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Sample records for dynamic compression counteracts

  1. Ultrahigh Pressure Dynamic Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    Laser-based dynamic compression provides a new opportunity to study the lattice structure and other properties of geological materials to ultrahigh pressure conditions ranging from 100 - 1000 GPa (1 TPa) and beyond. Such studies have fundamental applications to understanding the Earth's core as well as the interior structure of super-Earths and giant planets. This talk will review recent dynamic compression experiments using high-powered lasers on materials including Fe-Si, MgO, and SiC. Experiments were conducted at the Omega laser (University of Rochester) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Stanford). At Omega, laser drives as large as 2 kJ are applied over 10 ns to samples that are 50 microns thick. At peak compression, the sample is probed with quasi-monochromatic X-rays from a laser-plasma source and diffraction is recorded on image plates. At LCLS, shock waves are driven into the sample using a 40-J laser with a 10-ns pulse. The sample is probed with X-rays form the LCLS free electron laser providing 1012 photons in a monochromatic pulse near 10 keV energy. Diffraction is recorded using pixel array detectors. By varying the delay between the laser and the x-ray beam, the sample can be probed at various times relative to the shock wave transiting the sample. By controlling the shape and duration of the incident laser pulse, either shock or ramp (shockless) loading can be produced. Ramp compression produces less heating than shock compression, allowing samples to be probed to ultrahigh pressures without melting. Results for iron alloys, oxides, and carbides provide new constraints on equations of state and phase transitions that are relevant to the interior structure of large, extrasolar terrestrial-type planets.

  2. Dynamic Relative Compression, Dynamic Partial Sums, and Substring Concatenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Christiansen, Anders Roy; Cording, Patrick Hagge

    2017-01-01

    access to the (uncompressed) source string. We present new data structures that achieve optimal time for updates and queries while using space linear in the size of the optimal relative compression, for nearly all combinations of parameters. We also present solutions for restricted and extended sets......Given a static reference string R and a source string S, a relative compression of S with respect to R is an encoding of S as a sequence of references to substrings of R. Relative compression schemes are a classic model of compression and have recently proved very successful for compressing highly......-repetitive massive data sets such as genomes and web-data. We initiate the study of relative compression in a dynamic setting where the compressed source string S is subject to edit operations. The goal is to maintain the compressed representation compactly, while supporting edits and allowing efficient random...

  3. Dynamic Relative Compression, Dynamic Partial Sums, and Substring Concatenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2016-01-01

    access to the (uncompressed) source string. We present new data structures that achieve optimal time for updates and queries while using space linear in the size of the optimal relative compression, for nearly all combinations of parameters. We also present solutions for restricted and extended sets......Given a static reference string R and a source string S, a relative compression of S with respect to R is an encoding of S as a sequence of references to substrings of R. Relative compression schemes are a classic model of compression and have recently proved very successful for compressing highly......-repetitive massive data sets such as genomes and web-data. We initiate the study of relative compression in a dynamic setting where the compressed source string S is subject to edit operations. The goal is to maintain the compressed representation compactly, while supporting edits and allowing efficient random...

  4. DMPD: An arms race: innate antiviral responses and counteracting viral strategies. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18031256 An arms race: innate antiviral responses and counteracting viral strategie...s. Schroder M, Bowie AG. Biochem Soc Trans. 2007 Dec;35(Pt 6):1512-4. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show An arm...s race: innate antiviral responses and counteracting viral strategies. PubmedID 18031256 Title An arms ra

  5. Dynamic mode decomposition for compressive system identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhe; Kaiser, Eurika; Proctor, Joshua L.; Kutz, J. Nathan; Brunton, Steven L.

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic mode decomposition has emerged as a leading technique to identify spatiotemporal coherent structures from high-dimensional data. In this work, we integrate and unify two recent innovations that extend DMD to systems with actuation and systems with heavily subsampled measurements. When combined, these methods yield a novel framework for compressive system identification, where it is possible to identify a low-order model from limited input-output data and reconstruct the associated full-state dynamic modes with compressed sensing, providing interpretability of the state of the reduced-order model. When full-state data is available, it is possible to dramatically accelerate downstream computations by first compressing the data. We demonstrate this unified framework on simulated data of fluid flow past a pitching airfoil, investigating the effects of sensor noise, different types of measurements (e.g., point sensors, Gaussian random projections, etc.), compression ratios, and different choices of actuation (e.g., localized, broadband, etc.). This example provides a challenging and realistic test-case for the proposed method, and results indicate that the dominant coherent structures and dynamics are well characterized even with heavily subsampled data.

  6. Compressible dynamic stall vorticity flux control using a dynamic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    management of its unsteady vorticity using a variable droop leading edge (VDLE) airfoil. Through ... the pressure gradient term for the dynamic stall conditions encountered by a helicopter-rotor retreating blade. Thus ... This paper discusses control of compressible dynamic stall using the novel idea of variable droop leading ...

  7. Developing a dynamic control system for mine compressed air networks

    OpenAIRE

    Van Heerden, S.W.; Pelzer, R.; Marais, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Mines in general, make use of compressed air systems for daily operational activities. Compressed air on mines is traditionally distributed via compressed air ring networks where multiple shafts are supplied with compressed air from an integral system. These compressed air networks make use of a number of compressors feeding the ring from various locations in the network. While these mines have sophisticated control systems to control these compressors, they are not dynamic systems. Compresso...

  8. Perceptual Effects of Dynamic Range Compression in Popular Music Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    The belief that the use of dynamic range compression in music mastering deteriorates sound quality needs to be formally tested. In this study normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range...... compression. Surprisingly, the results failed to reveal any evidence of the effects of dynamic range compression on subjective preference or perceived depth cues. Perceptual data suggest that listeners are less sensitive than commonly believed to even high levels of compression. As measured in terms...

  9. Mesoscale Modeling of Dynamic Compression of Boron Carbide Polycrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    occurs in ballistic impact, and accompanies amorphization in diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments (Yan et al., 2009). Fracture in boron carbide ...Mesoscale Modeling of Dynamic Compression of Boron Carbide Polycrystals by J. D. Clayton ARL-RP-440 May 2013...Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-RP-440 May 2013 Mesoscale Modeling of Dynamic Compression of Boron Carbide Polycrystals J. D. Clayton

  10. The dynamics of surge in compression systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In air-compression systems, instabilities occur during operation close to their peak pressure-rise capability. However, the peak efficiency of a compression system lies close to this region of instability. A surge is a violent mode of instability where there is total breakdown of flow in the system and pressure-rise capability is lost ...

  11. Perceptual Effects of Dynamic Range Compression in Popular Music Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    There is a widespread belief that the increasing use of dynamic range compression in music mastering (the loudnesswar) deteriorates sound quality but experimental evidence of perceptual effects is lacking. In this study, normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings...... of response consistency between different presentations of the same music suggests that listeners are less sensitive to even high levels of dynamic range compression than often argued....... in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range compression. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of preference for the less compressed music. We also failed to find differences in ratings of perceived "depth" between the original and more compressed audio. A low degree...

  12. Theoretical approaches to chemical dynamics in highly compressed fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calef, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    Methods that have been developed in the chemical physics community over the previous decade are applied to problems involving the dynamic chemical behavior of fluids under highly compressed conditions. The methods require detailed structural information about the environment seen by the reacting molecules. These methods are briefly reviewed. Examples for both statically compressed and shock conditions are discussed

  13. Dynamical Functional Theory for Compressed Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Opper, Manfred; Winther, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a theoretical approach for designing generalizations of the approximate message passing (AMP) algorithm for compressed sensing which are valid for large observation matrices that are drawn from an invariant random matrix ensemble. By design, the fixed points of the algorithm obey...... that the resulting fields become Gaussian random variables allowing for an explicit analysis. The asymptotic statistics of these fields are consistent with the replica ansatz of the compressed sensing problem....

  14. Dynamic compressibility of air in porous structures at audible frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafarge, Denis; Lemarinier, Pavel; Allard, Jean F.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic compressibility of air-filled porous sound-absorbing materials are compared with predictions involving two parametere, the static thermal permeability k'_0 and the thermal characteristic dimension GAMMA'. Emphasis on the notion of dynamic and static thermal permeability...... of the viscous forces. Using both parameters, a simple model is constructed for the dynamic thermal permeability k', which is completely analogous to the Johnson et al. [J. Fluid Mech. vol. 176, 379 (1987)] model of dynamic viscous permeability k. The resultant modeling of dynamic compressibility provides...... predictions which are closer to the experimental results than the previously used simpler model where the compressibility is the same as in identical circular cross-sectional shaped pores, or distributions of slits, related to a given GAMMA'....

  15. Dynamic compressive constitutive relation and shearing instability of metallic neodymium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huanran; Cai Canyuan; Chen Danian; Ma Dongfang; Hou Yanjun; Wu Shanxing

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Dynamic constitutive relation of Nd was determined in first compression of SHPB. → Deformation of Nd in multi-compression of SHPB were recorded by high-speed camera. → Constitutive relation of Nd was adjusted in modeling large deformation of Nd. → Results of SDDM investigation of recovered Nd specimens showed shearing fracture. → Shearing instability of Nd was estimated with constitutive relation. - Abstract: Based on static tests on MTS and dynamic tests on split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) during the first loading, this study determined the dynamic compressive constitutive relation of metallic Nd. Based on large deformations of metallic Nd specimens generated by the multi-compressive loadings during SHPB tests, and recorded by a high-speed camera, the results of numerical simulations for SHPB test processes were used to extend the determined constitutive relation from small strain to large strain. The shearing instability strain in dynamic compressive deformations of metallic Nd was estimated with the extended constitutive relation according to the criterion given by Batra and Wei, and was compared with the average strain of recovered specimens.

  16. Dynamic compressive response of bovine liver tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervin, Farhana; Chen, Weinong W; Weerasooriya, Tusit

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to experimentally determine the strain rate effects on the compressive stress-strain behavior of bovine liver tissues. Fresh liver tissues were used to make specimens for mechanical loading. Experiments at quasi-static strain rates were conducted at 0.01 and 0.1 s(-1). Intermediate-rate experiments were performed at 1, 10, and 100 s(-1). High strain rate (1000, 2000, and 3000 s(-1)) experiments were conducted using a Kolsky bar modified for soft material characterization. A hollow transmission bar with semi-conductor strain gages was used to sense the weak forces from the soft specimens. Quartz-crystal force transducers were used to monitor valid testing conditions on the tissue specimens. The experiment results show that the compressive stress-strain response of the liver tissue is non-linear and highly rate-sensitive, especially when the strain rate is in the Kolsky bar range. The tissue stiffens significantly with increasing strain rate. The responses from liver tissues along and perpendicular to the liver surface were consistent, indicating isotropic behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A skinning prediction scheme for dynamic 3D mesh compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamou, Khaled; Zaharia, Titus; Prêteux, Françoise

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents a new prediction-based compression technique for dynamic 3D meshes with constant connectivity and time-varying geometry. The core of the proposed algorithm is a skinning model used for motion compensation. The mesh is first partitioned within vertex clusters that can be described by a single affine motion model. The proposed segmentation technique automatically determines the number of clusters and relays on a decimation strategy privileging the simplification of vertices exhibiting the same affine motion over the whole animation sequence. The residual prediction errors are finally compressed using a temporal-DCT representation. The performances of our encoder are objectively evaluated on a data set of eight animation sequences with various sizes, geometries and topologies, and exhibiting both rigid and elastic motions. The experimental evaluation shows that the proposed compression scheme outperforms state of the art techniques such as MPEG-4/AFX, Dynapack, RT, GV, MCGV, TDCT, PCA and RT compression schemes.

  18. Dynamic modeling of hydrostatic guideway considering compressibility and inertia effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yikang; Mao, Kuanmin; Zhu, Yaming; Wang, Fengyun; Mao, Xiaobo; Li, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Hydrostatic guideways are used as an alternative to contact bearings due to high stiffness and high damping in heavy machine tools. To improve the dynamic characteristic of bearing structure, the dynamic modeling of the hydrostatic guidway should be accurately known. This paper presents a "mass-spring-Maxwell" model considering the effects of inertia, squeeze, compressibility and static bearing. To determine the dynamic model coefficients, numerical simulation of different cases between displacement and dynamic force of oil film are performed with fluent code. Simulation results show that hydrostatic guidway can be taken as a linear system when it is subjected to a small oscillation amplitude. Based on a dynamic model and numerical simulation, every dynamic model's parameters are calculated by the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Identification results show that "mass-spring-damper" model is the most appropriate dynamic model of the hydrostatic guidway. This paper provides a reference and preparation for the analysis of the dynamic model of the similar hydrostatic bearings.

  19. A dynamic counterpart of Lamb vector in viscous compressible aerodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L Q; Wu, J Z; Shi, Y P; Zhu, J Y

    2014-01-01

    The Lamb vector is known to play a key role in incompressible fluid dynamics and vortex dynamics. In particular, in low-speed steady aerodynamics it is solely responsible for the total force acting on a moving body, known as the vortex force, with the classic two-dimensional (exact) Kutta–Joukowski theorem and three-dimensional (linearized) lifting-line theory as the most famous special applications. In this paper we identify an innovative dynamic counterpart of the Lamb vector in viscous compressible aerodynamics, which we call the compressible Lamb vector. Mathematically, we present a theorem on the dynamic far-field decay law of the vorticity and dilatation fields, and thereby prove that the generalized Lamb vector enjoys exactly the same integral properties as the Lamb vector does in incompressible flow, and hence the vortex-force theory can be generalized to compressible flow with exactly the same general formulation. Moreover, for steady flow of polytropic gas, we show that physically the force exerted on a moving body by the gas consists of a transverse force produced by the original Lamb vector and a new longitudinal force that reflects the effects of compression and irreversible thermodynamics. (paper)

  20. Perceptual Effects of Dynamic Range Compression in Popular Music Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    There is a widespread belief that the increasing use of dynamic range compression in music mastering (the loudnesswar) deteriorates sound quality but experimental evidence of perceptual effects is lacking. In this study, normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings...

  1. Effects of dynamic-range compression on temporal acuity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiinberg, Alan; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Epp, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    processing, temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) and “supra-threshold” modulation-depth discrimination (MDD) thresholds were obtained in normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with and without wide-dynamic range compression (WDRC). The TMTFs were obtained using tonal carriers of 1...

  2. Phonon dynamics in a compressible classical Heisenberg chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fivez, Jan; Raedt, Hans De; Raedt, Bart De

    1980-01-01

    The dynamic properties of the compressible classical Heisenberg chain with bilinear coupling are investigated. The sound velocity is calculated exactly. The Fourier-transformed displacement-displacement correlation function is studied as a function of temperature, wave vector, and the model

  3. Lagrangian investigations of vorticity dynamics in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Nishant; Sinha, Sawan Suman; Danish, Mohammad; Srinivasan, Balaji

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of compressibility on vorticity-strain rate dynamics. Well-resolved direct numerical simulations of compressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence performed over a cubical domain of 10243 are employed for this study. To clearly identify the influence of compressibility on the time-dependent dynamics (rather than on the one-time flow field), we employ a well-validated Lagrangian particle tracker. The tracker is used to obtain time correlations between the instantaneous vorticity vector and the strain-rate eigenvector system of an appropriately chosen reference time. In this work, compressibility is parameterized in terms of both global (turbulent Mach number) and local parameters (normalized dilatation-rate and flow field topology). Our investigations reveal that the local dilatation rate significantly influences these statistics. In turn, this observed influence of the dilatation rate is predominantly associated with rotation dominated topologies (unstable-focus-compressing, stable-focus-stretching). We find that an enhanced dilatation rate (in both contracting and expanding fluid elements) significantly enhances the tendency of the vorticity vector to align with the largest eigenvector of the strain-rate. Further, in fluid particles where the vorticity vector is maximally misaligned (perpendicular) at the reference time, vorticity does show a substantial tendency to align with the intermediate eigenvector as well. The authors make an attempt to provide physical explanations of these observations (in terms of moment of inertia and angular momentum) by performing detailed calculations following tetrads {approach of Chertkov et al. ["Lagrangian tetrad dynamics and the phenomenology of turbulence," Phys. Fluids 11(8), 2394-2410 (1999)] and Xu et al. ["The pirouette effect in turbulent flows," Nat. Phys. 7(9), 709-712 (2011)]} in a compressible flow field.

  4. Motion-Compensated Compression of Dynamic Voxelized Point Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Queiroz, Ricardo L; Chou, Philip A

    2017-05-24

    Dynamic point clouds are a potential new frontier in visual communication systems. A few articles have addressed the compression of point clouds, but very few references exist on exploring temporal redundancies. This paper presents a novel motion-compensated approach to encoding dynamic voxelized point clouds at low bit rates. A simple coder breaks the voxelized point cloud at each frame into blocks of voxels. Each block is either encoded in intra-frame mode or is replaced by a motion-compensated version of a block in the previous frame. The decision is optimized in a rate-distortion sense. In this way, both the geometry and the color are encoded with distortion, allowing for reduced bit-rates. In-loop filtering is employed to minimize compression artifacts caused by distortion in the geometry information. Simulations reveal that this simple motion compensated coder can efficiently extend the compression range of dynamic voxelized point clouds to rates below what intra-frame coding alone can accommodate, trading rate for geometry accuracy.

  5. Dynamic Stall in Pitching Airfoils: Aerodynamic Damping and Compressibility Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corke, Thomas C.; Thomas, Flint O.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stall is an incredibly rich fluid dynamics problem that manifests itself on an airfoil during rapid, transient motion in which the angle of incidence surpasses the static stall limit. It is an important element of many manmade and natural flyers, including helicopters and supermaneuverable aircraft, and low-Reynolds number flapping-wing birds and insects. The fluid dynamic attributes that accompany dynamic stall include an eruption of vorticity that organizes into a well-defined dynamic stall vortex and massive excursions in aerodynamic loads that can couple with the airfoil structural dynamics. The dynamic stall process is highly sensitive to surface roughness that can influence turbulent transition and to local compressibility effects that occur at free-stream Mach numbers that are otherwise incompressible. Under some conditions, dynamic stall can result in negative aerodynamic damping that leads to limit-cycle growth of structural vibrations and rapid mechanical failure. The mechanisms leading to negative damping have been a principal interest of recent experiments and analysis. Computational fluid dynamic simulations and low-order models have not been good predictors so far. Large-eddy simulation could be a viable approach although it remains computationally intensive. The topic is technologically important owing to the desire to develop next-generation rotorcraft that employ adaptive rotor dynamic stall control.

  6. Dynamic index and LZ factorization in compressed space

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimoto, Takaaki; I, Tomohiro; Inenaga, Shunsuke; Bannai, Hideo; Takeda, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new \\emph{dynamic compressed index} of $O(w)$ space for a dynamic text $T$, where $w = O(\\min(z \\log N \\log^*M, N))$ is the size of the signature encoding of $T$, $z$ is the size of the Lempel-Ziv77 (LZ77) factorization of $T$, $N$ is the length of $T$, and $M \\geq 3N$ is an integer that can be handled in constant time under word RAM model. Our index supports searching for a pattern $P$ in $T$ in $O(|P| f_{\\mathcal{A}} + \\log w \\log |P| \\log^* M (\\log N + \\log |P| ...

  7. In vitro biomechanical comparison of limited contat dynamic compression plate and locking compression plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguila, A Z; Manos, J M; Orlansky, A S; Todhunter, R J; Trotter, E J; Van der Meulen, M C H

    2005-01-01

    The locking compression plate (LCP) supports biological osteosynthesis by functioning as an internal fixator, rather than as a full or limited contact bone plate which must be adequately contoured and affixed directly to the bone for stable internal fixation of the fracture. In order to help justify the use of the LCP in our veterinary patients, in vitro biomechanical testing was performed comparing the LCP to the conventional limited contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) in canine femurs. We hypothesized that the LCP construct would be at least as stiff under bending and torsional loads as the LC-DCP. The LCP and LC-DCP were applied over a 20-mm osteotomy gap to contralateroal bones within each pair of 14 femora. Non-destructive four-point bending and torsion, and cyclical testing in torsion were performed. The constructs were then loaded to failure in torsion. In medial-lateral and lateral-medial structural bending, significant differences were not found between the LCP and LC-DCP, however, at the gap, the LCP construct was stiffer than the LC-DCP in lateral-medial bending. Significant differences in behaviour over time were not noted between the plate designs during cyclical testing. When loading the constructs to failure in internal rotation, the LC-DCP failed at a significantly lower twist angle (P = .0024) than the LCP. Based on the similar performance with loading, the locking compression plate is a good alternative implant for unstable diaphyseal femoral fracture repair in dogs.

  8. Dynamic compressive properties of bovine knee layered tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In Japan, the most common articular disease is knee osteoarthritis. Among many treatment methodologies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have recently received a lot of attention. In this field, cells and scaffolds are important, both ex vivo and in vivo. From the viewpoint of effective treatment, in addition to histological features, the compatibility of mechanical properties is also important. In this study, the dynamic and static compressive properties of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were measured using a universal testing machine and a split Hopkinson pressure bar method. The compressive behaviors of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were examined. The effects of strain rate on the maximum stress and the slope of stress-strain curves of the bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were discussed.

  9. Deciphering complex dynamics of water counteraction around secondary structural elements of allosteric protein complex: Case study of SAP-SLAM system in signal transduction cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sanchita

    2018-01-01

    The first hydration shell of a protein exhibits heterogeneous behavior owing to several attributes, majorly local polarity and structural flexibility as revealed by solvation dynamics of secondary structural elements. We attempt to recognize the change in complex water counteraction generated due to substantial alteration in flexibility during protein complex formation. The investigation is carried out with the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors, expressed by an array of immune cells, and interacting with SLAM-associated protein (SAP), composed of one SH2 domain. All atom molecular dynamics simulations are employed to the aqueous solutions of free SAP and SLAM-peptide bound SAP. We observed that water dynamics around different secondary structural elements became highly affected as well as nicely correlated with the SLAM-peptide induced change in structural rigidity obtained by thermodynamic quantification. A few instances of contradictory dynamic features of water to the change in structural flexibility are explained by means of occluded polar residues by the peptide. For βD, EFloop, and BGloop, both structural flexibility and solvent accessibility of the residues confirm the obvious contribution. Most importantly, we have quantified enhanced restriction in water dynamics around the second Fyn-binding site of the SAP due to SAP-SLAM complexation, even prior to the presence of Fyn. This observation leads to a novel argument that SLAM induced more restricted water molecules could offer more water entropic contribution during the subsequent Fyn binding and provide enhanced stability to the SAP-Fyn complex in the signaling cascade. Finally, SLAM induced water counteraction around the second binding site of the SAP sheds light on the allosteric property of the SAP, which becomes an integral part of the underlying signal transduction mechanism.

  10. Deciphering complex dynamics of water counteraction around secondary structural elements of allosteric protein complex: Case study of SAP-SLAM system in signal transduction cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sanchita

    2018-01-28

    The first hydration shell of a protein exhibits heterogeneous behavior owing to several attributes, majorly local polarity and structural flexibility as revealed by solvation dynamics of secondary structural elements. We attempt to recognize the change in complex water counteraction generated due to substantial alteration in flexibility during protein complex formation. The investigation is carried out with the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors, expressed by an array of immune cells, and interacting with SLAM-associated protein (SAP), composed of one SH2 domain. All atom molecular dynamics simulations are employed to the aqueous solutions of free SAP and SLAM-peptide bound SAP. We observed that water dynamics around different secondary structural elements became highly affected as well as nicely correlated with the SLAM-peptide induced change in structural rigidity obtained by thermodynamic quantification. A few instances of contradictory dynamic features of water to the change in structural flexibility are explained by means of occluded polar residues by the peptide. For βD, EFloop, and BGloop, both structural flexibility and solvent accessibility of the residues confirm the obvious contribution. Most importantly, we have quantified enhanced restriction in water dynamics around the second Fyn-binding site of the SAP due to SAP-SLAM complexation, even prior to the presence of Fyn. This observation leads to a novel argument that SLAM induced more restricted water molecules could offer more water entropic contribution during the subsequent Fyn binding and provide enhanced stability to the SAP-Fyn complex in the signaling cascade. Finally, SLAM induced water counteraction around the second binding site of the SAP sheds light on the allosteric property of the SAP, which becomes an integral part of the underlying signal transduction mechanism.

  11. Dynamic Range Across Music Genres and the Perception of Dynamic Compression in Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic range compression serves different purposes in the music and hearing-aid industries. In the music industry, it is used to make music louder and more attractive to normal-hearing listeners. In the hearing-aid industry, it is used to map the variable dynamic range of acoustic signals to the reduced dynamic range of hearing-impaired listeners. Hence, hearing-aided listeners will typically receive a dual dose of compression when listening to recorded music. The present study involved an acoustic analysis of dynamic range across a cross section of recorded music as well as a perceptual study comparing the efficacy of different compression schemes. The acoustic analysis revealed that the dynamic range of samples from popular genres, such as rock or rap, was generally smaller than the dynamic range of samples from classical genres, such as opera and orchestra. By comparison, the dynamic range of speech, based on recordings of monologues in quiet, was larger than the dynamic range of all music genres tested. The perceptual study compared the effect of the prescription rule NAL-NL2 with a semicompressive and a linear scheme. Music subjected to linear processing had the highest ratings for dynamics and quality, followed by the semicompressive and the NAL-NL2 setting. These findings advise against NAL-NL2 as a prescription rule for recorded music and recommend linear settings. PMID:26868955

  12. Dynamic Range Across Music Genres and the Perception of Dynamic Compression in Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberger, Martin; Russo, Frank A

    2016-02-10

    Dynamic range compression serves different purposes in the music and hearing-aid industries. In the music industry, it is used to make music louder and more attractive to normal-hearing listeners. In the hearing-aid industry, it is used to map the variable dynamic range of acoustic signals to the reduced dynamic range of hearing-impaired listeners. Hence, hearing-aided listeners will typically receive a dual dose of compression when listening to recorded music. The present study involved an acoustic analysis of dynamic range across a cross section of recorded music as well as a perceptual study comparing the efficacy of different compression schemes. The acoustic analysis revealed that the dynamic range of samples from popular genres, such as rock or rap, was generally smaller than the dynamic range of samples from classical genres, such as opera and orchestra. By comparison, the dynamic range of speech, based on recordings of monologues in quiet, was larger than the dynamic range of all music genres tested. The perceptual study compared the effect of the prescription rule NAL-NL2 with a semicompressive and a linear scheme. Music subjected to linear processing had the highest ratings for dynamics and quality, followed by the semicompressive and the NAL-NL2 setting. These findings advise against NAL-NL2 as a prescription rule for recorded music and recommend linear settings. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Dynamic Range Across Music Genres and the Perception of Dynamic Compression in Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kirchberger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic range compression serves different purposes in the music and hearing-aid industries. In the music industry, it is used to make music louder and more attractive to normal-hearing listeners. In the hearing-aid industry, it is used to map the variable dynamic range of acoustic signals to the reduced dynamic range of hearing-impaired listeners. Hence, hearing-aided listeners will typically receive a dual dose of compression when listening to recorded music. The present study involved an acoustic analysis of dynamic range across a cross section of recorded music as well as a perceptual study comparing the efficacy of different compression schemes. The acoustic analysis revealed that the dynamic range of samples from popular genres, such as rock or rap, was generally smaller than the dynamic range of samples from classical genres, such as opera and orchestra. By comparison, the dynamic range of speech, based on recordings of monologues in quiet, was larger than the dynamic range of all music genres tested. The perceptual study compared the effect of the prescription rule NAL-NL2 with a semicompressive and a linear scheme. Music subjected to linear processing had the highest ratings for dynamics and quality, followed by the semicompressive and the NAL-NL2 setting. These findings advise against NAL-NL2 as a prescription rule for recorded music and recommend linear settings.

  14. Counteraction of Trehalose on N, N-Dimethylformamide-Induced Candida rugosa Lipase Denaturation: Spectroscopic Insight and Molecular Dynamic Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    Full Text Available Candida rugosa lipase (CRL has been widely used as a biocatalyst for non-aqueous synthesis in biotechnological applications, which, however, often suffers significant loss of activity in organic solvent. Experimental results show that trehalose could actively counteract the organic-solvent-induced protein denaturation, while the molecular mechanisms still don't unclear. Herein, CRL was used as a model enzyme to explore the effects of trehalose on the retention of enzymatic activity upon incubation in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF. Results showed that both catalytic activity and conformation changes of CRL influenced by DMF solvent were inhibited by trehalose in a dose-dependent fashion. The simulations further indicated that the CRL protein unfolded in binary DMF solution, but retained the native state in the ternary DMF/trehalose system. Trehalose as the second osmolyte added into binary DMF solution decreased DMF-CRL hydrogen bonds efficiently, whereas increased the intermolecular hydrogen bondings between DMF and trehalose. Thus, the origin of its denaturing effects of DMF on protein is thought to be due to the preferential exclusion of trehalose as well as the intermolecular hydrogen bondings between trehalose and DMF. These findings suggest that trehalose protect the CRL protein from DMF-induced unfolding via both indirect and direct interactions.

  15. Molecular dynamics study of shock compression in porous silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Keith; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Vogler, Tracy J.

    2017-06-01

    The shock response of porous amorphous silica is investigated using classical molecular dynamics, over a range of porosity ranging from fully dense (2.21 g/cc) down to 0.14 g/cc. We observe an enhanced densification in the Hugoniot response at initial porosities above 50 %, and the effect increases with increasing porosity. In the lowest initial densities, after an initial compression response, the systems expand with increased pressure. These results show good agreement with experiments. Mechanisms leading to enhanced densification will be explored, which appear to differ from mechanisms observed in similar studies in silicon. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Inverse problem and uncertainty quantification: application to compressible gas dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birolleau, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with uncertainty propagation and the resolution of inverse problems together with their respective acceleration via Polynomial Chaos. The object of this work is to present a state of the art and a numerical analysis of this stochastic spectral method, in order to understand its pros and cons when tackling the probabilistic study of hydrodynamical instabilities in Richtmyer-Meshkov shock tube experiments. The first chapter is introductory and allows understanding the stakes of being able to accurately take into account uncertainties in compressible gas dynamics simulations. The second chapter is both an illustrative state of the art on generalized Polynomial Chaos and a full numerical analysis of the method keeping in mind the final application on hydrodynamical problems developing shocks and discontinuous solutions. In this chapter, we introduce a new method, naming iterative generalized Polynomial Chaos, which ensures a gain with respect to generalized Polynomial Chaos, especially with non smooth solutions. Chapter three is closely related to an accepted publication in Communication in Computational Physics. It deals with stochastic inverse problems and introduces bayesian inference. It also emphasizes the possibility of accelerating the bayesian inference thanks to iterative generalized Polynomial Chaos described in the previous chapter. Theoretical convergence is established and illustrated on several test-cases. The last chapter consists in the application of the above materials to a complex and ambitious compressible gas dynamics problem (Richtmyer-Meshkov shock tube configuration) together with a deepened study of the physico-numerical phenomenon at stake. Finally, in the appendix, we also present some interesting research paths we quickly tackled during this thesis. (author) [fr

  17. The Dynamic Compression Brace for Pectus Carinatum: Intermediate Results in 286 Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Sjoerd A.; Gritter, Martin; de Jong, Justin R.; van Heurn, Ernst L. W.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic brace compression is a novel treatment for patients with pectus carinatum. The dynamic compression system contains a device to measure the flexibility of the thoracic wall and regulate the pressure of the brace. Patients referred to our pediatric surgical center were screened for treatment

  18. Non-Ideal Compressible Fluid Dynamics: A Challenge for Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluwick, A.

    2017-03-01

    The possibility that compression as well as rarefaction shocks may form in single phase vapours was envisaged first by Bethe (1942). However calculations based on the Van der Waals equation of state indicated that the latter type of shock is possible only if the specific heat at constant volume cv divided by the universal gas constant R is larger than about 17.5 which he considered too large to be satisfied by real fluids. This conclusion was contested by Thompson (1971) who showed that the type of shock capable of forming in arbitrary fluids is determined by the sign of the thermodynamic quantity to which he referred to as fundamental derivative of gas dynamics. Here v, p, s and c denote the specific volume, the pressure, the entropy and the speed of sound. Thompson and co-workers also showed that the required condition for the existence of rarefaction shocks, that Γ may take on negative values, is indeed satisfied for a number of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon vapours. This finding spawned a burst of theoretical studies elaborating on the unusual and often counterintuitive behaviour of shocks with rarefaction shocks present. These produced both results of theoretical character but also results suggesting the practical importance of Non-Ideal Compressible Fluid Dynamics in general. The present paper addresses some of the challenges encountered in connection with the theoretical treatment of the associated flow behaviour. Weakly nonlinear acoustic waves of finite amplitude serve as a starting point. Here mixed rather than strictly positive nonlinearity generates a wealth of phenomena not possible in perfect gases. Examples of steady flows where these non-classical effects play a decisive role (and which may be useful also for future experimental work) are quasi one-dimensional nozzle flows and transonic two-dimensional flows past corners. The study of viscous effects concentrates on laminar flows of boundary layer type. Here non-classical phenomena are caused by the

  19. Cryotherapy with dynamic intermittent compression for analgesia after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgier, J; Cassard, X

    2014-05-01

    Cryotherapy is a useful adjunctive analgesic measure in patients with postoperative pain following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Either static permanent compression or dynamic intermittent compression can be added to increase the analgesic effect of cryotherapy. Our objective was to compare the efficacy of these two compression modalities combined with cryotherapy in relieving postoperative pain and restoring range of knee motion after ligament reconstruction surgery. When combined with cryotherapy, a dynamic and intermittent compression is associated with decreased analgesic drug requirements, less postoperative pain, and better range of knee motion compared to static compression. We conducted a case-control study of consecutive patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction at a single institution over a 3-month period. Both groups received the same analgesic drug protocol. One group was managed with cryotherapy and dynamic intermittent compression (Game Ready(®)) and the other with cryotherapy and static compression (IceBand(®)). Of 39 patients, 20 received dynamic and 19 static compression. In the post-anaesthesia recovery unit, the mean visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score was 2.4 (range, 0-6) with dynamic compression and 2.7 (0-7) with static compression (P=0.3); corresponding values were 1.85 (0-9) vs. 3 (0-8) (P=0.16) after 6 hours and 0.6 (0-3) vs. 1.14 (0-3) (P=0.12) at discharge. The cumulative mean tramadol dose per patient was 57.5mg (0-200mg) with dynamic compression and 128.6 mg (0-250 mg) with static compression (P=0.023); corresponding values for morphine were 0mg vs. 1.14 mg (0-8 mg) (Pcryotherapy decreases analgesic drug requirements after ACL reconstruction and improves the postoperative recovery of range of knee motion. Level III, case-control study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermo-fluid dynamic analysis of wet compression process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, Abhay; Kim, Heuy Dong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Chidambaram, Palani Kumar [FMTRC, Daejoo Machinery Co. Ltd., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Suryan, Abhilash [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering Trivandrum, Kerala (India)

    2016-12-15

    Wet compression systems increase the useful power output of a gas turbine by reducing the compressor work through the reduction of air temperature inside the compressor. The actual wet compression process differs from the conventional single phase compression process due to the presence of latent heat component being absorbed by the evaporating water droplets. Thus the wet compression process cannot be assumed isentropic. In the current investigation, the gas-liquid two phase has been modeled as air containing dispersed water droplets inside a simple cylinder-piston system. The piston moves in the axial direction inside the cylinder to achieve wet compression. Effects on the thermodynamic properties such as temperature, pressure and relative humidity are investigated in detail for different parameters such as compression speeds and overspray. An analytical model is derived and the requisite thermodynamic curves are generated. The deviations of generated thermodynamic curves from the dry isentropic curves (PV{sup γ} = constant) are analyzed.

  1. Thermo-fluid dynamic analysis of wet compression process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Abhay; Kim, Heuy Dong; Chidambaram, Palani Kumar; Suryan, Abhilash

    2016-01-01

    Wet compression systems increase the useful power output of a gas turbine by reducing the compressor work through the reduction of air temperature inside the compressor. The actual wet compression process differs from the conventional single phase compression process due to the presence of latent heat component being absorbed by the evaporating water droplets. Thus the wet compression process cannot be assumed isentropic. In the current investigation, the gas-liquid two phase has been modeled as air containing dispersed water droplets inside a simple cylinder-piston system. The piston moves in the axial direction inside the cylinder to achieve wet compression. Effects on the thermodynamic properties such as temperature, pressure and relative humidity are investigated in detail for different parameters such as compression speeds and overspray. An analytical model is derived and the requisite thermodynamic curves are generated. The deviations of generated thermodynamic curves from the dry isentropic curves (PV γ = constant) are analyzed

  2. Dynamics of heavy ion beams during longitudinal compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Bangerter, R.O.; Lee, E.P.; Brandon, S.; Mark, J.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    Heavy ion beams with initially uniform line charge density can be compressed longitudinally by an order of magnitude in such a way that the compressed beam has uniform line charge density and velocity-tilt profiles. There are no envelope mismatch oscillations during compression. Although the transverse temperature varies along the beam and also varies with time, no substantial longitudinal and transverse emittance growth has been observed. Scaling laws for beam radius and transport system parameters are given

  3. Dynamic Uniaxial Compression of HSLA-65 Steel at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dike, Shweta; Wang, Tianxue; Zuanetti, Bryan; Prakash, Vikas

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, the dynamic response of a high-strength, low alloy Grade 65 (HSLA-65) steel, used by the United States Navy for ship hull construction, is investigated under dynamic uniaxial compression at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1000 °C using a novel elevated temperature split-Hopkinson pressure bar. These experiments are designed to probe the dynamic response of HSLA-65 steel in its single α-ferrite phase, mixed α + γ-austenite phase, and the single γ-austenite phase, as a function of temperature. The investigation is conducted at two different average strain rates—1450 and 2100/s. The experimental results indicate that at test temperatures in the range from room temperature to lower than 600 °C, i.e. prior to the development of the mixed α + γ phase, a net softening in flow strength is observed at all levels of plastic strain with increase in test temperatures. As the test temperatures are increased, the rate of this strain softening with temperature is observed to decrease, and at 600 °C the trend reverses itself resulting in an increase in flow stress at all strains tested. This increase in flow stress is understood be due to dynamic strain aging, where solute atoms play a distinctive role in hindering dislocation motion. At 800 °C, a (sharp) drop in the flow stress, equivalent to one-half of its value at room temperature, is observed. As the test temperature are increased to 900 and 1000 °C, further drop in flow stress are observed at all plastic strain levels. In addition, strain hardening in flow stress is observed at all test temperatures up to 600 °C; beyond 800 °C the rate of strain hardening is observed to decrease, with strain softening becoming dominant at temperatures of 900 °C and higher. Moreover, comparing the high strain rate stress versus strain data gathered on HSLA 65 in the current investigation with those available in the literature at quasi-static strain rates, strain-rate hardening can be

  4. Dynamic Evaluation of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Subjected to High-Strain-Rate Compressive Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic Evaluation of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Subjected to High-Strain-Rate Compressive Loads by Alex Peterson, Ed Habtour, Jaret...Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5066 ARL-TN-0648 December 2014 Dynamic Evaluation of Acrylonitrile Butadiene ...Dynamic Evaluation of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Subjected to High-Strain- Rate Compressive Loads 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  5. Static and dynamic compression application and removal on the intervertebral discs of growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, Anne-Laure; Grimard, Guy; Massol, Elise; Londono, Irène; Moldovan, Florina; Villemure, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    Fusionless implants are used to correct pediatric progressive spinal deformities, most of them spanning the intervertebral disc. This study aimed at investigating the effects of in vivo static versus dynamic compression application and removal on discs of growing rats. A microloading device applied compression. 48 immature rats (28 d.o.) were divided into two groups (43d, 53d). Each group included four subgroups: control (no surgery), sham (device installed without loading), static (0.2 MPa) and dynamic compressions (0.2 MPa ± 30% with 0.1 Hz). In 43d subgroups, compression was applied for 15 days. In 53d subgroups, compression was followed by 10 days without loading. Disc heights, nucleus/annulus volumetric proportions and nucleus proteoglycan contents were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey comparisons (p static and dynamic loading rats were lower than shams (p static and dynamic loading rats. However, at 53d, static loading rats had lower proteoglycan content than dynamic loading rats (p static compression removal, but nucleus proteoglycan content remaining elevated in dynamic group. Dynamic fusionless implants would better preserve disc integrity. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Dynamic CT perfusion image data compression for efficient parallel processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Renan Sales; Olabarriaga, Silvia Delgado; Borst, Jordi; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Posthuma, Jorrit S; Streekstra, Geert J; van Herk, Marcel; Majoie, Charles B L M; Marquering, Henk A

    2016-03-01

    The increasing size of medical imaging data, in particular time series such as CT perfusion (CTP), requires new and fast approaches to deliver timely results for acute care. Cloud architectures based on graphics processing units (GPUs) can provide the processing capacity required for delivering fast results. However, the size of CTP datasets makes transfers to cloud infrastructures time-consuming and therefore not suitable in acute situations. To reduce this transfer time, this work proposes a fast and lossless compression algorithm for CTP data. The algorithm exploits redundancies in the temporal dimension and keeps random read-only access to the image elements directly from the compressed data on the GPU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to present a GPU-ready method for medical image compression with random access to the image elements from the compressed data.

  7. Characteristics and modeling of spruce wood under dynamic compression load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenacher, Germar

    2014-01-01

    Spruce wood is frequently used as an energy absorbing material in impact limiters of packages for the transportation of radioactive material. A 9m drop test onto an unyielding target is mandatory for the packages. The impact results in a dynamic compression load of the spruce wood inside the impact limiter. The lateral dilation of the wood is restrained thereby due to encasing steel sheets. This work's objective was to provide a material model for spruce wood based on experimental investigations to enable the calculation of such loading conditions. About 600 crush tests with cubical spruce wood specimens were performed to characterize the material. The compression was up to 70% and the material was assumed to be transversely isotropic. Particularly the lateral constraint showed to have an important effect: the material develops a high lateral dilation without lateral constraint. The force-displacement characteristics show a comparably low force level and no or only slight hardening. Distinctive softening occurs after the linear-elastic region when loaded parallel to the fiber. On the other hand, using a lateral constraint results in significantly higher general force levels, distinctive hardening and lateral forces. The softening effect when loaded parallel to the fiber is less distinctive. Strain rate and temperature raise or lower the strength level, which was quantified for the applicable ranges of impact limiters. The hypothesis of an uncoupled evolution of the yield surface was proposed based on the experimental findings. It postulates an independent strength evolution with deviatoric and volumetric deformation. The hypothesis could be established using the first modeling approach, the modified LS-DYNA material model MAT075. A transversely isotropic material model was developed based thereupon and implemented in LS-DYNA. The material characteristics of spruce wood were considered using a multi-surface yield criterion and a non-associated flow rule. The yield

  8. Dynamic control of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kevin P [Metamora, IL; Mehresh, Parag [Peoria, IL; Schuh, David [Peoria, IL; Kieser, Andrew J [Morton, IL; Hergart, Carl-Anders [Peoria, IL; Hardy, William L [Peoria, IL; Rodman, Anthony [Chillicothe, IL; Liechty, Michael P [Chillicothe, IL

    2008-06-03

    A homogenous charge compression ignition engine is operated by compressing a charge mixture of air, exhaust and fuel in a combustion chamber to an autoignition condition of the fuel. The engine may facilitate a transition from a first combination of speed and load to a second combination of speed and load by changing the charge mixture and compression ratio. This may be accomplished in a consecutive engine cycle by adjusting both a fuel injector control signal and a variable valve control signal away from a nominal variable valve control signal. Thereafter in one or more subsequent engine cycles, more sluggish adjustments are made to at least one of a geometric compression ratio control signal and an exhaust gas recirculation control signal to allow the variable valve control signal to be readjusted back toward its nominal variable valve control signal setting. By readjusting the variable valve control signal back toward its nominal setting, the engine will be ready for another transition to a new combination of engine speed and load.

  9. The response of nucleus pulposus cell senescence to static and dynamic compressions in a disc organ culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianmin; Pang, Lianglong; Jiao, Shouguo

    2018-04-27

    Mechanical stimuli obviously affect disc nucleus pulposus (NP) biology. Previous studies have indicated that static compression exhibits detrimental effects on disc biology compared with dynamic compression. To study disc NP cell senescence under static compression and dynamic compression in a disc organ culture, porcine discs were cultured and subjected to compression (static compression: 0.4 MPa for 4 h once per day; dynamic compression: 0.4 MPa at a frequency of 1.0 Hz for 4 h once per day) for 7 days using a self-developed mechanically active bioreactor. The non-compressed discs were used as controls. Compared with the dynamic compression, static compression significantly promoted disc NP cell senescence, reflected by the increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) activity, senescence-associated heterochromatic foci (SAHF) formation and senescence markers expression, and the decreased telomerase (TE) activity and NP matrix biosynthesis. Static compression accelerates disc NP cell senescence compared with the dynamic compression in a disc organ culture. The present study provides that acceleration of NP cell senescence may be involved in previously reported static compression-mediated disc NP degenerative changes. © 2018 The Author(s).

  10. Dynamic compression of synthetic diamond windows (final report for LDRD project 93531).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2008-09-01

    Diamond is an attractive dynamic compression window for many reasons: high elastic limit,large mechanical impedance, and broad transparency range. Natural diamonds, however, aretoo expensive to be used in destructive experiments. Chemical vapor deposition techniquesare now able to produce large single-crystal windows, opening up many potential dynamiccompression applications. This project studied the behavior of synthetic diamond undershock wave compression. The results suggest that synthetic diamond could be a usefulwindow in this field, though complete characterization proved elusive.3

  11. Effect of Dynamic Culture and Periodic Compression on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Proliferation and Chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ting; Yu, Li; Lim, Casey G; Goodley, Addison S; Xiao, Xuan; Placone, Jesse K; Ferlin, Kimberly M; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc B; Hsieh, Adam H; Fisher, John P

    2016-07-01

    We have recently developed a bioreactor that can apply both shear and compressive forces to engineered tissues in dynamic culture. In our system, alginate hydrogel beads with encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured under different dynamic conditions while subjected to periodic, compressive force. A customized pressure sensor was developed to track the pressure fluctuations when shear forces and compressive forces were applied. Compared to static culture, dynamic culture can maintain a higher cell population throughout the study. With the application of only shear stress, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed that hMSCs experienced less chondrogenic differentiation than the static group. The second study showed that chondrogenic differentiation was enhanced by additional mechanical compression. After 14 days, alcian blue staining showed more extracellular matrix formed in the compression group. The upregulation of the positive chondrogenic markers such as Sox 9, aggrecan, and type II collagen were demonstrated by qPCR. Our bioreactor provides a novel approach to apply mechanical forces to engineered cartilage. Results suggest that a combination of dynamic culture with proper mechanical stimulation may promote efficient progenitor cell expansion in vitro, thereby allowing the culture of clinically relevant articular chondrocytes for the treatment of articular cartilage defects.

  12. Dynamic XRD, Shock and Static Compression of CaF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Patricia; Specht, Paul; Root, Seth; Sinclair, Nicholas; Schuman, Adam; White, Melanie; Cornelius, Andrew; Smith, Jesse; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2017-06-01

    The high-pressure behavior of CaF2 is probed with x-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with both dynamic compression, using a two-stage light gas gun, and static compression, using diamond anvil cells. We use XRD to follow the unfolding of a shock-driven, fluorite to cotunnite phase transition, on the timescale of nanoseconds. The dynamic behavior of CaF2 under shock loading is contrasted with that under static compression. This work leverages experimental capabilities at the Advanced Photon Source: dynamic XRD and shock experiments at the Dynamic Compression Sector, as well as XRD and static compression in diamond anvil cell at the High-Pressure Collaborative Access Team. These experiments and cross-platform comparisons, open the door to an unprecedented understanding of equations of state and phase transitions at the microstructural level and at different time scales and will ultimately improve our capability to simulate the behavior of materials at extreme conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Study on dynamic compression performance of K9 glass with prefabricated defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changming; Wang, Xiang; Cai, Lingcang; Liu, Cangli

    2012-03-01

    We conducted several planar impact experiments to study dynamic compression properties of K9 glass on powder gun using Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measure system. Samples are prefabricated some internal meso-defects by laser three-dimensional erosion technique before shock loading. Free surface velocities recorded by high temporal-spatial resolution PDV array or multi-point PDV. All these experimental results show some different properties influenced by evolutions of pre-existed internal defects face on free surface velocity profiles. The critical compression strength and dynamic evolution information of pre-existed internal defects can be derived from the experimental results tentatively.

  14. Probing Complex Structural Behaviour in Dynamically Compressed Matter Using Ultrafast X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Malcolm

    2017-06-01

    Over the last 25 years, the static compression community has found that structural complexity is almost ubiquitous in high-density matter, even in the elemental metals. And modern structure prediction methods have reported that this complexity continues to ultra-high pressures. The prediction that aluminum will adopt an incommensurate host--guest structure at multi-TPa pressures is particularly noteworthy. As such compressions can only be achieved dynamically, two fundamental questions arise. Firstly, are such complex structural forms able to form on the nanosecond timescales of dynamic compression experiments, and, secondly, if they do, how can we determine their structures? We are currently conducting campaigns at both NIF and LCLS to address and answer these questions, using nanosecond and femtosecond x-ray diffraction to detect phase changes, including melting, and determine the detailed structural response to dynamic compression. A particular aim is to obtain structural data on a par with that long available in static compression research. An overview of recent results from these campaigns, and comparisons to previous studies, will be given. This work is supported by EPSRC under Grant No. EP/J017051/1. Use of the LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  15. Molecular analysis of chondrocytes cultured in agarose in response to dynamic compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallein-Gerin Frédéric

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Articular cartilage is exposed to high mechanical loads under normal physiological conditions and articular chondrocytes regulate the composition of cartilaginous matrix, in response to mechanical signals. However, the intracellular pathways involved in mechanotransduction are still being defined. Using the well-characterized chondrocyte/agarose model system and dynamic compression, we report protocols for preparing and characterizing constructs of murine chondrocytes and agarose, and analyzing the effect of compression on steady-state level of mRNA by RT-PCR, gene transcription by gene reporter assay, and phosphorylation state of signalling molecules by Western-blotting. The mouse model is of particular interest because of the availability of a large choice of bio-molecular tools suitable to study it, as well as genetically modified mice. Results Chondrocytes cultured in agarose for one week were surrounded by a newly synthesized pericellular matrix, as revealed by immunohistochemistry prior to compression experiments. This observation indicates that this model system is suitable to study the role of matrix molecules and trans-membrane receptors in cellular responsiveness to mechanical stress. The chondrocyte/agarose constructs were then submitted to dynamic compression with FX-4000C™ Flexercell® Compression Plus™ System (Flexcell. After clearing proteins off agarose, Western-blotting analysis showed transient activation of Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK in response to dynamic compression. After assessment by capillary electrophoresis of the quality of RNA extracted from agarose, steady-state levels of mRNA expression was measured by real time PCR. We observed an up-regulation of cFos and cJun mRNA levels as a response to compression, in accordance with the mechanosensitive character observed for these two genes in other studies using cartilage explants submitted to compression. To explore further the

  16. Dynamic compression of aluminum foam processed by a freeform fabrication technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannemann, Kathryn A.; Lankford, James Jr.; Nicholls, Arthur E.; Vaidyanathan, Ranji; Green, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    The compressive deformation behavior of a new type of aluminum foam was assessed under static and dynamic loading conditions. The aluminum foam investigated was processed by Advanced Ceramics Research using an extrusion freeform fabrication technique. The foam contained approximately 50 to 60% porosity. The dynamic compression response was evaluated in air using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system with aluminum bars, and strain rates ranging from 600 s-1 to 2000 s-1. Compression tests were also conducted at lower strain rates (10-3 s-1 to 4 s-1) to determine the extent of strain rate strengthening. The low strain rate tests were performed with a servo-controlled hydraulic test machine. The results were analyzed as a function of foam density, structure, and process conditions

  17. Fluid Compressibility Effects on the Dynamic Response of Hydrostatic Journal Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanandres, Luis A.

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical analysis for the dynamic performance characteristics of laminar flow, capillar/orifice compensated hydrostatic journal bearings is presented. The analysis considers in detail the effect of fluid compressibility in the bearing recesses. At high frequency excitations beyond a break frequency, the bearing hydrostatic stiffness increases sharply and it is accompanied by a rapid decrease in direct damping. Also, the potential of pneumatic hammer instability (negative damping) at low frequencies is likely to occur in hydrostatic bearing applications handling highly compressible fluids. Useful design criteria to avoid undesirable dynamic operating conditions at low and high frequencies are determined. The effect of fluid recess compressibility is brought into perspective, and found to be of utmost importance on the entire frequency spectrum response and stability characteristics of hydrostatic/hybrid journal bearings.

  18. Strength of tensed and compressed concrete segments in crack spacing under short-term dynamic load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galyautdinov Zaur

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of model describing dynamic straining of reinforced concrete requires taking into account the basic aspects influencing the stress-strain state of structures. Strength of concrete segments in crack spacing is one of the crucial aspects that affect general strain behavior of reinforced concrete. Experimental results demonstrate significant change in strength of tensed and compressed concrete segments in crack spacing both under static and under dynamic loading. In this case, strength depends on tensile strain level and the slope angle of rebars towards the cracks direction. Existing theoretical and experimental studies estimate strength of concrete segments in crack spacing under static loading. The present work presents results of experimental and theoretical studies of dynamic strength of plates between cracks subjected to compression-tension. Experimental data was analyzed statistically; the dependences were suggested to describe dynamic strength of concrete segments depending on tensile strain level and slope angle of rebars to cracks direction.

  19. Dynamic compressive mechanical response of a soft polymer material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical behaviour of a soft polymer material (Clear Flex 75) was studied using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus. Mechanical properties have been determined at moderate to high strain rates. Real time deformation and fracture were recorded using a high-speed camera.

  20. Dynamic behaviour CO2 capture and compression: an assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienoord, M.; Ogink, M.H.L.; Khakharia, P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Kler, R.F.C. de

    2014-01-01

    A clear understanding of the dynamic behavior of the whole chain of conventional power generation to CO2 storage is necessary. The rapidly increasing share of renewable energy makes the energy delivered to the grid more fluctuating leading to an impact on the CCS chain as well. A 250 MW scale carbon

  1. Simulating coupled dynamics of a rigid-flexible multibody system and compressible fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Tian, Qiang; Hu, HaiYan

    2018-04-01

    As a subsequent work of previous studies of authors, a new parallel computation approach is proposed to simulate the coupled dynamics of a rigid-flexible multibody system and compressible fluid. In this approach, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method is used to model the compressible fluid, the natural coordinate formulation (NCF) and absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) are used to model the rigid and flexible bodies, respectively. In order to model the compressible fluid properly and efficiently via SPH method, three measures are taken as follows. The first is to use the Riemann solver to cope with the fluid compressibility, the second is to define virtual particles of SPH to model the dynamic interaction between the fluid and the multibody system, and the third is to impose the boundary conditions of periodical inflow and outflow to reduce the number of SPH particles involved in the computation process. Afterwards, a parallel computation strategy is proposed based on the graphics processing unit (GPU) to detect the neighboring SPH particles and to solve the dynamic equations of SPH particles in order to improve the computation efficiency. Meanwhile, the generalized-alpha algorithm is used to solve the dynamic equations of the multibody system. Finally, four case studies are given to validate the proposed parallel computation approach.

  2. Dynamic Increase Factors for High Performance Concrete in Compression using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Benjamin; Ngo, Tuan; Mendis, Priyan

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides dynamic increase factors (DIF) in compression for two different High Performance Concretes (HPC), 100 MPa and 160 MPa, respectively. In the experimental investigation 2 different Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars are used in order to test over a wide range of strain rates, 100 sec1...

  3. DGFEM for dynamical systems describing interaction of compressible fluid and structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feistauer, M.; Hasnedlová, J.; Horáček, Jaromír; Kosík, A.; Kučera, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 254, December 2013 (2013), s. 17-30 ISSN 0377-0427 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0207 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : compressible Navier–Stokes equations * dynamic elasticity equations * newmark method * flow-induced vibrations of vocal folds Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.077, year: 2013

  4. Dynamic compressive response of wrought and additive manufactured 304L stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Erik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing (AM technology has been developed to fabricate metal components that include complex prototype fabrication, small lot production, precision repair or feature addition, and tooling. However, the mechanical response of the AM materials is a concern to meet requirements for specific applications. Differences between AM materials as compared to wrought materials might be expected, due to possible differences in porosity (voids, grain size, and residual stress levels. When the AM materials are designed for impact applications, the dynamic mechanical properties in both compression and tension need to be fully characterized and understood for reliable designs. In this study, a 304L stainless steel was manufactured with AM technology. For comparison purposes, both the AM and wrought 304L stainless steels were dynamically characterized in compression Kolsky bar techniques. They dynamic compressive stress-strain curves were obtained and the strain rate effects were determined for both the AM and wrought 304L stainless steels. A comprehensive comparison of dynamic compressive response between the AM and wrought 304L stainless steels was performed. SAND2015-0993 C.

  5. Spherical time dependent Thomas-Fermi calculation of the dynamical evolution of hot and compressed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, J.; Barranco, M.; Ngo, C.; Tomasi, E.

    1985-01-01

    We have used a self-consistent time dependent Thomas-Fermi model at finite temperature to calculate the dynamical evolution of hot and compressed nuclei. It has been found that nuclei can accomodate more thermal energy than compressional energy before they break. (orig.)

  6. ClC-3 Promotes Osteogenic Differentiation in MC3T3-E1 Cell After Dynamic Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dawei; Wang, Hao; Gao, Feng; Wang, Kun; Dong, Fusheng

    2017-06-01

    ClC-3 chloride channel has been proved to have a relationship with the expression of osteogenic markers during osteogenesis, persistent static compression can upregulate the expression of ClC-3 and regulate osteodifferentiation in osteoblasts. However, there was no study about the relationship between the expression of ClC-3 and osteodifferentiation after dynamic compression. In this study, we applied dynamic compression on MC3T3-E1 cells to detect the expression of ClC-3, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), osteopontin (OPN), nuclear-associated antigen Ki67 (Ki67), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in biopress system, then we investigated the expression of these genes after dynamic compression with Chlorotoxin (specific ClC-3 chloride channel inhibitor) added. Under transmission electron microscopy, there were more cell surface protrusions, rough surfaced endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, abundant glycogen, and lysosomes scattered in the cytoplasm in MC3T3-E1 cells after dynamic compression. The nucleolus was more obvious. We found that ClC-3 was significantly up-regulated after dynamic compression. The compressive force also up-regulated Runx2, BMP-2, and OPN after dynamic compression for 2, 4 and 8 h. The proliferation gene Ki67 and PCNA did not show significantly change after dynamic compression for 8 h. Chlorotoxin did not change the expression of ClC-3 but reduced the expression of Runx2, BMP-2, and OPN after dynamic compression compared with the group without Cltx added. The data from the current study suggested that ClC-3 may promotes osteogenic differentiation in MC3T3-E1 cell after dynamic compression. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1606-1613, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Structural transitions and hysteresis in clump- and stripe-forming systems under dynamic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Danielle; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Reichhardt, Charles

    2016-11-28

    Using numerical simulations, we study the dynamical evolution of particles interacting via competing long-range repulsion and short-range attraction in two dimensions. The particles are compressed using a time-dependent quasi-one dimensional trough potential that controls the local density, causing the system to undergo a series of structural phase transitions from a low density clump lattice to stripes, voids, and a high density uniform state. The compression proceeds via slow elastic motion that is interrupted with avalanche-like bursts of activity as the system collapses to progressively higher densities via plastic rearrangements. The plastic events vary in magnitude from small rearrangements of particles, including the formation of quadrupole-like defects, to large-scale vorticity and structural phase transitions. In the dense uniform phase, the system compresses through row reduction transitions mediated by a disorder-order process. We characterize the rearrangement events by measuring changes in the potential energy, the fraction of sixfold coordinated particles, the local density, and the velocity distribution. At high confinements, we find power law scaling of the velocity distribution during row reduction transitions. We observe hysteresis under a reversal of the compression when relatively few plastic rearrangements occur. The decompressing system exhibits distinct phase morphologies, and the phase transitions occur at lower compression forces as the system expands compared to when it is compressed.

  8. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I. (University of California, San Diego); Winey, J. Michael (Washington State University); Gupta, Yogendra Mohan (Washington State University); Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd (University of Texas at Austin); Quevedo, Hernan J. (University of Texas at Austin)

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  9. The origin of the compressibility anomaly in amorphous silica: a molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Andrew M; Sullivan, Lucy A; Trachenko, Kostya; Bruin, Richard P; White, Toby O H; Dove, Martin T; Tyer, Richard P; Todorov, Ilian T; Wells, Stephen A

    2007-01-01

    We propose an explanation for the anomalous compressibility maximum in amorphous silica based on rigidity arguments. The model considers the fact that a network structure will be rigidly compressed in the high-pressure limit, and rigidly taut in the negative pressure limit, but flexible and hence softer at intermediate pressures. We validate the plausibility of this explanation by the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. In fact this model is quite general, and will apply to any network solid, crystalline or amorphous; there are experimental indications that support this prediction. In contrast to other ideas concerning the compressibility maximum in amorphous silica, the model presented here does not invoke the existence of polyamorphic phase transitions in the glass phase

  10. Dynamic alteration of regional cerebral blood flow during carotid compression and proof of reversibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahi, Kouichi; Hori, M; Hamasaki, N; Sato, S; Nakanishi, H; Kuwatsuru, R; Sasai, K; Aoki, S

    2012-01-01

    It is difficult to non-invasively visualize changes in regional cerebral blood flow caused by manual compression of the carotid artery. To visualize dynamic changes in regional cerebral blood flow during and after manual compression of the carotid artery. Two healthy volunteers were recruited. Anatomic features and flow directions in the circle of Willis were evaluated with time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and two-dimensional phase-contrast (2DPC) MRA, respectively. Regional cerebral blood flow was visualized with territorial arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (TASL-MRI). TASL-MRI and 2DPC-MRA were performed in three states: at rest, during manual compression of the right carotid artery, and after decompression. In one volunteer, time-space labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP) MRA was performed to confirm collateral flow. During manual carotid compression, in one volunteer, the right thalamus changed to be fed only by the vertebrobasilar system, and the right basal ganglia changed to be fed by the left internal carotid artery. In the other volunteer, the right basal ganglia changed to be fed by the vertebrobasilar system. 2DPC-MRA showed that the flow direction changed in the right A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery and the right posterior communicating artery. Perfusion patterns and flow directions recovered after decompression. Time-SLIP MRA showed pial vessels and dural collateral circulation when the right carotid artery was manually compressed. Use of TASL-MRI and 2DPC-MRA was successful for non-invasive visualization of the dynamic changes in regional cerebral blood flow during and after manual carotid compression

  11. Compression, heating and fusion in dynamic pinches stabilized by an axial magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libermann, M.A.; Golberg, S.M.; Velikovich, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    The inertial confinement Z-pinch fusion systems have at least one advantage: there is no limitation on I like I PB , the current can be as high as the pulsed power driver is capable to deliver. When a dynamic Z-pinch is treated as an ICF system, its most important characteristic is stability of compression. The idea of combining the advantages of inertial and magnetic approaches to controlled fusion in some hybrid scheme has been discussed for a long time. It was shown that a sufficiently strong magnetic field in the ICF systems can localize the ignition by suppressing the electron thermal conductivity and diffusion of the α-particles, and also provide an initial preheating of the compressed plasma. It was also pointed out that perhaps the most important is the possibility to inhibit the development of hydrodynamic instabilities in the course of compression with the aid of the magnetic field, thus increasing the degree of stable radial compression. It was shown, that a relatively small axial magnetic field can significantly improve the uniform radial compression by suppressing the most dangerous sausage and kink modes of RT instability associated with inward acceleration of an annular plasma by the azimuthal magnetic field. This allows one to obtain higher degrees of stable radial compression up to 22-fold compression achieved instead of convetnional -8. The stabilizing effect of axial magnetic field on pinch implosions can be explained with the aid of an ideal MHD model. Stability of an implosion can be expected if the final number of e-folding of the dominating perturbation modes n ef is shown to be small or, at least, limited in comparison with the case when no axial magnetic field is present. (author) 9 refs., 1 fig

  12. Dynamic Response and Failure Mechanism of Brittle Rocks Under Combined Compression-Shear Loading Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Dai, Feng

    2018-03-01

    A novel method is developed for characterizing the mechanical response and failure mechanism of brittle rocks under dynamic compression-shear loading: an inclined cylinder specimen using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. With the specimen axis inclining to the loading direction of SHPB, a shear component can be introduced into the specimen. Both static and dynamic experiments are conducted on sandstone specimens. Given carefully pulse shaping, the dynamic equilibrium of the inclined specimens can be satisfied, and thus the quasi-static data reduction is employed. The normal and shear stress-strain relationships of specimens are subsequently established. The progressive failure process of the specimen illustrated via high-speed photographs manifests a mixed failure mode accommodating both the shear-dominated failure and the localized tensile damage. The elastic and shear moduli exhibit certain loading-path dependence under quasi-static loading but loading-path insensitivity under high loading rates. Loading rate dependence is evidently demonstrated through the failure characteristics involving fragmentation, compression and shear strength and failure surfaces based on Drucker-Prager criterion. Our proposed method is convenient and reliable to study the dynamic response and failure mechanism of rocks under combined compression-shear loading.

  13. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Bo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Environment Simulation Dept.; Nelson, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials Dept.; Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Dept.; Bignell, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural and Thermal Analysis Dept.; Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program; George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  14. Context-dependent JPEG backward-compatible high-dynamic range image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2013-10-01

    High-dynamic range (HDR) imaging is expected, together with ultrahigh definition and high-frame rate video, to become a technology that may change photo, TV, and film industries. Many cameras and displays capable of capturing and rendering both HDR images and video are already available in the market. The popularity and full-public adoption of HDR content is, however, hindered by the lack of standards in evaluation of quality, file formats, and compression, as well as large legacy base of low-dynamic range (LDR) displays that are unable to render HDR. To facilitate the wide spread of HDR usage, the backward compatibility of HDR with commonly used legacy technologies for storage, rendering, and compression of video and images are necessary. Although many tone-mapping algorithms are developed for generating viewable LDR content from HDR, there is no consensus of which algorithm to use and under which conditions. We, via a series of subjective evaluations, demonstrate the dependency of the perceptual quality of the tone-mapped LDR images on the context: environmental factors, display parameters, and image content itself. Based on the results of subjective tests, it proposes to extend JPEG file format, the most popular image format, in a backward compatible manner to deal with HDR images also. An architecture to achieve such backward compatibility with JPEG is proposed. A simple implementation of lossy compression demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed architecture compared with the state-of-the-art HDR image compression.

  15. Dynamic characterization and modeling of magneto-rheological elastomers under compressive loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, J H; Khan, F; Jang, D D; Jung, H J

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to characterize and model the compression properties of Magneto-Rheological Elastomers (MREs). MRE samples were fabricated by curing a two component elastomer resin with 30% content of 10 μm sized iron particles by volume. In order to vary the magnetic field during compressive testing, a test fixture was designed and fabricated in which two permanent magnets could be variably positioned on either side of the specimen. By changing the distance between the magnets, the fixture allowed for varying the magnetic field that passes uniformly through the sample. Using this test setup and a dynamic test frame, a series of compression tests of MRE samples was performed by varying the magnetic field and frequency of loading. The results show the MR effect (percent increase in the materials 'stiffness') increases as the magnetic field increases and loading frequency increases within the range of the magnetic field and input frequency considered in this study. Furthermore, a phenomenological model was developed to capture the dynamic behaviours of the MREs under compression loadings.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics in experimental devices with compressed/expanded surfactant monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuera, M; Perales, J M; Vega, J M

    2014-01-01

    A theory is provided for a common experimental set up that is used to measure surface properties in surfactant monolayers. The set up consists of a surfactant monolayer (over a shallow liquid layer) that is compressed/expanded in a periodic fashion by moving in counter-phase two parallel, slightly immersed solid barriers, which vary the free surface area and thus the surfactant concentration. The simplest theory ignores the fluid dynamics in the bulk fluid, assuming spatially uniform surfactant concentration, which requires quite small forcing frequencies and provides reversible dynamics in the compression/expansion cycles. In this paper, we present a long-wave theory for not so slow oscillations that assumes local equilibrium but takes the fluid dynamics into account. This simple theory uncovers the physical mechanisms involved in the surfactant behavior and allows for extracting more information from each experimental run. The conclusion is that the fluid dynamics cannot be ignored, and that some irreversible dynamics could well have a fluid dynamic origin. (paper)

  17. Dynamic Mechanical Compression of Chondrocytes for Tissue Engineering: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Devon E; Johnstone, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage functions to transmit and translate loads. In a classical structure-function relationship, the tissue resides in a dynamic mechanical environment that drives the formation of a highly organized tissue architecture suited to its biomechanical role. The dynamic mechanical environment includes multiaxial compressive and shear strains as well as hydrostatic and osmotic pressures. As the mechanical environment is known to modulate cell fate and influence tissue development toward a defined architecture in situ , dynamic mechanical loading has been hypothesized to induce the structure-function relationship during attempts at in vitro regeneration of articular cartilage. Researchers have designed increasingly sophisticated bioreactors with dynamic mechanical regimes, but the response of chondrocytes to dynamic compression and shear loading remains poorly characterized due to wide variation in study design, system variables, and outcome measurements. We assessed the literature pertaining to the use of dynamic compressive bioreactors for in vitro generation of cartilaginous tissue from primary and expanded chondrocytes. We used specific search terms to identify relevant publications from the PubMed database and manually sorted the data. It was very challenging to find consensus between studies because of species, age, cell source, and culture differences, coupled with the many loading regimes and the types of analyses used. Early studies that evaluated the response of primary bovine chondrocytes within hydrogels, and that employed dynamic single-axis compression with physiologic loading parameters, reported consistently favorable responses at the tissue level, with upregulation of biochemical synthesis and biomechanical properties. However, they rarely assessed the cellular response with gene expression or mechanotransduction pathway analyses. Later studies that employed increasingly sophisticated biomaterial-based systems, cells derived from different

  18. Dynamic Range Enhancement of High-Speed Electrical Signal Data via Non-Linear Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laun, Matthew C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for high-speed compression of dynamic electrical signal waveforms to extend the measuring capabilities of conventional measuring devices such as oscilloscopes and high-speed data acquisition systems are discussed. Transfer function components and algorithmic transfer functions can be used to accurately measure signals that are within the frequency bandwidth but beyond the voltage range and voltage resolution capabilities of the measuring device.

  19. Dynamic-range reduction by peak clipping or compression and its effects on phoneme perception in hearing-impaired listeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreschler, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, differences between dynamic-range reduction by peak clipping and single-channel compression for phoneme perception through conventional hearing aids have been investigated. The results from 16 hearing-impaired listeners show that compression limiting yields significantly better

  20. Analysis of compressible light dynamic stall flow at transitional Reynolds numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyken, R.D. Van; Ekaterinaris, John A.; Chandrasekhara, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results of steady and light dynamic stall flow over an oscillating NACA 0012 airfoil at a freestream Mach number of 0.3 and Reynolds number of 0.54 x 10(6) are compared, The experimental observation that dynamic stall is induced from the bursting of a laminar separation...... point is specified suitably and a simple transition length model is incorporated to determine the extent of the laminar separation bubble. The thin-layer approximations of compressible, Reynolds-averaged, Navier-Stokes equations are used for the numerical solution, with an implicit, upwind-biased, third...

  1. Single stock dynamics on high-frequency data: from a compressed coding perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fushing

    Full Text Available High-frequency return, trading volume and transaction number are digitally coded via a nonparametric computing algorithm, called hierarchical factor segmentation (HFS, and then are coupled together to reveal a single stock dynamics without global state-space structural assumptions. The base-8 digital coding sequence, which is capable of revealing contrasting aggregation against sparsity of extreme events, is further compressed into a shortened sequence of state transitions. This compressed digital code sequence vividly demonstrates that the aggregation of large absolute returns is the primary driving force for stimulating both the aggregations of large trading volumes and transaction numbers. The state of system-wise synchrony is manifested with very frequent recurrence in the stock dynamics. And this data-driven dynamic mechanism is seen to correspondingly vary as the global market transiting in and out of contraction-expansion cycles. These results not only elaborate the stock dynamics of interest to a fuller extent, but also contradict some classical theories in finance. Overall this version of stock dynamics is potentially more coherent and realistic, especially when the current financial market is increasingly powered by high-frequency trading via computer algorithms, rather than by individual investors.

  2. Single stock dynamics on high-frequency data: from a compressed coding perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushing, Hsieh; Chen, Shu-Chun; Hwang, Chii-Ruey

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency return, trading volume and transaction number are digitally coded via a nonparametric computing algorithm, called hierarchical factor segmentation (HFS), and then are coupled together to reveal a single stock dynamics without global state-space structural assumptions. The base-8 digital coding sequence, which is capable of revealing contrasting aggregation against sparsity of extreme events, is further compressed into a shortened sequence of state transitions. This compressed digital code sequence vividly demonstrates that the aggregation of large absolute returns is the primary driving force for stimulating both the aggregations of large trading volumes and transaction numbers. The state of system-wise synchrony is manifested with very frequent recurrence in the stock dynamics. And this data-driven dynamic mechanism is seen to correspondingly vary as the global market transiting in and out of contraction-expansion cycles. These results not only elaborate the stock dynamics of interest to a fuller extent, but also contradict some classical theories in finance. Overall this version of stock dynamics is potentially more coherent and realistic, especially when the current financial market is increasingly powered by high-frequency trading via computer algorithms, rather than by individual investors.

  3. Rheological-dynamical continuum damage model for concrete under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milašinović Dragan D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new analytical model for the prediction of concrete response under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification is presented in this paper. The proposed approach, referred to as the rheological-dynamical continuum damage model, combines rheological-dynamical analogy and damage mechanics. Within the framework of this approach the key continuum parameters such as the creep coefficient, Poisson’s ratio and damage variable are functionally related. The critical values of the creep coefficient and damage variable under peak stress are used to describe the failure mode of the concrete cylinder. The ultimate strain is determined in the post-peak regime only, using the secant stress-strain relation from damage mechanics. The post-peak branch is used for the energy analysis. Experimental data for five concrete compositions were obtained during the examination presented herein. The principal difference between compressive failure and tensile fracture is that there is a residual stress in the specimens, which is a consequence of uniformly accelerated motion of load during the examination of compressive strength. The critical interpenetration displacements and crushing energy are obtained theoretically based on the concept of global failure analysis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 174027: Computational Mechanics in Structural Engineering i br. TR 36017: Utilization of by-products and recycled waste materials in concrete composites for sustainable construction development in Serbia: Investigation and environmental assessment of possible applications

  4. Impact Toughness and Dynamic Compression of Ultrafine-Grained Titanium Grade 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Ivan V.; Konstantinov, Alexander Y.

    2018-03-01

    This work presents the study of an influence of ultrafine-grained (UFG) structure on impact toughness and dynamic compression of commercially pure titanium Grade 4. The UFG structure was provided by means of equal-channel angular pressing according to the Conform scheme (ECAP-Conform, Ufa) with subsequent heat treatment. Impact toughness tests on samples with U-shaped notch were carried out using a drop weight impact machine. Dynamic compression test of cylindrical samples were carried out on a setup with the Split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB-20) by the Kolsky method. It was found that the impact toughness of the UFG titanium is 15% greater than that of its coarse-grained (CG) counterpart. However, fracture process of the CG material requires 1.5 times more energy. The ECAP treatment significantly increased yield strength of the material. At the same time, an increase of compression strain rate by 6 orders resulted in an increase of yield strength of the CG material by 20%, while yield strength of the UFG titanium remained at the level of a quasi-static load. The UFG material showed a well-expressed strain hardening behaviour for all strain rates.

  5. Coherent source imaging and dynamic support tracking for inverse scattering using compressive MUSIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okkyun; Kim, Jong Min; Yoo, Jaejoon; Jin, Kyunghwan; Ye, Jong Chul

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this paper is to develop novel algorithms for inverse scattering problems such as EEG/MEG, microwave imaging, and/or diffuse optical tomograpahy, and etc. One of the main contributions of this paper is a class of novel non-iterative exact nonlinear inverse scattering theory for coherent source imaging and moving targets. Specifically, the new algorithms guarantee the exact recovery under a very relaxed constraint on the number of source and receivers, under which the conventional methods fail. Such breakthrough was possible thanks to the recent theory of compressive MUSIC and its extension using support correction criterion, where partial support are estimated using the conventional compressed sensing approaches, then the remaining supports are estimated using a novel generalized MUSIC criterion. Numerical results using coherent sources in EEG/MEG and dynamic targets confirm that the new algorithms outperform the conventional ones.

  6. Corruption: some issues of counteraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. Ivanova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective to develop the authorrsquos concept of corruption counteraction. Methods dialectical approach to cognition of social phenomena allowing to analyze them in historical development and functioning in the context of the totality of objective and subjective factors that determined the choice of the following research methods formallogical systematic content analysis. nbsp Results the authors have analyzed and proposed definitions of such notions as anticorruption monitoring corruption counteraction legalregulation subjects of counteraction the main methods of countercorruption management system evaluation are highlighted. The necessity is grounded to use the data of applied criminological research and the media to prevent and combat corruption to establish the monitoring mechanisms in particular providing the legal and social diagnostics of legal conscience. Scientific novelty for the first time the article presents and justifies the author39s concept of the mechanism of sociolegal control of law enforcement in the aspect of the implementation of its preventive function in the sphere of corruption crimes counteraction. Practical significance the findings of the article can be used in scientific educational and law enforcement activities in addressing the issues related to the identification suppression and prevention of corruption crimes.

  7. A Biomechanical Comparison of 3.5 Locking Compression Plate Fixation to 3.5 Limited Contact Dynamic Compression Plate Fixation in a Canine Cadaveric Distal Humeral Metaphyseal Gap Model

    OpenAIRE

    Filipowicz, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Objective- To compare the biomechanical properties of 3.5 locking compression plate (LCP) fixation to 3.5 limited contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) fixation in a canine cadaveric, distal humeral metaphyseal gap model in static axial compression and cyclic axial compression and torsion. Study Design- Biomechanical in vitro study. Sample Population- 30 paired humeri from adult, medium to large breed dogs. Methods- Testing was performed monotonically to failure in axial compres...

  8. Tensile-compressive asymmetry influence on shape memory alloy system dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savi, Marcelo A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, COPPE - Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 68.503, 21.941.972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: savi@mecanica.ufrj.br; Sa, Milton A.N. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, COPPE - Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 68.503, 21.941.972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Paiva, Alberto [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Escola de Engenharia Industrial e Metalurgica de Volta Redonda, 27.255.250 Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: paiva@lavi.coppe.ufrj.br; Pacheco, Pedro M.C.L. [CEFET/RJ - Department of Mechanical Engineering, 20.271.110 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: calas@cefet-rj.br

    2008-05-15

    The remarkable properties of shape memory alloys (SMAs) are attracting much technological interest in several science and engineering fields, varying from medical to aerospace applications. Hysteretic response of these systems is one of their essential characteristics being related to the martensitic phase transformation. The dynamical response of systems with SMA actuators presents a rich behavior due to their intrinsic nonlinear characteristic. Since experimental results show that SMAs present an asymmetric behavior when subjected to tensile or compressive loads, it is important to evaluate the influence of this kind of behavior in the nonlinear dynamics of mechanical systems with SMA devices. This article discusses the nonlinear dynamics of shape memory alloy systems, considering the influence of tensile-compressive asymmetry in the thermomechanical behavior of SMAs. An iterative numerical procedure based on the operator split technique, the orthogonal projection algorithm and the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is developed to deal with nonlinearities in the formulation. A numerical investigation is carried out showing some qualitative results such as chaotic-like response and multi-stability behavior for a single degree of freedom SMA oscillator.

  9. Dynamic Negative Compressibility of Few-Layer Graphene, h-BN, and MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Bernardo; Barboza, Ana Paula; Chacham, Helio; Oliveira, Camilla; Fernandes, Thales; Martins Ferreira, Erlon; Archanjo, Braulio; Batista, Ronaldo; Oliveira, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We report a novel mechanical response of few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 to the simultaneous compression and shear by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The response is characterized by the vertical expansion of these two-dimensional (2D) layered materials upon compression. Such effect is proportional to the applied load, leading to vertical strain values (opposite to the applied force) of up to 150%. The effect is null in the absence of shear, increases with tip velocity, and is anisotropic. It also has similar magnitudes in these solid lubricant materials (few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2), but it is absent in single-layer graphene and in few-layer mica and Bi2Se3. We propose a physical mechanism for the effect where the combined compressive and shear stresses from the tip induce dynamical wrinkling on the upper material layers, leading to the observed flake thickening. The new effect (and, therefore, the proposed wrinkling) is reversible in the three materials where it is observed.[2] Financial support from CNPq, Fapemig, Rede Nacional de Pesquisa em Nanotubos de Carbono and INCT-Nano-Carbono

  10. Observation of a New High-Pressure Solid Phase in Dynamically Compressed Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsin, D. N.

    2017-10-01

    Aluminum is ideal for testing theoretical first-principles calculations because of the relative simplicity of its atomic structure. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predict that Al transforms from an ambient-pressure, face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystal to the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) and body-centered-cubic (bcc) structures as it is compressed. Laser-driven experiments performed at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) ramp compressed Al samples to pressures up to 540 GPa without melting. Nanosecond in-situ x-ray diffraction was used to directly measure the crystal structure at pressures where the solid-solid phase transformations of Al are predicted to occur. Laser velocimetry provided the pressure in the Al. Our results show clear evidence of the fcc-hcp and hpc-bcc transformations at 216 +/- 9 GPa and 321 +/- 12 GPa, respectively. This is the first experimental in-situ observation of the bcc phase in compressed Al and a confirmation of the fcc-hcp transition previously observed under static compression at 217 GPa. The observations indicate these solid-solid phase transitions occur on the order of tens of nanoseconds time scales. In the fcc-hcp transition we find the original texture of the sample is preserved; however, the hcp-bcc transition diminishes that texture producing a structure that is more polycrystalline. The importance of this dynamic is discussed. The NIF results are the first demonstration of x-ray diffraction measurements at two different pressures in a single laser shot. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  11. Experimental study of dynamic diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord of goats under persistent compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jicun; Liu Huaijun; He Dan; Huang Boyuan; Cui Caixia; Wang Zhihong; Xu Yingjin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the dynamic changes of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in spinal cord of goats with persistent compression injury. Methods: Eighteen goats weighted 20-25 kg were divided into three groups with completely random design: A, B and C. A balloon catheter was inserted into the epidural space at C3-4 level via intervertabral foramen for each goat. The balloon was inflated by injection of variable volumes of saline in group A and B 10 days following operation. The volume of saline was 0.3 ml in group A and 0.2 ml in group B, respectively. The compression sustained for 40 days. Group C served as uncompressed control without injection of saline. The locomotor rating score was applied to each group. Conventional MRI and DTI were performed. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)and fractional anisotropy(FA) values were measured. Histopathological assessments of the compressed spinal cord were performed 50 days following operation with light microscope and transmission electron microscopy. Results: Before operation, the locomotor rating score was 5, the ADC value was (1.23 ± 0.05) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s and the FA value was (0.72 ± 0.05) each group. Of six goats in Group A, the locomotor rating score severely decreased and reached (1.5 ± 0.4)on the 40 th day after compression. The ADC value at compression site decreased soon and reached the minimum (0.75 ± 0.04) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s on the 5 th day after compression. Then the ADC value increased gradually, restored normal on the 10 th day or so, then became markedly higher than normal and reached (1.61±0.05) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s on the 40 th day. The FA value at compression site decreased soon, reached (0.54±0.04)on the 1st day, then decreased gradually and reached (0.43± 0.05) on the 40 th day. It appeared high signal intensity on T 2 WI on the 10 th day. In Group B, the locomotor rating score was moderately decreased and reached (3.4 ± 0.5) on the 40 th day. The ADC value at compression site decreased slightly

  12. Comparison of the effect on bone healing process of different implants used in minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis: limited contact dynamic compression plate versus locking compression plate

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Zichao; Xu, Haitao; Ding, Haoliang; Qin, Hui; An, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) has been widely accepted because of its satisfactory clinical outcomes. However, the implant construct that works best for MIPO remains controversial. Different plate designs result in different influence mechanisms to blood flow. In this study, we created ulnar fractures in 42 beagle dogs and fixed the fractures using MIPO. The dogs were randomly divided into two groups and were fixed with a limited contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) or ...

  13. Compressive Loads on the Lumbar Spine During Lifting: 4D WATBAK versus Inverse Dynamics Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Cole

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous two- and three-dimensional biomechanical models exist for the purpose of assessing the stresses placed on the lumbar spine during the performance of a manual material handling task. More recently, researchers have utilised their knowledge to develop specific computer-based models that can be applied in an occupational setting; an example of which is 4D WATBAK. The model used by 4D WATBAK bases its predications on static calculations and it is assumed that these static loads reasonably depict the actual dynamic loads acting on the lumbar spine. Consequently, it was the purpose of this research to assess the agreement between the static predictions made by 4D WATBAK and those from a comparable dynamic model. Six individuals were asked to perform a series of five lifting tasks, which ranged from lifting 2.5 kg to 22.5 kg and were designed to replicate the lifting component of the Work Capacity Assessment Test used within Australia. A single perpendicularly placed video camera was used to film each performance in the sagittal plane. The resultant two-dimensional kinematic data were input into the 4D WATBAK software and a dynamic biomechanical model to quantify the compression forces acting at the L4/L5 intervertebral joint. Results of this study indicated that as the mass of the load increased from 2.5 kg to 22.5 kg, the static compression forces calculated by 4D WATBAK became increasingly less than those calculated using the dynamic model (mean difference ranged from 22.0% for 2.5 kg to 42.9% for 22.5 kg. This study suggested that, for research purposes, a validated three-dimensional dynamic model should be employed when a task becomes complex and when a more accurate indication of spinal compression or shear force is required. Additionally, although it is clear that 4D WATBAK is particularly suited to industrial applications, it is suggested that the limitations of such modelling tools be carefully considered when task-risk and employee

  14. Numerical study on dynamic compressive deformation and elasto-plastic wave propagation of foam materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanigaki Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element models of closed-cell foam structures were created using the three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation method coupled with the random sequential addition algorithm. The dynamic compressive deformation behaviors of the models were numerically studied using LS-DYNA code. The deformation mode of the models changed gradually as the deformation rate increases. Also, the generation and the propagation of plastic wave was clearly observed with the rate of 100 m/s. The longitudinal elastic wave velocity showed a weak negative dependency on the deformation rate although the strain rate dependence of material properties was not considered. Furthermore, a prediction method for the dynamic stress state on the impact side based on the static stress-strain relationship was presented.

  15. Dynamic responses of concrete-filled steel tubular member under axial compression considering creep effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, X. T.; Wang, Y. D.; Dai, C. H.; Ding, M.

    2017-08-01

    The finite element model of concrete-filled steel tubular member was established by the numerical analysis software considering material nonlinearity to analyze concrete creep effect on the dynamic responses of the member under axial compression and lateral impact. In the model, the constitutive model of core concrete is the plastic damage model, that of steel is the Von Mises yield criterion and kinematic hardening model, and the creep effect at different ages is equivalent to the change of concrete elastic modulus. Then the dynamic responses of concrete-filled steel tubular member considering creep effects was simulated, and the effects of creep on contact time, impact load, deflection, stress and strain were discussed. The fruits provide a scientific basis for the design of the impact resistance of concrete filled steel tubular members.

  16. Identifying the dynamic compressive stiffness of a prospective biomimetic elastomer by an inverse method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mates, Steven P; Forster, Aaron M; Hunston, Donald; Rhorer, Richard; Everett, Richard K; Simmonds, Kirth E; Bagchi, Amit

    2012-10-01

    Soft elastomeric materials that mimic real soft human tissues are sought to provide realistic experimental devices to simulate the human body's response to blast loading to aid the development of more effective protective equipment. The dynamic mechanical behavior of these materials is often measured using a Kolsky bar because it can achieve both the high strain rates (>100s(-1)) and the large strains (>20%) that prevail in blast scenarios. Obtaining valid results is challenging, however, due to poor dynamic equilibrium, friction, and inertial effects. To avoid these difficulties, an inverse method was employed to determine the dynamic response of a soft, prospective biomimetic elastomer using Kolsky bar tests coupled with high-speed 3D digital image correlation. Individual tests were modeled using finite elements, and the dynamic stiffness of the elastomer was identified by matching the simulation results with test data using numerical optimization. Using this method, the average dynamic response was found to be nearly equivalent to the quasi-static response measured with stress-strain curves at compressive strains up to 60%, with an uncertainty of ±18%. Moreover, the behavior was consistent with the results in stress relaxation experiments and oscillatory tests although the latter were performed at lower strain levels. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Bayesian model calibration of computational models in velocimetry diagnosed dynamic compression experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Justin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hund, Lauren [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic compression experiments are being performed on complicated materials using increasingly complex drivers. The data produced in these experiments are beginning to reach a regime where traditional analysis techniques break down; requiring the solution of an inverse problem. A common measurement in dynamic experiments is an interface velocity as a function of time, and often this functional output can be simulated using a hydrodynamics code. Bayesian model calibration is a statistical framework to estimate inputs into a computational model in the presence of multiple uncertainties, making it well suited to measurements of this type. In this article, we apply Bayesian model calibration to high pressure (250 GPa) ramp compression measurements in tantalum. We address several issues speci c to this calibration including the functional nature of the output as well as parameter and model discrepancy identi ability. Speci cally, we propose scaling the likelihood function by an e ective sample size rather than modeling the autocorrelation function to accommodate the functional output and propose sensitivity analyses using the notion of `modularization' to assess the impact of experiment-speci c nuisance input parameters on estimates of material properties. We conclude that the proposed Bayesian model calibration procedure results in simple, fast, and valid inferences on the equation of state parameters for tantalum.

  18. Reconstruction of tissue dynamics in the compressed breast using multiplexed measurements and temporal basis functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boverman, Gregory; Miller, Eric L.; Brooks, Dana H.; Fang, Qianqian; Carp, S. A.; Selb, J. J.; Boas, David A.

    2007-02-01

    In the course of our experiments imaging the compressed breast in conjunction with digital tomosynthesis, we have noted that significant changes in tissue optical properties, on the order of 5%, occur during our imaging protocol. These changes seem to consistent with changes both in total Hemoglobin concentration as well as in oxygen saturation, as was the case for our standalone breast compression study, which made use of reflectance measurements. Simulation experiments show the importance of taking into account the temporal dynamics in the image reconstruction, and demonstrate the possibility of imaging the spatio-temporal dynamics of oxygen saturation and total Hemoglobin in the breast. In the image reconstruction, we make use of spatio-temporal basis functions, specifically a voxel basis for spatial imaging, and a cubic spline basis in time, and we reconstruct the spatio-temporal images using the entire data set simultaneously, making use of both absolute and relative measurements in the cost function. We have modified the sequence of sources used in our imaging acquisition protocol to improve our temporal resolution, and preliminary results are shown for normal subjects.

  19. Two-dimensional imaging and velocimetry to diagnose heterogeneous deformation under dynamic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Suzanne

    2017-06-01

    As a material is dynamically compressed, heterogeneities form, perturbations propagate, and fracture networks develop. Information about the deformation and fracture of materials under shock compression is typically obtained in one of two ways; either derived post-shock, (i.e. from recovery experiments), where the material is shocked and then the recovered sample is examined, or inferred from features in one-dimensional transiting wave profiles. The first provides very limited information with regards to the time scale of deformation mechanisms, and the second provides limited information with regards to spatial scales. Recently, a two-dimensional imaging velocimetry technique has been developed on Omega (OHRV 2D-VISAR system) to measure the velocity roughness of shock fronts. We have used this diagnostic to study the heterogenous deformation in the elastic-plastic regime in diamond as well the propagation of perturbations in GDP, beryllium, and high density carbon ablators, observing features that are difficult to identify in one-dimensional experiments, but important for fully understanding dynamic material response. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Compressible Kolmogorov flow in strongly coupled dusty plasma using molecular dynamics and computational fluid dynamics. II. A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Joy, Ashwin

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we perform comparative studies of compressible Kolmogorov flow in the two-dimensional strongly coupled dusty plasma by means of atomistic or molecular dynamics (MD) and continuum or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. Recently, using MD simulation, generation of molecular shear heat at the atomistic level is shown to reduce the average coupling strength of the system and destruct the vortical structures. To suppress the molecular heat, a novel method of a thermostat, namely, the configurational thermostat is introduced by which the microscale heat generated by the shear flow has shown to be thermostatted out efficiently without compromising the large scale vortex dynamics. While using a configurational thermostat, it has been found that the growth rate obtained from both the studies is the same with the marginal difference. To make the comparison with the continuum fluid model, we perform the same study using the generalised hydrodynamic model, wherein molecular shear heating phenomena is completely absent, however, viscous dissipation is there at the macroscale level. For this purpose, an Advanced Generalised SPECTral Code has been developed to study the linear and nonlinear aspects of the Kolmogorov flow in the incompressible and compressible limit for viscoelastic fluids. All the phenomenological parameters used in CFD simulations have been calculated from MD simulations. Code is benchmarked against the eigen value solver in the linear regime. Linear growth-rates calculated from the phenomenological fluid model is found to be close to that obtained from MD simulation for the same set of input parameters. The transition from laminar to turbulent flow has been found at a critical value of Reynolds number Rc in both the macroscopic (CFD) and microscopic (MD) simulation. Rc in MD is smaller than the one obtained by CFD simulation. In the nonlinear regime of CFD, the mode becomes unstable and vortex formation happens earlier than in MD. The

  1. S-EMG signal compression based on domain transformation and spectral shape dynamic bit allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabuco, Marcel Henrique; Costa, Marcus Vinícius Chaffim; Nascimento, Francisco Assis de Oliveira

    2014-02-27

    Surface electromyographic (S-EMG) signal processing has been emerging in the past few years due to its non-invasive assessment of muscle function and structure and because of the fast growing rate of digital technology which brings about new solutions and applications. Factors such as sampling rate, quantization word length, number of channels and experiment duration can lead to a potentially large volume of data. Efficient transmission and/or storage of S-EMG signals are actually a research issue. That is the aim of this work. This paper presents an algorithm for the data compression of surface electromyographic (S-EMG) signals recorded during isometric contractions protocol and during dynamic experimental protocols such as the cycling activity. The proposed algorithm is based on discrete wavelet transform to proceed spectral decomposition and de-correlation, on a dynamic bit allocation procedure to code the wavelets transformed coefficients, and on an entropy coding to minimize the remaining redundancy and to pack all data. The bit allocation scheme is based on mathematical decreasing spectral shape models, which indicates a shorter digital word length to code high frequency wavelets transformed coefficients. Four bit allocation spectral shape methods were implemented and compared: decreasing exponential spectral shape, decreasing linear spectral shape, decreasing square-root spectral shape and rotated hyperbolic tangent spectral shape. The proposed method is demonstrated and evaluated for an isometric protocol and for a dynamic protocol using a real S-EMG signal data bank. Objective performance evaluations metrics are presented. In addition, comparisons with other encoders proposed in scientific literature are shown. The decreasing bit allocation shape applied to the quantized wavelet coefficients combined with arithmetic coding results is an efficient procedure. The performance comparisons of the proposed S-EMG data compression algorithm with the established

  2. DCS - A high flux beamline for time resolved dynamic compression science – Design highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capatina, D.; D’Amico, K.; Nudell, J.; Collins, J.; Schmidt, O.

    2016-01-01

    The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) beamline, a national user facility for time resolved dynamic compression science supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed construction and is being commissioned at Sector 35 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The beamline consists of a First Optics Enclosure (FOE) and four experimental enclosures. A Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirror system with 2.2 mrad incident angles in the FOE delivers pink beam to the experimental stations. A refocusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system is situated in each of the two most downstream enclosures. Experiments can be conducted in either white, monochromatic, pink or monochromatic-reflected beam mode in any of the experimental stations by changing the position of two interlocked components in the FOE. The beamline Radiation Safety System (RSS) components have been designed to handle the continuous beam provided by two in-line revolver undulators with periods of 27 and 30 mm, at closed gap, 150 mA beam current, and passing through a power limiting aperture of 1.5 x 1.0 mm 2 . A novel pink beam end station stop [1] is used to stop the continuous and focused pink beam which can achieve a peak heat flux of 105 kW/mm 2 . A new millisecond shutter design [2] is used to deliver a quick pulse of beam to the sample, synchronized with the dynamic event, the microsecond shutter, and the storage ring clock.

  3. Effects of hearing-aid dynamic range compression on spatial perception in a reverberant environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Henrik Gert; Wiinberg, Alan; Dau, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of fast-acting hearing-aid compression on normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners’ spatial perception in a reverberant environment. Three compression schemes—independent compression at each ear, linked compression between the two ears, and “spatially ideal...

  4. Effects of hearing-aid dynamic range compression on spatial perception in a reverberant environment

    OpenAIRE

    Hassager, Henrik Gert; Wiinberg, Alan; Dau, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of fast-acting hearing-aid compression on normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners’ spatial perception in a reverberant environment. Three compression schemes—independent compression at each ear, linked compression between the two ears, and “spatially ideal” compression operating solely on the dry source signal—were considered using virtualized speech and noise bursts. Listeners indicated the location and extent of their perceived sound images on the h...

  5. Influence of Selected Factors on the Relationship between the Dynamic Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurowski, Krystian; Grzeszczyk, Stefania

    2018-03-22

    In this paper, the relationship between the static and dynamic elastic modulus of concrete and the relationship between the static elastic modulus and compressive strength of concrete have been formulated. These relationships are based on investigations of different types of concrete and take into account the type and amount of aggregate and binder used. The dynamic elastic modulus of concrete was tested using impulse excitation of vibration and the modal analysis method. This method could be used as a non-destructive way of estimating the compressive strength of concrete.

  6. Finite Element Analysis of Aluminum Honeycombs Subjected to Dynamic Indentation and Compression Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S.M. Ayman Ashab

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behavior of aluminum hexagonal honeycombs subjected to out-of-plane dynamic indentation and compression loads has been investigated numerically using ANSYS/LS-DYNA in this paper. The finite element (FE models have been verified by previous experimental results in terms of deformation pattern, stress-strain curve, and energy dissipation. The verified FE models have then been used in comprehensive numerical analysis of different aluminum honeycombs. Plateau stress, σpl, and dissipated energy (EI for indentation and EC for compression have been calculated at different strain rates ranging from 102 to 104 s−1. The effects of strain rate and t/l ratio on the plateau stress, dissipated energy, and tearing energy have been discussed. An empirical formula is proposed to describe the relationship between the tearing energy per unit fracture area, relative density, and strain rate for honeycombs. Moreover, it has been found that a generic formula can be used to describe the relationship between tearing energy per unit fracture area and relative density for both aluminum honeycombs and foams.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Transverse Effects in Shock-Compressed Fibre-Textured Tantalum Polycrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heighway, Patrick; Higginbotham, Andrew; McGonegle, David; Wark, Justin

    2017-06-01

    Whilst uniaxially shock-compressed crystas have zero total strain transverse to the shock propagation direction, this is a global, rather than local constraint. For individual grains, expansion or contraction can occur via the Poisson effect, or via plasticity. Neighbouring grains in a polycrystal may therefore 'push' one another transverse to the shock, causing transverse strain anisotropy. Here we discuss the results of multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of elementary fibre-textured tantalum polycrystals shock-compressed along the [110] direction. Below the elastic limit, we observe transverse stress waves driven by the Poisson effect that cause bending of the grain boundaries. In our quadcrystal geometry, the average transverse strains were 15% of the longitudinal strain, while the stress difference across the grain boundaries was of 2.5% of the peak pressure, representing a small deviation from the Reuss limit. Transverse motion of the boundaries is also visible in the plastic regime, but analysis of the stress-strain state of the bulk material is complicated by twin and dislocation nucleation. Work is currently being undertaken to quantify the transverse strain anisotropy of plastically deformed polycrystals at pressures in excess of 40 GPa.

  8. EFFECTIVENESS OF LOCKING VERSUS DYNAMIC COMPRESSION PLATES FOR DIAPHYSEAL HUMERUS FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penugonda Ravi Shankar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of locking compression plate (LCP over dynamic compression plate (DCP in the management of diaphyseal fractures of the humerus. 38 patients with diaphyseal fracture of the shaft of the humerus were randomized prospectively and treated by open reduction and internal fixation with LCP or DCP. 11 patients underwent internal fixation by LCP and 27 by DCP. Fixation was done through an anterolateral or posterior approach. The outcome was assessed in terms of the union time, union rate, functional outcome, ROM and the incidence of complications. Functional outcome was assessed using the Romen’s et al series grading system . On comparing the results by tests of significance like Chi - sqare test, there was no significant difference in Romen’s et al scores between the two groups ( P >0.05. Though the average union time and recovery of ROM was found to be better for LCP as compared to DCP, it is not statistically significant. Complications such as infection were found to be higher with DCP as compared to LCP. This study proves that LCP can be considered a better surgical option for the management of diaphyseal fractures of the humerus as it offers a short union time and lower incidence of serious complications like infection. However, there appears to be no difference between the two groups in terms of the rate of union and functional outcome

  9. Compression and release dynamics of an active matter system of Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Amy; Tsang, Alan C. H.; Ouellette, Nicholas; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar

    Active matter, defined as ensembles of self-propelled particles, encompasses a large variety of systems at all scales, from nanoparticles to bird flocks. Though various models and simulations have been created to describe the dynamics of these systems, experimental verification has been difficult to obtain. This is frequently due to the complex interaction rules which govern the particle behavior, in turn making systematic varying of parameters impossible. Here, we propose a model for predicting the system evolution of compression and release of an active system based on experiments and simulations. In particular, we consider ensembles of the unicellular, photo-responsive algae, Euglena gracilis, under light stimulation. By varying the spatiotemporal light patterns, we are able to finely adjust cell densities and achieve arbitrary non-homogeneous distributions, including compression into high-density aggregates of varying geometries. We observe the formation of depletion zones after the release of the confining stimulus and investigate the effects of the density distribution and particle rotational noise on the depletion. These results provide implications for defining state parameters which determine system evolution.

  10. Comparison of the effect on bone healing process of different implants used in minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis: limited contact dynamic compression plate versus locking compression plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zichao; Xu, Haitao; Ding, Haoliang; Qin, Hui; An, Zhiquan

    2016-11-25

    Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) has been widely accepted because of its satisfactory clinical outcomes. However, the implant construct that works best for MIPO remains controversial. Different plate designs result in different influence mechanisms to blood flow. In this study, we created ulnar fractures in 42 beagle dogs and fixed the fractures using MIPO. The dogs were randomly divided into two groups and were fixed with a limited contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) or a locking compression plate (LCP). Our study showed that with MIPO, there was no significant difference between the LCP and the LC-DCP in terms of fracture fixation, bone formation, or mineralization. Combined with the previous literature, we inferred that the healing process is affected by the quality of fracture reduction more than plate selection.

  11. Dynamic scaling and large scale effects in turbulence in compressible stratified fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pharasi, Hirdesh K.; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the propagation of sound in a turbulent fluid which is confined between two horizontal parallel plates, maintained at different temperatures. In the homogeneous fluid, Staroselsky et al. had predicted a divergent sound speed at large length scales. Here we find a divergent sound speed and a vanishing expansion coefficient at large length scales. Dispersion relation and the question of scale invariance at large distance scales lead to these results. - Highlights: • Turbulence in a stratified fluid has been studied in the Boussinesq approximation. • We extend this study to include density fluctuations due to pressure fluctuations. • For a homogeneous weakly compressible fluid the sound speed is known to become scale dependent. • For the stratified fluid we show that the expansion coefficient is also scale dependent. • Our results are based on general dynamic scaling arguments rather than detailed calculation.

  12. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging method based on golden-ratio cartesian sampling and compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuo; Zhu, Yanchun; Xie, Yaoqin; Gao, Song

    2018-01-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (DMRI) is used to noninvasively trace the movements of organs and the process of drug delivery. The results can provide quantitative or semiquantitative pathology-related parameters, thus giving DMRI great potential for clinical applications. However, conventional DMRI techniques suffer from low temporal resolution and long scan time owing to the limitations of the k-space sampling scheme and image reconstruction algorithm. In this paper, we propose a novel DMRI sampling scheme based on a golden-ratio Cartesian trajectory in combination with a compressed sensing reconstruction algorithm. The results of two simulation experiments, designed according to the two major DMRI techniques, showed that the proposed method can improve the temporal resolution and shorten the scan time and provide high-quality reconstructed images.

  13. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging method based on golden-ratio cartesian sampling and compressed sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Li

    Full Text Available Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (DMRI is used to noninvasively trace the movements of organs and the process of drug delivery. The results can provide quantitative or semiquantitative pathology-related parameters, thus giving DMRI great potential for clinical applications. However, conventional DMRI techniques suffer from low temporal resolution and long scan time owing to the limitations of the k-space sampling scheme and image reconstruction algorithm. In this paper, we propose a novel DMRI sampling scheme based on a golden-ratio Cartesian trajectory in combination with a compressed sensing reconstruction algorithm. The results of two simulation experiments, designed according to the two major DMRI techniques, showed that the proposed method can improve the temporal resolution and shorten the scan time and provide high-quality reconstructed images.

  14. Temperature dependence of dynamic behavior of commercially pure titanium by the compression test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Su Min; Seo, Song Won; Park, Kyoung Joon; Min, Oak Key

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a Commercially Pure Titanium (CP-Ti) is investigated at high temperature Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) compression test with high strain-rate. Tests are performed over a temperature range from room temperature to 1000 .deg. C with interval of 200 deg. C and a strain-rate range of 1900∼2000/sec. The true flow stress-true strain relations depending on temperature are achieved in these tests. For construction of constitutive equation from the true flow stress-true strain relation, parameters for the Johnson-Cook constitutive equation is determined. And the modified Johnson-Cook equation is used for investigation of behavior of flow stress in vicinity of recrystallization temperature. The modified Johnson-Cook constitutive equation is more suitable in expressing the dynamic behavior of a CP-Ti at high temperature, i.e. about recrystallization temperature

  15. Intelligibility and Clarity of Reverberant Speech: Effects of Wide Dynamic Range Compression Release Time and Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Paul N.; Souza, Pamela E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of varying wide dynamic range compression (WDRC) release time on intelligibility and clarity of reverberant speech. The study also considered the role of individual working memory. Method: Thirty older listeners with mild to moderately-severe sloping sensorineural hearing loss…

  16. Multiresolution imaging using golden angle stack-of-stars and compressed sensing for dynamic MR urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Abhishek; Yoruk, Umit; Keerthivasan, Mahesh; Galons, Jean-Philippe; Sharma, Puneet; Johnson, Kevin; Martin, Diego R; Altbach, Maria I; Bilgin, Ali; Saranathan, Manojkumar

    2017-07-01

    To develop a novel multiresolution MRI methodology for accurate estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in vivo. A three-dimensional golden-angle radial stack-of-stars (SoS) trajectory was used for data acquisition on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Multiresolution reconstruction and analysis was performed using arterial input function reconstructed at 1-s. temporal resolution and renal dynamic data reconstructed using compressed sensing (CS) with 4-s temporal resolution. The method was first validated using simulations and the clinical utility of the technique was evaluated by comparing the GFR estimates from the proposed method to the estimated GFR (eGFR) obtained from serum creatinine for 10 subjects. The 4-s temporal resolution CS images minimized streaking artifacts and noise while the 1-s temporal resolution AIF minimized errors in GFR estimates. A paired t-test showed that there was no statistically significant difference between MRI based total GFR values and serum creatinine based eGFR estimates (P = 0.92). We have demonstrated the feasibility of multiresolution MRI using a golden angle radial stack-of-stars scheme to accurately estimate GFR as well as produce diagnostic quality dynamic images in vivo. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:303-311. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Dynamic' MR imaging of the cervical cord in patients with cervical spondylosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament; Significance of dynamic cord compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Tetsuo; Itoh, Takayuki; Takahashi, Akira (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Yanagi, Tsutomu; Yamamura, Akiko

    1992-01-01

    This investigation was designed to assess the influence of dynamic cord compression on severity and course of myelopathy. Sixty-seven patients consisted of 54 cases of cervical spondylosis and 13 cases of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament. These patients underwent 'dynamic' MRI imaging of the cervical spine. MR images in the sagittal view were obtained in three different neck positions: flexion, neutral, and extension. MR imaging was performed with a 0.15 T resistive unit. For technical reasons, the body coil was used. The pulse sequence was 500/30 (Tr msec/echo time msec) for T1 images. The spinal cord compression was accelerated in 32 cases when extended, in 2 cases when flexsed, and in 4 cases when both extended and flexed. In 21 cases, we compared myelograms with MR images in the same neck position. Findings of myelograms well corresponded with those of MR images on 83 percent of intervertebral levels. The patients with dynamic cord compression were proved to have severer long tract signs, and their disability was regressive or progressive case by case for an average of 21-month follow-up. The 'dynamic' MR imaging can provide dynamic nature of spinal cord compression, and prognostic clues. (author).

  18. Verification of Compressible and Incompressible Computational Fluid Dynamics Codes and Residual-based Mesh Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Aniruddha

    Code verifition is the process of ensuring, to the degree possible, that there are no algorithm deficiencies and coding mistakes (bugs) in a scientific computing simulation. In this work, techniques are presented for performing code verifition of boundary conditions commonly used in compressible and incompressible Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. Using a compressible CFD code, this study assesses the subsonic in flow (isentropic and fixed-mass), subsonic out ow, supersonic out ow, no-slip wall (adiabatic and isothermal), and inviscid slip-wall. The use of simplified curved surfaces is proposed for easier generation of manufactured solutions during the verifition of certain boundary conditions involving many constraints. To perform rigorous code verifition, general grids with mixed cell types at the verified boundary are used. A novel approach is introduced to determine manufactured solutions for boundary condition verifition when the velocity-field is constrained to be divergence-free during the simulation in an incompressible CFD code. Order of accuracy testing using the Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) is employed here for code verifition of the major components of an open-source, multiphase ow code - MFIX. The presence of two-phase governing equations and a modified SIMPLE-based algorithm requiring divergence-free flows makes the selection of manufactured solutions more involved than for single-phase, compressible flows. Code verifition is performed here on 2D and 3D, uniform and stretched meshes for incompressible, steady and unsteady, single-phase and two-phase flows using the two-fluid model of MFIX. In a CFD simulation, truncation error (TE) is the difference between the continuous governing equation and its discrete approximation. Since TE can be shown to be the local source term for the discretization error, TE is proposed as the criterion for determining which regions of the computational mesh should be refined/coarsened. For mesh

  19. Influence of dynamic compressive loading on the in vitro degradation behavior of pure PLA and Mg/PLA composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Qi, Chenxi; Han, Linyuan; Chu, Chenglin; Bai, Jing; Guo, Chao; Xue, Feng; Shen, Baolong; Chu, Paul K

    2017-12-01

    The effects of dynamic compressive loading on the in vitro degradation behavior of pure poly-lactic acid (PLA) and PLA-based composite unidirectionally reinforced with micro-arc oxidized magnesium alloy wires (Mg/PLA) are investigated. Dynamic compressive loading is shown to accelerate degradation of pure PLA and Mg/PLA. As the applied stress is increased from 0.1MPa to 0.9MPa or frequency from 0.5Hz to 2.5Hz, the overall degradation rate goes up. After immersion for 21days at 0.9MPa and 2.5Hz, the bending strength retention of the composite and pure PLA is 60.1% and 50%, respectively. Dynamic loading enhances diffusion of small acidic molecules resulting in significant pH decrease in the immersion solution. The synergistic reaction between magnesium alloy wires and PLA in the composite is further clarified by electrochemical tests. The degradation behavior of the pure PLA and PLA matrix in the composite under dynamic conditions obey the first order degradation kinetics and a numerical model is postulated to elucidate the relationship of the bending strength, stress, frequency, and immersion time under dynamic conditions. We systematically study the influence of dynamic loading on the degradation behavior of pure PLA and Mg/PLA. Dynamic compressive loading is shown to accelerate degradation of pure PLA and Mg/PLA. The synergistic reaction between magnesium alloy wires and PLA in the composite is firstly clarified by electrochemical tests. The degradation behavior of the pure PLA and PLA matrix in the composite under dynamic conditions obey the first order degradation kinetics. Then, a numerical model is postulated to elucidate the relationship of the bending strength, stress, frequency, and immersion time under dynamic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Low-complexity Compression of High Dynamic Range Infrared Images with JPEG compatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belyaev, Evgeny; Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    . Then we compress each image by a JPEG baseline encoder and include the residual image bit stream into the application part of JPEG header of the base image. As a result, the base image can be reconstructed by JPEG baseline decoder. If the JPEG bit stream size of the residual image is higher than the raw......We propose a low-complexity High Dynamic Range (HDR) infrared image (IR) coding algorithm assuming the typical case of IR images with an active range of more than 8 bit depth, but less than 16 bit depth. First, we separate an input image into base and residual images with maximum 8 bit depth each...... data size, then we include the raw residual image instead. If the residual image contains only zero values or the quality factor for it is 0 then we do not include the residual image into the header. Experimental results show that compared with JPEG-XT Part 6 with ’global Reinhard’ tone...

  1. Quantitative Evaluation of Temporal Regularizers in Compressed Sensing Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI is used in cancer imaging to probe tumor vascular properties. Compressed sensing (CS theory makes it possible to recover MR images from randomly undersampled k-space data using nonlinear recovery schemes. The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively evaluate common temporal sparsity-promoting regularizers for CS DCE-MRI of the breast. Methods. We considered five ubiquitous temporal regularizers on 4.5x retrospectively undersampled Cartesian in vivo breast DCE-MRI data: Fourier transform (FT, Haar wavelet transform (WT, total variation (TV, second-order total generalized variation (TGVα2, and nuclear norm (NN. We measured the signal-to-error ratio (SER of the reconstructed images, the error in tumor mean, and concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs of the derived pharmacokinetic parameters Ktrans (volume transfer constant and ve (extravascular-extracellular volume fraction across a population of random sampling schemes. Results. NN produced the lowest image error (SER: 29.1, while TV/TGVα2 produced the most accurate Ktrans (CCC: 0.974/0.974 and ve (CCC: 0.916/0.917. WT produced the highest image error (SER: 21.8, while FT produced the least accurate Ktrans (CCC: 0.842 and ve (CCC: 0.799. Conclusion. TV/TGVα2 should be used as temporal constraints for CS DCE-MRI of the breast.

  2. Online remote control systems for static and dynamic compression and decompression using diamond anvil cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Smith, Jesse S.; Rod, Eric; Lin, Chuanlong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-01-01

    The ability to remotely control pressure in diamond anvil cells (DACs) in accurate and consistent manner at room temperature, as well as at cryogenic and elevated temperatures, is crucial for effective and reliable operation of a high-pressure synchrotron facility such as High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT). Over the last several years, a considerable effort has been made to develop instrumentation for remote and automated pressure control in DACs during synchrotron experiments. We have designed and implemented an array of modular pneumatic (double-diaphragm), mechanical (gearboxes), and piezoelectric devices and their combinations for controlling pressure and compression/decompression rate at various temperature conditions from 4 K in cryostats to several thousand Kelvin in laser-heated DACs. Because HPCAT is a user facility and diamond cells for user experiments are typically provided by users, our development effort has been focused on creating different loading mechanisms and frames for a variety of existing and commonly used diamond cells rather than designing specialized or dedicated diamond cells with various drives. In this paper, we review the available instrumentation for remote static and dynamic pressure control in DACs and show some examples of their applications to high pressure research

  3. Low-complexity Compression of High Dynamic Range Infrared Images with JPEG compatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belyaev, Evgeny; Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    We propose a low-complexity High Dynamic Range (HDR) infrared image (IR) coding algorithm assuming the typical case of IR images with an active range of more than 8 bit depth, but less than 16 bit depth. First, we separate an input image into base and residual images with maximum 8 bit depth each....... Then we compress each image by a JPEG baseline encoder and include the residual image bit stream into the application part of JPEG header of the base image. As a result, the base image can be reconstructed by JPEG baseline decoder. If the JPEG bit stream size of the residual image is higher than the raw...... data size, then we include the raw residual image instead. If the residual image contains only zero values or the quality factor for it is 0 then we do not include the residual image into the header. Experimental results show that compared with JPEG-XT Part 6 with ’global Reinhard’ tone...

  4. Comparative performance of locally made and the foreign made dynamic compression plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilal, M.; Gul, R.M.; Mujahid, M.; Askar, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Bone implants are widely used to treat patients due to trauma in different causalities. The major types of bone implants are plates known as Dynamic Compression Plates (DCP) and nails, both made of stainless steel (AISI 316L Grade). In Pakistan both local made and foreign made (DCP) are available. The unit price of foreign made DCP is about 8 to 10 times that of the local made, however, no comprehensive study has been done on the comparison of these plates. An in-depth analysis was performed to compare the essential properties of six different brands of DCP including two foreign, two local and two unknown brands. These properties included mechanical properties, such as bending stiffness, yield strength, modulus of elasticity and hardness. Compositional analysis and various dimensions of plate important for bone healing process were also compared. The results show that all plates have similar mechanical properties. The compositional analysis showed some variations from the ASTM standards for most of the plates. The dimensional analysis of plates showed that Slot Width and Land were within range for most of the plates but the Spherical Radius was out of range for all the plates. Generally, all plates have no major differences in their properties, material and shape. (author)

  5. Dynamic Behavior of AA2519-T8 Aluminum Alloy Under High Strain Rate Loading in Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasumboye, A. T.; Owolabi, G. M.; Odeshi, A. G.; Yilmaz, N.; Zeytinci, A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effects of strain rate on the dynamic behavior, microstructure evolution and hence, failure of the AA2519-T8 aluminum alloy were investigated under compression at strain rates ranging from 1000 to 3500 s-1. Cylindrical specimens of dimensions 3.3 mm × 3.3 mm (L/D = 1) were tested using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar integrated with a digital image correlation system. The microstructure of the alloy was assessed using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Results showed that the dynamic yield strength of the alloy is strain rate dependent, with the maximum yield strength attained by the material being 500 MPa. The peak flow stress of 562 MPa was attained by the material at 3500 s-1. The alloy also showed a significant rate of strain hardening that is typical of other Al-Cu alloys; the rate of strain hardening, however, decreased with increase in strain rate. It was determined that the strain rate sensitivity coefficient of the alloy within the range of high strain rates used in this study is approximately 0.05 at 0.12 plastic strain; a more significant value than what was reported in literature under quasi-static loading. Micrographs obtained showed potential sites for the evolution of adiabatic shear band at 3500 s-1, with a characteristic circular-shaped surface profile comprising partially dissolved second phase particles in the continuous phase across the incident plane of the deformed specimen. The regions surrounding the site showed little or no change in the size of particles. However, the constituent coarse particles were observed as agglomerations of fractured pieces, thus having a shape factor different from those contained in the as-received alloy. Since the investigated alloy is a choice material for military application where it can be exposed to massive deformation at high strain rates, this study provides information on its microstructural and mechanical responses to such extreme loading condition.

  6. Mechanical analysis of transversal iliac fracture stabilization using dynamic compression plate or screws and PMM in polyurethane bone model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.C. Prada

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Pelvic fractures correspond to 20 to 30 % of the fractures observed in dogs. Complete fractures, especially with bone axis deviation should be surgically treated. The mechanical study of surgical techniques is of utmost importance to assess the best way of treating these injuries. This study compared, biomechanically, the use of a dynamic compression plate (DCP and screws (group 1 or screws and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA (group 2 to stabilize an iliac fracture using a static test. Sixteen canine synthetic hemi-pelvises (test specimens with a transverse iliac osteotomy were used. After fixation with implants, a load was applied to the acetabulum until failure. Group 1 maximal compressive load was 133.9±18.60 N, displacement at yield 21.10±3.59mm and stiffness 125.22±12.25N/mm. Group 2 maximal compressive load was 183.50±27.38N, displacement at yield 16.66±5.42mm and stiffness 215.68±33.34N/mm. The stabilization with polymethylmethacrylate was stronger than dynamic compression plate since it resisted a greater load in all test specimens.

  7. Multiaxial and dynamic compression behaviors of low-density porous materials and their constitutive equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Atsushi; Nagaki, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, uniaxial compression tests are conducted for studying the nonlinear deformation behaviors of a porous material during compression. The results of uniaxial compression tests at some constant strain rates indicate that the plateau stress, which is the stress level in the plateau region, shows strain-rate dependency. In the compression tests by varying the strain rates, it is revealed that the strain-rate dependency relates to the behavior of well-known overstress phenomena. Therefore, the viscoplastic constitutive equation derived by Perzyna is adopted to simulate the uniaxial compression and to represent the strain-rate dependency. A comparison of experimental and simulation results shows that the overstress phenomenon during the compression of the material can be simulated by using the viscoplastic constitutive equation. The multiaxial behavior of the material is also observed for the designing. Equibiaxial pre-strained compression tests are adopted for the observation of the characteristics. The results of these tests show that the pre-strain causes the porous material to harden, and the extent of the hardening depends on the amount of change in the total volume of the material. The multiaxial behaviors of the porous material are simulated by using the constitutive equations incorporating the structure transformation of the porous material, and these results also indicate the effect of volume change on the compression behavior.

  8. Effects of hearing-aid dynamic range compression on spatial perception in a reverberant environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassager, Henrik Gert; Wiinberg, Alan; Dau, Torsten

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of fast-acting hearing-aid compression on normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners' spatial perception in a reverberant environment. Three compression schemes-independent compression at each ear, linked compression between the two ears, and "spatially ideal" compression operating solely on the dry source signal-were considered using virtualized speech and noise bursts. Listeners indicated the location and extent of their perceived sound images on the horizontal plane. Linear processing was considered as the reference condition. The results showed that both independent and linked compression resulted in more diffuse and broader sound images as well as internalization and image splits, whereby more image splits were reported for the noise bursts than for speech. Only the spatially ideal compression provided the listeners with a spatial percept similar to that obtained with linear processing. The same general pattern was observed for both listener groups. An analysis of the interaural coherence and direct-to-reverberant ratio suggested that the spatial distortions associated with independent and linked compression resulted from enhanced reverberant energy. Thus, modifications of the relation between the direct and the reverberant sound should be avoided in amplification strategies that attempt to preserve the natural sound scene while restoring loudness cues.

  9. Compressibility effects on a shear flow in strongly coupled dusty plasma. I. A study using computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman

    2018-01-01

    We study compressibility effects on the two-dimensional strongly coupled dusty plasma by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with the Kolmogorov flow as an initial shear flow profile. Nonlinear compressible vortex flow dynamics and other linear and nonlinear properties of such flow in the presence of variable density, pressure, and electrostatic potential are addressed using a generalised compressible hydrodynamic model. The stabilizing effect of compressibility on the unstable shear flows in the presence of strong correlation ( τm>0 ) is presented. Increasing the Mach number relatively reduces the growth-rate of perturbation. On the other hand, strong correlation makes the medium to be more unstable and increases the growth rate. Using an eigen value solver, various linear properties of compressible Kolmogorov flow have been investigated for a range of variable parameters, for example, Mach number, Reynolds number, and viscoelastic coefficient (τm). Compressible Kolmogorov flow becomes unstable above a critical value of the Reynolds number (Rc), and below Rc, the shear flow is found to be neutrally stable. In this study, it is found that the viscoelasticity reduces the value of Rc. For our choice of parameters, at τm=τmc , the compressible Kolmogorov flow becomes unconditionally unstable and no Rc exists for values of τm higher than τmc . To address the nonlinear properties, for example, mode-mode interaction due to the presence of nonlinearity in the fluid, vortex formation, etc., a massively parallelized Advanced Generalized SPECTral Code (AG-Spect) has been developed. AG-Spect, a newly developed code, is an efficient tool to solve any set of nonlinear fluid dynamic equations. A good agreement in linear growth rates obtained from the eigen value solver and time dependent simulation (AG-Spect) is found. In our CFD study, the suppression of instability, elongated vortex structures, pattern formation, nonlinear saturation, and visco

  10. Magnitude-dependent and inversely-related osteogenic/chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells under dynamic compressive strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Christopher B; Hirota, Koji; Liu, Junze; Maldonado, Maricela; Hyle Park, B; Nam, Jin

    2018-02-01

    Biomechanical forces have been shown to significantly affect tissue development, morphogenesis, pathogenesis and healing, especially in orthopaedic tissues. Such biological processes are critically related to the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). However, the mechanistic details regarding how mechanical forces direct MSC differentiation and subsequent tissue formation are still elusive. Electrospun three-dimensional scaffolds were used to culture and subject hMSCs to various magnitudes of dynamic compressive strains at 5, 10, 15 or 20% (ε = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20) at a frequency of 1 Hz for 2 h daily for up to 28 days in osteogenic media. Gene expression of chondrogenic markers (ACAN, COL2A1, SOX9) and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis were upregulated in response to the increased magnitudes of compressive strain, whereas osteogenic markers (COL1A1, SPARC, RUNX2) and calcium deposition had noticeable decreases by compressive loading in a magnitude-dependent manner. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed enhanced viscoelastic modulus with respect to the increased dynamic strain peaking at 15%, which coincides with the maximal GAG synthesis. Furthermore, polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography revealed that mechanical loading enhanced the alignment of extracellular matrix to the greatest level by 15% strain as well. Overall, we show that the degree of differentiation of hMSCs towards osteogenic or chondrogenic lineage is inversely related, and it depends on the magnitude of dynamic compressive strain. These results demonstrate that multiphenotypic differentiation of hMSCs can be controlled by varying the strain regimens, providing a novel strategy to modulate differentiation specification and tissue morphogenesis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Comparative endurance testing of the Biomet Matthews Nail and the Dynamic Compression Screw, in simulated condylar and supracondylar femoral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Benjamin M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamic compression screw is a plate and screws implant used to treat fractures of the distal femur. The Biomet Matthews Nail is a new retrograde intramedullary nail designed as an alternative surgical option to treat these fractures. The objective of this study was to assess the comparative endurance of both devices. Method The dynamic compression screw (DCS and Biomet Matthews Nail (BMN were implanted into composite femurs, which were subsequently cyclically loaded using a materials testing machine. Simulated fractures were applied to each femur prior to the application of load. Either a Y type fracture or a transverse osteotomy was prepared on each composite femur using a jig to enable consistent positioning of cuts. Results The Biomet Matthews Nail demonstrated a greater endurance limit load over the dynamic compression screw in both fracture configurations. Conclusion The distal locking screws pass through the Biomet Matthews Nail in a unique "cruciate" orientation. This allows for greater purchase in the bone of the femoral condyle and potentially improves the stability of the fracture fixation. As these fractures are usually in weak osteoporotic bone, the Biomet Matthews Nail represents a favourable surgical option in these patients.

  12. High Precision Motion Control System for the Two-Stage Light Gas Gun at the Dynamic Compression Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdanowicz, E.; Guarino, V.; Konrad, C.; Williams, B.; Capatina, D.; D'Amico, K.; Arganbright, N.; Zimmerman, K.; Turneaure, S.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2017-06-01

    The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), has a diverse set of dynamic compression drivers to obtain time resolved x-ray data in single event, dynamic compression experiments. Because the APS x-ray beam direction is fixed, each driver at DCS must have the capability to move through a large range of linear and angular motions with high precision to accommodate a wide variety of scientific needs. Particularly challenging was the design and implementation of the motion control system for the two-stage light gas gun, which rests on a 26' long structure and weighs over 2 tons. The target must be precisely positioned in the x-ray beam while remaining perpendicular to the gun barrel axis to ensure one-dimensional loading of samples. To accommodate these requirements, the entire structure can pivot through 60° of angular motion and move 10's of inches along four independent linear directions with 0.01° and 10 μm resolution, respectively. This presentation will provide details of how this system was constructed, how it is controlled, and provide examples of the wide range of x-ray/sample geometries that can be accommodated. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  13. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of WEB-treated aneurysms: Can CFD predict WEB "compression" during follow-up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroff, Jildaz; Mihalea, Cristian; Da Ros, Valerio; Yagi, Takanobu; Iacobucci, Marta; Ikka, Léon; Moret, Jacques; Spelle, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    Recent reports have revealed a worsening of aneurysm occlusion between WEB treatment baseline and angiographic follow-up due to "compression" of the device. We utilized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in order to determine whether the underlying mechanism of this worsening is flow related. We included data from all consecutive patients treated in our institution with a WEB for unruptured aneurysms located either at the middle cerebral artery or basilar tip. The CFD study was performed using pre-operative 3D rotational angiography. From digital subtraction follow-up angiographies patients were dichotomized into two groups: one with WEB "compression" and one without. We performed statistical analyses to determine a potential correlation between WEB compression and CFD inflow ratio. Between July 2012 and June 2015, a total of 22 unruptured middle cerebral artery or basilar tip aneurysms were treated with a WEB device in our department. Three patients were excluded from the analysis and the mean follow-up period was 17months. Eleven WEBs presented "compression" during follow-up. Interestingly, device "compression" was statistically correlated to the CFD inflow ratio (P=0.018), although not to aneurysm volume, aspect ratio or neck size. The mechanisms underlying the worsening of aneurysm occlusion in WEB-treated patients due to device compression are most likely complex as well as multifactorial. However, it is apparent from our pilot study that a high arterial inflow is, at least, partially involved. Further theoretical and animal research studies are needed to increase our understanding of this phenomenon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Minimally invasive percutaneous compression plating versus dynamic hip screw for intertrochanteric fractures: a randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HU Ning

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Intertrochanteric femur fracture is a common injury in elderly patients. The dynamic hip screw (DHS has served as the standard choice for fixation; however it has several drawbacks. Studies of the percutaneous compression plate (PCCP are still inconclusive in regards to its effi cacy and safety. By comparing the two methods, we assessed their clinical therapeutic outcome. Methods: A total of 121 elderly patients with intertrochanteric femur fractures (type AO/OTA 31.A1- A2, Evans type 1 were divided randomly into two groups undergoing either a minimally invasive PCCP procedure or a conventional DHS fi xation. Results: The mean operation duration was signifi cantly shorter in the PCCP group (55.2 min versus 88.5 min, P<0.01. The blood loss was 156.5 ml±18.3 ml in the PCCP group and 513.2 ml±66.2 ml in the DHSgroup (P<0.01. Among the patients treated with PCCP, 3.1% needed blood transfusions, compared with 44.6% of those that had DHS surgery (P<0.01. The PCCP group displayed less postoperative complications (P<0.05. The mean American Society of Anesthesiologists score and Harris hip score in the PCCP group were better than those in the DHS group. There were no signifi cant differences in the mean hospital stay, mortality rates, or fracture healing. Conclusion: Due to several advantages, PCCP has the potential to become the ideal choice for treating intertrochanteric fractures (type AO/OTA 31.A1-A2, Evans type 1, particularly in the elderly. Key words: Hip fractures; Osteoporotic fractures; Surgical procedures, minimally invasive; Fracture fixation, internal

  15. Dynamic range compression in the honey bee auditory system toward waggle dance sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiya Tsujiuchi

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Honey bee foragers use a "waggle dance" to inform nestmates about direction and distance to locations of attractive food. The sound and air flows generated by dancer's wing and abdominal vibrations have been implicated as important cues, but the decoding mechanisms for these dance messages are poorly understood. To understand the neural mechanisms of honey bee dance communication, we analyzed the anatomy of antenna and Johnston's organ (JO in the pedicel of the antenna, as well as the mechanical and neural response characteristics of antenna and JO to acoustic stimuli, respectively. The honey bee JO consists of about 300-320 scolopidia connected with about 48 cuticular "knobs" around the circumference of the pedicel. Each scolopidium contains bipolar sensory neurons with both type I and II cilia. The mechanical sensitivities of the antennal flagellum are specifically high in response to low but not high intensity stimuli of 265-350 Hz frequencies. The structural characteristics of antenna but not JO neurons seem to be responsible for the non-linear responses of the flagellum in contrast to mosquito and fruit fly. The honey bee flagellum is a sensitive movement detector responding to 20 nm tip displacement, which is comparable to female mosquito. Furthermore, the JO neurons have the ability to preserve both frequency and temporal information of acoustic stimuli including the "waggle dance" sound. Intriguingly, the response of JO neurons was found to be age-dependent, demonstrating that the dance communication is only possible between aged foragers. These results suggest that the matured honey bee antennae and JO neurons are best tuned to detect 250-300 Hz sound generated during "waggle dance" from the distance in a dark hive, and that sufficient responses of the JO neurons are obtained by reducing the mechanical sensitivity of the flagellum in a near-field of dancer. This nonlinear effect brings about dynamic range compression in the honey bee

  16. Formation and Collapse of Quiescent Cloud Cores Induced by Dynamic Compressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Gilberto C.; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Shadmehri, Mohsen; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2007-11-01

    We present numerical hydrodynamic simulations of the formation, evolution, and gravitational collapse of isothermal molecular cloud cores in spherical geometry. A compressive wave is set up in a constant sub-Jeans density distribution of radius r=1 pc. As the wave travels through the simulation grid, a shock-bounded spherical shell is formed. The inner shock of this shell reaches and bounces off the center, leaving behind a central core with an initially almost uniform density distribution, surrounded by an envelope consisting of the material in the shock-bounded shell, which at late times develops a logarithmic slope close to -2, even in noncollapsing cases. The central core and the envelope are separated by a mild shock. The central core grows to sizes of ~0.1 pc and resembles a Bonnor-Ebert (BE) sphere, although it has significant dynamical differences: its self-gravity is initially negligible, and it is confined by the ram pressure of the infalling material, thus growing continuously in mass and size. With the appropriate parameters, the core mass eventually reaches an effective Jeans mass, at which time the core begins to collapse. Thus, the core evolves from a stable regime to an unstable one, implying the existence of a time delay between the appearance of the core and the onset of its collapse, but due to its growth in mass, rather than to the dissipation of its internal turbulence, as is often believed. These results suggest that prestellar cores may approximate BE structures, which are, however, of variable mass and may or may not experience gravitational collapse, in qualitative agreement with the large observed frequency of cores with BE-like profiles.

  17. An unstructured-mesh finite-volume MPDATA for compressible atmospheric dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühnlein, Christian, E-mail: christian.kuehnlein@ecmwf.int; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K., E-mail: piotr.smolarkiewicz@ecmwf.int

    2017-04-01

    An advancement of the unstructured-mesh finite-volume MPDATA (Multidimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm) is presented that formulates the error-compensative pseudo-velocity of the scheme to rely only on face-normal advective fluxes to the dual cells, in contrast to the full vector employed in previous implementations. This is essentially achieved by expressing the temporal truncation error underlying the pseudo-velocity in a form consistent with the flux-divergence of the governing conservation law. The development is especially important for integrating fluid dynamics equations on non-rectilinear meshes whenever face-normal advective mass fluxes are employed for transport compatible with mass continuity—the latter being essential for flux-form schemes. In particular, the proposed formulation enables large-time-step semi-implicit finite-volume integration of the compressible Euler equations using MPDATA on arbitrary hybrid computational meshes. Furthermore, it facilitates multiple error-compensative iterations of the finite-volume MPDATA and improved overall accuracy. The advancement combines straightforwardly with earlier developments, such as the nonoscillatory option, the infinite-gauge variant, and moving curvilinear meshes. A comprehensive description of the scheme is provided for a hybrid horizontally-unstructured vertically-structured computational mesh for efficient global atmospheric flow modelling. The proposed finite-volume MPDATA is verified using selected 3D global atmospheric benchmark simulations, representative of hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic flow regimes. Besides the added capabilities, the scheme retains fully the efficacy of established finite-volume MPDATA formulations.

  18. Mechanical behaviour of low-cost dynamic compression plates correlates with manufacturing quality standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluede, Edward; McDonald, Erik; Jergesen, Harry; Penoyar, Thomas; Calvert, Kayla

    2014-01-01

    This study compares the mechanical properties of low-cost stainless steel dynamic compression plates (DCPs) from developing-world manufacturers, adhering to varying manufacturing quality standards, with those of high-cost DCPs manufactured for use in the developed world. Standard-design ten-hole DCPs from six developing-world manufacturers and high-cost DCPs from two manufacturers in the developed world were studied. Nine plates from each manufacturer underwent mechanical testing: six in four-point monotonic bending to assess strength and stiffness and three in four-point bending fatigue. Statistical comparisons of the group means of monotonic bending test data were made, and a qualitative comparison was performed to assess failures in fatigue. Low-cost DCPs from manufacturers with at least one manufacturing quality standard had significantly higher bending strength and fewer failures in fatigue than did those from low-cost manufacturers with no recognised quality standards. High-cost DCPs demonstrated greater bending strength than did those in both low-cost groups. There were no differences in stiffness and fatigue failure between high-cost DCPs and those low-cost DCPs with quality standards. However, high-cost DCPs were significantly less stiff and had fewer fatigue failures than low-cost DCPs manufactured without such standards. Significant differences were found in the mechanical properties of ten-hole DCP plates from selected manufacturers in the developing and developed worlds. These differences correlated with reported quality certification in the manufacturing process. Mechanical analysis of low-cost implants may provide information useful in determining which manufacturers produce implants with the best potential for benefit relative to cost.

  19. Pancarpal Arthrodesis Without Rigid Coaptation Using the Hybrid Dynamic Compression Plate in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Juan M; Macias, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    To describe the complications, short- and long-term outcomes, and owner satisfaction for dogs treated with pancarpal arthrodesis (PCA) using the 2.7/3.5 mm locking and dynamic compression plate (DCP) hybrid pancarpal arthrodesis plate (hybrid DCP [HDCP]) without rigid coaptation in the postoperative period. Retrospective case series. Dogs with carpal injuries requiring PCA (n=15). Records (May 2007-October 2013) of dogs that had PCA using 3.5/2.7 mm HDCP (1 or 2 plates) and a Robert-Jones bandage were reviewed to determine intra- and post-operative complications and overall limb function. Follow-up was obtained by clinical evaluation at our institution and telephone interview of owners. Fourteen dogs had PCA stabilized with a single HDCP and 1 giant breed dog had PCA stabilized with 2 HDCP on the dorsal aspect of the carpus secured onto the 3rd and 4th metacarpal bones. Two dogs presented with bilateral injuries. Thirteen owners (87%) judged the results of surgery as excellent and 2 (13%) judged the results of surgery as good. Minor complications (4 limbs; 23%) were occasional episodes of mild lameness in 3 dogs and 3 episodes of discharging sinus tracts in a single dog. Major complications (3 limbs; 17%) included 1 surgical site infection and implant failure in a 43 kg dog with an active leishmaniasis infection and a concurrent bilateral sacro-iliac luxation. Two dogs developed episodes of discharging sinus tract and pain over the most distal screw that eventually necessitated plate removal. PCA without rigid coaptation can successfully be performed using the HDCP. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  20. Kinetics and critical conditions for initiation of dynamic recrystallization during hot compression deformation of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazani, Mehdi Shaban; Eghbali, Beitallah; Ebrahimi, Gholamreza

    2017-09-01

    Dynamic recrystallization behavior of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel were studied using hot compression tests over the range of temperatures from 900 °C to 1200 °C and strain rates from 0.001 s-1 to 1 s-1. The critical strain and stress for initiation of dynamic recrystallization were determined by plotting strain hardening rate vs. stress curves and a constitutive equation describing the flow stress at strains lower than peak strain. Also, the strain at maximum flow softening was obtained and the effect of deformation conditions (Z parameter) on the critical strain and stress were analyzed. Finally, the volume fraction of dynamic recrystallization was calculated at different deformation conditions using these critical values. Results showed that the model used for predicting the kinetics of dynamic recrystallization has a great consistency with the data, in the form of θ-ɛ curves, directly acquired from experimental flow curves.

  1. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Dynamic compression of hydrogen isotopes at megabar pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunin, Ryurik F.; Urlin, Vitalii D.; Medvedev, Aleksandr B.

    2010-09-01

    We review the results of shock compression of solid protium to the pressure 66 GPa, of liquid deuterium to 110 GPa, and of solid deuterium to 123 GPa in explosive devices of spherical geometry. The results are compared with data obtained by US scientists using traditional energy sources (explosives and light-gas guns), striker acceleration in a strong magnetic field (Z facility at Sandia), and powerful lasers (Nova at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Omega at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester). Results of density measurements of hydrogen isotopes under quasi-isentropic compression are analyzed. The absence of an anomalous increase in density under shock and quasi-isentropic compression of hydrogen isotopes is demonstrated. On the other hand, both processes exhibit a sharp change in the compression curve slopes, at the respective pressures 45 and 300 GPa.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of the Effect of Axial and Transverse Compression on the Residual Tensile Properties of Ballistic Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib C. Chowdhury

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic impact induces multiaxial loading on Kevlar® and polyethylene fibers used in protective armor systems. The influence of multiaxial loading on fiber failure is not well understood. Experiments show reduction in the tensile strength of these fibers after axial and transverse compression. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics (MD simulations to explain and develop a fundamental understanding of this experimental observation since the property reduction mechanism evolves from the atomistic level. An all-atom MD method is used where bonded and non-bonded atomic interactions are described through a state-of-the-art reactive force field. Monotonic tension simulations in three principal directions of the models are conducted to determine the anisotropic elastic and strength properties. Then the models are subjected to multi-axial loads—axial compression, followed by axial tension and transverse compression, followed by axial tension. MD simulation results indicate that pre-compression distorts the crystal structure, inducing preloading of the covalent bonds and resulting in lower tensile properties.

  3. Preserving spatial perception in rooms using direct-sound driven dynamic range compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Henrik Gert; May, Tobias; Wiinberg, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Fast-acting hearing-aid compression systems typically distort the auditory cues involved in the spatial perception of sounds in rooms by enhancing low-level reverberant energy portions of the sound relative to the direct sound. The present study investigated the benefit of a direct-sound driven c....... The independent direct-sound driven compressor created a sense of movement of the sound between the two ears, suggesting that preserving the interaural level differences via linked compression is advantageous with the proposed direct-sound driven compression scheme.......Fast-acting hearing-aid compression systems typically distort the auditory cues involved in the spatial perception of sounds in rooms by enhancing low-level reverberant energy portions of the sound relative to the direct sound. The present study investigated the benefit of a direct-sound driven...... compression system that adaptively selects appropriate time constants to preserve the listener’s spatial impression. Specifically, fast-acting compression was maintained for timefrequency units dominated by the direct sound while the processing of the compressor was linearized for time-frequency units...

  4. Non-invasive imaging of myocardial bridge by coronary computed tomography angiography: the value of transluminal attenuation gradient to predict significant dynamic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuehua; Yu, Mengmeng; Zhang, Jiayin; Li, Minghua [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Shanghai (China); Lu, Zhigang; Wei, Meng [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Shanghai (China)

    2017-05-15

    To study the diagnostic value of transluminal attenuation gradient (TAG) measured by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) for identifying relevant dynamic compression of myocardial bridge (MB). Patients with confirmed MB who underwent both CCTA and ICA within one month were retrospectively included. TAG was defined as the linear regression coefficient between luminal attenuation and distance. The TAG of MB vessel, length and depth of MB were measured and correlated with the presence and degree of dynamic compression observed at ICA. Systolic compression ≥50 % was considered significant. 302 patients with confirmed MB lesions were included. TAG was lowest (-17.4 ± 6.7 HU/10 mm) in patients with significant dynamic compression and highest in patients without MB compression (-9.5 ± 4.3 HU/10 mm, p < 0.001). Linear correlation revealed relation between the percentage of systolic compression and TAG (Pearson correlation, r = -0.52, p < 0.001) and no significant relation between the percentage of systolic compression and MB depth or length. ROC curve analysis determined the best cut-off value of TAG as -14.8HU/10 mm (area under curve = 0.813, 95 % confidence interval = 0.764-0.855, p < 0.001), which yielded high diagnostic accuracy (82.1 %, 248/302). The degree of ICA-assessed systolic compression of MB significantly correlates with TAG but not MB depth or length. (orig.)

  5. Dynamic cervicomedullary cord compression and alterations in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in children with achondroplasia: review of an 11-year surgical case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Debraj; Pressman, Barry D; Krakow, Deborah; Rimoin, David L; Danielpour, Moise

    2014-09-01

    Achondroplasia may be associated with compression at the cervicomedullary junction. Determining which patients are at greatest risk for neurological complications of cervicomedullary compression can be difficult. In the current study the authors reviewed their records to determine the incidence and clinical significance of dynamic cervicomedullary stenosis and obstruction of CSF flow along with surgical outcomes following posterior fossa decompression. The authors reviewed 34 consecutive cases involving symptomatic children with achondroplasia undergoing cervicomedullary decompression performed by a single surgeon over 11 years. Of these patients, 29 had undergone preoperative dynamic MRI of the cervicomedullary junction with cine (cinema) CSF flow studies; 13 of these patients underwent postoperative dynamic MRI studies. Clinical outcomes included changes in polysomnography, head circumference percentile, and fontanel characteristics. Radiographic outcomes included changes in dynamic spinal cord diameter, improvement in CSF flow at the foramen magnum, and change in the Evans ratio. Patients were predominantly female, with a mean age at presentation of 6.6 years and mean follow-up of 3.7 years (range 1-10 years). All patients had moderate to excellent improvement in postoperative polysomnography, slight decrease in average head circumference percentile (from 46.9th percentile to 45.7th percentile), and no subjective worsening of fontanel characteristics. The Evans ratio decreased by 2%, spinal cord diameter increased an average of 3.1 mm, 5.2 mm, and 0.2 mm in the neutral, flexed, and extended positions, respectively, and CSF flow improved qualitatively in all 3 positions. There were no postoperative infections, CSF leaks, or other major complications. None of the patients undergoing initial foramen magnum decompression performed at our medical center required reoperation. Patients with achondroplasia and symptomatic cervicomedullary compression have increased risk

  6. Dynamic impact testing on post-tensioned steel rectangular hollow sections; An investigation into the "compression-softening" effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Darragh; Nogal, Maria; O`Connor, Alan; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the results of dynamic impact testing on externally axially loaded steel rectangular hollow sections (RHSs) and compares the response to that of externally post-tensioned steel RHSs. Both the fundamental natural bending frequency of the beam sections and the corresponding damping ratios have been calculated from the measured dynamic response of the beam to a series of impact hammer strikes. The validity of the "compression-softening" effect for post-tensioned sections is tested. The implications of the research are vast, as currently, there is significant disagreement among researchers about the effect of pre- and post-tensioning loads on the dynamic characteristics of structures. The fundamental bending frequencies have been calculated and corresponding damping ratio have been calculated from dynamic test results for each axial load level. The bending frequencies have been calculated repeatedly while changing the axial load level and the subsequent changes in both frequency and damping ratio, with increasing axial load level have been analysed to determine if the results are statistically significant. It has been determined that "compression softening" theory is not valid for pre- or post-tensioned sections.

  7. Dynamic relaxation processes in compressible multiphase flows. Application to evaporation phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Métayer O.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Phase changes and heat exchanges are examples of physical processes appearing in many industrial applications involving multiphase compressible flows. Their knowledge is of fundamental importance to reproduce correctly the resulting effects in simulation tools. A fine description of the flow topology is thus required to obtain the interfacial area between phases. This one is responsible for the dynamics and the kinetics of heat and mass transfer when evaporation or condensation occurs. Unfortunately this exchange area cannot be obtained easily and accurately especially when complex mixtures (drops, bubbles, pockets of very different sizes appear inside the transient medium. The natural way to solve this specific trouble consists in using a thin grid to capture interfaces at all spatial scales. But this possibility needs huge computing resources and can be hardly used when considering physical systems of large dimensions. A realistic method is to consider instantaneous exchanges between phases by the way of additional source terms in a full non-equilibrium multiphase flow model [2,15,17]. In this one each phase obeys its own equation of state and has its own set of equations and variables (pressure, temperature, velocity, energy, entropy,.... When enabling the relaxation source terms the multiphase mixture instantaneously tends towards a mechanical or thermodynamic equilibrium state at each point of the flow. This strategy allows to mark the boundaries of the real flow behavior and to magnify the dominant physical effects (heat exchanges, evaporation, drag,... inside the medium. A description of the various relaxation processes is given in the paper. Les changements de phase et les transferts de chaleur sont des exemples de phénomènes physiques présents dans de nombreuses applications industrielles faisant intervenir des écoulements compressibles multiphasiques. La connaissance des mécanismes associés est primordiale afin de reproduire

  8. Anisotropic sensitivity of RDX and HMX from compressive shear reactive dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tingting; An, Qi; Liu, Yi; Zybin, Sergey V.; Goddard, William A., III; Materials Process Simulation Center, Caltech Team

    2011-06-01

    The ReaxFF reactive force field was applied to study the mechanical and chemical behavior of RDX and HMX under combined compression and shear load. We use it to predict the anisotropic shock sensitivity of RDX and HMX single crystals. After compressed uniaxially along different shock directions, several preferable slip systems are chosen based on the maximum resolved shear stress. The pure shear deformation is applied at constant rate on these slip systems to relax the mechanical stresses until the crystal becomes amorphous. We find that the shear on a slip system with larger steric hindrance between molecules leads to larger shear stress overshoot and faster temperature increase resulting in early bond-breaking processes and initiation of chemical reactions. Our simulations confirm the effect of steric hindrance to shear on shock anisotropy of sensitivity and capture the thermochemical processes dominating the phenomena of shear-induced chemical initiation of shock- compressed explosives.

  9. A biomechanical comparison of 3.5 locking compression plate fixation to 3.5 limited contact dynamic compression plate fixation in a canine cadaveric distal humeral metaphyseal gap model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipowicz, D; Lanz, O; McLaughlin, R; Elder, S; Werre, S

    2009-01-01

    3.5 locking compression plate (LCP) fixation was compared to 3.5 limited contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) fixation in a canine cadaveric, distal humeral metaphyseal gap model. Thirty paired humeri from adult, large breed dogs were separated into equal groups based on testing: static compression, cyclic compression, and cyclic torsion. Humeral constructs stabilised with LCP were significantly stiffer than those plated with LC-DCP when loaded in static axial compression (P = 0.0004). When cyclically loaded in axial compression, the LCP constructs were significantly less stiff than the LC-DCP constructs (P = 0.0029). Constructs plated with LCP were significantly less resistant to torsion over 500 cycles than those plated with LC-DCP (Plocking plates may be attributed to the stability afforded by the plate-screw interface of locking plates. The LCP constructs demonstrated less stiffness in dynamic testing in this model, likely due to plate-bone offset secondary to non-anatomic contouring and occasional incomplete seating of the locking screws when using the torque-limiting screw driver. Resolution of these aspects of LCP application may help improve the stiffness of fixation in fractures modeled by the experimental set-up of this investigation.

  10. Dynamic Compression Promotes the Matrix Synthesis of Nucleus Pulposus Cells Through Up-Regulating N-CDH Expression in a Perfusion Bioreactor Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yichun; Yao, Hui; Li, Pei; Xu, Wenbin; Zhang, Junbin; Lv, Lulu; Teng, Haijun; Guo, Zhiliang; Zhao, Huiqing; Hou, Gang

    2018-03-26

    An adequate matrix production of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells is an important tissue engineering-based strategy to regenerate degenerative discs. Here, we mainly aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of mechanical compression (i.e., static compression vs. dynamic compression) on the matrix synthesis of three-dimensional (3D) cultured NP cells in vitro. Rat NP cells seeded on small intestinal submucosa (SIS) cryogel scaffolds were cultured in the chambers of a self-developed, mechanically active bioreactor for 10 days. Meanwhile, the NP cells were subjected to compression (static compression or dynamic compression at a 10% scaffold deformation) for 6 hours once per day. Unloaded NP cells were used as controls. The cellular phenotype and matrix biosynthesis of NP cells were investigated by real-time PCR and Western blotting assays. Lentivirus-mediated N-cadherin (N-CDH) knockdown and an inhibitor, LY294002, were used to further investigate the role of N-CDH and the PI3K/Akt pathway in this process. Dynamic compression better maintained the expression of cell-specific markers (keratin-19, FOXF1 and PAX1) and matrix macromolecules (aggrecan and collagen II), as well as N-CDH expression and the activity of the PI3K/Akt pathway, in the 3D-cultured NP cells compared with those expression levels and activity in the cells grown under static compression. Further analysis showed that the N-CDH knockdown significantly down-regulated the expression of NP cell-specific markers and matrix macromolecules and inhibited the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway under dynamic compression. However, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway had no effects on N-CDH expression but down-regulated the expression of NP cell-specific markers and matrix macromolecules under dynamic compression. Dynamic compression increases the matrix synthesis of 3D-cultured NP cells compared with that of the cells under static compression, and the N-CDH-PI3K/Akt pathway is involved in this regulatory process

  11. Peri-implant soft tissue conditioning with provisional restorations in the esthetic zone: the dynamic compression technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittneben, Julia-Gabriela; Buser, Daniel; Belser, Urs C; Brägger, Urs

    2013-01-01

    An optimal esthetic implant restoration is a combination of a visually pleasing prosthesis and surrounding peri-implant soft tissue architecture. This article introduces a clinical method, the dynamic compression technique, of conditioning soft tissues around bone-level implants with provisional restorations in the esthetic zone. The technique has several goals: to establish an adequate emergence profile; to recreate a balanced mucosa course and level in harmony with the gingiva of the adjacent teeth, including papilla height/width, localization of the mucosal zenith and the tissue profile's triangular shape; as well as to establish an accurate proximal contact area with the adjacent tooth/implant crown.

  12. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kirsty A; Stearne, Sarah M; Alderson, Jacqueline A; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running.

  13. Biomechanical Comparison of Locking Compression Plate and Limited Contact Dynamic Compression Plate Combined with an Intramedullary Rod in a Canine Femoral Fracture-Gap Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matres-Lorenzo, Luis; Diop, Amadou; Maurel, Nathalie; Boucton, Marie-Charlotte; Bernard, Fabrice; Bernardé, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    To compare the biomechanical properties of locking compression plate (LCP) and a limited contact dynamic compression plate combined with an intramedullary rod (LC-DCP-R) in a cadaveric, canine, femoral fracture-gap model. In vitro biomechanical study; nonrandomized, complete block (dog). Paired cadaveric canine femora (n = 10 dogs). Paired femurs with a mid-diaphyseal 20 mm gap were stabilized with either LCP or LC-DCP-R. Nondestructive testing up to 60% of body weight (BW) was followed by a continuous destructive test. Comparative structural properties, 3-dimensional (3D) interfragmentary motion, and plate linear strain were evaluated. Paired comparisons were made between LCP and LC-DCP-R. Stiffness after nondestructive testing was significantly lower for LCP with a mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) of 61 N/mm (46-76) versus 89 N/mm (67-110) for LC-DCP-R (P = .0072). Ultimate load to failure was significantly lower for LCP with a median (interquartile range [IQR]) of 270 N (247-286) versus 371.5 (353-385) for LC-DCP-R (P = .002). Axial motion at 60% BW was significantly higher for LCP with a median (IQR) of 1.01 mm (0.71-1.26) versus 0.36 mm (0.20-0.49) for LC-DCP-R (P = .002). Shear motion was significantly higher for LCP with a median (IQR) of 1.18 (0.78-1.58) versus 0.72 mm (0.45-1.00) for LC-DCP-R (P = .018). Strain was significantly higher for mid-LCP surface with a mean (95%CI) at 60% BW of 979 μdef (579-1378) versus 583 μdef (365-801) at mid-LC-DCP-R surface (P = .0153). The elastic limit strain of the plates was not different and was reached at a mean (95%CI) load of 241 N (190-292) for LCP versus 290 N (245-336) for LC-DCP-R (P = .12). The LC-DCP-R showed higher stiffness and resistance to failure, lower interfragmentary motion, and lower plate strain and stress compared to LCP. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  14. Dynamic loads on human and animal surrogates at different test locations in compressed-gas-driven shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alay, E.; Skotak, M.; Misistia, A.; Chandra, N.

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic loads on specimens in live-fire conditions as well as at different locations within and outside compressed-gas-driven shock tubes are determined by both static and total blast overpressure-time pressure pulses. The biomechanical loading on the specimen is determined by surface pressures that combine the effects of static, dynamic, and reflected pressures and specimen geometry. Surface pressure is both space and time dependent; it varies as a function of size, shape, and external contour of the specimens. In this work, we used two sets of specimens: (1) anthropometric dummy head and (2) a surrogate rodent headform instrumented with pressure sensors and subjected them to blast waves in the interior and at the exit of the shock tube. We demonstrate in this work that while inside the shock tube the biomechanical loading as determined by various pressure measures closely aligns with live-fire data and shock wave theory, significant deviations are found when tests are performed outside.

  15. Dynamic loads on human and animal surrogates at different test locations in compressed-gas-driven shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alay, E.; Skotak, M.; Misistia, A.; Chandra, N.

    2018-01-01

    Dynamic loads on specimens in live-fire conditions as well as at different locations within and outside compressed-gas-driven shock tubes are determined by both static and total blast overpressure-time pressure pulses. The biomechanical loading on the specimen is determined by surface pressures that combine the effects of static, dynamic, and reflected pressures and specimen geometry. Surface pressure is both space and time dependent; it varies as a function of size, shape, and external contour of the specimens. In this work, we used two sets of specimens: (1) anthropometric dummy head and (2) a surrogate rodent headform instrumented with pressure sensors and subjected them to blast waves in the interior and at the exit of the shock tube. We demonstrate in this work that while inside the shock tube the biomechanical loading as determined by various pressure measures closely aligns with live-fire data and shock wave theory, significant deviations are found when tests are performed outside.

  16. Retrofit device to improve vapor compression cooling system performance by dynamic blower speed modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Robert Paul; Hahn, David C.; Scaringe, Robert P.

    2015-12-08

    A device and method are provided to improve performance of a vapor compression system using a retrofittable control board to start up the vapor compression system with the evaporator blower initially set to a high speed. A baseline evaporator operating temperature with the evaporator blower operating at the high speed is recorded, and then the device detects if a predetermined acceptable change in evaporator temperature has occurred. The evaporator blower speed is reduced from the initially set high speed as long as there is only a negligible change in the measured evaporator temperature and therefore a negligible difference in the compressor's power consumption so as to obtain a net increase in the Coefficient of Performance.

  17. Effect of Fiber Orientation on Dynamic Compressive Properties of an Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    varying types of fibers on the post-peak compression behavior of UHPC. As might be expected qualitatively, adding fibers results in a more gradual descent...predominantly affected by alignment in the direction of flow . The following figures illustrate the vari - ation of fiber orientation as a function of...orientations were non-destructively evaluated using x-ray computed tomography. Fibers showed flow -induced alignment along the length of the beam. The

  18. Formation and Collapse of Quiescent Cloud Cores Induced by Dynamic Compressions

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, Gilberto C.; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Shadmehri, Mohsen; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2007-01-01

    (Abridged) We present numerical hydrodynamical simulations of the formation, evolution and gravitational collapse of isothermal molecular cloud cores. A compressive wave is set up in a constant sub-Jeans density distribution of radius r = 1 pc. As the wave travels through the simulation grid, a shock-bounded spherical shell is formed. The inner shock of this shell reaches and bounces off the center, leaving behind a central core with an initially almost uniform density distribution, surrounde...

  19. Low-complexity Compression of High Dynamic Range Infrared Images with JPEG compatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belyaev, Evgeny; Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    . Then we compress each image by a JPEG baseline encoder and include the residual image bit stream into the application part of JPEG header of the base image. As a result, the base image can be reconstructed by JPEG baseline decoder. If the JPEG bit stream size of the residual image is higher than the raw......-mapping, the proposed approach has lower complexity and similar rate-distortion performance on IR test images....

  20. Dynamic Compression Experiments on Hydrogen and Deuterium in the Warm Dense Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjarlais, Michael; McCoy, Chad; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas; Knudson, Marcus; Redmer, Ronald

    2017-06-01

    Recently a shock-ramp platform has been developed on the Z Accelerator to access off-Hugoniot states in liquids. The accelerator delivers a two-step current pulse; the first accelerates the electrode to a constant velocity, which upon impact with the sample cell creates a well-defined shock, the subsequent current rise produces ramp compression from the initially shocked state producing relatively cool (1-2 kK), high pressure (>300 GPa), high compression (10 to 15-fold compression) states. This technique allows experimental access to the region of phase space where hydrogen is predicted to undergo a first-order phase transition from an insulating molecular-like to a conducting atomic-like liquid. Here we discuss the experimental platform, survey various theoretical predictions for the liquid-liquid, insulator-to-metal transition in hydrogen, and present results of experiments on both deuterium and hydrogen that clearly show an abrupt transition to a metallic state. We also present results from recent experiments at higher temperatures (3-4 kK) and compare the observations to both first-principles theory and previous step-wise loading experiments that exhibited a minimum metallic conductivity. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Cyber terrorism prevention and counteraction workshop review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pastukhov, O.M.

    2011-01-01

    A NATO Advanced Training Course (ATC ) on Cyber Terrorism Prevention and Counteraction workshop, held in Kiev on September 27-29, 2010, allowed the participants to share their experiences with experts from Ukraine, a Partnership for Peace country. The participants exchanged their ideas on the ways

  2. Fracture Evolution Around a Cavity in Brittle Rock Under Uniaxial Compression and Coupled Static-Dynamic Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lei; Li, Xibing; Taheri, Abbas; Wu, Qiuhong; Xie, Xiaofeng

    2018-02-01

    To experimentally investigate the stability of underground excavations under high in situ stress conditions, several rock samples with a mini-tunnel were prepared and subjected to monotonic axial and coupled static-dynamic loading until failure. Mini-tunnels were generated by drilling circular or cubic cavities in the centre of granite rock blocks. Strain gauges were used to monitor the deformation of the mini-tunnels at different locations, and a high-speed camera system was used to capture the cracking and failure process. We found that the dynamic crack initiation stress, failure mode and dynamic crack velocity of the specimen all depend on the pre-stress level when the sample is under otherwise similar dynamic disturbance conditions. The crack initiation stress threshold first increased slightly and then decreased dramatically with the increase in the pre-stress value. The specimens were mainly fractured by tensile cracks parallel to the compression line under lower pre-stress, while they were severely damaged with additional shear cracks under higher pre-stress. Furthermore, the propagation velocity of the primary crack was significantly larger than that of the subsequent cracks. The effect of applying different amounts of static pre-stresses on the velocity of the primary tensile crack was similar to that observed for the crack initiation stress threshold; however, it did not affect the velocity of the secondary and subsequent tensile cracks.

  3. A biomechanical comparison of conventional dynamic compression plates and string-of-pearls™ locking plates using cantilever bending in a canine Ilial fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzig, Allison R; Butler, James R; Priddy, Lauren B; Lacy, Kristen R; Elder, Steven H

    2017-07-13

    Fracture of the ilium is common orthopedic injury that often requires surgical stabilization in canine patients. Of the various methods of surgical stabilization available, application of a lateral bone plate to the ilium is the most common method of fixation. Many plating options are available, each having its own advantages and disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a 3.5 mm String-of-Pearls™ plate and a 3.5 mm dynamic compression plate in a cadaveric canine ilial fracture model. Hemipelves were tested in cantilever bending to failure and construct stiffness, yield load, displacement at yield, ultimate load, and mode of failure were compared. The mean stiffness of dynamic compression plate (116 ± 47 N/mm) and String-of-Pearls™ plate (107 ± 18 N/mm) constructs, mean yield load of dynamic compression plate (793 ± 333 N) and String-of-Pearls™ plate (860 ± 207 N) constructs, mean displacement at yield of dynamic compression plate (8.6 ± 3.0 mm) and String-of-Pearls™ plate (10.2 ± 2.8 mm) constructs, and ultimate load at failure of dynamic compression plate (936 ± 320 N) and String-of-Pearls™ plate (939 ± 191 N) constructs were not significantly different. No differences were found between constructs with respect to mode of failure. No significant biomechanical differences were found between String-of-Pearls™ plate and dynamic compression plate constructs in this simplified cadaveric canine ilial fracture model.

  4. Dynamic Recrystallization Behavior of AISI 420 Stainless Steel under Hot Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y.; Di, H. S.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2015-04-01

    Hot deformation behavior of AISI 420 stainless steel was studied under hot compression tests in the temperature range of 950 to 1150 °C and strain rates of 0.01 s-1 and 0.1 s-1. The study indicates that higher deformation temperature makes the peak stress pronounced and the occurrence of DRX is detected by inflection point in the work hardening rate vs. flow stress (θ-σ) plot, irrespective of the shape of flow stress curve. Local misorientation (ML) was calculated to reveal the local change in the crystal orientation. The distribution of ML suggested that the process of DRX reduces the local misorientation during hot deformation. The critical stress for initiation of DRX under different deformation conditions was determined by setting the derivative of the third order polynomial to θ-σ plot. A good linear relationship between critical stress (σc) & critical strain (ɛc) and Zener-Hollomon parameter was established.

  5. A new technique for insertion of barrel plate over dy-namic hip/compression lag screw: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naranje Sameer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Dynamic hip/compression screw (DHS/ DCS is one of the most commonly performed surgeries in orthopaedic practice. Sliding barrel plate over the DHS/DCS lag screw is one of the very crucial and at times uncomfor-table and time consuming steps of DHS/DCS surgery espe-cially when it comes to inexperienced surgeons and residents. Also in developing countries where not all stan-dard instrumentation is always available, this crucial step becomes more time consuming. Here we present a case re-port of 58-year-old male patient with intertrochanteric fracture, in which we used a new device for insertion of barrel plate over DHS/DCS lag screw and found that a small DHS/DCS lag screw extension (sliding jig of barrel plate can be very helpful to slide barrel plate over the DHS/DCS lag screw. Key words: Bone screws; Intertrochanteric fracture; Femoral fracture

  6. Secure Hashing of Dynamic Hand Signatures Using Wavelet-Fourier Compression with BioPhasor Mixing and Discretization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Kuan Yip

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a novel method for secure computation of biometric hash on dynamic hand signatures using BioPhasor mixing and discretization. The use of BioPhasor as the mixing process provides a one-way transformation that precludes exact recovery of the biometric vector from compromised hashes and stolen tokens. In addition, our user-specific discretization acts both as an error correction step as well as a real-to-binary space converter. We also propose a new method of extracting compressed representation of dynamic hand signatures using discrete wavelet transform (DWT and discrete fourier transform (DFT. Without the conventional use of dynamic time warping, the proposed method avoids storage of user's hand signature template. This is an important consideration for protecting the privacy of the biometric owner. Our results show that the proposed method could produce stable and distinguishable bit strings with equal error rates (EERs of and for random and skilled forgeries for stolen token (worst case scenario, and for both forgeries in the genuine token (optimal scenario.

  7. Compressive strain induced dynamical stability of monolayer 1T-MX2 (M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyong; Wu, Musheng; Xu, Bo; Liu, Ruifan; Ouyang, Chuying

    2017-11-01

    The lattice dynamical properties of 1T–MX2 (M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se) under different strains were studied by using density functional perturbation theory method. Our results show that all MX2 with 1T phase in our calculations are dynamical instable under zero strain or tensile strain as obvious imaginary frequencies (soft modes) exist. When 3% biaxial compressive strains are applied, the imaginary frequencies remain except that the absolute values of maximum imaginary frequency decrease. With the increase of compressive strain to be 6%, 1T–MoS2, 1T–MoSe2, 1T–WS2 become stable, whereas 1T–WSe2 has small imaginary frequencies. When biaxial compressive strain reaches 9%, all 1T–MX2 are dynamical stable without imaginary frequencies in the phonon dispersion curves. Energy band structures show that all 1T–MX2 are metallic, regardless of zero strain or compressive strain. Therefore, compressive strain could be a practical approach to enhance the stability of 1T–MX2 while maintaining the metallic property.

  8. Spatial warping by oriented line detectors can counteract neural delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Don A.; Eagleman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The slow speed of neural transmission necessitates that cortical visual information from dynamic scenes will lag reality. The “perceiving the present” (PTP) hypothesis suggests that the visual system can mitigate the effect of such delays by spatially warping scenes to look as they will in ~100 ms from now (Changizi, 2001). We here show that the Hering illusion, in which straight lines appear bowed, can be induced by a background of optic flow, consistent with the PTP hypothesis. However, importantly, the bowing direction is the same whether the flow is inward or outward. This suggests that if the warping is meant to counteract latencies, it is accomplished by a simple strategy that is insensitive to motion direction, and that works only under typical (forward-moving) circumstances. We also find that the illusion strengthens with longer pulses of optic flow, demonstrating motion integration over ~80 ms. The illusion is identical whether optic flow precedes or follows the flashing of bars, exposing the spatial warping to be equally postdictive and predictive, i.e., peri-dictive. Additionally, the illusion is diminished by cues which suggest the bars are independent of the background movement. Collectively, our findings are consistent with a role for networks of visual orientation-tuned neurons (e.g., simple cells in primary visual cortex) in spatial warping. We conclude that under the common condition of forward ego-motion, spatial warping counteracts the disadvantage of neural latencies. It is not possible to prove that this is the purpose of spatial warping, but our findings at minimum place constraints on the PTP hypothesis, demonstrating that any spatial warping for the purpose of counteracting neural delays is not a precise, on-the-fly computation, but instead a heuristic achieved by a simple mechanism that succeeds under normal circumstances. PMID:24198798

  9. Spatial warping by oriented line detectors can counteract neural delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don eVaughn

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The slow speed of neural transmission necessitates that cortical visual information from dynamic scenes will lag reality. The perceiving the present (PTP hypothesis suggests that the visual system can mitigate the effect of such delays by spatially warping scenes to look as they will in ~100 ms from now (Changizi, 2001. We here show that the Hering illusion, in which straight lines appear bowed, can be induced by a background of optic flow, consistent with the PTP hypothesis. However, importantly, the bowing direction is the same whether the flow is inward or outward. This suggests that if the warping is meant to counteract latencies, it is accomplished by a simple strategy that is insensitive to motion direction, and that works only under typical (forward-moving circumstances. We also find that the illusion strengthens with longer pulses of optic flow, demonstrating motion integration over ~80 ms. The illusion is identical whether optic flow precedes or follows the flashing of bars, exposing the spatial warping to be equally postdictive and predictive, i.e., peri-dictive. Additionally, the illusion is diminished by cues which suggest the bars are independent of the background movement. Collectively, our findings are consistent with a role for networks of visual orientation-tuned neurons (e.g., simple cells in primary visual cortex in spatial warping. We conclude that under the common condition of forward ego-motion, spatial warping counteracts the disadvantage of neural latencies. It is not possible to prove that this is the purpose of spatial warping, but our findings at minimum place constraints on the PTP hypothesis, demonstrating that any spatial warping for the purpose of counteracting neural delays is not a precise, on-the-fly computation, but instead a heuristic achieved by a simple mechanism that succeeds under normal circumstances.

  10. Progress and monitoring system on compression and transmission technologies of dynamic image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Saijo, Nobuyuki; Nakajo, Ken

    2001-01-01

    The Toshiba Corporation developed a real-time dynamic image transmission matched with quality of transmission circuit by using MPEG-4 which was recent international standard system for the dynamic image coding system. Concretely, this system made possible on real-time dynamic image transmission even at transmission on wireless circuit such as portable telephone, PHS, wireless LAN, and so on, at viewpoint of the mobile communication. And, by using the wireless circuit, it could be built without any limit of transmission cable, to realize its layout-free establishment. In addition, this system uses only image for communication without using voice, and some devices were carried out to upgrade image and frame speed as possible. Here were described on outlines of transmission system and principle of detection MPEG-4, and function and application of monitoring system using this system. (G.K.)

  11. Adiabatic Compression Initiation Characteristics of Liquid Propellant Nitromethane under Dynamic Fill Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    transparent chamber permits high-speed cinematography of the dynamic flow tests . PCRL attended program briefing meetings held in Monroe, Louisiana...65211 41 University of Missouri at Kansas City Department of Phisics ATTN: Professor R.D. Murphy 1110 East 48th Street Kansas City, MO 64110-2499

  12. Electric-gun studies of conductors in high magnetic fields and experiments in dynamic flux compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osher, J. E.; Chau, H. H.; Lee, R. S.; Tipton, R. E.; Weingart, R. C.

    1989-07-01

    The devices we call electric guns operate by discharging a fast capacitor bank through a thin, metallic bridge-foil load. The explosion of the foil and the accompanying magnetic forces acting on the bridge-foil plasma accelerate a thin flyer plate of dielectric material initially placed on top of the bridge foil. In hypervelocity impact studies with the linear electric gun, a thin, flat flyer is punched out of a cover sheet of dielectric (or dielectric/metallic composite) material by the explosion of the bridge foil and accelerated down a short barrel to impact on a target. In the coaxial gun, a cylindrical bridge foil is used to implode a cylindrical dielectric or dielectric/metallic composite (liner) flyer to produce a high peak compression through axial convergence. In this paper we discuss the range of currents, their rate of rise, and the magnetic fields attained by our fast capacitor banks, which supply power to the electric gun to explode the bridge foil. Also included is a brief study of the change of resistance of the bridge-foil element as a function of time for various flyer mass loadings for the linear geometry of the gun. The change in resistance can be viewed as a type of opening switch for pulsed-power applications.

  13. Entropy Stable Summation-by-Parts Formulations for Compressible Computational Fluid Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Carpenter, M.H.

    2016-11-09

    A systematic approach based on a diagonal-norm summation-by-parts (SBP) framework is presented for implementing entropy stable (SS) formulations of any order for the compressible Navier–Stokes equations (NSE). These SS formulations discretely conserve mass, momentum, energy and satisfy a mathematical entropy equality for smooth problems. They are also valid for discontinuous flows provided sufficient dissipation is added at shocks and discontinuities to satisfy an entropy inequality. Admissible SBP operators include all centred diagonal-norm finite-difference (FD) operators and Legendre spectral collocation-finite element methods (LSC-FEM). Entropy stable multiblock FD and FEM operators follows immediately via nonlinear coupling operators that ensure conservation, accuracy and preserve the interior entropy estimates. Nonlinearly stable solid wall boundary conditions are also available. Existing SBP operators that lack a stability proof (e.g. weighted essentially nonoscillatory) may be combined with an entropy stable operator using a comparison technique to guarantee nonlinear stability of the pair. All capabilities extend naturally to a curvilinear form of the NSE provided that the coordinate mappings satisfy a geometric conservation law constraint. Examples are presented that demonstrate the robustness of current state-of-the-art entropy stable SBP formulations.

  14. High spatial and temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography using compressed sensing with magnitude image subtraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapacchi, Stanislas; Han, Fei; Natsuaki, Yutaka; Kroeker, Randall; Plotnik, Adam; Lehrman, Evan; Sayre, James; Laub, Gerhard; Finn, J Paul; Hu, Peng

    2014-05-01

    We propose a compressed-sensing (CS) technique based on magnitude image subtraction for high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA). Our technique integrates the magnitude difference image into the CS reconstruction to promote subtraction sparsity. Fully sampled Cartesian 3D CE-MRA datasets from 6 volunteers were retrospectively under-sampled and three reconstruction strategies were evaluated: k-space subtraction CS, independent CS, and magnitude subtraction CS. The techniques were compared in image quality (vessel delineation, image artifacts, and noise) and image reconstruction error. Our CS technique was further tested on seven volunteers using a prospectively under-sampled CE-MRA sequence. Compared with k-space subtraction and independent CS, our magnitude subtraction CS provides significantly better vessel delineation and less noise at 4× acceleration, and significantly less reconstruction error at 4× and 8× (P MRA with higher spatial and temporal resolution than current clinical TWIST protocol while maintaining comparable image quality (2.8 ± 0.5 vs. 3.0 ± 0.4, P = NS). Our technique is promising for dynamic CE-MRA. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A Case for Relational Leadership and an Ethics of Care for Counteracting Bullying at Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Brigitte; Scherman, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    This paper attends to a theoretical exposition of relational leadership and ethics care as complementary approaches to educational leadership in counteracting bullying at schools. Schools constitute complex systems of activities, processes and dynamics. More specifically, a social system in schools is a web of interactions between the various…

  16. Assessment of the Resistance of a Polymethylmethacrylate (Pmma Dynamic Compression Plate (DCP Prototype Tested on Osteotomized Canine Femurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel Cardona R.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Femur fractures are the most frequent long bone fractures in small animals. Due to the femur’s anatomical position, it is difficult to immobilize, and therefore internal fixations are very useful. Dynamic compression plates (DCP provide high stability, are durable, minimize fragment movement and promote primary healing of the bone. Advantages of this treatment include anatomical reconstruction, early mobility and carrying capacity of the affected limb. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA is an acrylic resin that has proved very useful in bone tumor treatment, cranial deformation prosthesis, percutaneous vertebroplasty and testicular prosthesis in animals. The purpose of this study was to manufacture DCP-PMMA and test its resistance to the different forces present in a fracture. Forty-eight (48 3.5MM x 4-hole DCP were made from an alginate mold. Six (6 femurs were obtained from canine cadavers zeighing from 10 to 20 kg, which underwent osteotomy simulating an oblique fracture. The plates were subsequently positioned in the osteotomized bones to submit them to the various forces involved in a fracture. The DCP-PMMA resisted a torque force of 2.83 newton/metres and a compression and flexion force of 0.21 kilonewton. The obtained resistance of the DCP-PMMA was an average of 20 kg per force. The results of this study show that it is possible to make a DCP-PMMA 3.5 mm x 4-hole, the resistance of which is of 20 kg against the three applied forces, and that it can be used to stabilize long bone fractures subjected to a pressure of less than 20 kg.

  17. On the polar moment of inertia of a compressible body. [planetary rotational dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The rotational dynamics of a body are governed by the values of its principle moments of inertia. These quantities are not directly observable, but they are related to the harmonic coefficients of the external gravity field and to the density distribution within the body, both of which can be inferred from appropriate observations. It is shown that, for the particular case of a spherical planet whose density varies as a power of the radial distance, the principal moment of inertia has an elegantly simple form. Application of this simplified case to the Jovian planets suggests that the density profiles outside the central core are approximately linear, with the apparent exception of Neptune.

  18. Core interventions to counteract school bullying

    OpenAIRE

    Cowie, Helen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we advocate the development of a whole-school approach (WSA) to counteract bullying. The WSA works at different levels of intervention in order to involve all members of the school community. The approach also works across the curriculum to promote the message that conflict can be resolved peacefully, that bullying is unfair and unjust, and that all children have the right to come to school to learn and socialise in harmony and safety. The WSA addresses bullying at three differe...

  19. Study on Dynamic Compressive Mechanical Properties and Failure Modes of Heat-Treated Granite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang Wang

    Full Text Available Abstract Temperature and external load are two important factors affecting the mechanical properties of rock material. The test on heat- treated granite specimen was carried out by using an improved split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB. Based on the test data, the dynamic behavior and failure characteristics of the granite under the coupling action of temperature and impact loading are studied. The results show that the amplitude of incident wave increases with the impact velocity of striker, and the shapes of the transmitted and reflected waves are closely related to the failure state of the specimen. The stress-strain curves for the heat-treated specimens above 700oC are obviously different to those below 500oC in terms of the slopes for the ascending segment and the peak stress, indicating that there is a temperature threshold between 500oC and 700oC. Under the same velocity, the strain rate decreases slightly and then increases as the temperature increases. At a constant temperature, strain rate increases linearly with the impact velocity. The relationship between elastic modulus and strain rate for the heat-treated specimen obviously tends to have no regularity. In addition, both peak stress and peak strain exhibit strain rate sensitivity, but different increasing rates for different temperatures are detected. Below 500oC, the influence of temperature on peak stress and peak strain is not evident, however, the influence becomes remarkable at 700oC and 900oC.

  20. Clinical comparison of the hybrid dynamic compression plate and the castless plate for pancarpal arthrodesis in 219 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Poppy C; Meeson, Richard L; Thorne, Rebecca M; Butterworth, Steven J; Rutherford, Scott; Renwick, Alasdair I C; Wustefeld-Janssens, Brandan; Witte, Philip G K; Woods, Samantha; Parsons, Kevin J; Keeley, Benjamin J; Owen, Martin R; Li, Alex; Arthurs, Gareth I

    2015-01-01

    To describe and compare a large population of dogs that had pancarpal arthrodesis (PCA) using either a hybrid dynamic compression plate (HDCP) or a CastLess Plate (CLP). Multicenter, retrospective, cohort study. Dogs (n = 240; 261 PCA). Medical records (2000-2012) from 12 UK orthopedic centers were reviewed for dogs that had PCA to document signalment, diagnosis, arthrodesis method, and complication rates. Follow-up data were used to compare outcome (lameness evaluation and radiographic healing) after use of HDCP and CLP plates. PCA was performed with HDCP in 125 cases, CLP in 105, and by other techniques in 31. Carpal hyperextension injury was the most common diagnosis in HDCP and CLP groups. Surgical site infection (18.3%) was the most common postoperative complication. There was no difference in intra- (11% HDCP, 21% CLP) or postoperative (34% HDCP, 41% CLP) complication rates. Use of external coaptation did not affect postoperative complication rates or outcome. External coaptation related complications occurred in 32% HDCP and 18% CLP (P = .02). At median follow-up, most dogs were classified as having no or mild lameness (73% HDCP, 83% CLP) and there was radiographic healing in 40% HDCP and 46% CLP (P = .8) cases. CLP and HDCP may both be used successfully to achieve pancarpal arthrodesis. Adjunctive external coaptation does not appear to have a measurable clinical benefit but is associated with morbidity. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  1. Shearing and compression behavior of end-grafted polyelectrolyte brushes with mono- and trivalent counterions: a molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Qianqian; Zuo, Chuncheng; Li, Lujuan; He, Hongwei

    2010-01-01

    We investigate polyelectrolytes end-grafted on two apposing walls using molecular dynamics simulation techniques. Monovalent and trivalent counterions are explicitly treated. Under normal compression, the osmotic pressure is examined in detail by decomposing it into various virial terms. It has been found that at small wall separations the increase in the osmotic pressure can be ascribed to the increase in the short-range virial term. At large wall separations, a negative osmotic pressure is observed in trivalent systems. Moreover, we study the effect of lateral shear on the density profiles of monomers and counterions, the net charge distribution, the local pressure tensor, the degree of interpenetration and the friction coefficient. At large shear ratios, the electrostatic interactions are weakened at the interface between two brushes. It is worth noting that although the magnitudes of the normal and shear stress components for the trivalent case are significantly lesser than those for the monovalent case, the friction coefficient is larger in the trivalent systems

  2. Application specific compression : final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melgaard, David Kennett; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Myers, Daniel S.; Harrison, Carol D.; Lee, David S.; Lewis, Phillip J.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2008-12-01

    With the continuing development of more capable data gathering sensors, comes an increased demand on the bandwidth for transmitting larger quantities of data. To help counteract that trend, a study was undertaken to determine appropriate lossy data compression strategies for minimizing their impact on target detection and characterization. The survey of current compression techniques led us to the conclusion that wavelet compression was well suited for this purpose. Wavelet analysis essentially applies a low-pass and high-pass filter to the data, converting the data into the related coefficients that maintain spatial information as well as frequency information. Wavelet compression is achieved by zeroing the coefficients that pertain to the noise in the signal, i.e. the high frequency, low amplitude portion. This approach is well suited for our goal because it reduces the noise in the signal with only minimal impact on the larger, lower frequency target signatures. The resulting coefficients can then be encoded using lossless techniques with higher compression levels because of the lower entropy and significant number of zeros. No significant signal degradation or difficulties in target characterization or detection were observed or measured when wavelet compression was applied to simulated and real data, even when over 80% of the coefficients were zeroed. While the exact level of compression will be data set dependent, for the data sets we studied, compression factors over 10 were found to be satisfactory where conventional lossless techniques achieved levels of less than 3.

  3. Discourse on corruption counteraction in network trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid A. Zhigun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective to determine the specific forms of corruption and promising methods to counteract corruption in network trade. Methods the combination of inductive observations comparisons generalizations facts and trends of corruption in network trade with a logical analytical deduction of economic theories and the corruption concept are the basis of the study and provide an opportunity on the one hand to assess the level of compliance of theoretical concepts of corruption with the practice and on the other handnbsp to determine their applicability to organize opposition and create conditions to prevent its occurrence to summarize the features of corruption in the form of a kickback the discourse method was applied in this work. Results on the basis of theoretical provisions and facts of corruption in trade it is proved that it has typical characteristics of corruption in commercial and nonprofit organizations. The key reasons are identified why corruption occurs in trade. Among them supply of poor quality goods at inflated prices leading to bribery in the form of laquopersonal bonusraquo to administrator of the trading organization when selling goods by an unscrupulous supplier and also supply goods to the trade organizations which will not buy without kickback. Most of these corrupt deals are carried out by natural monopolies in the form of state and municipal procurement. In some cases the kickback is the argument stimulating the decision to introduce new and advanced technologies. The factors that lead to corruption in trade are listed and reasonable methods to counteract it are grounded allowing to create conditions for its eradication in other branches of business as well. Scientific novelty for the first time a generalization has been made about the deficit as the driving force in the mechanism when the bribegivers and bribetakers change places. Practical significance the main provisions and conclusions of the article can be used in the

  4. Implementation of 3D spatial indexing and compression in a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation database for rapid atomic contact detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toofanny Rudesh D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular dynamics (MD simulations offer the ability to observe the dynamics and interactions of both whole macromolecules and individual atoms as a function of time. Taken in context with experimental data, atomic interactions from simulation provide insight into the mechanics of protein folding, dynamics, and function. The calculation of atomic interactions or contacts from an MD trajectory is computationally demanding and the work required grows exponentially with the size of the simulation system. We describe the implementation of a spatial indexing algorithm in our multi-terabyte MD simulation database that significantly reduces the run-time required for discovery of contacts. The approach is applied to the Dynameomics project data. Spatial indexing, also known as spatial hashing, is a method that divides the simulation space into regular sized bins and attributes an index to each bin. Since, the calculation of contacts is widely employed in the simulation field, we also use this as the basis for testing compression of data tables. We investigate the effects of compression of the trajectory coordinate tables with different options of data and index compression within MS SQL SERVER 2008. Results Our implementation of spatial indexing speeds up the calculation of contacts over a 1 nanosecond (ns simulation window by between 14% and 90% (i.e., 1.2 and 10.3 times faster. For a 'full' simulation trajectory (51 ns spatial indexing reduces the calculation run-time between 31 and 81% (between 1.4 and 5.3 times faster. Compression resulted in reduced table sizes but resulted in no significant difference in the total execution time for neighbour discovery. The greatest compression (~36% was achieved using page level compression on both the data and indexes. Conclusions The spatial indexing scheme significantly decreases the time taken to calculate atomic contacts and could be applied to other multidimensional neighbor discovery

  5. Sialyltransferase activity probably counteracts that of sialidase as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sialyltransferase activity probably counteracts that of sialidase as one of the possible mechanisms of natural recovery or stabilization of erythrocyte mass in trypanosome-infected animals - A perspective.

  6. Dynamic Compressive Strength and Failure of Natural Lake Ice Under Moderate Strain Rates at Near Melting Point Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfeng Qi

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a series of uniaxial compressive experiments on natural lake ice under moderate strain-rate in the range of 10−1 to 102 s−1 at −0.1 °C. Natural lake ice samples of 8 cm by 8 cm in cross section and 20 cm high were used to investigate strain-rate dependence of uniaxial compressive strength and flaw effects on ice strength under moderate strain rates. The fracture modes of ice at moderate strain rates were also systematically investigated by using high-speed camera. It is found uniaxial compressive strength of natural lake ice increases with increasing strain-rate in the employed moderate strain-rate range. And natural flaws such as air bubble have a significant effect on uniaxial compressive strength of ice under moderate strain-rate, higher air content ice possesses lower compressive strength. Ice fracture mode depends on strain-rate (or compressive velocity of ice specimen, varying from splitting at strain rates lower than 10 s−1 to crushing at strain rates higher than 10 s−1. Ice specimen crushes into fine fragments may due to insufficient time for micro cracks to propagate, thus results in higher strength. In addition, dependence of compressive strength on strain-rate in a wide strain-rate range is also discussed.

  7. "Compressed" Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, Galen; Gastpar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The field of compressed sensing has shown that a sparse but otherwise arbitrary vector can be recovered exactly from a small number of randomly constructed linear projections (or samples). The question addressed in this paper is whether an even smaller number of samples is sufficient when there exists prior knowledge about the distribution of the unknown vector, or when only partial recovery is needed. An information-theoretic lower bound with connections to free probability theory and an upp...

  8. Intramedullary nail versus dynamic compression plate fixation in treating humeral shaft fractures: grading the evidence through a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JianXiong Ma

    Full Text Available There is a debate regarding the choice of operative intervention in humeral shaft fractures that require surgical intervention. The choices for operative interventions include intramedullary nailing (IMN and dynamic compression plate (DCP. This meta-analysis was performed to compare fracture union, functional outcomes, and complication rates in patients treated with IMN or DCP for humeral shaft fractures and to develop GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation-based recommendations for using the procedures to treat humeral shaft fractures. A systematic search of all the studies published through December 2012 was conducted using the Medline, Embase, Sciencedirect, OVID and Cochrane Central databases. The randomized controlled trials (RCTs and quasi-RCTs that compared IMN with DCP in treating adult patients with humeral shaft fractures and provided data regarding the safety and clinical effects were identified. The demographic characteristics, adverse events and clinical outcomes were manually extracted from all of the selected studies. Ten studies that included a total of 448 patients met the inclusion criteria. The results of a meta-analysis indicated that both IMN and DCP can achieve similar fracture union with a similar incidence of radial nerve injury and infection. IMN was associated with an increased risk of shoulder impingement, more restriction of shoulder movement, an increased risk of intraoperative fracture comminution, a higher incidence of implant failure, and an increased risk of re-operation. The overall GRADE system evidence quality was very low, which reduces our confidence in the recommendations of this system. DCP may be superior to IMN in the treatment of humeral shaft fractures. Because of the low quality evidence currently available, high-quality RCTs are required.

  9. ISG15 counteracts Listeria monocytogenes infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoshevich, Lilliana; Impens, Francis; Ribet, David; Quereda, Juan J; Nam Tham, To; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Bierne, Hélène; Dussurget, Olivier; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Knobeloch, Klaus-Peter; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon-stimulated, linear di-ubiquitin-like protein, with anti-viral activity. The role of ISG15 during bacterial infection remains elusive. We show that ISG15 expression in nonphagocytic cells is dramatically induced upon Listeria infection. Surprisingly this induction can be type I interferon independent and depends on the cytosolic surveillance pathway, which senses bacterial DNA and signals through STING, TBK1, IRF3 and IRF7. Most importantly, we observed that ISG15 expression restricts Listeria infection in vitro and in vivo. We made use of stable isotope labeling in tissue culture (SILAC) to identify ISGylated proteins that could be responsible for the protective effect. Strikingly, infection or overexpression of ISG15 leads to ISGylation of ER and Golgi proteins, which correlates with increased secretion of cytokines known to counteract infection. Together, our data reveal a previously uncharacterized ISG15-dependent restriction of Listeria infection, reinforcing the view that ISG15 is a key component of the innate immune response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06848.001 PMID:26259872

  10. Electrical stimulation counteracts muscle decline in seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Helmut; Barberi, Laura; Löfler, Stefan; Sbardella, Simona; Burggraf, Samantha; Fruhmann, Hannah; Carraro, Ugo; Mosole, Simone; Sarabon, Nejc; Vogelauer, Michael; Mayr, Winfried; Krenn, Matthias; Cvecka, Jan; Romanello, Vanina; Pietrangelo, Laura; Protasi, Feliciano; Sandri, Marco; Zampieri, Sandra; Musaro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The loss in muscle mass coupled with a decrease in specific force and shift in fiber composition are hallmarks of aging. Training and regular exercise attenuate the signs of sarcopenia. However, pathologic conditions limit the ability to perform physical exercise. We addressed whether electrical stimulation (ES) is an alternative intervention to improve muscle recovery and defined the molecular mechanism associated with improvement in muscle structure and function. We analyzed, at functional, structural, and molecular level, the effects of ES training on healthy seniors with normal life style, without routine sport activity. ES was able to improve muscle torque and functional performances of seniors and increased the size of fast muscle fibers. At molecular level, ES induced up-regulation of IGF-1 and modulation of MuRF-1, a muscle-specific atrophy-related gene. ES also induced up-regulation of relevant markers of differentiating satellite cells and of extracellular matrix remodeling, which might guarantee shape and mechanical forces of trained skeletal muscle as well as maintenance of satellite cell function, reducing fibrosis. Our data provide evidence that ES is a safe method to counteract muscle decline associated with aging.

  11. Properties and Structure of X30MnAlSi26-4-3 High Strength Steel Subjected to Dynamic Compression Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Śmiglewicz A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of investigation on X30MnAlSi26-4-3 austenitic steel subjected to dynamic compression using the split Hopkinson pressure bar. The strain rate was 3700 s−1. The compression test was also carried out without the use of breaking rings and then true strain was about 0.3. The split Hopkinson pressure bar test take only few milliseconds to complete during which time it is impossible to transfer the excess heat out of the specimen, therefore the test must be carried out in adiabatic conditions and so the increase of the temperature caused by the work of plastic deformation had to be calculated. The stepping load method was used in order to evaluate the effect of adiabatic heating on the properties of steel which allowed to maintain the isothermal deformation conditions. The paper presents the comparison of results obtained during deformation under adiabatic and isothermal conditions in correlation to structure changes occurring in course of dynamic compression.

  12. Compression-Based Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Rezagah, Farideh Ebrahim; Jalali, Shirin; Erkip, Elza; Poor, H. Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Modern compression algorithms exploit complex structures that are present in signals to describe them very efficiently. On the other hand, the field of compressed sensing is built upon the observation that "structured" signals can be recovered from their under-determined set of linear projections. Currently, there is a large gap between the complexity of the structures studied in the area of compressed sensing and those employed by the state-of-the-art compression codes. Recent results in the...

  13. The study of vascular dynamics for the effect of a compress pack on pain relief using magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Ji Won; Lim, Young Khi [Gachon University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    This study was to investigate the effects of the hot compress pack on alleviating local muscular discomfort, stiffness in limbs as well as the chronic pains such as migraine in terms of hemodynamics. In this study, the hot compress band was put on the neck and the local physiological change on the stimulation site and the cranial blood circulation change were examined. We recruited healthy volunteers (n=8, mean age: 32.13 (4.61)), who participated in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. Local skin color and temperature were measured for the local effect of the hot compress band and the changes of intra-cranial and extra-cranial blood vessels were examined with MR angiography (MRA) images. The skin temperature increased from 36.4 degrees Celsius at the rest condition to 36.7 degrees Celsius and 37.1 degrees Celsius after 15 min and 30 min stimulation, respectively. The change of the extra-cranial blood vessels between pre-stimulation and post-stimulation of 30 min was significantly increased (+38.8%), while the change of the intra-cranial blood vessels was negligible. In this study, we demonstrated that the hot compress band on the neck yielded the increase of local skin temperature on the stimulation site and it made an effect on the extracranial circulation. In conclusion, the stimulation with a hot compress could facilitate the blood circulation, causing to relieve the muscular discomfort, stiffness in limbs as well as the chronic pains such as migraine.

  14. The study of vascular dynamics for the effect of a compress pack on pain relief using magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Ji Won; Lim, Young Khi

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the effects of the hot compress pack on alleviating local muscular discomfort, stiffness in limbs as well as the chronic pains such as migraine in terms of hemodynamics. In this study, the hot compress band was put on the neck and the local physiological change on the stimulation site and the cranial blood circulation change were examined. We recruited healthy volunteers (n=8, mean age: 32.13 (4.61)), who participated in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. Local skin color and temperature were measured for the local effect of the hot compress band and the changes of intra-cranial and extra-cranial blood vessels were examined with MR angiography (MRA) images. The skin temperature increased from 36.4 degrees Celsius at the rest condition to 36.7 degrees Celsius and 37.1 degrees Celsius after 15 min and 30 min stimulation, respectively. The change of the extra-cranial blood vessels between pre-stimulation and post-stimulation of 30 min was significantly increased (+38.8%), while the change of the intra-cranial blood vessels was negligible. In this study, we demonstrated that the hot compress band on the neck yielded the increase of local skin temperature on the stimulation site and it made an effect on the extracranial circulation. In conclusion, the stimulation with a hot compress could facilitate the blood circulation, causing to relieve the muscular discomfort, stiffness in limbs as well as the chronic pains such as migraine

  15. Compression embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  16. Compressibility effect in vortex identification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2009), s. 473-475 ISSN 0001-1452 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200600801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : vortex * vortex identification * compressible flows * compressibility effect Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.990, year: 2009

  17. Transport properties of LiF under strong compression: modeling using advanced electronic structure methods and classical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.; Jones, Reese; Ward, Donald; Spataru, Catalin; Shulenburger, Luke; Benedict, Lorin X.

    2015-06-01

    Window materials are ubiquitous in shock physics and with high energy density drivers capable of reaching multi-Mbar pressures the use of LiF is increasing. Velocimetry and temperature measurements of a sample through a window are both influenced by the assumed index of refraction and thermal conductivity, respectively. We report on calculations of index of refraction using the many-body theory GW and thermal ionic conductivity using linear response theory and model potentials. The results are expected to increase the accuracy of a broad range of high-pressure shock- and ramp compression experiments. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  19. Effect of stainless steel and titanium low-contact dynamic compression plate application on the vascularity and mechanical properties of cortical bone after fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R; Podworny, N; Hearn, T; Anderson, G I; Schemitsch, E H

    1997-10-01

    Comparison of the effect of stainless steel and titanium low-contact dynamic compression plate application on the vascularity and mechanical properties of cortical bone after fracture. Randomized, prospective. Orthopaedic research laboratory. Ten large (greater than twenty-five kilogram) adult dogs. A short, midshaft spiral tibial fracture was created, followed by lag screw fixation and neutralization with an eight-hole, 3.5-millimeter, low-contact dynamic compression plate (LCDCP) made of either 316L stainless steel (n = five) or commercially pure titanium (n = five). After surgery, animals were kept with unrestricted weight-bearing in individual stalls for ten weeks. Cortical bone blood flow was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry using a standard metalshafted probe (Periflux Pf303, Perimed, Jarfalla, Sweden) applied through holes in the custom-made LCDCPs at five sites. Bone blood flow was determined at four times: (a) prefracture, (b) postfracture, (c) postplating, and (d) ten weeks postplating. After the dogs were killed, the implant was removed and both the treated tibia and contralateral tibia were tested for bending stiffness and load to failure. Fracture creation decreased cortical perfusion in both groups at the fracture site (p = 0.02). The application of neither stainless steel nor titanium LCDCPs further decreased cortical bone blood flow after fracture creation. However, at ten weeks postplating, cortical perfusion significantly increased compared with acute postplating levels in the stainless steel (p = 0.003) and titanium (p = 0.001) groups. Cortical bone blood flow ten weeks postplating was not significantly different between the titanium group and the stainless steel group. Biomechanical tests performed on the tibiae with the plates removed did not reveal any differences in bending stiffness nor load required to cause failure between the two groups. Both titanium and stainless steel LCDCPs were equally effective in allowing revascularization, and

  20. Orientation dependent slip and twinning during compression and tension of strongly textured magnesium AZ31 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Samman, T., E-mail: al-samman@imm.rwth-aachen.de [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH Aachen, Kopernikusstr. 14, D-52064 Aachen (Germany); Li, X. [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH Aachen, Kopernikusstr. 14, D-52064 Aachen (Germany); Chowdhury, S. Ghosh [CSIR National Metallurgical Laboratory, MST Division, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2010-06-15

    Over recent years there have been a remarkable number of studies dealing with compression of magnesium. A literature search, however, shows a noticeably less number of papers concerned with tension and a very few papers comparing both modes, systematically, in one study. The current investigation reports the anisotropic deformation behavior and concomitant texture and microstructure evolution investigated in uniaxial tension and compression tests in two sample directions performed on an extruded commercial magnesium alloy AZ31 at different Z conditions. For specimens with the loading direction parallel to the extrusion axis, the tension-compression strength anisotropy was pronounced at high Z conditions. Loading at 45{sup o} from the extrusion axis yielded a tension-compression strength behavior that was close to isotropic. During tensile loading along the extrusion direction the extrusion texture resists twinning and favors prismatic slip (contrary to compression). This renders the shape change maximum in the basal plane and equal to zero along the c-axis, which resulted in the orientation of individual grains remaining virtually intact during all tension tests at different Z conditions. For the other investigated sample direction, straining was accommodated along the c-axis, which was associated with a lattice rotation, and thus, a change of crystal orientation. Uniaxial compression at a low Z condition (400 deg. C/10{sup -4} s{sup -1}) yielded a desired texture degeneration, which was explained on the basis of a more homogeneous partitioning of slip systems that reduces anisotropy and enhanced dynamic recrystallization (DRX), which counteracts the strong deformation texture. The critical strains for the nucleation of DRX in tensiled specimens at the highest investigated Z condition (200 deg. C/10{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were found to range between 4% and 5.6%.

  1. Compressed Counting Meets Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ping; Zhang, Cun-Hui; Zhang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Compressed sensing (sparse signal recovery) has been a popular and important research topic in recent years. By observing that natural signals are often nonnegative, we propose a new framework for nonnegative signal recovery using Compressed Counting (CC). CC is a technique built on maximally-skewed p-stable random projections originally developed for data stream computations. Our recovery procedure is computationally very efficient in that it requires only one linear scan of the coordinates....

  2. Counteraction to the learning and development of another person

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poddiakov, AN

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of counteraction to the learning and development of other subjects is analysed. Here the results of original empirical research of people's representations about prevalence of the phenomenon in real life (the interview of Russians and Americans). The typology of situations of

  3. To what extent can cirrus seeding counteract global warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Blaz; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2017-04-01

    The idea of modifying cirrus clouds to directly counteract greenhouse gas warming has gained a lot of momentum in recent years, despite large disputes over its physical feasibility. We use the ECHAM-HAM general circulation model to evaluate the temperature and precipitation responses to cirrus thinning by seeding with efficient ice nucleating particles and increasing ice crystal sedimentation velocities in a 1.5xCO2 world. The seeding scenario can counteract about 40% of the warming and precipitation increase induced by 1.5 x CO2 concentrations with respect to present day values. The idealized ice crystal sedimentation velocity increase scenario on the other hand fully restores the global annual temperature but counteracts only half of the precipitation increase. Moreover, we define a climate damage function, quadratic in temperature and precipitation anomalies to calculate the damage of the different scenarios in 21 selected land regions. Seeding can decrease about 55% of the CO2 induced damage, while the sedimentation velocity increase can counteract about 95% of the damage. A regional analysis shows the negative responses of seeding are minimal both in terms of precipitation and temperature, which makes cirrus seeding an attractive geoengineering method.

  4. Extensive characterisation of advanced manufacturing solutions for the ITER Central Solenoid pre-compression system

    CERN Document Server

    Langeslag, S.A.E.; Libeyre, P.; Marcinek, D.J.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS), positioned in the center of the ITER tokamak, will provide a magnetic field, contributing to the confinement of the plasma. The 13 m high CS consists of a vertical stack of 6 independently driven modules, dynamically activated. Resulting opposing currents can lead to high separation forces. A pre-compression structure is implemented to counteract these opposing forces, by realising a continuous 180 MN coil-to-coil contact loading. Preload is applied by mechanical fastening via 9 subunits, positioned along the coil stack, each consisting of 2 outer and 1 inner tie plate. The tie plates therefore need to feature outstanding mechanical behaviour in a large temperature range. High strength, Nitronic®-50 type F XM-19 austenitic stainless steel is selected as candidate material. The linearised stress distribution reaches approximately 250 MPa, leading to a required yield strength of 380 MPa at room temperature. Two different manufacturing methods are being studied for the procuremen...

  5. High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography (CE-MRA) using Compressed Sensing with Magnitude Image Subtraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapacchi, Stanislas; Han, Fei; Natsuaki, Yutaka; Kroeker, Randall; Plotnik, Adam; Lehman, Evan; Sayre, James; Laub, Gerhard; Finn, J Paul; Hu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We propose a compressed-sensing (CS) technique based on magnitude image subtraction for high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA). Methods Our technique integrates the magnitude difference image into the CS reconstruction to promote subtraction sparsity. Fully sampled Cartesian 3D CE-MRA datasets from 6 volunteers were retrospectively under-sampled and three reconstruction strategies were evaluated: k-space subtraction CS, independent CS, and magnitude subtraction CS. The techniques were compared in image quality (vessel delineation, image artifacts, and noise) and image reconstruction error. Our CS technique was further tested on 7 volunteers using a prospectively under-sampled CE-MRA sequence. Results Compared with k-space subtraction and independent CS, our magnitude subtraction CS provides significantly better vessel delineation and less noise at 4X acceleration, and significantly less reconstruction error at 4X and 8X (pMRA with higher spatial and temporal resolution than current clinical TWIST protocol while maintaining comparable image quality (2.8±0.5 vs. 3.0±0.4, p=NS). Conclusion Our technique is promising for dynamic CE-MRA. PMID:23801456

  6. Dynamics of layered reinforced concrete beam on visco-elastic foundation with different resistances of concrete and reinforcement to tension and compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovsky, Y. V.; Tikhonov, S. V.

    2018-03-01

    Originally, fundamentals of the theory of limit equilibrium and dynamic deformation of building metal and reinforced concrete structures were created by A. A. Gvozdev [1] and developed by his followers [4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12]. Forming the basis for the calculation, the model of an ideal rigid-plastic material has enabled to determine in many cases the ultimate load bearing capacity and upper (kinematically possible) or lower (statically valid) values for a wide class of different structures with quite simple methods. At the same time, applied to concrete structures the most important property of concrete to significantly differently resist tension and compression was not taken into account [10]. This circumstance was considered in [3] for reinforced concrete beams under conditions of quasistatic loading. The deformation is often accompanied by resistance of the environment in construction practice [8, 9]. In [2], the dynamics of multi-layered concrete beams on visco-elastic foundation under the loadings of explosive type is considered. In this work we consider the case which is often encountered in practical applications when the loadings weakly change in time.

  7. Dynamic Viscoelastic Effects on Sound Wave Diffraction by Spherical and Cylindrical Shells Submerged in and Filled with Viscous Compressible Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed M. Hasheminejad

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis for sound scattering by fluid-filled spherical and cylindrical viscoelastic shells immersed in viscous fluids is outlined. The dynamic viscoelastic properties of the scatterer and the viscosity of the surrounding and core fluids are rigorously taken into account in the solution of the acoustic scattering problem. The novel features of Havriliak-Negami model for viscoelastic material dynamic behaviour description along with the appropriate wave-harmonic field expansions and the pertinent boundary conditions are employed to develop a closed-form solution in form of infinite series. Subsequently, the associated acoustic field quantities such as the scattered far-field pressure directivity pattern, form function amplitude, transmitted intensity ratio, and acoustic force magnitude are evaluated for given sets of medium physical properties. Numerical results clearly indicate that in addition to the traditional fluid viscosity-related mechanisms, the dynamic viscoelastic properties of the shell material as well as its thickness can be of major significance in sound scattering. Limiting cases are examined and fair agreements with well-known solutions are established.

  8. Neural network modeling to evaluate the dynamic flow stress of high strength armor steels under high strain rate compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranadh Bobbili

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An artificial neural network (ANN constitutive model is developed for high strength armor steel tempered at 500 °C, 600 °C and 650 °C based on high strain rate data generated from split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB experiments. A new neural network configuration consisting of both training and validation is effectively employed to predict flow stress. Tempering temperature, strain rate and strain are considered as inputs, whereas flow stress is taken as output of the neural network. A comparative study on Johnson–Cook (J–C model and neural network model is performed. It was observed that the developed neural network model could predict flow stress under various strain rates and tempering temperatures. The experimental stress–strain data obtained from high strain rate compression tests using SHPB, over a range of tempering temperatures (500–650 °C, strains (0.05–0.2 and strain rates (1000–5500/s are employed to formulate J–C model to predict the high strain rate deformation behavior of high strength armor steels. The J-C model and the back-propagation ANN model were developed to predict the high strain rate deformation behavior of high strength armor steel and their predictability is evaluated in terms of correlation coefficient (R and average absolute relative error (AARE. R and AARE for the J–C model are found to be 0.7461 and 27.624%, respectively, while R and AARE for the ANN model are 0.9995 and 2.58%, respectively. It was observed that the predictions by ANN model are in consistence with the experimental data for all tempering temperatures.

  9. The dynamic compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of D1 railway wheel steel over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jing

    Full Text Available The dynamic compressive behavior of D1 railway wheel steel at high strain rates was investigated using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB apparatus. Three types of specimens, which were derived from the different positions (i.e., the rim, web and hub of a railway wheel, were tested over a wide range of strain rates from 10−3 s−1 to 2.4 × 103 s−1 and temperatures from 213 K to 973 K. Influences of the strain rate and temperature on flow stress were discussed, and rate- and temperature-dependent constitutive relationships were assessed by the Cowper-Symonds model, Johnson-Cook model and a physically-based model, respectively. The experimental results show that the compressive true stress versus true strain response of D1 wheel steel is strain rate-dependent, and the strain hardening rate during the plastic flow stage decreases with the elevation of strain rate. Besides, the D1 wheel steel displays obvious temperature-dependence, and the third-type strain aging (3rd SA is occurred at the temperature region of 673–973 K at a strain rate of ∼1500 s−1. Comparisons of experimental results with theoretical predictions indicate that the physically-based model has a better prediction capability for the 3rd SA characteristic of the tested D1 wheel steel. Keywords: Railway wheel steel, SHPB, Strain rate, Temperature effect, Strain aging

  10. Compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization with sensor arrays involves the estimation of the direction-of-arrival (DOA) from a limited number of observations. Compressive sensing (CS) solves such underdetermined problems achieving sparsity, thus improved resolution, and can be solved efficiently with convex...

  11. Sustainability and Counteracting Factors to Profit Rate Decline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ougaard, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses sustainability implications of barriers to growth as specified in the theory of the long-term falling rate of profit but focusing on the counteracting factors (CFs) specified by Marx. These depend much on political processes and are important in state theory for understanding...... policies of national and international institutions. Fourteen partly overlapping factors are identified and grouped in five categories: increased pressure on labor, geographical expansion, resource efficiency, technological progress, and destruction or devaluation of capital. It is suggested...

  12. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  13. Counteracting loneliness: on the restorative function of nostalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinyue; Sedikides, Constantine; Wildschut, Tim; Gao, Ding-Guo

    2008-10-01

    Four studies tested whether nostalgia can counteract reductions in perceived social support caused by loneliness. Loneliness reduced perceptions of social support but increased nostalgia. Nostalgia, in turn, increased perceptions of social support. Thus, loneliness affected perceived social support in two distinct ways. Whereas the direct effect of loneliness was to reduce perceived social support, the indirect effect of loneliness was to increase perceived social support via nostalgia. This restorative function of nostalgia was particularly apparent among resilient persons. Nostalgia is a psychological resource that protects and fosters mental health.

  14. Counteractive effects of cannabinoid and nicotine-addictive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Liu, Zhiqiang; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Xia

    2011-03-09

    Our recent results suggest that cannabinoid exposure induces conditioned place preference (CPP) through facilitated induction of synaptic long-term depression at dopamine circuitry of the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA). Here, we show that chronic nicotine exposure also induces CPP, but facilitates the induction of synaptic long-term potentiation in the VTA. Coadministration of cannabinoid and nicotine leads to a blockade of facilitated long-term depression and long-term potentiation induction in these neurons and elimination of CPP. These findings point to counteractive effects of cannabinoid and nicotine-addictive behavior through opposite changes in synaptic plasticity of dopamine circuitry of the VTA.

  15. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN TITANIUM ELASTIC NAILING (TENS AND DYNAMIC COMPRESSION PLATING (DCP IN THE TREATMENT OF FEMORAL DIAPHYSEAL FRACTURES IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasubba Reddy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Orthopaedic surgeons have long maintained that all children who have sustained a diaphyseal fracture of femur recover with c onservative treatment, given the excellent remodeling ability of immature bone in children. Angulations, shortenings and malrotations are not always corrected by conservative treatment. Of many surgical options, titanium elastic nailing has been the newer implant which is being used regularly. Although good results have been reported with elastic intramedullary nails, plate fixation continues to be a viable alternative in surgical treatment of femoral shaft fractures. However there are not many studies comp aring the efficiency of titanium elastic nailing and plating for femoral diaphyseal fractures in pediatric age group. AIM : The present study aims to compare the surgical management of diaphyseal fractures of femur in children with Dynamic Compression Plati ng versus Titanium Elastic Nailing. DESIGN : This is a prospective study . MATERIALS AND METHODS : This prospective study was conducted in a tertiary hospital. Patients who presented to the out - patient department and casualty of the hospital with femoral diap hyseal fractures during April 2012 to June 2014 were considered for the study. Subjects fulfilling the predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study. STATISTICAL METHODS : Fisher Exact test, Chi - Square Test, Student t test (Two t ailed, independent . RESULTS : Patients in the age group of 6 - 14 years were considered for the study, Patients were divided into two groups and treated with DCP/TENS. The duration of surgery, hospital stay, and, amount of blood loss was minimal in TENS grou p. Callus was seen early in TENS group. Radiological union was early in TENS group by 2 - 3 weeks. Outcome was better in patients treated with TENS (Excellent - 70%; Satisfactory – 30%; Poor - 0% in comparison to DCP (Excellent - 70%; Satisfactory - 25%; Poor - 5%. CO NCLUSION : TENS

  17. Ultrafast dynamic contrast-enhanced mri of the breast using compressed sensing: breast cancer diagnosis based on separate visualization of breast arteries and veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Natsuko; Kataoka, Masako; Kanao, Shotaro; Sagawa, Hajime; Iima, Mami; Nickel, Marcel Dominik; Toi, Masakazu; Togashi, Kaori

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of ultrafast dynamic contrast-enhanced (UF-DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with compressed sensing (CS) for the separate identification of breast arteries/veins and perform temporal evaluations of breast arteries and veins with a focus on the association with ipsilateral cancers. Our Institutional Review Board approved this study with retrospective design. Twenty-five female patients who underwent UF-DCE MRI at 3T were included. UF-DCE MRI consisting of 20 continuous frames was acquired using a prototype 3D gradient-echo volumetric interpolated breath-hold sequence including a CS reconstruction: temporal resolution, 3.65 sec/frame; spatial resolution, 0.9 × 1.3 × 2.5 mm. Two readers analyzed 19 maximum intensity projection images reconstructed from subtracted images, separately identified breast arteries/veins and the earliest frame in which they were respectively visualized, and calculated the time interval between arterial and venous visualization (A-V interval) for each breast. In total, 49 breasts including 31 lesions (breast cancer, 16; benign lesion, 15) were identified. In 39 of the 49 breasts (breasts with cancers, 16; breasts with benign lesions, 10; breasts with no lesions, 13), both breast arteries and veins were separately identified. The A-V intervals for breasts with cancers were significantly shorter than those for breasts with benign lesions (P = 0.043) and no lesions (P = 0.007). UF-DCE MRI using CS enables the separate identification of breast arteries/veins. Temporal evaluations calculating the time interval between arterial and venous visualization might be helpful in the differentiation of ipsilateral breast cancers from benign lesions. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:97-104. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Desalted duck egg white peptides promote calcium uptake by counteracting the adverse effects of phytic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tao; Liu, Weiwei; Shi, Wen; Ma, Zhili; He, Hui

    2017-03-15

    The structure of the desalted duck egg white peptides-calcium chelate was characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Characterization results showed structural folding and aggregation of amino acids or oligopeptides during the chelation process. Desalted duck egg white peptides enhanced the calcium uptake in the presence of oxalate, phosphate and zinc ions in Caco-2 monolayers. Animal model indicated that desalted duck egg white peptides effectively enhanced the mineral absorption and counteracted the deleterious effects of phytic acid. These findings suggested that desalted duck egg white peptides might promote calcium uptake in three pathways: 1) desalted duck egg white peptides bind with calcium to form soluble chelate and avoid precipitate; 2) the chelate is absorbed as small peptides by enterocyte; and 3) desalted duck egg white peptides regulate the proliferation and differentiation of enterocytes through the interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid 6 calcium channel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Real-time dynamic MR image reconstruction using compressed sensing and principal component analysis (CS-PCA): Demonstration in lung tumor tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Bryson; Yip, Eugene; Yun, Jihyun; Fallone, B Gino; Wachowicz, Keith

    2017-08-01

    This work presents a real-time dynamic image reconstruction technique, which combines compressed sensing and principal component analysis (CS-PCA), to achieve real-time adaptive radiotherapy with the use of a linac-magnetic resonance imaging system. Six retrospective fully sampled dynamic data sets of patients diagnosed with non-small-cell lung cancer were used to investigate the CS-PCA algorithm. Using a database of fully sampled k-space, principal components (PC's) were calculated to aid in the reconstruction of undersampled images. Missing k-space data were calculated by projecting the current undersampled k-space data onto the PC's to generate the corresponding PC weights. The weighted PC's were summed together, and the missing k-space was iteratively updated. To gain insight into how the reconstruction might proceed at lower fields, 6× noise was added to the 3T data to investigate how the algorithm handles noisy data. Acceleration factors ranging from 2 to 10× were investigated using CS-PCA and Split Bregman CS for comparison. Metrics to determine the reconstruction quality included the normalized mean square error (NMSE), as well as the dice coefficients (DC) and centroid displacement of the tumor segmentations. Our results demonstrate that CS-PCA performed superior than CS alone. The CS-PCA patient averaged DC for 3T and 6× noise added data remained above 0.9 for acceleration factors up to 10×. The patient averaged NMSE gradually increased with increasing acceleration; however, it remained below 0.06 up to an acceleration factor of 10× for both 3T and 6× noise added data. The CS-PCA reconstruction speed ranged from 5 to 20 ms (Intel i7-4710HQ CPU @ 2.5 GHz), depending on the chosen parameters. A real-time reconstruction technique was developed for adaptive radiotherapy using a Linac-MRI system. Our CS-PCA algorithm can achieve tumor contours with DC greater than 0.9 and NMSE less than 0.06 at acceleration factors of up to, and including, 10×. The

  20. PA3297 Counteracts Antimicrobial Effects of Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao eTan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in human. Its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Among the alternatives is the unconventional usage of conventional antibiotics, of which the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example. AZM therapy is associated with a small but consistent improvement in respiratory function of cystic fibrosis (CF patients suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Besides immunomodulating activities, AZM represses bacterial genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and motility, all of which are due to stalling of ribosome and depletion of cellular tRNA pool. However, how P. aeruginosa responds to and counteracts the effects of AZM remain elusive. Here we found that deficiency of PA3297, a gene encoding a DEAH-box helicase, intensified AZM-mediated bacterial killing, suppression of pyocyanin production and swarming motility, and hypersusceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrated that expression of PA3297 is induced by the interaction between AZM and ribosome. Importantly, mutation of PA3297 resulted in elevated levels of unprocessed 23S-5S rRNA in the presence of AZM, which might lead to increased susceptibility to AZM-mediated effects. Our results revealed one of the bacterial responses in counteracting the detrimental effects of AZM.

  1. Topical legal aspects of corruption counteraction in public procurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Igorevich Zemlin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to analyze the current developments in the Russian legislation on corruption counteraction and the legislation on public procurement system on this basis to study legal conflicts and gaps and to develop proposals under the provisions of the National AntiCorruption Plan for 2014ndash2015. Methods historical formallegal logical and systemicfunctional structural and contextual approach to the study of law and theoretical propositions concerning the definition nature and characteristics of legal relations arising in the process of and relating to the corruption counteraction in the public procurement system. Results аn aggregate of theoretical conclusions and proposals aimed at perfection of anticorruption legislation and legislation on the contractual public procurement system is presented. Scientific novelty the results of the author39s interpretation of changes in the Russian anticorruption legislation and legislation on the contractual public procurement system existing legal conflicts and gaps. Practical significance developing proposals for improving the standards of anticorruption legislation and legislation on public procurement system under the provisions of the National AntiCorruption Plan for 2014ndash2015. nbsp

  2. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  3. An in vitro biomechanical comparison of equine proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis techniques: an axial positioned dynamic compression plate and two abaxial transarticular cortical screws inserted in lag fashion versus three parallel transarticular cortical screws inserted in lag fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sod, Gary A; Riggs, Laura M; Mitchell, Colin F; Hubert, Jeremy D; Martin, George S

    2010-01-01

    To compare in vitro monotonic biomechanical properties of an axial 3-hole, 4.5 mm narrow dynamic compression plate (DCP) using 5.5 mm cortical screws in conjunction with 2 abaxial transarticular 5.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion (DCP-TLS) with 3 parallel transarticular 5.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion (3-TLS) for the equine proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint arthrodesis. Paired in vitro biomechanical testing of 2 methods of stabilizing cadaveric adult equine forelimb PIP joints. Cadaveric adult equine forelimbs (n=15 pairs). For each forelimb pair, 1 PIP joint was stabilized with an axial 3-hole narrow DCP (4.5 mm) using 5.5 mm cortical screws in conjunction with 2 abaxial transarticular 5.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion and 1 with 3 parallel transarticular 5.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion. Five matching pairs of constructs were tested in single cycle to failure under axial compression, 5 construct pairs were tested for cyclic fatigue under axial compression, and 5 construct pairs were tested in single cycle to failure under torsional loading. Mean values for each fixation method were compared using a paired t-test within each group with statistical significance set at P<.05. Mean yield load, yield stiffness, and failure load under axial compression and torsion, single cycle to failure, of the DCP-TLS fixation were significantly greater than those of the 3-TLS fixation. Mean cycles to failure in axial compression of the DCP-TLS fixation was significantly greater than that of the 3-TLS fixation. The DCP-TLS was superior to the 3-TLS in resisting the static overload forces and in resisting cyclic fatigue. The results of this in vitro study may provide information to aid in the selection of a treatment modality for arthrodesis of the equine PIP joint.

  4. Acidification counteracts negative effects of warming on diatom silicification

    KAUST Repository

    Coello-Camba, Alexandra

    2016-10-24

    Diatoms are a significant group contributing up to 40 % of annual primary production in the oceans. They have a special siliceous cell wall that, acting as a ballast, plays a key role in the sequestration of global carbon and silica. Diatoms dominate primary production in the Arctic Ocean, where global climate change is causing increases in water temperature and in the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Here we show that as water temperature increases diatoms become stressed, grow to smaller sizes, and decrease their silicification rates. But at higher pCO2, as the pH of seawater decreases, silica incorporation rates are increased. In a future warmer Arctic ocean diatoms may have a competitive advantage under increased ocean acidification, as increased pCO2 counteracts the adverse effects of increasing temperature on silicification and buffers its consequences in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and silica.

  5. Counteracting effect of threat on reward enhancements during working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Moon; Padmala, Srikanth; Pessoa, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive performance has been shown to be enhanced when performance-based rewards are at stake. On the other hand, task-irrelevant threat processing has been shown to have detrimental effects during several cognitive tasks. Crucially, the impact of reward and threat on cognition has been studied largely independently of one another. Hence, our understanding of how reward and threat simultaneously contribute to performance is incomplete. To fill in this gap, the present study investigated how reward and threat interact with one another during a cognitive task. We found that threat of shock counteracted the beneficial effect of reward during a working memory task. Furthermore, individual differences in self-reported reward-sensitivity and anxiety were linked to the extent to which reward and threat interacted during behaviour. Together, the current findings contribute to a limited but growing literature unravelling how positive and negative information processing jointly influence cognition.

  6. RNA-virus proteases counteracting host innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jian; Hilgenfeld, Rolf

    2017-10-01

    Virus invasion triggers host immune responses, in particular, innate immune responses. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns of viruses (such as dsRNA, ssRNA, or viral proteins) released during virus replication are detected by the corresponding pattern-recognition receptors of the host, and innate immune responses are induced. Through production of type-I and type-III interferons as well as various other cytokines, the host innate immune system forms the frontline to protect host cells and inhibit virus infection. Not surprisingly, viruses have evolved diverse strategies to counter this antiviral system. In this review, we discuss the multiple strategies used by proteases of positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses of the families Picornaviridae, Coronaviridae, and Flaviviridae, when counteracting host innate immune responses. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Dynamic compression plate (DCP) fixation of propagating medial condylar fractures of the third metacarpal/metatarsal bone in 30 racehorses: retrospective analysis (1990-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, L R; Nixon, A J; Conway, J D; Morley, P S; Bladon, B M; Hogan, P M

    2014-11-01

    An in-depth review of dynamic compression plate (DCP) fixation of propagating medial condyle fractures of the third metacarpus or metatarsus has not been previously reported. To describe the technique, evaluate short-term outcome and long-term race performance of racehorses that underwent DCP fixation for repair of propagating or spiralling medial condylar fractures of the third metacarpal (McIII) or metatarsal (MtIII) bone. Retrospective case series. The surgical case records of 30 horses with propagating fractures of the medial condyle of McIII or MtIII were reviewed. Medical information included: age, breed, sex, presentation, how injury occurred (racing or training), surgical treatment and post operative complications. Racing information included: starts, top 3 placing and career earnings. Long propagating fractures of the medial condyle of Mc/tIII were identified in 23 Thoroughbred (TB) and 7 Standardbred (STB) racehorses. The fracture spiralled proximally in 22 of 30 cases (73%). Standardbreds had a higher propensity for hindlimb involvement (71%), whereas TBs tended to have more front limb involvement (61%). Twelve of 30 (40%) horses raced post surgery. Career earnings were significantly lower for TB horses with medial condylar fractures; $34,916 when compared with the national average of $60,841 (P≤0.03). Overall, horses having DCP fixation for medial condylar fractures had less starts post surgery (3.1 TBs and 5.8 STBs) compared with the national average (7 TBs and 17.3 STBs) and decreased lifetime starts 13.4 (TBs) compared with 17.3 nationally. Propagating medial condyle fractures can be repaired with plate fixation to potentially lessen the risk of catastrophic fracture destabilisation and return to racing can be expected in 40% of horses. Further prospective studies are warranted comparing lag screw fixation with DCP fixation for repair of severe medial condylar fractures of the metacarpus/metatarsus. © 2013 The Authors. Equine Veterinary Journal

  8. Does comorbid anxiety counteract emotion recognition deficits in conduct disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Roxanna M L; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S; Adams, Wendy J; Fairchild, Graeme

    2016-08-01

    Previous research has reported altered emotion recognition in both conduct disorder (CD) and anxiety disorders (ADs) - but these effects appear to be of different kinds. Adolescents with CD often show a generalised pattern of deficits, while those with ADs show hypersensitivity to specific negative emotions. Although these conditions often cooccur, little is known regarding emotion recognition performance in comorbid CD+ADs. Here, we test the hypothesis that in the comorbid case, anxiety-related emotion hypersensitivity counteracts the emotion recognition deficits typically observed in CD. We compared facial emotion recognition across four groups of adolescents aged 12-18 years: those with CD alone (n = 28), ADs alone (n = 23), cooccurring CD+ADs (n = 20) and typically developing controls (n = 28). The emotion recognition task we used systematically manipulated the emotional intensity of facial expressions as well as fixation location (eye, nose or mouth region). Conduct disorder was associated with a generalised impairment in emotion recognition; however, this may have been modulated by group differences in IQ. AD was associated with increased sensitivity to low-intensity happiness, disgust and sadness. In general, the comorbid CD+ADs group performed similarly to typically developing controls. Although CD alone was associated with emotion recognition impairments, ADs and comorbid CD+ADs were associated with normal or enhanced emotion recognition performance. The presence of comorbid ADs appeared to counteract the effects of CD, suggesting a potentially protective role, although future research should examine the contribution of IQ and gender to these effects. © 2016 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  9. Habitat-mediated facilitation and counteracting ecosystem engineering interactively influence ecosystem responses to disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklöf, Johan S; van der Heide, Tjisse; Donadi, Serena; van der Zee, Els M; O'Hara, Robert; Eriksson, Britas Klemens

    2011-01-01

    Recovery of an ecosystem following disturbance can be severely hampered or even shift altogether when a point disturbance exceeds a certain spatial threshold. Such scale-dependent dynamics may be caused by preemptive competition, but may also result from diminished self-facilitation due to weakened ecosystem engineering. Moreover, disturbance can facilitate colonization by engineering species that alter abiotic conditions in ways that exacerbate stress on the original species. Consequently, establishment of such counteracting engineers might reduce the spatial threshold for the disturbance, by effectively slowing recovery and increasing the risk for ecosystem shifts to alternative states. We tested these predictions in an intertidal mudflat characterized by a two-state mosaic of hummocks (humps exposed during low tide) dominated by the sediment-stabilizing seagrass Zostera noltii) and hollows (low-tide waterlogged depressions dominated by the bioturbating lugworm Arenicola marina). In contrast to expectations, seagrass recolonized both natural and experimental clearings via lateral expansion and seemed unaffected by both clearing size and lugworm addition. Near the end of the growth season, however, an additional disturbance (most likely waterfowl grazing and/or strong hydrodynamics) selectively impacted recolonizing seagrass in the largest (1 m(2)) clearings (regardless of lugworm addition), and in those medium (0.25 m(2)) clearings where lugworms had been added nearly five months earlier. Further analyses showed that the risk for the disturbance increased with hollow size, with a threshold of 0.24 m(2). Hollows of that size were caused by seagrass removal alone in the largest clearings, and by a weaker seagrass removal effect exacerbated by lugworm bioturbation in the medium clearings. Consequently, a sufficiently large disturbance increased the vulnerability of recolonizing seagrass to additional disturbance by weakening seagrass engineering effects (sediment

  10. Bond graph modeling of centrifugal compression systems

    OpenAIRE

    Uddin, Nur; Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach to model unsteady fluid dynamics in a compressor network by using a bond graph is presented. The model is intended in particular for compressor control system development. First, we develop a bond graph model of a single compression system. Bond graph modeling offers a different perspective to previous work by modeling the compression system based on energy flow instead of fluid dynamics. Analyzing the bond graph model explains the energy flow during compressor surge. Two pri...

  11. Properties of compressible elastica from relativistic analogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshri, Oz; Diamant, Haim

    2016-01-21

    Kirchhoff's kinetic analogy relates the deformation of an incompressible elastic rod to the classical dynamics of rigid body rotation. We extend the analogy to compressible filaments and find that the extension is similar to the introduction of relativistic effects into the dynamical system. The extended analogy reveals a surprising symmetry in the deformations of compressible elastica. In addition, we use known results for the buckling of compressible elastica to derive the explicit solution for the motion of a relativistic nonlinear pendulum. We discuss cases where the extended Kirchhoff analogy may be useful for the study of other soft matter systems.

  12. Coronavirus gene 7 counteracts host defenses and modulates virus virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jazmina L G; Sola, Isabel; Becares, Martina; Alberca, Berta; Plana, Joan; Enjuanes, Luis; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2011-06-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) genome contains three accessory genes: 3a, 3b and 7. Gene 7 is only present in members of coronavirus genus a1, and encodes a hydrophobic protein of 78 aa. To study gene 7 function, a recombinant TGEV virus lacking gene 7 was engineered (rTGEV-Δ7). Both the mutant and the parental (rTGEV-wt) viruses showed the same growth and viral RNA accumulation kinetics in tissue cultures. Nevertheless, cells infected with rTGEV-Δ7 virus showed an increased cytopathic effect caused by an enhanced apoptosis mediated by caspase activation. Macromolecular synthesis analysis showed that rTGEV-Δ7 virus infection led to host translational shut-off and increased cellular RNA degradation compared with rTGEV-wt infection. An increase of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) phosphorylation and an enhanced nuclease, most likely RNase L, activity were observed in rTGEV-Δ7 virus infected cells. These results suggested that the removal of gene 7 promoted an intensified dsRNA-activated host antiviral response. In protein 7 a conserved sequence motif that potentially mediates binding to protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1c), a key regulator of the cell antiviral defenses, was identified. We postulated that TGEV protein 7 may counteract host antiviral response by its association with PP1c. In fact, pull-down assays demonstrated the interaction between TGEV protein 7, but not a protein 7 mutant lacking PP1c binding motif, with PP1. Moreover, the interaction between protein 7 and PP1 was required, during the infection, for eIF2α dephosphorylation and inhibition of cell RNA degradation. Inoculation of newborn piglets with rTGEV-Δ7 and rTGEV-wt viruses showed that rTGEV-Δ7 virus presented accelerated growth kinetics and pathology compared with the parental virus. Overall, the results indicated that gene 7 counteracted host cell defenses, and modified TGEV persistence increasing TGEV survival. Therefore, the acquisition of

  13. Coronavirus gene 7 counteracts host defenses and modulates virus virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazmina L G Cruz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV genome contains three accessory genes: 3a, 3b and 7. Gene 7 is only present in members of coronavirus genus a1, and encodes a hydrophobic protein of 78 aa. To study gene 7 function, a recombinant TGEV virus lacking gene 7 was engineered (rTGEV-Δ7. Both the mutant and the parental (rTGEV-wt viruses showed the same growth and viral RNA accumulation kinetics in tissue cultures. Nevertheless, cells infected with rTGEV-Δ7 virus showed an increased cytopathic effect caused by an enhanced apoptosis mediated by caspase activation. Macromolecular synthesis analysis showed that rTGEV-Δ7 virus infection led to host translational shut-off and increased cellular RNA degradation compared with rTGEV-wt infection. An increase of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α phosphorylation and an enhanced nuclease, most likely RNase L, activity were observed in rTGEV-Δ7 virus infected cells. These results suggested that the removal of gene 7 promoted an intensified dsRNA-activated host antiviral response. In protein 7 a conserved sequence motif that potentially mediates binding to protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1c, a key regulator of the cell antiviral defenses, was identified. We postulated that TGEV protein 7 may counteract host antiviral response by its association with PP1c. In fact, pull-down assays demonstrated the interaction between TGEV protein 7, but not a protein 7 mutant lacking PP1c binding motif, with PP1. Moreover, the interaction between protein 7 and PP1 was required, during the infection, for eIF2α dephosphorylation and inhibition of cell RNA degradation. Inoculation of newborn piglets with rTGEV-Δ7 and rTGEV-wt viruses showed that rTGEV-Δ7 virus presented accelerated growth kinetics and pathology compared with the parental virus. Overall, the results indicated that gene 7 counteracted host cell defenses, and modified TGEV persistence increasing TGEV survival. Therefore, the

  14. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  15. Breaking of rod-shaped model material during compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Kulaviak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The breakage of a model anisometric dry granular material caused by uniaxial compression was studied. The bed of uniform rod-like pasta particles (8 mm long, aspect ratio 1:8 was compressed (Gamlen Tablet Press and their size distribution was measured after each run (Dynamic Image Analysing. The compression dynamics was recorded and the effect of several parameters was tested (rate of compression, volume of granular bed, pressure magnitude and mode of application. Besides the experiments, numerical modelling of the compressed breakable material was performed as well, employing the DEM approach (Discrete Element Method. The comparison between the data and the model looks promising.

  16. Counteracting the Influence of Peer Smoking on YouTube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Daniel; Jamieson, Patrick E; Jamieson, Kathleen Hall; Jones, Christopher; Sherr, Susan

    2017-04-01

    YouTube, a popular online site for user-generated content, is emerging as a powerful source of peer modeling of smoking. Previous research suggests that in counteracting such influence, health messages may inadvertently increase the perceived prevalence of drug use (a descriptive norm) without reducing its acceptability (injunctive norm). This research tested the ability of health messages to reduce the social acceptability of peer smoking on YouTube despite enhancing its perceived prevalence. In an online experiment with 999 adolescents, participants were randomly assigned to view one of two videos: (a) a mosaic displaying a variety of YouTube videos of adolescents smoking followed by a message about the mortality risk to those smokers, or (b) a control video on a health topic unrelated to smoking. Although exposure to the adolescent YouTube smokers increased perceived prevalence among some participants, it simultaneously increased beliefs about smoking's adverse health outcomes and negative attitudes toward smoking, effects that were associated with reductions in injunctive norms of social acceptability. Interventions that communicate the severity and scope of health risks associated with smoking may undercut the descriptive normative effects of peer modeling of smoking on social media sites such as YouTube.

  17. Electrical stimulation (ES counteracts muscle decline in seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut eKern

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The loss in muscle mass coupled with a decrease in specific force and shift in fiber composition are all marks of aging. Training and regular exercise attenuate the signs of sarcopenia. However, pathologic conditions limit the ability to perform physical exercise.We addressed whether electrical stimulation (ES is an alternative intervention to improve muscle recovery and defined the molecular mechanism associated with improvement in muscle structure and function.We analyzed, at functional, structural, and molecular level, the effects of ES training on healthy seniors with normal life style, without routine sport activity.ES was able to improve muscle torque and functional performances of seniors and increased the size of fast muscle fibers. At molecular level, ES induced up-regulation of IGF-1 and modulation of MuRF1, a muscle-specific atrophy-related gene. ES also induced up-regulation of relevant markers of differentiating satellite cells and of extracellular matrix remodeling, which might guarantee shape and mechanical forces of trained skeletal muscle as well as maintenance of satellite cell function, reducing fibrosis.Our data provide evidence that ES is a safe method to counteract muscle decline associated with aging.

  18. Compressive properties of aluminum foams by gas injection method

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Huiming; Chen Xiang; Fan Xueliu

    2012-01-01

    The compressive properties of aluminum foams by gas injection method are investigated under both quasi-static and dynamic compressive loads in this paper. The experimental results indicate that the deformation of the aluminum foams goes through three stages: elastic deforming, plastic deforming and densification stage, during both the quasi-static and dynamic compressions. The aluminum foams with small average cell size or low porosity have high yield strength. An increase in strain rate can ...

  19. Can humic water discharge counteract eutrophication in coastal waters?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Andersson

    Full Text Available A common and established view is that increased inputs of nutrients to the sea, for example via river flooding, will cause eutrophication and phytoplankton blooms in coastal areas. We here show that this concept may be questioned in certain scenarios. Climate change has been predicted to cause increased inflow of freshwater to coastal areas in northern Europe. River waters in these areas are often brown from the presence of high concentrations of allochthonous dissolved organic carbon (humic carbon, in addition to nitrogen and phosphorus. In this study we investigated whether increased inputs of humic carbon can change the structure and production of the pelagic food web in the recipient seawater. In a mesocosm experiment unfiltered seawater from the northern Baltic Sea was fertilized with inorganic nutrients and humic carbon (CNP, and only with inorganic nutrients (NP. The system responded differently to the humic carbon addition. In NP treatments bacterial, phytoplankton and zooplankton production increased and the systems turned net autotrophic, whereas the CNP-treatment only bacterial and zooplankton production increased driving the system to net heterotrophy. The size-structure of the food web showed large variations in the different treatments. In the enriched NP treatments the phytoplankton community was dominated by filamentous >20 µm algae, while in the CNP treatments the phytoplankton was dominated by picocyanobacteria <5 µm. Our results suggest that climate change scenarios, resulting in increased humic-rich river inflow, may counteract eutrophication in coastal waters, leading to a promotion of the microbial food web and other heterotrophic organisms, driving the recipient coastal waters to net-heterotrophy.

  20. Clinical Feasibility of Free-Breathing Dynamic T1-Weighted Imaging With Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Combination of Variable Density Sampling and Compressed Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Yu, Mi Hye; Chang, Won; Park, Jin-Young; Nickel, Marcel Dominik; Son, Yohan; Kiefer, Berthold; Lee, Jeong Min

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the clinical feasibility of free-breathing dynamic T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) using Cartesian sampling, compressed sensing, and iterative reconstruction in gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. A total of 51 patients at high risk of breath-holding failure underwent dynamic T1WI in a free-breathing manner using volumetric interpolated breath-hold (BH) examination with compressed sensing reconstruction (CS-VIBE) and hard gating. Timing, motion artifacts, and image quality were evaluated by 4 radiologists on a 4-point scale. For patients with low image quality scores (<3) on the late arterial phase, respiratory motion-resolved (extradimension [XD]) reconstruction was additionally performed and reviewed in the same manner. In addition, in 68.6% (35/51) patients who had previously undergone liver MRI, image quality and motion artifacts on dynamic phases using CS-VIBE were compared with previous BH-T1WIs. In all patients, adequate arterial-phase timing was obtained at least once. Overall image quality of free-breathing T1WI was 3.30 ± 0.59 on precontrast and 2.68 ± 0.70, 2.93 ± 0.65, and 3.30 ± 0.49 on early arterial, late arterial, and portal venous phases, respectively. In 13 patients with lower than average image quality (<3) on the late arterial phase, motion-resolved reconstructed T1WI (XD-reconstructed CS-VIBE) significantly reduced motion artifacts (P < 0.002-0.021) and improved image quality (P < 0.0001-0.002). In comparison with previous BH-T1WI, CS-VIBE with hard gating or XD reconstruction showed less motion artifacts and better image quality on precontrast, arterial, and portal venous phases (P < 0.0001-0.013). Volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination with compressed sensing has the potential to provide consistent, motion-corrected free-breathing dynamic T

  1. Unveil Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiteng

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the applicability of compressed sensing theory. We take a genuine look at both experimental results and theoretical works. We answer the following questions: 1) What can compressed sensing really do? 2) More importantly, why?

  2. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  3. Compressed and Practical Data Structures for Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Anders Roy

    in the following. Finger Search in Grammar-Compressed Strings. Grammar-based compression, where one replaces a long string by a small context-free grammar that generates the string, is a simple and powerful paradigm that captures many popular compression schemes. Given a grammar, the random access problem...... string. We present new data structures that achieve optimal time for updates and queries while using space linear in the size of the optimal relative compression, for nearly all combinations of parameters. We also present solutions for restricted and extended sets of updates. To achieve these results, we...... revisit the dynamic partial sums problem and the substring concatenation problem. We present new optimal or near optimal bounds for these problems. Plugging in our new results we also immediately obtain new bounds for the string indexing for patterns with wildcards problem and the dynamic text and static...

  4. Compressive multi-mode superresolution display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Compressive displays are an emerging technology exploring the co-design of new optical device configurations and compressive computation. Previously, research has shown how to improve the dynamic range of displays and facilitate high-quality light field or glasses-free 3D image synthesis. In this paper, we introduce a new multi-mode compressive display architecture that supports switching between 3D and high dynamic range (HDR) modes as well as a new super-resolution mode. The proposed hardware consists of readily-available components and is driven by a novel splitting algorithm that computes the pixel states from a target high-resolution image. In effect, the display pixels present a compressed representation of the target image that is perceived as a single, high resolution image. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

  5. Microbunching and RF Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  6. Hyperspectral data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, Giovanni; Storer, James A

    2006-01-01

    Provides a survey of results in the field of compression of remote sensed 3D data, with a particular interest in hyperspectral imagery. This work covers topics such as compression architecture, lossless compression, lossy techniques, and more. It also describes a lossless algorithm based on vector quantization.

  7. Compression test assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariotis, A. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A compression test assembly is described which prevents buckling of small diameter rigid specimens undergoing compression testing and permits attachment of extensometers for strain measurements. The test specimen is automatically aligned and laterally supported when compressive force is applied to the end caps and transmitted to the test specimen during testing.

  8. Resultados de tratamento cirúrgico da pseudoartrose de fratura diafisária do úmero com placa de compressão dinâmica e enxerto de osso esponjoso Results of surgical treatment of nonunion of humeral shaft fracture with dynamic compression plate and cancellous bone grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olasinde Anthony Ayotunde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliamos o tratamento da pseudoartrose de fratura diafisária do úmero com placa de compressão dinâmica de janeiro de 2002 a dezembro de 2009. MÉTODOS: Vinte e dois pacientes foram tratados durante o período do estudo. O trauma foi a causa predominante de lesão em 86,4% dos pacientes. RESULTADOS: A pseudoartrose foi atrófica em 81,8% e hipertrófica em 18,2% dos indivíduos. Havia lesão primária do nervo radial nervo em 27,3% dos pacientes. Todos os participantes tinham fratura fechada à apresentação e 81,2% deles tinham recebido tratamento anterior de traditional bone setters (pessoa que faz a redução de ossos quebrados ou deslocados, geralmente sem ser médico licenciado e 18,8% tinham falha do tratamento conservador com gesso. O tempo médio até a união foi 16 semanas. O tratamento anterior com traditional bone setters afetou significantemente o tempo de consolidação da fratura (p OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the treatment of nonunion of humeral shaft fracture with dynamic compression plate from January 2002 to December 2009. METHODS: Twenty two patients were treated over the study period. Trauma was the predominant cause of injury in 86,4% of the patients. RESULTS: Nonunion was atrophic in 81,8% and hypertrophic in 18,2% of the individuals. There was a primary injury of the radial nerve in 27,3% of the patients. All the participants had closed fracture at presentation, and 81,2% had received previous treatment from traditional bone setters and 18,8% had failure of the conservative cast management.The average time to healing was 16 weeks. Previous treatment from traditional bone setters significantly affected the time to fracture healing (p<0,05. All fractures had successful union. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that dynamic compression plating remains an effective treatment option for nonunion of humeral shaft fracture. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective study.

  9. Webinar Presentation: Vitamins, Minerals and Metals: Do Healthy Diets Counteract Health Effects of Toxicants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation, Vitamins, Minerals and Metals: Do Healthy Diets Counteract Health Effects of Toxicants?, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Food and Children's Health held on Dec. 9, 2015.

  10. Compressible effect algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudder, Stan

    2004-08-01

    We define a special type of additive map J on an effect algebra E called a compression. We call J(1) the focus of J and if p is the focus of a compression then p is called a projection. The set of projections in E is denoted by P(E). A compression J is direct if J( a) ≤ a for all a ɛ E. We show that direct compressions are equivalent to projections onto components of cartesian products. An effect algebra E is said to be compressible if every compression on E is uniquely determined by its focus and every compression on E has a supplement. We define and characterize the commutant C(p) of a projection p and show that a compression with focus p is direct if and only if C(p) = E. We show that P(E) is an orthomodular poset. It is proved that the cartesian product of effect algebras is compressible if and only if each component is compressible. We then consider compressible sequential effect algebras, Lüders maps and conditional probabilities.

  11. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben Rune; Satti, Srinivasa Rao; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to ......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances......The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  12. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune Hansen, Esben; Srinivasa Rao, S.; Tiedemann, Peter

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to ......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances.......The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  13. Anomalous thermal expansion, negative linear compressibility, and high-pressure phase transition in ZnAu2(CN) 4 : Neutron inelastic scattering and lattice dynamics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mayanak K.; Singh, Baltej; Mittal, Ranjan; Zbiri, Mohamed; Cairns, Andrew B.; Goodwin, Andrew L.; Schober, Helmut; Chaplot, Samrath L.

    2017-12-01

    We present temperature-dependent inelastic-neutron-scattering measurements, accompanied by ab initio calculations of the phonon spectra and elastic properties as a function of pressure to quantitatively explain an unusual combination of negative thermal expansion and negative linear compressibility behavior of ZnAu2(CN) 4 . The mechanism of the negative thermal expansion is identified in terms of specific anharmonic phonon modes that involve bending of the -Zn-NC-Au-CN-Zn- linkage. The soft phonon at the L point at the Brillouin zone boundary quantitatively relates to the high-pressure phase transition at about 2 GPa. The ambient pressure structure is also found to be close to an elastic instability that leads to a weakly first-order transition.

  14. Comparative study of bridge plate associated to the intramedullary pin and the dynamic compression plate on the experimental osteotomy fixation of femoral in rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Clinical, radiographic, histological and scintigraphy analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Natalie Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    The objectives were to benchmark and monitor the fracture healing of femoral osteotomy in rabbits after fixation with dynamic compression plate and bridge plate associated with intramedullary pin. Were used 14 New Zealand rabbits, four months old with mean weight of 3.5 pounds, from the Experimental Farm Professor Helio Barbosa of the Veterinary School of Minas Gerais Federal Univ. (UFMG). The animals were randomly divided into two groups (I and II). All rabbits underwent osteotomy across the middle third of right femur. In the group I was made to fix the osteotomy with the bridge plate (BP) associated with intramedullary pin, introduced the technique of minimal invasion. In group II, we used dynamic compression plate (DCP) via the conventional approach. Both groups were evaluated clinical, radiographic, histologic and scintigraphic findings. Clinical assessments were performed weekly until the 12 th postoperative week and radiographic examinations were performed before, immediately after, at 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90 days. The bone scintigraphy were performed before and at 20, 50 and 90 days after surgery to monitor the bone metabolism qualitatively and quantitatively. Observed perfusion and bone healing process. After 90 days of study, there was histopathologic evaluation of the osteotomized area and the insertion of screws. In the region of the osteotomy was observed predominance of trabecular bone in group I and group II, the predominance of bone osteons, compatible with the original bone. On insertion of the screws did not differ between groups and there was cortical discontinuity, little necrosis and local hemorrhage. The two types of fixation have led to consolidation within the scheduled period, maturing in early fixation with DCP fixation compared with BP. Scintigraphy demonstrated by the indices of activity and image characteristics, the process of bone healing was significantly greater in animals undergoing early fixation with DCP. (author)

  15. Image and video compression for HDR content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Reinhard, Erik; Agrafiotis, Dimitris; Bull, David R.

    2012-10-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) technology can offer high levels of immersion with a dynamic range meeting and exceeding that of the Human Visual System (HVS). A primary drawback with HDR images and video is that memory and bandwidth requirements are significantly higher than for conventional images and video. Many bits can be wasted coding redundant imperceptible information. The challenge is therefore to develop means for efficiently compressing HDR imagery to a manageable bit rate without compromising perceptual quality. In this paper, we build on previous work of ours and propose a compression method for both HDR images and video, based on an HVS optimised wavelet subband weighting method. The method has been fully integrated into a JPEG 2000 codec for HDR image compression and implemented as a pre-processing step for HDR video coding (an H.264 codec is used as the host codec for video compression). Experimental results indicate that the proposed method outperforms previous approaches and operates in accordance with characteristics of the HVS, tested objectively using a HDR Visible Difference Predictor (VDP). Aiming to further improve the compression performance of our method, we additionally present the results of a psychophysical experiment, carried out with the aid of a high dynamic range display, to determine the difference in the noise visibility threshold between HDR and Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) luminance edge masking. Our findings show that noise has increased visibility on the bright side of a luminance edge. Masking is more consistent on the darker side of the edge.

  16. Interspecific competition counteracts negative effects of dispersal on adaptation of an arthropod herbivore to a new host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzate, A; Bisschop, K; Etienne, R S; Bonte, D

    2017-11-01

    Dispersal and competition have both been suggested to drive variation in adaptability to a new environment, either positively or negatively. A simultaneous experimental test of both mechanisms is however lacking. Here, we experimentally investigate how population dynamics and local adaptation to a new host plant in a model species, the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae), are affected by dispersal from a stock population (no-adapted) and competition with an already adapted spider mite species (Tetranychus evansi). For the population dynamics, we find that competition generally reduces population size and increases the risk of population extinction. However, these negative effects are counteracted by dispersal. For local adaptation, the roles of competition and dispersal are reversed. Without competition, dispersal exerts a negative effect on adaptation (measured as fecundity) to a novel host and females receiving the highest number of immigrants performed similarly to the stock population females. By contrast, with competition, adding more immigrants did not result in a lower fecundity. Females from populations with competition receiving the highest number of immigrants had a significantly higher fecundity than females from populations without competition (same dispersal treatment) and than the stock population females. We suggest that by exerting a stronger selection on the adapting populations, competition can counteract the migration load effect of dispersal. Interestingly, adaptation to the new host does not significantly reduce performance on the ancestral host, regardless of dispersal rate or competition. Our results highlight that assessments of how species can adapt to changing conditions need to jointly consider connectivity and the community context. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons ltd on Behalf of European Society for Evolutionary Biology.

  17. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  18. zlib compression library

    OpenAIRE

    Gailly, Jean-loup; Adler, Mark

    2004-01-01

    (taken from http://www.gzip.org/ on 2004-12-01) zlib is designed to be a free, general-purpose, legally unencumbered -- that is, not covered by any patents -- lossless data-compression library for use on virtually any computer hardware and operating system. The zlib data format is itself portable across platforms. Unlike the LZW compression method used in Unix compress(1) and in the GIF image format, the compression method currently used in zlib essentially never expands the data. (LZW ca...

  19. Interactive calculation procedures for mixed compression inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshotko, Eli

    1983-01-01

    The proper design of engine nacelle installations for supersonic aircraft depends on a sophisticated understanding of the interactions between the boundary layers and the bounding external flows. The successful operation of mixed external-internal compression inlets depends significantly on the ability to closely control the operation of the internal compression portion of the inlet. This portion of the inlet is one where compression is achieved by multiple reflection of oblique shock waves and weak compression waves in a converging internal flow passage. However weak these shocks and waves may seem gas-dynamically, they are of sufficient strength to separate a laminar boundary layer and generally even strong enough for separation or incipient separation of the turbulent boundary layers. An understanding was developed of the viscous-inviscid interactions and of the shock wave boundary layer interactions and reflections.

  20. Shock absorbing properties of toroidal shells under compression, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Yuji

    1985-01-01

    The author has previously presented the static load-deflection relations of a toroidal shell subjected to axisymmetric compression between rigid plates and those of its outer half when subjected to lateral compression. In both these cases, the analytical method was based on the incremental Rayleigh-Ritz method. In this paper, the effects of compression angle and strain rate on the load-deflection relations of the toroidal shell are investigated for its use as a shock absorber for the radioactive material shipping cask which must keep its structural integrity even after accidental falls at any angle. Static compression tests have been carried out at four angles of compression, 10 0 , 20 0 , 50 0 , 90 0 and the applications of the preceding analytical method have been discussed. Dynamic compression tests have also been performed using the free-falling drop hammer. The results are compared with those in the static compression tests. (author)

  1. The N-end rule pathway counteracts cell death by destroying proapoptotic protein fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkov, Konstantin I; Brower, Christopher S; Varshavsky, Alexander

    2012-07-03

    In the course of apoptosis, activated caspases cleave ∼500 to ∼1,000 different proteins in a mammalian cell. The dynamics of apoptosis involve a number of previously identified, caspase-generated proapoptotic protein fragments, defined as those that increase the probability of apoptosis. In contrast to activated caspases, which can be counteracted by inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, there is little understanding of antiapoptotic responses to proapoptotic protein fragments. One possibility is the regulation of proapoptotic fragments through their selective degradation. The previously identified proapoptotic fragments Cys-RIPK1, Cys-TRAF1, Asp-BRCA1, Leu-LIMK1, Tyr-NEDD9, Arg-BID, Asp-BCL(XL), Arg-BIM(EL), Asp-EPHA4, and Tyr-MET bear destabilizing N-terminal residues. Tellingly, the destabilizing nature (but not necessarily the actual identity) of N-terminal residues of proapoptotic fragments was invariably conserved in evolution. Here, we show that these proapoptotic fragments are short-lived substrates of the Arg/N-end rule pathway. Metabolic stabilization of at least one such fragment, Cys-RIPK1, greatly augmented the activation of the apoptosis-inducing effector caspase-3. In agreement with this understanding, even a partial ablation of the Arg/N-end rule pathway in two specific N-end rule mutants is shown to sensitize cells to apoptosis. We also found that caspases can inactivate components of the Arg/N-end rule pathway, suggesting a mutual suppression between this pathway and proapoptotic signaling. Together, these results identify a mechanistically specific and functionally broad antiapoptotic role of the Arg/N-end rule pathway. In conjunction with other apoptosis-suppressing circuits, the Arg/N-end rule pathway contributes to thresholds that prevent a transient or otherwise weak proapoptotic signal from reaching the point of commitment to apoptosis.

  2. Total Correlation Function Integrals and Isothermal Compressibilities from Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Rasmus; Peters, Günther H.j.; Abildskov, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Generation of thermodynamic data, here compressed liquid density and isothermal compressibility data, using molecular dynamics simulations is investigated. Five normal alkane systems are simulated at three different state points. We compare two main approaches to isothermal compressibilities: (1......) fluctuation solution theory analysis of trajectories obtained from simulations to yield total correlation function integrals; and (2) the more commonly used fluctuation formula. The results show that the two approaches yield consistent values and consistent uncertainties. Also, the computations converge...

  3. Effect of fluid compressibility on journal bearing performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimofte, Florin

    1993-01-01

    An analysis was undertaken to determine the effect of fluid film compressibility on the performance of fluid film bearings. A new version of the Reynolds equation was developed, using a polytropic expansion, for both steady-state and dynamic conditions. Polytropic exponents from 1 (isothermal) to 1000 (approaching an incompressible liquid) were evaluated for two bearing numbers, selected from a range of practical interest for cryogenic application, and without cavitation. Bearing loads were insensitive to fluid compressibility for low bearing numbers, as was expected. The effect of compressibility on attitude angle was significant, even when the bearing number was low. A small amount of fluid compressibility was enough to obtain stable running conditions. Incompressible liquid lacked stability at all conditions. Fluid compressibility can be used to control the bearing dynamic coefficients, thereby influencing the dynamic behavior of the rotor-bearing system.

  4. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  5. Salt creep and wicking counteract hydrophobic organic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Juergen

    2017-04-01

    The hydrophobic nature of many biological and edaphic surfaces prevents wetting and water movement. Already small amounts of salts and other hygroscopic material (e.g. by aerosol deposition to leaf surfaces) may change this situation. Salts attract minute amounts of liquid water to the surface and may dynamically expand on the original surface by creeping (evaporation-driven extension of crystals). Creeping is governed by fluctuations of relative humidity and increases with time. Under high, almost saturated concentrations of the salt solutions, ions from the chaotropic side of the Hofmeister series creep most efficiently. Once established, continuous salt connections may act to channel small water flows along the surface. They may act as wicks if water is removed from one side by evaporation. Stomata may in this way become 'leaky' by the leaf surface accumulation of hygroscopic aerosols.

  6. Model-based fitting of compression settings using narrowband stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalewski, Borys; Fereczkowski, Michal; MacDonald, Ewen

    Most state-of-the-art hearing aids apply multi-channel dynamic-range compression (DRC). Studies using speech intelligibility as an outcome measure have shown mixed results in terms of the benefits of compression over linear amplification (e.g. Davies-Venn et al. 2009; Goedegebure et al. 2001, 200...

  7. Testing framework for compression methods

    OpenAIRE

    Štoček, Ondřej

    2008-01-01

    There are many algorithms for data compression. These compression methods often achieve different compression rate and also use computer resources differently. In practice a combination of compression is usually used instead of standalone compression methods. The software tool can be evolved, where we can easily combine existing compression methods to new one and test it consequently. Main goal of this work is to propound such tool and implement it. Further goal is to implement basic library ...

  8. Compressible turbulence in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Jason Wolf

    1999-11-01

    The Burgers' model of compressible fluid dynamics in one dimension is extended to include the effects of pressure back-reaction. The new system consists of two coupled equations: Burgers' equation with a pressure gradient (essentially the 1-D Navier-Stokes equation) and an advection-diffusion equation for the pressure field. It presents a minimal model of both adiabatic gas dynamics and compressible magnetohydrodynamics. From the magnetic perspective, it is the simplest possible system which allows for Alfvenization, i.e. energy transfer between the fluid and the magnetic field. For the special case of equal fluid viscosity and (magnetic) diffusivity, the system is completely integrable, reducing to two decoupled Burgers' equations in the characteristic variables v +/- vsound ( v +/- vAlfven). For arbitrary diffusivities, renormalized perturbation theory is used to calculate the effective transport coefficients for forced Burgerlence. It is shown that energy equi- dissipation, not equipartition, is fundamental to the turbulent state. Both energy and dissipation are localized to shock-like structures, in which wave steepening is inhibited by small-scale forcing and by pressure back-reaction. The spectral forms predicted by theory are confirmed by numerical simulations. It is shown that the velocity structures lead to an asymmetric velocity PDF, as in Burgers' turbulence. Pressure fluctuations, however, are symmetrically distributed. A Fokker-Planck calculation of these distributions is compared and contrasted with a path integral approach. The latter instanton solution suggests that the system maintains its characteristic directions in steady-state turbulence, supporting the results from perturbation theory. Implications for the spectra of turbulence and self-organization phenomena in compressible fluids and plasmas are also discussed.

  9. Compressive properties of aluminum foams by gas injection method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Huiming

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The compressive properties of aluminum foams by gas injection method are investigated under both quasi-static and dynamic compressive loads in this paper. The experimental results indicate that the deformation of the aluminum foams goes through three stages: elastic deforming, plastic deforming and densification stage, during both the quasi-static and dynamic compressions. The aluminum foams with small average cell size or low porosity have high yield strength. An increase in strain rate can lead to an increase of yield strength. The yield strength of the aluminum foams under the dynamic loading condition is much greater than that under the quasi-static loading condition. Dynamic compressive tests show that a higher strain rate can give rise to a higher energy absorption capacity, which demonstrates that the aluminum foams have remarkable strain rate sensitivity on the loading rate.

  10. Radio frequency pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1988-12-01

    High gradients require peak powers. One possible way to generate high peak powers is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a shorter pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before dc to rf conversion as is done for the relativistic klystron or after dc to rf conversion as is done with SLED. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered. Three methods of RFPC will be discussed: SLED, BEC, and REC. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  11. Hydrodynamic instability of compressible fluid in porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argal, Shraddha; Tiwari, Anita; Sharma, P K; Prajapati, R P

    2014-01-01

    The hydrodynamic Rayleigh -Taylor instability of two superposed compressible fluids in porous medium has been studied. The dispersion relation is derived for such a medium by using normal mode analysis. The RT instability is discussed for various simplified configuration. The effect of porosity and dynamic viscosity has been analyzed and it is observed that porosity and dynamic viscosity have stabilizing effect on the Rayleigh- Taylor instability of compressible fluids.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of the Mechanical Behavior of Strongly Anisotropic Light-Weight Metallic Fiber Structures under Static and Dynamic Compressive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Andersen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rigid metallic fiber structures made from a variety of different metals and alloys have been investigated mainly with regard to their functional properties such as heat transfer, pressure drop, or filtration characteristics. With the recent advent of aluminum and magnesium-based fiber structures, the application of such structures in light-weight crash absorbers has become conceivable. The present paper therefore elucidates the mechanical behavior of rigid sintered fiber structures under quasi-static and dynamic loading. Special attention is paid to the strongly anisotropic properties observed for different directions of loading in relation to the main fiber orientation. Basically, the structures show an orthotropic behavior; however, a finite thickness of the fiber slabs results in moderate deviations from a purely orthotropic behavior. The morphology of the tested specimens is examined by computed tomography, and experimental results for different directions of loading as well as different relative densities are presented. Numerical calculations were carried out using real structural data derived from the computed tomography data. Depending on the direction of loading, the fiber structures show a distinctively different deformation behavior both experimentally and numerically. Based on these results, the prevalent modes of deformation are discussed and a first comparison with an established polymer foam and an assessment of the applicability of aluminum fiber structures in crash protection devices is attempted.

  13. Aphid watery saliva counteracts sieve-tube occlusion: a universal phenomenon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Will, T.; Kornemann, S.R.; Furch, A.C.U.; Tjallingii, W.F.; Bel, van A.J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Ca2+-binding proteins in the watery saliva of Megoura viciae counteract Ca2+-dependent occlusion of sieve plates in Vicia faba and so prevent the shut-down of food supply in response to stylet penetration. The question arises whether this interaction between aphid saliva and sieve-element proteins

  14. Alpha-Tocopherol Counteracts the Cytotoxicity Induced by Ochratoxin A in Primary Porcine Fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusi, Elenora; Rebucci, Raffaella; Pecorini, Chiara

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to determine the half-lethal concentration of ochratoxin A (OTA) as well as the levels of lactate dehydrogenase release and DNA fragmentation induced by OTA in primary porcine fibroblasts, and to examine the role of α-tocopherol in counteracting its toxicity. Ce...

  15. Anti-corruption examination in the system of measures designed to counteract and prevent corruption

    OpenAIRE

    Tatishvili, Tengiz

    2013-01-01

    He subject of the article is anti-corruption examination — a relatively new procedure in the struggle against corrupt practices, and its place in the system of counteracting corruption The article presents corruptio-nogenic factors and methods used to detect such factors in regulatory legal acts

  16. Alanine Counteracts the Destabilizing Effect that Urea has on RNase-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowhan, Rimpy K; Ali, Fasil; Bhat, Mohd Y; Rahman, Safikur; Singh, Laishram R; Ahmad, Faizan; Dar, Tanveer A

    2016-01-01

    It is generally believed that organisms use and accumulate methylamine osmolytes to prevent urea's damaging effect on protein stability and activity. However, urea-rich cells not only accumulate methylamines but also many other methylated and non-methylated compounds as well. But, so far it is not known whether osmolytes that are not accumulated in urea-rich cells could also confer urea-counteracting properties. We investigated the behavior of a non-methylamine osmolyte, alanine for its counteracting effect against urea denaturation of a model protein, ribonuclease A (RNase-A). We have measured structure and thermodynamic parameters (Tm, ΔHm, and ΔGD°) of RNase-A in the presence of alanine, urea and their combination. The results were also compared with the ability of glycine (osmolyte lacking one methyl group when compared with alanine) to counter urea's effect on protein stability. We observed that alanine but not glycine counteracts urea's harmful effect on RNase-A stability. The results indicated that alanine (in addition to methylamine osmolytes) may serve as an alternate urea-counteractant. Since glycine fails to protect RNase-A from urea's destabilizing effect, it seems that methylation to glycine might have some evolutionary significance to protect proteins against harmful effects of urea.

  17. Counteracting media’s thin body ideal in adolescent girls: informing is more effective than warning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, J.; Konijn, E.A.; Seidell, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated whether information or warnings about depictions of the thin-body ideal in mass media are effective in counteracting media-induced negative body perceptions of adolescent girls. Based on counter-advertising and reactance theories, our hypotheses were tested in a 3

  18. Are hamstrings activated to counteract shear forces during isometric knee extension efforts in healthy subjects?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, I.; Aalbersberg-van Berkel, S.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    The hamstring muscles have the potential to counteract anterior shear forces at the knee joint by co-contracting during knee extension efforts. Such a muscle recruitment pattern might protect the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) by reducing its strain. In this study we investigated to what extent

  19. Compressed Video Segmentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobla, Vikrant; Doermann, David S; Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1996-01-01

    ... changes in content and camera motion. The analysis is performed in the compressed domain using available macroblock and motion vector information, and if necessary, discrete cosine transform (DCT) information...

  20. Mechanical chest compressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Matthew

    2012-09-13

    The authors of this study state that there is a lack of evidence about the efficiency of mechanical devices in producing chest compressions as an adjunct to resuscitation during cardiorespiratory arrest.

  1. Biaxial compression test technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansard, E. T.

    1975-01-01

    Fixture and technique have been developed for predicting behavior of stiffened skin panels under biaxial compressive loading. Tester can load test panel independently in longitudinal and transverse directions. Data can also be obtained in combined mode.

  2. Muon cooling: longitudinal compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-06

    A 10  MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2  μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 10^{7}. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 10^{4}.

  3. Quantifying porosity, compressibility and permeability in Shale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbia, Ernest Ncha; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Frykman, Peter

    The Fjerritslev Formation in the Norwegian-Danish Basin forms the main seal to Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic sandstone reservoirs. In order to estimate rock properties Jurassic shale samples from deep onshore wells in Danish basin were studied. Mineralogical analysis based on X-ray diffractometry...... (NMR) show that, the MICP porosity is 9-10% points lower than HPMI and NMR porosity. Compressibility result shows that deep shale is stiffer in situ than normally assumed in geotechnical modelling and that static compressibility corresponds with dynamic one only at the begining of unloading stress...

  4. Deterministic Compressed Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    programs. Examples of such algorithms are the interior point methods [51, 52], Lasso modification to LARS [106, 171], homotopy methods [99], weighted...component analysis . IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 9(2):40–42, 2002. [171] S. J. Kim, K. Koh, M. Lustig, S. Boyd, and D. Gorinevsky. A method for...53 7.3 Analysis of the GAME Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 III Expander-Based Compressed Sensing 61 8 Efficient Compressed

  5. Blind Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Gleichman, Sivan; Eldar, Yonina C.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle underlying compressed sensing is that a signal, which is sparse under some basis representation, can be recovered from a small number of linear measurements. However, prior knowledge of the sparsity basis is essential for the recovery process. This work introduces the concept of blind compressed sensing, which avoids the need to know the sparsity basis in both the sampling and the recovery process. We suggest three possible constraints on the sparsity basis that can ...

  6. Experiments of cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Zhou, Zhongyu; Zhang, Chunbo; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2015-09-01

    The high Explosive Magnetic Flux Implosion Compression Generator (EMFICG) is a kind of unique high energy density dynamic technique with characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising and could be suitable as a tool of cylindrical isentropic compression. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) have developed EMFICG technique and realized cylindrical isentropic compression. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5-6 Tesla were built first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive. The inner free surface velocity of sample was measured by PDV. The isentropic compression of a copper sample was verified and the isentropic pressure is over 100 GPa. The cylindrical isentropic compression process has been numerical simulated by 1D MHD code and the simulation results were compared with the experiments. Compared with the transitional X-ray flash radiograph measurement, this method will probably promote the data accuracy.

  7. Experiments of cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Zhuowei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high Explosive Magnetic Flux Implosion Compression Generator (EMFICG is a kind of unique high energy density dynamic technique with characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising and could be suitable as a tool of cylindrical isentropic compression. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP have developed EMFICG technique and realized cylindrical isentropic compression. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5–6 Tesla were built first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive. The inner free surface velocity of sample was measured by PDV. The isentropic compression of a copper sample was verified and the isentropic pressure is over 100 GPa. The cylindrical isentropic compression process has been numerical simulated by 1D MHD code and the simulation results were compared with the experiments. Compared with the transitional X-ray flash radiograph measurement, this method will probably promote the data accuracy.

  8. Importance of twinning in static and dynamic compression of a Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy with an equiaxed microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coghe, F.; Tirry, W.; Rabet, L.; Schryvers, D.; Van Houtte, P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Twinning has a marked influence on texture and mechanical response in Ti–6Al–4V. ► Experimental and simulated twin fractions differed significantly. ► Strengthens the hypothesis of complete grains being reoriented by twinning. ► Strain rate enhances significantly the activity of twinning. - Abstract: Whereas deformation twinning is known to be an important deformation mechanism for hexagonal materials like magnesium and pure titanium, so far almost no literature exists on the twinning behaviour of the Ti–6Al–4V alloy. In this work it was shown that the activation of twinning as a deformation mechanism could have a pronounced effect on the mechanical behaviour of the Ti–6Al–4V alloy. This effect is even more pronounced under dynamic loading conditions. Transmission electron microscopy showed that only the {101 ¯ 2}〈1 ¯ 011〉 tensile twin system was activated under certain loading conditions. Light-optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction data were afterwards used to experimentally determine the twin fractions. The importance of twinning for the texture evolution was also studied. It was shown that even small twin fractions can lead to distinct texture features, especially due to the discrete reorientation of the c-axes. The experimental results were compared to simulated results that were obtained with a viscoplastic self-consistent crystal plasticity code, after experimental validation that twinning can be reliably modelled as a unidirectional slip system. Although good agreement was obtained for the experimental and simulated stress–strain curves, the simulated results concerning twinning correlated well only on a qualitative basis as the simulated twin fractions were systematically higher than the experimental fractions. This seems to strengthen the hypothesis made by other research groups that complete grains might reorient by twinning.

  9. Compression Models for Plasma Focus Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Jose; Calusse, Alejandro; Ramos, Ruben; Rodriguez Palomino, Luis

    2003-01-01

    Using a numerical model that calculates the dynamics of Plasma Focus devices, we compared the results of three different compression models of the plasma pinch.One of the main objectives in this area is to develop a simplified model to calculate the neutron production of Plasma Focus devices, to study the influence of the main parameters in this neutron yield.The dynamics is thoroughly studied, and the model predicts fairly well values such as maximum currents and times for pinch collapse.Therefore, we evaluate here different models of pinch compression, to try to predict the neutron production with good agreement with the rest of the variables involved.To fulfill this requirement, we have experimental results of neutron production as a function of deuterium filling pressure in the chamber, and typical values of other main variables in the dynamics of the current sheet

  10. Application of the bilinear compression function to calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Cattaneo, P W

    2000-01-01

    The energy dynamic range required by a calorimeter may exceed, if high speed is also required, the technical limitations of available ADCs. In this case the use of a dynamic compressor matching the energy range to the ADC range may be an adequate solution. The requirement for the compression function is to add an appropriately small quantization error to the calorimeter resolution. The bilinear compression function is easy to realize, it is therefore interesting to study the conditions under which it is adequate and which are the parameters of the compression curve, the slope ratio and the break point, minimizing the additional error due to quantization.

  11. Application of the bilinear compression function to calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattaneo, Paolo Walter

    2000-01-01

    The energy dynamic range required by a calorimeter may exceed, if high speed is also required, the technical limitations of available ADCs. In this case the use of a dynamic compressor matching the energy range to the ADC range may be an adequate solution. The requirement for the compression function is to add an appropriately small quantization error to the calorimeter resolution. The bilinear compression function is easy to realize, it is therefore interesting to study the conditions under which it is adequate and which are the parameters of the compression curve, the slope ratio and the break point, minimizing the additional error due to quantization

  12. An Adaptive Lossless Data Compression Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Gana Kolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy is an important consideration in the design and deployment of wireless sensor networks (WSNs since sensor nodes are typically powered by batteries with limited capacity. Since the communication unit on a wireless sensor node is the major power consumer, data compression is one of possible techniques that can help reduce the amount of data exchanged between wireless sensor nodes resulting in power saving. However, wireless sensor networks possess significant limitations in communication, processing, storage, bandwidth, and power. Thus, any data compression scheme proposed for WSNs must be lightweight. In this paper, we present an adaptive lossless data compression (ALDC algorithm for wireless sensor networks. Our proposed ALDC scheme performs compression losslessly using multiple code options. Adaptive compression schemes allow compression to dynamically adjust to a changing source. The data sequence to be compressed is partitioned into blocks, and the optimal compression scheme is applied for each block. Using various real-world sensor datasets we demonstrate the merits of our proposed compression algorithm in comparison with other recently proposed lossless compression algorithms for WSNs.

  13. Short-Term Summer Inundation as a Measure to Counteract Acidification in Rich Fens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan S Mettrop

    Full Text Available In regions with intensive agriculture, water level fluctuation in wetlands has generally become constricted within narrow limits. Water authorities are, however, considering the re-establishment of fluctuating water levels as a management tool in biodiverse, base-rich fens ('rich fens'. This includes temporary inundation with surface water from ditches, which may play an important role in counteracting acidification in order to conserve and restore biodiversity. Inundation may result in an increased acid neutralizing capacity (ANC for two reasons: infiltration of base-rich inundation water into peat soils, and microbial alkalinity generation under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to test whether short-term (2 weeks summer inundation is more effective than short-term winter inundation to restore the ANC in the upper 10 cm of non-floating peat soils, and to explain potential differences. Large-scale field experiments were conducted for five years in base-rich fens and Sphagnum-dominated poor fens. Winter inundation did not result in increased porewater ANC, because infiltration was inhibited in the waterlogged peat and evapotranspiration rates were relatively low. Also, low temperatures limit microbial alkalinity generation. In summer, however, when temperature and evapotranspiration rates are higher, inundation resulted in increased porewater Ca and HCO3- concentrations, but only in areas with characteristic rich fen bryophytes. This increase was not only due to stronger infiltration into the soil, but also to higher microbial alkalinity generation under anaerobic conditions. In contrast, porewater ANC did not increase in Sphagnum-plots as a result of the ability of Sphagnum spp. to acidify their environment. In both rich and poor fens, flooding-induced P-mobilization remained sufficiently low to safeguard P-limited vegetation. NO3(- and NH4(+ dynamics showed no considerable changes either. In conclusion, short

  14. Compressibility of air in fibrous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1996-01-01

    The dynamic compressibility of air in fibrous materials has been computed for two assumed configurations of fibers which are close to the geometry of real fiber materials. Models with parallel cylinders placed in a regular square lattice and placed randomly are treated. For these models...... the compressibility is computed approximately from the diameter and mean distances between cylinders. This requires calculation of the air temperature, which is calculated for cylinders in a regular lattive by the Wigner-Seitz cell approximation. In the case of random placement, the calculation is done by a summation...... over thermal waves from all fibers, and by a self-consistent procedure. Figuren of the compressibility in the frequency range 10-100 000 Hz, are given for diameter of the cylinders of 6.8 µm, and mean distances between them from 50 to 110 µm, which corresponds to glass wool with a density of 40 to 16...

  15. Comprehensive Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced 3D Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Breast With Fat/Water Separation and High Spatiotemporal Resolution Using Radial Sampling, Compressed Sensing, and Parallel Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkert, Thomas; Block, Kai Tobias; Heller, Samantha; Moccaldi, Melanie; Sodickson, Daniel K; Kim, Sungheon Gene; Moy, Linda

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of Dixon radial volumetric encoding (Dixon-RAVE) for comprehensive dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast using a combination of radial sampling, model-based fat/water separation, compressed sensing, and parallel imaging. In this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant prospective study, 24 consecutive patients underwent bilateral breast MRI, including both conventional fat-suppressed and non-fat-suppressed precontrast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE). Afterward, 1 continuous Dixon-RAVE scan was performed with the proposed approach while the contrast agent was injected. This scan was immediately followed by the acquisition of 4 conventional fat-saturated VIBE scans. From the comprehensive Dixon-RAVE data set, different image contrasts were reconstructed that are comparable to the separate conventional VIBE scans.Two radiologists independently rated image quality, conspicuity of fibroglandular tissue from fat (FG), and degree of fat suppression (FS) on a 5-point Likert-type scale for the following 3 comparisons: precontrast fat-suppressed (pre-FS), precontrast non-fat-suppressed (pre-NFS), and dynamic fat-suppressed (dyn-FS) images. When scores were averaged over readers, Dixon-RAVE achieved significantly higher (P < 0.001) degree of fat suppression compared with VIBE, for both pre-FS (4.25 vs 3.67) and dyn-FS (4.10 vs 3.46) images. Although Dixon-RAVE had lower image quality score compared with VIBE for the pre-FS (3.56 vs 3.67, P = 0.490), the pre-NFS (3.54 vs 3.88, P = 0.009), and the dyn-FS images (3.06 vs 3.67, P < 0.001), acceptable or better diagnostic quality was achieved (score ≥ 3). The FG score for Dixon-RAVE in comparison to VIBE was significantly higher for the pre-FS image (4.23 vs 3.85, P = 0.044), lower for the pre-NFS image (3.98 vs 4.25, P = 0.054), and higher for the dynamic fat-suppressed image (3

  16. Channel box compression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamizo, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yuki.

    1996-01-01

    The device of the present invention reduces the volume of spent fuel channel boxes of power plant facilities to eliminate secondary wastes, suppress generation of radiation sources and improve storage space efficiency. The device has a box-like shape. A support frame is disposed on the lateral side of the box for supporting spent channel boxes. A horizontal transferring unit and a vertical transferring compression unit driven by a driving mechanism are disposed in the support frame. Further, the compression unit may have a rotational compression roller so as to move freely in the transferring unit. In addition, the transferring unit and the driving mechanism may be disposed outside of pool water. With such a constitution, since spent channel boxes are compressed and bent by horizontal movement of the transferring unit and the vertical movement of the compression unit, no cut pieces or cut powders are generated. Further, if the transferring unit and the driving mechanism are disposed outside of the pool water, it is not necessary to make them waterproof, which facilitates the maintenance. (I.S.)

  17. Optical pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The interest in using large lasers to achieve a very short and intense pulse for generating fusion plasma has provided a strong impetus to reexamine the possibilities of optical pulse compression at high energy. Pulse compression allows one to generate pulses of long duration (minimizing damage problems) and subsequently compress optical pulses to achieve the short pulse duration required for specific applications. The ideal device for carrying out this program has not been developed. Of the two approaches considered, the Gires--Tournois approach is limited by the fact that the bandwidth and compression are intimately related, so that the group delay dispersion times the square of the bandwidth is about unity for all simple Gires--Tournois interferometers. The Treacy grating pair does not suffer from this limitation, but is inefficient because diffraction generally occurs in several orders and is limited by the problem of optical damage to the grating surfaces themselves. Nonlinear and parametric processes were explored. Some pulse compression was achieved by these techniques; however, they are generally difficult to control and are not very efficient. (U.S.)

  18. Energy transfer in compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grete, Philipp; O'Shea, Brian W.; Beckwith, Kris; Schmidt, Wolfram; Christlieb, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic fields, compressibility, and turbulence are important factors in many terrestrial and astrophysical processes. While energy dynamics, i.e., how energy is transferred within and between kinetic and magnetic reservoirs, has been previously studied in the context of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, we extend shell-to-shell energy transfer analysis to the compressible regime. We derive four new transfer functions specifically capturing compressibility effects in the kinetic and magnetic cascade, and capturing energy exchange via magnetic pressure. To illustrate their viability, we perform and analyze four simulations of driven isothermal MHD turbulence in the sub- and supersonic regime with two different codes. On the one hand, our analysis reveals robust characteristics across regime and numerical method. For example, energy transfer between individual scales is local and forward for both cascades with the magnetic cascade being stronger than the kinetic one. Magnetic tension and magnetic pressure related transfers are less local and weaker than the cascades. We find no evidence for significant nonlocal transfer. On the other hand, we show that certain functions, e.g., the compressive component of the magnetic energy cascade, exhibit a more complex behavior that varies both with regime and numerical method. Having established a basis for the analysis in the compressible regime, the method can now be applied to study a broader parameter space.

  19. Celiac artery compression syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, J N; Lambidis, C D; Lioulias, A G; Skouteli, E T; Bastounis, E A; Livesay, J J

    2000-04-01

    Celiac artery compression syndrome occurs when the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm causes extrinsic compression of the celiac trunk. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with a three-month history of postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and some emesis, without weight loss. There was a bruit in the upper mid-epigastrium and the lateral aortic arteriography revealed a significant stenosis of the celiac artery. At operation, the celiac axis was found to be severely compressed anteriorly by fibers forming the inferior margin of the arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. The ligament was cut and a vein by-pass from the supraceliac aorta to the distal celiac artery was performed. The patient remains well and free of symptoms two and a half years since operation.In this report we discuss the indications and the therapeutic options of this syndrome as well as a review of the literature is being given.

  20. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oona, H.; Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Rodriquez, P.J.; Younger, S.M.; Lewis, W.; Turley, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal

  1. Outcome of Repair of Distal Radial and Ulnar Fractures in Dogs Weighing 4 kg or Less Using a 1.5-mm Locking Adaption Plate or 2.0-mm Limited Contact Dynamic Compression Plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Thomas A; Strom, Adam

    2017-11-01

    Objectives  Retrospective evaluation of repairing distal radial and ulnar fractures in small breed dogs with the Synthes 1.5-mm locking Adaption plate system and compare results in a similar group of patients repaired with the Synthes 2.0-mm limited contact-dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP). Methods  Electronic medical records from one specialty referral centre were reviewed from March 21, 2010, to October 9, 2015, for patients weighing less than or equal to 4 kg that had a distal one-third radial and ulnar fracture repaired with a Synthes 1.5-mm locking adaption plate or Synthes 2.0-mm LC-DCP. Further inclusion criteria included application of the plate to the cranial surface of the radius via open reduction and internal fixation. Results  Six 1.5-mm Adaption plates and 7 2.0-mm LC-DCPs were used to repair 13 distal radial and ulnar fractures in 12 dogs. There were three major complications in the 1.5-mm adaption plate group (one plate fracture, one screw pull-out and one fracture through a distal screw hole) and one major complication in the 2.0-mm LC-DCP group due to a re-fracture. All patients without a complication had good or excellent functional outcome. Clinical Significance  The authors recommend that the 1.5-mm Adaption plate be used only when a 2.0-mm LC-DCP would not allow for a minimum of two screws in the distal segment and at the discretion of the surgeon. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  2. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...... correlation to the curing time. The experiments show no correlation between the anisotropy and the curing time and a small strength difference between the two drilling directions. The literature shows variations on which drilling direction that is strongest. Based on a Monto Carlo simulation of the expected...

  3. Image data compression investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrie, Carlos

    1989-01-01

    NASA continuous communications systems growth has increased the demand for image transmission and storage. Research and analysis was conducted on various lossy and lossless advanced data compression techniques or approaches used to improve the efficiency of transmission and storage of high volume stellite image data such as pulse code modulation (PCM), differential PCM (DPCM), transform coding, hybrid coding, interframe coding, and adaptive technique. In this presentation, the fundamentals of image data compression utilizing two techniques which are pulse code modulation (PCM) and differential PCM (DPCM) are presented along with an application utilizing these two coding techniques.

  4. Alpha-Tocopherol Counteracts the Cytotoxicity Induced by Ochratoxin A in Primary Porcine Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Fusi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the current study were to determine the half-lethal concentration of ochratoxin A (OTA as well as the levels of lactate dehydrogenase release and DNA fragmentation induced by OTA in primary porcine fibroblasts, and to examine the role of α-tocopherol in counteracting its toxicity. Cells showed a dose-, time- and origin-dependent (ear vs. embryo sensitivity to ochratoxin A. Pre-incubation for 3 h with 1 nM α-tocopherol significantly (P < 0.01 reduced OTA cytotoxicity, lactate dehydrogenase release and DNA damage in both fibroblast cultures. These findings indicate that α-tocopherol supplementation may counteract short-term OTA toxicity, supporting its defensive role in the cell membrane.

  5. Counteracting 16-QAM Optical Fiber Transmission Impairments With Iterative Turbo Equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlunno, Valeria; Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Borkowski, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A turbo equalization (TE) scheme based on convolutional code and normalized least mean square equalizer for coherent optical communication links is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The proposed iterative TE technique is proved effective for counteracting polarization-division-multiplexin......A turbo equalization (TE) scheme based on convolutional code and normalized least mean square equalizer for coherent optical communication links is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The proposed iterative TE technique is proved effective for counteracting polarization......-division-multiplexing 16 quadrature amplitude modulation impairments in dispersion uncompensated coherent transmission links. Gains exceeding one order of magnitude in terms of bit error rate are obtained in experimental validation up to 497 km-standard single mode fiber link transmission....

  6. Nature gives us strength: exposure to nature counteracts ego-depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jason T; Lau, Shun

    2015-01-01

    Previous research rarely investigated the role of physical environment in counteracting ego-depletion. In the present research, we hypothesized that exposure to natural environment counteracts ego-depletion. Three experiments were conducted to test this hypothesis. In Experiment 1, initially depleted participants who viewed pictures of nature scenes showed greater persistence on a subsequent anagram task than those who were given a rest period. Experiment 2 expanded upon this finding by showing that natural environment enhanced logical reasoning performance after ego-depleting task. Experiment 3 adopted a two- (depletion vs. no-depletion) -by-two (nature exposure vs. urban exposure) factorial design. We found that nature exposure moderated the effect of depletion on anagram task performance. Taken together, the present studies offer a viable and novel strategy to mitigate the negative impacts of ego-depletion.

  7. Manifestation of counteracting photovoltaic effect on IV characteristics in multi-junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintairov, M. A.; Evstropov, V. V.; Mintairov, S. A.; Shvarts, M. Z.; Kozhukhovskaia, S. A.; Kalyuzhnyy, N. A.

    2017-11-01

    The existence within monolithic double- and triple-junction solar cells of a photoelectric source, which counteracts the basic photovoltaic p-n junctions, is proved. The paper presents a detailed analysis of the shape of the light IV-characteristics, as well as the dependence Voc-Jsc (open circuit voltage - short-circuit current). It is established that the counteracting source is tunnel p+-n+ junction. The photoelectric characteristics of samples with different tunnel diode peak current values were investigated, including the case of a zero value. When the tunnel p+-n+ junction is photoactive, the Voc-Jsc dependence has a dropping part, including a sharp jump. This undesirable effect decreases with increasing peak current.

  8. Counteracting Animal Homelessness and Providing Care for Stray Animals as a Task of a Commune

    OpenAIRE

    Szalewska, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of Polish binding law acts allows one to assume that, on normative level, the obligation of public administration to provide care for stray animals is deeply embedded. Both the Animal Protection Act, as well as the Act on Maintaining Cleanliness, indicate the tasks of a commune in the scope of providing care for stray animals, catching homeless animals and counteracting their homelessness. Simultaneously, the analysis of jurisdiction, and inquiries as well as considerations emerg...

  9. The University of the Third Age as an institution counteracting marginalization of older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Marcinkiewicz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the role of the University of the Third Age in counteracting the effects of marginalization of the elderly. The history of the University of the Third Age is presented and also different models of this institution are characterized. The paper presents new trends in research conducted by participants of the U3A and shown their relation to marginalization

  10. In COS cells Vpu can both stabilize tetherin expression and counteract its antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, Abdul A; Kuruppu, Nishani D; Felton, Kathryn L; D'Souza, Darren; Freed, Eric O

    2014-01-01

    The interferon-inducible cellular protein tetherin (CD317/BST-2) inhibits the release of a broad range of enveloped viruses. The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu enhances virus particle release by counteracting this host restriction factor. While the antagonism of human tetherin by Vpu has been associated with both proteasomal and lysosomal degradation, the link between Vpu-mediated tetherin degradation and the ability of Vpu to counteract the antiviral activity of tetherin remains poorly understood. Here, we show that human tetherin is expressed at low levels in African green monkey kidney (COS) cells. However, Vpu markedly increases tetherin expression in this cell line, apparently by sequestering it in an internal compartment that bears lysosomal markers. This stabilization of tetherin by Vpu requires the transmembrane sequence of human tetherin. Although Vpu stabilizes human tetherin in COS cells, it still counteracts the ability of tetherin to suppress virus release. The enhancement of virus release by Vpu in COS cells is associated with a modest reduction in cell-surface tetherin expression, even though the overall expression of tetherin is higher in the presence of Vpu. This study demonstrates that COS cells provide a model system in which Vpu-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 release is uncoupled from Vpu-mediated tetherin degradation.

  11. Physical activity counteracts tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26-injected muscles: an interim report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Hiroux

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle tissue is a rare site of tumor metastasis but is the main target of the degenerative processes occurring in cancer-associated cachexia syndrome. Beneficial effects of physical activity in counteracting cancer-related muscle wasting have been described in the last decades. Recently it has been shown that, in tumor xeno-transplanted mouse models, physical activity is able to directly affect tumor growth by modulating inflammatory responses in the tumor mass microenvironment. Here, we investigated the effect of physical activity on tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26 cells injected tibialis anterior muscles of BALB/c mice. Histological analyses revealed that 4 days of voluntary wheel running significantly counteracts tumor cell growth in C26-injected muscles compared to the non-injected sedentary controls. Since striated skeletal muscle tissue is the site of voluntary contraction, our results confirm that physical activity can also directly counteract tumor cell growth in a metabolically active tissue that is usually not a target for metastasis.

  12. Compressive Information Extraction: A Dynamical Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-24

    sparsely encoded in very large data streams. (a) Target tracking in an urban canyon; (b) and (c) sample frames showing contextually abnormal events: onset...tractable convex relaxation can be obtained by using the nuclear norm as a surrogate for rank, leading to a convex semi- definite program that can be...extraction to identify contextually abnormal se- quences (see section 2.2.3). Formally, the problem of interest can be stated as establishing whether a noisy

  13. The dynamics of surge in compression systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    47. Figure 4. Time series (a) and corresponding frequency spectra plot (b) indicating surge. of surge, flow visualisation studies, another setup was fabricated with a piston, cylinder configuration, with which volume of the plenum could be changed continuously. Different lengths of compressor duct were used in the study.

  14. Quantum dynamics of attosecond electron pulse compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Peter

    2017-12-01

    If an electron beam is periodically modulated in velocity, for example by laser field cycles, it can transform upon further propagation into a train of attosecond or shorter electron pulses. Here, I investigate the quantum mechanics of such an approach by numerically solving the Schrödinger equation in the time domain. There is a limit for the shortest electron pulses that can be achieved, and it depends on simple relations between the electron energy, the laser period, and the modulation strength. These results allow to design future experiments and to compare the measured electron pulse shapes to their quantum limit.

  15. The dynamics of surge in compression systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Even though the experimental work of Grietzer (1976) was quite in conformity with his theory, the parameter B,could ... It was reported by Day (1994) that during experimental work on stall and surge, oscillations at the system natural frequency ... In other words, deep surge cycles are similar to relaxation oscillations exhibited ...

  16. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  17. Temporal compressive sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W.

    2017-12-12

    Methods and systems for temporal compressive sensing are disclosed, where within each of one or more sensor array data acquisition periods, one or more sensor array measurement datasets comprising distinct linear combinations of time slice data are acquired, and where mathematical reconstruction allows for calculation of accurate representations of the individual time slice datasets.

  18. Compressive CFAR Radar Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of a combined Compressive Sensing (CS) Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) radar processor under different interference scenarios using both the Cell Averaging (CA) and Order Statistic (OS) CFAR detectors. Using the properties of the Complex Approximate

  19. Compressive CFAR radar detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop the first Compressive Sensing (CS) adaptive radar detector. We propose three novel architectures and demonstrate how a classical Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detector can be combined with ℓ1-norm minimization. Using asymptotic arguments and the Complex Approximate

  20. Gas compression infrared generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, W.F.

    1980-01-01

    A molecular gas is compressed in a quasi-adiabatic manner to produce pulsed radiation during each compressor cycle when the pressure and temperature are sufficiently high, and part of the energy is recovered during the expansion phase, as defined in U.S. Pat. No. 3,751,666; characterized by use of a cylinder with a reciprocating piston as a compressor

  1. Multiple snapshot compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstoft, Peter; Xenaki, Angeliki; Mecklenbrauker, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    For sound fields observed on an array, compressive sensing (CS) reconstructs the multiple source signals at unknown directions-of-arrival (DOAs) using a sparsity constraint. The DOA estimation is posed as an underdetermined problem expressing the field at each sensor as a phase-lagged superposition...

  2. Compression of Infrared images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the compression of infrared images with three codecs: JPEG2000, JPEG-XT and HEVC. Results are evaluated in terms of SNR, Mean Relative Squared Error (MRSE) and the HDR-VDP2 quality metric. JPEG2000 and HEVC perform fairy similar and better than JPEG-XT. JPEG2000 performs...

  3. Nonlinear Frequency Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollie, Susan; Glista, Danielle; Seelisch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Frequency lowering technologies offer an alternative amplification solution for severe to profound high frequency hearing losses. While frequency lowering technologies may improve audibility of high frequency sounds, the very nature of this processing can affect the perceived sound quality. This article reports the results from two studies that investigated the impact of a nonlinear frequency compression (NFC) algorithm on perceived sound quality. In the first study, the cutoff frequency and compression ratio parameters of the NFC algorithm were varied, and their effect on the speech quality was measured subjectively with 12 normal hearing adults, 12 normal hearing children, 13 hearing impaired adults, and 9 hearing impaired children. In the second study, 12 normal hearing and 8 hearing impaired adult listeners rated the quality of speech in quiet, speech in noise, and music after processing with a different set of NFC parameters. Results showed that the cutoff frequency parameter had more impact on sound quality ratings than the compression ratio, and that the hearing impaired adults were more tolerant to increased frequency compression than normal hearing adults. No statistically significant differences were found in the sound quality ratings of speech-in-noise and music stimuli processed through various NFC settings by hearing impaired listeners. These findings suggest that there may be an acceptable range of NFC settings for hearing impaired individuals where sound quality is not adversely affected. These results may assist an Audiologist in clinical NFC hearing aid fittings for achieving a balance between high frequency audibility and sound quality. PMID:23539261

  4. Compressed-air flow control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Ki Wan; Chapin, Stephen C; Pregibon, Daniel C; Baah, David; Floyd-Smith, Tamara M; Doyle, Patrick S

    2011-02-21

    We present the construction and operation of a compressed-air driven flow system that can be used for a variety of microfluidic applications that require rapid dynamic response and precise control of multiple inlet streams. With the use of inexpensive and readily available parts, we describe how to assemble this versatile control system and further explore its utility in continuous- and pulsed-flow microfluidic procedures for the synthesis and analysis of microparticles.

  5. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  6. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  7. COMPRESSIVE AND SHEAR ANALYSIS OF RUBBER BLOCK UNDER LARGE STRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    K. Sridharan; R. Sivaramakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    The Elastomeric materials have found use in a wide range of applications, including hoses, tires, gaskets, seals, vibration isolators, bearings and dock fenders. The analysis of rubber blocks for its compression and shear behavior has been carried out using the imaging techniques. The dynamic stressing and its associated change in shape of the rubber blocks during large compression are very limited as their measurements were difficult. A newly developed Machine Vision based image processing t...

  8. Comparative analysis of successful practices of corruption counteraction in the sphere of school education in foreign countries

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina Vladimirovna Tereshkova

    2015-01-01

    Objective to analyze the practice of corruption counteraction in the sphere of school education in foreign countries. Methods comparativelegal method polling content analysis of documents expert evaluation testing of experts with an international technique Questionnaire Profile of Demand. Results the need for the corruption counteraction program is stated in Art. 13.3 of the Federal Law ldquoOn corruption counteractionrdquoand Methodological recommendations of the Russian Mi...

  9. Fingerprints in compressed strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Cording, Patrick Hagge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed into a context-free grammar of size n that supports efficient Karp–Rabin fingerprint queries to any substring of S. That is, given indices i and j, the answer to a query is the fingerprint of the substring S......[i,j]. We present the first O(n) space data structures that answer fingerprint queries without decompressing any characters. For Straight Line Programs (SLP) we get O(log⁡N) query time, and for Linear SLPs (an SLP derivative that captures LZ78 compression and its variations) we get O(log⁡log⁡N) query time...

  10. Compressive CFAR Radar Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Anitori, Laura; Baraniuk, Richard; Maleki, Arian; Otten, Matern; van Rossum, Wim

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of a combined Compressive Sensing (CS) Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) radar processor under different interference scenarios using both the Cell Averaging (CA) and Order Statistic (OS) CFAR detectors. Using the properties of the Complex Approximate Message Passing (CAMP) algorithm, we demonstrate that the behavior of the CFAR processor is independent of the combination with the non-linear recovery and therefore its performance can be predicted us...

  11. Recursive Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Freris, Nikolaos M.; Öçal, Orhan; Vetterli, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a recursive algorithm for performing compressed sensing on streaming data. The approach consists of a) recursive encoding, where we sample the input stream via overlapping windowing and make use of the previous measurement in obtaining the next one, and b) recursive decoding, where the signal estimate from the previous window is utilized in order to achieve faster convergence in an iterative optimization scheme applied to decode the new one. To remove estimation bias, a two-step ...

  12. Universal Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Jalali, Shirin; Poor, H. Vincent

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of developing universal algorithms for compressed sensing of stochastic processes is studied. First, R\\'enyi's notion of information dimension (ID) is generalized to analog stationary processes. This provides a measure of complexity for such processes and is connected to the number of measurements required for their accurate recovery. Then a minimum entropy pursuit (MEP) optimization approach is proposed, and it is proven that it can reliably recover any stationary ...

  13. Kalman Filtered Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Vaswani, Namrata

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of reconstructing time sequences of spatially sparse signals (with unknown and time-varying sparsity patterns) from a limited number of linear "incoherent" measurements, in real-time. The signals are sparse in some transform domain referred to as the sparsity basis. For a single spatial signal, the solution is provided by Compressed Sensing (CS). The question that we address is, for a sequence of sparse signals, can we do better than CS, if (a) the sparsity pattern of ...

  14. Comparative analysis of successful practices of corruption counteraction in the sphere of school education in foreign countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Vladimirovna Tereshkova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to analyze the practice of corruption counteraction in the sphere of school education in foreign countries. Methods comparativelegal method polling content analysis of documents expert evaluation testing of experts with an international technique Questionnaire Profile of Demand. Results the need for the corruption counteraction program is stated in Art. 13.3 of the Federal Law ldquoOn corruption counteractionrdquoand Methodological recommendations of the Russian Ministry of Labor on corruption risks evaluation when implementing functions but no definite measures for corruption counteraction in educational organizations have been formulated. Nevertheless the controlling bodies inquire for information on such measures. As an example wecitean inquiry of Krasnoyarsk Oktyabrskiy region Prosecutorrsquos Office to educational organizations of October 21 2014 no. 86012014 ldquoOn measures for corruption counteraction in the sphere of educationrdquo. Scientific novelty summarizing the experience of corruption counteraction in the sphere of education in foreign countries and the expertsrsquo opinion of the specialist of international organizations allowed to formulate a number of recommendations for the Russian educational establishments. Practical value the experience of corruption counteraction in foreign countries will allow the head of an educational establishment to choose those of the proposed measures which will be efficient in corruption prevention and to elaborate an efficient program for corruption prevention. nbsp

  15. Scale adaptive compressive tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pengpeng; Cui, Shaohui; Gao, Min; Fang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the compressive tracking (CT) method (Zhang et al. in Proceedings of European conference on computer vision, pp 864-877, 2012) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency, but it cannot well deal with the scale changing objects due to its constant tracking box. To address this issue, in this paper we propose a scale adaptive CT approach, which adaptively adjusts the scale of tracking box with the size variation of the objects. Our method significantly improves CT in three aspects: Firstly, the scale of tracking box is adaptively adjusted according to the size of the objects. Secondly, in the CT method, all the compressive features are supposed independent and equal contribution to the classifier. Actually, different compressive features have different confidence coefficients. In our proposed method, the confidence coefficients of features are computed and used to achieve different contribution to the classifier. Finally, in the CT method, the learning parameter λ is constant, which will result in large tracking drift on the occasion of object occlusion or large scale appearance variation. In our proposed method, a variable learning parameter λ is adopted, which can be adjusted according to the object appearance variation rate. Extensive experiments on the CVPR2013 tracking benchmark demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method compared to state-of-the-art tracking algorithms.

  16. Compressed sensing electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, Rowan, E-mail: rkl26@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Holland, Daniel J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    The recent mathematical concept of compressed sensing (CS) asserts that a small number of well-chosen measurements can suffice to reconstruct signals that are amenable to sparse or compressible representation. In addition to powerful theoretical results, the principles of CS are being exploited increasingly across a range of experiments to yield substantial performance gains relative to conventional approaches. In this work we describe the application of CS to electron tomography (ET) reconstruction and demonstrate the efficacy of CS–ET with several example studies. Artefacts present in conventional ET reconstructions such as streaking, blurring of object boundaries and elongation are markedly reduced, and robust reconstruction is shown to be possible from far fewer projections than are normally used. The CS–ET approach enables more reliable quantitative analysis of the reconstructions as well as novel 3D studies from extremely limited data. - Highlights: • Compressed sensing (CS) theory and its application to electron tomography (ET) is described. • The practical implementation of CS–ET is outlined and its efficacy demonstrated with examples. • High fidelity tomographic reconstruction is possible from a small number of images. • The CS–ET reconstructions can be more reliably segmented and analysed quantitatively. • CS–ET is applicable to different image content by choice of an appropriate sparsifying transform.

  17. New Regenerative Cycle for Vapor Compression Refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark J. Bergander

    2005-08-29

    The main objective of this project is to confirm on a well-instrumented prototype the theoretically derived claims of higher efficiency and coefficient of performance for geothermal heat pumps based on a new regenerative thermodynamic cycle as comparing to existing technology. In order to demonstrate the improved performance of the prototype, it will be compared to published parameters of commercially available geothermal heat pumps manufactured by US and foreign companies. Other objectives are to optimize the design parameters and to determine the economic viability of the new technology. Background (as stated in the proposal): The proposed technology closely relates to EERE mission by improving energy efficiency, bringing clean, reliable and affordable heating and cooling to the residential and commercial buildings and reducing greenhouse gases emission. It can provide the same amount of heating and cooling with considerably less use of electrical energy and consequently has a potential of reducing our nations dependence on foreign oil. The theoretical basis for the proposed thermodynamic cycle was previously developed and was originally called a dynamic equilibrium method. This theory considers the dynamic equations of state of the working fluid and proposes the methods for modification of T-S trajectories of adiabatic transformation by changing dynamic properties of gas, such as flow rate, speed and acceleration. The substance of this proposal is a thermodynamic cycle characterized by the regenerative use of the potential energy of two-phase flow expansion, which in traditional systems is lost in expansion valves. The essential new features of the process are: (1) The application of two-step throttling of the working fluid and two-step compression of its vapor phase. (2) Use of a compressor as the initial step compression and a jet device as a second step, where throttling and compression are combined. (3) Controlled ratio of a working fluid at the first and

  18. Counteracting fatigue in multiple sclerosis with right parietal anodal transcranial direct current stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Hanken

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS patients appears to correlate with vigilance decrement as reflected in an increase in reaction time and errors with prolonged time-on-task. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS over the right parietal or frontal cortex counteracts fatigue-associated vigilance decrement and subjective fatigue. Methods: In study I, a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study, anodal tDCS (1,5mA was delivered to the right parietal cortex or the right frontal cortex of 52 healthy participants during the first 20min of a 40min lasting visual vigilance task. Study II, also a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study, investigated the effect of anodal tDCS (1.5mA over the right parietal cortex in 46 MS patients experiencing cognitive fatigue. TDCS was delivered for 20min before patients performed a 20min lasting visual vigilance task.Results: Study I showed that right parietal stimulation, but not right frontal stimulation, counteracts the increase in reaction time associated with vigilance decrement. Hence, only right parietal stimulation was applied to the MS patients in study II. Stimulation had a significant effect on vigilance decrement in mildly to moderately cognitively fatigued MS patients. Vigilance testing significantly increased the feeling of fatigue independent of stimulation.Conclusions: Anodal tDCS over the right parietal cortex can counteract the increase in reaction times during vigilance performance but not the increase in subjective fatigue. This finding is compatible with our model of fatigue in MS, suggesting a dissociation between the feeling and the behavioral characteristics of fatigue.

  19. Counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion by recovery using submersible microbial desalination cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia inhibition is one of the most frequent and serious problems in biogas plants. In this study, a novel hybrid system consisting of a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was developed for counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic...... digestion (AD) with simultaneous in situ ammonia recovery and electricity production. The SMDC was powered by acetate in a buffer solution, while synthetic ammonia-rich wastewater was used as the feeding of the CSTR. Under continuous operation, ammonia recovery rate of 86 g-N/m2 /day and current density...

  20. Violence and Means to Counteract Power: a View to Migrant Indigenous Women in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara María Lara Flores

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analizes the conditions in which women farmers incorporate into México’s exports processes. This sector has a great need of labour at the national level, which in turn brings about many migration fluxes in which indigenous women play an important role. The study shows how this feminine incorporation into the labour market triggers gender as well as ethnic inequalities that manifest themselves in a segmentation within the branches and sectors of the national economy. Also, the article describes the means to which indigenous women turn to in order to counteract the actual and symbolic violence they are submitted to.

  1. Mammographic compression in Asian women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Lau

    Full Text Available To investigate: (1 the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2 the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD in Asian women based on phantom study.We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD measurement software (Volpara to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA slabs.Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (p0.05.Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.

  2. Mammographic compression in Asian women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. Methods We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35–80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Results Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (p0.05). Conclusions Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD. PMID:28419125

  3. Image compression with Iris-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gains, David

    2009-05-01

    Iris-C is an image codec designed for streaming video applications that demand low bit rate, low latency, lossless image compression. To achieve compression and low latency the codec features the discrete wavelet transform, Exp-Golomb coding, and online processes that construct dynamic models of the input video. Like H.264 and Dirac, the Iris-C codec accepts input video from both the YUV and YCOCG colour spaces, but the system can also operate on Bayer RAW data read directly from an image sensor. Testing shows that the Iris-C codec is competitive with the Dirac low delay syntax codec which is typically regarded as the state-of-the-art low latency, lossless video compressor.

  4. Compressive Transient Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Qilin

    2017-04-01

    High resolution transient/3D imaging technology is of high interest in both scientific research and commercial application. Nowadays, all of the transient imaging methods suffer from low resolution or time consuming mechanical scanning. We proposed a new method based on TCSPC and Compressive Sensing to achieve a high resolution transient imaging with a several seconds capturing process. Picosecond laser sends a serious of equal interval pulse while synchronized SPAD camera\\'s detecting gate window has a precise phase delay at each cycle. After capturing enough points, we are able to make up a whole signal. By inserting a DMD device into the system, we are able to modulate all the frames of data using binary random patterns to reconstruct a super resolution transient/3D image later. Because the low fill factor of SPAD sensor will make a compressive sensing scenario ill-conditioned, We designed and fabricated a diffractive microlens array. We proposed a new CS reconstruction algorithm which is able to denoise at the same time for the measurements suffering from Poisson noise. Instead of a single SPAD senor, we chose a SPAD array because it can drastically reduce the requirement for the number of measurements and its reconstruction time. Further more, it not easy to reconstruct a high resolution image with only one single sensor while for an array, it just needs to reconstruct small patches and a few measurements. In this thesis, we evaluated the reconstruction methods using both clean measurements and the version corrupted by Poisson noise. The results show how the integration over the layers influence the image quality and our algorithm works well while the measurements suffer from non-trival Poisson noise. It\\'s a breakthrough in the areas of both transient imaging and compressive sensing.

  5. Aphid watery saliva counteracts sieve-tube occlusion: a universal phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Torsten; Kornemann, Sarah R; Furch, Alexandra C U; Tjallingii, W Fred; van Bel, Aart J E

    2009-10-01

    Ca2+-binding proteins in the watery saliva of Megoura viciae counteract Ca2+-dependent occlusion of sieve plates in Vicia faba and so prevent the shut-down of food supply in response to stylet penetration. The question arises whether this interaction between aphid saliva and sieve-element proteins is a universal phenomenon as inferred by the coincidence between sieve-tube occlusion and salivation. For this purpose, leaf tips were burnt in a number of plant species from four different families to induce remote sieve-plate occlusion. Resultant sieve-plate occlusion in these plant species was counteracted by an abrupt switch of aphid behaviour. Each of the seven aphid species tested interrupted its feeding behaviour and started secreting watery saliva. The protein composition of watery saliva appeared strikingly different between aphid species with less than 50% overlap. Secretion of watery saliva seems to be a universal means to suppress sieve-plate occlusion, although the protein composition of watery saliva seems to diverge between species.

  6. Gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 expression counteracts its actions by inducing tumor neovascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yao; Baba, Tomohisa [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Li, Ying-Yi [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Furukawa, Kaoru; Tanabe, Yamato [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); School of Natural System Bioengineering Course, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Matsugo, Seiichi [School of Natural System Bioengineering Course, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Sasaki, Soichiro [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Mukaida, Naofumi, E-mail: mukaida@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2015-03-06

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are frequently complicated with metastatic disease or locally advanced tumors, and consequently need chemotherapy. Gemcitabine is commonly used for PDAC treatment, but with limited efficacy. The capacity of gemcitabine to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human pancreatic cancer cells, prompted us to examine its effects on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We observed that gemcitabine enhanced selectively the expression of CXCL8 in human pancreatic cancer cells through ROS generation and NF-κB activation. In vitro blocking of CXCL8 failed to modulate gemcitabine-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells. Gemcitabine also enhanced CXCL8 expression in pancreatic cancer cells in xenografted tumor tissues. Moreover, anti-CXCL8 antibody treatment in vivo attenuated tumor formation as well as intra-tumoral vascularity in nude mice, which were transplanted with Miapaca-2 cells and treated with gemcitabine. Thus, gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 may counteract the drug through inducing neovascularization. - Highlights: • Gemcitabine induced CXCL8 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 expression required ROS generation and NF-κB activation. • CXCL8 did not affect in vitro proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 in vivo counteracted gemcitabine by inducing neovascularization.

  7. Current means for raising efficiency of counteraction to counterfeit goods trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dronova O.B.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of counteraction to counterfeit goods trafficking is shown. Annual loss due to counterfeit goods producing and trafficking reaches several billion dollars. There remains a danger of buying low-quality and counterfeit goods despite implementing new producing techniques and protective elements. Measures, taken by law enforcement agencies, state authorities and public human rights organizations have not led to systematic suppression of producing and trafficking of such goods. Creation of new information and reference resource, containing information blocks of protective symbols on goods and packages and illustrated materials comprising patterns of discovered counterfeit goods, can assist to increase public awareness and to give necessary information to law enforcement agencies. Organizations, realizing state and social protection of consumers and entrepreneurs, along with producers, rightholders’ representatives and law enforcement bodies can accept the responsibility of creating and functioning this information and reference system in the Internet. Such level of cooperation of all interested organizations will allow to raise efficiency of measures for counteraction to trafficking goods with violated consumer properties. The author proves the necessity to organize functioning of information and reference resource for a wide range of users. Operation of such resource should comply with main principles of generating any information resource, notably full scale, authenticity and relevance of information. The author proposes the algorithm of creating such system which provides cooperation of law enforcement agencies, producers and consumers for the purpose of preventing counterfeit goods trafficking and investigating committed crimes.

  8. Efficacy of Dietary Selenium to Counteract Toxicity of Deoxynivalenol in Growing Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Faixová

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of deoxynivalenol on plasma indicators and efficacy of dietary selenium to counteract toxicity of deoxynivalenol in growing broiler chicks. Three groups of broilers were formed with 14 birds in each group. Three diets included control (0.2 ppm deoxynivalenol, 0.4 mg selenium/kg diet, deoxynivalenol-contaminated (3 ppm deoxynivalenol, 0.4 mg selenium/kg diet and deoxynivalenol-contaminated (3 ppm deoxynivalenol plus selenium-enriched yeast (1.4 mg selenium/kg diet. After 6 weeks of feeding all birds were sacrifi ced and blood samples for chemical analyses were collected. Plasma calcium, chloride and alanine aminotransferase activity were signifi cantly elevated and magnesium, total proteins, triglycerides and free glycerol were decreased in chicks fed deoxynivalenol-contaminated diet compared with those fed the control diet. Supplementation of selenium-enriched yeast to the diet reversed plasma levels of calcium, magnesium and alanine aminotransferase activity in chicks induced by dietary deoxynivalenol. Phosphorus, albumin and cholesterol levels and alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were not affected by diets. The inclusion of selenium to DON-contaminated diet, however, did not completely alleviate toxic effect on protein and lipid metabolism by the liver. Supplementation of selenium-enriched yeast product counteracted most of the plasma indicator alterations caused by deoxynivalenol-contaminated diet in chicks.

  9. Tamoxifen counteracts estradiol induced effects on striatal and hypophyseal dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferretti, C.; Blengio, M.; Ghi, P.; Racca, S.; Genazzani, E.; Portaleone, P.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the ability of Tamoxifen (TAM), an antiestrogen drug, to counteract the modification induced by estrogens on dopamine (DA) receptors on striatum and on adenohypophysis of ovex female rats. Subacute treatment with 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) at both low (0.1 μg/kg) and high (20 μg/kg) doses confirmed its ability to increase the number of striatal 3 H-Spiperone ( 3 H-SPI) binding sites in a dose dependent manner. By contrast in the pituitary, only high doses of estrogen were effective in reducing the number of DA receptors. We treated ovex female rats for 15 days with TAM alone or associated with E 2 , to see if these estrogenic effects could be suppressed by an antiestrogenic drug. TAM did not affect the number of striatal DA receptors, but significantly increased the adenohypophy-seal DA binding sites, without varying their affinity. No changes were observed in pituitary and striatal DA receptor density, even when TAM was injected in association with estradiol. In conclusions: TAM is able to counteract the effects estrogens have on DA receptors. However there is some evidence that it could influence the pituitary DA systems independently of it antiestrogenic activity

  10. Tamoxifen counteracts estradiol induced effects on striatal and hypophyseal dopamine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferretti, C.; Blengio, M.; Ghi, P.; Racca, S.; Genazzani, E.; Portaleone, P.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the ability of Tamoxifen (TAM), an antiestrogen drug, to counteract the modification induced by estrogens on dopamine (DA) receptors on striatum and on adenohypophysis of ovex female rats. Subacute treatment with 17..beta..-estradiol (E/sub 2/) at both low (0.1 ..mu..g/kg) and high (20 ..mu..g/kg) doses confirmed its ability to increase the number of striatal /sup 3/H-Spiperone (/sup 3/H-SPI) binding sites in a dose dependent manner. By contrast in the pituitary, only high doses of estrogen were effective in reducing the number of DA receptors. We treated ovex female rats for 15 days with TAM alone or associated with E/sub 2/, to see if these estrogenic effects could be suppressed by an antiestrogenic drug. TAM did not affect the number of striatal DA receptors, but significantly increased the adenohypophy-seal DA binding sites, without varying their affinity. No changes were observed in pituitary and striatal DA receptor density, even when TAM was injected in association with estradiol. In conclusions: TAM is able to counteract the effects estrogens have on DA receptors. However there is some evidence that it could influence the pituitary DA systems independently of it antiestrogenic activity.

  11. Olopatadine Inhibits Exocytosis in Rat Peritoneal Mast Cells by Counteracting Membrane Surface Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuka Baba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud/Aims: Besides its anti-allergic properties as a histamine receptor antagonist, olopatadine stabilizes mast cells by inhibiting the release of chemokines. Since olopatadine bears amphiphilic features and is preferentially partitioned into the lipid bilayers of the plasma membrane, it would induce some morphological changes in mast cells and thus affect the process of exocytosis. Methods: Employing the standard patch-clamp whole-cell recording technique, we examined the effects of olopatadine and other anti-allergic drugs on the membrane capacitance (Cm in rat peritoneal mast cells during exocytosis. Using confocal imaging of a water-soluble fluorescent dye, lucifer yellow, we also examined their effects on the deformation of the plasma membrane. Results: Low concentrations of olopatadine (1 or 10 µM did not significantly affect the GTP-γ-S-induced increase in the Cm. However, 100 µM and 1 mM olopatadine almost totally suppressed the increase in the Cm. Additionally, these doses completely washed out the trapping of the dye on the cell surface, indicating that olopatadine counteracted the membrane surface deformation induced by exocytosis. As shown by electron microscopy, olopatadine generated inward membrane bending in mast cells. Conclusion: This study provides electrophysiological evidence for the first time that olopatadine dose-dependently inhibits the process of exocytosis in rat peritoneal mast cells. Such mast cell stabilizing properties of olopatadine may be attributed to its counteracting effects on the plasma membrane deformation in degranulating mast cells.

  12. Effect of IR Laser on Myoblasts: Prospects of Application for Counteracting Microgravity-Induced Muscle Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monici, Monica; Cialdai, Francesca; Romano, Giovanni; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Rizzo, Angela Maria; Caselli, Anna; Ranaldi, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    Microgravity-induced muscle atrophy is a problem of utmost importance for the impact it may have on the health and performance of astronauts. Therefore, appropriate countermeasures are needed to prevent disuse atrophy and favour muscle recovery. Muscle atrophy is characterized by loss of muscle mass and strength, and a shift in substrate utilization from fat to glucose, that leads to a reduced metabolic efficiency and enhanced fatigability. Laser therapy is already used in physical medicine and rehabilitation to accelerate muscle recovery and in sports medicine to prevent damages produced by metabolic disturbances and inflammatory reactions after heavy exercise. The aim of the research we present was to get insights on possible benefits deriving from the application of an advanced infrared laser system to counteract deficits of muscle energy metabolism and stimulate the recovery of the hypotrophic tissue. The source used was a Multiwave Locked System (MLS) laser, which combines continuous and pulsed emissions at 808 nm and 905 nm, respectively. We studied the effect of MLS treatment on morphology and energy metabolism of C2C12 cells, a widely accepted myoblast model, previously exposed to microgravity conditions modelled by a Random Positioning Machine. The MLS laser treatment was able to restore basal levels of serine/threonine protein phosphatase activity and to counteract cytoskeletal alterations and increase in glycolytic enzymes activity that occurred following the exposure to modelled microgravity. In conclusion, the results provide interesting insights for the application of infrared laser in the treatment of muscle atrophy.

  13. Analysis by compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meredith, David

    MEL is a geometric music encoding language designed to allow for musical objects to be encoded parsimoniously as sets of points in pitch-time space, generated by performing geometric transformations on component patterns. MEL has been implemented in Java and coupled with the SIATEC pattern discov...... discovery algorithm to allow for compact encodings to be generated automatically from in extenso note lists. The MEL-SIATEC system is founded on the belief that music analysis and music perception can be modelled as the compression of in extenso descriptions of musical objects....

  14. Compressive full waveform lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiyi; Ke, Jun

    2017-05-01

    To avoid high bandwidth detector, fast speed A/D converter, and large size memory disk, a compressive full waveform LIDAR system, which uses a temporally modulated laser instead of a pulsed laser, is studied in this paper. Full waveform data from NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network) are used. Random binary patterns are used to modulate the source. To achieve 0.15 m ranging resolution, a 100 MSPS A/D converter is assumed to make measurements. SPIRAL algorithm with canonical basis is employed when Poisson noise is considered in the low illuminated condition.

  15. Compression test apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, G. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus for compressive testing of a test specimen may comprise vertically spaced upper and lower platen members between which a test specimen may be placed. The platen members are supported by a fixed support assembly. A load indicator is interposed between the upper platen member and the support assembly for supporting the total weight of the upper platen member and any additional weight which may be placed on it. Operating means are provided for moving the lower platen member upwardly toward the upper platen member whereby an increasing portion of the total weight is transferred from the load indicator to the test specimen.

  16. Compressive Fatigue in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four...... frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation...

  17. Metal Hydride Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowman, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Barton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Anovitz, Lawrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a

  18. Energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Francoise; Zhou, YE; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1995-01-01

    This letter investigates the compressible energy transfer process. We extend a methodology developed originally for incompressible turbulence and use databases from numerical simulations of a weak compressible turbulence based on Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the well known Helmholtz decomposition is used. While the compressible component has very little influence on the solenoidal part, we found that almost all of the compressible turbulence energy is received from its solenoidal counterpart. We focus on the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer process, the triadic interactions. This analysis leads us to conclude that, at low turbulent Mach number, the compressible energy transfer process is dominated by a local radiative transfer (absorption) in both inertial and energy containing ranges.

  19. Compressive sensing in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Christian G; Sidky, Emil Y

    2015-03-10

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed.

  20. Fingerprints in Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2013-01-01

    The Karp-Rabin fingerprint of a string is a type of hash value that due to its strong properties has been used in many string algorithms. In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed by a context-free grammar of size n that answers fingerprint queries....... That is, given indices i and j, the answer to a query is the fingerprint of the substring S[i,j]. We present the first O(n) space data structures that answer fingerprint queries without decompressing any characters. For Straight Line Programs (SLP) we get O(logN) query time, and for Linear SLPs (an SLP...... derivative that captures LZ78 compression and its variations) we get O(loglogN) query time. Hence, our data structures has the same time and space complexity as for random access in SLPs. We utilize the fingerprint data structures to solve the longest common extension problem in query time O(logNlogℓ) and O...

  1. Respiratory sounds compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadollahi, Azadeh; Moussavi, Zahra

    2008-04-01

    Recently, with the advances in digital signal processing, compression of biomedical signals has received great attention for telemedicine applications. In this paper, an adaptive transform coding-based method for compression of respiratory and swallowing sounds is proposed. Using special characteristics of respiratory sounds, the recorded signals are divided into stationary and nonstationary portions, and two different bit allocation methods (BAMs) are designed for each portion. The method was applied to the data of 12 subjects and its performance in terms of overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values was calculated at different bit rates. The performance of different quantizers was also considered and the sensitivity of the quantizers to initial conditions has been alleviated. In addition, the fuzzy clustering method was examined for classifying the signal into different numbers of clusters and investigating the performance of the adaptive BAM with increasing the number of classes. Furthermore, the effects of assigning different numbers of bits for encoding stationary and nonstationary portions of the signal were studied. The adaptive BAM with variable number of bits was found to improve the SNR values of the fixed BAM by 5 dB. Last, the possibility of removing the training part for finding the parameters of adaptive BAMs for each individual was investigated. The results indicate that it is possible to use a predefined set of BAMs for all subjects and remove the training part completely. Moreover, the method is fast enough to be implemented for real-time application.

  2. Free compression tube. Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Ioan

    2012-11-01

    During the flight of vehicles, their propulsion energy must overcome gravity, to ensure the displacement of air masses on vehicle trajectory, to cover both energy losses from the friction between a solid surface and the air and also the kinetic energy of reflected air masses due to the impact with the flying vehicle. The flight optimization by increasing speed and reducing fuel consumption has directed research in the aerodynamics field. The flying vehicles shapes obtained through studies in the wind tunnel provide the optimization of the impact with the air masses and the airflow along the vehicle. By energy balance studies for vehicles in flight, the author Ioan Rusu directed his research in reducing the energy lost at vehicle impact with air masses. In this respect as compared to classical solutions for building flight vehicles aerodynamic surfaces which reduce the impact and friction with air masses, Ioan Rusu has invented a device which he named free compression tube for rockets, registered with the State Office for Inventions and Trademarks of Romania, OSIM, deposit f 2011 0352. Mounted in front of flight vehicles it eliminates significantly the impact and friction of air masses with the vehicle solid. The air masses come into contact with the air inside the free compression tube and the air-solid friction is eliminated and replaced by air to air friction.

  3. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Mona A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed.

  4. Introduction to compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe Equations of Steady One-Dimensional Compressible FlowSome Fundamental Aspects of Compressible FlowOne-Dimensional Isentropic FlowNormal Shock WavesOblique Shock WavesExpansion Waves - Prandtl-Meyer FlowVariable Area FlowsAdiabatic Flow with FrictionFlow with Heat TransferLinearized Analysis of Two-Dimensional Compressible FlowsHypersonic and High-Temperature FlowsHigh-Temperature Gas EffectsLow-Density FlowsBibliographyAppendices

  5. Mammographic compression in Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (pAsian women. The median compression force should be about 8.1 daN compared to the current 12.0 daN. Decreasing compression force from 12.0 daN to 9.0 daN increased CBT by 3.3±1.4 mm, MGD by 6.2-11.0%, and caused no significant effects on image quality (p>0.05). Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.

  6. Glutamate Induced Thermal Equilibrium Intermediate and Counteracting Effect on Chemical Denaturation of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumalla, Bramhini; Prabhu, N Prakash

    2018-01-25

    When organisms are subjected to stress conditions, one of their adaptive responses is accumulation of small organic molecules called osmolytes. These osmolytes affect the structure and stability of the biological macromolecules including proteins. The present study examines the effect of a negatively charged amino acid osmolyte, glutamate (Glu), on two model proteins, ribonuclease A (RNase A) and α-lactalbumin (α-LA), which have positive and negative surface charges at pH 7, respectively. These proteins follow two-state unfolding transitions during both heat and chemical induced denaturation processes. The addition of Glu stabilizes the proteins against temperature and induces an early equilibrium intermediate during unfolding. The stability is found to be enthalpy-driven, and the free energy of stabilization is more for α-LA compared to RNase A. The decrease in the partial molar volume and compressibility of both of the proteins in the presence of Glu suggests that the proteins attain a more compact state through surface hydration which could provide a more stable conformation. This is also supported by molecule dynamic simulation studies which demonstrate that the water density around the proteins is increased upon the addition of Glu. Further, the intermediates could be completely destabilized by lower concentrations (∼0.5 M) of guanidinium chloride and salt. However, urea subverts the Glu-induced intermediate formed by α-LA, whereas it only slightly destabilizes in the case of RNase A which has a positive surface charge and could possess charge-charge interactions with Glu. This suggests that, apart from hydration, columbic interactions might also contribute to the stability of the intermediate. Gdm-induced denaturation of RNase A and α-LA in the absence and the presence of Glu at different temperatures was carried out. These results also show the Glu-induced stabilization of both of the proteins; however, all of the unfolding transitions followed two

  7. Hugoniot and refractive indices of bromoform under shock compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. C. Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate physical properties of bromoform (liquid CHBr3 including compressibility and refractive index under dynamic extreme conditions of shock compression. Planar shock experiments are conducted along with high-speed laser interferometry. Our experiments and previous results establish a linear shock velocity−particle velocity relation for particle velocities below 1.77 km/s, as well as the Hugoniot and isentropic compression curves up to ∼21 GPa. Shock-state refractive indices of CHBr3 up to 2.3 GPa or ∼26% compression, as a function of density, can be described with a linear relation and follows the Gladstone-Dale relation. The velocity corrections for laser interferometry measurements at 1550 nm are also obtained.

  8. Compressible dynamic stall vorticity flux control using a dynamic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    introduced when the leading edge was drooped are explained to be the source of this benefit. Analysis of the peak vorticity flux ... even lead to structural failure of aircraft components. Thus, a wing or a rotor blade, and other ... has developed to avail this benefit safely. The motivation for the present study stems from this goal.

  9. Adiabatic compression and radiative compression of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    Flux is conserved during mechanical compression of magnetic fields for both nonrelativistic and relativistic compressors. However, the relativistic compressor generates radiation, which can carry up to twice the energy content of the magnetic field compressed adiabatically. The radiation may be either confined or allowed to escape

  10. TPC data compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Jens; Frankenfeld, Ulrich; Lindenstruth, Volker; Plamper, Patrick; Roehrich, Dieter; Schaefer, Erich; W. Schulz, Markus; M. Steinbeck, Timm; Stock, Reinhard; Sulimma, Kolja; Vestboe, Anders; Wiebalck, Arne E-mail: wiebalck@kip.uni-heidelberg.de

    2002-08-21

    In the collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions in fixed-target and collider experiments, multiplicities of several ten thousand charged particles are generated. The main devices for tracking and particle identification are large-volume tracking detectors (TPCs) producing raw event sizes in excess of 100 Mbytes per event. With increasing data rates, storage becomes the main limiting factor in such experiments and, therefore, it is essential to represent the data in a way that is as concise as possible. In this paper, we present several compression schemes, such as entropy encoding, modified vector quantization, and data modeling techniques applied on real data from the CERN SPS experiment NA49 and on simulated data from the future CERN LHC experiment ALICE.

  11. Waves and compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ockendon, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this book continues to give readers a broad mathematical basis for modelling and understanding the wide range of wave phenomena encountered in modern applications.  New and expanded material includes topics such as elastoplastic waves and waves in plasmas, as well as new exercises.  Comprehensive collections of models are used to illustrate the underpinning mathematical methodologies, which include the basic ideas of the relevant partial differential equations, characteristics, ray theory, asymptotic analysis, dispersion, shock waves, and weak solutions. Although the main focus is on compressible fluid flow, the authors show how intimately gasdynamic waves are related to wave phenomena in many other areas of physical science.   Special emphasis is placed on the development of physical intuition to supplement and reinforce analytical thinking. Each chapter includes a complete set of carefully prepared exercises, making this a suitable textbook for students in applied mathematics, ...

  12. Survey of numerical methods for compressible fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sod, G A

    1977-06-01

    The finite difference methods of Godunov, Hyman, Lax-Wendroff (two-step), MacCormack, Rusanov, the upwind scheme, the hybrid scheme of Harten and Zwas, the antidiffusion method of Boris and Book, and the artificial compression method of Harten are compared with the random choice known as Glimm's method. The methods are used to integrate the one-dimensional equations of gas dynamics for an inviscid fluid. The results are compared and demonstrate that Glimm's method has several advantages. 16 figs., 4 tables.

  13. Malaysian adolescent students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldas, Seffetullah; Hashim, Shahabuddin; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2015-01-02

    The adolescence period of life comes along with changes and challenges in terms of physical and cognitive development. In this hectic period, many adolescents may suffer more from various risk factors such as low socioeconomic status, substance abuse, sexual abuse and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicate that such disadvantaged backgrounds of Malaysian adolescent students lead to failure or underachievement in their academic performance. This narrative review scrutinises how some of these students are able to demonstrate academic resilience, which is satisfactory performance in cognitive or academic tasks in spite of their disadvantaged backgrounds. The review stresses the need for developing a caregiving relationship model for at-risk adolescent students in Malaysia. Such a model would allow educators to meet the students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience.

  14. Disentangling the counteracting effects of water content and carbon mass on zooplankton growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mcconville, Kristian; Atkinson, Angus; Fileman, Elaine S.

    2017-01-01

    inclusion improves zooplankton growth models. We found that carbon percentage is continuous, but that species are not distributed homogenously along this axis. To assess variability of this trait in situ, we investigated the distribution of biomass across the range of carbon percentage for a zooplankton......Zooplankton vary widely in carbon percentage (carbon mass as a percentage of wet mass), but are often described as either gelatinous or non-gelatinous. Here we update datasets of carbon percentage and growth rate to investigate whether carbon percentage is a continuous trait, and whether its...... time series at station L4 off Plymouth, UK. This showed separate biomass peaks for gelatinous and crustacean taxa, however, carbon percentage varied 8-fold within the gelatinous group. Species with high carbon mass had lower carbon percentage, allowing separation of the counteracting effects...

  15. Counteracting radio frequency inhomogeneity in the human brain at 7 Tesla using strongly modulating pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulant, N; Mangin, J-F; Amadon, A

    2009-05-01

    We report flip angle and spoiled gradient echo measurements at 7 Tesla on human brains in three-dimensional imaging, using strongly modulating pulses to counteract the transmitted radiofrequency inhomogeneity problem. Compared with the standard square pulse results, three points of improvement are demonstrated, namely: (i) the removal of the bright center (typical at high fields when using a quadrature head coil), (ii) the substantial gain of signal in the regions of low B(1) intensity, and (iii) an increased 35% signal uniformity over the whole brain at the flip angle where maximum contrast between white and gray matter occurs. We also find by means of simulations that standard BIR-4 adiabatic pulses need several times more energy to reach a similar performance at the same field strength. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Maternal dazap2 Regulates Germ Granules by Counteracting Dynein in Zebrafish Primordial Germ Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredyth M. Forbes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Primordial germ cells (PGCs are the stem cells of the germline. Generally, germline induction occurs via zygotic factors or the inheritance of maternal determinants called germ plasm (GP. GP is packaged into ribonucleoprotein complexes within oocytes and later promotes the germline fate in embryos. Once PGCs are specified by either mechanism, GP components localize to perinuclear granular-like structures. Although components of zebrafish PGC germ granules have been studied, the maternal factors regulating their assembly and contribution to germ cell development are unknown. Here, we show that the scaffold protein Dazap2 binds to Bucky ball, an essential regulator of oocyte polarity and GP assembly, and colocalizes with the GP in oocytes and in PGCs. Mutational analysis revealed a requirement for maternal Dazap2 (MDazap2 in germ-granule maintenance. Through molecular epistasis analyses, we show that MDazap2 is epistatic to Tdrd7 and maintains germ granules in the embryonic germline by counteracting Dynein activity.

  17. Housing, energy cost, and the poor: Counteracting effects in Germany's housing allowance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groesche, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Adequate housing and affordable warmth are essential human needs, the lack of which may seriously harm people's health. Germany provides an allowance to low-income households, covering the housing as well as the space heating cost, to protect people from the consequences of poor housing conditions and fuel poverty. In order to limit public expenditures, payment recipients are required to choose low-cost dwellings, with the consequence that they probably occupy flats with a poor thermal performance. Recipients might therefore exhibit a lower per-square meter rent but in turn are likely to have a higher energy consumption and energy expenditures. Using a large data set of German households, this paper demonstrates that this financially counteracting effect is of negligible magnitude.

  18. Malaysian adolescent students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldas, Seffetullah; Hashim, Shahabuddin; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2015-01-01

    The adolescence period of life comes along with changes and challenges in terms of physical and cognitive development. In this hectic period, many adolescents may suffer more from various risk factors such as low socioeconomic status, substance abuse, sexual abuse and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicate that such disadvantaged backgrounds of Malaysian adolescent students lead to failure or underachievement in their academic performance. This narrative review scrutinises how some of these students are able to demonstrate academic resilience, which is satisfactory performance in cognitive or academic tasks in spite of their disadvantaged backgrounds. The review stresses the need for developing a caregiving relationship model for at-risk adolescent students in Malaysia. Such a model would allow educators to meet the students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience. PMID:25663734

  19. In vitro generation of polysialylated cervical mucins by bacterial polysialyltransferases to counteract cytotoxicity of extracellular histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galuska, Sebastian P; Galuska, Christina E; Tharmalingam, Tharmala; Zlatina, Kristina; Prem, Gerlinde; Husejnov, Farzali C O; Rudd, Pauline M; Vann, Willie F; Reid, Colm; Vionnet, Justine; Gallagher, Mary E; Carrington, Faye A; Hassett, Sarah-Louise; Carrington, Stephen D

    2017-06-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) are formed against pathogens. However, various diseases are directly linked to this meshwork of DNA. The cytotoxic properties of extracellular histones especially seem to be an important trigger during these diseases. Furthermore, NET accumulation on implants is discussed to result in an impaired efficiency or failure, depending on the category of implant. Interestingly, mucins have been investigated as surface coatings potentially capable of reducing neutrophil adhesion. Similarly, polysialic acid was shown to inactivate the cytotoxic properties of extracellular histones. We wanted to combine the probability to decrease the adhesion of neutrophils using mucins with the capability of sialic acid polymers to counteract histone-mediated cytotoxicity. To this end, we elongate cervical mucins using bacterial polysialyltransferases. Subsequent cell-based experiments demonstrated the activity of elongated mucins against histone-mediated cytotoxicity. Thus, polysialylated mucins may represent a novel component to coat implants or to combat diseases with exaggerated NET formation. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Vif N-Terminal Residues Selectively Counteract Feline APOBEC3s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qinyong; Zhang, Zeli; Cano Ortiz, Lucía; Franco, Ana Cláudia; Häussinger, Dieter; Münk, Carsten

    2016-12-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif protein counteracts feline APOBEC3s (FcaA3s) restriction factors by inducing their proteasomal degradation. The functional domains in FIV Vif for interaction with FcaA3s are poorly understood. Here, we have identified several motifs in FIV Vif that are important for selective degradation of different FcaA3s. Cats (Felis catus) express three types of A3s: single-domain A3Z2, single-domain A3Z3, and double-domain A3Z2Z3. We proposed that FIV Vif would selectively interact with the Z2 and the Z3 A3s. Indeed, we identified two N-terminal Vif motifs (12LF13 and 18GG19) that specifically interacted with the FcaA3Z2 protein but not with A3Z3. In contrast, the exclusive degradation of FcaA3Z3 was regulated by a region of three residues (M24, L25, and I27). Only a FIV Vif carrying a combination of mutations from both interaction sites lost the capacity to degrade and counteract FcaA3Z2Z3. However, alterations in the specific A3s interaction sites did not affect the cellular localization of the FIV Vif protein and binding to feline A3s. Pulldown experiments demonstrated that the A3 binding region localized to FIV Vif residues 50 to 80, outside the specific A3 interaction domain. Finally, we found that the Vif sites specific to individual A3s are conserved in several FIV lineages of domestic cat and nondomestic cats, while being absent in the FIV Vif of pumas. Our data support a complex model of multiple Vif-A3 interactions in which the specific region for selective A3 counteraction is discrete from a general A3 binding domain. Both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif proteins counteract their host's APOBEC3 restriction factors. However, these two Vif proteins have limited sequence homology. The molecular interaction between FIV Vif and feline APOBEC3s are not well understood. Here, we identified N-terminal FIV Vif sites that regulate the selective interaction of Vif with either feline APOBEC3Z

  1. Stevioside counteracts the alpha-cell hypersecretion caused by long-term palmitate exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, J; Chen, L; Jeppesen, P B

    2006-01-01

    Long-term exposure to fatty acids impairs beta-cell function in type 2 diabetes, but little is known about the chronic effects of fatty acids on alpha-cells. We therefore studied the prolonged impact of palmitate on alpha-cell function and on the expression of genes related to fuel metabolism. We......-activated receptor-gamma, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase gene expressions in the presence of palmitate (Pterm exposure to elevated fatty acids leads to a hypersecretion of glucagon and an accumulation of TG content in clonal alpha-TC1-6 cells. Stevioside was able to counteract the alpha......, and changes in gene expression. Glucagon secretion was dose-dependently increased after 72-h culture, with palmitate at concentrations >or=0.25 mM (P

  2. Docosahexaenoic acid counteracts attenuation of CD95-induced cell death by inorganic mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Randall [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit MI (United States); Lanni, Lydia; Jen, K.-L. Catherine [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Wayne State University, Detroit MI (United States); McCabe, Michael J. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester NY (United States); Rosenspire, Allen, E-mail: arosenspire@wayne.edu [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit MI (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In the United States the principal environmental exposure to mercury is through dietary consumption of sea food. Although the mechanism by which low levels of mercury affect the nervous system is not well established, epidemiological studies suggest that low level exposure of pregnant women to dietary mercury can adversely impact cognitive development in their children, but that Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the most prominent n-polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-PUFA) present in fish may counteract negative effects of mercury on the nervous system. Aside from effects on the nervous system, epidemiological and animal studies have also suggested that low level mercury exposure may be a risk factor for autoimmune disease. However unlike the nervous system where a mechanism linking mercury to impaired cognitive development remains elusive, we have previously suggested a potential mechanism linking low level mercury exposures to immune system dysfunction and autoimmunity. In the immune system it is well established that disruption of CD95 mediated apoptosis leads to autoimmune disease. We have previously shown in vitro as well as in vivo that in lymphocytes burdened with low levels of mercury, CD95 mediated cell death is impaired. In this report we now show that DHA counteracts the negative effect of mercury on CD95 signaling in T lymphocytes. T cells which have been pre-exposed to DHA are able to cleave pro-caspase 3 and efficiently signal programmed cell death through the CD95 signaling pathway, whether or not they are burdened with low levels of mercury. Thus DHA may lower the risk of autoimmune disease after low level mercury exposures. - Highlights: • Inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) interferes with CD95 mediated cell death in Jurkat T cells • DHA restores the ability of CD95 to signal cell death in Hg{sup 2+} intoxicated T cells • The restoration of CD95 mediated cell death by DHA is correlated with increased activation of Caspase 3.

  3. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giovanna Scioli

    Full Text Available Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery.We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, placental growth factor (PlGF and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4 expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction.PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Antioxidant therapy and

  4. Efficacy of caffeine and modafinil in counteracting sleep deprivation in the marmoset monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Sanneke A M; Jongsma, Marjan J; Vanwersch, Raymond A P; Olivier, Berend; Philippens, Ingrid H C H M

    2008-03-01

    The effects of sleep deprivation are a burden in our 24-h society. The use of wake-promoting compounds could improve the performance in situations where sleep cannot be allowed. In this study, the efficacy of the wake-promoting compounds, modafinil and caffeine, in counteracting the effects of 24-h sleep deprivation in the marmoset monkey were tested. As caffeine is habitually used, the efficacy of both compounds after short- and long-term use was investigated. After a normal active day, the animals were kept awake and received wake-promoting compounds during the whole night. Three times during the sleep-deprived night, putative fatigue was assessed with an activity test and the vigilance and ability to execute a task was assessed with a hand-eye coordination (HEC) task. Both compounds were able to counteract to some extent the decline in performance. Modafinil was able to keep the activity at baseline performance, but performance on the HEC task was not improved. Caffeine was able to keep performance in the HEC task at a level just below daytime level but was not able to keep activity at daytime levels during the last part of the night. Caffeine and modafinil administration for 2 weeks showed a comparable effect on activity as acute use. The performance on the HEC task was similar after chronic caffeine and improved after chronic modafinil. It is therefore concluded that modafinil and caffeine were both able to postpone or prevent the decline in vigilance and psychomotor performance and increase in fatigue induced by sleep deprivation.

  5. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Antioxidant therapy and pharmacological

  6. Compression and expansion in central collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielewicz, P.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of central collisions of heavy nuclei in the energy range from few tens of MeV/nucleon to a couple of GeV/nucleon is discussed. As the beam energy increases and/or the impact parameter decreases, the maximum compression increases. It is argued that the hydrodynamic behaviour of matter sets in the vicinity of balance energy. At higher energies shock fronts are observed to form within head-on reaction simulations, perpendicular to beam axis and separating hot compressed matter from cold. In the semi-central reactions a weak tangential discontinuity develops in-between these fronts. The hot compressed matter exposed to the vacuum in directions parallel to the shock front begin to expand collectively into these directions. The expansion affects particle angular distributions and mean energy components and further shapes of spectra and mean energies of particles emitted into any one direction. The variation of slopes and the relative yields measured within the FOPI collaboration are in a general agreement with the results of simulations. As to the FOPI data on stopping, they are consistent with the preference for transverse over the longitudinal motion in the head-on Au + Au collisions. Unfortunately, though, the data can not be used to decide directly on that preference due to acceptance cuts. Tied to the spatial and temporal changes in the reactions are changes in the entropy per nucleon. (authors)

  7. Tight bounds for top tree compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Fernstrøm, Finn; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2017-01-01

    We consider compressing labeled, ordered and rooted trees using DAG compression and top tree compression. We show that there exists a family of trees such that the size of the DAG compression is always a logarithmic factor smaller than the size of the top tree compression (even for an alphabet...

  8. Compressed Baryonic Matter of Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yanjun; Xu, Renxin

    2013-01-01

    Baryonic matter in the core of a massive and evolved star is compressed significantly to form a supra-nuclear object, and compressed baryonic matter (CBM) is then produced after supernova. The state of cold matter at a few nuclear density is pedagogically reviewed, with significant attention paid to a possible quark-cluster state conjectured from an astrophysical point of view.

  9. Generalized massive optimal data compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsing, Justin; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2018-02-01

    Data compression has become one of the cornerstones of modern astronomical data analysis, with the vast majority of analyses compressing large raw datasets down to a manageable number of informative summaries. In this paper we provide a general procedure for optimally compressing N data down to n summary statistics, where n is equal to the number of parameters of interest. We show that compression to the score function - the gradient of the log-likelihood with respect to the parameters - yields n compressed statistics that are optimal in the sense that they preserve the Fisher information content of the data. Our method generalizes earlier work on linear Karhunen-Loéve compression for Gaussian data whilst recovering both lossless linear compression and quadratic estimation as special cases when they are optimal. We give a unified treatment that also includes the general non-Gaussian case as long as mild regularity conditions are satisfied, producing optimal non-linear summary statistics when appropriate. As a worked example, we derive explicitly the n optimal compressed statistics for Gaussian data in the general case where both the mean and covariance depend on the parameters.

  10. Compressed sensing for body MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li; Benkert, Thomas; Block, Kai Tobias; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo; Chandarana, Hersh

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of compressed sensing for increasing imaging speed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has raised significant interest among researchers and clinicians, and has initiated a large body of research across multiple clinical applications over the last decade. Compressed sensing aims to reconstruct unaliased images from fewer measurements than are traditionally required in MRI by exploiting image compressibility or sparsity. Moreover, appropriate combinations of compressed sensing with previously introduced fast imaging approaches, such as parallel imaging, have demonstrated further improved performance. The advent of compressed sensing marks the prelude to a new era of rapid MRI, where the focus of data acquisition has changed from sampling based on the nominal number of voxels and/or frames to sampling based on the desired information content. This article presents a brief overview of the application of compressed sensing techniques in body MRI, where imaging speed is crucial due to the presence of respiratory motion along with stringent constraints on spatial and temporal resolution. The first section provides an overview of the basic compressed sensing methodology, including the notion of sparsity, incoherence, and nonlinear reconstruction. The second section reviews state-of-the-art compressed sensing techniques that have been demonstrated for various clinical body MRI applications. In the final section, the article discusses current challenges and future opportunities. 5 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:966-987. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Images compression in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, M.S.; Furuie, S.S.; Moura, L.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of two methods for images compression in nuclear medicine was evaluated. The LZW precise, and Cosine Transformed, approximate, methods were analyzed. The results were obtained, showing that the utilization of approximated method produced images with an agreeable quality for visual analysis and compression rates, considerably high than precise method. (C.G.C.)

  12. Compressive Sensing in Communication Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    . The need for cheaper, smarter and more energy efficient wireless devices is greater now than ever. This thesis addresses this problem and concerns the application of the recently developed sampling theory of compressive sensing in communication systems. Compressive sensing is the merging of signal...... acquisition and compression. It allows for sampling a signal with a rate below the bound dictated by the celebrated Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem. In some communication systems this necessary minimum sample rate, dictated by the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem, is so high it is at the limit of what...... with using compressive sensing in communication systems. The main contribution of this thesis is two-fold: 1) a new compressive sensing hardware structure for spread spectrum signals, which is simpler than the current state-of-the-art, and 2) a range of algorithms for parameter estimation for the class...

  13. A Hamiltonian vorticity–dilatation formulation of the compressible Euler equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polner, M.A.; van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Using the Hodge decomposition on bounded domains the compressible Euler equations of gas dynamics are reformulated using a density weighted vorticity and dilatation as primary variables, together with the entropy and density. This formulation is an extension to compressible flows of the well-known

  14. Acoustical and Perceptual Comparison of Noise Reduction and Compression in Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brons, Inge; Houben, Rolph; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Noise reduction and dynamic-range compression are generally applied together in hearing aids but may have opposite effects on amplification. This study evaluated the acoustical and perceptual effects of separate and combined processing of noise reduction and compression. Design: Recordings of the output of 4 hearing aids for speech in…

  15. Electronic Structures of MgB{$_2$} under Uniaxial and Hydrostatic Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic and lattice properties of MgB{$_2$} under uniaxial and hydrostatic compression are calculated. Lattice properties are optimized automatically by using the first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) method. Features of the electronic band structures under uniaxial and hydrostatic compression are quite different each other.

  16. Stationary solution of the compressible magnetohydrodynamic equation and its stability with respect to initial disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Renchao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider three dimensional compressible viscous magnetohydro dynamic equations(MHD with external potentialforce. We first derive the corresponding non-constantstationary solutions. Then we show global well-posedness of the initial value problem for the three dimensional compressible viscous magnetohydrodynamic equations, provided that rescribed initial data is close to the stationary solution.

  17. Chemical reactivity of the compressed noble gas atoms and their ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Systems become harder, less polarizable and difficult to excite as the compression increases. Ionization also causes similar effects. A quantum ... projectile velocities and impact parameters. Dynamical variants of the principles of maximum hardness, minimum polarizability and maximum entropy are found to be operative.

  18. Compression and its effect on the speech signal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Verschuure (Hans); A.J.J. Maas (A. J J); E. Stikvoort (E.); R.M. de Jong; A. Goedegebure (Andre); W.A. Dreschler (Wouter)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractCompression systems are often used in hearing aids to increase the wearing comfort. A patient has to readjust frequently the gain of a linear hearing aid because of the limited dynamic hearing range and the changing acoustical conditions. A great deal of attention has been given to the

  19. Compression and its effect on the speech signal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuure, J.; Maas, A. J.; Stikvoort, E.; de Jong, R. M.; Goedegebure, A.; Dreschler, W. A.

    1996-01-01

    Compression systems are often used in hearing aids to increase the wearing comfort. A patient has to readjust frequently the gain of a linear hearing aid because of the limited dynamic hearing range and the changing acoustical conditions. A great deal of attention has been given to the static

  20. Influence of free water content on the compressive mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    indicates that the similarity exists in the shape of strain–stress curves of cement mor- tars with different water content, the upward section of the stress–strain curve shows bilinear characteristics, while the descending stage (softening state) is almost linear. The dynamic compressive strength of cement mortar increased with ...

  1. Evaluation of mammogram compression efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przelaskowski, A.; Surowski, P.; Kukula, A.

    2005-01-01

    Lossy image coding significantly improves performance over lossless methods, but a reliable control of diagnostic accuracy regarding compressed images is necessary. The acceptable range of compression ratios must be safe with respect to as many objective criteria as possible. This study evaluates the compression efficiency of digital mammograms in both numerically lossless (reversible) and lossy (irreversible) manner. Effective compression methods and concepts were examined to increase archiving and telediagnosis performance. Lossless compression as a primary applicable tool for medical applications was verified on a set 131 mammograms. Moreover, nine radiologists participated in the evaluation of lossy compression of mammograms. Subjective rating of diagnostically important features brought a set of mean rates given for each test image. The lesion detection test resulted in binary decision data analyzed statistically. The radiologists rated and interpreted malignant and benign lesions, representative pathology symptoms, and other structures susceptible to compression distortions contained in 22 original and 62 reconstructed mammograms. Test mammograms were collected in two radiology centers for three years and then selected according to diagnostic content suitable for an evaluation of compression effects. Lossless compression efficiency of the tested coders varied, but CALIC, JPEG-LS, and SPIHT performed the best. The evaluation of lossy compression effects affecting detection ability was based on ROC-like analysis. Assuming a two-sided significance level of p=0.05, the null hypothesis that lower bit rate reconstructions are as useful for diagnosis as the originals was false in sensitivity tests with 0.04 bpp mammograms. However, verification of the same hypothesis with 0.1 bpp reconstructions suggested their acceptance. Moreover, the 1 bpp reconstructions were rated very similarly to the original mammograms in the diagnostic quality evaluation test, but the

  2. Mammography image compression using Wavelet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuhar Ripin; Md Saion Salikin; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Asmaliza Hashim; Norriza Md Isa

    2004-01-01

    Image compression plays an important role in many applications like medical imaging, televideo conferencing, remote sensing, document and facsimile transmission, which depend on the efficient manipulation, storage, and transmission of binary, gray scale, or color images. In Medical imaging application such Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACs), the image size or image stream size is too large and requires a large amount of storage space or high bandwidth for communication. Image compression techniques are divided into two categories namely lossy and lossless data compression. Wavelet method used in this project is a lossless compression method. In this method, the exact original mammography image data can be recovered. In this project, mammography images are digitized by using Vider Sierra Plus digitizer. The digitized images are compressed by using this wavelet image compression technique. Interactive Data Language (IDLs) numerical and visualization software is used to perform all of the calculations, to generate and display all of the compressed images. Results of this project are presented in this paper. (Author)

  3. An in vitro biomechanical comparison of hydroxyapatite coated and uncoated ao cortical bone screws for a limited contact: dynamic compression plate fixation of osteotomized equine 3rd metacarpal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Myra E; Sod, Gary A; Riggs, Laura M; Mitchell, Colin F

    2015-02-01

    To compare the monotonic biomechanical properties of a broad 4.5 mm limited contact-dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) fixation secured with hydroxyapatite (HA) coated cortical bone screws (HA-LC-DCP) versus uncoated cortical bone screws (AO-LC-DCP) to repair osteotomized equine 3rd metacarpal (MC3) bones. Experimental. Adult equine cadaveric MC3 bones (n = 12 pair). Twelve pairs of equine MC3 were divided into 3 test groups (4 pairs each) for: (1) 4 point bending single cycle to failure testing; (2) 4 point bending cyclic fatigue testing; and (3) torsional single cycle to failure testing. For the HA-LC-DCP-MC3 construct, an 8-hole broad LC-DCP (Synthes Ltd, Paoli, PA) was secured on the dorsal surface of each randomly selected MC3 bone with a combination of four 5.5 mm and four 4.5 mm HA-coated cortical screws. For the AO-LC-DCP-MC3 construct, an 8-hole 4.5 mm broad LC-DCP was secured on the dorsal surface of the contralateral MC3 bone with a combination of four 5.5 mm and four 4.5 mm uncoated cortical screws. All MC3 bones had mid-diaphyseal osteotomies. Mean test variable values for each method were compared using a paired t-test within each group. Significance was set at P < .05. Mean yield load, yield bending moment, composite rigidity, failure load, and failure bending moment, under 4 point bending, single cycle to failure, of the HA-LC-DCP fixation were significantly greater than those of the AO-LC-DCP fixation. Mean ± SD values for the HA-LC-DCP and the AO-LC-DCP fixation techniques, respectively, in single cycle to failure under 4 point bending were: yield load, 26.7 ± 2.15 and 16.3 ± 1.38 kN; yield bending moment, 527.4 ± 42.4 and 322.9 ± 27.2 N-m; composite rigidity, 5306 ± 399 and 3003 ± 300 N-m/rad; failure load, 40.6 ± 3.94 and 26.5 ± 2.52 kN; and failure bending moment, 801.9 ± 77.9 and 522.9 ± 52.2 N-m. Mean cycles to failure in 4 point bending of the HA

  4. Conceptual design of heavy ion beam compression using a wedge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C. Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ion beams are a useful tool for conducting high energy density physics (HEDP experiments. Target heating can be enhanced by beam compression, because a shorter pulse diminishes hydrodynamic expansion during irradiation. A conceptual design is introduced to compress ∼100  MeV/u to ∼GeV/u heavy ion beams using a wedge. By deflecting the beam with a time-varying field and placing a tailor-made wedge amid its path downstream, each transverse slice passes through matter of different thickness. The resulting energy loss creates a head-to-tail velocity gradient, and the wedge shape can be designed by using stopping power models to give maximum compression at the target. The compression ratio at the target was found to vary linearly with (head-to-tail centroid offset/spot radius at the wedge. The latter should be approximately 10 to attain tenfold compression. The decline in beam quality due to projectile ionization, energy straggling, fragmentation, and scattering is shown to be acceptable for well-chosen wedge materials. A test experiment is proposed to verify the compression scheme and to study the beam-wedge interaction and its associated beam dynamics, which will facilitate further efforts towards a HEDP facility.

  5. Modulation of Stem Cell Differentiation and Myostatin as an Approach to Counteract Fibrosis in Muscle Dystrophy and Regeneration after Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    combination of oral apocynin as NADPH oxidase inhibitor and oral allopurinol as xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, to counteract oxidative stress as a...hematoxylin/eosin, MHC II, dystrophin), and if possible oxidative stress ( xanthine oxido- reductase, NADPH oxidase ) b. Finalize the parallel ongoing study on

  6. Compressive behavior of Sulcata Tortoise’s carapace at high rate of deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongpairojcosit, Nadda; Glunrawd, Chinnawit; Jearanaisilawong, Petch

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the dynamic compressive response of tortoise carapace at high rate of deformation. Disk specimens are cut from carapace and compressed using Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The steel bar system together with a copper pulse shaper generate an incident wave that can achieve a constant rate of deformation within the specimens. The results show increasing compressive modulus and compressive strength compared to the quasi-static data of carapace. The strain waves on the incident and the transmission bars from finite element analysis based on the experimental setup agree with the test data.

  7. Compressive sensing for urban radar

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of compressive sensing and sparse signal reconstruction, approaches to urban radar have shifted toward relaxed constraints on signal sampling schemes in time and space, and to effectively address logistic difficulties in data acquisition. Traditionally, these challenges have hindered high resolution imaging by restricting both bandwidth and aperture, and by imposing uniformity and bounds on sampling rates.Compressive Sensing for Urban Radar is the first book to focus on a hybrid of two key areas: compressive sensing and urban sensing. It explains how reliable imaging, tracki

  8. Efficient Lossy Compression for Compressive Sensing Acquisition of Images in Compressive Sensing Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Compressive Sensing Imaging (CSI is a new framework for image acquisition, which enables the simultaneous acquisition and compression of a scene. Since the characteristics of Compressive Sensing (CS acquisition are very different from traditional image acquisition, the general image compression solution may not work well. In this paper, we propose an efficient lossy compression solution for CS acquisition of images by considering the distinctive features of the CSI. First, we design an adaptive compressive sensing acquisition method for images according to the sampling rate, which could achieve better CS reconstruction quality for the acquired image. Second, we develop a universal quantization for the obtained CS measurements from CS acquisition without knowing any a priori information about the captured image. Finally, we apply these two methods in the CSI system for efficient lossy compression of CS acquisition. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed solution improves the rate-distortion performance by 0.4~2 dB comparing with current state-of-the-art, while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  9. Parameters affecting the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression in patients with prolonged tracheostomy mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Akira; Shida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sato, Kimihiro; Seko, Toshiaki; Ito, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Shunichi; Takahashi, Naoaki

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify physical parameters affecting the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression in patients with prolonged tracheostomy mechanical ventilation. [Methods] Eighteen patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation were included in this study. Expiratory abdominal compression was performed on patients lying in a supine position. The abdomen above the navel was vertically compressed in synchronization with expiration and released with inspiration. We measured the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression. [Results] The mean tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression was higher than that at rest (430.6 ± 127.1 mL vs. 344.0 ± 94.3 mL). The tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression was correlated with weight, days of ventilator support, dynamic compliance and abdominal expansion. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that weight (β = 0.499), dynamic compliance (β = 0.387), and abdominal expansion (β = 0.365) were factors contributing to the tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression. [Conclusion] Expiratory abdominal compression increased the tidal volume in patients with prolonged tracheostomy mechanical ventilation. The tidal volume during expiratory abdominal compression was influenced by each of the pulmonary conditions and the physical characteristics.

  10. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  11. Compressed sensing for distributed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Coluccia, Giulio; Magli, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the state-of-the art in the exciting and timely topic of compressed sensing for distributed systems. It has to be noted that, while compressed sensing has been studied for some time now, its distributed applications are relatively new. Remarkably, such applications are ideally suited to exploit all the benefits that compressed sensing can provide. The objective of this book is to provide the reader with a comprehensive survey of this topic, from the basic concepts to different classes of centralized and distributed reconstruction algorithms, as well as a comparison of these techniques. This book collects different contributions on these aspects. It presents the underlying theory in a complete and unified way for the first time, presenting various signal models and their use cases. It contains a theoretical part collecting latest results in rate-distortion analysis of distributed compressed sensing, as well as practical implementations of algorithms obtaining performance close to...

  12. Observation of soliton compression in silicon photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Redondo, A.; Husko, C.; Eades, D.; Zhang, Y.; Li, J.; Krauss, T.F.; Eggleton, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Solitons are nonlinear waves present in diverse physical systems including plasmas, water surfaces and optics. In silicon, the presence of two photon absorption and accompanying free carriers strongly perturb the canonical dynamics of optical solitons. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of soliton-effect pulse compression of picosecond pulses in silicon, despite two photon absorption and free carriers. Here we achieve compression of 3.7 ps pulses to 1.6 ps with soliton-based functionalities in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible platforms. PMID:24423977

  13. Geometric Results for Compressible Magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Arter, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Recently, compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) has been elegantly formulated in terms of Lie derivatives. This paper exploits the geometrical properties of the Lie bracket to give new insights into the properties of compressible MHD behaviour, both with and without feedback of the magnetic field on the flow. These results are expected to be useful for the solution of MHD equations in both tokamak fusion experiments and space plasmas.

  14. Compressive spectroscopy by spectral modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiknine, Yaniv; August, Isaac; Stern, Adrian

    2017-05-01

    We review two compressive spectroscopy techniques based on modulation in the spectral domain that we have recently proposed. Both techniques achieve a compression ratio of approximately 10:1, however each with a different sensing mechanism. The first technique uses a liquid crystal cell as a tunable filter to modulate the spectral signal, and the second technique uses a Fabry-Perot etalon as a resonator. We overview the specific properties of each of the techniques.

  15. Compressive Temporal Summation in Human Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jingyang; Benson, Noah C; Kay, Kendrick N; Winawer, Jonathan

    2018-01-17

    Combining sensory inputs over space and time is fundamental to vision. Population receptive field models have been successful in characterizing spatial encoding throughout the human visual pathways. A parallel question, how visual areas in the human brain process information distributed over time, has received less attention. One challenge is that the most widely used neuroimaging method, fMRI, has coarse temporal resolution compared with the time-scale of neural dynamics. Here, via carefully controlled temporally modulated stimuli, we show that information about temporal processing can be readily derived from fMRI signal amplitudes in male and female subjects. We find that all visual areas exhibit subadditive summation, whereby responses to longer stimuli are less than the linear prediction from briefer stimuli. We also find fMRI evidence that the neural response to two stimuli is reduced for brief interstimulus intervals (indicating adaptation). These effects are more pronounced in visual areas anterior to V1-V3. Finally, we develop a general model that shows how these effects can be captured with two simple operations: temporal summation followed by a compressive nonlinearity. This model operates for arbitrary temporal stimulation patterns and provides a simple and interpretable set of computations that can be used to characterize neural response properties across the visual hierarchy. Importantly, compressive temporal summation directly parallels earlier findings of compressive spatial summation in visual cortex describing responses to stimuli distributed across space. This indicates that, for space and time, cortex uses a similar processing strategy to achieve higher-level and increasingly invariant representations of the visual world. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Combining sensory inputs over time is fundamental to seeing. Two important temporal phenomena are summation, the accumulation of sensory inputs over time, and adaptation, a response reduction for repeated

  16. Compact compressive arc and beam switchyard for energy recovery linac-driven ultraviolet free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkermans, J. A. G.; Di Mitri, S.; Douglas, D.; Setija, I. D.

    2017-08-01

    High gain free electron lasers (FELs) driven by high repetition rate recirculating accelerators have received considerable attention in the scientific and industrial communities in recent years. Cost-performance optimization of such facilities encourages limiting machine size and complexity, and a compact machine can be realized by combining bending and bunch length compression during the last stage of recirculation, just before lasing. The impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on electron beam quality during compression can, however, limit FEL output power. When methods to counteract CSR are implemented, appropriate beam diagnostics become critical to ensure that the target beam parameters are met before lasing, as well as to guarantee reliable, predictable performance and rapid machine setup and recovery. This article describes a beam line for bunch compression and recirculation, and beam switchyard accessing a diagnostic line for EUV lasing at 1 GeV beam energy. The footprint is modest, with 12 m compressive arc diameter and ˜20 m diagnostic line length. The design limits beam quality degradation due to CSR both in the compressor and in the switchyard. Advantages and drawbacks of two switchyard lines providing, respectively, off-line and on-line measurements are discussed. The entire design is scalable to different beam energies and charges.

  17. Short- and medium-range orders in Cu46Zr54 metallic glasses under shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, W. R.; Yao, X. H.; Wang, L.; Tang, X. C.; Luo, S. N.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate short- and medium-range orders in Cu46Zr54 metallic glasses, as represented by icosahedra and icosahedron networks, respectively, under shock compression with molecular dynamics simulations. Complementary isothermal compression and isobaric heating simulations reveal that compression below 60 GPa gives rise to increased coordination and thus high-coordination-number Voronoi polyhedra, such as icosahedra; however, pressure-induced collapse or thermal disintegration of icosahedra (and subsequently, icosahedron networks) occurs at pressures above 60 GPa or at melting, accompanied by free volume increase. The evolutions of the short- and medium-range orders upon shock loading are the effects of compression combined with shock-induced melting. The structural changes are partially reversible for weak shocks without melting (below 60 GPa) and irreversible for strong shocks. Crystallization does not occur under isothermal or shock compression at molecular dynamics scales.

  18. Development of 1D Liner Compression Code for IDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Akihisa; Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    A 1D liner compression code is developed to model liner implosion dynamics in the Inductively Driven Liner Experiment (IDL) where FRC plasmoid is compressed via inductively-driven metal liners. The driver circuit, magnetic field, joule heating, and liner dynamics calculations are performed at each time step in sequence to couple these effects in the code. To obtain more realistic magnetic field results for a given drive coil geometry, 2D and 3D effects are incorporated into the 1D field calculation through use of correction factor table lookup approach. Commercial low-frequency electromagnetic fields solver, ANSYS Maxwell 3D, is used to solve the magnetic field profile for static liner condition at various liner radius in order to derive correction factors for the 1D field calculation in the code. The liner dynamics results from the code is verified to be in good agreement with the results from commercial explicit dynamics solver, ANSYS Explicit Dynamics, and previous liner experiment. The developed code is used to optimize the capacitor bank and driver coil design for better energy transfer and coupling. FRC gain calculations are also performed using the liner compression data from the code for the conceptual design of the reactor sized system for fusion energy gains.

  19. Does vibration counteract the static stretch-induced deficit on muscle force development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Igor Alexandre; Kawchuk, Gregory; Bhambhani, Yagesh; Gomes, Paulo Sergio Chagas

    2013-09-01

    To determine the residual acute vibration-stretching effect on preactivation levels, short-latency stretch reflex, and performance during execution of drop jumps. Repeated measures. Eleven male recreational athletes performed a set of three 45cm drop jumps before and immediately after a 30s static stretching exercise with and without simultaneously imposed muscle vibration (45Hz, 5mm). Drop jump height, ground reaction forces and electromyographic data including Vastus Lateralis onset/levels of preactivation and short-latency stretch reflex were recorded. No changes were induced on drop jump height. However, stretching-induced decrements on ground reaction force peak and time to peak as well as an increment in contact time followed a delay in short-latency stretch reflex onset and a reduced preactivation level of Vastus Lateralis. Otherwise, when vibration was simultaneously imposed, there was no evidence of changes in high-speed force production variables or electromyographic recordings. Mechanical vibration, when applied simultaneously to static-stretching routines, appeared to be effective to counteract decreased musculotendinous unit stiffness-induced high-speed force production deficit during jumping performance. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Interleukin-35 administration counteracts established murine type 1 diabetes--possible involvement of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kailash; Kadesjö, Erik; Lindroos, Julia; Hjort, Marcus; Lundberg, Marcus; Espes, Daniel; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Sandler, Stellan; Thorvaldson, Lina

    2015-07-30

    The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-35 is produced by regulatory T (Treg) cells to suppress autoimmune and inflammatory responses. The role of IL-35 in type 1 diabetes (T1D) remains to be answered. To elucidate this, we investigated the kinetics of Treg cell response in the multiple low dose streptozotocin induced (MLDSTZ) T1D model and measured the levels of IL-35 in human T1D patients. We found that Treg cells were increased in MLDSTZ mice. However, the Treg cells showed a decreased production of anti-inflammatory (IL-10, IL-35, TGF-β) and increased pro-inflammatory (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17) cytokines, indicating a phenotypic shift of Treg cells under T1D condition. IL-35 administration effectively both prevented development of, and counteracted established MLDSTZ T1D, seemingly by induction of Eos expression and IL-35 production in Treg cells, thus reversing the phenotypic shift of the Treg cells. IL-35 administration reversed established hyperglycemia in NOD mouse model of T1D. Moreover, circulating IL-35 levels were decreased in human T1D patients compared to healthy controls. These findings suggest that insufficient IL-35 levels play a pivotal role in the development of T1D and that treatment with IL-35 should be investigated in treatment of T1D and other autoimmune diseases.

  1. Anthocyanin-rich extract from Hibiscus sabdariffa calyx counteracts UVC-caused impairments in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkol, Hatice Uce; Koyuncu, Ismail; Tuluce, Yasin; Dilsiz, Nihat; Soral, Sinan; Ozkol, Halil

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV) was reported to cause oxidative stress. Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae) calyx is commonly used in traditional Asian and African medicines and possesses strong antioxidant capacity due to its anthocyanin (ANTH) content. This study researched the possible protective role of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyx extract (HSCE) in UVC exposure of rats. Levels of serum enzymes, renal function tests, and some oxidant/antioxidant biomarkers of skin, lens, and retina tissues were monitored. Rats were exposed to UVC 4 h daily for 40 d and simultaneously received HSCE containing 2.5, 5, and 10 mg doses of ANTH in drinking water. Significant (p < 0.05) increases in the levels of serum aminotransferases, lactate dehydrogenase, urea, creatinine, and uric acid were noted after UVC exposure. In skin, lens, and retina tissues, total oxidant status, oxidative stress index, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation escalated markedly (p < 0.05) whereas total antioxidant status, reduced glutathione, and superoxide dismutase decreased dramatically (p < 0.05) related to UVC. Co-administration of HSCE with each ANTH dose significantly (p < 0.05) reversed aforementioned parameters (except total oxidant status) almost in all tissues. The LD50 of HSCE in rats was determined to be above 5000 mg/kg. Our data revealed that HSCE has a remarkable potential to counteract UVC-caused impairments, probably through its antioxidant and free radical-defusing effects. Therefore, HSCE could be useful against some cutaneous and ocular diseases in which UV and oxidative stress have a role in the etiopathogenesis.

  2. Apricot melanoidins prevent oxidative endothelial cell death by counteracting mitochondrial oxidation and membrane depolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Cossu

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular benefits associated with diets rich in fruit and vegetables are thought to be due to phytochemicals contained in fresh plant material. However, whether processed plant foods provide the same benefits as unprocessed ones is an open question. Melanoidins from heat-processed apricots were isolated and their presence confirmed by colorimetric analysis and browning index. Oxidative injury of endothelial cells (ECs is the key step for the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases (CVD, therefore the potential protective effect of apricot melanoidins on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative mitochondrial damage and cell death was explored in human ECs. The redox state of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial compartments was detected by using the redox-sensitive, fluorescent protein (roGFP, while the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP was assessed with the fluorescent dye, JC-1. ECs exposure to hydrogen peroxide, dose-dependently induced mitochondrial and cytoplasmic oxidation. Additionally detected hydrogen peroxide-induced phenomena were MMP dissipation and ECs death. Pretreatment of ECs with apricot melanoidins, significantly counteracted and ultimately abolished hydrogen peroxide-induced intracellular oxidation, mitochondrial depolarization and cell death. In this regard, our current results clearly indicate that melanoidins derived from heat-processed apricots, protect human ECs against oxidative stress.

  3. Counteracting Rotor Imbalance in a Bearingless Motor System with Feedforward Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kascak, Peter Eugene; Jansen, Ralph H.; Dever, Timothy; Nagorny, Aleksandr; Loparo, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    In standard motor applications, traditional mechanical bearings represent the most economical approach to rotor suspension. However, in certain high performance applications, rotor suspension without bearing contact is either required or highly beneficial. Such applications include very high speed, extreme environment, or limited maintenance access applications. This paper extends upon a novel bearingless motor concept, in which full five-axis levitation and rotation of the rotor is achieved using two motors with opposing conical air-gaps. By leaving the motors' pole-pairs unconnected, different d-axis flux in each pole-pair is created, generating a flux imbalance which creates lateral force. Note this is approach is different than that used in previous bearingless motors, which use separate windings for levitation and rotation. This paper will examine the use of feedforward control to counteract synchronous whirl caused by rotor imbalance. Experimental results will be presented showing the performance of a prototype bearingless system, which was sized for a high speed flywheel energy storage application, with and without feedforward control.

  4. Postnatal stimulation of the pups counteracts prenatal stress-induced deficits in hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Valerie; Lamarque, Stephanie; Le Moal, Michel; Piazza, Pier-Vincenzo; Abrous, Djoher Nora

    2006-05-01

    Prenatal stress constitutes a developmental risk factor for later psychopathology. The behavioral disorders are sustained by neurobiological alterations including long-term reduction of hippocampal neurogenesis; its deregulation has been involved in cognitive impairments, mood disorders and addiction. A major goal is to define periods in development and strategies for intervening to prevent the effects of early stressful events. We investigated the ability of a postnatal infantile stimulation to prevent prenatal stress-induced alteration in hippocampal neurogenesis. The influence of postnatal handling on prenatal stress-induced changes in hippocampal neurogenesis was examined in 4 and 26 month-old male rats. Three distinct phases of the neurogenesis were studied: proliferation, survival and neuronal differentiation. Prenatal stress reduced hippocampal cell proliferation all throughout life. Furthermore, the survival rate of newborn cells, the number of immature neurons and the number of differentiated new neurons were reduced in young and old prenatally-stressed rats. All those deleterious effects were counteracted by neonatal handling. These data show that finer aspects of brain shaping can be rewired by environmental influences occurring at sensitive phase of development. They also suggest that infantile stimulation may reverse the appearance of behavioral disorders induced by early life stress.

  5. Coumestrol Counteracts Interleukin-1β-Induced Catabolic Effects by Suppressing Inflammation in Primary Rat Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jae-Seek; Cho, In-A; Kang, Kyeong-Rok; Oh, Ji-Su; Yu, Sang-Joun; Lee, Gyeong-Je; Seo, Yo-Seob; Kim, Su-Gwan; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Do Kyung; Im, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-catabolic effects of coumestrol, a phytoestrogen derived from herbal plants, against interleukin-1β-induced cartilage degeneration in primary rat chondrocytes and articular cartilage. Coumestrol did not affect the viability of human normal oral keratinocytes and primary rat chondrocytes treated for 24 h and 21 days, respectively. Although coumestrol did not significantly increase the proteoglycan contents in long-term culture, it abolished the interleukin-1β-induced loss of proteoglycans in primary rat chondrocytes and knee articular cartilage. Furthermore, coumestrol suppressed the expression of matrix-degrading enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinase-13, -3, and -1 in primary rat chondrocytes stimulated with interleukin-1β. Moreover, the expression of catabolic factors such as nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E 2 , and inflammatory cytokines in interleukin-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes was suppressed by coumestrol. In summary, these results indicate that coumestrol counteracts the catabolic effects induced by interleukin-1β through the suppression of inflammation. Therefore, based on its biological activity and safety profile, coumestrol could be used as a potential anti-catabolic biomaterial for osteoarthritis.

  6. Evidence That the Microbiota Counteracts Male Outbreeding Strategy by Inhibiting Sexual Signaling in Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Heys

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The microbiota is increasingly being recognized as having important impacts on many host biological processes. However, evidence of its effects on animal communication and breeding strategy is lacking. In this three-factorial study, we show that females were more willing to mate with related males, with relatedness likely being assessed through the microbiota. By contrast, male mating investment is concurrently determined by both the relatedness and microbiota status of the female. When the microbiota in female Drosophila melanogaster is altered by an antibiotic, male investment in sperm number increased when mating with unrelated females compared to related ones. Contrastingly, the presence of an intact microbiota in females canceled this male outbreeding strategy. As a consequence, the microbiota, when intact, decreased the fitness of the mating couple. Furthermore, we showed that female sexual signaling (cuticular hydrocarbons, with regards to kin recognition, significantly interacts with microbiota. Interestingly, the interaction is significant for hydrocarbons expressed by both sexes, but not for female-specific compounds. Taken together, our results suggest that microbiota can influence kin recognition by disfavoring male outbreeding strategies, likely by inhibiting key olfactory sexual signaling. This represents the first evidence of a host outbreeding strategy counteracted by their microbiota.

  7. HSV-1 ICP0: An E3 Ubiquitin Ligase That Counteracts Host Intrinsic and Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Perusina Lanfranca

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0, is required for efficient lytic viral replication and regulates the switch between the lytic and latent states of HSV-1. As an E3 ubiquitin ligase, ICP0 directs the proteasomal degradation of several cellular targets, allowing the virus to counteract different cellular intrinsic and innate immune responses. In this review, we will focus on how ICP0’s E3 ubiquitin ligase activity inactivates the host intrinsic defenses, such as nuclear domain 10 (ND10, SUMO, and the DNA damage response to HSV-1 infection. In addition, we will examine ICP0’s capacity to impair the activation of interferon (innate regulatory mediators that include IFI16 (IFN γ-inducible protein 16, MyD88 (myeloid differentiation factor 88, and Mal (MyD88 adaptor-like protein. We will also consider how ICP0 allows HSV-1 to evade activation of the NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa B inflammatory signaling pathway. Finally, ICP0’s paradoxical relationship with USP7 (ubiquitin specific protease 7 and its roles in intrinsic and innate immune responses to HSV-1 infection will be discussed.

  8. FGFR2-Driven Signaling Counteracts Tamoxifen Effect on ERα-Positive Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Turczyk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Signaling mediated by growth factors receptors has long been suggested as one of the key factors responsible for failure of endocrine treatment in breast cancer (BCa. Herein we present that in the presence of tamoxifen, FGFs (Fibroblast Growth Factors promote BCa cell growth with the strongest effect being produced by FGF7. FGFR2 was identified as a mediator of FGF7 action and the FGFR2-induced signaling was found to underlie cancer-associated fibroblasts-dependent resistance to tamoxifen. FGF7/FGFR2-triggered pathway was shown to induce ER phosphorylation, ubiquitination and subsequent ER proteasomal degradation which counteracted tamoxifen-promoted ER stabilization. We also identified activation of PI3K/AKT signaling targeting ER-Ser167 and regulation of Bcl-2 expression as a mediator of FGFR2-promoted resistance to tamoxifen. Analysis of tissue samples from patients with invasive ductal carcinoma revealed an inversed correlation between expression of FGFR2 and ER, thus supporting our in vitro data. These results unveil the complexity of ER regulation by FGFR2-mediated signaling likely to be associated with BCa resistance to endocrine therapy.

  9. Personal values that support and counteract utilization of a screening test for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aavik, Toivo; Aavik, Anu; Punab, Margus

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the current research was to discover the personal values that may support men's prostate cancer screening decisions in the future. We asked for participants' past behavior and future behavioral intentions, and also considered their real-life behavior. The sample consisted of 371 men, of which 93 were first-time patients at the Andrology Unit. The results show that Security value was related to past participation, while Achievement, Stimulation, and Traditions counteracted this. Present prostate-testing behavior was related only to higher Security values. Predictors of future behavioral intentions were Security, Self-direction, and Benevolence, which described 21% of the total variability. Considering informed decision-making processes, our results suggest that men who hold Security, Self-direction, and Benevolence values are more likely to participate in office-based initial screening. The study indicates the need to offer office-based initial screening to those age-eligible men whose values do not support participation.

  10. MyT1 Counteracts the Neural Progenitor Program to Promote Vertebrate Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca F. Vasconcelos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The generation of neurons from neural stem cells requires large-scale changes in gene expression that are controlled to a large extent by proneural transcription factors, such as Ascl1. While recent studies have characterized the differentiation genes activated by proneural factors, less is known on the mechanisms that suppress progenitor cell identity. Here, we show that Ascl1 induces the transcription factor MyT1 while promoting neuronal differentiation. We combined functional studies of MyT1 during neurogenesis with the characterization of its transcriptional program. MyT1 binding is associated with repression of gene transcription in neural progenitor cells. It promotes neuronal differentiation by counteracting the inhibitory activity of Notch signaling at multiple levels, targeting the Notch1 receptor and many of its downstream targets. These include regulators of the neural progenitor program, such as Hes1, Sox2, Id3, and Olig1. Thus, Ascl1 suppresses Notch signaling cell-autonomously via MyT1, coupling neuronal differentiation with repression of the progenitor fate.

  11. Positive Alpha and Negative Beta (A Strategy for Counteracting Systematic Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Sonne Noddeboe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Undiversifiable (or systematic risk has long been an enemy of investors. Many countercyclical strategies have been developed to counter this. However, like all insurance types, these strategies are generally costly to implement, and over time can significantly reduce portfolio returns in long and extended bull markets. In this paper, we discuss an alternative technique, founded on the premise of physiological bias and risk-aversion. We take a behavioral discussion in order to contextualize the insurance like characteristics of option pricing and discuss how this can lead to a mispricing of the asymmetric relationship between the VIX and the S&P 500. To test this, we perform studies in which we find statistical inefficiencies, thereby making it possible to implement a method of hedging index option premium in a way that has displayed no monthly drawdowns in bullish periods, while still providing large returns in major sell-offs. The three versions of the strategy discussed have negative betas to the S&P 500, while exhibiting similar risk-adjusted excess returns over both bull and bear markets. Further, the performance generated over the entire period, for all three strategies, is highly statistically significant. The results challenge the weak form of the Efficient Market Hypothesis and provide evidence that the methods of hedging could be a valuable addition to an equity rich portfolio for the purpose of counteracting systematic risk.

  12. P-cadherin counteracts myosin II-B function: implications in melanoma progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Wever Olivier

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant transformation of melanocytes is frequently attended by a switch in cadherin expression profile as shown for E- and N-cadherin. For P-cadherin, downregulation in metastasizing melanoma has been demonstrated, and over-expression of P-cadherin in melanoma cell lines has been shown to inhibit invasion. The strong invasive and metastatic nature of cutaneous melanoma implies a deregulated interplay between intercellular adhesion and migration-related molecules Results In this study we performed a microarray analysis to compare the mRNA expression profile of an invasive BLM melanoma cell line (BLM LIE and the non-invasive P-cadherin over-expression variant (BLM P-cad. Results indicate that nonmuscle myosin II-B is downregulated in BLM P-cad. Moreover, myosin II-B plays a major role in melanoma migration and invasiveness by retracting the tail during the migratory cycle, as shown by the localization of myosin II-B stress fibers relative to Golgi and the higher levels of phosphorylated myosin light chain. Analysis of P-cadherin and myosin II-B in nodular melanoma sections and in a panel of melanoma cell lines further confirmed that there is an inverse relationship between both molecules. Conclusions Therefore, we conclude that P-cadherin counteracts the expression and function of myosin II-B, resulting in the suppression of the invasive and migratory behaviour of BLM melanoma cells

  13. Green tea (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate counteracts daytime overeating induced by high-fat diet in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyu; Kek, Huiling Calvina; Lim, Joy; Gelling, Richard Wayne; Han, Weiping

    2016-12-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) induces overeating and obesity. Green tea (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) reduces HFD-induced body weight and body fat gain mainly through increased lipid metabolism and fat oxidation. However, little is known about its effect on HFD-induced alterations in feeding behavior. Three diet groups of wildtype C57B/6j male mice at 5 months old were fed on normal chow diet, 1 week of HFD (60% of energy) and 3 months of HFD (diet-induced obesity (DIO)) prior to EGCG supplement in respective diet. EGCG had no effect on feeding behavior in normal chow diet group. Increased daytime feeding induced by HFD was selectively corrected by EGCG treatment in HFD groups, including reversed food intake, feeding frequency and meal size in HFD + EGCG group, and reduced food intake and feeding frequency in DIO + EGCG group. Moreover, EGCG treatment altered diurnally oscillating expression pattern of key appetite-regulating genes, including AGRP, POMC, and CART, and key circadian genes Clock and Bmal1 in hypothalamus of DIO mice, indicating its central effect on feeding regulation. Our study demonstrates that EGCG supplement specifically counteracts daytime overeating induced by HFD in mice, suggesting its central role in regulating feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Feebates promoting energy-efficient cars: Design options to address more consumers and possible counteracting effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Anja; Mueller, Michel G.; Haan, Peter de; Scholz, Roland W.

    2008-01-01

    An increasing number of countries have implemented or are evaluating feebate systems in order to reduce energy consumption of new vehicle registrations. We distinguish between absolute feebates based strictly on a vehicle's energy consumption and relative feebates normalizing energy consumption by a given car utility. This paper analyzes whether absolute or relative feebates encourage more consumers to change to vehicles with lower energy consumption. We combine an analysis of all car models on sale at the end of 2005 with survey data from 326 potential new car buyers. Analysis of the car fleet with regard to behavioral changes assumed as realistic shows that relative systems succeed better in offering more consumer groups cars that are eligible for incentives. Survey results suggest that consumers show some, but limited, willingness to change behavior to obtain an incentive. However, a relative system potentially allows people to switch to cars with higher relative efficiency without actually lowering absolute CO 2 emissions. We discuss this inherent dilemma of simultaneously addressing more consumers and limiting counteracting effects. In order to find the optimal trade-off, we suggest assessing different parameters operationalizing vehicle utility by means of micro-simulation with detailed car fleet and differentiated consumer segments

  15. MHC class I cross-presentation by dendritic cells counteracts viral immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopora, Katrin; Bernhard, Caroline A; Ried, Christine; Castello, Alejandro A; Murphy, Kenneth M; Marconi, Peggy; Koszinowski, Ulrich; Brocker, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    DCs very potently activate CD8(+) T cells specific for viral peptides bound to MHC class I molecules. However, many viruses have evolved immune evasion mechanisms, which inactivate infected DCs and might reduce priming of T cells. Then MHC class I cross-presentation of exogenous viral Ag by non-infected DCs may become crucial to assure CD8(+) T cell responses. Although many vital functions of infected DCs are inhibited in vitro by many different viruses, the contributions of cross-presentation to T cell immunity when confronted with viral immune inactivation in vivo has not been demonstrated up to now, and remains controversial. Here we show that priming of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-, but not murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV)-specific CD8(+) T cells was severely reduced in mice with a DC-specific cross-presentation deficiency. In contrast, while CD8(+) T cell responses to mutant HSV, which lacks crucial inhibitory genes, also depended on CD8α(+) DCs, they were independent of cross-presentation. Therefore HSV-specific CTL-responses entirely depend on the CD8α(+) DC subset, which present via direct or cross-presentation mechanisms depending on the immune evasion equipment of virus. Our data establish the contribution of cross-presentation to counteract viral immune evasion mechanisms in some, but not all viruses.

  16. MHC class I cross-presentation by Dendritic Cells counteracts viral immune evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eNopora

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available DCs very potently activate CD8+ T cells specific for viral peptides bound to MHC class I molecules. However, many viruses have evolved immune evasion mechanisms, which inactivate infected DCs and might reduce priming of T cells. Then MHC class I cross-presentation of exogenous viral Ag by non-infected DCs may become crucial to assure CD8+ T cell responses. Although many vital functions of infected DCs are inhibited in vitro by many different viruses, the contributions of cross-presentation to T cell immunity when confronted with viral immune inactivation in vivo has not been demonstrated up to now, and remains controversial. Here we show that priming of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-, but not murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV-specific CD8+ T cells was severely reduced in mice with a DC-specific cross-presentation deficiency. In contrast, while CD8+ T cell responses to mutant HSV, which lacks crucial inhibitory genes, also depended on CD8+ DCs, they were independent of cross-presentation. Therefore HSV-specific CTL-responses entirely depend on the CD8+ DC-subset, which present via direct or cross-presentation mechanisms depending on the immune-evasion equipment of virus. Our data establish the contribution of cross-presentation to counteract viral immune evasion mechanisms in some, but not all viruses.

  17. Vertebral compression exacerbates osteoporotic pain in an ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Miyako; Orita, Sumihisa; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Kamoda, Hiroto; Eguchi, Yawara; Arai, Gen; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Go; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Kawarai, Yuya; Yoshino, Kensuke; Ozawa, Tomoyuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Kawakami, Mamoru; Ohtori, Seiji; Inoue, Gen

    2013-11-15

    Basic pain study using osteoporotic rodent models. To examine alterations in distribution of pain-related neuropeptides after compressive force on osteoporotic vertebrae and their chronic pain-related properties. We previously reported significantly increased production of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a marker of inflammatory pain, in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of vertebrae in osteoporosis-model ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Here, we hypothesized that longitudinal compressive force on vertebrae can affect osteoporotic pain properties, which has not been examined yet. OVX rats were used as the osteoporosis model. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were prepared and Fluoro-Gold (FG) neurotracer was applied to the periosteal surface of the Co5 vertebra. After FG labeling, the animals were divided into 4 groups: Control, Control + compression, OVX, and OVX + compression. The Control groups were not ovariectomized. In the compression groups, K-wires were stabbed transversely through Co4 and Co6 with Co5 compressed longitudinally by rubber bands bridged between the 2. One, 2, 4, and 8 weeks after surgery, bilateral S1 to S3 DRGs were excised for immunofluorescence assays. Expression of CGRP and activating transcription factor 3, a marker of neuronal injury, were compared among the 4 groups. Sustained upregulation of CGRP in DRG neurons was observed after compression of the Co5 vertebra, and Co5 compression caused significant increase in CGRP production in DRG neurons, whereas a greater level of activating transcription factor 3 upregulation was observed in DRGs in OVX rats after dynamic vertebral compression 8 weeks after surgery, implying potential neuropathic pain. There was sustained upregulation of CGRP and activating transcription factor 3 in DRGs in osteoporotic model rats compared with controls, and levels were further enhanced by dynamic vertebral compression. These findings imply that dynamic compression stress on vertebrae can exacerbate osteoporotic pain by

  18. Double-compression method for biomedical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, Yevhenii A.; Mustetsov, Timofey N.; Hamdi, Rami R.; Małecka-Massalska, Teresa; Orshubekov, Nurbek; DzierŻak, RóŻa; Uvaysova, Svetlana

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes a double compression method (DCM) of biomedical images. A comparison of image compression factors in size JPEG, PNG and developed DCM was carried out. The main purpose of the DCM - compression of medical images while maintaining the key points that carry diagnostic information. To estimate the minimum compression factor an analysis of the coding of random noise image is presented.

  19. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed a...

  20. Perceptual Image Compression in Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Eckstein, Miguel; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The next era of space exploration, especially the "Mission to Planet Earth" will generate immense quantities of image data. For example, the Earth Observing System (EOS) is expected to generate in excess of one terabyte/day. NASA confronts a major technical challenge in managing this great flow of imagery: in collection, pre-processing, transmission to earth, archiving, and distribution to scientists at remote locations. Expected requirements in most of these areas clearly exceed current technology. Part of the solution to this problem lies in efficient image compression techniques. For much of this imagery, the ultimate consumer is the human eye. In this case image compression should be designed to match the visual capacities of the human observer. We have developed three techniques for optimizing image compression for the human viewer. The first consists of a formula, developed jointly with IBM and based on psychophysical measurements, that computes a DCT quantization matrix for any specified combination of viewing distance, display resolution, and display brightness. This DCT quantization matrix is used in most recent standards for digital image compression (JPEG, MPEG, CCITT H.261). The second technique optimizes the DCT quantization matrix for each individual image, based on the contents of the image. This is accomplished by means of a model of visual sensitivity to compression artifacts. The third technique extends the first two techniques to the realm of wavelet compression. Together these two techniques will allow systematic perceptual optimization of image compression in NASA imaging systems. Many of the image management challenges faced by NASA are mirrored in the field of telemedicine. Here too there are severe demands for transmission and archiving of large image databases, and the imagery is ultimately used primarily by human observers, such as radiologists. In this presentation I will describe some of our preliminary explorations of the applications

  1. 76 FR 4338 - Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo- Compressed... Fuel Cell Technologies Program, will be hosting two days of workshops on compressed and cryo-compressed... perspectives, and overviews of carbon fiber development and recent costs analyses. The cryo-compressed hydrogen...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped with...

  3. Building indifferentiable compression functions from the PGV compression functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauravaram, P.; Bagheri, Nasour; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde

    2016-01-01

    Preneel, Govaerts and Vandewalle (PGV) analysed the security of single-block-length block cipher based compression functions assuming that the underlying block cipher has no weaknesses. They showed that 12 out of 64 possible compression functions are collision and (second) preimage resistant. Black......, Rogaway and Shrimpton formally proved this result in the ideal cipher model. However, in the indifferentiability security framework introduced by Maurer, Renner and Holenstein, all these 12 schemes are easily differentiable from a fixed input-length random oracle (FIL-RO) even when their underlying block...

  4. Plasma heating by adiabatic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.A. Jr.

    1972-01-01

    These two lectures will cover the following three topics: (i) The application of adiabatic compression to toroidal devices is reviewed. The special case of adiabatic compression in tokamaks is considered in more detail, including a discussion of the equilibrium, scaling laws, and heating effects. (ii) The ATC (Adiabatic Toroidal Compressor) device which was completed in May 1972, is described in detail. Compression of a tokamak plasma across a static toroidal field is studied in this device. The device is designed to produce a pre-compression plasma with a major radius of 17 cm, toroidal field of 20 kG, and current of 90 kA. The compression leads to a plasma with major radius of 38 cm and minor radius of 10 cm. Scaling laws imply a density increase of a factor 6, temperature increase of a factor 3, and current increase of a factor 2.4. An additional feature of ATC is that it is a large tokamak which operates without a copper shell. (iii) Data which show that the expected MHD behavior is largely observed is presented and discussed. (U.S.)

  5. Compressibility effects in planar wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Jean-Pierre; Hussain, Fazle; Wu, Xiaohua

    2010-11-01

    Far-field, temporally evolving planar wakes are studied by DNS to evaluate the effect of compressibility on the flow. A high-order predictor-corrector code was developed and fully validated against canonical compressible test cases. In this study, wake simulations are performed at constant Reynolds number for three different Mach numbers: Ma= 0.2, 0.8 and 1.2. The domain is doubly periodic with a non-reflecting boundary in the cross-flow and is initialized by a randomly perturbed laminar profile. The compressibility of the flow modifies the observed structures which show greater three-dimensionality. A self-similar period develops in which the square of the wake half-width increase linearly with time and the Reynolds stress statistics at various times collapse using proper scaling parameters. The growth-rate increases with increasing compressibility of the flow: an observation which is substantiated by experimental results but is in stark contrast with the high-speed mixing-layer. As the growth-rate is related to the mixing ability of the flow, the impact of compressibility is of fundamental importance. Therefore, we seek an explanation of the modified growth-rate by investigating the turbulent kinetic energy equation. From the analysis, it can be conjectured that the pressure-strain term might play a role in the modified growth-rate.

  6. Radiologic image compression -- A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.; Huang, H.K.; Zaremba, L.; Gooden, D.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of radiologic image compression is to reduce the data volume of and to achieve a lot bit rate in the digital representation of radiologic images without perceived loss of image quality. However, the demand for transmission bandwidth and storage space in the digital radiology environment, especially picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and teleradiology, and the proliferating use of various imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine, computed radiography, and digital subtraction angiography, continue to outstrip the capabilities of existing technologies. The availability of lossy coding techniques for clinical diagnoses further implicates many complex legal and regulatory issues. This paper reviews the recent progress of lossless and lossy radiologic image compression and presents the legal challenges of using lossy compression of medical records. To do so, the authors first describe the fundamental concepts of radiologic imaging and digitization. Then, the authors examine current compression technology in the field of medical imaging and discuss important regulatory policies and legal questions facing the use of compression in this field. The authors conclude with a summary of future challenges and research directions. 170 refs

  7. Red Seaweed (Hypnea Bryodies and Melanothamnus Somalensis) Extracts Counteracting Azoxymethane-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waly, Mostafa Ibrahim; Al Alawi, Ahmed Ali; Al Marhoobi, Insaaf Mohammad; Rahman, Mohammad Shafiur

    2016-12-01

    Background: Azoxymethane (AOM) is a well-known colon cancer-inducing agent in experimental animals via mechanisms that include oxidative stress in rat colon and liver tissue. Few studies have investigated AOM-induced oxidative stress in rat liver tissue. Red seaweeds of the genera Hypnea Bryodies and Melanothamnus Somalensis are rich in polyphenolic compounds that may suppress cancer through antioxidant properties, yet limited research has been carried out to investigate their anti-carcinogenic and antioxidant influence against AOM-induced oxidative stress in rat liver. Objective: This study aims to determine protective effects of red seaweed (Hypnea Bryodies and Melanothamnus Somalensis) extracts against AOM-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress. Materials and Methods: Sprague–Dawley rats received intraperitoneal injections of AOM, 15 mg/kg body weight, once a week for two consecutive weeks and then orally administered red seaweed (100 mg/kg body-weight) extracts for sixteen weeks. At the end of the experiment all animals were overnight fasted then sacrificed and blood and liver tissues were collected. Results: AOM treatment significantly decreased serum liver markers and induced hepatic oxidative stress as evidenced by increased liver tissue homogenate levels of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde, decreased total antioxidant capacity and glutathione, and inhibition of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase and superoxide dismutase). Both red seaweed extracts abolished the AOM-associated oxidative stress and protected against liver injury as evidenced by increased serum levels of liver function markers. In addition, histological findings confirmed protective effects of the two red seaweed extracts against AOM-induced liver injury. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that red seaweed (Hypnea Bryodies and Melanothamnus Somalensis) extracts counteracted oxidative stress-induced hepatotoxicity in a

  8. Cardiac impairment in rabbits fed a high-fat diet is counteracted by dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragno, M; Meineri, G; Vercellinatto, I; Bardini, P; Raimondo, S; Peiretti, P G; Vercelli, A; Alloatti, G; Tomasinelli, C E; Danni, O; Boccuzzi, G

    2009-07-03

    The biochemical and structural cardiac oxidative-dependent damage induced by high-fat (HF) diet was examined in a rabbit model, together with the role of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in contrasting tissue damage. New Zealand white rabbits fed a HF diet supplemented or not with DHEA (0.02%) were utilized for 12 weeks. Oxidative stress, inflammatory and necrosis parameters, fatty deposition, heavy-chain myosin isoforms (MHC) expression and papillary muscle functionality were examined in the left ventricle of rabbits. Rabbits fed a HF diet that showed hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia together with increase of oxidative stress and of advanced end-glycation product levels have been observed. Concerning pro-inflammatory insults, there was increased p65-NFkB activation and increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha and C-reactive protein expressions. Cellular damage induced by the HF diet was detected through the switch of expression of MHC isoforms, indicating impairment of cardiac contractility, confirmed by altered of basal parameters of papillary muscle functionality. Rabbits fed the HF diet supplemented with DHEA showed a partial reduction of oxidative stress and the inflammatory state. Cardiac necrosis, the shift of MHC isoforms, and cardiac functionality, were also partially counteracted. Rabbits fed with a HF diet showed a beneficial effect when low-dose DHEA was added to the diet. The steroid, without affecting high plasma glucose level or insulin resistance, restored oxidative balance, lowered lipid levels and inflammation insults, preventing cellular and functional alterations of cardiac tissue and thus delaying the onset of cardiac damage.

  9. Counteracting ammonia inhibition in anaerobic digestion by removal with a hollow fiber membrane contactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterböck, B; Ortner, M; Haider, R; Fuchs, W

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the feasibility of membrane contactors for continuous ammonia (NH₃-N) removal in an anaerobic digestion process and to counteract ammonia inhibition. Two laboratory anaerobic digesters were fed slaughterhouse wastes with ammonium (NH₄⁺) concentrations ranging from 6 to 7.4 g/L. One reactor was used as reference reactor without any ammonia removal. In the second reactor, a hollow fiber membrane contactor module was used for continuous ammonia removal. The hollow fiber membranes were directly submerged into the digestate of the anaerobic reactor. Sulfuric acid was circulated in the lumen as an adsorbent solution. Using this set up, the NH₄⁺-N concentration in the membrane reactor was significantly reduced. Moreover the extraction of ammonia lowered the pH by 0.2 units. In combination that led to a lowering of the free NH₃-N concentration by about 70%. Ammonia inhibition in the reference reactor was observed when the concentration exceeded 6 g/L NH₄⁺-N or 1-1.2 g/L NH₃-N. In contrast, in the membrane reactor the volatile fatty acid concentration, an indicator for process stability, was much lower and a higher gas yield and better degradation was observed. The chosen approach offers an appealing technology to remove ammonia directly from media having high concentrations of solids and it can help to improve process efficiency in anaerobic digestion of ammonia rich substrates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Muscle cell atrophy induced by HSP gene silencing was counteracted by HSP overexpression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Inho; Lee, Joo-Hee; Nikawa, Takeshi; Gwag, Taesik; Park, Kyoungsook; Park, Junsoo

    Heat shock proteins (HSP), as molecular chaperones, are known to assist protein quality control under various stresses. Although overexpression of HSP70 was found to contribute to muscle size retention under an unloading condition, it remains largely unclarified whether muscle atrophy is induced by active suppression of HSP expression. In this study, we pre-treated Hsp70 siRNA to rat L6 cells for the HSP gene silencing, and determined myotube diameter, HSP72 expression and anabolic and catabolic signaling activities in the absence or presence of triterpene celastrol (CEL), the HSP70 inducer. Relative to a negative control (NC), muscle cell diameter was reduced 0.89-fold in the siRNA-treated group, increased 1.2-fold in the CEL-treated group and retained at the size of NC in the siRNA+CEL group. HSP72 expression was decreased 0.35-fold by siRNA whereas the level was increased 6- to 8-fold in the CEL and siRNA+CEL groups. Expression of FoxO3 and atrogin-1 was increased 1.8- to 4.8-fold by siRNA, which was abolished by CEL treatment. Finally, phosphorylation of Akt1, S6K and ERK1/2 was not affected by siRNA, but was elevated 2- to 6-fold in the CEL and siRNA+CEL groups. Taken together, HSP downregulation by Hsp gene silencing led to muscle cell atrophy principally via increases in catabolic activities and that such anti-atrophic effect was counteracted by HSP overexpression.

  11. Dietary curcumin supplementation counteracts reduction in levels of molecules involved in energy homeostasis after brain trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Zhuang, Y; Ying, Z; Wu, A; Gomez-Pinilla, F

    2009-07-21

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is followed by an energy crisis that compromises the capacity of the brain to cope with challenges, and often reduces cognitive ability. New research indicates that events that regulate energy homeostasis crucially impact synaptic function and this can compromise the capacity of the brain to respond to challenges during the acute and chronic phases of TBI. The goal of the present study is to determine the influence of the phenolic yellow curry pigment curcumin on molecular systems involved with the monitoring, balance, and transduction of cellular energy, in the hippocampus of animals exposed to mild fluid percussion injury (FPI). Young adult rats were exposed to a regular diet (RD) without or with 500 ppm curcumin (Cur) for four weeks, before an FPI was performed. The rats were assigned to four groups: RD/Sham, Cur/Sham, RD/FPI, and Cur/FPI. We found that FPI decreased the levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase (uMtCK) and cytochrome c oxidase II (COX-II) in RD/FPI rats as compared to the RD/sham rats. The curcumin diet counteracted the effects of FPI and elevated the levels of AMPK, uMtCK, COX-II in Cur/FPI rats as compared to RD/sham rats. In addition, in the Cur/sham rats, AMPK and uMtCK increased compared to the RD/sham. Results show the potential of curcumin to regulate molecules involved in energy homeostasis following TBI. These studies may foster a new line of therapeutic treatments for TBI patients by endogenous upregulation of molecules important for functional recovery.

  12. Housing in Pyramid Counteracts Neuroendocrine and Oxidative Stress Caused by Chronic Restraint in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Surekha Bhat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The space within the great pyramid and its smaller replicas is believed to have an antistress effect. Research has shown that the energy field within the pyramid can protect the hippocampal neurons of mice from stress-induced atrophy and also reduce neuroendocrine stress, oxidative stress and increase antioxidant defence in rats. In this study, we have, for the first time, attempted to study the antistress effects of pyramid exposure on the status of cortisol level, oxidative damage and antioxidant status in rats during chronic restraint stress. Adult female Wistar rats were divided into four groups as follows: normal controls (NC housed in home cage and left in the laboratory; restrained rats (with three subgroups subject to chronic restraint stress by placing in a wire mesh restrainer for 6 h per day for 14 days, the restrained controls (RC having their restrainers kept in the laboratory; restrained pyramid rats (RP being kept in the pyramid; and restrained square box rats (RS in the square box during the period of restraint stress everyday. Erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA and plasma cortisol levels were significantly increased and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione (GSH levels, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and superoxide dismutase (SOD activities were significantly decreased in RC and RS rats as compared to NC. However, these parameters were maintained to near normal levels in RP rats which showed significantly decreased erythrocyte MDA and plasma cortisol and significantly increased erythrocyte GSH levels, erythrocyte GSH-Px and SOD activities when compared with RS rats. The results showed that housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

  13. Exercise counteracts fatty liver disease in rats fed on fructose-rich diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voltarelli Fabrício A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to analyze the effects of exercise at the aerobic/anaerobic transition on the markers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, insulin sensitivity and the blood chemistry of rats kept on a fructose-rich diet. Methods We separated 48 Wistar rats into two groups according to diet: a control group (balanced diet AIN-93 G and a fructose-rich diet group (60% fructose. The animals were tested for maximal lactate-steady state (MLSS in order to identify the aerobic/anaerobic metabolic transition during swimming exercises at 28 and 90 days of age. One third of the animals of each group were submitted to swimming training at an intensity equivalent to the individual MLSS for 1 hours/day, 5 days/week from 28 to 120 days (early protocol. Another third were submitted to the training from 90 to 120 days (late protocol, and the others remained sedentary. The main assays performed included an insulin tolerance test (ITT and tests of serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT] and aspartate aminotransferase [AST] activities, serum triglyceride concentrations [TG] and liver total lipid concentrations. Results The fructose-fed rats showed decreased insulin sensitivity, and the late-exercise training protocol counteracted this alteration. There was no difference between the groups in levels of serum ALT, whereas AST and liver lipids increased in the fructose-fed sedentary group when compared with the other groups. Serum triglycerides concentrations were higher in the fructose-fed trained groups when compared with the corresponding control group. Conclusions The late-training protocol was effective in restoring insulin sensitivity to acceptable standards. Considering the markers here evaluated, both training protocols were successful in preventing the emergence of non-alcoholic fatty liver status disease.

  14. Selenium-Induced Toxicity Is Counteracted by Sulfur in Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Tian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is an essential micronutrient for humans. Increasing Se content in food crops offers an effective approach to enhance the consumption of Se in human diets. A thoroughly understanding of the effects of Se on plant growth is important for Se biofortification in food crops. Given that Se is an analog of sulfur (S and can be toxic to plants, its effect on plant growth is expected to be greatly affected by S nutrition. However, this remains to be further understood. Here, we evaluated the influence of Se treatments on broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica growth when S was withheld from the growth nutrient solution. We found that Se was highly toxic to plants when S nutrition was poor. In contrast to Se treatments with adequate S nutrition that slightly reduced broccoli growth, the same concentration of Se treatments without S supplementation dramatically reduced plant sizes. Higher Se toxicity was observed with selenate than selenite under low S nutrition. We examined the bases underlying the toxicity. We discovered that the high Se toxicity in low S nutrition was specifically associated with an increased ratio of Se in proteins verse total Se level, enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species, elevated lipid peroxidation causing increased cell membrane damage, and reduced antioxidant enzyme activities. Se toxicity could be counteracted with increased supplementation of S, which is likely through decreasing non-specific integration of Se into proteins and altering the redox system. The present study provides information for better understanding of Se toxicity and shows that adequate S nutrition is important to prevent Se toxicity during biofortification of crops by Se fertilization.

  15. Sulforaphane counteracts aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer driven by dysregulated Cx43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiyao; Isayev, Orkhan; Heilmann, Katharina; Schoensiegel, Frank; Liu, Li; Nessling, Michelle; Richter, Karsten; Labsch, Sabrina; Nwaeburu, Clifford C.; Mattern, Juergen; Gladkich, Jury; Giese, Nathalia; Werner, Jens; Schemmer, Peter; Gross, Wolfgang; Gebhard, Martha M.; Gerhauser, Clarissa; Schaefer, Michael; Herr, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The extreme aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has been associated with blocked gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). We examined whether disturbed GJIC is responsible for a CSC phenotype in established and primary cancer cells and patient tissue of PDA using interdisciplinary methods based in physiology, cell and molecular biology, histology and epigenetics. Flux of fluorescent dyes and gemcitabine through gap junctions (GJs) was intact in less aggressive cells but not in highly malignant cells with morphological dysfunctional GJs. Among several connexins, only Cx43 was expressed on the cell surface of less aggressive and GJIC-competent cells, whereas Cx43 surface expression was absent in highly malignant, E-cadherin-negative and GJIC-incompetent cells. The levels of total Cx43 protein and Cx43 phosphorylated at Ser368 and Ser279/282 were high in normal tissue but low to absent in malignant tissue. si-RNA-mediated inhibition of Cx43 expression in GJIC-competent cells prevented GJIC and induced colony formation and the expression of stem cell-related factors. The bioactive substance sulforaphane enhanced Cx43 and E-cadherin levels, inhibited the CSC markers c-Met and CD133, improved the functional morphology of GJs and enhanced GJIC. Sulforaphane altered the phosphorylation of several kinases and their substrates and inhibition of GSK3, JNK and PKC prevented sulforaphane-induced CX43 expression. The sulforaphane-mediated expression of Cx43 was not correlated with enhanced Cx43 RNA expression, acetylated histone binding and Cx43 promoter de-methylation, suggesting that posttranslational phosphorylation is the dominant regulatory mechanism. Together, the absence of Cx43 prevents GJIC and enhances aggressiveness, whereas sulforaphane counteracts this process, and our findings highlight dietary co-treatment as a viable treatment option for PDA. PMID:24742583

  16. MECHANISMS OF COUNTERACTING FLAP-VALVE BRONCHIAL OBSTRUCTION IN CASE OF OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Tetenev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research goal was to formulate and substantiate the hypothesis explaining support for an expiratory air flow in case of pulmonary emphysema. The research method consisted in comparing the mechanical properties of lungs in practically healthy individuals (37 individuals, mean age – (30.4 ± 1.7 y.o. and COPD patients with pronounced lung emphysema (30 patients, mean age – (52.1 ± 2.3 y.o. as well as those of isolated normal lungs (n = 14 and isolated lungs of patients who died of COPD (n = 5. Pulmo-nary mechanics was studied via the simultaneous measurement of transpulmonary pressure and lung ven-tilation volume. General lung hysteresis and elastic lung hysteresis were calculated. The mechanical properties of isolated lungs were studied using passive ventilation under the Donders bell. The air flow was interrupted in order to measure alveolar pressure and develop an elastic lung hysteresis curve. Pres-sure in the Donders bell was changed by means of a special pump in automatic and manual modes. The research has not revealed any fundamental differences between the mechanical properties of the normal and emphysematous lungs. A minimum increase in the pressure inside the Donders bell over atmospheric pressure used to stop air ejection in both normal and the emphysematous lungs as the result of flap-valve bronchial obstruction. In living beings, air is ejected from lungs with an increase in pressure under the conditions of forced expiration. Pressure increases up to (38.6 ± 2.71 cm H2O in healthy individuals and up to (20.5 ± 1.86 cm H2O in COPD patients. Probably, an expiratory air flow is supported by active expiratory bronchial dilatation that counteracts flap-valve bronchial obstruction. The hypothesis is based on the confirmed ability of the lungs to perform inspiratory actions (in addition to the action of respiratory muscles and the theory of mechanical lung activity.

  17. Effects of counteracting external valgus moment on lateral tibial cartilage contact conditions and tibial rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriram, Duraisamy; Parween, Rizuwana; Lee, Yee Han Dave; Subburaj, Karupppasamy

    2017-07-01

    Knee osteoarthritis that prevalently occurs at the medial compartment is a progressive chronic disorder affecting the articular cartilage of the knee joint, and lead to loss of joint functionality. Valgus braces have been used as a treatment procedure to unload the medial compartment for patients with medial osteoarthritis. Valgus braces through the application of counteracting external valgus moment shift the load from medial compartment towards the lateral compartment. Previous biomechanical studies focused only on the changes in varus moments before and after wearing the brace. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of opposing external valgus moment applied by knee braces on the lateral tibial cartilage contact conditions using a 3D finite element model of the knee joint. Finite element simulations were performed on the knee joint model without and with the application of opposing valgus moment to mimic the unbraced and braced conditions. Lateral tibial cartilage contact pressures and contact area, and tibial rotation (varus-valgus and internal-external) were estimated for the complete walking gait cycle. The opposing valgus moment increased the maximum contact pressure and contact area on the lateral tibial cartilage compared to the normal gait moment. A peak contact pressure of 8.2 MPa and maximum cartilage loaded area of 28% (loaded cartilage nodes) on the lateral cartilage with the application of external valgus moment were induced at 50% of the gait cycle. The results show that the use of opposing valgus moment may significantly increase the maximum contact pressures and contact area on the lateral tibial cartilage and increases the risk of articular cartilage damage on the lateral compartment.

  18. Humanin Specifically Interacts with Amyloid-β Oligomers and Counteracts Their in vivo Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Margherita; Stravalaci, Matteo; Beeg, Marten; Rossi, Alessandro; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Salmona, Mario; Gobbi, Marco; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Diomede, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    The 24-residue peptide humanin (HN) has been proposed as a peptide-based inhibitor able to interact directly with amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers and interfere with the formation and/or biological properties of toxic Aβ species. When administered exogenously, HN, or its synthetic S14G-derivative (HNG), exerted multiple cytoprotective effects, counteracting the Aβ-induced toxicity. Whether these peptides interact directly with Aβ, particularly with the soluble oligomeric assemblies, remains largely unknown. We here investigated the ability of HN and HNG to interact directly with highly aggregating Aβ42, and interfere with the formation and toxicity of its oligomers. Experiments were run in cell-free conditions and in vivo in a transgenic C. elegans strain in which the Aβ toxicity was specifically due to oligomeric species. Thioflavin-T assay indicated that both HN and HNG delay the formation and reduce the final amount of Aβ42 fibrils. In vitro surface plasmon resonance studies indicated that they interact with Aβ42 oligomers favoring the formation of amorphous larger assemblies, observed with turbidity and electron microscopy. In vivo studies indicated that both HN and HNG decrease the relative abundance of A11-positive prefibrillar oligomers as well as OC-positive fibrillar oligomers and had similar protective effects. However, while HN possibly decreased the oligomers by promoting their assembly into larger aggregates, the reduction of oligomers caused by HNG can be ascribed to a marked decrease of the total Aβ levels, likely the consequence of the HNG-induced overexpression of the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin. These findings provide information on the mechanisms underlying the anti-oligomeric effects of HN and HNG and illustrate the role of S14G substitution in regulating the in vivo mechanism of action.

  19. The Deubiquitylase USP2 Regulates the LDLR Pathway by Counteracting the E3-Ubiquitin Ligase IDOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jessica Kristine; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Avagliano Trezza, Rossella; Heride, Claire; Urbe, Sylvie; Distel, Ben; Zelcer, Noam

    2016-02-05

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) is a central determinant of circulating LDL-cholesterol and as such subject to tight regulation. Recent studies and genetic evidence implicate the inducible degrader of the LDLR (IDOL) as a regulator of LDLR abundance and of circulating levels of LDL-cholesterol in humans. Acting as an E3-ubiquitin ligase, IDOL promotes ubiquitylation and subsequent lysosomal degradation of the LDLR. Consequently, inhibition of IDOL-mediated degradation of the LDLR represents a potential strategy to increase hepatic LDL-cholesterol clearance. To establish whether deubiquitylases counteract IDOL-mediated ubiquitylation and degradation of the LDLR. Using a genetic screening approach, we identify the ubiquitin-specific protease 2 (USP2) as a post-transcriptional regulator of IDOL-mediated LDLR degradation. We demonstrate that both USP2 isoforms, USP2-69 and USP2-45, interact with IDOL and promote its deubiquitylation. IDOL deubiquitylation requires USP2 enzymatic activity and leads to a marked stabilization of IDOL protein. Paradoxically, this also markedly attenuates IDOL-mediated degradation of the LDLR and the ability of IDOL to limit LDL uptake into cells. Conversely, loss of USP2 reduces LDLR protein in an IDOL-dependent manner and limits LDL uptake. We identify a tri-partite complex encompassing IDOL, USP2, and LDLR and demonstrate that in this context USP2 promotes deubiquitylation of the LDLR and prevents its degradation. Our findings identify USP2 as a novel regulator of lipoprotein clearance owing to its ability to control ubiquitylation-dependent degradation of the LDLR by IDOL. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Intravitreal NGF administration counteracts retina degeneration after permanent carotid artery occlusion in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Sordi Nadia

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF is produced by different cell types in the anterior and posterior eye, exerting a neuroprotective role in the adult life. The visual system is highly sensitive to NGF and the retina and optic nerve provides suitable subjects for the study of central nervous system degeneration. The model of bilateral carotid occlusion (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO is a well-established model for chronic brain hypoperfusion leading to brain capillary pathology, to retina and optic nerve degeneration. In order to study if a single intravitreal injection of NGF protects the retina and the optic nerve from degeneration during systemic circulatory diseases, we investigated morphological and molecular changes occurring in the retina and optic nerve of adult rats at different time-points (8, 30 and 75 days after bilateral carotid occlusion. Results We demonstrated that a single intravitreal injection of NGF (5 μg/3 μl performed 24 hours after 2VO ligation has a long-lasting protective effect on retina and optic nerve degeneration. NGF counteracts retinal ganglion cells degeneration by early affecting Bax/Bcl-2 balance- and c-jun- expression (at 8 days after 2VO. A single intravitreal NGF injection regulates the demyelination/remyelination balance after ischemic injury in the optic nerve toward remyelination (at 75 days after 2VO, as indicated by the MBP expression regulation, thus preventing optic nerve atrophy and ganglion cells degeneration. At 8 days, NGF does not modify 2VO-induced alteration in VEFG and related receptors mRNA expression. Conclusion The protective effect of exogenous NGF during this systemic circulatory disease seems to occur also by strengthening the effect of endogenous NGF, the synthesis of which is increased by vascular defect and also by the mechanical lesion associated with NGF or even vehicle intraocular delivery.

  1. Action plan to counteract soil acidification and to promote sustainable use of forest land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-04-01

    This report consists of the National Board of Forestry's proposals on a plan to counteract soil acidification and to promote sustainable use of forest land. In 1989 the government requested the National Board of Forestry to start experimental activities to find measures to counteract soil acidification. In 1997 the Board presented a proposal for liming and vitalisation of forest land. An Environmental Impact Assessment of the proposal was submitted in 1999, after which a revision of the plan was started. In order to obtain better basic knowledge of the situation, the Board of Forestry commissioned nine reports that dealt with different aspects of soil acidification and corrective measures. Major emphasis has also been placed on the national environmental quality goals and the national plan for liming of lakes and waterways. The report is divided into three parts. The first part explains the Board of Forestry's proposals on measures to counteract soil acidification, and the second part, the description of the situation today, presents the conditions for the design of the plan such as political goals and guidelines that affect the plan and its design, the knowledge available today on soil acidification, its effects, possibilities for recovery, and possible measures that can be used. The third and final part contains brief summaries of the responses to the plan when circulated for comments. The action plan allows a return of the buffering capacity of the most acidified forest land, mainly in southern and southwestern Sweden. The Board of Forestry proposes that the spreading of ashes and lime is done within drainage areas where the natural recovery is assessed to be slow and insufficient, and where the leaching of toxic aluminium from forest land is hazardous to the aquatic ecosystem. In the assessments made by the Board, between 200,000 and 350,000 hectares of forest land may require measures of this kind. The Board of Forestry is of the opinion that a three

  2. Photon level chemical classification using digital compressive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, David S; Buzzard, Gregery T; Lucier, Bradley J; Wang, Ping; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2012-11-28

    A key bottleneck to high-speed chemical analysis, including hyperspectral imaging and monitoring of dynamic chemical processes, is the time required to collect and analyze hyperspectral data. Here we describe, both theoretically and experimentally, a means of greatly speeding up the collection of such data using a new digital compressive detection strategy. Our results demonstrate that detecting as few as ~10 Raman scattered photons (in as little time as ~30 μs) can be sufficient to positively distinguish chemical species. This is achieved by measuring the Raman scattered light intensity transmitted through programmable binary optical filters designed to minimize the error in the chemical classification (or concentration) variables of interest. The theoretical results are implemented and validated using a digital compressive detection instrument that incorporates a 785 nm diode excitation laser, digital micromirror spatial light modulator, and photon counting photodiode detector. Samples consisting of pairs of liquids with different degrees of spectral overlap (including benzene/acetone and n-heptane/n-octane) are used to illustrate how the accuracy of the present digital compressive detection method depends on the correlation coefficients of the corresponding spectra. Comparisons of measured and predicted chemical classification score plots, as well as linear and non-linear discriminant analyses, demonstrate that this digital compressive detection strategy is Poisson photon noise limited and outperforms total least squares-based compressive detection with analog filters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Prediction of Peak Back Compressive Forces as a Function of Lifting Speed and Compressive Forces at Lift Origin and Destination - A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasey O. Greenland

    2011-09-01

    Conclusion: SODA under-predict both static and dynamic peak back-compressive force values. Peak values are highly predictable and could be readily determined using back-compressive force assessments at the origin and destination of a lifting task. This could be valuable for enhancing job design and analysis in the workplace and for large-scale studies where a full analysis of each lifting task is not feasible.

  4. Success Counteracting Tobacco Company Interference in Thailand: An Example of FCTC Implementation for Low- and Middle-income Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. Hamann

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Transnational tobacco companies (TTCs interfere regularly in policymaking in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. The WHO Framework Convention for Tobacco Control provides mechanisms and guidance for dealing with TTC interference, but many countries still face ‘how to’ challenges of implementation. For more than two decades, Thailand’s public health community has been developing a system for identifying and counteracting strategies TTCs use to derail, delay and undermine tobacco control policymaking. Consequently, Thailand has already implemented most of the FCTC guidelines for counteracting TTC interference. In this study, our aims are to describe strategies TTCs have used in Thailand to interfere in policymaking, and to examine how the public health community in Thailand has counteracted TTC interference. We analyzed information reported by three groups with a stake in tobacco control policies: Thai tobacco control advocates, TTCs, and international tobacco control experts. To identify TTC viewpoints and strategies, we also extracted information from internal tobacco industry documents. We synthesized these data and identified six core strategies TTCs use to interfere in tobacco control policymaking: (1 doing business with ‘two faces’, (2 seeking to influence people in high places, (3 ‘buying’ advocates in grassroots organizations, (4 putting up a deceptive front, (5 intimidation, and (6 undermining controls on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship. We present three case examples showing where TTCs have employed multiple interference strategies simultaneously, and showing how Thai tobacco control advocates have successfully counteracted those strategies by: (1 conducting vigilant surveillance, (2 excluding tobacco companies from policymaking, (3 restricting tobacco company sales, (4 sustaining pressure, and (5 dedicating resources to the effective enforcement of regulations. Policy implications from this study are

  5. Correlations between quality indexes of chest compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Ling; Yan, Li; Huang, Su-Fang; Bai, Xiang-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a kind of emergency treatment for cardiopulmonary arrest, and chest compression is the most important and necessary part of CPR. The American Heart Association published the new Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care in 2010 and demanded for better performance of chest compression practice, especially in compression depth and rate. The current study was to explore the relationship of quality indexes of chest compression and to identify the key points in chest compression training and practice. Totally 219 healthcare workers accepted chest compression training by using Laerdal ACLS advanced life support resuscitation model. The quality indexes of chest compression, including compression hands placement, compression rate, compression depth, and chest wall recoil as well as self-reported fatigue time were monitored by the Laerdal Computer Skills and Reporting System. The quality of chest compression was related to the gender of the compressor. The indexes in males, including self-reported fatigue time, the accuracy of compression depth and the compression rate, the accuracy of compression rate, were higher than those in females. However, the accuracy of chest recoil was higher in females than in males. The quality indexes of chest compression were correlated with each other. The self-reported fatigue time was related to all the indexes except the compression rate. It is necessary to offer CPR training courses regularly. In clinical practice, it might be better to change the practitioner before fatigue, especially for females or weak practitioners. In training projects, more attention should be paid to the control of compression rate, in order to delay the fatigue, guarantee enough compression depth and improve the quality of chest compression.

  6. Lossless Compression of Broadcast Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Bo; Eriksen, N.; Faber, E.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate several techniques for lossless and near-lossless compression of broadcast video.The emphasis is placed on the emerging international standard for compression of continous-tone still images, JPEG-LS, due to its excellent compression performance and moderatecomplexity. Except for one...... cannot be expected to code losslessly at a rate of 125 Mbit/s. We investigate the rate and quality effects of quantization using standard JPEG-LS quantization and two new techniques: visual quantization and trellis quantization. Visual quantization is not part of baseline JPEG-LS, but is applicable...... in the framework of JPEG-LS. Visual tests show that this quantization technique gives much better quality than standard JPEG-LS quantization. Trellis quantization is a process by which the original image is altered in such a way as to make lossless JPEG-LS encoding more effective. For JPEG-LS and visual...

  7. Premixed autoignition in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduri, Aditya; Kolla, Hemanth; Krisman, Alexander; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    Prediction of chemical ignition delay in an autoignition process is critical in combustion systems like compression ignition engines and gas turbines. Often, ignition delay times measured in simple homogeneous experiments or homogeneous calculations are not representative of actual autoignition processes in complex turbulent flows. This is due the presence of turbulent mixing which results in fluctuations in thermodynamic properties as well as chemical composition. In the present study the effect of fluctuations of thermodynamic variables on the ignition delay is quantified with direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence. A premixed syngas-air mixture is used to remove the effects of inhomogeneity in the chemical composition. Preliminary results show a significant spatial variation in the ignition delay time. We analyze the topology of autoignition kernels and identify the influence of extreme events resulting from compressibility and intermittency. The dependence of ignition delay time on Reynolds and turbulent Mach numbers is also quantified. Supported by Basic Energy Sciences, Dept of Energy, United States.

  8. Compressive sensing and hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barducci, A.; Guzzi, D.; Lastri, C.; Marcoionni, P.; Nardino, V.; Pippi, I.

    2017-11-01

    Compressive sensing (sampling) is a novel technology and science domain that exploits the option to sample radiometric and spectroscopic signals at a lower sampling rate than the one dictated by the traditional theory of ideal sampling. In the paper some general concepts and characteristics regarding the use of compressive sampling in instruments devoted to Earth observation is discussed. The remotely sensed data is assumed to be constituted by sampled images collected by a passive device in the optical spectral range from the visible up to the thermal infrared, with possible spectral discrimination ability, e.g. hyperspectral imaging. According to recent investigations, compressive sensing necessarily employs a signal multiplexing architecture, which in spite of traditional expectations originates a significant SNR disadvantage.

  9. Rectal perforation by compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Jin

    2017-07-01

    As the use of compressed air in industrial work has increased, so has the risk of associated pneumatic injury from its improper use. However, damage of large intestine caused by compressed air is uncommon. Herein a case of pneumatic rupture of the rectum is described. The patient was admitted to the Emergency Room complaining of abdominal pain and distension. His colleague triggered a compressed air nozzle over his buttock. On arrival, vital signs were stable but physical examination revealed peritoneal irritation and marked distension of the abdomen. Computed tomography showed a large volume of air in the peritoneal cavity and subcutaneous emphysema at the perineum. A rectal perforation was found at laparotomy and the Hartmann procedure was performed.

  10. Compressibility of rotating black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Interpreting the cosmological constant as a pressure, whose thermodynamically conjugate variable is a volume, modifies the first law of black hole thermodynamics. Properties of the resulting thermodynamic volume are investigated: the compressibility and the speed of sound of the black hole are derived in the case of nonpositive cosmological constant. The adiabatic compressibility vanishes for a nonrotating black hole and is maximal in the extremal case--comparable with, but still less than, that of a cold neutron star. A speed of sound v s is associated with the adiabatic compressibility, which is equal to c for a nonrotating black hole and decreases as the angular momentum is increased. An extremal black hole has v s 2 =0.9 c 2 when the cosmological constant vanishes, and more generally v s is bounded below by c/√(2).

  11. Quality and loudness judgments for music subjected to compression limiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croghan, Naomi B H; Arehart, Kathryn H; Kates, James M

    2012-08-01

    Dynamic-range compression (DRC) is used in the music industry to maximize loudness. The amount of compression applied to commercial recordings has increased over time due to a motivating perspective that louder music is always preferred. In contrast to this viewpoint, artists and consumers have argued that using large amounts of DRC negatively affects the quality of music. However, little research evidence has supported the claims of either position. The present study investigated how DRC affects the perceived loudness and sound quality of recorded music. Rock and classical music samples were peak-normalized and then processed using different amounts of DRC. Normal-hearing listeners rated the processed and unprocessed samples on overall loudness, dynamic range, pleasantness, and preference, using a scaled paired-comparison procedure in two conditions: un-equalized, in which the loudness of the music samples varied, and loudness-equalized, in which loudness differences were minimized. Results indicated that a small amount of compression was preferred in the un-equalized condition, but the highest levels of compression were generally detrimental to quality, whether loudness was equalized or varied. These findings are contrary to the "louder is better" mentality in the music industry and suggest that more conservative use of DRC may be preferred for commercial music.

  12. Coronal heating by Alfven waves dissipation in compressible nonuniform media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malara, Francesco; Primavera, Leonardo; Veltri, Pierluigi

    1996-01-01

    The possibility to produce small scales and then to efficiently dissipate energy has been studied by Malara et al. [1992b] in the case of MHD disturbances propagating in an weakly dissipative incompressible and inhomogeneous medium, for a strictly 2D geometry. We extend this work to include both compressibility and the third component for vector quantities. Numerical simulations show that, when an Alfven wave propagates in a compressible nonuniform medium, the two dynamical effects responsible for the small scales formation in the incompressible case are still at work: energy pinching and phase-mixing. These effects give rise to the formation of compressible perturbations (fast and slow waves or a static entropy wave). Some of these compressive fluctuations are subject to the steepening of the wave front and become shock waves, which are extremely efficient in dissipating their energy, their dissipation being independent of the Reynolds number. Rough estimates of the typical times the various dynamical processes take to produce small scales show that these times are consistent with those required to dissipate inside the solar corona the energy of Alfven waves of photospheric origin

  13. Excessive chest compression rate is associated with insufficient compression depth in prehospital cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; De Regge, Melissa; Vansteelandt, Kristof; De Smet, Jeroen; Annaert, Emmanuel; Lemoyne, Sabine; Kalmar, Alain F.; Calle, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and goal of study: The relationship between chest compression rate and compression depth is unknown. In order to characterise this relationship, we performed an observational study in prehospital cardiac arrest patients. We hypothesised that faster compressions are associated with

  14. Role of compressibility on driven magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.; Hayashi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Horiuchi, R.; Tanaka, M.; Sawairi, N.; Kusano, K.

    1991-08-01

    Whether it is induced by an ideal (current driven) instability or by an external force, plasma flow causes a change in the magnetic field configuration and often gives rise to a current intensification locally, thereby a fast driven reconnection being driven there. Many dramatic phenomena in magnetically confined plasmas such as magnetospheric substorms, solar flares, MHD self-organization and tokamak sawtooth crash, may be attributed to this fast driven reconnection. Using a fourth order MHD simulation code it is confirmed that compressibility of the plasma plays a crucial role in leading to a fast (MHD time scale) driven reconnection. This indicates that the incompressible representation is not always applicable to the study of a global dynamical behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. (author)

  15. Flux Limiter Lattice Boltzmann for Compressible Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feng; Li Yingjun; Xu Aiguo; Zhang Guangcai

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new flux limiter scheme with the splitting technique is successfully incorporated into a multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for shacked compressible flows. The proposed flux limiter scheme is efficient in decreasing the artificial oscillations and numerical diffusion around the interface. Due to the kinetic nature, some interface problems being difficult to handle at the macroscopic level can be modeled more naturally through the LB method. Numerical simulations for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability show that with the new model the computed interfaces are smoother and more consistent with physical analysis. The growth rates of bubble and spike present a satisfying agreement with the theoretical predictions and other numerical simulations. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  16. Ammonium azide under hydrostatic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landerville, A. C.; Steele, B. A.; Oleynik, I. I.

    2014-05-01

    The properties of ammonium azide NH4N3 upon compression were investigated using first-principles density functional theory. The equation of state was calculated and the mechanism of a phase transition experimentally observed at 3.3 GPa is elucidated. Novel polymorphs of NH4N3 were found using a simple structure search algorithm employing random atomic displacements upon static compression. The structures of three new polymorphs, labelled as B, C, and D, are similar to those of other metal azides.

  17. Lossless Compression of Digital Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Bo

    are constructed by this principle. A multi-pass free tree coding scheme produces excellent compression results for all test images. A multi-pass fast free template coding scheme produces much better results than JBIG for difficult images, such as halftonings. Rissanen's algorithm `Context' is presented in a new...... version that is substantially faster than its precursorsand brings it close to the multi-pass coders in compression performance.Handprinted characters are of unequal complexity; recent work by Singer and Tishby demonstrates that utilizing the physiological process of writing one can synthesize cursive...

  18. Methods for Distributed Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Sundman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing is a thriving research field covering a class of problems where a large sparse signal is reconstructed from a few random measurements. In the presence of several sensor nodes measuring correlated sparse signals, improvements in terms of recovery quality or the requirement for a fewer number of local measurements can be expected if the nodes cooperate. In this paper, we provide an overview of the current literature regarding distributed compressed sensing; in particular, we discuss aspects of network topologies, signal models and recovery algorithms.

  19. Coding Strategies and Implementations of Compressive Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Han

    information from a noisy environment. Using engineering efforts to accomplish the same task usually requires multiple detectors, advanced computational algorithms, or artificial intelligence systems. Compressive acoustic sensing incorporates acoustic metamaterials in compressive sensing theory to emulate the abilities of sound localization and selective attention. This research investigates and optimizes the sensing capacity and the spatial sensitivity of the acoustic sensor. The well-modeled acoustic sensor allows localizing multiple speakers in both stationary and dynamic auditory scene; and distinguishing mixed conversations from independent sources with high audio recognition rate.

  20. Use of magnetic compression to support turbine engine rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomfret, Chris J.

    1994-02-01

    Ever since the advent of gas turbine engines, their rotating disks have been designed with sufficient size and weight to withstand the centrifugal forces generated when the engine is operating. Unfortunately, this requirement has always been a life and performance limiting feature of gas turbine engines and, as manufacturers strive to meet operator demands for more performance without increasing weight, the need for innovative technology has become more important. This has prompted engineers to consider a fundamental and radical breakaway from the traditional design of turbine and compressor disks which have been in use since the first jet engine was flown 50 years ago. Magnetic compression aims to counteract, by direct opposition rather than restraint, the centrifugal forces generated within the engine. A magnetic coupling is created between a rotating disk and a stationary superconducting coil to create a massive inwardly-directed magnetic force. With the centrifugal forces opposed by an equal and opposite magnetic force, the large heavy disks could be dispensed with and replaced with a torque tube to hold the blades. The proof of this concept has been demonstrated and the thermal management of such a system studied in detail; this aspect, especially in the hot end of a gas turbine engine, remains a stiff but not impossible challenge. The potential payoffs in both military and commercial aviation and in the power generation industry are sufficient to warrant further serious studies for its application and optimization.

  1. Faddeev-Jackiw analysis for the charged compressible fluid in a higher-derivative electromagnetic field background

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, Albert C. R.; Abreu, Everton M. C.; Neto, Jorge Ananias; Takakura, Flavio I.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we will discuss the Faddeev-Jackiw symplectic approach in the analysis of a charged compressible fluid immersed in a higher-derivative electromagnetic field theory. We have obtained the full set of constraints directly from the zero-mode eigenvectors. Besides, we have computed the Dirac brackets for the dynamic variables of the compressible fluid. Finally, as a result of the coupling between the charged compressible fluid and the electromagnetic field we have calculated t...

  2. Internal combustion engines a detailed introduction to the thermodynamics of spark and compression ignition engines, their design and development

    CERN Document Server

    Benson, Rowland S

    1979-01-01

    Internal Combustion of Engines: A Detailed Introduction to the Thermodynamics of Spark and Compression Ignition Engines, Their Design and Development focuses on the design, development, and operations of spark and compression ignition engines. The book first describes internal combustion engines, including rotary, compression, and indirect or spark ignition engines. The publication then discusses basic thermodynamics and gas dynamics. Topics include first and second laws of thermodynamics; internal energy and enthalpy diagrams; gas mixtures and homocentric flow; and state equation. The text ta

  3. The impact of chest compression rates on quality of chest compressions : a manikin study

    OpenAIRE

    Field, Richard A.; Soar, Jasmeet; Davies, Robin P.; Akhtar, Naheed; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose\\ud Chest compressions are often performed at a variable rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The effect of compression rate on other chest compression quality variables (compression depth, duty-cycle, leaning, performance decay over time) is unknown. This randomised controlled cross-over manikin study examined the effect of different compression rates on the other chest compression quality variables.\\ud Methods\\ud Twenty healthcare professionals performed two minutes of co...

  4. Compressing Data Cube in Parallel OLAP Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Dehne

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an efficient algorithm to compress the cubes in the progress of the parallel data cube generation. This low overhead compression mechanism provides block-by-block and record-by-record compression by using tuple difference coding techniques, thereby maximizing the compression ratio and minimizing the decompression penalty at run-time. The experimental results demonstrate that the typical compression ratio is about 30:1 without sacrificing running time. This paper also demonstrates that the compression method is suitable for Hilbert Space Filling Curve, a mechanism widely used in multi-dimensional indexing.

  5. Survivin counteracts the therapeutic effect of microtubule de-stabilizers by stabilizing tubulin polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Hsing-Pang

    2009-07-01

    stability of microtubules, but not with caspases inhibition. Over-expression of survivin counteracts the therapeutic effect of microtubule de-stabilizer BPR0L075 probably by stabilizing tubulin polymers, instead of the inhibition of caspase activity in cancer cells. Besides microtubule-related caspase-dependent cell death, caspase-independent mitotic cell death could be initiated in survivin/BPR0L075 combination treatments. We suggest that combining microtubule de-stabilizers with a survivin inhibitor may attribute to a better clinical outcome than the use of anti-mitotic monotherapy in clinical situations.

  6. Compression of Probabilistic XML documents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, Irma

    2009-01-01

    Probabilistic XML (PXML) files resulting from data integration can become extremely large, which is undesired. For XML there are several techniques available to compress the document and since probabilistic XML is in fact (a special form of) XML, it might benefit from these methods even more. In

  7. Temporal compressive imaging for video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qun; Zhang, Linxia; Ke, Jun

    2018-01-01

    In many situations, imagers are required to have higher imaging speed, such as gunpowder blasting analysis and observing high-speed biology phenomena. However, measuring high-speed video is a challenge to camera design, especially, in infrared spectrum. In this paper, we reconstruct a high-frame-rate video from compressive video measurements using temporal compressive imaging (TCI) with a temporal compression ratio T=8. This means that, 8 unique high-speed temporal frames will be obtained from a single compressive frame using a reconstruction algorithm. Equivalently, the video frame rates is increased by 8 times. Two methods, two-step iterative shrinkage/threshold (TwIST) algorithm and the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) method, are used for reconstruction. To reduce reconstruction time and memory usage, each frame of size 256×256 is divided into patches of size 8×8. The influence of different coded mask to reconstruction is discussed. The reconstruction qualities using TwIST and GMM are also compared.

  8. Force balancing in mammographic compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branderhorst, W.; de Groot, J. E.; Neeter, L. M. F. H.; van Lier, M. G. J. T. B.; Neeleman, C.; den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before compressing the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body

  9. Compressing spatio-temporal trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Joachim; Katajainen, Jyrki; Merrick, Damian

    2009-01-01

    A trajectory is a sequence of locations, each associated with a timestamp, describing the movement of a point. Trajectory data is becoming increasingly available and the size of recorded trajectories is getting larger. In this paper we study the problem of compressing planar trajectories such tha...

  10. Nonlinear compression of optical solitons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pulse area can be conserved by the inclusion of gain (or loss) and phase modulation effects. Keywords. Optical solitons; bright and dark solitons; nonlinear compression; phase modulation; fibre amplification; loss. PACS Nos 42.81. Dp; 02.30 Jr; 04.30 Nk. 1. Introduction. The term soliton refers to special kinds of waves that ...

  11. Grid-free compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation problem involves the localization of a few sources from a limited number of observations on an array of sensors, thus it can be formulated as a sparse signal reconstruction problem and solved efficiently with compressive sensing (CS) to achieve high...

  12. Entropy, Coding and Data Compression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 9. Entropy, Coding and Data Compression. S Natarajan. General Article Volume 6 Issue 9 September 2001 pp 35-45. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/09/0035-0045 ...

  13. Incremental data compression -extended abstract-

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuring, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Data may be compressed using textual substitution. Textual substitution identifies repeated substrings and replaces some or all substrings by pointers to another copy. We construct an incremental algorithm for a specific textual substitution method: coding a text with respect to a dictionary. With

  14. Pure rate effect on compressive strength of concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Sangho; Kim Kyoung-Min; Cho Jae-Yoel

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF) has been used to consider the compressive strength enhancement of concrete at the high and intermediate strain rates. However, DIF formulae suggested until now include the inertia effects as well as the rate effect because the DIF formulae has been assumed as a function of only the strain rate and the inertia effects cannot be avoided in tests at the high and intermediate strain rate region. Therefore, applying the DIF to design or analysis of social infrastructu...

  15. Control of synchrotron radiation effects during recirculation with bunch compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of beam quality during recirculation have been extended to an arc providing bunch compression with positive momentum compaction. It controls both incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation (ISR and CSR) using methods including optics balance and generates little microbunching gain. We detail the dynamical basis for the design, discuss the design process, give an example, and provide simulations of ISR and CSR effects. Reference will be made to a complete analysis of microbunching effects.

  16. Adiabatic compression of ion rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrabee, D.A.; Lovelace, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    A study has been made of the compression of collisionless ion rings in an increasing external magnetic field, B/sub e/ = zB/sub e/(t), by numerically implementing a previously developed kinetic theory of ring compression. The theory is general in that there is no limitation on the ring geometry or the compression ratio, lambdaequivalentB/sub e/ (final)/B/sub e/ (initial)> or =1. However, the motion of a single particle in an equilibrium is assumed to be completely characterized by its energy H and canonical angular momentum P/sub theta/ with the absence of a third constant of the motion. The present computational work assumes that plasma currents are negligible, as is appropriate for a low-temperature collisional plasma. For a variety of initial ring geometries and initial distribution functions (having a single value of P/sub theta/), it is found that the parameters for ''fat'', small aspect ratio rings follow general scaling laws over a large range of compression ratios, 1 3 : The ring radius varies as lambda/sup -1/2/; the average single particle energy as lambda/sup 0.72/; the root mean square energy spread as lambda/sup 1.1/; and the total current as lambda/sup 0.79/. The field reversal parameter is found to saturate at values typically between 2 and 3. For large compression ratios the current density is found to ''hollow out''. This hollowing tends to improve the interchange stability of an embedded low β plasma. The implications of these scaling laws for fusion reactor systems are discussed

  17. Effects of twin boundaries in vanadium nitride films subjected to tensile/compressive deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tao; Peng, Xianghe; Huang, Cheng; Zhao, Yinbo; Weng, Shayuan; Chen, Xiang; Hu, Ning

    2017-12-01

    Two kinds of atoms can serve as the twin boundary (TB) atoms in a transition metal nitride (TMN). In this work, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for the responses of vanadium nitride (VN) films with different kinds of TB atoms (V or N) subjected to uniaxial tensile/compressive deformations, to investigate their effects and the tensile-compressive asymmetry. In compressive deformation, the migration of TBs with V atoms to that with N atoms contributes to softening, while the pile-up of dislocations at TBs contributes to strengthening. During tension, fractures occur at the TBs without distinct nucleation of dislocations, the nature of the brittle fracture, which does not result in any improvement of fracture toughness and critical stress. Different frictional effects, cutoff radii, asymmetrical tensile and compressive nature of the interatomic potential and different deformation mechanisms are responsible for the tension-compression asymmetry in VN.

  18. Semantic Source Coding for Flexible Lossy Image Compression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phoha, Shashi; Schmiedekamp, Mendel

    2007-01-01

    Semantic Source Coding for Lossy Video Compression investigates methods for Mission-oriented lossy image compression, by developing methods to use different compression levels for different portions...

  19. The task of control digital image compression

    OpenAIRE

    TASHMANOV E.B.; МАМАTOV М.S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider the relationship of control tasks and image compression losses. The main idea of this approach is to allocate structural lines simplified image and further compress the selected data

  20. Chest compression pauses during defibrillation attempts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deakin, Charles D.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This article summarizes current knowledge of the causes and consequences of interruption of chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Recent findings Pauses in chest compressions occur during analysis of the heart rhythm, delivery of ventilation, interventions such