 ml of contrast medium using Somatom DR. The width of the slice was 4 mm and the scan time was 3 sec. The corticomedullary junction time in normal rats was 23.0±10.5 sec, the peak value of the cortical curve was 286.3±76.7 Hounsfield Unit (HU) and the peak value of the medullary curve was 390.1±66.2 HU. Corticomedullary junction time after exposure of the kidney was prolonged compared to that of the unexposed kidney. In rats with acute renal failure, the excretion pattern of contrast medium was similar in both the glycerol- and HgCl2-induced acute renal failure models. The peak values of the cortical curve were maintained three hours after a clamp was placed at the hilar region of the kidney for one hour, and the peak values of the medullary curve were maintained during the administration of 10μg/kg/min of angiotensin II. Dynamic CT curves in the acute renal failure models examined were slightly different from those in human acute renal failure. These results suggest that rats do not provide an ideal model for human acute renal failure. However, the application of dynamic CT to the rat kidney models was valuable for estimating the pathogenesis of various human kidney diseases. (author)

  15. Near-wellbore modeling of a horizontal well with Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szanyi, Márton L.; Hemmingsen, Casper Schytte; Yan, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Dynamics (CFD) is capable of modeling the complex interaction between the creeping reservoir flow and turbulent well flow for single phases, while capturing both the completion geometry and formation damage. A series of single phase steady-state simulations are undertaken, using such fully coupled three...... dimensional numerical models, to predict the inflow to the well. The present study considers the applicability of CFD for near-wellbore modeling through benchmark cases with available analytical solutions. Moreover, single phase steady-state numerical investigations are performed on a specific perforated...... horizontal well producing from the Siri field, offshore Denmark. The performance of the well is investigated with an emphasis on the inflow profile and the productivity index for different formation damage scenarios. A considerable redistribution of the inflow profile were found when the filtrate invasion...

  16. Physiological Dynamics in Demyelinating Diseases: Unraveling Complex Relationships through Computer Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay S. Coggan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intense research, few treatments are available for most neurological disorders. Demyelinating diseases are no exception. This is perhaps not surprising considering the multifactorial nature of these diseases, which involve complex interactions between immune system cells, glia and neurons. In the case of multiple sclerosis, for example, there is no unanimity among researchers about the cause or even which system or cell type could be ground zero. This situation precludes the development and strategic application of mechanism-based therapies. We will discuss how computational modeling applied to questions at different biological levels can help link together disparate observations and decipher complex mechanisms whose solutions are not amenable to simple reductionism. By making testable predictions and revealing critical gaps in existing knowledge, such models can help direct research and will provide a rigorous framework in which to integrate new data as they are collected. Nowadays, there is no shortage of data; the challenge is to make sense of it all. In that respect, computational modeling is an invaluable tool that could, ultimately, transform how we understand, diagnose, and treat demyelinating diseases.

  17. Dynamics of a Computer Virus Propagation Model with Delays and Graded Infection Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zizhen Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A four-compartment computer virus propagation model with two delays and graded infection rate is investigated in this paper. The critical values where a Hopf bifurcation occurs are obtained by analyzing the distribution of eigenvalues of the corresponding characteristic equation. In succession, direction and stability of the Hopf bifurcation when the two delays are not equal are determined by using normal form theory and center manifold theorem. Finally, some numerical simulations are also carried out to justify the obtained theoretical results.

  18. Coupling of Coastal Wave Transformation and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models for Seakeeping Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-03

    accuracy and stability of the model results. 4. CFD Experiment OpenFOAM (Open source Field Operation and Manipulation) is an open-source CFD toolbox...that enables customization of applications in continuum mechanics and chemical processes. The InterFOAM solver within OpenFOAM makes use of the...the solution from OpenFOAM . The computational domains correspond to a flume of 60 m long and 2.5 m high with the bottom step at the center. The height

  19. Modelling of Mass Transfer Phenomena in Chemical and Biochemical Reactor Systems using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Hilde Kristina

    the velocity and pressure distributions in a fluid. CFD also enables the modelling of several fluids simultaneously, e.g. gas bubbles in a liquid, as well as the presence of turbulence and dissolved chemicals in a fluid, and many other phenomena. This makes CFD an appreciated tool for studying flow structures......, mixing, and other mass transfer phenomena in chemical and biochemical reactor systems. In this project, four selected case studies are investigated in order to explore the capabilities of CFD. The selected cases are a 1 ml stirred microbioreactor, an 8 ml magnetically stirred reactor, a Rushton impeller...... and an ion-exchange reaction are also modelled and compared to experimental data. The thesis includes a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals behind a CFD software, as well as a more detailed review of the fluid dynamic phenomena investigated in this project. The momentum and continuity equations...

  20. Exploring the dynamics of collective cognition using a computational model of cognitive dissonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Paul R.; Sycara, Katia; Richardson, Darren P.

    2013-05-01

    The socially-distributed nature of cognitive processing in a variety of organizational settings means that there is increasing scientific interest in the factors that affect collective cognition. In military coalitions, for example, there is a need to understand how factors such as communication network topology, trust, cultural differences and the potential for miscommunication affects the ability of distributed teams to generate high quality plans, to formulate effective decisions and to develop shared situation awareness. The current paper presents a computational model and associated simulation capability for performing in silico experimental analyses of collective sensemaking. This model can be used in combination with the results of human experimental studies in order to improve our understanding of the factors that influence collective sensemaking processes.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics application: slosh analysis of a fuel tank model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iu, H.S.; Cleghorn, W.L.; Mills, J.K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of fluid slosh behaviour inside a fuel tank model. The fuel tank model was a simplified version of a stock fuel tank that has a sloshing noise problem. A commercial CFD software, FLOW-3D, was used to simulate the slosh behaviour. Slosh experiments were performed to verify the computer simulation results. High speed video equipment enhanced with a data acquisition system was used to record the slosh experiments and to obtain the instantaneous sound level of each video frame. Five baffle configurations including the no baffle configuration were considered in the computer simulations and the experiments. The simulation results showed that the best baffle configuration can reduce the mean kinetic energy by 80% from the no baffle configuration in a certain slosh situation. The experimental results showed that 15dB(A) noise reduction can be achieved by the best baffle configuration. The correlation analysis between the mean kinetic energy and the noise level showed that high mean kinetic energy of the fluid does not always correspond to high sloshing noise. High correlation between them only occurs for the slosh situations where the fluid hits the top of the tank and creates noise. (author)

  2. Consequence Based Design. An approach for integrating computational collaborative models (Integrated Dynamic Models) in the building design phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Negendahl, Kristoffer

    relies on various advancements in the area of integrated dynamic models. It also relies on the application and test of the approach in practice to evaluate the Consequence based design and the use of integrated dynamic models. As a result, the Consequence based design approach has been applied in five...... and define new ways to implement integrated dynamic models for the following project. In parallel, seven different developments of new methods, tools and algorithms have been performed to support the application of the approach. The developments concern: Decision diagrams – to clarify goals and the ability...... affect the design process and collaboration between building designers and simulationists. Within the limits of applying the approach of Consequence based design to five case studies, followed by documentation based on interviews, surveys and project related documentations derived from internal reports...

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Pulsatile Blood Flow Behavior in Modelled Stenosed Vessels with Different Severities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mehrabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the behavior of blood flow in the stenosed vessels. Blood is modelled as an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid which is based on the power law viscosity model. A numerical technique based on the finite difference method is developed to simulate the blood flow taking into account the transient periodic behaviour of the blood flow in cardiac cycles. Also, pulsatile blood flow in the stenosed vessel is based on the Womersley model, and fluid flow in the lumen region is governed by the continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equations. In this study, the stenosis shape is cosine by using Tu and Devil model. Comparing the results obtained from three stenosed vessels with 30%, 50%, and 75% area severity, we find that higher percent-area severity of stenosis leads to higher extrapressure jumps and higher blood speeds around the stenosis site. Also, we observe that the size of the stenosis in stenosed vessels does influence the blood flow. A little change on the cross-sectional value makes vast change on the blood flow rate. This simulation helps the people working in the field of physiological fluid dynamics as well as the medical practitioners.

  4. Reconstruction of neuronal input through modeling single-neuron dynamics and computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Qing; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Chan, Wai-lok

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models provide a mathematical description of neuron activity, which can better understand and quantify neural computations and corresponding biophysical mechanisms evoked by stimulus. In this paper, based on the output spike train evoked by the acupuncture mechanical stimulus, we present two different levels of models to describe the input-output system to achieve the reconstruction of neuronal input. The reconstruction process is divided into two steps: First, considering the neuronal spiking event as a Gamma stochastic process. The scale parameter and the shape parameter of Gamma process are, respectively, defined as two spiking characteristics, which are estimated by a state-space method. Then, leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model is used to mimic the response system and the estimated spiking characteristics are transformed into two temporal input parameters of LIF model, through two conversion formulas. We test this reconstruction method by three different groups of simulation data. All three groups of estimates reconstruct input parameters with fairly high accuracy. We then use this reconstruction method to estimate the non-measurable acupuncture input parameters. Results show that under three different frequencies of acupuncture stimulus conditions, estimated input parameters have an obvious difference. The higher the frequency of the acupuncture stimulus is, the higher the accuracy of reconstruction is.

  5. Reconstruction of neuronal input through modeling single-neuron dynamics and computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Qing; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin, E-mail: dengbin@tju.edu.cn; Chan, Wai-lok [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Mathematical models provide a mathematical description of neuron activity, which can better understand and quantify neural computations and corresponding biophysical mechanisms evoked by stimulus. In this paper, based on the output spike train evoked by the acupuncture mechanical stimulus, we present two different levels of models to describe the input-output system to achieve the reconstruction of neuronal input. The reconstruction process is divided into two steps: First, considering the neuronal spiking event as a Gamma stochastic process. The scale parameter and the shape parameter of Gamma process are, respectively, defined as two spiking characteristics, which are estimated by a state-space method. Then, leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model is used to mimic the response system and the estimated spiking characteristics are transformed into two temporal input parameters of LIF model, through two conversion formulas. We test this reconstruction method by three different groups of simulation data. All three groups of estimates reconstruct input parameters with fairly high accuracy. We then use this reconstruction method to estimate the non-measurable acupuncture input parameters. Results show that under three different frequencies of acupuncture stimulus conditions, estimated input parameters have an obvious difference. The higher the frequency of the acupuncture stimulus is, the higher the accuracy of reconstruction is.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of gas dispersion in multi impeller bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Ubaid; Ranganathan, Panneerselvam; Pandey, Ashok; Sivaraman, Savithri

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, experiments have been carried out to identify various flow regimes in a dual Rushton turbines stirred bioreactor for different gas flow rates and impeller speeds. The hydrodynamic parameters like fractional gas hold-up, power consumption and mixing time have been measured. A two fluid model along with MUSIG model to handle polydispersed gas flow has been implemented to predict the various flow regimes and hydrodynamic parameters in the dual turbines stirred bioreactor. The computational model has been mapped on commercial solver ANSYS CFX. The flow regimes predicted by numerical simulations are validated with the experimental results. The present model has successfully captured the flow regimes as observed during experiments. The measured gross flow characteristics like fractional gas hold-up, and mixing time have been compared with numerical simulations. Also the effect of gas flow rate and impeller speed on gas hold-up and power consumption have been investigated. (c) 2009 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Temperature control of CMS Barrel ECAL (EB) : computational thermo-hydraulic model for dynamic behaviour, control aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Wertelaers, P

    2010-01-01

    The current design foresees a central heat exchanger followed by a controlled post heater, for all ECAL. We discuss the scheme and try to assess its performance, from a Barrel viewpoint. This is based on computational work. The coolant transfer pipes play an essential role in building a dynamical model. After some studies on the behaviour of the cooling circuit itself, a strong yet simple controller is proposed. Then, the system with feedback control is scrutinized, with emphasis on disturbance rejection. The most relevant disturbances are cooling ripple, pipe heat attack, and electronics’ switching.

  8. Computer Modeling of the Dynamic Strength of Metal-Plastic Cylindrical Shells Under Explosive Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrosimov, N. A.; Novosel'tseva, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    A technique for numerically analyzing the dynamic strength of two-layer metal-plastic cylindrical shells under an axisymmetric internal explosive loading is developed. The kinematic deformation model of the layered package is based on a nonclassical theory of shells. The geometric relations are constructed using relations of the simplest quadratic version of the nonlinear elasticity theory. The stress and strain tensors in the composite macrolayer are related by Hooke's law for an orthotropic body with account of degradation of the stiffness characteristics of the multilayer package due to local failure of some its elementary layers. The physical relations in the metal layer are formulated in terms of a differential theory of plasticity. An energy-correlated resolving system of dynamic equations for the metal-plastic cylindrical shells is derived by minimizing the functional of total energy of the shells as three-dimensional bodies. The numerical method for solving the initial boundary-value problem formulated is based on an explicit variational-difference scheme. The reliability of the technique considered is verified by comparing numerical results with experimental data. An analysis of the ultimate strains and strength of one-layer basalt-and glass-fiber-reinforced plastic and two-layer metalplastic cylindrical shells is carried out.

  9. Development and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Models for Prediction of Heat Transfer and Thermal Microenvironments of Corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Robert H.; King, Andrew J. C.; Mullins, Benjamin J.; Cooper, Timothy F.; Caley, M. Julian

    2012-01-01

    We present Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models of the coupled dynamics of water flow, heat transfer and irradiance in and around corals to predict temperatures experienced by corals. These models were validated against controlled laboratory experiments, under constant and transient irradiance, for hemispherical and branching corals. Our CFD models agree very well with experimental studies. A linear relationship between irradiance and coral surface warming was evident in both the simulation and experimental result agreeing with heat transfer theory. However, CFD models for the steady state simulation produced a better fit to the linear relationship than the experimental data, likely due to experimental error in the empirical measurements. The consistency of our modelling results with experimental observations demonstrates the applicability of CFD simulations, such as the models developed here, to coral bleaching studies. A study of the influence of coral skeletal porosity and skeletal bulk density on surface warming was also undertaken, demonstrating boundary layer behaviour, and interstitial flow magnitude and temperature profiles in coral cross sections. Our models compliment recent studies showing systematic changes in these parameters in some coral colonies and have utility in the prediction of coral bleaching. PMID:22701582

  10. Computational Intelligence Based Data Fusion Algorithm for Dynamic sEMG and Skeletal Muscle Force Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrasekhar Potluri,; Madhavi Anugolu; Marco P. Schoen; D. Subbaram Naidu

    2013-08-01

    In this work, an array of three surface Electrography (sEMG) sensors are used to acquired muscle extension and contraction signals for 18 healthy test subjects. The skeletal muscle force is estimated using the acquired sEMG signals and a Non-linear Wiener Hammerstein model, relating the two signals in a dynamic fashion. The model is obtained from using System Identification (SI) algorithm. The obtained force models for each sensor are fused using a proposed fuzzy logic concept with the intent to improve the force estimation accuracy and resilience to sensor failure or misalignment. For the fuzzy logic inference system, the sEMG entropy, the relative error, and the correlation of the force signals are considered for defining the membership functions. The proposed fusion algorithm yields an average of 92.49% correlation between the actual force and the overall estimated force output. In addition, the proposed fusionbased approach is implemented on a test platform. Experiments indicate an improvement in finger/hand force estimation.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of an innovative start-up method of high temperature fuel cells using dynamic 3d model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupecki Jakub

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a numerical analysis of an innovative method for starting systems based on high temperature fuel cells. The possibility of preheating the fuel cell stacks from the cold state to the nominal working conditions encounters several limitations related to heat transfer and stability of materials. The lack of rapid and safe start-up methods limits the proliferation of MCFCs and SOFCs. For that reason, an innovative method was developed and verified using the numerical analysis presented in the paper. A dynamic 3D model was developed that enables thermo-fluidic investigations and determination of measures for shortening the preheating time of the high temperature fuel cell stacks. The model was implemented in ANSYS Fluent computational fluid dynamic (CFD software and was used for verification of the proposed start-up method. The SOFC was chosen as a reference fuel cell technology for the study. Results obtained from the study are presented and discussed.

  12. Dynamic Computational Model of Symptomatic Bacteremia to Inform Bacterial Separation Treatment Requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinead E Miller

    Full Text Available The rise of multi-drug resistance has decreased the effectiveness of antibiotics, which has led to increased mortality rates associated with symptomatic bacteremia, or bacterial sepsis. To combat decreasing antibiotic effectiveness, extracorporeal bacterial separation approaches have been proposed to capture and separate bacteria from blood. However, bacteremia is dynamic and involves host-pathogen interactions across various anatomical sites. We developed a mathematical model that quantitatively describes the kinetics of pathogenesis and progression of symptomatic bacteremia under various conditions, including bacterial separation therapy, to better understand disease mechanisms and quantitatively assess the biological impact of bacterial separation therapy. Model validity was tested against experimental data from published studies. This is the first multi-compartment model of symptomatic bacteremia in mammals that includes extracorporeal bacterial separation and antibiotic treatment, separately and in combination. The addition of an extracorporeal bacterial separation circuit reduced the predicted time of total bacteria clearance from the blood of an immunocompromised rodent by 49%, compared to antibiotic treatment alone. Implementation of bacterial separation therapy resulted in predicted multi-drug resistant bacterial clearance from the blood of a human in 97% less time than antibiotic treatment alone. The model also proposes a quantitative correlation between time-dependent bacterial load among tissues and bacteremia severity, analogous to the well-known 'area under the curve' for characterization of drug efficacy. The engineering-based mathematical model developed may be useful for informing the design of extracorporeal bacterial separation devices. This work enables the quantitative identification of the characteristics required of an extracorporeal bacteria separation device to provide biological benefit. These devices will potentially

  13. Computationally Modeling Interpersonal Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Joo eLee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a computational model capable of predicting—above human accuracy—the degree of trust a person has toward their novel partner by observing the trust-related nonverbal cues expressed in their social interaction. We summarize our prior work, in which we identify nonverbal cues that signal untrustworthy behavior and also demonstrate the human mind’s readiness to interpret those cues to assess the trustworthiness of a social robot. We demonstrate that domain knowledge gained from our prior work using human-subjects experiments, when incorporated into the feature engineering process, permits a computational model to outperform both human predictions and a baseline model built in naivete' of this domain knowledge. We then present the construction of hidden Markov models to incorporate temporal relationships among the trust-related nonverbal cues. By interpreting the resulting learned structure, we observe that models built to emulate different levels of trust exhibit different sequences of nonverbal cues. From this observation, we derived sequence-based temporal features that further improve the accuracy of our computational model. Our multi-step research process presented in this paper combines the strength of experimental manipulation and machine learning to not only design a computational trust model but also to further our understanding of the dynamics of interpersonal trust.

  14. [The implementation of computer model in research of dynamics of proliferation of cells of thyroid gland follicle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduvaliev, A A; Gil'dieva, M S; Khidirov, B N; Saĭdalieva, M; Khasanov, A A; Musaeva, Sh N; Saatov, T S

    2012-04-01

    The article deals with the results of computational experiments in research of dynamics of proliferation of cells of thyroid gland follicle in normal condition and in the case of malignant neoplasm. The model studies demonstrated that the chronic increase of parameter of proliferation of cells of thyroid gland follicle results in abnormal behavior of numbers of cell cenosis of thyroid gland follicle. The stationary state interrupts, the auto-oscillations occur with transition to irregular oscillations with unpredictable cell proliferation and further to the "black hole" effect. It is demonstrated that the present medical biologic experimental data and theory propositions concerning the structural functional organization of thyroid gland on cell level permit to develop mathematical models for quantitative analysis of numbers of cell cenosis of thyroid gland follicle in normal conditions. The technique of modeling of regulative mechanisms of living systems and equations of cell cenosis regulations was used

  15. Defining forces that are associated with shoulder dystocia: the use of a mathematic dynamic computer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonik, Bernard; Zhang, Ning; Grimm, Michele J

    2003-04-01

    A computer model was modified to study the impact of maternal endogenous and clinician-applied exogenous delivery loads on the contact force between the anterior fetal shoulder and the maternal symphysis pubis. Varying endogenous and exogenous loads were applied, and the contact force was determined. Experiments also examined the effect of pelvic orientation and the direction of load application on contact force behind the symphysis pubis. Exogenous loading forces (50-100 N) resulted in anterior shoulder contact forces of 107 to 127 N, with delivery accomplished at 100 N of applied load. Higher contact forces (147-272 N) were noted for endogenously applied loads (100-400 N), with delivery occurring at 400 N of maternal force. Pelvic rotation from lithotomy to McRoberts' positioning resulted in reduced contact forces. Downward lateral flexion of the fetal head led to little difference in contact force but required 30% more exogenous load to achieve delivery. Compared with clinician-applied exogenous force, larger maternally derived endogenous forces are needed to clear the impacted anterior fetal shoulder. This is associated with >2 times more contact force by the obstructing symphysis pubis. McRoberts' positioning reduces shoulder-symphysis pubis contact force. Lateral flexion of the fetal head results in the larger forces that are needed for delivery but has little effect on contact force. Model refinements are needed to examine delivery forces and brachial plexus stretching more specifically.

  16. Reduced combustion mechanism for C1-C4 hydrocarbons and its application in computational fluid dynamics flare modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodara, Vijaya; Chen, Daniel H; Lou, Helen H; Rasel, Kader M A; Richmond, Peyton; Wang, Anan; Li, Xianchang

    2017-05-01

    Emissions from flares constitute unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide (CO), soot, and other partially burned and altered hydrocarbons along with carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and water. Soot or visible smoke is of particular concern for flare operators/regulatory agencies. The goal of the study is to develop a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model capable of predicting flare combustion efficiency (CE) and soot emission. Since detailed combustion mechanisms are too complicated for (CFD) application, a 50-species reduced mechanism, LU 3.0.1, was developed. LU 3.0.1 is capable of handling C 4 hydrocarbons and soot precursor species (C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 4 , C 6 H 6 ). The new reduced mechanism LU 3.0.1 was first validated against experimental performance indicators: laminar flame speed, adiabatic flame temperature, and ignition delay. Further, CFD simulations using LU 3.0.1 were run to predict soot emission and CE of air-assisted flare tests conducted in 2010 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, using ANSYS Fluent software. Results of non-premixed probability density function (PDF) model and eddy dissipation concept (EDC) model are discussed. It is also noteworthy that when used in conjunction with the EDC turbulence-chemistry model, LU 3.0.1 can reasonably predict volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions as well. A reduced combustion mechanism containing 50 C 1 -C 4 species and soot precursors has been developed and validated against experimental data. The combustion mechanism is then employed in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) of modeling of soot emission and combustion efficiency (CE) of controlled flares for which experimental soot and CE data are available. The validated CFD modeling tools are useful for oil, gas, and chemical industries to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) mandate to achieve smokeless flaring with a high CE.

  17. Development of effect assessment methodology for the deployment of fast reactor cycle system with dynamic computable general equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiotani, Hiroki; Ono, Kiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    The Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) is a widely used computable general equilibrium (CGE) model developed by Purdue University. Although the GTAP-E, an energy environmental version of the GTAP model, is useful for surveying the energy-economy-environment-trade linkage is economic policy analysis, it does not have the decomposed model of the electricity sector and its analyses are comparatively static. In this study, a recursive dynamic CGE model with a detailed electricity technology bundle with nuclear power generation including FR was developed based on the GTAP-E to evaluate the long-term socioeconomic effects of FR deployment. The capital stock changes caused by international investments and some dynamic constraints of the FR deployment and operation (e.g., load following capability and plutonium mass balance) were incorporated in the analyses. The long-term socioeconomic effects resulting from the deployment of economic competitive FR with innovative technologies can be assessed; the cumulative effects of the FR deployment on GDP calculated using this model costed over 40 trillion yen in Japan and 400 trillion yen worldwide, which were several times more than the cost of the effects calculated using the conventional cost-benefit analysis tool, because of ripple effects and energy substitutions among others. (author)

  18. Dynamic indoor thermal comfort model identification based on neural computing PMV index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahari, K S Mohamed; Jalal, M F Abdul; Homod, R Z; Eng, Y K

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on modelling and simulation of building dynamic thermal comfort control for non-linear HVAC system. Thermal comfort in general refers to temperature and also humidity. However in reality, temperature or humidity is just one of the factors affecting the thermal comfort but not the main measures. Besides, as HVAC control system has the characteristic of time delay, large inertia, and highly nonlinear behaviour, it is difficult to determine the thermal comfort sensation accurately if we use traditional Fanger's PMV index. Hence, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been introduced due to its ability to approximate any nonlinear mapping. Using ANN to train, we can get the input-output mapping of HVAC control system or in other word; we can propose a practical approach to identify thermal comfort of a building. Simulations were carried out to validate and verify the proposed method. Results show that the proposed ANN method can track down the desired thermal sensation for a specified condition space.

  19. Security Dynamics of Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Khaled M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores various dimensions of cloud computing security. It argues that security concerns of cloud computing need to be addressed from the perspective of individual stakeholder. Security focuses of cloud computing are essentially different in terms of its characteristics and business model. Conventional way of viewing as well as addressing security such as ‘bolting-in’ on the top of cloud computing may not work well. The paper attempts to portray the security spectrum necessary for...

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for Solar Thermal Storage Tanks with Helical Jacket Heater and Upper Spiral Coil Heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Seung Man [Seoul Nat' l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhong, Yiming; Nam, Jin Hyun [Daegu Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jae Dong [Sejong Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hiki [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    In a solar domestic hot water (Shadow) system, solar energy is collected using collector panels, transferred to a circulating heat transfer fluid (brine), and eventually stored in a thermal storage tank (Test) as hot water. In this study, a computational fluid dynamics (CAD) model was developed to predict the solar thermal energy storage in a hybrid type Test equipped with a helical jacket heater (mantle heat exchanger) and an immersed spiral coil heater. The helical jacket heater, which is the brine flow path attached to the side wall of a Test, has advantages including simple system design, low brine flow rate, and enhanced thermal stratification. In addition, the spiral coil heater further enhances the thermal performance and thermal stratification of the Test. The developed model was validated by the good agreement between the CAD results and the experimental results performed with the hybrid-type Test in Shadow settings.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for Solar Thermal Storage Tanks with Helical Jacket Heater and Upper Spiral Coil Heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Man; Zhong, Yiming; Nam, Jin Hyun; Chung, Jae Dong; Hong, Hiki

    2013-01-01

    In a solar domestic hot water (Shadow) system, solar energy is collected using collector panels, transferred to a circulating heat transfer fluid (brine), and eventually stored in a thermal storage tank (Test) as hot water. In this study, a computational fluid dynamics (CAD) model was developed to predict the solar thermal energy storage in a hybrid type Test equipped with a helical jacket heater (mantle heat exchanger) and an immersed spiral coil heater. The helical jacket heater, which is the brine flow path attached to the side wall of a Test, has advantages including simple system design, low brine flow rate, and enhanced thermal stratification. In addition, the spiral coil heater further enhances the thermal performance and thermal stratification of the Test. The developed model was validated by the good agreement between the CAD results and the experimental results performed with the hybrid-type Test in Shadow settings

  2. GASFLOW-MPI. A scalable computational fluid dynamics code for gases, aerosols and combustion. Vol. 1. Theory and computational model (Revision 1.0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Jianjun; Travis, Jack; Royl, Peter; Necker, Gottfried; Svishchev, Anatoly; Jordan, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is developing the parallel computational fluid dynamics code GASFLOW-MPI as a best-estimate tool for predicting transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containments and other facility buildings. GASFLOW-MPI is a finite-volume code based on proven computational fluid dynamics methodology that solves the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for three-dimensional volumes in Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates.

  3. Accuracy of the microcanonical Lanczos method to compute real-frequency dynamical spectral functions of quantum models at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Satoshi; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Dagotto, Elbio; Tohyama, Takami

    2018-04-01

    We examine the accuracy of the microcanonical Lanczos method (MCLM) developed by Long et al. [Phys. Rev. B 68, 235106 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevB.68.235106] to compute dynamical spectral functions of interacting quantum models at finite temperatures. The MCLM is based on the microcanonical ensemble, which becomes exact in the thermodynamic limit. To apply the microcanonical ensemble at a fixed temperature, one has to find energy eigenstates with the energy eigenvalue corresponding to the internal energy in the canonical ensemble. Here, we propose to use thermal pure quantum state methods by Sugiura and Shimizu [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 010401 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.010401] to obtain the internal energy. After obtaining the energy eigenstates using the Lanczos diagonalization method, dynamical quantities are computed via a continued fraction expansion, a standard procedure for Lanczos-based numerical methods. Using one-dimensional antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains with S =1 /2 , we demonstrate that the proposed procedure is reasonably accurate, even for relatively small systems.

  4. Accuracy of the microcanonical Lanczos method to compute real-frequency dynamical spectral functions of quantum models at finite temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Satoshi; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Dagotto, Elbio; Tohyama, Takami

    2018-04-01

    We examine the accuracy of the microcanonical Lanczos method (MCLM) developed by Long et al. [Phys. Rev. B 68, 235106 (2003)PRBMDO0163-182910.1103/PhysRevB.68.235106] to compute dynamical spectral functions of interacting quantum models at finite temperatures. The MCLM is based on the microcanonical ensemble, which becomes exact in the thermodynamic limit. To apply the microcanonical ensemble at a fixed temperature, one has to find energy eigenstates with the energy eigenvalue corresponding to the internal energy in the canonical ensemble. Here, we propose to use thermal pure quantum state methods by Sugiura and Shimizu [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 010401 (2013)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.111.010401] to obtain the internal energy. After obtaining the energy eigenstates using the Lanczos diagonalization method, dynamical quantities are computed via a continued fraction expansion, a standard procedure for Lanczos-based numerical methods. Using one-dimensional antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains with S=1/2, we demonstrate that the proposed procedure is reasonably accurate, even for relatively small systems.

  5. A computationally fast, reduced model for simulating landslide dynamics and tsunamis generated by landslides in natural terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, F.

    2016-12-01

    Landslide hazards such as fast-moving debris flows, slow-moving landslides, and other mass flows cause numerous fatalities, injuries, and damage. Landslide occurrences in fjords, bays, and lakes can additionally generate tsunamis with locally extremely high wave heights and runups. Two-dimensional depth-averaged models can successfully simulate the entire lifecycle of the three-dimensional landslide dynamics and tsunami propagation efficiently and accurately with the appropriate assumptions. Landslide rheology is defined using viscous fluids, visco-plastic fluids, and granular material to account for the possible landslide source materials. Saturated and unsaturated rheologies are further included to simulate debris flow, debris avalanches, mudflows, and rockslides respectively. The models are obtained by reducing the fully three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with the internal rheological definition of the landslide material, the water body, and appropriate scaling assumptions to obtain the depth-averaged two-dimensional models. The landslide and tsunami models are coupled to include the interaction between the landslide and the water body for tsunami generation. The reduced models are solved numerically with a fast semi-implicit finite-volume, shock-capturing based algorithm. The well-balanced, positivity preserving algorithm accurately accounts for wet-dry interface transition for the landslide runout, landslide-water body interface, and the tsunami wave flooding on land. The models are implemented as a General-Purpose computing on Graphics Processing Unit-based (GPGPU) suite of models, either coupled or run independently within the suite. The GPGPU implementation provides up to 1000 times speedup over a CPU-based serial computation. This enables simulations of multiple scenarios of hazard realizations that provides a basis for a probabilistic hazard assessment. The models have been successfully validated against experiments, past studies, and field data

  6. Validation of a loss of vacuum accident (LOVA) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellecci, C.; Gaudio, P.; Lupelli, I.; Malizia, A.; Porfiri, M.T.; Quaranta, R.; Richetta, M.

    2011-01-01

    Intense thermal loads in fusion devices occur during plasma disruptions, Edge Localized Modes (ELM) and Vertical Displacement Events (VDE). They will result in macroscopic erosion of the plasma facing materials and consequent accumulation of activated dust into the ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV). A recognized safety issue for future fusion reactors fueled with deuterium and tritium is the generation of sizeable quantities of dust. In case of LOVA, air inlet occurs due to the pressure difference between the atmospheric condition and the internal condition. It causes mobilization of the dust that can exit the VV threatening public safety because it may contain tritium, may be radioactive from activation products, and may be chemically reactive and/or toxic (Sharpe et al.; Sharpe and Humrickhouse). Several experiments have been conducted with STARDUST facility in order to reproduce a low pressurization rate (300 Pa/s) LOVA event in ITER due to a small air leakage for two different positions of the leak, at the equatorial port level and at the divertor port level, in order to evaluate the velocity magnitude in case of a LOVA that is strictly connected with dust mobilization phenomena. A two-dimensional (2D) modelling of STARDUST, made with the CFD commercial code FLUENT, has been carried out. The results of these simulations were compared against the experimental data for CFD code validation. For validation purposes, the CFD simulation data were extracted at the same locations as the experimental data were collected. In this paper, the authors present and discuss the computer-simulation data and compare them with data collected during the laboratory studies at the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' Quantum Electronics and Plasmas lab.

  7. Shroud leakage flow models and a multi-dimensional coupling CFD (computational fluid dynamics) method for shrouded turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Zhengping; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Weihao; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Multi-dimensional coupling simulation is an effective approach for evaluating the flow and aero-thermal performance of shrouded turbines, which can balance the simulation accuracy and computing cost effectively. In this paper, 1D leakage models are proposed based on classical jet theories and dynamics equations, which can be used to evaluate most of the main features of shroud leakage flow, including the mass flow rate, radial and circumferential momentum, temperature and the jet width. Then, the 1D models are expanded to 2D distributions on the interface by using a multi-dimensional scaling method. Based on the models and multi-dimensional scaling, a multi-dimensional coupling simulation method for shrouded turbines is developed, in which, some boundary source and sink are set on the interface between the shroud and the main flow passage. To verify the precision, some simulations on the design point and off design points of a 1.5 stage turbine are conducted. It is indicated that the models and methods can give predictions with sufficient accuracy for most of the flow field features and will contribute to pursue deeper understanding and better design methods of shrouded axial turbines, which are the important devices in energy engineering. - Highlights: • Free and wall attached jet theories are used to model the leakage flow in shrouds. • Leakage flow rate is modeled by virtual labyrinth number and residual-energy factor. • A scaling method is applied to 1D model to obtain 2D distributions on interfaces. • A multi-dimensional coupling CFD method for shrouded turbines is proposed. • The proposed coupling method can give accurate predictions with low computing cost.

  8. Improvement of level-1 PSA computer code package - Modeling and analysis for dynamic reliability of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hoon; Baek, Sang Yeup; Shin, In Sup; Moon, Shin Myung; Moon, Jae Phil; Koo, Hoon Young; Kim, Ju Shin [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jung Sik [Seoul National Polytechnology University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Tae Jin [Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a methodology of the dynamic reliability analysis for NPP. The first year`s research was focused on developing a procedure for analyzing failure data of running components and a simulator for estimating the reliability of series-parallel structures. The second year`s research was concentrated on estimating the lifetime distribution and PM effect of a component from its failure data in various cases, and the lifetime distribution of a system with a particular structure. Computer codes for performing these jobs were also developed. The objectives of the third year`s research is to develop models for analyzing special failure types (CCFs, Standby redundant structure) that were nor considered in the first two years, and to complete a methodology of the dynamic reliability analysis for nuclear power plants. The analysis of failure data of components and related researches for supporting the simulator must be preceded for providing proper input to the simulator. Thus this research is divided into three major parts. 1. Analysis of the time dependent life distribution and the PM effect. 2. Development of a simulator for system reliability analysis. 3. Related researches for supporting the simulator : accelerated simulation analytic approach using PH-type distribution, analysis for dynamic repair effects. 154 refs., 5 tabs., 87 figs. (author)

  9. Dynamics and computation in functional shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2004-07-01

    We introduce a new type of shift dynamics as an extended model of symbolic dynamics, and investigate the characteristics of shift spaces from the viewpoints of both dynamics and computation. This shift dynamics is called a functional shift, which is defined by a set of bi-infinite sequences of some functions on a set of symbols. To analyse the complexity of functional shifts, we measure them in terms of topological entropy, and locate their languages in the Chomsky hierarchy. Through this study, we argue that considering functional shifts from the viewpoints of both dynamics and computation gives us opposite results about the complexity of systems. We also describe a new class of shift spaces whose languages are not recursively enumerable.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Allard, Francis; Awbi, Hazim B.

    2008-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation Design is a new title in the is a new title in the REHVA guidebook series. The guidebook is written for people who need to use and discuss results based on CFD predictions, and it gives insight into the subject for those who are not used to work with CFD...

  11. Plasticity: modeling & computation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borja, Ronaldo Israel

    2013-01-01

    .... "Plasticity Modeling & Computation" is a textbook written specifically for students who want to learn the theoretical, mathematical, and computational aspects of inelastic deformation in solids...

  12. Dynamics of complexation of a charged dendrimer by linear polyelectrolyte: Computer modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyulin, S.V.; Darinskii, A.A.; Lyulin, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    Brownian-dynamics simulations have been performed for complexes formed by a charged dendrimer and a long oppositely charged linear polyelectrolyte when overcharging phenomenon is always observed. After a complex formation the orientational mobility of the individual dendrimer bonds, the fluctuations

  13. Applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the modelling and design of ventilation systems in the agricultural industry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Tomás; Sun, Da-Wen; Grant, Jim; Fallon, Richard; Dodd, Vincent

    2007-09-01

    The application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the agricultural industry is becoming ever more important. Over the years, the versatility, accuracy and user-friendliness offered by CFD has led to its increased take-up by the agricultural engineering community. Now CFD is regularly employed to solve environmental problems of greenhouses and animal production facilities. However, due to a combination of increased computer efficacy and advanced numerical techniques, the realism of these simulations has only been enhanced in recent years. This study provides a state-of-the-art review of CFD, its current applications in the design of ventilation systems for agricultural production systems, and the outstanding challenging issues that confront CFD modellers. The current status of greenhouse CFD modelling was found to be at a higher standard than that of animal housing, owing to the incorporation of user-defined routines that simulate crop biological responses as a function of local environmental conditions. Nevertheless, the most recent animal housing simulations have addressed this issue and in turn have become more physically realistic.

  14. Urban Flow and Pollutant Dispersion Simulation with Multi-scale coupling of Meteorological Model with Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yushi; Poh, Hee Joo

    2014-11-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis has become increasingly important in modern urban planning in order to create highly livable city. This paper presents a multi-scale modeling methodology which couples Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with open source CFD simulation tool, OpenFOAM. This coupling enables the simulation of the wind flow and pollutant dispersion in urban built-up area with high resolution mesh. In this methodology meso-scale model WRF provides the boundary condition for the micro-scale CFD model OpenFOAM. The advantage is that the realistic weather condition is taken into account in the CFD simulation and complexity of building layout can be handled with ease by meshing utility of OpenFOAM. The result is validated against the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Field Tests in Oklahoma City and there is reasonably good agreement between the CFD simulation and field observation. The coupling of WRF- OpenFOAM provide urban planners with reliable environmental modeling tool in actual urban built-up area; and it can be further extended with consideration of future weather conditions for the scenario studies on climate change impact.

  15. Microcirculation in the murine liver: a computational fluid dynamic model based on 3D reconstruction from in vivo microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piergiovanni, Monica; Bianchi, Elena; Capitani, Giada; Li Piani, Irene; Ganzer, Lucia; Guidotti, Luca G; Iannacone, Matteo; Dubini, Gabriele

    2017-10-03

    The liver is organized in hexagonal functional units - termed lobules - characterized by a rather peculiar blood microcirculation, due to the presence of a tangled network of capillaries - termed sinusoids. A better understanding of the hemodynamics that governs liver microcirculation is relevant to clinical and biological studies aimed at improving our management of liver diseases and transplantation. Herein, we built a CFD model of a 3D sinusoidal network, based on in vivo images of a physiological mouse liver obtained with a 2-photon microscope. The CFD model was developed with Fluent 16.0 (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA), particular care was taken in imposing the correct boundary conditions representing a physiological state. To account for the remaining branches of the sinusoids, a lumped parameter model was used to prescribe the correct pressure at each outlet. The effect of an adhered cell on local hemodynamics is also investigated for different occlusion degrees. The model here proposed accurately reproduces the fluid dynamics in a portion of the sinusoidal network in mouse liver. Mean velocities and mass flow rates are in agreement with literature values from in vivo measurements. Our approach provides details on local phenomena, hardly described by other computational studies, either focused on the macroscopic hepatic vasculature or based on homogeneous porous medium model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling Aerosol Particle Deposition on a Person Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-03

    Consulting Inc. 534 Paradise Crescent, Waterloo, Ontario PWGSC Contractor Number: W7702-155701/001/EDM Contract Scientific Authority: Eugene Yee...Fluid Dynamics Final Report Hua Ji and Fue-Sang Lien Waterloo CFD Engineering Consulting Inc. (WATCFD) 534 Paradise Cres, Waterloo Ontario, N2L 3G1...enters a new eddy. The time step is chosen to be the minimum of one fifth of the eddy lifetime or one fifth of the minimum side length of the local

  17. Modelling flow and heat transfer around a seated human body by computational fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Voigt, Lars Peter Kølgaard

    2003-01-01

    A database (http://www.ie.dtu.dk/manikin) containing a detailed representation of the surface geometry of a seated female human body was created from a surface scan of a thermal manikin (minus clothing and hair). The radiative heat transfer coefficient and the natural convection flow around...... of the computational manikin has all surface features of a human being; (2) the geometry is an exact copy of an experimental thermal manikin, enabling detailed comparisons between calculations and experiments....

  18. Engineering applications of computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Awang, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis that can be used for conceptual studies of product design, detail product development, process troubleshooting. It demonstrates the benefit of CFD modeling as a cost saving, timely, safe and easy to scale-up methodology.

  19. Computation of transitional flow past a circular cylinder using multiblock lattice Boltzmann method with a dynamic subgrid scale model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premnath, Kannan N; Pattison, Martin J; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2013-01-01

    Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a kinetic based numerical scheme for the simulation of fluid flow. While the approach has attracted considerable attention during the last two decades, there is a need for systematic investigation of its applicability for complex canonical turbulent flow problems of engineering interest, where the nature of the numerical properties of the underlying scheme plays an important role for their accurate solution. In this paper, we discuss and evaluate a LBM based on a multiblock approach for efficient large eddy simulation of three-dimensional external flow past a circular cylinder in the transitional regime characterized by the presence of multiple scales. For enhanced numerical stability at higher Reynolds numbers, a multiple relaxation time formulation is considered. The effect of subgrid scales is represented by means of a Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity model, where the model coefficient is computed locally by means of a dynamic procedure, providing better representation of flow physics with reduced empiricism. Simulations are performed for a Reynolds number of 3900 based on the free stream velocity and cylinder diameter for which prior data is available for comparison. The presence of laminar boundary layer which separates into a pair of shear layers that evolve into turbulent wakes impose particular challenge for numerical methods for this condition. The relatively low numerical dissipation introduced by the inherently parallel and second-order accurate LBM is an important computational asset in this regard. Computations using five different grid levels, where the various blocks are suitably aligned to resolve multiscale flow features show that the structure of the recirculation region is well reproduced and the statistics of the mean flow and turbulent fluctuations are in satisfactory agreement with prior data. (paper)

  20. Computation of transitional flow past a circular cylinder using multiblock lattice Boltzmann method with a dynamic subgrid scale model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premnath, Kannan N [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado Denver, 1200 Larimer Street, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); Pattison, Martin J [HyPerComp Inc., 2629 Townsgate Road, Suite 105, Westlake Village, CA 91361 (United States); Banerjee, Sanjoy, E-mail: kannan.premnath@ucdenver.edu, E-mail: kannan.np@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, City College of New York, City University of New York, New York, NY 10031 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a kinetic based numerical scheme for the simulation of fluid flow. While the approach has attracted considerable attention during the last two decades, there is a need for systematic investigation of its applicability for complex canonical turbulent flow problems of engineering interest, where the nature of the numerical properties of the underlying scheme plays an important role for their accurate solution. In this paper, we discuss and evaluate a LBM based on a multiblock approach for efficient large eddy simulation of three-dimensional external flow past a circular cylinder in the transitional regime characterized by the presence of multiple scales. For enhanced numerical stability at higher Reynolds numbers, a multiple relaxation time formulation is considered. The effect of subgrid scales is represented by means of a Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity model, where the model coefficient is computed locally by means of a dynamic procedure, providing better representation of flow physics with reduced empiricism. Simulations are performed for a Reynolds number of 3900 based on the free stream velocity and cylinder diameter for which prior data is available for comparison. The presence of laminar boundary layer which separates into a pair of shear layers that evolve into turbulent wakes impose particular challenge for numerical methods for this condition. The relatively low numerical dissipation introduced by the inherently parallel and second-order accurate LBM is an important computational asset in this regard. Computations using five different grid levels, where the various blocks are suitably aligned to resolve multiscale flow features show that the structure of the recirculation region is well reproduced and the statistics of the mean flow and turbulent fluctuations are in satisfactory agreement with prior data. (paper)

  1. Computer modeling of the dynamics of surface tension on rotating fluids in low and microgravity environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Hong, B. B.; Leslie, Fred W.

    1989-01-01

    Time-dependent evolutions of the profile of the free surface (bubble shapes) for a cylindrical container partially filled with a Newtonian fluid of constant density, rotating about its axis of symmetry, have been studied. Numerical computations have been carried out with the following situations: (1) linear functions of spin-up and spin-down in low- and microgravity environments, (2) linear functions of increasing and decreasing gravity environments at high- and low-rotating cylinder speeds, and (3) step functions of spin-up and spin-down in a low-gravity environment.

  2. Dynamic behaviour of raft and pile foundations tests and computational models. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrieux, H.; Mohammadioun, G.

    1981-01-01

    Ground shaking due to the fall, from varied heights, of the mass of a compacting machine were recorded using a network of sensors located at different dpeths and aligned to form three profiles. The recordings and their interpretation were carried out in such a way as to define not only the ground motion at each point, but also the propagation mode and velocity of the seismic waves - data necessary when taking into account the ground motion in soil/structure interaction studies. The recordings obtained were deconvolved and rendered as acceleration, velocity, and displacement time histories, and response spectra were computed for each. (orig./RW)

  3. Use of Computational Fluid Dynamics for improving freeze-dryers design and process understanding. Part 1: Modelling the lyophilisation chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barresi, Antonello A; Rasetto, Valeria; Marchisio, Daniele L

    2018-05-15

    This manuscript shows how computational models, mainly based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), can be used to simulate different parts of an industrial freeze-drying equipment and to properly design them; in particular, the freeze-dryer chamber and the duct connecting the chamber with the condenser, with the valves and vanes eventually present are analysed in this work. In Part 1, it will be shown how CFD can be employed to improve specific designs, to perform geometry optimization, to evaluate different design choices and how it is useful to evaluate the effect on product drying and batch variance. Such an approach allows an in-depth process understanding and assessment of the critical aspects of lyophilisation. This can be done by running either steady-state or transient simulations with imposed sublimation rates or with multi-scale approaches. This methodology will be demonstrated on freeze-drying equipment of different sizes, investigating the influence of the equipment geometry and shelf inter-distance. The effect of valve type (butterfly and mushroom) and shape on duct conductance and critical flow conditions will be instead investigated in Part 2. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling to Improve Natural Flow Rate and Sweet Pepper Productivity in Greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Limtrakarn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural flow rate and sweet peppers productivity in tropical greenhouse are improved by CFD simulation is the main objective of this research work. Most of the greenhouse types today are in the arch shape. To develop an improved greenhouse structure for the region, the arch type was built and used as the control model. Mae Sar Mai agriculture research station under the royal project foundation was selected as the field test site. Temperature sensors with data logger were installed to monitor variation of temperature inside the greenhouse. The measured temperature data were used as the boundary conditions for the CFD analysis. A new greenhouse model with two-step roof shape was designed and the air flow behavior was simulated by using CFD. Regarding CFD results the air flow rate of the new model is about 39% higher than that of old model. The maximum temperature of the new model is lower than that of the old one. The sweet paper growths in both greenhouse models were measured and compared. Results show that the new model obtains 4°C lower maximum temperature in day time, 97% in number and 90% in weight higher the first grade pepper productivity than the old one.

  5. Development and validation of a new dynamic computer-controlled model of the human stomach and small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Aurélie; Denis, Sylvain; le Goff, Olivier; Sicardi, Vincent; François, Olivier; Yao, Anne-Françoise; Garrait, Ghislain; Manzi, Aimé Pacifique; Beyssac, Eric; Alric, Monique; Blanquet-Diot, Stéphanie

    2016-06-01

    For ethical, regulatory, and economic reasons, in vitro human digestion models are increasingly used as an alternative to in vivo assays. This study aims to present the new Engineered Stomach and small INtestine (ESIN) model and its validation for pharmaceutical applications. This dynamic computer-controlled system reproduces, according to in vivo data, the complex physiology of the human stomach and small intestine, including pH, transit times, chyme mixing, digestive secretions, and passive absorption of digestion products. Its innovative design allows a progressive meal intake and the differential gastric emptying of solids and liquids. The pharmaceutical behavior of two model drugs (paracetamol immediate release form and theophylline sustained release tablet) was studied in ESIN during liquid digestion. The results were compared to those found with a classical compendial method (paddle apparatus) and in human volunteers. Paracetamol and theophylline tablets showed similar absorption profiles in ESIN and in healthy subjects. For theophylline, a level A in vitro-in vivo correlation could be established between the results obtained in ESIN and in humans. Interestingly, using a pharmaceutical basket, the swelling and erosion of the theophylline sustained release form was followed during transit throughout ESIN. ESIN emerges as a relevant tool for pharmaceutical studies but once further validated may find many other applications in nutritional, toxicological, and microbiological fields. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1325-1335. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Nondeterministic computational fluid dynamics modeling of Escherichia coli inactivation by peracetic acid in municipal wastewater contact tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Domenico; Crapulli, Ferdinando; Raisee, Mehrdad; Raspa, Giuseppe; Haas, Charles N

    2015-06-16

    Wastewater disinfection processes are typically designed according to heuristics derived from batch experiments in which the interaction among wastewater quality, reactor hydraulics, and inactivation kinetics is often neglected. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study was conducted in a nondeterministic (ND) modeling framework to predict the Escherichia coli inactivation by peracetic acid (PAA) in municipal contact tanks fed by secondary settled wastewater effluent. The extent and variability associated with the observed inactivation kinetics were both satisfactorily predicted by the stochastic inactivation model at a 95% confidence level. Moreover, it was found that (a) the process variability induced by reactor hydraulics is negligible when compared to the one caused by inactivation kinetics, (b) the PAA dose required for meeting regulations is dictated equally by the fixed limit of the microbial concentration as well as its probability of occurrence, and (c) neglecting the probability of occurrence during process sizing could lead to an underestimation of the PAA dose required by as much as 100%. Finally, the ND-CFD model was used to generate sizing information in the form of probabilistic disinfection curves relating E. coli inactivation and probability of occurrence with the average PAA dose and PAA residual concentration at the outlet of the contact tank.

  7. Integrating Solid-State NMR and Computational Modeling to Investigate the Structure and Dynamics of Membrane-Associated Ghrelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Chollet, Constance; Scheidt, Holger A.; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Meiler, Jens; Huster, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin activates the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a, also known as the ghrelin receptor. This 28-residue peptide is acylated at Ser3 and is the only peptide hormone in the human body that is lipid-modified by an octanoyl group. Little is known about the structure and dynamics of membrane-associated ghrelin. We carried out solid-state NMR studies of ghrelin in lipid vesicles, followed by computational modeling of the peptide using Rosetta. Isotropic chemical shift data of isotopically labeled ghrelin provide information about the peptide’s secondary structure. Spin diffusion experiments indicate that ghrelin binds to membranes via its lipidated Ser3. Further, Phe4, as well as electrostatics involving the peptide’s positively charged residues and lipid polar headgroups, contribute to the binding energy. Other than the lipid anchor, ghrelin is highly flexible and mobile at the membrane surface. This observation is supported by our predicted model ensemble, which is in good agreement with experimentally determined chemical shifts. In the final ensemble of models, residues 8–17 form an α-helix, while residues 21–23 and 26–27 often adopt a polyproline II helical conformation. These helices appear to assist the peptide in forming an amphipathic conformation so that it can bind to the membrane. PMID:25803439

  8. Integrating solid-state NMR and computational modeling to investigate the structure and dynamics of membrane-associated ghrelin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Vortmeier

    Full Text Available The peptide hormone ghrelin activates the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a, also known as the ghrelin receptor. This 28-residue peptide is acylated at Ser3 and is the only peptide hormone in the human body that is lipid-modified by an octanoyl group. Little is known about the structure and dynamics of membrane-associated ghrelin. We carried out solid-state NMR studies of ghrelin in lipid vesicles, followed by computational modeling of the peptide using Rosetta. Isotropic chemical shift data of isotopically labeled ghrelin provide information about the peptide's secondary structure. Spin diffusion experiments indicate that ghrelin binds to membranes via its lipidated Ser3. Further, Phe4, as well as electrostatics involving the peptide's positively charged residues and lipid polar headgroups, contribute to the binding energy. Other than the lipid anchor, ghrelin is highly flexible and mobile at the membrane surface. This observation is supported by our predicted model ensemble, which is in good agreement with experimentally determined chemical shifts. In the final ensemble of models, residues 8-17 form an α-helix, while residues 21-23 and 26-27 often adopt a polyproline II helical conformation. These helices appear to assist the peptide in forming an amphipathic conformation so that it can bind to the membrane.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Three-Dimensional Unsteady Turbulent Flow and Excitation Force in Partial Admission Air Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Air turbines are widely used to convert kinetic energy into power output in power engineering. The unsteady performance of air turbines with partial admission not only influences the aerodynamic performance and thermodynamic efficiency of turbine but also generates strong excitation force on blades to impair the turbine safely operating. Based on three-dimensional viscous compressible Navier-stokes equations, the present study employs RNG (Renormalization group k-ε turbulence model with finite volume discretization on air turbine with partial admission. Numerical models of four different admission rates with full annulus are built and analyzed via CFD (computational fluid dynamics modeling unsteady flows. Results indicate that the unsteady time-averaged isentropic efficiency is lower than the steady isentropic efficiency, and this difference rises as unsteady isentropic efficiency fluctuates stronger when the admission rate is reduced. The rotor axial and tangential forces with time are provided for all four admission rates. The low frequency excitation forces generated by partial admission are extraordinarily higher than the high frequency excitation forces by stator wakes.

  10. Rule-based modeling: a computational approach for studying biomolecular site dynamics in cell signaling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chylek, Lily A.; Harris, Leonard A.; Tung, Chang-Shung; Faeder, James R.; Lopez, Carlos F.

    2013-01-01

    Rule-based modeling was developed to address the limitations of traditional approaches for modeling chemical kinetics in cell signaling systems. These systems consist of multiple interacting biomolecules (e.g., proteins), which themselves consist of multiple parts (e.g., domains, linear motifs, and sites of phosphorylation). Consequently, biomolecules that mediate information processing generally have the potential to interact in multiple ways, with the number of possible complexes and post-translational modification states tending to grow exponentially with the number of binary interactions considered. As a result, only large reaction networks capture all possible consequences of the molecular interactions that occur in a cell signaling system, which is problematic because traditional modeling approaches for chemical kinetics (e.g., ordinary differential equations) require explicit network specification. This problem is circumvented through representation of interactions in terms of local rules. With this approach, network specification is implicit and model specification is concise. Concise representation results in a coarse graining of chemical kinetics, which is introduced because all reactions implied by a rule inherit the rate law associated with that rule. Coarse graining can be appropriate if interactions are modular, and the coarseness of a model can be adjusted as needed. Rules can be specified using specialized model-specification languages, and recently developed tools designed for specification of rule-based models allow one to leverage powerful software engineering capabilities. A rule-based model comprises a set of rules, which can be processed by general-purpose simulation and analysis tools to achieve different objectives (e.g., to perform either a deterministic or stochastic simulation). PMID:24123887

  11. Dynamical model of computation of the rhodium self-powered neutron detector current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erben, O.; Slovacek, M.; Zerola, L.

    1992-01-01

    A model is presented for the calculation of the rhodium self-powered neutron detector current in dependence on the neutron flux density during reactor core transients. The total signal consists of a beta emission, prompt, and gamma component and a background signal. The model has been verified by means of experimental data obtained during measurements on the LVR-15 research reactor and at the Dukovany nuclear power plant. (author) 9 figs., 21 refs

  12. Rule-based modeling: a computational approach for studying biomolecular site dynamics in cell signaling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chylek, Lily A; Harris, Leonard A; Tung, Chang-Shung; Faeder, James R; Lopez, Carlos F; Hlavacek, William S

    2014-01-01

    Rule-based modeling was developed to address the limitations of traditional approaches for modeling chemical kinetics in cell signaling systems. These systems consist of multiple interacting biomolecules (e.g., proteins), which themselves consist of multiple parts (e.g., domains, linear motifs, and sites of phosphorylation). Consequently, biomolecules that mediate information processing generally have the potential to interact in multiple ways, with the number of possible complexes and posttranslational modification states tending to grow exponentially with the number of binary interactions considered. As a result, only large reaction networks capture all possible consequences of the molecular interactions that occur in a cell signaling system, which is problematic because traditional modeling approaches for chemical kinetics (e.g., ordinary differential equations) require explicit network specification. This problem is circumvented through representation of interactions in terms of local rules. With this approach, network specification is implicit and model specification is concise. Concise representation results in a coarse graining of chemical kinetics, which is introduced because all reactions implied by a rule inherit the rate law associated with that rule. Coarse graining can be appropriate if interactions are modular, and the coarseness of a model can be adjusted as needed. Rules can be specified using specialized model-specification languages, and recently developed tools designed for specification of rule-based models allow one to leverage powerful software engineering capabilities. A rule-based model comprises a set of rules, which can be processed by general-purpose simulation and analysis tools to achieve different objectives (e.g., to perform either a deterministic or stochastic simulation). © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics a practical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Liu, Chaoqun

    2018-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics: A Practical Approach, Third Edition, is an introduction to CFD fundamentals and commercial CFD software to solve engineering problems. The book is designed for a wide variety of engineering students new to CFD, and for practicing engineers learning CFD for the first time. Combining an appropriate level of mathematical background, worked examples, computer screen shots, and step-by-step processes, this book walks the reader through modeling and computing, as well as interpreting CFD results. This new edition has been updated throughout, with new content and improved figures, examples and problems.

  14. Principles of computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wesseling, Pieter

    2001-01-01

    The book is aimed at graduate students, researchers, engineers and physicists involved in flow computations. An up-to-date account is given of the present state-of-the-art of numerical methods employed in computational fluid dynamics. The underlying numerical principles are treated with a fair amount of detail, using elementary mathematical analysis. Attention is given to difficulties arising from geometric complexity of the flow domain and of nonuniform structured boundary-fitted grids. Uniform accuracy and efficiency for singular perturbation problems is studied, pointing the way to accurate computation of flows at high Reynolds number. Much attention is given to stability analysis, and useful stability conditions are provided, some of them new, for many numerical schemes used in practice. Unified methods for compressible and incompressible flows are discussed. Numerical analysis of the shallow-water equations is included. The theory of hyperbolic conservation laws is treated. Godunov's order barrier and ho...

  15. Energetic-economic dynamic computational analysis of plants with small capacity - Gera model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storfer, A.F.; Demanboro, A.C. de; Campello, C.A.G.B.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology and mathematical model for energy and economic analysis of hydroelectric power plants with low and medium capacity are presented. This methodology will be used for isolated or integrated hydroelectric power plants, including plants that part of their produced energy will go to the site market and part will go to regional electric system. (author)

  16. Computationally Efficient Modelling of Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction of Offshore Wind Turbines on Gravity Footings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    of a 5.0 MW offshore wind turbine is evaluated for different stratifications, environmental conditions and foundation geometries by the aeroelastic nonlinear multi-body code HAWC2. Analyses show that a consistent lumped-parameter model with three to five internal degrees of freedom per displacement...

  17. Computational modeling in biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mofrad, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a glimpse of the diverse and important roles that modern computational technology is playing in various areas of biomechanics. It includes unique chapters on ab initio quantum mechanical, molecular dynamic and scale coupling methods..

  18. Wastewater treatment using photo-impinging streams cyclone reactor: Computational fluid dynamics and kinetics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royaee, Sayed Javid; Shafeghat, Amin [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sohrabi, Morteza [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    A photo impinging streams cyclone reactor has been used as a novel apparatus in photocatalytic degradation of organic compounds using titanium dioxide nanoparticles in wastewater. The operating parameters, including catalyst loading, pH, initial phenol concentration and light intensity have been optimized to increase the efficiency of the photocatalytic degradation process within this photoreactor. The results have demonstrated a higher efficiency and an increased performance capability of the present reactor in comparison with the conventional processes. In the next step, residence time distribution (RTD) of the slurry phase within the reactor was measured using the impulse tracer method. A CFD-based model for predicting the RTD was also developed which compared well with the experimental results. The RTD data was finally applied in conjunction with the phenol degradation kinetic model to predict the apparent rate coefficient for such a reaction.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling to Improve Natural Flow Rate and Sweet Pepper Productivity in Greenhouse

    OpenAIRE

    W. Limtrakarn; P. Boonmongkol; A. Chompupoung; K. Rungprateepthaworn; J. Kruenate; P. Dechaumphai

    2012-01-01

    Natural flow rate and sweet peppers productivity in tropical greenhouse are improved by CFD simulation is the main objective of this research work. Most of the greenhouse types today are in the arch shape. To develop an improved greenhouse structure for the region, the arch type was built and used as the control model. Mae Sar Mai agriculture research station under the royal project foundation was selected as the field test site. Temperature sensors with data logger were installed to monitor ...

  20. Computational modeling on the recognition of the HRE motif by HIF-1: molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokkar, Pandian; Sathis, Vani; Ramachandran, Murugesan

    2012-05-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a bHLH-family transcription factor that controls genes involved in glycolysis, angiogenesis, migration, as well as invasion factors that are important for tumor progression and metastasis. HIF-1, a heterodimer of HIF-1α and HIF-1β, binds to the hypoxia responsive element (HRE) present in the promoter regions of hypoxia responsive genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Neither the structure of free HIF-1 nor that of its complex with HRE is available. Computational modeling of the transcription factor-DNA complex has always been challenging due to their inherent flexibility and large conformational space. The present study aims to model the interaction between the DNA-binding domain of HIF-1 and HRE. Experiments showed that rigid macromolecular docking programs (HEX and GRAMM-X) failed to predict the optimal dimerization of individually modeled HIF-1 subunits. Hence, the HIF-1 heterodimer was modeled based on the phosphate system positive regulatory protein (PHO4) homodimer. The duplex VEGF-DNA segment containing HRE with flanking nucleotides was modeled in the B form and equilibrated via molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A rigid docking approach was used to predict the crude binding mode of HIF-1 dimer with HRE, in which the putative contacts were found to be present. An MD simulation (5 ns) of the HIF-1-HRE complex in explicit water was performed to account for its flexibility and to optimize its interactions. All of the conserved amino acid residues were found to play roles in the recognition of HRE. The present work, which sheds light on the recognition of HRE by HIF-1, could be beneficial in the design of peptide or small molecule therapeutics that can mimic HIF-1 and bind with the HRE sequence.

  1. A Performance Prediction Method for Pumps as Turbines (PAT Using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Frosina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Small and micro hydropower systems represent an attractive solution for generating electricity at low cost and with low environmental impact. The pump-as-turbine (PAT approach has promise in this application due to its low purchase and maintenance costs. In this paper, a new method to predict the inverse characteristic of industrial centrifugal pumps is presented. This method is based on results of simulations performed with commercial three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software. Model results have been first validated in pumping mode using data supplied by pump manufacturers. Then, the results have been compared to experimental data for a pump running in reverse. Experimentation has been performed on a dedicated test bench installed in the Department of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering of the University of Naples Federico II. Three different pumps, with different specific speeds, have been analyzed. Using the model results, the inverse characteristic and the best efficiency point have been evaluated. Finally, results have been compared to prediction methods available in the literature.

  2. Developing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD Models to Evaluate Available Energy in Exhaust Systems of Diesel Light-Duty Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Fernández-Yáñez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Around a third of the energy input in an automotive engine is wasted through the exhaust system. Since numerous technologies to harvest energy from exhaust gases are accessible, it is of great interest to find time- and cost-efficient methods to evaluate available thermal energy under different engine conditions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD is becoming a very valuable tool for numerical predictions of exhaust flows. In this work, a methodology to build a simple three-dimensional (3D model of the exhaust system of automotive internal combustion engines (ICE was developed. Experimental data of exhaust gas in the most used part of the engine map in passenger diesel vehicles were employed as input for calculations. Sensitivity analyses of different numeric schemes have been conducted in order to attain accurate results. The model built allows for obtaining details on temperature and pressure fields along the exhaust system, and for complementing the experimental results for a better understanding of the flow phenomena and heat transfer through the system for further energy recovery devices.

  3. Two-compartmental population balance modeling of a pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huolong; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-11-20

    In this work a two-compartmental population balance model (TCPBM) was proposed to model a pulsed top-spray fluidized bed granulation. The proposed TCPBM considered the spatially heterogeneous granulation mechanisms of the granule growth by dividing the granulator into two perfectly mixed zones of the wetting compartment and drying compartment, in which the aggregation mechanism was assumed in the wetting compartment and the breakage mechanism was considered in the drying compartment. The sizes of the wetting and drying compartments were constant in the TCPBM, in which 30% of the bed was the wetting compartment and 70% of the bed was the drying compartment. The exchange rate of particles between the wetting and drying compartments was determined by the details of the flow properties and distribution of particles predicted by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The experimental validation has shown that the proposed TCPBM can predict evolution of the granule size and distribution within the granulator under different binder spray operating conditions accurately. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comprehensive optimisation of China’s energy prices, taxes and subsidy policies based on the dynamic computable general equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Y.X.; Liu, Y.Y.; Du, M.; Zhang, J.X.; Pang, Y.X.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy policy is defined as a complication of energy price, tax and subsidy policies. • The maximisation of total social benefit is the optimised objective. • A more rational carbon tax ranges from 10 to 20 Yuan/ton under the current situation. • The optimal coefficient pricing is more conducive to maximise total social benefit. - Abstract: Under the condition of increasingly serious environmental pollution, rational energy policy plays an important role in the practical significance of energy conservation and emission reduction. This paper defines energy policies as the compilation of energy prices, taxes and subsidy policies. Moreover, it establishes the optimisation model of China’s energy policy based on the dynamic computable general equilibrium model, which maximises the total social benefit, in order to explore the comprehensive influences of a carbon tax, the sales pricing mechanism and the renewable energy fund policy. The results show that when the change rates of gross domestic product and consumer price index are ±2%, ±5% and the renewable energy supply structure ratio is 7%, the more reasonable carbon tax ranges from 10 to 20 Yuan/ton, and the optimal coefficient pricing mechanism is more conducive to the objective of maximising the total social benefit. From the perspective of optimising the overall energy policies, if the upper limit of change rate in consumer price index is 2.2%, the existing renewable energy fund should be improved

  5. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.

    2009-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of Hydraulics and Sedimentation in Process Reactors during Aeration Tank Settling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M.D.; Ingildsen, P.; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Aeration tank settling is a control method allowing settling in the process tank during highhydraulic load. The control method is patented. Aeration tank settling has been applied in several wastewater treatment plants using the present design of the process tanks. Some process tank designs...... and outletcausing a disruption of the sludge blanket at the outlet and thereby reducing the retention of sludge in theprocess tank. The model has allowed us to establish a clear picture of the problems arising at the plantduring aeration tank settling. Secondly, several process tank design changes have been...

  7. Ten iterative steps for model development and evaluation applied to Computational Fluid Dynamics for Environmental Fluid Mechanic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blocken, B.J.E.; Gualtieri, C.

    2012-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is increasingly used to study a wide variety of complex Environmental Fluid Mechanics (EFM) processes, such as water flow and turbulent mixing of contaminants in rivers and estuaries and wind flow and air pollution dispersion in urban areas. However, the accuracy

  8. Dynamic computing random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traversa, F L; Bonani, F; Pershin, Y V; Di Ventra, M

    2014-01-01

    The present von Neumann computing paradigm involves a significant amount of information transfer between a central processing unit and memory, with concomitant limitations in the actual execution speed. However, it has been recently argued that a different form of computation, dubbed memcomputing (Di Ventra and Pershin 2013 Nat. Phys. 9 200–2) and inspired by the operation of our brain, can resolve the intrinsic limitations of present day architectures by allowing for computing and storing of information on the same physical platform. Here we show a simple and practical realization of memcomputing that utilizes easy-to-build memcapacitive systems. We name this architecture dynamic computing random access memory (DCRAM). We show that DCRAM provides massively-parallel and polymorphic digital logic, namely it allows for different logic operations with the same architecture, by varying only the control signals. In addition, by taking into account realistic parameters, its energy expenditures can be as low as a few fJ per operation. DCRAM is fully compatible with CMOS technology, can be realized with current fabrication facilities, and therefore can really serve as an alternative to the present computing technology. (paper)

  9. Corruption dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malafeyev, O. A.; Nemnyugin, S. A.; Rylow, D.; Kolpak, E. P.; Awasthi, Achal

    2017-07-01

    The corruption dynamics is analyzed by means of the lattice model which is similar to the three-dimensional Ising model. Agents placed at nodes of the corrupt network periodically choose to perfom or not to perform the act of corruption at gain or loss while making decisions based on the process history. The gain value and its dynamics are defined by means of the Markov stochastic process modelling with parameters established in accordance with the influence of external and individual factors on the agent's gain. The model is formulated algorithmically and is studied by means of the computer simulation. Numerical results are obtained which demonstrate asymptotic behaviour of the corruption network under various conditions.

  10. Contact dynamics math model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaese, John R.; Tobbe, Patrick A.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station Mechanism Test Bed consists of a hydraulically driven, computer controlled six degree of freedom (DOF) motion system with which docking, berthing, and other mechanisms can be evaluated. Measured contact forces and moments are provided to the simulation host computer to enable representation of orbital contact dynamics. This report describes the development of a generalized math model which represents the relative motion between two rigid orbiting vehicles. The model allows motion in six DOF for each body, with no vehicle size limitation. The rotational and translational equations of motion are derived. The method used to transform the forces and moments from the sensor location to the vehicles' centers of mass is also explained. Two math models of docking mechanisms, a simple translational spring and the Remote Manipulator System end effector, are presented along with simulation results. The translational spring model is used in an attempt to verify the simulation with compensated hardware in the loop results.

  11. A Computational Model of the Temporal Dynamics of Plasticity in Procedural Learning: Sensitivity to Feedback Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian V. Valentin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The evidence is now good that different memory systems mediate the learning of different types of category structures. In particular, declarative memory dominates rule-based (RB category learning and procedural memory dominates information-integration (II category learning. For example, several studies have reported that feedback timing is critical for II category learning, but not for RB category learning – results that have broad support within the memory systems literature. Specifically, II category learning has been shown to be best with feedback delays of 500ms compared to delays of 0 and 1000ms, and highly impaired with delays of 2.5 seconds or longer. In contrast, RB learning is unaffected by any feedback delay up to 10 seconds. We propose a neurobiologically detailed theory of procedural learning that is sensitive to different feedback delays. The theory assumes that procedural learning is mediated by plasticity at cortical-striatal synapses that are modified by dopamine-mediated reinforcement learning. The model captures the time-course of the biochemical events in the striatum that cause synaptic plasticity, and thereby accounts for the empirical effects of various feedback delays on II category learning.

  12. Modeling-gas phase reactions in indoor environments using computational fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Weschler, Charles J.

    2002-01-01

    This CFD modeling study examines the concentrations of two gaseous compounds that react in an indoor setting to produce a hypothetical product. The reactants are ozone and either d-limonene or alpha-terpinene (which reacts with ozone about 40 times faster than d-limonene). In addition to two...... different terpenes, the scenarios include two air exchange rates (0.5 and 2.0 h(-1)). The terpene is introduced as a floor source with an emission pattern similar to a floor-care product. These four scenarios have been set in a fairly large two-dimensional room (13.6 x 40.6 m) with a supply at the top...... of the left wall and an exhaust at the bottom of the right wall. The room has been deliberately scaled so that the Reynolds numbers for key flow regimes match those of a room in which the calculated flow field has been validated against measured data. It has been further assumed that ozone interacts with room...

  13. Multiple degree of freedom inverted pendulum dynamics: Modeling, computation, and experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Yuan Jerry

    A pendulum is statically unstable in its upright inverted state due to the Earth's gravitational attraction which points downward. However, with proper forcing, the pendulum can be stabilized in its upright inverted state. Special interest is on periodic vertical forcing applied to the pendulum's base to stabilize it around the upright inverted equilibrium. Many researchers have studied how to stabilize the system by varying various parameters, in particular its amplitude and frequency. Most have focused on the single degree of freedom inverted pendulum case, which with linear assumption can be described via Mathieu's equation. The system stability can then be characterized by Floquet theory. Our focus is on searching for the periodic solutions inside the linearly stable region of the pendulum's inverted state when the pendulum is under proper periodic forcing. Our research shows that under appropriate excitation by controlling the forcing amplitude and frequency, the pendulum can maintain certain periodic orbits around its inverted state which we characterize in a systematic way. In this thesis, we applied four different kinds of geometric realizations of the system response: system time traces, system phase portraits, three dimensional views of the system phase portrait as a function of input forcing, and the system's power spectral density diagram. By analyzing these four diagrams simultaneously, we characterize different kinds of multi-frequency periodic behavior around the pendulum's inverted state. To further discuss the effect of the nonlinearity, we applied perturbation techniques using the normalized forcing amplitude as a perturbation parameter to carry out the approximate periodic solutions on a single degree of freedom inverted pendulum nonlinear model. We also discuss the multiple degree of freedom inverted pendulum system. Both numerical simulation and experiments were performed and detailed comparisons are discussed. Our numerical simulations show

  14. Computational Methods in Stochastic Dynamics Volume 2

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanou, George; Papadopoulos, Vissarion

    2013-01-01

    The considerable influence of inherent uncertainties on structural behavior has led the engineering community to recognize the importance of a stochastic approach to structural problems. Issues related to uncertainty quantification and its influence on the reliability of the computational models are continuously gaining in significance. In particular, the problems of dynamic response analysis and reliability assessment of structures with uncertain system and excitation parameters have been the subject of continuous research over the last two decades as a result of the increasing availability of powerful computing resources and technology.   This book is a follow up of a previous book with the same subject (ISBN 978-90-481-9986-0) and focuses on advanced computational methods and software tools which can highly assist in tackling complex problems in stochastic dynamic/seismic analysis and design of structures. The selected chapters are authored by some of the most active scholars in their respective areas and...

  15. The computer code EURDYN - 1 M (release 1) for transient dynamic fluid-structure interaction. Pt.1: governing equations and finite element modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donea, J.; Fasoli-Stella, P.; Giuliani, S.; Halleux, J.P.; Jones, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes the governing equations and the finite element modelling used in the computer code EURDYN - 1 M. The code is a non-linear transient dynamic program for the analysis of coupled fluid-structure systems; It is designed for safety studies on LMFBR components (primary containment and fuel subassemblies)

  16. Computer Programme for the Dynamic Analysis of Tall Regular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The traditional method of dynamic analysis of tall rigid frames assumes the shear frame model. Models that allow joint rotations with/without the inclusion of the column axial loads give improved results but pose much more computational difficulty. In this work a computer program Natfrequency that determines the dynamic ...

  17. Using FlowLab, an educational computational fluid dynamics tool, to perform a comparative study of turbulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parihar, A.; Kulkarni, A.; Stern, F.; Xing, T.; Moeykens, S.

    2005-01-01

    Flow over an Ahmed body is a key benchmark case for validating the complex turbulent flow field around vehicles. In spite of the simple geometry, the flow field around an Ahmed body retains critical features of real, external vehicular flow. The present study is an attempt to implement such a real life example into the course curriculum for undergraduate engineers. FlowLab, which is a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool developed by Fluent Inc. for use in engineering education, allows students to conduct interactive application studies. This paper presents a synopsis of FlowLab, a description of one FlowLab exercise, and an overview of the educational experience gained by students through using FlowLab, which is understood through student surveys and examinations. FlowLab-based CFD exercises were implemented into 57:020 Mechanics of Fluids and Transport Processes and 58:160 Intermediate Mechanics of Fluids courses at the University of Iowa in the fall of 2004, although this report focuses only on experiences with the Ahmed body exercise, which was used only in the intermediate-level fluids class, 58:160. This exercise was developed under National Science Foundation funding by the authors of this paper. The focus of this study does not include validating the various turbulence models used for the Ahmed body simulation, because a two-dimensional simplification was applied. With the two-dimensional simplification, students may setup, run, and post process this model in a 50 minute class period using a single-CPU PC, as required for the 58:160 class at the University of Iowa. It is educational for students to understand the implication of a two- dimensional approximation for essentially a three-dimensional flow field, along with the consequent variation in both qualitative and quantitative results. Additionally, through this exercise, students may realize that the choice of the respective turbulence model will affect simulation prediction. (author)

  18. Using Micro-Computed Tomography to Evaluate the Dynamics of Orthodontically Induced Root Resorption Repair in a Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Xu

    Full Text Available To observe dynamic changes in root resorption repair, tooth movement relapse and alveolar bone microstructure following the application of orthodontic force.Forces of 20 g, 50 g or 100 g were delivered to the left maxillary first molars of fifteen 10-week-old rats for 14 days. Each rat was subjected to micro-computed tomography scanning at 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 28 and 42 days after force removal. The root resorption crater volume, tooth movement relapse and alveolar bone microarchitecture were measured at each time point.From day 3 to day 14, the root resorption volume decreased significantly in each group. In the 20-g force group, the root resorption volume gradually stabilized after 14 days, whereas in the 50-g and 100-g force groups, it stabilized after 28 days. In all groups, tooth movement relapsed significantly from day 0 to day 14 and then remained stable. From day 3 to day 10, the 20-g group exhibited faster relapse than the 50-g and 100-g groups. In all groups, the structure model index and trabecular separation decreased slowly from day 0 to day 10 and eventually stabilized. Trabecular number increased slowly from day 0 to day 7 and then stabilized.The initial stage of root resorption repair did not change significantly and was followed by a dramatic repair period before stabilizing. The most serious tooth movement relapse occurred immediately after the appliance was removed, and then the tooth completely returned to the original position.

  19. Impact of competitive flow on wall shear stress in coronary surgery: computational fluid dynamics of a LIMA-LAD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgaard, Håvard; Swillens, Abigail; Nordhaug, Dag; Kirkeby-Garstad, Idar; Van Loo, Denis; Vitale, Nicola; Segers, Patrick; Haaverstad, Rune; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2010-12-01

    Competitive flow from native coronary vessels is considered a major factor in the failure of coronary bypass grafts. However, the pathophysiological effects are not fully understood. Low and oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease, like atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. The aim was to investigate the impact of competitive flow on WSS in mammary artery bypass grafts. Using computational fluid dynamics, WSS was calculated in a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft to the left anterior descending artery in a three-dimensional in vivo porcine coronary artery bypass graft model. The following conditions were investigated: high competitive flow (non-significant coronary lesion), partial competitive flow (significant coronary lesion), and no competitive flow (totally occluded coronary vessel). Time-averaged WSS of LIMA at high, partial, and no competitive flow were 0.3-0.6, 0.6-3.0, and 0.9-3.0 Pa, respectively. Further, oscillatory WSS quantified as the oscillatory shear index (OSI) ranged from (maximum OSI = 0.5 equals zero net WSS) 0.15 to 0.35, OSI similar to the no competitive flow condition. Graft flow is highly dependent on the degree of competitive flow. High competitive flow was found to produce unfavourable WSS consistent with endothelial dysfunction and subsequent graft narrowing and failure. Partial competitive flow, however, may be better tolerated as it was found to be similar to the ideal condition of no competitive flow.

  20. Magnetic drug targeting through a realistic model of human tracheobronchial airways using computational fluid and particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmehran, Oveis; Gorji, Tahereh B; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic drug targeting (MDT) is a local drug delivery system which aims to concentrate a pharmacological agent at its site of action in order to minimize undesired side effects due to systemic distribution in the organism. Using magnetic drug particles under the influence of an external magnetic field, the drug particles are navigated toward the target region. Herein, computational fluid dynamics was used to simulate the air flow and magnetic particle deposition in a realistic human airway geometry obtained by CT scan images. Using discrete phase modeling and one-way coupling of particle-fluid phases, a Lagrangian approach for particle tracking in the presence of an external non-uniform magnetic field was applied. Polystyrene (PMS40) particles were utilized as the magnetic drug carrier. A parametric study was conducted, and the influence of particle diameter, magnetic source position, magnetic field strength and inhalation condition on the particle transport pattern and deposition efficiency (DE) was reported. Overall, the results show considerable promise of MDT in deposition enhancement at the target region (i.e., left lung). However, the positive effect of increasing particle size on DE enhancement was evident at smaller magnetic field strengths (Mn [Formula: see text] 1.5 T), whereas, at higher applied magnetic field strengths, increasing particle size has a inverse effect on DE. This implies that for efficient MTD in the human respiratory system, an optimal combination of magnetic drug career characteristics and magnetic field strength has to be achieved.

  1. Technical and functional analysis of Spanish windmills: 3D modeling, computational-fluid-dynamics simulation and finite-element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas-Sola, José Ignacio; Bouza-Rodríguez, José Benito; Menéndez-Díaz, Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Technical and functional analysis of the two typologies of windmills in Spain. • Spatial distribution of velocities and pressures by computational-fluid dynamics (CFD). • Finite-element analysis (FEA) of the rotors of these two types of windmills. • Validation of the operative functionality of these windmills. - Abstract: A detailed study has been made of the two typologies of windmills in Spain, specifically the rectangular-bladed type, represented by the windmill ‘Sardinero’, located near the town of Campo de Criptana (Ciudad Real province, Spain) and the type with triangular sails (lateens), represented by the windmill ‘San Francisco’, in the town of Vejer de la Frontera (Cádiz province, Spain). For this, an ad hoc research methodology has been applied on the basis of three aspects: three-dimensional geometric modeling, analysis by computational-fluid dynamics (CFD), and finite-element analysis (FEA). The results found with the CFD technique show the correct functioning of the two windmills in relation to the spatial distribution of the wind velocities and pressures to which each is normally exposed (4–7 m/s in the case of ‘Sardinero’, and 5–11 for ‘San Francisco’), thereby validating the operative functionality of both types. In addition, as a result of the FEA, the spatial distribution of stresses on the rotor has revealed that the greatest concentrations of these occurs in the teeth of the head wheel in ‘Sardinero’, reaching a value of 12 MPa, and at the base of the masts in the case of the ‘San Francisco’, with a value of 24 MPa. Also, this analysis evidences that simple, effective designs to reinforce the masts absorb a great concentration of stresses that would otherwise cause breakage. Furthermore, it was confirmed that the oak wood from which the rotors were made functioned properly, as the windmill never exceeded the maximum admissible working stress, demonstrating the effectiveness of the materials

  2. RETRAN dynamic slip model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, J.H.; Paulsen, M.P.; Gose, G.C.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic codes in general use for system calculations are based on extensive analyses of loss-of-coolant accidents following the postulated rupture of a large coolant pipe. In this study, time-dependent equation for the slip velocity in a two-phase flow condition has been incorporated into the RETRAN-02 computer code. This model addition was undertaken to remove a limitation in RETRAN-01 associated with the homogeneous equilibrium mixture model. The dynamic slip equation was derived from a set of two-fluid conservation equations. 18 refs

  3. CFD [computational fluid dynamics] And Safety Factors. Computer modeling of complex processes needs old-fashioned experiments to stay in touch with reality.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Poirier, Michael R.; Steeper, Timothy J.; Ervin, Robert C.; Giddings, Billy J.; Stefanko, David B.; Harp, Keith D.; Fowley, Mark D.; Van Pelt, William B.

    2012-10-07

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is recognized as a powerful engineering tool. That is, CFD has advanced over the years to the point where it can now give us deep insight into the analysis of very complex processes. There is a danger, though, that an engineer can place too much confidence in a simulation. If a user is not careful, it is easy to believe that if you plug in the numbers, the answer comes out, and you are done. This assumption can lead to significant errors. As we discovered in the course of a study on behalf of the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in South Carolina, CFD models fail to capture some of the large variations inherent in complex processes. These variations, or scatter, in experimental data emerge from physical tests and are inadequately captured or expressed by calculated mean values for a process. This anomaly between experiment and theory can lead to serious errors in engineering analysis and design unless a correction factor, or safety factor, is experimentally validated. For this study, blending times for the mixing of salt solutions in large storage tanks were the process of concern under investigation. This study focused on the blending processes needed to mix salt solutions to ensure homogeneity within waste tanks, where homogeneity is required to control radioactivity levels during subsequent processing. Two of the requirements for this task were to determine the minimum number of submerged, centrifugal pumps required to blend the salt mixtures in a full-scale tank in half a day or less, and to recommend reasonable blending times to achieve nearly homogeneous salt mixtures. A full-scale, low-flow pump with a total discharge flow rate of 500 to 800 gpm was recommended with two opposing 2.27-inch diameter nozzles. To make this recommendation, both experimental and CFD modeling were performed. Lab researchers found that, although CFD provided good estimates of an average blending time, experimental blending times varied

  4. Colour in visualisation for computational fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Kinnear, D; Atherton, MA; Collins, MW; Dokhan, J; Karayiannis, TG

    2006-01-01

    Colour is used in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations in two key ways. First it is used to visualise the geometry and allow the engineers to be confident that the model constructed is a good representation of the engineering situation. Once an analysis has been completed, colour is used in post-processing the data from the simulations to illustrate the complex fluid mechanic phenomena under investigation. This paper describes these two uses of colour and provides some examples to il...

  5. Computational fluid dynamics in ventilation design

    CERN Document Server

    Allard, Francis; Awbi, Hazim B; Davidson, Lars; Schälin, Alois

    2007-01-01

    CFD-calculations have been rapidly developed to a powerful tool for the analysis of air pollution distribution in various spaces. However, the user of CFD-calculation should be aware of the basic principles of calculations and specifically the boundary conditions. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) – in Ventilation Design models is written by a working group of highly qualified international experts representing research, consulting and design.

  6. Coupling of the computational fluid dynamics code ANSYS CFX with the 3D neutron kinetic core model DYN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.; Grahn, A.; Rohde, U.; Schuetze, J.; Frank, Th.

    2010-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics code ANSYS CFX has been coupled with the neutron-kinetic core model DYN3D. ANSYS CFX calculates the fluid dynamics and related transport phenomena in the reactors coolant and provides the corresponding data to DYN3D. In the fluid flow simulation of the coolant, the core itself is modeled within the porous body approach. DYN3D calculates the neutron kinetics and the fuel behavior including the heat transfer to the coolant. The physical data interface between the codes is the volumetric heat release rate into the coolant. In the prototype that is currently available, the coupling is restricted to single-phase flow problems. In the time domain an explicit coupling of the codes has been implemented so far. Steady-state and transient verification calculations for two small-size test problems confirm the correctness of the implementation of the prototype coupling. The first test problem was a mini-core consisting of nine real-size fuel assemblies with quadratic cross section. Comparison was performed with the DYN3D stand-alone code. In the steady state, the effective multiplication factor obtained by the DYN3D/ANSYS CFX codes hows a deviation of 9.8 pcm from the DYN3D stand-alone solution. This difference can be attributed to the use of different water property packages in the two codes. The transient test case simulated the withdrawal of the control rod from the central fuel assembly at hot zero power in the same mini-core. Power increase during the introduction of positive reactivity and power reduction due to fuel temperature increase are calculated in the same manner by the coupled and the stand-alone codes. The maximum values reached during the power rise differ by about 1 MW at a power level of 50 MW. Beside the different water property packages, these differences are caused by the use of different flow solvers. The same calculations were carried for a mini-core with seven real-size fuel assemblies with hexagonal cross section in

  7. Principles of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesseling, P.

    2001-01-01

    The book is aimed at graduate students, researchers, engineers and physicists involved in flow computations. An up-to-date account is given of the present state- of-the-art of numerical methods employed in computational fluid dynamics. The underlying numerical principles are treated with a fair amount of detail, using elementary mathematical analysis. Attention is given to difficulties arising from geometric complexity of the flow domain and of nonuniform structured boundary-fitted grids. Uniform accuracy and efficiency for singular perturbation problems is studied, pointing the way to accurate computation of flows at high Reynolds number. Much attention is given to stability analysis, and useful stability conditions are provided, some of them new, for many numerical schemes used in practice. Unified methods for compressible and incompressible flows are discussed. Numerical analysis of the shallow-water equations is included. The theory of hyperbolic conservation laws is treated. Godunov's order barrier and how to overcome it by means of slope-limited schemes is discussed. An introduction is given to efficient iterative solution methods, using Krylov subspace and multigrid acceleration. Many pointers are given to recent literature, to help the reader to quickly reach the current research frontier. (orig.)

  8. Computational methods for fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferziger, Joel H

    2002-01-01

    In its 3rd revised and extended edition the book offers an overview of the techniques used to solve problems in fluid mechanics on computers and describes in detail those most often used in practice. Included are advanced methods in computational fluid dynamics, like direct and large-eddy simulation of turbulence, multigrid methods, parallel computing, moving grids, structured, block-structured and unstructured boundary-fitted grids, free surface flows. The 3rd edition contains a new section dealing with grid quality and an extended description of discretization methods. The book shows common roots and basic principles for many different methods. The book also contains a great deal of practical advice for code developers and users, it is designed to be equally useful to beginners and experts. The issues of numerical accuracy, estimation and reduction of numerical errors are dealt with in detail, with many examples. A full-feature user-friendly demo-version of a commercial CFD software has been added, which ca...

  9. Dynamic causal modeling of hippocampal links within the human default mode network: Lateralization and computational stability of effective connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Leonidovich Ushakov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to study causal relationships between left and right hippocampal regions (LHIP and RHIP, respectively within the default mode network (DMN as represented by its key structures: the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC and the inferior parietal cortex of left (LIPC and right (RIPC hemispheres. Furthermore, we were interested in testing the stability of the connectivity patterns when adding or deleting regions of interest. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data from a group of 30 healthy right-handed subjects in the resting state were collected and a connectivity analysis was performed. To model the effective connectivity, we used the spectral Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM. Three DCM analyses were completed. Two of them modeled interaction between five nodes that included four DMN key structures in addition to either LHIP or RHIP. The last DCM analysis modeled interactions between four nodes whereby one of the main DMN structures, PCC, was excluded from the analysis. The results of all DCM analyses indicated a high level of stability in the computational method: those parts of the winning models that included the key DMN structures demonstrated causal relations known from recent research. However, we discovered new results as well. First of all, we found a pronounced asymmetry in LHIP and RHIP connections. LHIP demonstrated a high involvement of DMN activity with preponderant information outflow to all other DMN regions. Causal interactions of LHIP were bidirectional only in the case of LIPC. On the contrary, RHIP was primarily affected by inputs from LIPC, RIPC and LHIP without influencing these or other DMN key structures. For the first time, an inhibitory link was found from MPFC to LIPC, which may indicate the subjects’ effort to maintain a resting state. Functional connectivity data echoed these results, though they also showed links not reflected in the patterns of

  10. Multilaboratory particle image velocimetry analysis of the FDA benchmark nozzle model to support validation of computational fluid dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Prasanna; Giarra, Matthew; Reddy, Varun; Day, Steven W; Manning, Keefe B; Deutsch, Steven; Stewart, Sandy F C; Myers, Matthew R; Berman, Michael R; Burgreen, Greg W; Paterson, Eric G; Malinauskas, Richard A

    2011-04-01

    This study is part of a FDA-sponsored project to evaluate the use and limitations of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in assessing blood flow parameters related to medical device safety. In an interlaboratory study, fluid velocities and pressures were measured in a nozzle model to provide experimental validation for a companion round-robin CFD study. The simple benchmark nozzle model, which mimicked the flow fields in several medical devices, consisted of a gradual flow constriction, a narrow throat region, and a sudden expansion region where a fluid jet exited the center of the nozzle with recirculation zones near the model walls. Measurements of mean velocity and turbulent flow quantities were made in the benchmark device at three independent laboratories using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Flow measurements were performed over a range of nozzle throat Reynolds numbers (Re(throat)) from 500 to 6500, covering the laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow regimes. A standard operating procedure was developed for performing experiments under controlled temperature and flow conditions and for minimizing systematic errors during PIV image acquisition and processing. For laminar (Re(throat)=500) and turbulent flow conditions (Re(throat)≥3500), the velocities measured by the three laboratories were similar with an interlaboratory uncertainty of ∼10% at most of the locations. However, for the transitional flow case (Re(throat)=2000), the uncertainty in the size and the velocity of the jet at the nozzle exit increased to ∼60% and was very sensitive to the flow conditions. An error analysis showed that by minimizing the variability in the experimental parameters such as flow rate and fluid viscosity to less than 5% and by matching the inlet turbulence level between the laboratories, the uncertainties in the velocities of the transitional flow case could be reduced to ∼15%. The experimental procedure and flow results from this interlaboratory study (available

  11. The CMS Computing Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonacorsi, D.

    2007-01-01

    The CMS experiment at LHC has developed a baseline Computing Model addressing the needs of a computing system capable to operate in the first years of LHC running. It is focused on a data model with heavy streaming at the raw data level based on trigger, and on the achievement of the maximum flexibility in the use of distributed computing resources. The CMS distributed Computing Model includes a Tier-0 centre at CERN, a CMS Analysis Facility at CERN, several Tier-1 centres located at large regional computing centres, and many Tier-2 centres worldwide. The workflows have been identified, along with a baseline architecture for the data management infrastructure. This model is also being tested in Grid Service Challenges of increasing complexity, coordinated with the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid community

  12. Microfocal X-ray computed tomography post-processing operations for optimizing reconstruction volumes of stented arteries during 3D computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladisa, John F; Olson, Lars E; Ropella, Kristina M; Molthen, Robert C; Haworth, Steven T; Kersten, Judy R; Warltier, David C; Pagel, Paul S

    2005-08-01

    Restenosis caused by neointimal hyperplasia (NH) remains an important clinical problem after stent implantation. Restenosis varies with stent geometry, and idealized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have indicated that geometric properties of the implanted stent may differentially influence NH. However, 3D studies capturing the in vivo flow domain within stented vessels have not been conducted at a resolution sufficient to detect subtle alterations in vascular geometry caused by the stent and the subsequent temporal development of NH. We present the details and limitations of a series of post-processing operations used in conjunction with microfocal X-ray CT imaging and reconstruction to generate geometrically accurate flow domains within the localized region of a stent several weeks after implantation. Microfocal X-ray CT reconstruction volumes were subjected to an automated program to perform arterial thresholding, spatial orientation, and surface smoothing of stented and unstented rabbit iliac arteries several weeks after antegrade implantation. A transfer function was obtained for the current post-processing methodology containing reconstructed 16 mm stents implanted into rabbit iliac arteries for up to 21 days after implantation and resolved at circumferential and axial resolutions of 32 and 50 microm, respectively. The results indicate that the techniques presented are sufficient to resolve distributions of WSS with 80% accuracy in segments containing 16 surface perturbations over a 16 mm stented region. These methods will be used to test the hypothesis that reductions in normalized wall shear stress (WSS) and increases in the spatial disparity of WSS immediately after stent implantation may spatially correlate with the temporal development of NH within the stented region.

  13. Characterization of deposition from nasal spray devices using a computational fluid dynamics model of the human nasal passages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbell, Julia S; Segal, Rebecca A; Asgharian, Bahman; Wong, Brian A; Schroeter, Jeffry D; Southall, Jeremy P; Dickens, Colin J; Brace, Geoff; Miller, Frederick J

    2007-01-01

    Many studies suggest limited effectiveness of spray devices for nasal drug delivery due primarily to high deposition and clearance at the front of the nose. Here, nasal spray behavior was studied using experimental measurements and a computational fluid dynamics model of the human nasal passages constructed from magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy adult male. Eighteen commercially available nasal sprays were analyzed for spray characteristics using laser diffraction, high-speed video, and high-speed spark photography. Steadystate, inspiratory airflow (15 L/min) and particle transport were simulated under measured spray conditions. Simulated deposition efficiency and spray behavior were consistent with previous experimental studies, two of which used nasal replica molds based on this nasal geometry. Deposition fractions (numbers of deposited particles divided by the number released) of 20- and 50-microm particles exceeded 90% in the anterior part of the nose for most simulated conditions. Predicted particle penetration past the nasal valve improved when (1) the smaller of two particle sizes or the lower of two spray velocities was used, (2) the simulated nozzle was positioned 1.0 rather than 0.5 or 1.5 cm into the nostril, and (3) inspiratory airflow was present rather than absent. Simulations also predicted that delaying the appearance of normal inspiratory airflow more than 1 sec after the release of particles produced results equivalent to cases in which no inspiratory airflow was present. These predictions contribute to more effective design of drug delivery devices through a better understanding of the effects of nasal airflow and spray characteristics on particle transport in the nose.

  14. A Computational Model Based on Multi-Regional Calcium Imaging Represents the Spatio-Temporal Dynamics in a Caenorhabditis elegans Sensory Neuron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kuramochi

    Full Text Available Due to the huge number of neuronal cells in the brain and their complex circuit formation, computer simulation of neuronal activity is indispensable to understanding whole brain dynamics. Recently, various computational models have been developed based on whole-brain calcium imaging data. However, these analyses monitor only the activity of neuronal cell bodies and treat the cells as point unit. This point-neuron model is inexpensive in computational costs, but the model is unrealistically simplistic at representing intact neural activities in the brain. Here, we describe a novel three-unit Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE model based on the neuronal responses derived from a Caenorhabditis elegans salt-sensing neuron. We recorded calcium responses in three regions of the ASER neuron using a simple downstep of NaCl concentration. Our simple ODE model generated from a single recording can adequately reproduce and predict the temporal responses of each part of the neuron to various types of NaCl concentration changes. Our strategy which combines a simple recording data and an ODE mathematical model may be extended to realistically understand whole brain dynamics by computational simulation.

  15. An efficient nonlinear finite-difference approach in the computational modeling of the dynamics of a nonlinear diffusion-reaction equation in microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Díaz, J E; Macías, Siegfried; Medina-Ramírez, I E

    2013-12-01

    In this manuscript, we present a computational model to approximate the solutions of a partial differential equation which describes the growth dynamics of microbial films. The numerical technique reported in this work is an explicit, nonlinear finite-difference methodology which is computationally implemented using Newton's method. Our scheme is compared numerically against an implicit, linear finite-difference discretization of the same partial differential equation, whose computer coding requires an implementation of the stabilized bi-conjugate gradient method. Our numerical results evince that the nonlinear approach results in a more efficient approximation to the solutions of the biofilm model considered, and demands less computer memory. Moreover, the positivity of initial profiles is preserved in the practice by the nonlinear scheme proposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Computer-graphic visualization of dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, H.B.

    1986-01-01

    As engineered systems become increasingly sophisticated and complex, questions of efficiency, reliability, and safety demand the application of more powerful methods of analysis. One indication of this is the accelerating trend away from purely static or quasi-steady system modeling toward models that include essentially dynamic behavior. It is here that the qualitative ideas of nonlinear dynamics, dealing as they do with the most typical behavior in real dynamical systems, can be expected to play an increasingly prominent role. As part of a continuing investigation of the most important low-order differential equations, an interactive computer graphics environment has been created for the study of systems in three-dimensional phase space. This environment makes available the basic control of both numerical simulation and graphic visualization by a specially designed menu system. A key ingredient in this environment is the possibility of graphic communication not only from machine to man, but also from man to machine. Thus to specify the starting point for a numerical integration, for example, the user points to a location in phase space on the screen of the graphics terminal (using crosshairs or a mouse and cursor), bypassing the necessity to give numerical values of the phase-space coordinates. By devising a flexible computer interface which implements conceptual approaches to phase-space analysis of dynamical systems, significant advances in understanding of prototypical differential equations have been achieved

  17. Dynamic wake meandering modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Gunner C.; Aagaard Madsen, H.; Bingoel, F. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    We present a consistent, physically based theory for the wake meandering phenomenon, which we consider of crucial importance for the overall description of wind turbine loadings in wind farms. In its present version the model is confined to single wake situations. The model philosophy does, however, have the potential to include also mutual wake interaction phenomenons. The basic conjecture behind the dynamic wake meandering model is that wake transportation in the atmospheric boundary layer is driven by the large scale lateral- and vertical turbulence components. Based on this conjecture a stochastic model of the downstream wake meandering is formulated. In addition to the kinematic formulation of the dynamics of the 'meandering frame of reference', models characterizing the mean wake deficit as well as the added wake turbulence, described in the meandering frame of reference, are an integrated part the model complex. For design applications, the computational efficiency of wake deficit prediction is a key issue. Two computationally low cost models are developed for this purpose. The character of the added wake turbulence, generated by the up-stream turbine in the form of shed and trailed vorticity, has been approached by analytical as well as by numerical studies. The dynamic wake meandering philosophy has been verified by comparing model predictions with extensive full-scale measurements. These comparisons have demonstrated good agreement, both qualitatively and quantitatively, concerning both flow characteristics and turbine load characteristics. Contrary to previous attempts to model wake loading, the dynamic wake meandering approach opens for a unifying description in the sense that turbine power and load aspects can be treated simultaneously. This capability is a direct and attractive consequence of the model being based on the underlying physical process, and it potentially opens for optimization of wind farm topology, of wind farm operation as

  18. High performance computations using dynamical nucleation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windus, T L; Crosby, L D; Kathmann, S M

    2008-01-01

    Chemists continue to explore the use of very large computations to perform simulations that describe the molecular level physics of critical challenges in science. In this paper, we describe the Dynamical Nucleation Theory Monte Carlo (DNTMC) model - a model for determining molecular scale nucleation rate constants - and its parallel capabilities. The potential for bottlenecks and the challenges to running on future petascale or larger resources are delineated. A 'master-slave' solution is proposed to scale to the petascale and will be developed in the NWChem software. In addition, mathematical and data analysis challenges are described

  19. Computational models of neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellous, J M; Linster, C

    1998-05-15

    Computational modeling of neural substrates provides an excellent theoretical framework for the understanding of the computational roles of neuromodulation. In this review, we illustrate, with a large number of modeling studies, the specific computations performed by neuromodulation in the context of various neural models of invertebrate and vertebrate preparations. We base our characterization of neuromodulations on their computational and functional roles rather than on anatomical or chemical criteria. We review the main framework in which neuromodulation has been studied theoretically (central pattern generation and oscillations, sensory processing, memory and information integration). Finally, we present a detailed mathematical overview of how neuromodulation has been implemented at the single cell and network levels in modeling studies. Overall, neuromodulation is found to increase and control computational complexity.

  20. Computationally efficient dynamic modeling of robot manipulators with multiple flexible-links using acceleration-based discrete time transfer matrix method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xuping; Sørensen, Rasmus; RahbekIversen, Mathias

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a novel and computationally efficient modeling method for the dynamics of flexible-link robot manipulators. In this method, a robot manipulator is decomposed into components/elements. The component/element dynamics is established using Newton–Euler equations, and then is linea......This paper presents a novel and computationally efficient modeling method for the dynamics of flexible-link robot manipulators. In this method, a robot manipulator is decomposed into components/elements. The component/element dynamics is established using Newton–Euler equations......, and then is linearized based on the acceleration-based state vector. The transfer matrices for each type of components/elements are developed, and used to establish the system equations of a flexible robot manipulator by concatenating the state vector from the base to the end-effector. With this strategy, the size...... manipulators, and only involves calculating and transferring component/element dynamic equations that have small size. The numerical simulations and experimental testing of flexible-link manipulators are conducted to validate the proposed methodologies....

  1. Reduced-order computational model in nonlinear structural dynamics for structures having numerous local elastic modes in the low-frequency range. Application to fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batou, A.; Soize, C.; Brie, N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A ROM of a nonlinear dynamical structure is built with a global displacements basis. • The reduced order model of fuel assemblies is accurate and of very small size. • The shocks between grids of a row of seven fuel assemblies are computed. -- Abstract: We are interested in the construction of a reduced-order computational model for nonlinear complex dynamical structures which are characterized by the presence of numerous local elastic modes in the low-frequency band. This high modal density makes the use of the classical modal analysis method not suitable. Therefore the reduced-order computational model is constructed using a basis of a space of global displacements, which is constructed a priori and which allows the nonlinear dynamical response of the structure observed on the stiff part to be predicted with a good accuracy. The methodology is applied to a complex industrial structure which is made up of a row of seven fuel assemblies with possibility of collisions between grids and which is submitted to a seismic loading

  2. Reduced-order computational model in nonlinear structural dynamics for structures having numerous local elastic modes in the low-frequency range. Application to fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batou, A., E-mail: anas.batou@univ-paris-est.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee (France); Soize, C., E-mail: christian.soize@univ-paris-est.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee (France); Brie, N., E-mail: nicolas.brie@edf.fr [EDF R and D, Département AMA, 1 avenue du général De Gaulle, 92140 Clamart (France)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • A ROM of a nonlinear dynamical structure is built with a global displacements basis. • The reduced order model of fuel assemblies is accurate and of very small size. • The shocks between grids of a row of seven fuel assemblies are computed. -- Abstract: We are interested in the construction of a reduced-order computational model for nonlinear complex dynamical structures which are characterized by the presence of numerous local elastic modes in the low-frequency band. This high modal density makes the use of the classical modal analysis method not suitable. Therefore the reduced-order computational model is constructed using a basis of a space of global displacements, which is constructed a priori and which allows the nonlinear dynamical response of the structure observed on the stiff part to be predicted with a good accuracy. The methodology is applied to a complex industrial structure which is made up of a row of seven fuel assemblies with possibility of collisions between grids and which is submitted to a seismic loading.

  3. Overhead Crane Computer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enin, S. S.; Omelchenko, E. Y.; Fomin, N. V.; Beliy, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    The paper has a description of a computer model of an overhead crane system. The designed overhead crane system consists of hoisting, trolley and crane mechanisms as well as a payload two-axis system. With the help of the differential equation of specified mechanisms movement derived through Lagrange equation of the II kind, it is possible to build an overhead crane computer model. The computer model was obtained using Matlab software. Transients of coordinate, linear speed and motor torque of trolley and crane mechanism systems were simulated. In addition, transients of payload swaying were obtained with respect to the vertical axis. A trajectory of the trolley mechanism with simultaneous operation with the crane mechanism is represented in the paper as well as a two-axis trajectory of payload. The designed computer model of an overhead crane is a great means for studying positioning control and anti-sway control systems.

  4. HTTR plant dynamic simulation using a hybrid computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazaki, Junya; Suzuki, Katsuo; Nabeshima, Kunihiko; Watanabe, Koichi; Shinohara, Yoshikuni; Nakagawa, Shigeaki.

    1990-01-01

    A plant dynamic simulation of High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor has been made using a new-type hybrid computer. This report describes a dynamic simulation model of HTTR, a hybrid simulation method for SIMSTAR and some results obtained from dynamics analysis of HTTR simulation. It concludes that the hybrid plant simulation is useful for on-line simulation on account of its capability of computation at high speed, compared with that of all digital computer simulation. With sufficient accuracy, 40 times faster computation than real time was reached only by changing an analog time scale for HTTR simulation. (author)

  5. Analog computing for a new nuclear reactor dynamic model based on a time-dependent second order form of the neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirouzmand, Ahmad; Hadad, Kamal; Suh, Kune Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the concept of analog computing based on a cellular neural network (CNN) paradigm to simulate nuclear reactor dynamics using a time-dependent second order form of the neutron transport equation. Instead of solving nuclear reactor dynamic equations numerically, which is time-consuming and suffers from such weaknesses as vulnerability to transient phenomena, accumulation of round-off errors and floating-point overflows, use is made of a new method based on a cellular neural network. The state-of-the-art shows the CNN as being an alternative solution to the conventional numerical computation method. Indeed CNN is an analog computing paradigm that performs ultra-fast calculations and provides accurate results. In this study use is made of the CNN model to simulate the space-time response of scalar flux distribution in steady state and transient conditions. The CNN model also is used to simulate step perturbation in the core. The accuracy and capability of the CNN model are examined in 2D Cartesian geometry for two fixed source problems, a mini-BWR assembly, and a TWIGL Seed/Blanket problem. We also use the CNN model concurrently for a typical small PWR assembly to simulate the effect of temperature feedback, poisons, and control rods on the scalar flux distribution

  6. Computer Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronskikh, V. S. [Fermilab

    2014-05-09

    Verification and validation of computer codes and models used in simulation are two aspects of the scientific practice of high importance and have recently been discussed by philosophers of science. While verification is predominantly associated with the correctness of the way a model is represented by a computer code or algorithm, validation more often refers to model’s relation to the real world and its intended use. It has been argued that because complex simulations are generally not transparent to a practitioner, the Duhem problem can arise for verification and validation due to their entanglement; such an entanglement makes it impossible to distinguish whether a coding error or model’s general inadequacy to its target should be blamed in the case of the model failure. I argue that in order to disentangle verification and validation, a clear distinction between computer modeling (construction of mathematical computer models of elementary processes) and simulation (construction of models of composite objects and processes by means of numerical experimenting with them) needs to be made. Holding on to that distinction, I propose to relate verification (based on theoretical strategies such as inferences) to modeling and validation, which shares the common epistemology with experimentation, to simulation. To explain reasons of their intermittent entanglement I propose a weberian ideal-typical model of modeling and simulation as roles in practice. I suggest an approach to alleviate the Duhem problem for verification and validation generally applicable in practice and based on differences in epistemic strategies and scopes

  7. Numerical Simulation of Desulfurization Behavior in Gas-Stirred Systems Based on Computation Fluid Dynamics-Simultaneous Reaction Model (CFD-SRM) Coupled Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Wentao; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2014-10-01

    A computation fluid dynamics-simultaneous reaction model (CFD-SRM) coupled model has been proposed to describe the desulfurization behavior in a gas-stirred ladle. For the desulfurization thermodynamics, different models were investigated to determine sulfide capacity and oxygen activity. For the desulfurization kinetic, the effect of bubbly plume flow, as well as oxygen absorption and oxidation reactions in slag eyes are considered. The thermodynamic and kinetic modification coefficients are proposed to fit the measured data, respectively. Finally, the effects of slag basicity and gas flow rate on the desulfurization efficiency are investigated. The results show that as the interfacial reactions (Al2O3)-(FeO)-(SiO2)-(MnO)-[S]-[O] simultaneous kinetic equilibrium is adopted to determine the oxygen activity, and the Young's model with the modification coefficient R th of 1.5 is adopted to determine slag sulfide capacity, the predicted sulfur distribution ratio LS agrees well with the measured data. With an increase of the gas blowing time, the predicted desulfurization rate gradually decreased, and when the modification parameter R k is 0.8, the predicted sulfur content changing with time in ladle agrees well with the measured data. If the oxygen absorption and oxidation reactions in slag eyes are not considered in this model, then the sulfur removal rate in the ladle would be overestimated, and this trend would become more obvious with an increase of the gas flow rate and decrease of the slag layer height. With the slag basicity increasing, the total desulfurization ratio increases; however, the total desulfurization ratio changes weakly as the slag basicity exceeds 7. With the increase of the gas flow rate, the desulfurization ratio first increases and then decreases. When the gas flow rate is 200 NL/min, the desulfurization ratio reaches a maximum value in an 80-ton gas-stirred ladle.

  8. Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Calculation Using Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model Flow Measurements in Primary Loop of Coolant in a Pressurized Water Reactor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Farkas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to simulate the thermohydraulic consequences of a main steam line break and to compare the obtained results with Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model (ROCOM 1.1 experimental results. The objective is to utilize data from steady-state mixing experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD calculations to determine the flow distribution and the effect of thermal mixing phenomena in the primary loops for the improvement of normal operation conditions and structural integrity assessment of pressurized water reactors. The numerical model of ROCOM was developed using the FLUENT code. The positions of the inlet and outlet boundary conditions and the distribution of detailed velocity/turbulence parameters were determined by preliminary calculations. The temperature fields of transient calculation were averaged in time and compared with time-averaged experimental data. The perforated barrel under the core inlet homogenizes the flow, and therefore, a uniform temperature distribution is formed in the pressure vessel bottom. The calculated and measured values of lowest temperature were equal. The inlet temperature is an essential parameter for safety assessment. The calculation predicts precisely the experimental results at the core inlet central region. CFD results showed a good agreement (both qualitatively and quantitatively with experimental results.

  9. Computational modeling of lava domes using particle dynamics to investigate the effect of conduit flow mechanics on flow patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Taha Murtuza

    Large (1--4 x 106 m3) to major (> 4 x 106 m3) dome collapses for andesitic lava domes such as Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat are observed for elevated magma discharge rates (6--13 m3/s). The gas rich magma pulses lead to pressure build up in the lava dome that result in structural failure of the over steepened canyon-like walls which may lead to rockfall or pyroclastic flow. This indicates that dome collapse intimately related to magma extrusion rate. Variation in magma extrusion rate for open-system magma chambers is observed to follow alternating periods of high and low activity. Periodic behavior of magma exhibits a rich diversity in the nature of its eruptive history due to variation in magma chamber size, total crystal content, linear crystal growth rate and magma replenishment rate. Distinguished patterns of growth were observed at different magma flow rates ranging from endogenous to exogenous dome growth for magma with varying strengths. Determining the key parameters that control the transition in flow pattern of the magma during its lava dome building eruption is the main focus. This dissertation examines the mechanical effects on the morphology of the evolving lava dome on the extrusion of magma from a central vent using a 2D particle dynamics model. The particle dynamics model is coupled with a conduit flow model that incorporates the kinetics of crystallization and rheological stiffening to investigate important mechanisms during lava dome building eruptions. Chapter I of this dissertation explores lava dome growth and failure mechanics using a two-dimensional particle-dynamics model. The model follows the evolution of fractured lava, with solidification driven by degassing induced crystallization of magma. The particle-dynamics model emulates the natural development of dome growth and rearrangement of the lava dome which is difficult in mesh-based analyses due to mesh entanglement effects. The deformable talus evolves naturally as a frictional

  10. Modeling dynamic swarms

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanem, Bernard; Ahuja, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes the problem of modeling video sequences of dynamic swarms (DSs). We define a DS as a large layout of stochastically repetitive spatial configurations of dynamic objects (swarm elements) whose motions exhibit local spatiotemporal

  11. CMS computing model evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandi, C; Bonacorsi, D; Colling, D; Fisk, I; Girone, M

    2014-01-01

    The CMS Computing Model was developed and documented in 2004. Since then the model has evolved to be more flexible and to take advantage of new techniques, but many of the original concepts remain and are in active use. In this presentation we will discuss the changes planned for the restart of the LHC program in 2015. We will discuss the changes planning in the use and definition of the computing tiers that were defined with the MONARC project. We will present how we intend to use new services and infrastructure to provide more efficient and transparent access to the data. We will discuss the computing plans to make better use of the computing capacity by scheduling more of the processor nodes, making better use of the disk storage, and more intelligent use of the networking.

  12. Computational Intelligence, Cyber Security and Computational Models

    CERN Document Server

    Anitha, R; Lekshmi, R; Kumar, M; Bonato, Anthony; Graña, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This book contains cutting-edge research material presented by researchers, engineers, developers, and practitioners from academia and industry at the International Conference on Computational Intelligence, Cyber Security and Computational Models (ICC3) organized by PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore, India during December 19–21, 2013. The materials in the book include theory and applications for design, analysis, and modeling of computational intelligence and security. The book will be useful material for students, researchers, professionals, and academicians. It will help in understanding current research trends and findings and future scope of research in computational intelligence, cyber security, and computational models.

  13. A computational model incorporating neural stem cell dynamics reproduces glioma incidence across the lifespan in the human population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Bauer

    Full Text Available Glioma is the most common form of primary brain tumor. Demographically, the risk of occurrence increases until old age. Here we present a novel computational model to reproduce the probability of glioma incidence across the lifespan. Previous mathematical models explaining glioma incidence are framed in a rather abstract way, and do not directly relate to empirical findings. To decrease this gap between theory and experimental observations, we incorporate recent data on cellular and molecular factors underlying gliomagenesis. Since evidence implicates the adult neural stem cell as the likely cell-of-origin of glioma, we have incorporated empirically-determined estimates of neural stem cell number, cell division rate, mutation rate and oncogenic potential into our model. We demonstrate that our model yields results which match actual demographic data in the human population. In particular, this model accounts for the observed peak incidence of glioma at approximately 80 years of age, without the need to assert differential susceptibility throughout the population. Overall, our model supports the hypothesis that glioma is caused by randomly-occurring oncogenic mutations within the neural stem cell population. Based on this model, we assess the influence of the (experimentally indicated decrease in the number of neural stem cells and increase of cell division rate during aging. Our model provides multiple testable predictions, and suggests that different temporal sequences of oncogenic mutations can lead to tumorigenesis. Finally, we conclude that four or five oncogenic mutations are sufficient for the formation of glioma.

  14. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2001-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes Two distinguishing features of the discourse are solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty Matlab codes are presented and discussed for a broad...

  15. Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics: Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner. The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming. This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice. There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes. Two distinguishing features of the discourse are: solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty. Matlab codes are presented and discussed for ...

  16. Nonlinear dynamics as an engine of computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Behnam; Lindner, John F; Ditto, William L

    2017-03-06

    Control of chaos teaches that control theory can tame the complex, random-like behaviour of chaotic systems. This alliance between control methods and physics-cybernetical physics-opens the door to many applications, including dynamics-based computing. In this article, we introduce nonlinear dynamics and its rich, sometimes chaotic behaviour as an engine of computation. We review our work that has demonstrated how to compute using nonlinear dynamics. Furthermore, we investigate the interrelationship between invariant measures of a dynamical system and its computing power to strengthen the bridge between physics and computation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Horizons of cybernetical physics'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Zonal methods and computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atta, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in developing numerical algorithms for solving fluid flow problems, and the continuing improvement in the speed and storage of large scale computers have made it feasible to compute the flow field about complex and realistic configurations. Current solution methods involve the use of a hierarchy of mathematical models ranging from the linearized potential equation to the Navier Stokes equations. Because of the increasing complexity of both the geometries and flowfields encountered in practical fluid flow simulation, there is a growing emphasis in computational fluid dynamics on the use of zonal methods. A zonal method is one that subdivides the total flow region into interconnected smaller regions or zones. The flow solutions in these zones are then patched together to establish the global flow field solution. Zonal methods are primarily used either to limit the complexity of the governing flow equations to a localized region or to alleviate the grid generation problems about geometrically complex and multicomponent configurations. This paper surveys the application of zonal methods for solving the flow field about two and three-dimensional configurations. Various factors affecting their accuracy and ease of implementation are also discussed. From the presented review it is concluded that zonal methods promise to be very effective for computing complex flowfields and configurations. Currently there are increasing efforts to improve their efficiency, versatility, and accuracy

  18. Dynamic Latent Classification Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Shengtong; Martínez, Ana M.; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    as possible. Motivated by this problem setting, we propose a generative model for dynamic classification in continuous domains. At each time point the model can be seen as combining a naive Bayes model with a mixture of factor analyzers (FA). The latent variables of the FA are used to capture the dynamics...

  19. A Computational Fluid Dynamic and Heat Transfer Model for Gaseous Core and Gas Cooled Space Power and Propulsion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, S.; Chen, G.

    1996-01-01

    A computational model based on the axisymmetric, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations is developed to predict the convective, radiation and conductive heat transfer in high temperature space nuclear reactors. An implicit-explicit, finite volume, MacCormack method in conjunction with the Gauss-Seidel line iteration procedure is utilized to solve the thermal and fluid governing equations. Simulation of coolant and propellant flows in these reactors involves the subsonic and supersonic flows of hydrogen, helium and uranium tetrafluoride under variable boundary conditions. An enthalpy-rebalancing scheme is developed and implemented to enhance and accelerate the rate of convergence when a wall heat flux boundary condition is used. The model also incorporated the Baldwin and Lomax two-layer algebraic turbulence scheme for the calculation of the turbulent kinetic energy and eddy diffusivity of energy. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to simulate the radiative energy transfer in the optically thick environment of gas core reactors. The computational model is benchmarked with experimental data on flow separation angle and drag force acting on a suspended sphere in a cylindrical tube. The heat transfer is validated by comparing the computed results with the standard heat transfer correlations predictions. The model is used to simulate flow and heat transfer under a variety of design conditions. The effect of internal heat generation on the heat transfer in the gas core reactors is examined for a variety of power densities, 100 W/cc, 500 W/cc and 1000 W/cc. The maximum temperature, corresponding with the heat generation rates, are 2150 K, 2750 K and 3550 K, respectively. This analysis shows that the maximum temperature is strongly dependent on the value of heat generation rate. It also indicates that a heat generation rate higher than 1000 W/cc is necessary to maintain the gas temperature at about 3500 K, which is typical design temperature required to achieve high

  20. Equivalent Dynamic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Peter C M

    2017-01-01

    Equivalences of two classes of dynamic models for weakly stationary multivariate time series are discussed: dynamic factor models and autoregressive models. It is shown that exploratory dynamic factor models can be rotated, yielding an infinite set of equivalent solutions for any observed series. It also is shown that dynamic factor models with lagged factor loadings are not equivalent to the currently popular state-space models, and that restriction of attention to the latter type of models may yield invalid results. The known equivalent vector autoregressive model types, standard and structural, are given a new interpretation in which they are conceived of as the extremes of an innovating type of hybrid vector autoregressive models. It is shown that consideration of hybrid models solves many problems, in particular with Granger causality testing.

  1. Traffic Dynamics of Computer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Attila

    2008-10-01

    Two important aspects of the Internet, namely the properties of its topology and the characteristics of its data traffic, have attracted growing attention of the physics community. My thesis has considered problems of both aspects. First I studied the stochastic behavior of TCP, the primary algorithm governing traffic in the current Internet, in an elementary network scenario consisting of a standalone infinite-sized buffer and an access link. The effect of the fast recovery and fast retransmission (FR/FR) algorithms is also considered. I showed that my model can be extended further to involve the effect of link propagation delay, characteristic of WAN. I continued my thesis with the investigation of finite-sized semi-bottleneck buffers, where packets can be dropped not only at the link, but also at the buffer. I demonstrated that the behavior of the system depends only on a certain combination of the parameters. Moreover, an analytic formula was derived that gives the ratio of packet loss rate at the buffer to the total packet loss rate. This formula makes it possible to treat buffer-losses as if they were link-losses. Finally, I studied computer networks from a structural perspective. I demonstrated through fluid simulations that the distribution of resources, specifically the link bandwidth, has a serious impact on the global performance of the network. Then I analyzed the distribution of edge betweenness in a growing scale-free tree under the condition that a local property, the in-degree of the "younger" node of an arbitrary edge, is known in order to find an optimum distribution of link capacity. The derived formula is exact even for finite-sized networks. I also calculated the conditional expectation of edge betweenness, rescaled for infinite networks.

  2. Chaos Modelling with Computers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 5. Chaos Modelling with Computers Unpredicatable Behaviour of Deterministic Systems. Balakrishnan Ramasamy T S K V Iyer. General Article Volume 1 Issue 5 May 1996 pp 29-39 ...

  3. Fluid dynamics computer programs for NERVA turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    During the design of the NERVA turbopump, numerous computer programs were developed for the analyses of fluid dynamic problems within the machine. Program descriptions, example cases, users instructions, and listings for the majority of these programs are presented.

  4. Influence of the operational parameters on bioelectricity generation in continuous microbial fuel cell, experimental and computational fluid dynamics modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszuk, Paweł; Zamojska-Jaroszewicz, Anna; Makowski, Łukasz

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the organic loading rate (also known as active anodic chamber volume) on bioelectricity generation in a continuous, two-chamber microbial fuel cell for the treatment of synthetic wastewater, with glucose as the only carbon source, was examined. Ten sets of experiments with different combinations of hydraulic retention times (0.24-1.14 d) and influent chemical oxygen demand concentrations were performed to verify the impact of organic loading rate on the voltage generation capacity of a simple dual-chamber microbial fuel cell working in continuous mode. We found that there is an optimal hydraulic retention time value at which the maximum voltage is generated: 0.41 d. However, there were no similar effects, in terms of voltage generation, when a constant hydraulic retention time with different influent chemical oxygen demand of wastewater was used. The obtained maximal voltage value (600 mV) has also been compared to literature data. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to calculate the fluid flow and the exit age distribution of fluid elements in the reactor to explain the obtained experimental results and identify the crucial parameters for the design of bioreactors on an industrial scale.

  5. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an accessible introduction to the basic theory of fluid mechanics and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical computation. Methods of scientific computing are introduced alongside with theoretical analysis and MATLAB® codes are presented and discussed for a broad range of topics: from interfacial shapes in hydrostatics, to vortex dynamics, to viscous flow, to turbulent flow, to panel methods for flow past airfoils. The third edition includes new topics, additional examples, solved and unsolved problems, and revised images. It adds more computational algorithms and MATLAB programs. It also incorporates discussion of the latest version of the fluid dynamics software library FDLIB, which is freely available online. FDLIB offers an extensive range of computer codes that demonstrate the implementation of elementary and advanced algorithms and provide an invaluable resource for research, teaching, classroom instruction, and self-study. This ...

  6. Hardware for dynamic quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Colm A; Johnson, Blake R; Ristè, Diego; Donovan, Brian; Ohki, Thomas A

    2017-10-01

    We describe the hardware, gateware, and software developed at Raytheon BBN Technologies for dynamic quantum information processing experiments on superconducting qubits. In dynamic experiments, real-time qubit state information is fed back or fed forward within a fraction of the qubits' coherence time to dynamically change the implemented sequence. The hardware presented here covers both control and readout of superconducting qubits. For readout, we created a custom signal processing gateware and software stack on commercial hardware to convert pulses in a heterodyne receiver into qubit state assignments with minimal latency, alongside data taking capability. For control, we developed custom hardware with gateware and software for pulse sequencing and steering information distribution that is capable of arbitrary control flow in a fraction of superconducting qubit coherence times. Both readout and control platforms make extensive use of field programmable gate arrays to enable tailored qubit control systems in a reconfigurable fabric suitable for iterative development.

  7. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Algorithm on a Massively Parallel Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of computational fluid dynamics is demanding ever-increasing computational power to deal with complex fluid flow problems. We investigate the performance of a finite-difference computational fluid dynamics algorithm on a massively parallel computer, the Connection Machine. Of special interest is an implicit time-stepping algorithm; to obtain maximum performance from the Connection Machine, it is necessary to use a nonstandard algorithm to solve the linear systems that arise in the implicit algorithm. We find that the Connection Machine ran achieve very high computation rates on both explicit and implicit algorithms. The performance of the Connection Machine puts it in the same class as today's most powerful conventional supercomputers.

  8. A computational model of the ionic currents, Ca2+ dynamics and action potentials underlying contraction of isolated uterine smooth muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Chiu Tong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Uterine contractions during labor are discretely regulated by rhythmic action potentials (AP of varying duration and form that serve to determine calcium-dependent force production. We have employed a computational biology approach to develop a fuller understanding of the complexity of excitation-contraction (E-C coupling of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC. Our overall aim is to establish a mathematical platform of sufficient biophysical detail to quantitatively describe known uterine E-C coupling parameters and thereby inform future empirical investigations of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms governing normal and dysfunctional labors. From published and unpublished data we construct mathematical models for fourteen ionic currents of USMCs: Ca2+ currents (L- and T-type, Na+ current, an hyperpolarization-activated current, three voltage-gated K+ currents, two Ca2+-activated K+ current, Ca2+-activated Cl current, non-specific cation current, Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, Na+-K+ pump and background current. The magnitudes and kinetics of each current system in a spindle shaped single cell with a specified surface area:volume ratio is described by differential equations, in terms of maximal conductances, electrochemical gradient, voltage-dependent activation/inactivation gating variables and temporal changes in intracellular Ca2+ computed from known Ca2+ fluxes. These quantifications are validated by the reconstruction of the individual experimental ionic currents obtained under voltage-clamp. Phasic contraction is modeled in relation to the time constant of changing [Ca2+]i. This integrated model is validated by its reconstruction of the different USMC AP configurations (spikes, plateau and bursts of spikes, the change from bursting to plateau type AP produced by estradiol and of simultaneous experimental recordings of spontaneous AP, [Ca2+]i and phasic force. In summary, our advanced mathematical model provides a powerful tool to

  9. The Dynamic Geometrisation of Computer Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Nathalie; Patterson, Margaret

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore dynamic geometry environments (DGE) as a type of computer programming language. Using projects created by secondary students in one particular DGE, we analyse the extent to which the various aspects of computational thinking--including both ways of doing things and particular concepts--were evident in their…

  10. Modelling computer networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Max, G

    2011-01-01

    Traffic models in computer networks can be described as a complicated system. These systems show non-linear features and to simulate behaviours of these systems are also difficult. Before implementing network equipments users wants to know capability of their computer network. They do not want the servers to be overloaded during temporary traffic peaks when more requests arrive than the server is designed for. As a starting point for our study a non-linear system model of network traffic is established to exam behaviour of the network planned. The paper presents setting up a non-linear simulation model that helps us to observe dataflow problems of the networks. This simple model captures the relationship between the competing traffic and the input and output dataflow. In this paper, we also focus on measuring the bottleneck of the network, which was defined as the difference between the link capacity and the competing traffic volume on the link that limits end-to-end throughput. We validate the model using measurements on a working network. The results show that the initial model estimates well main behaviours and critical parameters of the network. Based on this study, we propose to develop a new algorithm, which experimentally determines and predict the available parameters of the network modelled.

  11. Development of computational fluid dynamics--habitat suitability (CFD-HSI) models to identify potential passage--Challenge zones for migratory fishes in the Penobscot River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Alexander J.; Dudley, Robert W.; Chelminski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics-habitat suitability (CFD–HSI) model was developed to identify potential zones of shallow depth and high water velocity that may present passage challenges for five anadromous fish species in the Penobscot River, Maine, upstream from two existing dams and as a result of the proposed future removal of the dams. Potential depth-challenge zones were predicted for larger species at the lowest flow modeled in the dam-removal scenario. Increasing flows under both scenarios increased the number and size of potential velocity-challenge zones, especially for smaller species. This application of the two-dimensional CFD–HSI model demonstrated its capabilities to estimate the potential effects of flow and hydraulic alteration on the passage of migratory fish.

  12. Spatiotemporal Dynamics and Reliable Computations in Recurrent Spiking Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Ryan; Rosenbaum, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Randomly connected networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons provide a parsimonious model of neural variability, but are notoriously unreliable for performing computations. We show that this difficulty is overcome by incorporating the well-documented dependence of connection probability on distance. Spatially extended spiking networks exhibit symmetry-breaking bifurcations and generate spatiotemporal patterns that can be trained to perform dynamical computations under a reservoir computing framework.

  13. Spatiotemporal Dynamics and Reliable Computations in Recurrent Spiking Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Ryan; Rosenbaum, Robert

    2017-01-06

    Randomly connected networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons provide a parsimonious model of neural variability, but are notoriously unreliable for performing computations. We show that this difficulty is overcome by incorporating the well-documented dependence of connection probability on distance. Spatially extended spiking networks exhibit symmetry-breaking bifurcations and generate spatiotemporal patterns that can be trained to perform dynamical computations under a reservoir computing framework.

  14. Verification and validation in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberkampf, William L.; Trucano, Timothy G.

    2002-04-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess accuracy and reliability in computational simulations. This paper presents an extensive review of the literature in V&V in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), discusses methods and procedures for assessing V&V, and develops a number of extensions to existing ideas. The review of the development of V&V terminology and methodology points out the contributions from members of the operations research, statistics, and CFD communities. Fundamental issues in V&V are addressed, such as code verification versus solution verification, model validation versus solution validation, the distinction between error and uncertainty, conceptual sources of error and uncertainty, and the relationship between validation and prediction. The fundamental strategy of verification is the identification and quantification of errors in the computational model and its solution. In verification activities, the accuracy of a computational solution is primarily measured relative to two types of highly accurate solutions: analytical solutions and highly accurate numerical solutions. Methods for determining the accuracy of numerical solutions are presented and the importance of software testing during verification activities is emphasized. The fundamental strategy of validation is to assess how accurately the computational results compare with the experimental data, with quantified error and uncertainty estimates for both. This strategy employs a hierarchical methodology that segregates and simplifies the physical and coupling phenomena involved in the complex engineering system of interest. A hypersonic cruise missile is used as an example of how this hierarchical structure is formulated. The discussion of validation assessment also encompasses a number of other important topics. A set of guidelines is proposed for designing and conducting validation experiments, supported by an explanation of how validation experiments are different

  15. iCFD: Interpreted Computational Fluid Dynamics - Degeneration of CFD to one-dimensional advection-dispersion models using statistical experimental design - The secondary clarifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyonvarch, Estelle; Ramin, Elham; Kulahci, Murat; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-10-15

    The present study aims at using statistically designed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations as numerical experiments for the identification of one-dimensional (1-D) advection-dispersion models - computationally light tools, used e.g., as sub-models in systems analysis. The objective is to develop a new 1-D framework, referred to as interpreted CFD (iCFD) models, in which statistical meta-models are used to calculate the pseudo-dispersion coefficient (D) as a function of design and flow boundary conditions. The method - presented in a straightforward and transparent way - is illustrated using the example of a circular secondary settling tank (SST). First, the significant design and flow factors are screened out by applying the statistical method of two-level fractional factorial design of experiments. Second, based on the number of significant factors identified through the factor screening study and system understanding, 50 different sets of design and flow conditions are selected using Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). The boundary condition sets are imposed on a 2-D axi-symmetrical CFD simulation model of the SST. In the framework, to degenerate the 2-D model structure, CFD model outputs are approximated by the 1-D model through the calibration of three different model structures for D. Correlation equations for the D parameter then are identified as a function of the selected design and flow boundary conditions (meta-models), and their accuracy is evaluated against D values estimated in each numerical experiment. The evaluation and validation of the iCFD model structure is carried out using scenario simulation results obtained with parameters sampled from the corners of the LHS experimental region. For the studied SST, additional iCFD model development was carried out in terms of (i) assessing different density current sub-models; (ii) implementation of a combined flocculation, hindered, transient and compression settling velocity function; and (iii

  16. Computational plasticity algorithm for particle dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbenhoft, K.; Lyamin, A. V.; Vignes, C.

    2018-01-01

    The problem of particle dynamics simulation is interpreted in the framework of computational plasticity leading to an algorithm which is mathematically indistinguishable from the common implicit scheme widely used in the finite element analysis of elastoplastic boundary value problems. This algorithm provides somewhat of a unification of two particle methods, the discrete element method and the contact dynamics method, which usually are thought of as being quite disparate. In particular, it is shown that the former appears as the special case where the time stepping is explicit while the use of implicit time stepping leads to the kind of schemes usually labelled contact dynamics methods. The framing of particle dynamics simulation within computational plasticity paves the way for new approaches similar (or identical) to those frequently employed in nonlinear finite element analysis. These include mixed implicit-explicit time stepping, dynamic relaxation and domain decomposition schemes.

  17. Models for Dynamic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Morales Rodriguez, Ricardo; Heitzig, Martina

    2011-01-01

    This chapter covers aspects of the dynamic modelling and simulation of several complex operations that include a controlled blending tank, a direct methanol fuel cell that incorporates a multiscale model, a fluidised bed reactor, a standard chemical reactor and finally a polymerisation reactor...... be applied to formulate, analyse and solve these dynamic problems and how in the case of the fuel cell problem the model consists of coupledmeso and micro scale models. It is shown how data flows are handled between the models and how the solution is obtained within the modelling environment....

  18. Quantum vertex model for reversible classical computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamon, C; Mucciolo, E R; Ruckenstein, A E; Yang, Z-C

    2017-05-12

    Mappings of classical computation onto statistical mechanics models have led to remarkable successes in addressing some complex computational problems. However, such mappings display thermodynamic phase transitions that may prevent reaching solution even for easy problems known to be solvable in polynomial time. Here we map universal reversible classical computations onto a planar vertex model that exhibits no bulk classical thermodynamic phase transition, independent of the computational circuit. Within our approach the solution of the computation is encoded in the ground state of the vertex model and its complexity is reflected in the dynamics of the relaxation of the system to its ground state. We use thermal annealing with and without 'learning' to explore typical computational problems. We also construct a mapping of the vertex model into the Chimera architecture of the D-Wave machine, initiating an approach to reversible classical computation based on state-of-the-art implementations of quantum annealing.

  19. LHCb computing model

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, M; Pacheco, Andreu

    1998-01-01

    This document is a first attempt to describe the LHCb computing model. The CPU power needed to process data for the event filter and reconstruction is estimated to be 2.2 \\Theta 106 MIPS. This will be installed at the experiment and will be reused during non data-taking periods for reprocessing. The maximal I/O of these activities is estimated to be around 40 MB/s.We have studied three basic models concerning the placement of the CPU resources for the other computing activities, Monte Carlo-simulation (1:4 \\Theta 106 MIPS) and physics analysis (0:5 \\Theta 106 MIPS): CPU resources may either be located at the physicist's homelab, national computer centres (Regional Centres) or at CERN.The CPU resources foreseen for analysis are sufficient to allow 100 concurrent analyses. It is assumed that physicists will work in physics groups that produce analysis data at an average rate of 4.2 MB/s or 11 TB per month. However, producing these group analysis data requires reading capabilities of 660 MB/s. It is further assu...

  20. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haworth, D.C.; O' Rourke, P.J.; Ranganathan, R.

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one discipline falling under the broad heading of computer-aided engineering (CAE). CAE, together with computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), comprise a mathematical-based approach to engineering product and process design, analysis and fabrication. In this overview of CFD for the design engineer, our purposes are three-fold: (1) to define the scope of CFD and motivate its utility for engineering, (2) to provide a basic technical foundation for CFD, and (3) to convey how CFD is incorporated into engineering product and process design.

  1. Interface between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and plant analysis computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffield, R.D.; Dunckhorst, F.F.; Tomlinson, E.T.; Welch, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can provide valuable input to the development of advanced plant analysis computer codes. The types of interfacing discussed in this paper will directly contribute to modeling and accuracy improvements throughout the plant system and should result in significant reduction of design conservatisms that have been applied to such analyses in the past

  2. The Antares computing model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopper, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.kopper@nikhef.nl [NIKHEF, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-10-11

    Completed in 2008, Antares is now the largest water Cherenkov neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. Its main goal is to detect neutrinos from galactic and extra-galactic sources. Due to the high background rate of atmospheric muons and the high level of bioluminescence, several on-line and off-line filtering algorithms have to be applied to the raw data taken by the instrument. To be able to handle this data stream, a dedicated computing infrastructure has been set up. The paper covers the main aspects of the current official Antares computing model. This includes an overview of on-line and off-line data handling and storage. In addition, the current usage of the “IceTray” software framework for Antares data processing is highlighted. Finally, an overview of the data storage formats used for high-level analysis is given.

  3. Three-dimensional computer simulation at vehicle collision using dynamic model. Application to various collision types; Rikigaku model ni yoru jidosha shototsuji no sanjigen kyodo simulation. Shushu no shototsu keitai eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, M; Morisawa, M [Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, T [Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, K [Molex-Japan Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The past study of safety at vehicle collision pays attention to phenomena within the short time from starting collision, and the behavior of rollover is studied separating from that at collision. Most simulations of traffic accident are two-dimensional simulations. Therefore, it is indispensable for vehicle design to the analyze three-dimensional and continuous behavior from crash till stopping. Accordingly, in this study, the three-dimensional behavior of two vehicles at collision was simulated by computer using dynamic models. Then, by comparison of the calculated results with real vehicles` collision test data, it was confirmed that dynamic model of this study was reliable. 10 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Quantum Computation and Quantum Spin Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Michielsen, Kristel; Hams, Anthony; Miyashita, Seiji; Saito, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the stability of quantum computations on physically realizable quantum computers by simulating quantum spin models representing quantum computer hardware. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation are used to demonstrate that the results of a quantum

  5. Accelerating population balance-Monte Carlo simulation for coagulation dynamics from the Markov jump model, stochastic algorithm and GPU parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zuwei; Zhao, Haibo; Zheng, Chuguang

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a comprehensive framework for accelerating population balance-Monte Carlo (PBMC) simulation of particle coagulation dynamics. By combining Markov jump model, weighted majorant kernel and GPU (graphics processing unit) parallel computing, a significant gain in computational efficiency is achieved. The Markov jump model constructs a coagulation-rule matrix of differentially-weighted simulation particles, so as to capture the time evolution of particle size distribution with low statistical noise over the full size range and as far as possible to reduce the number of time loopings. Here three coagulation rules are highlighted and it is found that constructing appropriate coagulation rule provides a route to attain the compromise between accuracy and cost of PBMC methods. Further, in order to avoid double looping over all simulation particles when considering the two-particle events (typically, particle coagulation), the weighted majorant kernel is introduced to estimate the maximum coagulation rates being used for acceptance–rejection processes by single-looping over all particles, and meanwhile the mean time-step of coagulation event is estimated by summing the coagulation kernels of rejected and accepted particle pairs. The computational load of these fast differentially-weighted PBMC simulations (based on the Markov jump model) is reduced greatly to be proportional to the number of simulation particles in a zero-dimensional system (single cell). Finally, for a spatially inhomogeneous multi-dimensional (multi-cell) simulation, the proposed fast PBMC is performed in each cell, and multiple cells are parallel processed by multi-cores on a GPU that can implement the massively threaded data-parallel tasks to obtain remarkable speedup ratio (comparing with CPU computation, the speedup ratio of GPU parallel computing is as high as 200 in a case of 100 cells with 10 000 simulation particles per cell). These accelerating approaches of PBMC are

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Room Air Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2004-01-01

    on the mass fraction transport equation. The importance of ?false? or numerical diffusion is also addressed in connection with the simple description of a supply opening. The different aspects of boundary conditions in the indoor environment as e.g. the simulation of Air Terminal Devices and the simulation......Nielsen, P.V. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Room Air Movement. Indoor Air, International Journal of Indoor Environment and Health, Vol. 14, Supplement 7, pp. 134-143, 2004. ABSTRACT Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and new developments of CFD in the indoor environment as well as quality...... considerations are important elements in the study of energy consumption, thermal comfort and indoor air quality in buildings. The paper discusses the quality level of Computational Fluid Dynamics and the involved schemes (first, second and third order schemes) by the use of the Smith and Hutton problem...

  7. Dynamic term structure models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller; Meldrum, Andrew

    This paper studies whether dynamic term structure models for US nominal bond yields should enforce the zero lower bound by a quadratic policy rate or a shadow rate specification. We address the question by estimating quadratic term structure models (QTSMs) and shadow rate models with at most four...

  8. An introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    1999-01-01

    CFD is the shortname for Computational Fluid Dynamics and is a numerical method by means of which we can analyze systems containing fluids. For instance systems dealing with heat flow or smoke control systems acting when a fire occur in a building.......CFD is the shortname for Computational Fluid Dynamics and is a numerical method by means of which we can analyze systems containing fluids. For instance systems dealing with heat flow or smoke control systems acting when a fire occur in a building....

  9. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  10. DNA computing models

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatova, Zoya; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2008-01-01

    In this excellent text, the reader is given a comprehensive introduction to the field of DNA computing. The book emphasizes computational methods to tackle central problems of DNA computing, such as controlling living cells, building patterns, and generating nanomachines.

  11. Computational Fluid and Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory System

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2013-01-01

    Traditional research methodologies in the human respiratory system have always been challenging due to their invasive nature. Recent advances in medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have accelerated this research. This book compiles and details recent advances in the modelling of the respiratory system for researchers, engineers, scientists, and health practitioners. It breaks down the complexities of this field and provides both students and scientists with an introduction and starting point to the physiology of the respiratory system, fluid dynamics and advanced CFD modeling tools. In addition to a brief introduction to the physics of the respiratory system and an overview of computational methods, the book contains best-practice guidelines for establishing high-quality computational models and simulations. Inspiration for new simulations can be gained through innovative case studies as well as hands-on practice using pre-made computational code. Last but not least, students and researcher...

  12. APPLICATION OF MODELLING SYSTEMS IN THE DISCIPLINE «MODERN THEORY OF THE DYNAMIC SYSTEMS CONTROL» OF BACHELOR DEGREE FOR THE «COMPUTER SCIENCES» SPECIALTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ERSHOVA N. M.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Annotation. Purpose of the article. To present the capabilities of the MVTU 3.7 simulation system while the transient processes studying of complex dynamic systems and the appropriateness of its using in the learning process. Methodology of the research. Computer technology and information technologies are the main tools of the modern IT specialist, therefore, the qualitative preparation of students in this field has a great importance in the general system of specialists training and largely determines the material mastering degree at the senior courses. The absence of standard programs libraries for solving the most frequently encountered engineering problems in modern algorithmic programming languages makes the creating software products process for research of complex dynamic systems very difficult. For help come systems of modeling, mathematical base of which is the theory of automatic control. There are unified principles for their creation, which are based on the description of structural schemes, that is the graphical representation of a mathematical model. The MVTU 3.7 simulation system allows you to model transient processes, investigate stability and perform the synthesis of the parameters of the oscillatory processes of various technical devices: mechanical, hydraulic, heat engineering, electrotechnical, etc., including means and automation systems. The restricted version is applicable to technical devices with 15 degrees of freedom. In the MVTU 3.7 simulation system, the main role is assigned to the graphic editor, with its help a simulation scheme is created on the display screen according to the structural scheme of the research system. Block structures are selected from the graphics database using the mouse. The graphical database is located on the display screen next to the working field. After the simulation scheme creating the function block parameters are assigned, the integration method is selected and the integration

  13. Cognitive engineering models: A prerequisite to the design of human-computer interaction in complex dynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter examines a class of human-computer interaction applications, specifically the design of human-computer interaction for the operators of complex systems. Such systems include space systems (e.g., manned systems such as the Shuttle or space station, and unmanned systems such as NASA scientific satellites), aviation systems (e.g., the flight deck of 'glass cockpit' airplanes or air traffic control) and industrial systems (e.g., power plants, telephone networks, and sophisticated, e.g., 'lights out,' manufacturing facilities). The main body of human-computer interaction (HCI) research complements but does not directly address the primary issues involved in human-computer interaction design for operators of complex systems. Interfaces to complex systems are somewhat special. The 'user' in such systems - i.e., the human operator responsible for safe and effective system operation - is highly skilled, someone who in human-machine systems engineering is sometimes characterized as 'well trained, well motivated'. The 'job' or task context is paramount and, thus, human-computer interaction is subordinate to human job interaction. The design of human interaction with complex systems, i.e., the design of human job interaction, is sometimes called cognitive engineering.

  14. Graphics supercomputer for computational fluid dynamics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Goang S.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this project is to purchase a state-of-the-art graphics supercomputer to improve the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) research capability at Alabama A & M University (AAMU) and to support the Air Force research projects. A cutting-edge graphics supercomputer system, Onyx VTX, from Silicon Graphics Computer Systems (SGI), was purchased and installed. Other equipment including a desktop personal computer, PC-486 DX2 with a built-in 10-BaseT Ethernet card, a 10-BaseT hub, an Apple Laser Printer Select 360, and a notebook computer from Zenith were also purchased. A reading room has been converted to a research computer lab by adding some furniture and an air conditioning unit in order to provide an appropriate working environments for researchers and the purchase equipment. All the purchased equipment were successfully installed and are fully functional. Several research projects, including two existing Air Force projects, are being performed using these facilities.

  15. Visualization of unsteady computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimes, Robert

    1994-11-01

    A brief summary of the computer environment used for calculating three dimensional unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is presented. This environment requires a super computer as well as massively parallel processors (MPP's) and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (by concurrently working on the same task) provide the required computational bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. The cluster of reduced instruction set computers (RISC) is a recent advent based on the low cost and high performance that workstation vendors provide. The cluster, with the proper software can act as a multiple instruction/multiple data (MIMD) machine. A new set of software tools is being designed specifically to address visualizing 3D unsteady CFD results in these environments. Three user's manuals for the parallel version of Visual3, pV3, revision 1.00 make up the bulk of this report.

  16. Dynamic accelerator modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Hiroshi.

    1993-05-01

    Object-Oriented Programming has been used extensively to model the LBL Advanced Light Source 1.5 GeV electron storage ring. This paper is on the present status of the class library construction with emphasis on a dynamic modeling

  17. Dynamic panel data models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bun, M.J.G.; Sarafidis, V.

    2013-01-01

    This Chapter reviews the recent literature on dynamic panel data models with a short time span and a large cross-section. Throughout the discussion we considerlinear models with additional endogenous covariates. First we give a broad overview of available inference methods placing emphasis on GMM.

  18. Domain of attraction computation for tumor dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doban, A.I.; Lazar, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose the use of rational Lyapunov functions to estimate the domain of attraction of the tumor dormancy equilibrium of immune cells-malignant cells interaction dynamics. A procedure for computing rational Lyapunov functions is worked out, with focus on obtaining a meaningful

  19. Generating Computational Models for Serious Gaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westera, Wim

    2018-01-01

    Many serious games include computational models that simulate dynamic systems. These models promote enhanced interaction and responsiveness. Under the social web paradigm more and more usable game authoring tools become available that enable prosumers to create their own games, but the inclusion of

  20. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xiaohan; Wu, Si

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) at the single-neuron level, and short-term facilitation (STF) and depression (STD) at the synapse level. These dynamical features typically cover a broad range of time scales and exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what is the computational benefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics. In this study, we propose that the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictory computations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractor neural network (CANN) as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing time constants in its dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity, adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, and hence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar time constants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network is able to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed light on the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realize diverse cognitive functions.

  1. Use of Computational Fluid Dynamics for improving freeze-dryers design and process understanding. Part 2: Condenser duct and valve modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchisio, Daniele L; Galan, Miquel; Barresi, Antonello A

    2018-05-05

    This manuscript shows how computational models, mainly based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), can be used to simulate different parts of an industrial freeze-drying equipment and to properly design them; in particular in this part the duct connecting the chamber with the condenser, with its valves, is considered, while the chamber design and its effect on drying kinetics have been investigated in Part 1. Such an approach allows a much deeper process understanding and assessment of the critical aspects of lyophilisation. This methodology will be demonstrated on freeze-drying equipment of different sizes, investigating influence of valve type (butterfly and mushroom) and shape on duct conductance and critical flow conditions. The role of the inlet and boundary conditions considered has been assessed, also by modelling the whole apparatus including chamber and condenser, and the influence of the duct diameter has been discussed; the results show a little dependence of the relationship between critical mass flux and chamber pressure on the duct size. Results concerning the fluid dynamics of a simple disk valve, a profiled butterfly valve and a mushroom valve installed in a medium size horizontal condenser are presented. Also in these cases the maximum allowable flow when sonic flow conditions are reached can be described by a correlation similar to that found valid for empty ducts; for the mushroom valve the parameters are dependent on the valve opening length. The possibility to use the equivalent length concept, and to extend the validity of the results obtained for empty ducts will be also discussed. Finally the presence of the inert gas modifies the conductance of the duct, reducing the maximum flow rate of water that can be removed through it before the flow is choked; this also requires a proper over-sizing of the duct (or duct-butterfly valve system). Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Modeling dynamic swarms

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanem, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes the problem of modeling video sequences of dynamic swarms (DSs). We define a DS as a large layout of stochastically repetitive spatial configurations of dynamic objects (swarm elements) whose motions exhibit local spatiotemporal interdependency and stationarity, i.e., the motions are similar in any small spatiotemporal neighborhood. Examples of DS abound in nature, e.g., herds of animals and flocks of birds. To capture the local spatiotemporal properties of the DS, we present a probabilistic model that learns both the spatial layout of swarm elements (based on low-level image segmentation) and their joint dynamics that are modeled as linear transformations. To this end, a spatiotemporal neighborhood is associated with each swarm element, in which local stationarity is enforced both spatially and temporally. We assume that the prior on the swarm dynamics is distributed according to an MRF in both space and time. Embedding this model in a MAP framework, we iterate between learning the spatial layout of the swarm and its dynamics. We learn the swarm transformations using ICM, which iterates between estimating these transformations and updating their distribution in the spatiotemporal neighborhoods. We demonstrate the validity of our method by conducting experiments on real and synthetic video sequences. Real sequences of birds, geese, robot swarms, and pedestrians evaluate the applicability of our model to real world data. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Computer processing of dynamic scintigraphic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, V.

    1985-01-01

    The methods are discussed of the computer processing of dynamic scintigraphic studies which were developed, studied or implemented by the authors within research task no. 30-02-03 in nuclear medicine within the five year plan 1981 to 85. This was mainly the method of computer processing radionuclide angiography, phase radioventriculography, regional lung ventilation, dynamic sequential scintigraphy of kidneys and radionuclide uroflowmetry. The problems are discussed of the automatic definition of fields of interest, the methodology of absolute volumes of the heart chamber in radionuclide cardiology, the design and uses are described of the multipurpose dynamic phantom of heart activity for radionuclide angiocardiography and ventriculography developed within the said research task. All methods are documented with many figures showing typical clinical (normal and pathological) and phantom measurements. (V.U.)

  4. Image-Based Computational Fluid Dynamics in Blood Vessel Models: Toward Developing a Prognostic Tool to Assess Cardiovascular Function Changes in Prolonged Space Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzimavroudis, George P.; Spirka, Thomas A.; Setser, Randolph M.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2004-01-01

    One of NASA's objectives is to be able to perform a complete, pre-flight, evaluation of cardiovascular changes in astronauts scheduled for prolonged space missions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has shown promise as a method for estimating cardiovascular function during reduced gravity conditions. For this purpose, MRI can provide geometrical information, to reconstruct vessel geometries, and measure all spatial velocity components, providing location specific boundary conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate the reliability of MRI-based model reconstruction and measured boundary conditions for CFD simulations. An aortic arch model and a carotid bifurcation model were scanned in a 1.5T Siemens MRI scanner. Axial MRI acquisitions provided images for geometry reconstruction (slice thickness 3 and 5 mm; pixel size 1x1 and 0.5x0.5 square millimeters). Velocity acquisitions provided measured inlet boundary conditions and localized three-directional steady-flow velocity data (0.7-3.0 L/min). The vessel walls were isolated using NIH provided software (ImageJ) and lofted to form the geometric surface. Constructed and idealized geometries were imported into a commercial CFD code for meshing and simulation. Contour and vector plots of the velocity showed identical features between the MRI velocity data, the MRI-based CFD data, and the idealized-geometry CFD data, with less than 10% differences in the local velocity values. CFD results on models reconstructed from different MRI resolution settings showed insignificant differences (less than 5%). This study illustrated, quantitatively, that reliable CFD simulations can be performed with MRI reconstructed models and gives evidence that a future, subject-specific, computational evaluation of the cardiovascular system alteration during space travel is feasible.

  5. A future for computational fluid dynamics at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Battistin, M

    2005-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is an analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer and associated phenomena in physical systems using computers. CFD has been used at CERN since 1993 by the TS-CV group, to solve thermo-fluid related problems, particularly during the development, design and construction phases of the LHC experiments. Computer models based on CFD techniques can be employed to reduce the effort required for prototype testing, saving not only time and money but offering possibilities of additional investigations and design optimisation. The development of a more efficient support team at CERN depends on to two important factors: available computing power and experienced engineers. Available computer power IS the limiting resource of CFD. Only the recent increase of computer power had allowed important high tech and industrial applications. Computer Grid is already now (OpenLab at CERN) and will be more so in the future natural environment for CFD science. At CERN, CFD activities have been developed by...

  6. Plasticity modeling & computation

    CERN Document Server

    Borja, Ronaldo I

    2013-01-01

    There have been many excellent books written on the subject of plastic deformation in solids, but rarely can one find a textbook on this subject. “Plasticity Modeling & Computation” is a textbook written specifically for students who want to learn the theoretical, mathematical, and computational aspects of inelastic deformation in solids. It adopts a simple narrative style that is not mathematically overbearing, and has been written to emulate a professor giving a lecture on this subject inside a classroom. Each section is written to provide a balance between the relevant equations and the explanations behind them. Where relevant, sections end with one or more exercises designed to reinforce the understanding of the “lecture.” Color figures enhance the presentation and make the book very pleasant to read. For professors planning to use this textbook for their classes, the contents are sufficient for Parts A and B that can be taught in sequence over a period of two semesters or quarters.

  7. An Interaction of Economy and Environment in Dynamic Computable General Equilibrium Modelling with a Focus on Climate Change Issues in Korea : A Proto-type Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joh, Seung Hun; Dellink, Rob; Nam, Yunmi; Kim, Yong Gun; Song, Yang Hoon [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    In the beginning of the 21st century, climate change is one of hottest issues in arena of both international environment and domestic one. During the COP6 meeting held in The Hague, over 10,000 people got together from the world. This report is a series of policy study on climate change in context of Korea. This study addresses on interactions of economy and environment in a perfect foresight dynamic computable general equilibrium with a focus on greenhouse gas mitigation strategy in Korea. The primary goal of this study is to evaluate greenhouse gas mitigation portfolios of changes in timing and magnitude with a particular focus on developing a methodology to integrate the bottom-up information on technical measures to reduce pollution into a top-down multi-sectoral computable general equilibrium framework. As a non-Annex I country Korea has been under strong pressure to declare GHG reduction commitment. Of particular concern is economic consequences GHG mitigation would accrue to the society. Various economic assessment have been carried out to address on the issue including analyses on cost, ancillary benefit, emission trading, so far. In this vein, this study on GHG mitigation commitment is a timely answer to climate change policy field. Empirical results available next year would be highly demanded in the situation. 62 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. Models of optical quantum computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krovi Hari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available I review some work on models of quantum computing, optical implementations of these models, as well as the associated computational power. In particular, we discuss the circuit model and cluster state implementations using quantum optics with various encodings such as dual rail encoding, Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding, and coherent state encoding. Then we discuss intermediate models of optical computing such as boson sampling and its variants. Finally, we review some recent work in optical implementations of adiabatic quantum computing and analog optical computing. We also provide a brief description of the relevant aspects from complexity theory needed to understand the results surveyed.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Blazek, J

    2005-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is an important design tool in engineering and also a substantial research tool in various physical sciences as well as in biology. The objective of this book is to provide university students with a solid foundation for understanding the numerical methods employed in today's CFD and to familiarise them with modern CFD codes by hands-on experience. It is also intended for engineers and scientists starting to work in the field of CFD or for those who apply CFD codes. Due to the detailed index, the text can serve as a reference handbook too. Each chapter includes an extensive bibliography, which provides an excellent basis for further studies. The accompanying companion website contains the sources of 1-D and 2-D Euler and Navier-Stokes flow solvers (structured and unstructured) as well as of grid generators. Provided are also tools for Von Neumann stability analysis of 1-D model equations. Finally, the companion website includes the source code of a dedicated visualisation so...

  10. Computational fluid dynamics in ventilation: Practical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, J. R.

    The potential of computation fluid dynamics (CFD) for conceiving ventilation systems is shown through the simulation of five practical cases. The following examples are considered: capture of pollutants on a surface treating tank equipped with a unilateral suction slot in the presence of a disturbing air draft opposed to suction; dispersion of solid aerosols inside fume cupboards; performances comparison of two general ventilation systems in a silkscreen printing workshop; ventilation of a large open painting area; and oil fog removal inside a mechanical engineering workshop. Whereas the two first problems are analyzed through two dimensional numerical simulations, the three other cases require three dimensional modeling. For the surface treating tank case, numerical results are compared to laboratory experiment data. All simulations are carried out using EOL, a CFD software specially devised to deal with air quality problems in industrial ventilated premises. It contains many analysis tools to interpret the results in terms familiar to the industrial hygienist. Much experimental work has been engaged to validate the predictions of EOL for ventilation flows.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of hot air flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation of air flow distribution, air velocity and pressure field pattern as it will affect moisture transient in a cabinet tray dryer is performed using SolidWorks Flow Simulation (SWFS) 2014 SP 4.0 program. The model used for the drying process in this experiment was designed with Solid ...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of rabbit nasal airflows for the development of hybrid CFD/PBPK models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, R A; Minard, K R; Kabilan, S; Einstein, D R; Kuprat, A P; Harkema, J R; Kimbell, J S; Gargas, M L; Kinzell, John H

    2009-05-01

    The percentages of total airflows over the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium of female rabbits were calculated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of steady-state inhalation. These airflow calculations, along with nasal airway geometry determinations, are critical parameters for hybrid CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that describe the nasal dosimetry of water-soluble or reactive gases and vapors in rabbits. CFD simulations were based upon three-dimensional computational meshes derived from magnetic resonance images of three adult female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In the anterior portion of the nose, the maxillary turbinates of rabbits are considerably more complex than comparable regions in rats, mice, monkeys, or humans. This leads to a greater surface area to volume ratio in this region and thus the potential for increased extraction of water soluble or reactive gases and vapors in the anterior portion of the nose compared to many other species. Although there was considerable interanimal variability in the fine structures of the nasal turbinates and airflows in the anterior portions of the nose, there was remarkable consistency between rabbits in the percentage of total inspired airflows that reached the ethmoid turbinate region (approximately 50%) that is presumably lined with olfactory epithelium. These latter results (airflows reaching the ethmoid turbinate region) were higher than previous published estimates for the male F344 rat (19%) and human (7%). These differences in regional airflows can have significant implications in interspecies extrapolations of nasal dosimetry.

  13. Probabilistic Methods for the Quantification of Uncertainty and Error in Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Faragher, John

    2004-01-01

    ... conservatism to allow for them. This report examines the feasibility of using a probabilistic approach for modelling the component temperatures in an engine using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics).

  14. Prediction of gasoline yield in a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC riser using k-epsilon turbulence and 4-lump kinetic models: A computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ahsan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC is an essential process for the conversion of gas oil to gasoline. This study is an effort to model the phenomenon numerically using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD software, heavy density catalyst and 4-lump kinetic model. Geometry, boundary conditions and dimensions of industrial riser for catalytic cracking unit are conferred for 2D simulation using commercial CFD code FLUENT 6.3. Continuity, momentum, energy and species transport equations, applicable to two phase solid and gas flow, are used to simulate the physical phenomenon as efficient as possible. This study implements and predicts the use of the granular Eulerian multiphase model with species transport. Time accurate transient problem is solved with the prediction of mass fraction profiles of gas oil, gasoline, light gas and coke. The output curves demonstrate the breaking of heavy hydrocarbon in the presence of catalyst. An approach proposed in this study shows good agreement with the experimental and numerical data available in the literature.

  15. Modeling and validation of heat and mass transfer in individual coffee beans during the coffee roasting process using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Torres, Beatriz; Hernández-Pérez, José Alfredo; Sierra-Espinoza, Fernando; Schenker, Stefan; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2013-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer in individual coffee beans during roasting were simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Numerical equations for heat and mass transfer inside the coffee bean were solved using the finite volume technique in the commercial CFD code Fluent; the software was complemented with specific user-defined functions (UDFs). To experimentally validate the numerical model, a single coffee bean was placed in a cylindrical glass tube and roasted by a hot air flow, using the identical geometrical 3D configuration and hot air flow conditions as the ones used for numerical simulations. Temperature and humidity calculations obtained with the model were compared with experimental data. The model predicts the actual process quite accurately and represents a useful approach to monitor the coffee roasting process in real time. It provides valuable information on time-resolved process variables that are otherwise difficult to obtain experimentally, but critical to a better understanding of the coffee roasting process at the individual bean level. This includes variables such as time-resolved 3D profiles of bean temperature and moisture content, and temperature profiles of the roasting air in the vicinity of the coffee bean.

  16. Closed-Loop Feedback Computation Model of Dynamical Reputation Based on the Local Trust Evaluation in Business-to-Consumer E-Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Tian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Trust and reputation are important factors that influence the success of both traditional transactions in physical social networks and modern e-commerce in virtual Internet environments. It is difficult to define the concept of trust and quantify it because trust has both subjective and objective characteristics at the same time. A well-reported issue with reputation management system in business-to-consumer (BtoC e-commerce is the “all good reputation” problem. In order to deal with the confusion, a new computational model of reputation is proposed in this paper. The ratings of each customer are set as basic trust score events. In addition, the time series of massive ratings are aggregated to formulate the sellers’ local temporal trust scores by Beta distribution. A logical model of trust and reputation is established based on the analysis of the dynamical relationship between trust and reputation. As for single goods with repeat transactions, an iterative mathematical model of trust and reputation is established with a closed-loop feedback mechanism. Numerical experiments on repeated transactions recorded over a period of 24 months are performed. The experimental results show that the proposed method plays guiding roles for both theoretical research into trust and reputation and the practical design of reputation systems in BtoC e-commerce.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Steam Condensation on Nuclear Containment Wall Surfaces Based on Semiempirical Generalized Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan K. Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled nuclear power reactors, significant quantities of steam and hydrogen could be produced within the primary containment following the postulated design basis accidents (DBA or beyond design basis accidents (BDBA. For accurate calculation of the temperature/pressure rise and hydrogen transport calculation in nuclear reactor containment due to such scenarios, wall condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC is used. In the present work, the adaptation of a commercial CFD code with the implementation of models for steam condensation on wall surfaces in presence of noncondensable gases is explained. Steam condensation has been modeled using the empirical average HTC, which was originally developed to be used for “lumped-parameter” (volume-averaged modeling of steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases. The present paper suggests a generalized HTC based on curve fitting of most of the reported semiempirical condensation models, which are valid for specific wall conditions. The present methodology has been validated against limited reported experimental data from the COPAIN experimental facility. This is the first step towards the CFD-based generalized analysis procedure for condensation modeling applicable for containment wall surfaces that is being evolved further for specific wall surfaces within the multicompartment containment atmosphere.

  18. The use of computers for instruction in fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Val

    1987-01-01

    Applications for computers which improve instruction in fluid dynamics are examined. Computers can be used to illustrate three-dimensional flow fields and simple fluid dynamics mechanisms, to solve fluid dynamics problems, and for electronic sketching. The usefulness of computer applications is limited by computer speed, memory, and software and the clarity and field of view of the projected display. Proposed advances in personal computers which will address these limitations are discussed. Long range applications for computers in education are considered.

  19. Security Management Model in Cloud Computing Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadpanah, Seyed Hossein

    2016-01-01

    In the cloud computing environment, cloud virtual machine (VM) will be more and more the number of virtual machine security and management faced giant Challenge. In order to address security issues cloud computing virtualization environment, this paper presents a virtual machine based on efficient and dynamic deployment VM security management model state migration and scheduling, study of which virtual machine security architecture, based on AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) virtual machine de...

  20. PETRI NET MODELING OF COMPUTER VIRUS LIFE CYCLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    dynamic system analysis is applied to model the virus life cycle. Simulation of the derived model ... Keywords: Virus lifecycle, Petri nets, modeling. simulation. .... complex process. Figure 2 .... by creating Matlab files for five different computer ...

  1. Design of a day tank glass furnace using a transient model and steady-state computation fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz-Ibarra, Oscar; Abad, Pablo; Molina, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    To design day tanks with energy efficiency and good operation standards, a detailed transient model that considers the melting, refining, cooling and working stages of the glass production process was developed. With the model, the required power input was determined, with glass coverage with batch (β) as parameter, for a furnace with a daily production of 1130 kg of soda-lime glass and 14 h for melting/refining. A detailed analysis of the energy balance with the model showed that during the daily cycle about 70% of the energy input is released with the flue gas. During the working stage most of the energy escapes through the doors. As the peak of energy consumption is during the refining process, the power requirement for this stage defines the global power requirement. Calculated energy efficiencies vary between 13% and 16% for β = 70% and 30% respectively. A steady state CFD simulation of the combustion chamber and glass tank shows that a side-fired burner configuration allows for lower gas velocities and temperatures close to the glass and the furnace walls while guaranteeing the same heat transfer characteristics to the glass than the more traditional end-fired (U-type) furnaces. -- Highlights: ► A transient model of a day tank glass furnace captures main process characteristics. ► Heat loss through doors during working stage impacts thermal efficiency. ► A side-fired burner configuration should be preferred to an end-fired approach

  2. DYNAMIC LOAD DAMPER MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loktev Aleksey Alekseevich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present their findings associated with their modeling of a dynamic load damper. According to the authors, the damper is to be installed onto a structure or its element that may be exposed to impact, vibration or any other dynamic loading. The damper is composed of paralleled or consecutively connected viscous and elastic elements. The authors study the influence of viscosity and elasticity parameters of the damper produced onto the regular displacement of points of the structure to be protected and onto the regular acceleration transmitted immediately from the damper to the elements positioned below it.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of the initial stages of a VHTR air-ingress accident using a scaled-down model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Tae K., E-mail: taekyu8@gmail.com [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Arcilesi, David J., E-mail: arcilesi.1@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Kim, In H., E-mail: ihkim0730@gmail.com [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Sun, Xiaodong, E-mail: sun.200@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Christensen, Richard N., E-mail: rchristensen@uidaho.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Oh, Chang H. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Kim, Eung S., E-mail: kes7741@snu.ac.kr [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    shows that flow reversal could occur due to Taylor wave expansion near the end of the depressurization, which could affect subsequent stages of the air ingress accident scenario. Therefore, to properly understand and evaluate the depressurization effects, numerical simulations are performed for the double-ended guillotine break of the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) cross vessel with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool, ANSYS FLUENT. A benchmark and error quantification study of the depressurization shows that the ANSYS FLUENT model can predict the depressurization problem with relatively low uncertainty. In addition, the computational results show that the depressurization of a double-ended guillotine break behaves as an isentropic process. The observed flow oscillations near the end of the depressurization promote mixing of helium gas and air near the break. The results of the CFD analyses also show that the density-driven stratified flow, which is postulated to be the next stage of the air-ingress accident scenario, is strongly dependent on the density difference between the air–helium mixture in the containment and the helium in the reactor vessel. Therefore, the flow oscillations near the end of the depressurization stage may have a minor, yet notable, effect to slow down the air ingress due to density-driven stratified flow by decreasing the bulk density of the gas mixture in the containment through the addition of helium and increasing the bulk density in the reactor vessel through the addition of air.

  4. Dynamic computer simulation of the Fort St. Vrain steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    A computer simulation is described for the dynamic response of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear reactor regenerative intermediate- and low-pressure steam turbines. The fundamental computer-modeling assumptions for the turbines and feedwater heaters are developed. A turbine heat balance specifying steam and feedwater conditions at a given generator load and the volumes of the feedwater heaters are all that are necessary as descriptive input parameters. Actual plant data for a generator load reduction from 100 to 50% power (which occurred as part of a plant transient on November 9, 1981) are compared with computer-generated predictions, with reasonably good agreement

  5. Arterioportal shunts on dynamic computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, T.; Hiyama, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Tsuchiya, S.; Kohno, K.; Nakajima, Y.; Okuda, K.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-two patients, 20 with hepatocelluar carcinoma and 12 with liver cirrhosis, were examined by dynamic computed tomography (CT) using intravenous bolus injection of contrast medium and by celiac angiography. Dynamic CT disclosed arterioportal shunting in four cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and in one of cirrhosis. In three of the former, the arterioportal shunt was adjacent to a mass lesion on CT, suggesting tumor invasion into the portal branch. In one with hepatocellular carcinoma, the shunt was remote from the mass. In the case with cirrhosis, there was no mass. In these last two cases, the shunt might have been caused by prior percutaneous needle puncture. In another case of hepatocellular carcinoma, celiac angiography but not CT demonstrated an arterioportal shunt. Thus, dynamic CT was diagnostic in five of six cases of arteriographically demonstrated arterioportal shunts

  6. Loss of vacuum accident (LOVA): Comparison of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow velocities against experimental data for the model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellecci, C.; Gaudio, P.; Lupelli, I.; Malizia, A.; Porfiri, M.T.; Quaranta, R.; Richetta, M.

    2011-01-01

    computer-simulation data and compare them with data collected in STARDUST.

  7. Computer Modelling of Photochemical Smog Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebert, Barry J.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a computer program that has been used in environmental chemistry courses as an example of modelling as a vehicle for teaching chemical dynamics, and as a demonstration of some of the factors which affect the production of smog. (Author/GS)

  8. Computational complexity of symbolic dynamics at the onset of chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakdawala, Porus

    1996-05-01

    In a variety of studies of dynamical systems, the edge of order and chaos has been singled out as a region of complexity. It was suggested by Wolfram, on the basis of qualitative behavior of cellular automata, that the computational basis for modeling this region is the universal Turing machine. In this paper, following a suggestion of Crutchfield, we try to show that the Turing machine model may often be too powerful as a computational model to describe the boundary of order and chaos. In particular we study the region of the first accumulation of period doubling in unimodal and bimodal maps of the interval, from the point of view of language theory. We show that in relation to the ``extended'' Chomsky hierarchy, the relevant computational model in the unimodal case is the nested stack automaton or the related indexed languages, while the bimodal case is modeled by the linear bounded automaton or the related context-sensitive languages.

  9. Dynamic Thermal Loads and Cooling Requirements Calculations for V ACs System in Nuclear Fuel Processing Facilities Using Computer Aided Energy Conservation Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL Fawal, M.M.; Gadalla, A.A.; Taher, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    In terms of nuclear safety, the most important function of ventilation air conditioning (VAC) systems is to maintain safe ambient conditions for components and structures important to safety inside the nuclear facility and to maintain appropriate working conditions for the plant's operating and maintenance staff. As a part of a study aimed to evaluate the performance of VAC system of the nuclear fuel cycle facility (NFCF) a computer model was developed and verified to evaluate the thermal loads and cooling requirements for different zones of fuel processing facility. The program is based on transfer function method (TFM) and it is used to calculate the dynamic heat gain by various multilayer walls constructions and windows hour by hour at any orientation of the building. The developed model was verified by comparing the obtained calculated results of the solar heat gain by a given building with the corresponding calculated values using finite difference method (FDM) and total equivalent temperature different method (TETD). As an example the developed program is used to calculate the cooling loads of the different zones of a typical nuclear fuel facility the results showed that the cooling capacities of the different cooling units of each zone of the facility meet the design requirements according to safety regulations in nuclear facilities.

  10. Comparison of wind turbine wake properties in non‐sheared inflow predicted by different computational fluid dynamics rotor models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels; Zahle, Frederik; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2015-01-01

    , which is characterized by much higher turbulence levels. In the simulations with turbulent inflow, the wake characteristics predicted by the three methods are in close agreement, indicating that the differences observed in uniform inflow do not play an important role if the inflow is turbulent...... both uniform and turbulent inflows, and the wake properties predicted by the three models are compared. In uniform inflow, the wake properties predicted by the actuator disc and line methods are found to be in very close agreement but differ significantly from the wake of the fully resolved rotor....... Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  11. Computational fluid dynamic model for thermohydraulic calculation for the steady-state of the real scale HTR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamez, Abel; Rojas, Leorlen; Rosales, Jesus; Castro, Landy Y.; Gonzalez, Daniel; Garcia, Carlos, E-mail: agamezgmf@gmail.com, E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com, E-mail: jrosales@instec.cu, E-mail: lcastro@instec.cu, E-mail: danielgonro@gmail.com, E-mail: cgr@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira, Carlos B. de, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Dominguez, Dany S., E-mail: dsdominguez@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is one of candidates of next generation of nuclear reactor according to IAEA report 2013. Evaluation of thermohydraulic performance and an experimental comparison results were proposed to the international research community. In this article, the tree dimensional CFD thermohydraulic modelation of steady state of HTR-10 modular reactor, using ANSYS CFX v14.0, has been done. Code-to-code and Code-to-experiment benchmark analyses, related to the testing program of the HTR-10 plant including steady state temperature distribution with the reactor at full power, were developed. The 3D real scale representation of reflector zone and fluid path flow inner and outer reflector blocks and cold helium cavity were carried out. The porous medium model was used to simulate the core zone in the reactor. The power distribution of the initial core published by IAEA-TECDOC-1694 obtained by Chief Scientific Investigators (CSIs) from China was used as heat sources in the core zone. (author)

  12. Sierra toolkit computational mesh conceptual model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, David G.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Cochran, William K.; Williams, Alan B.; Sjaardema, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    The Sierra Toolkit computational mesh is a software library intended to support massively parallel multi-physics computations on dynamically changing unstructured meshes. This domain of intended use is inherently complex due to distributed memory parallelism, parallel scalability, heterogeneity of physics, heterogeneous discretization of an unstructured mesh, and runtime adaptation of the mesh. Management of this inherent complexity begins with a conceptual analysis and modeling of this domain of intended use; i.e., development of a domain model. The Sierra Toolkit computational mesh software library is designed and implemented based upon this domain model. Software developers using, maintaining, or extending the Sierra Toolkit computational mesh library must be familiar with the concepts/domain model presented in this report.

  13. Numerical simulation of dynamics of brushless dc motors for aerospace and other applications. Volume 2: User's guide to computer EMA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerdash, N. A. O.; Nehl, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    A description and user's guide of the computer program developed to simulate the dynamics of an electromechanical actuator for aerospace applications are presented. The effects of the stator phase currents on the permanent magnets of the rotor are examined. The voltage and current waveforms present in the power conditioner network during the motoring, regenerative braking, and plugging modes of operation are presented and discussed.

  14. A physicist's model of computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredkin, E.

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is presented to make a statement about what a computer is and how it works from the perspective of physics. The single observation that computation can be a reversible process allows for the same kind of insight into computing as was obtained by Carnot's discovery that heat engines could be modelled as reversible processes. It allows us to bring computation into the realm of physics, where the power of physics allows us to ask and answer questions that seemed intractable from the viewpoint of computer science. Strangely enough, this effort makes it clear why computers get cheaper every year. (author) 14 refs., 4 figs

  15. Programming Unconventional Computers: Dynamics, Development, Self-Reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Stepney

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical computing has well-established formalisms for specifying, refining, composing, proving, and otherwise reasoning about computations. These formalisms have matured over the past 70 years or so. Unconventional Computing includes the use of novel kinds of substrates–from black holes and quantum effects, through to chemicals, biomolecules, even slime moulds–to perform computations that do not conform to the classical model. Although many of these unconventional substrates can be coerced into performing classical computation, this is not how they “naturally” compute. Our ability to exploit unconventional computing is partly hampered by a lack of corresponding programming formalisms: we need models for building, composing, and reasoning about programs that execute in these substrates. What might, say, a slime mould programming language look like? Here I outline some of the issues and properties of these unconventional substrates that need to be addressed to find “natural” approaches to programming them. Important concepts include embodied real values, processes and dynamical systems, generative systems and their meta-dynamics, and embodied self-reference.

  16. RETRAN dynamic slip model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, J.H.; Paulsen, M.P.; Gose, G.C.

    1981-01-01

    A time dependent equation for the slip velocity in a two-phase flow condition has been incorporated into a developmental version of the RETRAN computer code. This model addition has been undertaken to remove a limitation in RETRAN-01 associated with the homogeneous equilibrium mixture model. In this paper, the development of the slip model is summarized and the corresponding constitutive equations are discussed. Comparisons of RETRAN analyses with steady-state void fraction data and data from the Semiscale S-02-6 small break test are also presented

  17. Quality control of computational fluid dynamics in indoor environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Nielsen, P. V.

    2003-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used routinely to predict air movement and distributions of temperature and concentrations in indoor environments. Modelling and numerical errors are inherent in such studies and must be considered when the results are presented. Here, we discuss modelling as...... the quality of CFD calculations, as well as guidelines for the minimum information that should accompany all CFD-related publications to enable a scientific judgment of the quality of the study....

  18. Dynamical chiral bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colanero, K.; Chu, M.-C.

    2002-01-01

    We study a dynamical chiral bag model, in which massless fermions are confined within an impenetrable but movable bag coupled to meson fields. The self-consistent motion of the bag is obtained by solving the equations of motion exactly assuming spherical symmetry. When the bag interacts with an external meson wave we find three different kinds of resonances: fermionic, geometric, and σ resonances. We discuss the phenomenological implications of our results

  19. Model for macroevolutionary dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruvka, Yosef E; Shnerb, Nadav M; Kessler, David A; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2013-07-02

    The highly skewed distribution of species among genera, although challenging to macroevolutionists, provides an opportunity to understand the dynamics of diversification, including species formation, extinction, and morphological evolution. Early models were based on either the work by Yule [Yule GU (1925) Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 213:21-87], which neglects extinction, or a simple birth-death (speciation-extinction) process. Here, we extend the more recent development of a generic, neutral speciation-extinction (of species)-origination (of genera; SEO) model for macroevolutionary dynamics of taxon diversification. Simulations show that deviations from the homogeneity assumptions in the model can be detected in species-per-genus distributions. The SEO model fits observed species-per-genus distributions well for class-to-kingdom-sized taxonomic groups. The model's predictions for the appearance times (the time of the first existing species) of the taxonomic groups also approximately match estimates based on molecular inference and fossil records. Unlike estimates based on analyses of phylogenetic reconstruction, fitted extinction rates for large clades are close to speciation rates, consistent with high rates of species turnover and the relatively slow change in diversity observed in the fossil record. Finally, the SEO model generally supports the consistency of generic boundaries based on morphological differences between species and provides a comparator for rates of lineage splitting and morphological evolution.

  20. Unsteady computational fluid dynamics in aeronautics

    CERN Document Server

    Tucker, P G

    2014-01-01

    The field of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and hybrids is a vibrant research area. This book runs through all the potential unsteady modelling fidelity ranges, from low-order to LES. The latter is probably the highest fidelity for practical aerospace systems modelling. Cutting edge new frontiers are defined.  One example of a pressing environmental concern is noise. For the accurate prediction of this, unsteady modelling is needed. Hence computational aeroacoustics is explored. It is also emerging that there is a critical need for coupled simulations. Hence, this area is also considered and the tensions of utilizing such simulations with the already expensive LES.  This work has relevance to the general field of CFD and LES and to a wide variety of non-aerospace aerodynamic systems (e.g. cars, submarines, ships, electronics, buildings). Topics treated include unsteady flow techniques; LES and hybrids; general numerical methods; computational aeroacoustics; computational aeroelasticity; coupled simulations and...

  1. Mathematical Modeling and Computational Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, John F.; Naidu, Jaideep T.

    2017-01-01

    The paper argues that mathematical modeling is the essence of computational thinking. Learning a computer language is a valuable assistance in learning logical thinking but of less assistance when learning problem-solving skills. The paper is third in a series and presents some examples of mathematical modeling using spreadsheets at an advanced…

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of The Dalles Project: Effects of Spill Flow Distribution Between the Washington Shore and the Tailrace Spillwall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Portland District (CENWP) has ongoing work to improve the survival of juvenile salmonids (smolt) migrating past The Dalles Dam. As part of that effort, a spillwall was constructed to improve juvenile egress through the tailrace downstream of the stilling basin. The spillwall was designed to improve smolt survival by decreasing smolt retention time in the spillway tailrace and the exposure to predators on the spillway shelf. The spillwall guides spillway flows, and hence smolt, more quickly into the thalweg. In this study, an existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was modified and used to characterize tailrace hydraulics between the new spillwall and the Washington shore for six different total river flows. The effect of spillway flow distribution was simulated for three spill patterns at the lowest total river flow. The commercial CFD solver, STAR-CD version 4.1, was used to solve the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations together with the k-epsilon turbulence model. Free surface motion was simulated using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique. The model results were used in two ways. First, results graphics were provided to CENWP and regional fisheries agency representatives for use and comparison to the same flow conditions at a reduced-scale physical model. The CFD results were very similar in flow pattern to that produced by the reduced-scale physical model but these graphics provided a quantitative view of velocity distribution. During the physical model work, an additional spill pattern was tested. Subsequently, that spill pattern was also simulated in the numerical model. The CFD streamlines showed that the hydraulic conditions were likely to be beneficial to fish egress at the higher total river flows (120 kcfs and greater, uniform flow distribution). At the lowest flow case, 90 kcfs, it was necessary to use a non-uniform distribution. Of the three distributions tested, splitting the flow evenly between

  3. COMPUTATIONAL MODELS FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Monendra Grover; Rajesh Kumar; Tapan Kumar Mondal; S. Rajkumar

    2011-01-01

    Genetic erosion is a serious problem and computational models have been developed to prevent it. The computational modeling in this field not only includes (terrestrial) reserve design, but also decision modeling for related problems such as habitat restoration, marine reserve design, and nonreserve approaches to conservation management. Models have been formulated for evaluating tradeoffs between socioeconomic, biophysical, and spatial criteria in establishing marine reserves. The percolatio...

  4. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Mi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequencyadaptation (SFA at single neurons, and short-term facilitation (STF and depression (STDat neuronal synapses. These dynamical features typically covers a broad range of time scalesand exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what the computationalbenefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics is. In this study, we proposethat the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictorycomputations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractorneural network (CANN as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing timeconstants in their dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity,adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, andhence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar timeconstants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network isable to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed lighton the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realizediverse cognitive functions.

  5. Dynamical modeling of tidal streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovy, Jo

    2014-01-01

    I present a new framework for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams. The framework consists of simple models for the initial action-angle distribution of tidal debris, which can be straightforwardly evolved forward in time. Taking advantage of the essentially one-dimensional nature of tidal streams, the transformation to position-velocity coordinates can be linearized and interpolated near a small number of points along the stream, thus allowing for efficient computations of a stream's properties in observable quantities. I illustrate how to calculate the stream's average location (its 'track') in different coordinate systems, how to quickly estimate the dispersion around its track, and how to draw mock stream data. As a generative model, this framework allows one to compute the full probability distribution function and marginalize over or condition it on certain phase-space dimensions as well as convolve it with observational uncertainties. This will be instrumental in proper data analysis of stream data. In addition to providing a computationally efficient practical tool for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams, the action-angle nature of the framework helps elucidate how the observed width of the stream relates to the velocity dispersion or mass of the progenitor, and how the progenitors of 'orphan' streams could be located. The practical usefulness of the proposed framework crucially depends on the ability to calculate action-angle variables for any orbit in any gravitational potential. A novel method for calculating actions, frequencies, and angles in any static potential using a single orbit integration is described in the Appendix.

  6. Comparison of particle-wall interaction boundary conditions in the prediction of cyclone collection efficiency in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valverde Ramirez, M.; Coury, J.R.; Goncalves, J.A.S.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, many computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies have appeared attempting to predict cyclone pressure drop and collection efficiency. While these studies have been able to predict pressure drop well, they have been only moderately successful in predicting collection efficiency. Part of the reason for this failure has been attributed to the relatively simple wall boundary conditions implemented in the commercially available CFD software, which are not capable of accurately describing the complex particle-wall interaction present in a cyclone. According, researches have proposed a number of different boundary conditions in order to improve the model performance. This work implemented the critical velocity boundary condition through a user defined function (UDF) in the Fluent software and compared its predictions both with experimental data and with the predictions obtained when using Fluent's built-in boundary conditions. Experimental data was obtained from eight laboratory scale cyclones with varying geometric ratios. The CFD simulations were made using the software Fluent 6.3.26. (author)

  7. Development of a model for the rational design of molecular imprinted polymer: Computational approach for combined molecular dynamics/quantum mechanics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Cunku; Li Xin; Guo Zechong; Qi Jingyao

    2009-01-01

    A new rational approach for the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) based on the combination of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanics (QM) calculations is described in this work. Before performing molecular modeling, a virtual library of functional monomers was created containing forty frequently used monomers. The MD simulations were first conducted to screen the top three monomers from virtual library in each porogen-acetonitrile, chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. QM simulations were then performed with an aim to select the optimum monomer and progen solvent in which the QM simulations were carried out; the monomers giving the highest binding energies were chosen as the candidate to prepare MIP in its corresponding solvent. The acetochlor, a widely used herbicide, was chosen as the target analyte. According to the theoretical calculation results, the MIP with acetochlor as template was prepared by emulsion polymerization method using N,N-methylene bisacrylamide (MBAAM) as functional monomer and divinylbenzene (DVB) as cross-linker in chloroform. The synthesized MIP was then tested by equilibrium-adsorption method, and the MIP demonstrated high removal efficiency to the acetochlor. Mulliken charge distribution and 1 H NMR spectroscopy of the synthesized MIP provided insight on the nature of recognition during the imprinting process probing the governing interactions for selective binding site formation at a molecular level. We think the computer simulation method first proposed in this paper is a novel and reliable method for the design and synthesis of MIP.

  8. Computer-Aided Modeling Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorova, Marina; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    Models are playing important roles in design and analysis of chemicals based products and the processes that manufacture them. Computer-aided methods and tools have the potential to reduce the number of experiments, which can be expensive and time consuming, and there is a benefit of working...... development and application. The proposed work is a part of the project for development of methods and tools that will allow systematic generation, analysis and solution of models for various objectives. It will use the computer-aided modeling framework that is based on a modeling methodology, which combines....... In this contribution, the concept of template-based modeling is presented and application is highlighted for the specific case of catalytic membrane fixed bed models. The modeling template is integrated in a generic computer-aided modeling framework. Furthermore, modeling templates enable the idea of model reuse...

  9. Wind Farm Decentralized Dynamic Modeling With Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Shakeri, Sayyed Mojtaba; Grunnet, Jacob Deleuran

    2010-01-01

    Development of dynamic wind flow models for wind farms is part of the research in European research FP7 project AEOLUS. The objective of this report is to provide decentralized dynamic wind flow models with parameters. The report presents a structure for decentralized flow models with inputs from...... local models. The results of this report are especially useful, but not limited, to design a decentralized wind farm controller, since in centralized controller design one can also use the model and update it in a central computing node.......Development of dynamic wind flow models for wind farms is part of the research in European research FP7 project AEOLUS. The objective of this report is to provide decentralized dynamic wind flow models with parameters. The report presents a structure for decentralized flow models with inputs from...

  10. Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) and gamma radiation meter for comparison with and validation and tuning of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeep, Chaminda; Yan, Ru; Mylvaganam, Saba; Vestøl, Sondre; Melaaen, Morten C

    2014-01-01

    The electrical capacitance tomographic (ECT) approach is increasingly seen as attractive for measurement and control applications in the process industries. Recently, there is increased interest in using the tomographic details from ECT for comparing with and validating and tuning CFD models of multiphase flow. Collaboration with researchers working in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flows gives valuable information for both groups of researchers in the field of ECT and CFD. By studying the ECT tomograms of multiphase flows under carefully monitored inflow conditions of the different media and by obtaining the capacitance values, C(i, j, t) with i = 1…N, j = 1, 2,…N and i ≠ j obtained from ECT modules with N electrodes, it is shown how the interface heights in a pipe with stratified flow of oil and air can be fruitfully compared to the values of those obtained from ECT and gamma radiation meter (GRM) for improving CFD modeling. Monitored inflow conditions in this study are flow rates of air, water and oil into a pipe which can be positioned at varying inclinations to the horizontal, thus emulating the pipelines laid in subsea installations. It is found that ECT-based tomograms show most of the features seen in the GRM-based visualizations with nearly one-to-one correspondence to interface heights obtained from these two methods, albeit some anomalies at the pipe wall. However, there are some interesting features the ECT manages to capture: features which the GRM or the CFD modeling apparently do not show, possibly due to parameters not defined in the inputs to the CFD model or much slower response of the GRM. Results presented in this paper indicate that a combination of ECT and GRM and preferably with other modalities with enhanced data fusion and analysis combined with CFD modeling can help to improve the modeling, measurement and control of multiphase flow in the oil and gas industries and in the process industries

  11. Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) and gamma radiation meter for comparison with and validation and tuning of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, Chaminda; Yan, Ru; Vestøl, Sondre; Melaaen, Morten C.; Mylvaganam, Saba

    2014-07-01

    The electrical capacitance tomographic (ECT) approach is increasingly seen as attractive for measurement and control applications in the process industries. Recently, there is increased interest in using the tomographic details from ECT for comparing with and validating and tuning CFD models of multiphase flow. Collaboration with researchers working in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flows gives valuable information for both groups of researchers in the field of ECT and CFD. By studying the ECT tomograms of multiphase flows under carefully monitored inflow conditions of the different media and by obtaining the capacitance values, C(i, j, t) with i = 1…N, j = 1, 2,…N and i ≠ j obtained from ECT modules with N electrodes, it is shown how the interface heights in a pipe with stratified flow of oil and air can be fruitfully compared to the values of those obtained from ECT and gamma radiation meter (GRM) for improving CFD modeling. Monitored inflow conditions in this study are flow rates of air, water and oil into a pipe which can be positioned at varying inclinations to the horizontal, thus emulating the pipelines laid in subsea installations. It is found that ECT-based tomograms show most of the features seen in the GRM-based visualizations with nearly one-to-one correspondence to interface heights obtained from these two methods, albeit some anomalies at the pipe wall. However, there are some interesting features the ECT manages to capture: features which the GRM or the CFD modeling apparently do not show, possibly due to parameters not defined in the inputs to the CFD model or much slower response of the GRM. Results presented in this paper indicate that a combination of ECT and GRM and preferably with other modalities with enhanced data fusion and analysis combined with CFD modeling can help to improve the modeling, measurement and control of multiphase flow in the oil and gas industries and in the process industries

  12. The dynamic micro computed tomography at SSRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R.; Xu, L.; Du, G.; Deng, B.; Xie, H.; Xiao, T.

    2018-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-μCT) is a critical technique for quantitative characterizing the 3D internal structure of samples, recently the dynamic SR-μCT has been attracting vast attention since it can evaluate the three-dimensional structure evolution of a sample. A dynamic μCT method, which is based on monochromatic beam, was developed at the X-ray Imaging and Biomedical Application Beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, by combining the compressed sensing based CT reconstruction algorithm and hardware upgrade. The monochromatic beam based method can achieve quantitative information, and lower dose than the white beam base method in which the lower energy beam is absorbed by the sample rather than contribute to the final imaging signal. The developed method is successfully used to investigate the compression of the air sac during respiration in a bell cricket, providing new knowledge for further research on the insect respiratory system.

  13. Dynamic X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grangeat, P.

    2003-01-01

    Paper Dynamic computed tomography (CT) imaging aims at reconstructing image sequences where the dynamic nature of the living human body is of primary interest. Main concerned applications are image-guided interventional procedures, functional studies and cardiac imaging. The introduction of ultra-fast rotating gantries along with multi-row detectors and in near future area detectors allows a huge progress toward the imaging of moving organs with low-contrast resolution. This paper gives an overview of the different concepts used in dynamic CT. A new reconstruction algorithm based on a voxel-specific dynamic evolution compensation is also presented. It provides four-dimensional image sequences with accurate spatio-temporal information, where each frame is reconstructed using a long-scan acquisition mode on several half-turns. In the same time, this technique permits to reduce the dose delivered per rotation while keeping the same signal to noise ratio for every frame using an adaptive motion-compensated temporal averaging. Results are illustrated on simulated data. (authors)

  14. Notions of similarity for computational biology models

    KAUST Repository

    Waltemath, Dagmar

    2016-03-21

    Computational models used in biology are rapidly increasing in complexity, size, and numbers. To build such large models, researchers need to rely on software tools for model retrieval, model combination, and version control. These tools need to be able to quantify the differences and similarities between computational models. However, depending on the specific application, the notion of similarity may greatly vary. A general notion of model similarity, applicable to various types of models, is still missing. Here, we introduce a general notion of quantitative model similarities, survey the use of existing model comparison methods in model building and management, and discuss potential applications of model comparison. To frame model comparison as a general problem, we describe a theoretical approach to defining and computing similarities based on different model aspects. Potentially relevant aspects of a model comprise its references to biological entities, network structure, mathematical equations and parameters, and dynamic behaviour. Future similarity measures could combine these model aspects in flexible, problem-specific ways in order to mimic users\\' intuition about model similarity, and to support complex model searches in databases.

  15. Notions of similarity for computational biology models

    KAUST Repository

    Waltemath, Dagmar; Henkel, Ron; Hoehndorf, Robert; Kacprowski, Tim; Knuepfer, Christian; Liebermeister, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Computational models used in biology are rapidly increasing in complexity, size, and numbers. To build such large models, researchers need to rely on software tools for model retrieval, model combination, and version control. These tools need to be able to quantify the differences and similarities between computational models. However, depending on the specific application, the notion of similarity may greatly vary. A general notion of model similarity, applicable to various types of models, is still missing. Here, we introduce a general notion of quantitative model similarities, survey the use of existing model comparison methods in model building and management, and discuss potential applications of model comparison. To frame model comparison as a general problem, we describe a theoretical approach to defining and computing similarities based on different model aspects. Potentially relevant aspects of a model comprise its references to biological entities, network structure, mathematical equations and parameters, and dynamic behaviour. Future similarity measures could combine these model aspects in flexible, problem-specific ways in order to mimic users' intuition about model similarity, and to support complex model searches in databases.

  16. Computational approach to large quantum dynamical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesner, R.A.; Brunet, J.P.; Wyatt, R.E.; Leforestier, C.; Binkley, S.

    1987-01-01

    The organizational structure is described for a new program that permits computations on a variety of quantum mechanical problems in chemical dynamics and spectroscopy. Particular attention is devoted to developing and using algorithms that exploit the capabilities of current vector supercomputers. A key component in this procedure is the recursive transformation of the large sparse Hamiltonian matrix into a much smaller tridiagonal matrix. An application to time-dependent laser molecule energy transfer is presented. Rate of energy deposition in the multimode molecule for systematic variations in the molecular intermode coupling parameters is emphasized

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Ventilation Airflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2014-01-01

    the principle behind CFD, the development in numerical schemes and computer size since the 1970s. Special attention is given to the selection of the correct governing equations, to the understanding of low turbulent flow, to the selection of turbulence models, and to addressing situations with more steady...

  18. Computer simulation of multiple dynamic photorefractive gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben

    1998-01-01

    The benefits of a direct visualization of space-charge grating buildup are described. The visualization is carried out by a simple repetitive computer program, which simulates the basic processes in the band-transport model and displays the result graphically or in the form of numerical data. The...

  19. Computer architecture evaluation for structural dynamics computations: Project summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Hilda M.

    1989-01-01

    The intent of the proposed effort is the examination of the impact of the elements of parallel architectures on the performance realized in a parallel computation. To this end, three major projects are developed: a language for the expression of high level parallelism, a statistical technique for the synthesis of multicomputer interconnection networks based upon performance prediction, and a queueing model for the analysis of shared memory hierarchies.

  20. Time series modeling, computation, and inference

    CERN Document Server

    Prado, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    The authors systematically develop a state-of-the-art analysis and modeling of time series. … this book is well organized and well written. The authors present various statistical models for engineers to solve problems in time series analysis. Readers no doubt will learn state-of-the-art techniques from this book.-Hsun-Hsien Chang, Computing Reviews, March 2012My favorite chapters were on dynamic linear models and vector AR and vector ARMA models.-William Seaver, Technometrics, August 2011… a very modern entry to the field of time-series modelling, with a rich reference list of the current lit

  1. Effects of Intraluminal Thrombus on Patient-Specific Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Hemodynamics via Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocity and Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Antón, Raúl; Hung, Ming-yang; Menon, Prahlad; Finol, Ender A.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2014-01-01

    The pathology of the human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and its relationship to the later complication of intraluminal thrombus (ILT) formation remains unclear. The hemodynamics in the diseased abdominal aorta are hypothesized to be a key contributor to the formation and growth of ILT. The objective of this investigation is to establish a reliable 3D flow visualization method with corresponding validation tests with high confidence in order to provide insight into the basic hemodynamic features for a better understanding of hemodynamics in AAA pathology and seek potential treatment for AAA diseases. A stereoscopic particle image velocity (PIV) experiment was conducted using transparent patient-specific experimental AAA models (with and without ILT) at three axial planes. Results show that before ILT formation, a 3D vortex was generated in the AAA phantom. This geometry-related vortex was not observed after the formation of ILT, indicating its possible role in the subsequent appearance of ILT in this patient. It may indicate that a longer residence time of recirculated blood flow in the aortic lumen due to this vortex caused sufficient shear-induced platelet activation to develop ILT and maintain uniform flow conditions. Additionally, two computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling codes (Fluent and an in-house cardiovascular CFD code) were compared with the two-dimensional, three-component velocity stereoscopic PIV data. Results showed that correlation coefficients of the out-of-plane velocity data between PIV and both CFD methods are greater than 0.85, demonstrating good quantitative agreement. The stereoscopic PIV study can be utilized as test case templates for ongoing efforts in cardiovascular CFD solver development. Likewise, it is envisaged that the patient-specific data may provide a benchmark for further studying hemodynamics of actual AAA, ILT, and their convolution effects under physiological conditions for clinical applications. PMID:24316984

  2. An analytical formulation of thermodynamic properties of dry and metastable steam suitable for computational fluid dynamics modelling of steam turbine flows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrubý, Jan; Pátek, Jaroslav; Duška, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 228, č. 2 (2014), s. 120-128 ISSN 0957-6509 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200760905; GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/1593; GA MŠk LG13056 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : metastable steam * thermodynamic properties * computational fluid dynamics Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.645, year: 2014 http://pia.sagepub.com/content/228/2.toc

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on the new REHVA Guidebook Computational Fluid  Dynamics in Ventilation Design (Nielsen et al. 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis(Nielsen 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis Allard, Hazim B. Awbi, Lars Davidson and Alois Schälin. The guidebook is made for people....... The guidebook introduces rules for good quality prediction work, and it is the purpose of the guidebook to improve the technical level of CFD work in ventilation.......This paper is based on the new REHVA Guidebook Computational Fluid  Dynamics in Ventilation Design (Nielsen et al. 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis(Nielsen 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis Allard, Hazim B. Awbi, Lars Davidson and Alois Schälin. The guidebook is made for people...... who need to use and discuss results based on CFD predictions, and it gives insight into the subject for those who are not used to work with CFD. The guidebook is also written for people working with CFD who have to be more aware of how this numerical method is applied in the area of ventilation...

  4. RFQ modeling computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The mathematical background for a multiport-network-solving program is described. A method for accurately numerically modeling an arbitrary, continuous, multiport transmission line is discussed. A modification to the transmission-line equations to accommodate multiple rf drives is presented. An improved model for the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator that corrects previous errors is given. This model permits treating the RFQ as a true eight-port network for simplicity in interpreting the field distribution and ensures that all modes propagate at the same velocity in the high-frequency limit. The flexibility of the multiport model is illustrated by simple modifications to otherwise two-dimensional systems that permit modeling them as linear chains of multiport networks

  5. Computer codes for beam dynamics analysis of cyclotronlike accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V.

    2017-12-01

    Computer codes suitable for the study of beam dynamics in cyclotronlike (classical and isochronous cyclotrons, synchrocyclotrons, and fixed field alternating gradient) accelerators are reviewed. Computer modeling of cyclotron segments, such as the central zone, acceleration region, and extraction system is considered. The author does not claim to give a full and detailed description of the methods and algorithms used in the codes. Special attention is paid to the codes already proven and confirmed at the existing accelerating facilities. The description of the programs prepared in the worldwide known accelerator centers is provided. The basic features of the programs available to users and limitations of their applicability are described.

  6. Computer Based Modelling and Simulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GENERAL I ARTICLE. Computer Based ... universities, and later did system analysis, ... sonal computers (PC) and low cost software packages and tools. They can serve as useful learning experience through student projects. Models are .... Let us consider a numerical example: to calculate the velocity of a trainer aircraft ...

  7. Computational Modeling of Space Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Griffin, Devon W.

    2016-01-01

    The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP), within NASAs Human Research Program, develops and implements computational modeling for use in the mitigation of human health and performance risks associated with long duration spaceflight. Over the past decade, DAP developed models to provide insights into space flight related changes to the central nervous system, cardiovascular system and the musculoskeletal system. Examples of the models and their applications include biomechanical models applied to advanced exercise device development, bone fracture risk quantification for mission planning, accident investigation, bone health standards development, and occupant protection. The International Space Station (ISS), in its role as a testing ground for long duration spaceflight, has been an important platform for obtaining human spaceflight data. DAP has used preflight, in-flight and post-flight data from short and long duration astronauts for computational model development and validation. Examples include preflight and post-flight bone mineral density data, muscle cross-sectional area, and muscle strength measurements. Results from computational modeling supplement space physiology research by informing experimental design. Using these computational models, DAP personnel can easily identify both important factors associated with a phenomenon and areas where data are lacking. This presentation will provide examples of DAP computational models, the data used in model development and validation, and applications of the model.

  8. The general dynamic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Michael K.; Matthews, Thomas J.; Whittaker, Robert James

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Island biogeography focuses on understanding the processes that underlie a set of well-described patterns on islands, but it lacks a unified theoretical framework for integrating these processes. The recently proposed general dynamic model (GDM) of oceanic island biogeography offers a step...... towards this goal. Here, we present an analysis of causality within the GDM and investigate its potential for the further development of island biogeographical theory. Further, we extend the GDM to include subduction-based island arcs and continental fragment islands. Location: A conceptual analysis...... of evolutionary processes in simulations derived from the mechanistic assumptions of the GDM corresponded broadly to those initially suggested, with the exception of trends in extinction rates. Expanding the model to incorporate different scenarios of island ontogeny and isolation revealed a sensitivity...

  9. Structural models of zebrafish (Danio rerio NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT domains suggest differential ATP binding orientations: insights from computational modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Maharana

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1 and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, γ-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved 'Lysine' at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds and Aspartic acid (Walker B formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. 'Proline' of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2 interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with γ-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2.

  10. Documentation and user guides for SPBLOB: a computer simulation model of the join population dynamics for loblolly pine and the southern pine beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Bishir; James Roberds; Brian Strom; Xiaohai Wan

    2009-01-01

    SPLOB is a computer simulation model for the interaction between loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.), the economically most important forest crop in the United States, and the southern pine beetle (SPB: Dendroctonus frontalis Zimm.), the major insect pest for this species. The model simulates loblolly pine stands from time of planting...

  11. Computational modelling in fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauguel, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modelling of the greatest part of environmental or industrial flow problems gives very similar types of equations. The considerable increase in computing capacity over the last ten years consequently allowed numerical models of growing complexity to be processed. The varied group of computer codes presented are now a complementary tool of experimental facilities to achieve studies in the field of fluid mechanics. Several codes applied in the nuclear field (reactors, cooling towers, exchangers, plumes...) are presented among others [fr

  12. A Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Simulation of PM10 Dispersion Caused by Rail Transit Construction Activity: A Real Urban Street Canyon Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhou, Ying; Zuo, Jian

    2018-01-01

    Particle emissions derived from construction activities have a significant impact on the local air quality, while the canyon effect with reduced natural ventilation contributes to the highest particulate pollution in urban environments. This study attempted to examine the effect of PM10 emissions derived from the construction of a rail transit system in an urban street canyon. Using a 3D computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model based on a real street canyon with different height ratios, this study formulates the impact of height ratio and wind directions on the dispersion and concentration of PM10. The results indicate that parallel flow would cause the concentration of PM10 at the end of the street canyons in all height ratios, and the trends in horizontal, vertical and lateral planes in all street canyons are similar. While in the condition of perpendicular flow, double-eddy circulations occur and lead to the concentration of PM10 in the middle part of the street canyon and leeward of backwind buildings in all height ratios. Furthermore, perpendicular flow will cause the concentration of PM10 to increase if the upwind buildings are higher than the backwind ones. This study also shows that the dispersion of PM10 is strongly associated with wind direction in and the height ratios of the street canyons. Certain measures could, therefore, be taken to prevent the impact on people in terms of the PM10 concentration and the heights of street canyons identified in this research. Potential mitigation strategies are suggested, include measurements below 4 m according to governmental regulations, dust shields, and atomized water. PMID:29522495

  13. A Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD Simulation of PM10 Dispersion Caused by Rail Transit Construction Activity: A Real Urban Street Canyon Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Particle emissions derived from construction activities have a significant impact on the local air quality, while the canyon effect with reduced natural ventilation contributes to the highest particulate pollution in urban environments. This study attempted to examine the effect of PM10 emissions derived from the construction of a rail transit system in an urban street canyon. Using a 3D computational fluid dynamic (CFD model based on a real street canyon with different height ratios, this study formulates the impact of height ratio and wind directions on the dispersion and concentration of PM10. The results indicate that parallel flow would cause the concentration of PM10 at the end of the street canyons in all height ratios, and the trends in horizontal, vertical and lateral planes in all street canyons are similar. While in the condition of perpendicular flow, double-eddy circulations occur and lead to the concentration of PM10 in the middle part of the street canyon and leeward of backwind buildings in all height ratios. Furthermore, perpendicular flow will cause the concentration of PM10 to increase if the upwind buildings are higher than the backwind ones. This study also shows that the dispersion of PM10 is strongly associated with wind direction in and the height ratios of the street canyons. Certain measures could, therefore, be taken to prevent the impact on people in terms of the PM10 concentration and the heights of street canyons identified in this research. Potential mitigation strategies are suggested, include measurements below 4 m according to governmental regulations, dust shields, and atomized water.

  14. A Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Simulation of PM10 Dispersion Caused by Rail Transit Construction Activity: A Real Urban Street Canyon Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhou, Ying; Zuo, Jian; Rameezdeen, Raufdeen

    2018-03-09

    Particle emissions derived from construction activities have a significant impact on the local air quality, while the canyon effect with reduced natural ventilation contributes to the highest particulate pollution in urban environments. This study attempted to examine the effect of PM 10 emissions derived from the construction of a rail transit system in an urban street canyon. Using a 3D computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model based on a real street canyon with different height ratios, this study formulates the impact of height ratio and wind directions on the dispersion and concentration of PM 10 . The results indicate that parallel flow would cause the concentration of PM 10 at the end of the street canyons in all height ratios, and the trends in horizontal, vertical and lateral planes in all street canyons are similar. While in the condition of perpendicular flow, double-eddy circulations occur and lead to the concentration of PM 10 in the middle part of the street canyon and leeward of backwind buildings in all height ratios. Furthermore, perpendicular flow will cause the concentration of PM 10 to increase if the upwind buildings are higher than the backwind ones. This study also shows that the dispersion of PM 10 is strongly associated with wind direction in and the height ratios of the street canyons. Certain measures could, therefore, be taken to prevent the impact on people in terms of the PM 10 concentration and the heights of street canyons identified in this research. Potential mitigation strategies are suggested, include measurements below 4 m according to governmental regulations, dust shields, and atomized water.

  15. Hemodynamics in Transplant Renal Artery Stenosis and its Alteration after Stent Implantation Based on a Patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yang; Liu, Long-Shan; Cao, Hai-Ming; Li, Jun; Deng, Rong-Hai; Fu, Qian; Zhang, Huan-Xi; Fei, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chang-Xi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Accumulating studies on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) support the involvement of hemodynamic factors in artery stenosis. Based on a patient-specific CFD model, the present study aimed to investigate the hemodynamic characteristics of transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) and its alteration after stent treatment. Methods: Computed tomography angiography (CTA) data of kidney transplant recipients in a single transplant center from April 2013 to November 2014 were reviewed. The three-dimensional geometry of transplant renal artery (TRA) was reconstructed from the qualified CTA images and categorized into three groups: the normal, stenotic, and stented groups. Hemodynamic parameters including pressure distribution, velocity, wall shear stress (WSS), and mass flow rate (MFR) were extracted. The data of hemodynamic parameters were expressed as median (interquartile range), and Mann–Whitney U-test was used for analysis. Results: Totally, 6 normal, 12 stenotic, and 6 stented TRAs were included in the analysis. TRAS presented nonuniform pressure distribution, adverse pressure gradient across stenosis throat, flow vortex, and a separation zone at downstream stenosis. Stenotic arteries had higher maximal velocity and maximal WSS (2.94 [2.14, 3.30] vs. 1.06 [0.89, 1.15] m/s, 256.5 [149.8, 349.4] vs. 41.7 [37.8, 45.3] Pa at end diastole, P = 0.001; 3.25 [2.67, 3.56] vs. 1.65 [1.18, 1.72] m/s, 281.3 [184.3, 364.7] vs. 65.8 [61.2, 71.9] Pa at peak systole, P = 0.001) and lower minimal WSS and MFRs (0.07 [0.03, 0.13] vs. 0.52 [0.45, 0.67] Pa, 1.5 [1.0, 3.0] vs. 11.0 [8.0, 11.3] g/s at end diastole, P = 0.001; 0.08 [0.03, 0.19] vs. 0.70 [0.60, 0.81] Pa, 2.0 [1.3, 3.3] vs. 16.5 [13.0, 20.3] g/s at peak systole, P = 0.001) as compared to normal arteries. Stent implantation ameliorated all the alterations of the above hemodynamic factors except low WSS. Conclusions: Hemodynamic factors were significantly changed in severe TRAS. Stent implantation can restore or

  16. Hemodynamics in Transplant Renal Artery Stenosis and its Alteration after Stent Implantation Based on a Patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yang; Liu, Long-Shan; Cao, Hai-Ming; Li, Jun; Deng, Rong-Hai; Fu, Qian; Zhang, Huan-Xi; Fei, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chang-Xi

    Accumulating studies on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) support the involvement of hemodynamic factors in artery stenosis. Based on a patient-specific CFD model, the present study aimed to investigate the hemodynamic characteristics of transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) and its alteration after stent treatment. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) data of kidney transplant recipients in a single transplant center from April 2013 to November 2014 were reviewed. The three-dimensional geometry of transplant renal artery (TRA) was reconstructed from the qualified CTA images and categorized into three groups: the normal, stenotic, and stented groups. Hemodynamic parameters including pressure distribution, velocity, wall shear stress (WSS), and mass flow rate (MFR) were extracted. The data of hemodynamic parameters were expressed as median (interquartile range), and Mann-Whitney U-test was used for analysis. Totally, 6 normal, 12 stenotic, and 6 stented TRAs were included in the analysis. TRAS presented nonuniform pressure distribution, adverse pressure gradient across stenosis throat, flow vortex, and a separation zone at downstream stenosis. Stenotic arteries had higher maximal velocity and maximal WSS (2.94 [2.14, 3.30] vs. 1.06 [0.89, 1.15] m/s, 256.5 [149.8, 349.4] vs. 41.7 [37.8, 45.3] Pa at end diastole, P= 0.001; 3.25 [2.67, 3.56] vs. 1.65 [1.18, 1.72] m/s, 281.3 [184.3, 364.7] vs. 65.8 [61.2, 71.9] Pa at peak systole, P= 0.001) and lower minimal WSS and MFRs (0.07 [0.03, 0.13] vs. 0.52 [0.45, 0.67] Pa, 1.5 [1.0, 3.0] vs. 11.0 [8.0, 11.3] g/s at end diastole, P= 0.001; 0.08 [0.03, 0.19] vs. 0.70 [0.60, 0.81] Pa, 2.0 [1.3, 3.3] vs. 16.5 [13.0, 20.3] g/s at peak systole, P= 0.001) as compared to normal arteries. Stent implantation ameliorated all the alterations of the above hemodynamic factors except low WSS. Hemodynamic factors were significantly changed in severe TRAS. Stent implantation can restore or ameliorate deleterious change of hemodynamic

  17. Chaos Modelling with Computers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chaos is one of the major scientific discoveries of our times. In fact many scientists ... But there are other natural phenomena that are not predictable though ... characteristics of chaos. ... The position and velocity are all that are needed to determine the motion of a .... a system of equations that modelled the earth's weather ...

  18. Patient-Specific Computational Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Peña, Estefanía

    2012-01-01

    This book addresses patient-specific modeling. It integrates computational modeling, experimental procedures, imagine clinical segmentation and mesh generation with the finite element method (FEM) to solve problems in computational biomedicine and bioengineering. Specific areas of interest include cardiovascular problems, ocular and muscular systems and soft tissue modeling. Patient-specific modeling has been the subject of serious research over the last seven years and interest in the area is continually growing and this area is expected to further develop in the near future.

  19. Computer model for ductile fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.; Reaugh, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A computer model is described for predicting ductile fracture initiation and propagation. The computer fracture model is calibrated by simple and notched round-bar tension tests and a precracked compact tension test. The model is used to predict fracture initiation and propagation in a Charpy specimen and compare the results with experiments. The calibrated model provides a correlation between Charpy V-notch (CVN) fracture energy and any measure of fracture toughness, such as J/sub Ic/. A second simpler empirical correlation was obtained using the energy to initiate fracture in the Charpy specimen rather than total energy CVN, and compared the results with the empirical correlation of Rolfe and Novak

  20. Trust Models in Ubiquitous Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Krukow, Karl; Sassone, Vladimiro

    2008-01-01

    We recapture some of the arguments for trust-based technologies in ubiquitous computing, followed by a brief survey of some of the models of trust that have been introduced in this respect. Based on this, we argue for the need of more formal and foundational trust models.......We recapture some of the arguments for trust-based technologies in ubiquitous computing, followed by a brief survey of some of the models of trust that have been introduced in this respect. Based on this, we argue for the need of more formal and foundational trust models....

  1. Dynamic Linear Models with R

    CERN Document Server

    Campagnoli, Patrizia; Petris, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    State space models have gained tremendous popularity in as disparate fields as engineering, economics, genetics and ecology. Introducing general state space models, this book focuses on dynamic linear models, emphasizing their Bayesian analysis. It illustrates the fundamental steps needed to use dynamic linear models in practice, using R package.

  2. GIS and dynamic phenomena modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Dana

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 4 (2006), s. 11-15 ISSN 0139-570X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : dynamic modelling * temporal analysis * dynamics evaluation * temporal space Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory

  3. Artificial Intelligence In Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1991-01-01

    Paper compares four first-generation artificial-intelligence (Al) software systems for computational fluid dynamics. Includes: Expert Cooling Fan Design System (EXFAN), PAN AIR Knowledge System (PAKS), grid-adaptation program MITOSIS, and Expert Zonal Grid Generation (EZGrid). Focuses on knowledge-based ("expert") software systems. Analyzes intended tasks, kinds of knowledge possessed, magnitude of effort required to codify knowledge, how quickly constructed, performances, and return on investment. On basis of comparison, concludes Al most successful when applied to well-formulated problems solved by classifying or selecting preenumerated solutions. In contrast, application of Al to poorly understood or poorly formulated problems generally results in long development time and large investment of effort, with no guarantee of success.

  4. Combining dynamical decoupling with fault-tolerant quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Hui Khoon; Preskill, John; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    We study how dynamical decoupling (DD) pulse sequences can improve the reliability of quantum computers. We prove upper bounds on the accuracy of DD-protected quantum gates and derive sufficient conditions for DD-protected gates to outperform unprotected gates. Under suitable conditions, fault-tolerant quantum circuits constructed from DD-protected gates can tolerate stronger noise and have a lower overhead cost than fault-tolerant circuits constructed from unprotected gates. Our accuracy estimates depend on the dynamics of the bath that couples to the quantum computer and can be expressed either in terms of the operator norm of the bath's Hamiltonian or in terms of the power spectrum of bath correlations; we explain in particular how the performance of recursively generated concatenated pulse sequences can be analyzed from either viewpoint. Our results apply to Hamiltonian noise models with limited spatial correlations.

  5. Grid computing in large pharmaceutical molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Brian L; Johnson, Stephen R

    2008-07-01

    Most major pharmaceutical companies have employed grid computing to expand their compute resources with the intention of minimizing additional financial expenditure. Historically, one of the issues restricting widespread utilization of the grid resources in molecular modeling is the limited set of suitable applications amenable to coarse-grained parallelization. Recent advances in grid infrastructure technology coupled with advances in application research and redesign will enable fine-grained parallel problems, such as quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics, which were previously inaccessible to the grid environment. This will enable new science as well as increase resource flexibility to load balance and schedule existing workloads.

  6. Computer simulation of dynamic processes on accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kol'ga, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    The problems of computer numerical investigation of motion of accelerated particles in accelerators and storages, an effect of different accelerator systems on the motion, determination of optimal characteristics of accelerated charged particle beams are considered. Various simulation representations are discussed which describe the accelerated particle dynamics, such as the enlarged particle method, the representation where a great number of discrete particle is substituted for a field of continuously distributed space charge, the method based on determination of averaged beam characteristics. The procedure is described of numerical studies involving the basic problems, viz. calculation of closed orbits, establishment of stability regions, investigation of resonance propagation determination of the phase stability region, evaluation of the space charge effect the problem of beam extraction. It is shown that most of such problems are reduced to solution of the Cauchy problem using a computer. The ballistic method which is applied to solution of the boundary value problem of beam extraction is considered. It is shown that introduction into the equation under study of additional members with the small positive regularization parameter is a general idea of the methods for regularization of noncorrect problems [ru

  7. Agent Based Modeling on Organizational Dynamics of Terrorist Network

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Li; Duoyong Sun; Renqi Zhu; Ze Li

    2015-01-01

    Modeling organizational dynamics of terrorist network is a critical issue in computational analysis of terrorism research. The first step for effective counterterrorism and strategic intervention is to investigate how the terrorists operate with the relational network and what affects the performance. In this paper, we investigate the organizational dynamics by employing a computational experimentation methodology. The hierarchical cellular network model and the organizational dynamics model ...

  8. Computation Modeling of Limb-bud Dysmorphogenesis: Predicting Cellular Dynamics and Key Events in Developmental Toxicity with a Multicellular Systems Model (FutureToxII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital limb malformations are among the most frequent malformation occurs in humans, with a frequency of about 1 in 500 to 1 in 1000 human live births. ToxCast is profiling the bioactivity of thousands of chemicals based on high-throughput (HTS) and computational methods that...

  9. Trust models in ubiquitous computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukow, Karl; Nielsen, Mogens; Sassone, Vladimiro

    2008-10-28

    We recapture some of the arguments for trust-based technologies in ubiquitous computing, followed by a brief survey of some of the models of trust that have been introduced in this respect. Based on this, we argue for the need of more formal and foundational trust models.

  10. Ch. 33 Modeling: Computational Thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besmann, Theodore M.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter considers methods and techniques for computational modeling for nuclear materials with a focus on fuels. The basic concepts for chemical thermodynamics are described and various current models for complex crystalline and liquid phases are illustrated. Also included are descriptions of available databases for use in chemical thermodynamic studies and commercial codes for performing complex equilibrium calculations.

  11. Computer Based Modelling and Simulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 3. Computer Based Modelling and Simulation - Modelling Deterministic Systems. N K Srinivasan. General Article Volume 6 Issue 3 March 2001 pp 46-54. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics of Choanoflagellate Filter-Feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asadzadeh, Seyed Saeed; Walther, Jens Honore; Nielsen, Lasse Tor

    Choanoflagellates are unicellular aquatic organisms with a single flagellum that drives a feeding current through a funnel-shaped collar filter on which bacteria-sized prey are caught. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) we model the beating flagellum and the complex filter flow of the choanoflagell...... to suggest a radically different filtration mechanism that requires a flagellar vane (sheet), and addition of a wide vane in our CFD model allows us to correctly predict the observed clearance rate....

  13. Computer simulation model for the striped bass young-of-the-year population in the Hudson River. [Effects of entrainment and impingement at power plants on population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eraslan, A.H.; Van Winkle, W.; Sharp, R.D.; Christensen, S.W.; Goodyear, C.P.; Rush, R.M.; Fulkerson, W.

    1975-09-01

    This report presents a daily transient (tidal-averaged), longitudinally one-dimensional (cross-section-averaged) computer simulation model for the assessment of the entrainment and impingement impacts of power plant operations on young-of-the-year populations of the striped bass, Morone saxatilis, in the Hudson River.

  14. Modelling dynamic roughness during floods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paarlberg, Andries; Dohmen-Janssen, Catarine M.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Termes, A.P.P.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a dynamic roughness model to predict water levels during floods. Hysteresis effects of dune development are explicitly included. It is shown that differences between the new dynamic roughness model, and models where the roughness coefficient is calibrated, are most

  15. Modelling the Dynamics of Emotional Awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thilakarathne, D.J.; Treur, J.; Schaub, T.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, based on literature from Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, a computational agent model is introduced incorporating the role of emotional awareness states in the dynamics of action generation. More specifically, it covers both automatic, unconscious (bottom-up) and more cognitive

  16. Modeling the population dynamics of Pacific yew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard T. Busing; Thomas A. Spies

    1995-01-01

    A study of Pacific yew (Taxus brevifolia Nutt.) population dynamics in the mountains of western Oregon and Washington was based on a combination of long-term population data and computer modeling. Rates of growth and mortality were low in mature and old-growth forest stands. Diameter growth at breast height ranged from 0 to 3 centimeters per decade...

  17. Symbolic mathematical computing: orbital dynamics and application to accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fateman, R.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-assisted symbolic mathematical computation has become increasingly useful in applied mathematics. A brief introduction to such capabilitites and some examples related to orbital dynamics and accelerator physics are presented. (author)

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme 1995- 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haekkinen, R.J.; Hirsch, C.; Krause, E.; Kytoemaa, H.K. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The report is a mid-term evaluation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme started by Technology Development Centre Finland (TEKES) in 1995 as a five-year initiative to be concluded in 1999. The main goal of the programme is to increase the know-how and application of CFD in Finnish industry, to coordinate and thus provide a better basis for co-operation between national CFD activities and encouraging research laboratories and industry to establish co-operation with the international CFD community. The projects of the programme focus on the following areas: (1) studies of modeling the physics and dynamics of the behaviour of fluid material, (2) expressing the physical models in a numerical mode and developing a computer codes, (3) evaluating and testing current physical models and developing new ones, (4) developing new numerical algorithms, solvers, and pre- and post-processing software, and (5) applying the new computational tools to problems relevant to their ultimate industrial use. The report consists of two sections. The first considers issues concerning the whole programme and the second reviews each project

  19. Computational models of complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dabbaghian, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Computational and mathematical models provide us with the opportunities to investigate the complexities of real world problems. They allow us to apply our best analytical methods to define problems in a clearly mathematical manner and exhaustively test our solutions before committing expensive resources. This is made possible by assuming parameter(s) in a bounded environment, allowing for controllable experimentation, not always possible in live scenarios. For example, simulation of computational models allows the testing of theories in a manner that is both fundamentally deductive and experimental in nature. The main ingredients for such research ideas come from multiple disciplines and the importance of interdisciplinary research is well recognized by the scientific community. This book provides a window to the novel endeavours of the research communities to present their works by highlighting the value of computational modelling as a research tool when investigating complex systems. We hope that the reader...

  20. An introduction to modeling neuronal dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Börgers, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    This book is intended as a text for a one-semester course on Mathematical and Computational Neuroscience for upper-level undergraduate and beginning graduate students of mathematics, the natural sciences, engineering, or computer science. An undergraduate introduction to differential equations is more than enough mathematical background. Only a slim, high school-level background in physics is assumed, and none in biology. Topics include models of individual nerve cells and their dynamics, models of networks of neurons coupled by synapses and gap junctions, origins and functions of population rhythms in neuronal networks, and models of synaptic plasticity. An extensive online collection of Matlab programs generating the figures accompanies the book. .

  1. Dynamic Modelling Of A SCARA Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiel, J. Perez; Calleja, R. Grossi; Diez, V. Gutierrez

    1987-10-01

    This paper describes a method for modelling industrial robots that considers dynamic approach to manipulation systems motion generation, obtaining the complete dynamic model for the mechanic part of the robot and taking into account the dynamic effect of actuators acting at the joints. For a four degree of freedom SCARA robot we obtain the dynamic model for the basic (minimal) configuration, that is, the three degrees of freedom that allow us to place the robot end effector in a desired point, using the Lagrange Method to obtain the dynamic equations in matrix form. The manipulator is considered to be a set of rigid bodies inter-connected by joints in the form of simple kinematic pairs. Then, the state space model is obtained for the actuators that move the robot joints, uniting the models of the single actuators, that is, two DC permanent magnet servomotors and an electrohydraulic actuator. Finally, using a computer simulation program written in FORTRAN language, we can compute the matrices of the complete model.

  2. Fast reactor safety and computational thermo-fluid dynamics approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninokata, Hisashi; Shimizu, Takeshi

    1993-01-01

    This article provides a brief description of the safety principle on which liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) is based and the roles of computations in the safety practices. A number of thermohydraulics models have been developed to date that successfully describe several of the important types of fluids and materials motion encountered in the analysis of postulated accidents in LMFBRs. Most of these models use a mixture of implicit and explicit numerical solution techniques in solving a set of conservation equations formulated in Eulerian coordinates, with special techniques included to specific situations. Typical computational thermo-fluid dynamics approaches are discussed in particular areas of analyses of the physical phenomena relevant to the fuel subassembly thermohydraulics design and that involve describing the motion of molten materials in the core over a large scale. (orig.)

  3. Climate Modeling Computing Needs Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraska, K. E.; McCabe, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    This paper discusses early findings of an assessment of computing needs for NASA science, engineering and flight communities. The purpose of this assessment is to document a comprehensive set of computing needs that will allow us to better evaluate whether our computing assets are adequately structured to meet evolving demand. The early results are interesting, already pointing out improvements we can make today to get more out of the computing capacity we have, as well as potential game changing innovations for the future in how we apply information technology to science computing. Our objective is to learn how to leverage our resources in the best way possible to do more science for less money. Our approach in this assessment is threefold: Development of use case studies for science workflows; Creating a taxonomy and structure for describing science computing requirements; and characterizing agency computing, analysis, and visualization resources. As projects evolve, science data sets increase in a number of ways: in size, scope, timelines, complexity, and fidelity. Generating, processing, moving, and analyzing these data sets places distinct and discernable requirements on underlying computing, analysis, storage, and visualization systems. The initial focus group for this assessment is the Earth Science modeling community within NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD). As the assessment evolves, this focus will expand to other science communities across the agency. We will discuss our use cases, our framework for requirements and our characterizations, as well as our interview process, what we learned and how we plan to improve our materials after using them in the first round of interviews in the Earth Science Modeling community. We will describe our plans for how to expand this assessment, first into the Earth Science data analysis and remote sensing communities, and then throughout the full community of science, engineering and flight at NASA.

  4. Computer Profiling Based Model for Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Neeraj Choudhary; Nikhil Kumar Singh; Parmalik Singh

    2011-01-01

    Computer profiling is used for computer forensic analysis, and proposes and elaborates on a novel model for use in computer profiling, the computer profiling object model. The computer profiling object model is an information model which models a computer as objects with various attributes and inter-relationships. These together provide the information necessary for a human investigator or an automated reasoning engine to make judgments as to the probable usage and evidentiary value of a comp...

  5. CFDLIB05, Computational Fluid Dynamics Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwa, B.A.; Padial, N.T.; Rauenzahn, R.M.; VanderHeyden, W.B.

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CFDLib05 is the Los Alamos Computational Fluid Dynamics Library. This is a collection of hydro-codes using a common data structure and a common numerical method, for problems ranging from single-field, incompressible flow, to multi-species, multi-field, compressible flow. The data structure is multi-block, with a so-called structured grid in each block. The numerical method is a Finite-Volume scheme employing a state vector that is fully cell-centered. This means that the integral form of the conversation laws is solved on the physical domain that is represented by a mesh of control volumes. The typical control volume is an arbitrary quadrilateral in 2D and an arbitrary hexahedron in 3D. The Finite-Volume scheme is for time-unsteady flow and remains well coupled by means of time and space centered fluxes; if a steady state solution is required, the problem is integrated forward in time until the user is satisfied that the state is stationary. 2 - Methods: Cells-centered Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) method

  6. Vehicle - Bridge interaction, comparison of two computing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcer, Jozef; Kuchárová, Daniela

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents the calculation of the bridge response on the effect of moving vehicle moves along the bridge with various velocities. The multi-body plane computing model of vehicle is adopted. The bridge computing models are created in two variants. One computing model represents the bridge as the Bernoulli-Euler beam with continuously distributed mass and the second one represents the bridge as the lumped mass model with 1 degrees of freedom. The mid-span bridge dynamic deflections are calculated for both computing models. The results are mutually compared and quantitative evaluated.

  7. Issues in computational fluid dynamics code verification and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1997-09-01

    A broad range of mathematical modeling errors of fluid flow physics and numerical approximation errors are addressed in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is strongly believed that if CFD is to have a major impact on the design of engineering hardware and flight systems, the level of confidence in complex simulations must substantially improve. To better understand the present limitations of CFD simulations, a wide variety of physical modeling, discretization, and solution errors are identified and discussed. Here, discretization and solution errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential, or integral, conservation equations representing the physical process, to algebraic equations and their solution on a computer. The impact of boundary conditions on the solution of the partial differential equations and their discrete representation will also be discussed. Throughout the article, clear distinctions are made between the analytical mathematical models of fluid dynamics and the numerical models. Lax`s Equivalence Theorem and its frailties in practical CFD solutions are pointed out. Distinctions are also made between the existence and uniqueness of solutions to the partial differential equations as opposed to the discrete equations. Two techniques are briefly discussed for the detection and quantification of certain types of discretization and grid resolution errors.

  8. Getting computer models to communicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caremoli, Ch.; Erhard, P.

    1999-01-01

    Today's computers have the processing power to deliver detailed and global simulations of complex industrial processes such as the operation of a nuclear reactor core. So should we be producing new, global numerical models to take full advantage of this new-found power? If so, it would be a long-term job. There is, however, another solution; to couple the existing validated numerical models together so that they work as one. (authors)

  9. Hybrid dynamics for currency modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Theodosopoulos, Ted; Trifunovic, Alex

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple hybrid dynamical model as a tool to investigate behavioral strategies based on trend following. The multiplicative symbolic dynamics are generated using a lognormal diffusion model for the at-the-money implied volatility term structure. Thus, are model exploits information from derivative markets to obtain qualititative properties of the return distribution for the underlier. We apply our model to the JPY-USD exchange rate and the corresponding 1mo., 3mo., 6mo. and 1yr. im...

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods and Their Applications in Medical Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalewski Wojciech

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As defined by the National Institutes of Health: “Biomedical engineering integrates physical, chemical, mathematical, and computational sciences and engineering principles to study biology, medicine, behavior, and health”. Many issues in this area are closely related to fluid dynamics. This paper provides an overview of the basic concepts concerning Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications in medicine.

  11. Computational Modeling in Liver Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Christ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The need for extended liver resection is increasing due to the growing incidence of liver tumors in aging societies. Individualized surgical planning is the key for identifying the optimal resection strategy and to minimize the risk of postoperative liver failure and tumor recurrence. Current computational tools provide virtual planning of liver resection by taking into account the spatial relationship between the tumor and the hepatic vascular trees, as well as the size of the future liver remnant. However, size and function of the liver are not necessarily equivalent. Hence, determining the future liver volume might misestimate the future liver function, especially in cases of hepatic comorbidities such as hepatic steatosis. A systems medicine approach could be applied, including biological, medical, and surgical aspects, by integrating all available anatomical and functional information of the individual patient. Such an approach holds promise for better prediction of postoperative liver function and hence improved risk assessment. This review provides an overview of mathematical models related to the liver and its function and explores their potential relevance for computational liver surgery. We first summarize key facts of hepatic anatomy, physiology, and pathology relevant for hepatic surgery, followed by a description of the computational tools currently used in liver surgical planning. Then we present selected state-of-the-art computational liver models potentially useful to support liver surgery. Finally, we discuss the main challenges that will need to be addressed when developing advanced computational planning tools in the context of liver surgery.

  12. Symposium on computational fluid dynamics: technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    A symposium on the technology and applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was held in Pretoria from 21-23 Nov 1988. The following aspects were covered: multilevel adaptive methods and multigrid solvers in CFD, a symbolic processing approach to CFD, interplay between CFD and analytical approximations, CFD on a transfer array, the application of CFD in high speed aerodynamics, numerical simulation of laminar blood flow, two-phase flow modelling in nuclear accident analysis, and the finite difference scheme for the numerical solution of fluid flow

  13. Helicopter fuselage drag - combined computational fluid dynamics and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batrakov, A.; Kusyumov, A.; Mikhailov, S.; Pakhov, V.; Sungatullin, A.; Valeev, M.; Zherekhov, V.; Barakos, G.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, wind tunnel experiments are combined with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) aiming to analyze the aerodynamics of realistic fuselage configurations. A development model of the ANSAT aircraft and an early model of the AKTAI light helicopter were employed. Both models were tested at the subsonic wind tunnel of KNRTU-KAI for a range of Reynolds numbers and pitch and yaw angles. The force balance measurements were complemented by particle image velocimetry (PIV) investigations for the cases where the experimental force measurements showed substantial unsteadiness. The CFD results were found to be in fair agreement with the test data and revealed some flow separation at the rear of the fuselages. Once confidence on the CFD method was established, further modifications were introduced to the ANSAT-like fuselage model to demonstrate drag reduction via small shape changes.

  14. Towards a Population Dynamics Theory for Evolutionary Computing: Learning from Biological Population Dynamics in Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhanshan (Sam)

    In evolutionary computing (EC), population size is one of the critical parameters that a researcher has to deal with. Hence, it was no surprise that the pioneers of EC, such as De Jong (1975) and Holland (1975), had already studied the population sizing from the very beginning of EC. What is perhaps surprising is that more than three decades later, we still largely depend on the experience or ad-hoc trial-and-error approach to set the population size. For example, in a recent monograph, Eiben and Smith (2003) indicated: "In almost all EC applications, the population size is constant and does not change during the evolutionary search." Despite enormous research on this issue in recent years, we still lack a well accepted theory for population sizing. In this paper, I propose to develop a population dynamics theory forEC with the inspiration from the population dynamics theory of biological populations in nature. Essentially, the EC population is considered as a dynamic system over time (generations) and space (search space or fitness landscape), similar to the spatial and temporal dynamics of biological populations in nature. With this conceptual mapping, I propose to 'transplant' the biological population dynamics theory to EC via three steps: (i) experimentally test the feasibility—whether or not emulating natural population dynamics improves the EC performance; (ii) comparatively study the underlying mechanisms—why there are improvements, primarily via statistical modeling analysis; (iii) conduct theoretical analysis with theoretical models such as percolation theory and extended evolutionary game theory that are generally applicable to both EC and natural populations. This article is a summary of a series of studies we have performed to achieve the general goal [27][30]-[32]. In the following, I start with an extremely brief introduction on the theory and models of natural population dynamics (Sections 1 & 2). In Sections 4 to 6, I briefly discuss three

  15. [Measurements of blood velocities using duplex sonography in carotid artery stents: analysis of reliability in an in-vitro model and computational fluid dynamics (CFD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönwald, U G; Jorczyk, U; Kipfmüller, B

    2011-01-01

    Stents are commonly used for the treatment of occlusive artery diseases in carotid arteries. Today, there is a controversial discussion as to whether duplex sonography (DS) displays blood velocities (BV) that are too high in stented areas. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of stenting on DS with respect to BV in artificial carotid arteries. The results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) were also used for the comparison. To analyze BV using DS, a phantom with a constant flow (70 cm/s) was created. Three different types of stents for carotid arteries were selected. The phantom fluid consisted of 67 % water and 33 % glycerol. All BV measurements were carried out on the last third of the stents. Furthermore, all test runs were simulated using CFD. All measurements were statistically analyzed. DS-derived BV values increased significantly after the placement of the Palmaz Genesis stent (77.6 ± 4.92 cm/sec, p = 0.03). A higher increase in BV values was registered when using the Precise RX stent (80.1 ± 2.01 cm/sec, p CFD simulations showed similar results. Stents have a significant impact on BV, but no effect on DS. The main factor of the blood flow acceleration is the material thickness of the stents. Therefore, different stents need different velocity criteria. Furthermore, the results of computational fluid dynamics prove that CFD can be used to simulate BV in stented silicone tubes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Adaptive Dynamic Process Scheduling on Distributed Memory Parallel Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shu

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges in programming distributed memory parallel machines is deciding how to allocate work to processors. This problem is particularly important for computations with unpredictable dynamic behaviors or irregular structures. We present a scheme for dynamic scheduling of medium-grained processes that is useful in this context. The adaptive contracting within neighborhood (ACWN is a dynamic, distributed, load-dependent, and scalable scheme. It deals with dynamic and unpredictable creation of processes and adapts to different systems. The scheme is described and contrasted with two other schemes that have been proposed in this context, namely the randomized allocation and the gradient model. The performance of the three schemes on an Intel iPSC/2 hypercube is presented and analyzed. The experimental results show that even though the ACWN algorithm incurs somewhat larger overhead than the randomized allocation, it achieves better performance in most cases due to its adaptiveness. Its feature of quickly spreading the work helps it outperform the gradient model in performance and scalability.

  17. Dynamic computer simulations of electrophoresis: three decades of active research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Wolfgang; Caslavska, Jitka; Breadmore, Michael C; Mosher, Richard A

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic models for electrophoresis are based upon model equations derived from the transport concepts in solution together with user-inputted conditions. They are able to predict theoretically the movement of ions and are as such the most versatile tool to explore the fundamentals of electrokinetic separations. Since its inception three decades ago, the state of dynamic computer simulation software and its use has progressed significantly and Electrophoresis played a pivotal role in that endeavor as a large proportion of the fundamental and application papers were published in this periodical. Software is available that simulates all basic electrophoretic systems, including moving boundary electrophoresis, zone electrophoresis, ITP, IEF and EKC, and their combinations under almost exactly the same conditions used in the laboratory. This has been employed to show the detailed mechanisms of many of the fundamental phenomena that occur in electrophoretic separations. Dynamic electrophoretic simulations are relevant for separations on any scale and instrumental format, including free-fluid preparative, gel, capillary and chip electrophoresis. This review includes a historical overview, a survey of current simulators, simulation examples and a discussion of the applications and achievements of dynamic simulation.

  18. Three-Dimensional Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Modeling of Preferential Flow Dynamics at Fracture Intersections on a High-Performance Computing Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordilla, J.; Bresinsky, L. T.

    2017-12-01

    The physical mechanisms that govern preferential flow dynamics in unsaturated fractured rock formations are complex and not well understood. Fracture intersections may act as an integrator of unsaturated flow, leading to temporal delay, intermittent flow and partitioning dynamics. In this work, a three-dimensional Pairwise-Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) model is being applied in order to simulate gravity-driven multiphase flow at synthetic fracture intersections. SPH, as a meshless Lagrangian method, is particularly suitable for modeling deformable interfaces, such as three-phase contact dynamics of droplets, rivulets and free-surface films. The static and dynamic contact angle can be recognized as the most important parameter of gravity-driven free-surface flow. In SPH, surface tension and adhesion naturally emerges from the implemented pairwise fluid-fluid (sff) and solid-fluid (ssf) interaction force. The model was calibrated to a contact angle of 65°, which corresponds to the wetting properties of water on Poly(methyl methacrylate). The accuracy of the SPH simulations were validated against an analytical solution of Poiseuille flow between two parallel plates and against laboratory experiments. Using the SPH model, the complex flow mode transitions from droplet to rivulet flow of an experimental study were reproduced. Additionally, laboratory dimensionless scaling experiments of water droplets were successfully replicated in SPH. Finally, SPH simulations were used to investigate the partitioning dynamics of single droplets into synthetic horizontal fractures with various apertures (Δdf = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 mm) and offsets (Δdoff = -1.5, -1.0, -0.5, 0, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 mm). Fluid masses were measured in the domains R1, R2 and R3. The perfect conditions of ideally smooth surfaces and the SPH inherent advantage of particle tracking allow the recognition of small scale partitioning mechanisms and its importance for bulk flow

  19. Dynamic optimization deterministic and stochastic models

    CERN Document Server

    Hinderer, Karl; Stieglitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book explores discrete-time dynamic optimization and provides a detailed introduction to both deterministic and stochastic models. Covering problems with finite and infinite horizon, as well as Markov renewal programs, Bayesian control models and partially observable processes, the book focuses on the precise modelling of applications in a variety of areas, including operations research, computer science, mathematics, statistics, engineering, economics and finance. Dynamic Optimization is a carefully presented textbook which starts with discrete-time deterministic dynamic optimization problems, providing readers with the tools for sequential decision-making, before proceeding to the more complicated stochastic models. The authors present complete and simple proofs and illustrate the main results with numerous examples and exercises (without solutions). With relevant material covered in four appendices, this book is completely self-contained.

  20. Computational Modeling of Large Wildfires: A Roadmap

    KAUST Repository

    Coen, Janice L.

    2010-08-01

    Wildland fire behavior, particularly that of large, uncontrolled wildfires, has not been well understood or predicted. Our methodology to simulate this phenomenon uses high-resolution dynamic models made of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models coupled to fire behavior models to simulate fire behavior. NWP models are capable of modeling very high resolution (< 100 m) atmospheric flows. The wildland fire component is based upon semi-empirical formulas for fireline rate of spread, post-frontal heat release, and a canopy fire. The fire behavior is coupled to the atmospheric model such that low level winds drive the spread of the surface fire, which in turn releases sensible heat, latent heat, and smoke fluxes into the lower atmosphere, feeding back to affect the winds directing the fire. These coupled dynamic models capture the rapid spread downwind, flank runs up canyons, bifurcations of the fire into two heads, and rough agreement in area, shape, and direction of spread at periods for which fire location data is available. Yet, intriguing computational science questions arise in applying such models in a predictive manner, including physical processes that span a vast range of scales, processes such as spotting that cannot be modeled deterministically, estimating the consequences of uncertainty, the efforts to steer simulations with field data ("data assimilation"), lingering issues with short term forecasting of weather that may show skill only on the order of a few hours, and the difficulty of gathering pertinent data for verification and initialization in a dangerous environment. © 2010 IEEE.

  1. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains.

  2. Dynamic stability calculations for power grids employing a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, K

    1982-06-01

    The aim of dynamic contingency calculations in power systems is to estimate the effects of assumed disturbances, such as loss of generation. Due to the large dimensions of the problem these simulations require considerable computing time and costs, to the effect that they are at present only used in a planning state but not for routine checks in power control stations. In view of the homogeneity of the problem, where a multitude of equal generator models, having different parameters, are to be integrated simultaneously, the use of a parallel computer looks very attractive. The results of this study employing a prototype parallel computer (SMS 201) are presented. It consists of up to 128 equal microcomputers bus-connected to a control computer. Each of the modules is programmed to simulate a node of the power grid. Generators with their associated control are represented by models of 13 states each. Passive nodes are complemented by 'phantom'-generators, so that the whole power grid is homogenous, thus removing the need for load-flow-iterations. Programming of microcomputers is essentially performed in FORTRAN.

  3. Dynamic computed tomography findings in cerebrovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Yutaka; Tomoda, Kaname; Kariya, Mitsumasa; Mori, Shigeru; Mitomo, Masanori.

    1988-01-01

    Dynamic CT was performed with 41 patients with the clinically diagnosed cerebrovascular diseases. A visual evaluation based on the dynamic CT images classified six patterns of brain parenchymal enhancement, especially four patterns of which could only be detected by dynamic CT technique. Dynamic CT was proved of great value in detecting regional cerebral tissue filled by collaterals in retrograde fashion because of the occlusion of main arteries, namely brain tissue perfusion of internal carotid occlusion disease and moyamoya disease was best understood by dynamic CT with adequate resolution. (author)

  4. Integrating interactive computational modeling in biology curricula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Helikar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While the use of computer tools to simulate complex processes such as computer circuits is normal practice in fields like engineering, the majority of life sciences/biological sciences courses continue to rely on the traditional textbook and memorization approach. To address this issue, we explored the use of the Cell Collective platform as a novel, interactive, and evolving pedagogical tool to foster student engagement, creativity, and higher-level thinking. Cell Collective is a Web-based platform used to create and simulate dynamical models of various biological processes. Students can create models of cells, diseases, or pathways themselves or explore existing models. This technology was implemented in both undergraduate and graduate courses as a pilot study to determine the feasibility of such software at the university level. First, a new (In Silico Biology class was developed to enable students to learn biology by "building and breaking it" via computer models and their simulations. This class and technology also provide a non-intimidating way to incorporate mathematical and computational concepts into a class with students who have a limited mathematical background. Second, we used the technology to mediate the use of simulations and modeling modules as a learning tool for traditional biological concepts, such as T cell differentiation or cell cycle regulation, in existing biology courses. Results of this pilot application suggest that there is promise in the use of computational modeling and software tools such as Cell Collective to provide new teaching methods in biology and contribute to the implementation of the "Vision and Change" call to action in undergraduate biology education by providing a hands-on approach to biology.

  5. Integrating interactive computational modeling in biology curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helikar, Tomáš; Cutucache, Christine E; Dahlquist, Lauren M; Herek, Tyler A; Larson, Joshua J; Rogers, Jim A

    2015-03-01

    While the use of computer tools to simulate complex processes such as computer circuits is normal practice in fields like engineering, the majority of life sciences/biological sciences courses continue to rely on the traditional textbook and memorization approach. To address this issue, we explored the use of the Cell Collective platform as a novel, interactive, and evolving pedagogical tool to foster student engagement, creativity, and higher-level thinking. Cell Collective is a Web-based platform used to create and simulate dynamical models of various biological processes. Students can create models of cells, diseases, or pathways themselves or explore existing models. This technology was implemented in both undergraduate and graduate courses as a pilot study to determine the feasibility of such software at the university level. First, a new (In Silico Biology) class was developed to enable students to learn biology by "building and breaking it" via computer models and their simulations. This class and technology also provide a non-intimidating way to incorporate mathematical and computational concepts into a class with students who have a limited mathematical background. Second, we used the technology to mediate the use of simulations and modeling modules as a learning tool for traditional biological concepts, such as T cell differentiation or cell cycle regulation, in existing biology courses. Results of this pilot application suggest that there is promise in the use of computational modeling and software tools such as Cell Collective to provide new teaching methods in biology and contribute to the implementation of the "Vision and Change" call to action in undergraduate biology education by providing a hands-on approach to biology.

  6. SciDAC advances and applications in computational beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryne, R; Abell, D; Adelmann, A; Amundson, J; Bohn, C; Cary, J; Colella, P; Dechow, D; Decyk, V; Dragt, A; Gerber, R; Habib, S; Higdon, D; Katsouleas, T; Ma, K-L; McCorquodale, P; Mihalcea, D; Mitchell, C; Mori, W; Mottershead, C T; Neri, F; Pogorelov, I; Qiang, J; Samulyak, R; Serafini, D; Shalf, J; Siegerist, C; Spentzouris, P; Stoltz, P; Terzic, B; Venturini, M; Walstrom, P

    2005-01-01

    SciDAC has had a major impact on computational beam dynamics and the design of particle accelerators. Particle accelerators-which account for half of the facilities in the DOE Office of Science Facilities for the Future of Science 20 Year Outlook-are crucial for US scientific, industrial, and economic competitiveness. Thanks to SciDAC, accelerator design calculations that were once thought impossible are now carried routinely, and new challenging and important calculations are within reach. SciDAC accelerator modeling codes are being used to get the most science out of existing facilities, to produce optimal designs for future facilities, and to explore advanced accelerator concepts that may hold the key to qualitatively new ways of accelerating charged particle beams. In this paper we present highlights from the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project Beam Dynamics focus area in regard to algorithm development, software development, and applications

  7. SciDAC Advances and Applications in Computational Beam Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryne, R.; Abell, D.; Adelmann, A.; Amundson, J.; Bohn, C.; Cary, J.; Colella, P.; Dechow, D.; Decyk, V.; Dragt, A.; Gerber, R.; Habib, S.; Higdon, D.; Katsouleas, T.; Ma, K.-L.; McCorquodale, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Mitchell, C.; Mori, W.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neri, F.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Samulyak, R.; Serafini, D.; Shalf, J.; Siegerist, C.; Spentzouris, P.; Stoltz, P.; Terzic, B.; Venturini, M.; Walstrom, P.

    2005-01-01

    SciDAC has had a major impact on computational beam dynamics and the design of particle accelerators. Particle accelerators--which account for half of the facilities in the DOE Office of Science Facilities for the Future of Science 20 Year Outlook--are crucial for US scientific, industrial, and economic competitiveness. Thanks to SciDAC, accelerator design calculations that were once thought impossible are now carried routinely, and new challenging and important calculations are within reach. SciDAC accelerator modeling codes are being used to get the most science out of existing facilities, to produce optimal designs for future facilities, and to explore advanced accelerator concepts that may hold the key to qualitatively new ways of accelerating charged particle beams. In this poster we present highlights from the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project Beam Dynamics focus area in regard to algorithm development, software development, and applications

  8. Computer simulation of confined liquid crystal dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, R.E.

    2001-11-01

    Results are presented from a series of simulations undertaken to determine whether dynamic processes observed in device-scale liquid crystal cells confined between aligning substrates can be simulated in a molecular system using parallel molecular dynamics of the Gay-Berne model. In a nematic cell, on removal of an aligning field, initial near-surface director relaxation can induce flow, termed 'backflow' in the liquid. This, in turn, can cause director rotation, termed 'orientational kickback', in the centre of the cell. Simulations are performed of the relaxation in nematic systems confined between substrates with a common alignment on removal of an aligning field. Results show /that relaxation timescales of medium sized systems are accessible. Following this, simulations are performed of relaxation in hybrid aligned nematic systems, where each surface induces a different alignment. Flow patterns associated with director reorientation are observed. The damped oscillatory nature of the relaxation process suggests that the behaviour of these systems is dominated by orientational elastic forces and that the observed director motion and flow do not correspond to the macroscopic processes of backflow and kickback. Chevron structures can occur in confined smectic cells which develop two domains of equal and opposite layer tilt on cooling. Layer lilting is thought to be caused by a need to reconcile a mismatch between bulk and surface smectic layer spacing. Here, simulations are performed of the formation of structures in confined smectic systems where layer tilt is induced by an imposed surface pretilt. Results show that bookshelf, chevron and tilled layer structures are observable in a confined Gay-Berne system. The formation and stability of the chevron structure are shown to be influenced by surface slip. (author)

  9. Computer simulation of confined liquid crystal dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, R.E

    2001-11-01

    Results are presented from a series of simulations undertaken to determine whether dynamic processes observed in device-scale liquid crystal cells confined between aligning substrates can be simulated in a molecular system using parallel molecular dynamics of the Gay-Berne model. In a nematic cell, on removal of an aligning field, initial near-surface director relaxation can induce flow, termed 'backflow' in the liquid. This, in turn, can cause director rotation, termed 'orientational kickback', in the centre of the cell. Simulations are performed of the relaxation in nematic systems confined between substrates with a common alignment on removal of an aligning field. Results show /that relaxation timescales of medium sized systems are accessible. Following this, simulations are performed of relaxation in hybrid aligned nematic systems, where each surface induces a different alignment. Flow patterns associated with director reorientation are observed. The damped oscillatory nature of the relaxation process suggests that the behaviour of these systems is dominated by orientational elastic forces and that the observed director motion and flow do not correspond to the macroscopic processes of backflow and kickback. Chevron structures can occur in confined smectic cells which develop two domains of equal and opposite layer tilt on cooling. Layer lilting is thought to be caused by a need to reconcile a mismatch between bulk and surface smectic layer spacing. Here, simulations are performed of the formation of structures in confined smectic systems where layer tilt is induced by an imposed surface pretilt. Results show that bookshelf, chevron and tilled layer structures are observable in a confined Gay-Berne system. The formation and stability of the chevron structure are shown to be influenced by surface slip. (author)

  10. Indonesia’s Electricity Demand Dynamic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulistio, J.; Wirabhuana, A.; Wiratama, M. G.

    2017-06-01

    Electricity Systems modelling is one of the emerging area in the Global Energy policy studies recently. System Dynamics approach and Computer Simulation has become one the common methods used in energy systems planning and evaluation in many conditions. On the other hand, Indonesia experiencing several major issues in Electricity system such as fossil fuel domination, demand - supply imbalances, distribution inefficiency, and bio-devastation. This paper aims to explain the development of System Dynamics modelling approaches and computer simulation techniques in representing and predicting electricity demand in Indonesia. In addition, this paper also described the typical characteristics and relationship of commercial business sector, industrial sector, and family / domestic sector as electricity subsystems in Indonesia. Moreover, it will be also present direct structure, behavioural, and statistical test as model validation approach and ended by conclusions.

  11. Parallel computing in enterprise modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsby, Michael E.; Armstrong, Robert C.; Shneider, Max S.; Vanderveen, Keith; Ray, Jaideep; Heath, Zach; Allan, Benjamin A.

    2008-08-01

    This report presents the results of our efforts to apply high-performance computing to entity-based simulations with a multi-use plugin for parallel computing. We use the term 'Entity-based simulation' to describe a class of simulation which includes both discrete event simulation and agent based simulation. What simulations of this class share, and what differs from more traditional models, is that the result sought is emergent from a large number of contributing entities. Logistic, economic and social simulations are members of this class where things or people are organized or self-organize to produce a solution. Entity-based problems never have an a priori ergodic principle that will greatly simplify calculations. Because the results of entity-based simulations can only be realized at scale, scalable computing is de rigueur for large problems. Having said that, the absence of a spatial organizing principal makes the decomposition of the problem onto processors problematic. In addition, practitioners in this domain commonly use the Java programming language which presents its own problems in a high-performance setting. The plugin we have developed, called the Parallel Particle Data Model, overcomes both of these obstacles and is now being used by two Sandia frameworks: the Decision Analysis Center, and the Seldon social simulation facility. While the ability to engage U.S.-sized problems is now available to the Decision Analysis Center, this plugin is central to the success of Seldon. Because Seldon relies on computationally intensive cognitive sub-models, this work is necessary to achieve the scale necessary for realistic results. With the recent upheavals in the financial markets, and the inscrutability of terrorist activity, this simulation domain will likely need a capability with ever greater fidelity. High-performance computing will play an important part in enabling that greater fidelity.

  12. Cosmic logic: a computational model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    We initiate a formal study of logical inferences in context of the measure problem in cosmology or what we call cosmic logic. We describe a simple computational model of cosmic logic suitable for analysis of, for example, discretized cosmological systems. The construction is based on a particular model of computation, developed by Alan Turing, with cosmic observers (CO), cosmic measures (CM) and cosmic symmetries (CS) described by Turing machines. CO machines always start with a blank tape and CM machines take CO's Turing number (also known as description number or Gödel number) as input and output the corresponding probability. Similarly, CS machines take CO's Turing number as input, but output either one if the CO machines are in the same equivalence class or zero otherwise. We argue that CS machines are more fundamental than CM machines and, thus, should be used as building blocks in constructing CM machines. We prove the non-computability of a CS machine which discriminates between two classes of CO machines: mortal that halts in finite time and immortal that runs forever. In context of eternal inflation this result implies that it is impossible to construct CM machines to compute probabilities on the set of all CO machines using cut-off prescriptions. The cut-off measures can still be used if the set is reduced to include only machines which halt after a finite and predetermined number of steps

  13. A dynamic model for the estimation of optimum timing of computed tomography scan for dose evaluation of 125I or 103Pd seed implant of prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Ning; Dicker, Adam P.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Nath, Ravinder; Waterman, Frank M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The dosimetric evaluation of permanent 125 I or 103 Pd prostate implant is based on the assumption that both prostate and seeds are static throughout the entire treatment time which lasts months. However, the prostate is often edematous after the surgical implantation of seeds. Therefore, both the volume of the prostate and the seed locations change dynamically as the edema resolves. This effect has impact on the validity of postimplant analysis based upon a CT scan. If a CT scan is taken too early after implantation while there is edema in the prostate, the dose delivered by the implant may be underestimated. If the imaging is delayed too long, the dose may be overestimated. The magnitude of this effect depends on both of the half-life of the isotope used and the half-life and magnitude of the edema. This study describes a dynamic biomathematical model which takes edema into account in calculating the dose delivered by the implant and is used to investigate the optimum time to obtain the postimplant CT scan. Materials and Methods: The dynamic biomathematical model is a numerical integration of the accumulated dose in which the prostate dimensions, the seed locations, and the source strength are all functions of time. The function which describes the change in prostate dimensions and seed locations as a function of time was determined in a separate study by analysis of serial postimplant CT scans. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the prostate for the total dose generated by the dynamic model are compared to DVHs generated by CT scans simulated for postimplant intervals ranging from 0 to 300 days after the implantation for 30 different combinations of the magnitude and duration of edema. Results: DVHs of the prostate calculated by taking edema into account show that the time of obtaining a CT scan for postimplant analysis is critical to the accuracy of dose evaluations. The comparison of the DVHs generated by the dynamic model to those generated by

  14. Minimal models of multidimensional computations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D Fitzgerald

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The multidimensional computations performed by many biological systems are often characterized with limited information about the correlations between inputs and outputs. Given this limitation, our approach is to construct the maximum noise entropy response function of the system, leading to a closed-form and minimally biased model consistent with a given set of constraints on the input/output moments; the result is equivalent to conditional random field models from machine learning. For systems with binary outputs, such as neurons encoding sensory stimuli, the maximum noise entropy models are logistic functions whose arguments depend on the constraints. A constraint on the average output turns the binary maximum noise entropy models into minimum mutual information models, allowing for the calculation of the information content of the constraints and an information theoretic characterization of the system's computations. We use this approach to analyze the nonlinear input/output functions in macaque retina and thalamus; although these systems have been previously shown to be responsive to two input dimensions, the functional form of the response function in this reduced space had not been unambiguously identified. A second order model based on the logistic function is found to be both necessary and sufficient to accurately describe the neural responses to naturalistic stimuli, accounting for an average of 93% of the mutual information with a small number of parameters. Thus, despite the fact that the stimulus is highly non-Gaussian, the vast majority of the information in the neural responses is related to first and second order correlations. Our results suggest a principled and unbiased way to model multidimensional computations and determine the statistics of the inputs that are being encoded in the outputs.

  15. Computational Models of Rock Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Dave A.; Spiegelman, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Practitioners in computational geodynamics, as per many other branches of applied science, typically do not analyse the underlying PDE's being solved in order to establish the existence or uniqueness of solutions. Rather, such proofs are left to the mathematicians, and all too frequently these results lag far behind (in time) the applied research being conducted, are often unintelligible to the non-specialist, are buried in journals applied scientists simply do not read, or simply have not been proven. As practitioners, we are by definition pragmatic. Thus, rather than first analysing our PDE's, we first attempt to find approximate solutions by throwing all our computational methods and machinery at the given problem and hoping for the best. Typically this approach leads to a satisfactory outcome. Usually it is only if the numerical solutions "look odd" that we start delving deeper into the math. In this presentation I summarise our findings in relation to using pressure dependent (Drucker-Prager type) flow laws in a simplified model of continental extension in which the material is assumed to be an incompressible, highly viscous fluid. Such assumptions represent the current mainstream adopted in computational studies of mantle and lithosphere deformation within our community. In short, we conclude that for the parameter range of cohesion and friction angle relevant to studying rocks, the incompressibility constraint combined with a Drucker-Prager flow law can result in problems which have no solution. This is proven by a 1D analytic model and convincingly demonstrated by 2D numerical simulations. To date, we do not have a robust "fix" for this fundamental problem. The intent of this submission is to highlight the importance of simple analytic models, highlight some of the dangers / risks of interpreting numerical solutions without understanding the properties of the PDE we solved, and lastly to stimulate discussions to develop an improved computational model of

  16. Computer modelling as a tool for understanding language evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Bart; Gontier, N; VanBendegem, JP; Aerts, D

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the uses of computer models in studying the evolution of language. Language is a complex dynamic system that can be studied at the level of the individual and at the level of the population. Much of the dynamics of language evolution and language change occur because of the

  17. Computer - based modeling in extract sciences research -I ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Specifically, in the discipline of chemistry, it has been of great utility. Its use dates back to the 17th Century and includes such wide areas as computational chemistry, chemoinformatics, molecular mechanics, chemical dynamics, molecular dynamics, molecular graphics and algorithms. Modeling has been employed ...

  18. Computational fluid dynamics on a massively parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    A finite difference code was implemented for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on the Connection Machine, a massively parallel computer. The code is based on the ARC2D/ARC3D program and uses the implicit factored algorithm of Beam and Warming. The codes uses odd-even elimination to solve linear systems. Timings and computation rates are given for the code, and a comparison is made with a Cray XMP.

  19. A hybrid computer simulation of reactor spatial dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinds, H.W.

    1977-08-01

    The partial differential equations describing the one-speed spatial dynamics of thermal neutron reactors were converted to a set of ordinary differential equations, using finite-difference approximations for the spatial derivatives. The variables were then normalized to a steady-state reference condition in a novel manner, to yield an equation set particularly suitable for implementation on a hybrid computer. One Applied Dynamics AD/FIVE analog-computer console is capable of solving, all in parallel, up to 30 simultaneous differential equations. This corresponds roughly to eight reactor nodes, each with two active delayed-neutron groups. To improve accuracy, an increase in the number of nodes is usually required. Using the Hsu-Howe multiplexing technique, an 8-node, one-dimensional module was switched back and forth between the left and right halves of the reactor, to simulate a 16-node model, also in one dimension. These two versions (8 or 16 nodes) of the model were tested on benchmark problems of the loss-of-coolant type, which were also solved using the digital code FORSIM, with two energy groups and 26 nodes. Good agreement was obtained between the two solution techniques. (author)

  20. A Symbolic and Graphical Computer Representation of Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Laurence I.

    2005-04-01

    AUTONO is a Macsyma/Maxima program, designed at the University of Hartford, for solving autonomous systems of differential equations as well as for relating Lagrangians and Hamiltonians to their associated dynamical equations. AUTONO can be used in a number of fields to decipher a variety of complex dynamical systems with ease, producing their Lagrangian and Hamiltonian equations in seconds. These equations can then be incorporated into VisSim, a modeling and simulation program, which yields graphical representations of motion in a given system through easily chosen input parameters. The program, along with the VisSim differential-equations graphical package, allows for resolution and easy understanding of complex problems in a relatively short time; thus enabling quicker and more advanced computing of dynamical systems on any number of platforms---from a network of sensors on a space probe, to the behavior of neural networks, to the effects of an electromagnetic field on components in a dynamical system. A flowchart of AUTONO, along with some simple applications and VisSim output, will be shown.

  1. Solving Dynamic Battlespace Movement Problems Using Dynamic Distributed Computer Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bradford, Robert

    2000-01-01

    .... The thesis designs a system using this architecture that invokes operations research network optimization algorithms to solve problems involving movement of people and equipment over dynamic road networks...

  2. Modeling biological pathway dynamics with timed automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schivo, Stefano; Scholma, Jetse; Wanders, Brend; Urquidi Camacho, Ricardo A; van der Vet, Paul E; Karperien, Marcel; Langerak, Rom; van de Pol, Jaco; Post, Janine N

    2014-05-01

    Living cells are constantly subjected to a plethora of environmental stimuli that require integration into an appropriate cellular response. This integration takes place through signal transduction events that form tightly interconnected networks. The understanding of these networks requires capturing their dynamics through computational support and models. ANIMO (analysis of Networks with Interactive Modeling) is a tool that enables the construction and exploration of executable models of biological networks, helping to derive hypotheses and to plan wet-lab experiments. The tool is based on the formalism of Timed Automata, which can be analyzed via the UPPAAL model checker. Thanks to Timed Automata, we can provide a formal semantics for the domain-specific language used to represent signaling networks. This enforces precision and uniformity in the definition of signaling pathways, contributing to the integration of isolated signaling events into complex network models. We propose an approach to discretization of reaction kinetics that allows us to efficiently use UPPAAL as the computational engine to explore the dynamic behavior of the network of interest. A user-friendly interface hides the use of Timed Automata from the user, while keeping the expressive power intact. Abstraction to single-parameter kinetics speeds up construction of models that remain faithful enough to provide meaningful insight. The resulting dynamic behavior of the network components is displayed graphically, allowing for an intuitive and interactive modeling experience.

  3. Structural dynamic modifications via models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study shows that as many as half of the matrix ... the dynamicist's analytical modelling skill which would appear both in the numerator as. Figure 2. ..... Brandon J A 1990 Strategies for structural dynamic modification (New York: John Wiley).

  4. Dynamic programming models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Denardo, Eric V

    2003-01-01

    Introduction to sequential decision processes covers use of dynamic programming in studying models of resource allocation, methods for approximating solutions of control problems in continuous time, production control, more. 1982 edition.

  5. Dynamic complexities in a parasitoid-host-parasitoid ecological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hengguo; Zhao Min; Lv Songjuan; Zhu Lili

    2009-01-01

    Chaotic dynamics have been observed in a wide range of population models. In this study, the complex dynamics in a discrete-time ecological model of parasitoid-host-parasitoid are presented. The model shows that the superiority coefficient not only stabilizes the dynamics, but may strongly destabilize them as well. Many forms of complex dynamics were observed, including pitchfork bifurcation with quasi-periodicity, period-doubling cascade, chaotic crisis, chaotic bands with narrow or wide periodic window, intermittent chaos, and supertransient behavior. Furthermore, computation of the largest Lyapunov exponent demonstrated the chaotic dynamic behavior of the model

  6. Dynamic complexities in a parasitoid-host-parasitoid ecological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Hengguo [School of Mathematic and Information Science, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Zhao Min [School of Life and Environmental Science, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325027 (China)], E-mail: zmcn@tom.com; Lv Songjuan; Zhu Lili [School of Mathematic and Information Science, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China)

    2009-01-15

    Chaotic dynamics have been observed in a wide range of population models. In this study, the complex dynamics in a discrete-time ecological model of parasitoid-host-parasitoid are presented. The model shows that the superiority coefficient not only stabilizes the dynamics, but may strongly destabilize them as well. Many forms of complex dynamics were observed, including pitchfork bifurcation with quasi-periodicity, period-doubling cascade, chaotic crisis, chaotic bands with narrow or wide periodic window, intermittent chaos, and supertransient behavior. Furthermore, computation of the largest Lyapunov exponent demonstrated the chaotic dynamic behavior of the model.

  7. Dynamical models of the Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillan P.J.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available I discuss the importance of dynamical models for exploiting survey data, focusing on the advantages of “torus” models. I summarize a number of applications of these models to the study of the Milky Way, including the determination of the peculiar Solar velocity and investigation of the Hyades moving group.

  8. Three-dimensional multi-phase flow computational fluid dynamics model for analysis of transport phenomena and thermal stresses in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, A.R.; Al-Baghdadi, S. [International Technological Univ., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Haroun, A.K.; Al-Janabi, S. [Babylon Univ., Babylon (Iraq). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Fuel cell technology is expected to play an important role in meeting the growing demand for distributed generation because it can convert the chemical energy of a clean fuel directly into electrical energy. An operating fuel cell has varying local conditions of temperature, humidity, and power generation across the active area of the fuel cell in 3D. This paper presented a model that was developed to improve the basic understanding of the transport phenomena and thermal stresses in PEM fuel cells, and to investigate the behaviour of polymer membrane under hygro and thermal stresses during the cell operation. This comprehensive 3D, multiphase, non-isothermal model accounts for the major transport phenomena in a PEM fuel cell, notably convective and diffusive heat and mass transfer; electrode kinetics; transport and phase change mechanism of water; and potential fields. The model accounts for the liquid water flux inside the gas diffusion layers by viscous and capillary forces and can therefore predict the amount of liquid water inside the gas diffusion layers. This study also investigated the key parameters affecting fuel cell performance including geometry, materials and operating conditions. The model considers the many interacting, complex electrochemical, transport phenomena, thermal stresses and deformation that cannot be studied experimentally. It was concluded that the model can provide a computer-aided tool for the design and optimization of future fuel cells with much higher power density and lower cost. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs.

  9. Business model elements impacting cloud computing adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogataj, Kristina; Pucihar, Andreja; Sudzina, Frantisek

    The paper presents a proposed research framework for identification of business model elements impacting Cloud Computing Adoption. We provide a definition of main Cloud Computing characteristics, discuss previous findings on factors impacting Cloud Computing Adoption, and investigate technology a...

  10. Petri Net Modeling of Computer Virus Life Cycle | Ikekonwu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Virus life cycle, which refers to the stages of development of a computer virus, is presented as a suitable area for the application of Petri nets. Petri nets a powerful modeling tool in the field of dynamic system analysis is applied to model the virus life cycle. Simulation of the derived model is also presented. The intention of ...

  11. Computational Modeling in Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in tissue engineering is the translation of biological knowledge on complex cell and tissue behavior into a predictive and robust engineering process. Mastering this complexity is an essential step towards clinical applications of tissue engineering. This volume discusses computational modeling tools that allow studying the biological complexity in a more quantitative way. More specifically, computational tools can help in:  (i) quantifying and optimizing the tissue engineering product, e.g. by adapting scaffold design to optimize micro-environmental signals or by adapting selection criteria to improve homogeneity of the selected cell population; (ii) quantifying and optimizing the tissue engineering process, e.g. by adapting bioreactor design to improve quality and quantity of the final product; and (iii) assessing the influence of the in vivo environment on the behavior of the tissue engineering product, e.g. by investigating vascular ingrowth. The book presents examples of each...

  12. Methodological inaccuracies in clinical aortic valve severity assessment: insights from computational fluid dynamic modeling of CT-derived aortic valve anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeger, Brad; Srivatsa, Sanjay S.; Beussman, Kevin M.; Wang, Yechun; Suzen, Yildirim B.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mazur, Wojciech; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease. Assessing the contribution of the valve as a portion to total ventricular load is essential for the aging population. A CT scan for one patient was used to create one in vivo tricuspid aortic valve geometry and assessed with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD simulated the pressure, velocity, and flow rate, which were used to assess the Gorlin formula and continuity equation, current clinical diagnostic standards. The results demonstrate an underestimation of the anatomic orifice area (AOA) by Gorlin formula and overestimation of AOA by the continuity equation, using peak velocities, as would be measured clinically by Doppler echocardiography. As a result, we suggest that the Gorlin formula is unable to achieve the intended estimation of AOA and largely underestimates AOA at the critical low-flow states present in heart failure. The disparity in the use of echocardiography with the continuity equation is due to the variation in velocity profile between the outflow tract and the valve orifice. Comparison of time-averaged orifice areas by Gorlin and continuity with instantaneous orifice areas by planimetry can mask the errors of these methods, which is a result of the assumption that the blood flow is inviscid.

  13. Identification and control of factors influencing flow-accelerated corrosion in HRSG units using computational fluid dynamics modeling, full-scale air flow testing, and risk analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrowski, Ronald L. [The Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    2010-11-15

    In 2009, Consolidated Edison's East River heat recovery steam generator units 10 and 20 both experienced economizer tube failures which forced each unit offline. Extensive inspections indicated that the primary failure mechanism was flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC). The inspections revealed evidence of active FAC in all 7 of the economizer modules, with the most advanced stages of degradation being noted in center modules. Analysis determined that various factors were influencing and enabling this corrosion mechanism. Computational fluid dynamics and full-scale air flow testing showed very turbulent feedwater flow prevalent in areas of the modules corresponding with the pattern of FAC damage observed through inspection. It also identified preferential flow paths, with higher flow velocities, in certain tubes directly under the inlet nozzles. A FAC risk analysis identified more general susceptibility to FAC in the areas experiencing damage due to feedwater pH, operating temperatures, local shear fluid forces, and the chemical composition of the original materials of construction. These, in combination, were the primary root causes of the failures. Corrective actions were identified, analyzed, and implemented, resulting in equipment replacements and repairs. (orig.)

  14. Molecular dynamics modeling of polymer flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyden, M.R.; Brown, J.E.; Lomakin, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations were used to identify factors which promote char formation during the thermal degradation of polymers. Computer movies based on these simulations, indicate that cross-linked model polymers tend to undergo further cross-linking when burned, eventually forming a high molecular weight, thermally stable char. This paper reports that the prediction was confirmed by char yield measurements made on γ and e - -irradiated polyethylene and chemically cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate)

  15. In Silico Dynamics: computer simulation in a Virtual Embryo ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Utilizing cell biological information to predict higher order biological processes is a significant challenge in predictive toxicology. This is especially true for highly dynamical systems such as the embryo where morphogenesis, growth and differentiation require precisely orchestrated interactions between diverse cell populations. In patterning the embryo, genetic signals setup spatial information that cells then translate into a coordinated biological response. This can be modeled as ‘biowiring diagrams’ representing genetic signals and responses. Because the hallmark of multicellular organization resides in the ability of cells to interact with one another via well-conserved signaling pathways, multiscale computational (in silico) models that enable these interactions provide a platform to translate cellular-molecular lesions perturbations into higher order predictions. Just as ‘the Cell’ is the fundamental unit of biology so too should it be the computational unit (‘Agent’) for modeling embryogenesis. As such, we constructed multicellular agent-based models (ABM) with ‘CompuCell3D’ (www.compucell3d.org) to simulate kinematics of complex cell signaling networks and enable critical tissue events for use in predictive toxicology. Seeding the ABMs with HTS/HCS data from ToxCast demonstrated the potential to predict, quantitatively, the higher order impacts of chemical disruption at the cellular or biochemical level. This is demonstrate

  16. Dynamic modeling of IGCC power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casella, F.; Colonna, P.

    2012-01-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants are an effective option to reduce emissions and implement carbon-dioxide sequestration. The combination of a very complex fuel-processing plant and a combined cycle power station leads to challenging problems as far as dynamic operation is concerned. Dynamic performance is extremely relevant because recent developments in the electricity market push toward an ever more flexible and varying operation of power plants. A dynamic model of the entire system and models of its sub-systems are indispensable tools in order to perform computer simulations aimed at process and control design. This paper presents the development of the lumped-parameters dynamic model of an entrained-flow gasifier, with special emphasis on the modeling approach. The model is implemented into software by means of the Modelica language and validated by comparison with one set of data related to the steady operation of the gasifier of the Buggenum power station in the Netherlands. Furthermore, in order to demonstrate the potential of the proposed modeling approach and the use of simulation for control design purposes, a complete model of an exemplary IGCC power plant, including its control system, has been developed, by re-using existing models of combined cycle plant components; the results of a load dispatch ramp simulation are presented and shortly discussed. - Highlights: ► The acausal dynamic model of an entrained gasifier has been developed. ► The model can be used to perform system optimization and control studies. ► The model has been validated using field data. ► Model use is illustrated with an example showing the transient of an IGCC plant.

  17. Improving coal flotation recovery using computational fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Koh [CSIRO Minerals (Australia)

    2009-06-15

    This work involves using the latest advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to increase understanding of the hydrodynamics in coal flotation and to identify any opportunities to improve design and operation of both the Microcel column and Jameson cell. The CSIRO CFD model incorporates micro-processes from cell hydrodynamics that affect particle-bubble attachments and detachments. CFD simulation results include the liquid velocities, turbulent dissipation rates, gas hold-up, particle-bubble attachment rates and detachment rates. This work has demonstrated that CFD modelling is a cost effective means of developing an understanding of particle-bubble attachments and detachments, and can be used to identify and test potential cell or process modifications.

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics of Choanoflagellate Filter-Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadzadeh, Seyed Saeed; Walther, Jens; Nielsen, Lasse Tore; Kiorboe, Thomas; Dolger, Julia; Andersen, Anders

    2017-11-01

    Choanoflagellates are unicellular aquatic organisms with a single flagellum that drives a feeding current through a funnel-shaped collar filter on which bacteria-sized prey are caught. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) we model the beating flagellum and the complex filter flow of the choanoflagellate Diaphanoeca grandis. Our CFD simulations based on the current understanding of the morphology underestimate the experimentally observed clearance rate by more than an order of magnitude: The beating flagellum is simply unable to draw enough water through the fine filter. Our observations motivate us to suggest a radically different filtration mechanism that requires a flagellar vane (sheet), and addition of a wide vane in our CFD model allows us to correctly predict the observed clearance rate.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics-habitat suitability index (CFD-HSI) modelling as an exploratory tool for assessing passability of riverine migratory challenge zones for fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Alexander J.; Chelminski, Michael; Dudley, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    We developed two-dimensional computational fluid hydraulics-habitat suitability index (CFD-HSI) models to identify and qualitatively assess potential zones of shallow water depth and high water velocity that may present passage challenges for five major anadromous fish species in a 2.63-km reach of the main stem Penobscot River, Maine, as a result of a dam removal downstream of the reach. Suitability parameters were based on distribution of fish lengths and body depths and transformed to cruising, maximum sustained and sprint swimming speeds. Zones of potential depth and velocity challenges were calculated based on the hydraulic models; ability of fish to pass a challenge zone was based on the percent of river channel that the contiguous zone spanned and its maximum along-current length. Three river flows (low: 99.1 m3 sec-1; normal: 344.9 m3 sec-1; and high: 792.9 m3 sec-1) were modelled to simulate existing hydraulic conditions and hydraulic conditions simulating removal of a dam at the downstream boundary of the reach. Potential depth challenge zones were nonexistent for all low-flow simulations of existing conditions for deeper-bodied fishes. Increasing flows for existing conditions and removal of the dam under all flow conditions increased the number and size of potential velocity challenge zones, with the effects of zones being more pronounced for smaller species. The two-dimensional CFD-HSI model has utility in demonstrating gross effects of flow and hydraulic alteration, but may not be as precise a predictive tool as a three-dimensional model. Passability of the potential challenge zones cannot be precisely quantified for two-dimensional or three-dimensional models due to untested assumptions and incomplete data on fish swimming performance and behaviours.

  20. Computational and experimental investigation of dynamic shock reflection phenomena

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, K

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available wedge are used to analyse dynamic flow field phenomena and response of the triple point below and within the dual solution domain. Computed, unsteady pressure traces on the reflection plane are also analysed...