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Sample records for dye-labeled dna detects

  1. Structures of an apo and a binary complex of an evolved archeal B family DNA polymerase capable of synthesising highly cy-dye labelled DNA.

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    Samantha A Wynne

    Full Text Available Thermophilic DNA polymerases of the polB family are of great importance in biotechnological applications including high-fidelity PCR. Of particular interest is the relative promiscuity of engineered versions of the exo- form of polymerases from the Thermo- and Pyrococcales families towards non-canonical substrates, which enables key advances in Next-generation sequencing. Despite this there is a paucity of structural information to guide further engineering of this group of polymerases. Here we report two structures, of the apo form and of a binary complex of a previously described variant (E10 of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu polymerase with an ability to fully replace dCTP with Cyanine dye-labeled dCTP (Cy3-dCTP or Cy5-dCTP in PCR and synthesise highly fluorescent "CyDNA" densely decorated with cyanine dye heterocycles. The apo form of Pfu-E10 closely matches reported apo form structures of wild-type Pfu. In contrast, the binary complex (in the replicative state with a duplex DNA oligonucleotide reveals a closing movement of the thumb domain, increasing the contact surface with the nascent DNA duplex strand. Modelling based on the binary complex suggests how bulky fluorophores may be accommodated during processive synthesis and has aided the identification of residues important for the synthesis of unnatural nucleic acid polymers.

  2. Structures of an Apo and a Binary Complex of an Evolved Archeal B Family DNA Polymerase Capable of Synthesising Highly Cy-Dye Labelled DNA

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    Wynne, Samantha A.; Pinheiro, Vitor B.; Holliger, Philipp; Leslie, Andrew G. W.

    2013-01-01

    Thermophilic DNA polymerases of the polB family are of great importance in biotechnological applications including high-fidelity PCR. Of particular interest is the relative promiscuity of engineered versions of the exo- form of polymerases from the Thermo- and Pyrococcales families towards non-canonical substrates, which enables key advances in Next-generation sequencing. Despite this there is a paucity of structural information to guide further engineering of this group of polymerases. Here we report two structures, of the apo form and of a binary complex of a previously described variant (E10) of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) polymerase with an ability to fully replace dCTP with Cyanine dye-labeled dCTP (Cy3-dCTP or Cy5-dCTP) in PCR and synthesise highly fluorescent “CyDNA” densely decorated with cyanine dye heterocycles. The apo form of Pfu-E10 closely matches reported apo form structures of wild-type Pfu. In contrast, the binary complex (in the replicative state with a duplex DNA oligonucleotide) reveals a closing movement of the thumb domain, increasing the contact surface with the nascent DNA duplex strand. Modelling based on the binary complex suggests how bulky fluorophores may be accommodated during processive synthesis and has aided the identification of residues important for the synthesis of unnatural nucleic acid polymers. PMID:23940661

  3. High sensitivity analysis of water-soluble, cyanine dye labeled proteins by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection

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    Qiao Xiaoqiang [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Wang Li [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, 158 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116012 (China); Ma Junfeng [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Deng Qiliang; Liang Zhen [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhang Lihua, E-mail: lihuazhang@dicp.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Peng Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, 158 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116012 (China); Zhang Yukui [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2009-04-27

    A water-soluble sulfo-3H-indocyanine dye, the active N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of 3H-Indolium,1-[(4-carboxyphenyl)methyl]-2-[3-[1-[(4-carboxyphenyl)methyl] -1,3-dihydro-3,3-dimethyl-5-sulfo-2H-indol-2-ylidene]-1-propenyl] -3,3-dimethyl-5-sulfo-(9CI) (sb-cy3-NHS), containing two p-carboxybenzyl groups on nitrogen atoms, previously developed by our laboratory, was for the first time used for protein derivatization, followed by HPLC separation and fluorescence detection. With bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein, effects of various experimental conditions, including denaturant concentration, reaction time and temperature, the pH value of buffer, and the molar ratio of fluorescence reagent to protein, on protein derivatization efficiency were systematically investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for derivatized BSA was decreased to 12.8 nM, about 100-fold lower than that by UV and fluorescence detection with commercial fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) as labeling reagent. For HPLC analysis, an on-column excess fluorescence reagent depletion technique was developed based on the hydrophilicity of sb-cy3-NHS, which could avoid the interference on the analysis of target compounds. In addition, sb-cy3-NHS was applied for the derivatization of a three-protein mixture and egg white proteins. Compared to the results labeled by FITC, more proteins with low concentrations could be labeled by sb-cy3-NHS, resulting in improved detection sensitivity for protein analysis. All these results demonstrated that sb-cy3-NHS might be promising in detecting low abundance proteins, especially in the quantitative analysis of proteins.

  4. Detection of gastroenteritis viruses among pediatric patients in Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan, between 2006 and 2013 using multiplex reverse transcription PCR-based assays involving fluorescent dye-labeled primers.

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    Shigemoto, Naoki; Hisatsune, Yuri; Toukubo, Yasushi; Tanizawa, Yukie; Shimazu, Yukie; Takao, Shinichi; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Noda, Mamoru; Fukuda, Shinji

    2017-05-01

    Multiplex reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays involving fluorescent dye-labeled primers were modified to detect 10 types of gastroenteritis viruses by adding two further assays to a previously developed assay. Then, these assays were applied to clinical samples, which were collected between January 2006 and December 2013. All 10 types of viruses were effectively detected in the multiplex RT-PCR-based assays. In addition, various viral parameters, such as the detection rates and age distributions of each viral type, were examined. The frequency and types of mixed infections were also investigated. Among the 186 virus-positive samples, genogroup II noroviruses were found to be the most common type of virus (32.7%), followed by group A rotaviruses (10.6%) and parechoviruses (10.3%). Mixed infections were observed in 37 samples, and many of them were detected in patients who were less than 2 years old. These observations showed that the multiplex RT-PCR-based assays involving fluorescent dye-labeled primers were able to effectively detect the viruses circulating among pediatric acute gastroenteritis patients and contributed to the highly specific and sensitive diagnosis of gastroenteritis. J. Med. Virol. 89:791-800, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Carbon nanotube signal amplification for ultrasensitive fluorescence polarization detection of DNA methyltransferase activity and inhibition.

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    Huang, Yong; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Limin; Zhao, Shulin; Hu, Kun; Chen, Zheng-Feng; Chen, Jia; Liang, Hong

    2014-04-15

    A versatile sensing platform based on multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) signal amplification and fluorescence polarization (FP) is developed for the simple and ultrasensitive monitoring of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity and inhibition in homogeneous solution. This method uses a dye-labeled DNA probe that possess a doubled-stranded DNA (dsDNA) part for Mtase and its corresponding restriction endonuclease recognition, and a single-stranded DNA part for binding MWCNTs. In the absence of MTase, the dye-labeled DNA is cleaved by restriction endonuclease, and releases very short DNA carrying the dye that cannot bind to MWCNTs, which has relatively small FP value. However, in the presence of MTase, the specific recognition sequence in the dye-labeled DNA probe is methylated and not cleaved by restriction endonuclease. Thus, the dye-labeled methylated DNA product is adsorbed onto MWCNTs via strong π-π stacking interactions, which leads to a significant increase in the FP value due to the enlargement of the molecular volume of the dye-labeled methylated DNA/MWCNTs complex. This provides the basic of a quantitative measurement of MTase activity. By using the MWCNT signal amplification approach, the detection sensitivity can be significantly improved by two orders of magnitude over the previously reported methods. Moreover, this method also has high specificity and a wide dynamic range of over five orders of magnitude. Additionally, the suitability of this sensing platform for MTase inhibitor screening has also been demonstrated. This approach may serve as a general detection platform for sensitive assay of a variety of DNA MTases and screening potential drugs. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Single molecule DNA detection with an atomic vapor notch filter

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    Uhland, Denis; Rendler, Torsten; Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Wrachtrup, Joerg; Gerhardt, Ilja [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    The detection of single molecules has facilitated many advances in life- and material-science. Commonly the fluorescence of dye molecules is detected, which are attached to a non-fluorescent structure under study. For fluorescence microscopy one desires to maximize the detection efficiency together with an efficient suppression of undesired laser leakage. Here we present the use of the narrow-band filtering properties of hot atomic sodium vapor to selectively filter the excitation light from the red-shifted fluorescence of dye labeled single-stranded DNA molecules. A statistical analysis proves an enhancement in detection efficiency of more than 15% in a confocal and in a wide-field configuration. (orig.)

  7. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING A FIBEROPTIC BIOSENSOR

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    A rapid and sensitive fiber optic biosensor assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. For this assay, a biotin-labeled capture oligonucleotide (38 mer) was immobilized to an avidin-coated quartz fiber. Hybridization of a dye-labeled complementary sequence was observed...

  8. The DNA relaxation activity and covalent complex accumulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I can be assayed in Escherichia coli: application for identification of potential FRET-dye labeling sites

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    Abrenica Maria V

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MtTOP1 and Escherichia coli topoisomerase I have highly homologous transesterification domains, but the two enzymes have distinctly different C-terminal domains. To investigate the structure-function of MtTOP1 and to target its activity for development of new TB therapy, it is desirable to have a rapid genetic assay for its catalytic activity, and potential bactericidal consequence from accumulation of its covalent complex. Results We show that plasmid-encoded recombinant MtTOP1 can complement the temperature sensitive topA function of E. coli strain AS17. Moreover, expression of MtTOP1-G116 S enzyme with the TOPRIM mutation that inhibits DNA religation results in SOS induction and loss of viability in E. coli. The absence of cysteine residues in the MtTOP1 enzyme makes it an attractive system for introduction of potentially informative chemical or spectroscopic probes at specific positions via cysteine mutagenesis. Such probes could be useful for development of high throughput screening (HTS assays. We employed the AS17 complementation system to screen for sites in MtTOP1 that can tolerate cysteine substitution without loss of complementation function. These cysteine substitution mutants were confirmed to have retained the relaxation activity. One such mutant of MtTOP1 was utilized for fluorescence probe incorporation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurement with fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide substrate. Conclusions The DNA relaxation and cleavage complex accumulation of M. tuberculosis topoisomerase I can be measured with genetic assays in E. coli, facilitating rapid analysis of its activities, and discovery of new TB therapy targeting this essential enzyme.

  9. Rectangular coordination polymer nanoplates: large-scale, rapid synthesis and their application as a fluorescent sensing platform for DNA detection.

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    Yingwei Zhang

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report on the large-scale, rapid synthesis of uniform rectangular coordination polymer nanoplates (RCPNs assembled from Cu(II and 4,4'-bipyridine for the first time. We further demonstrate that such RCPNs can be used as a very effective fluorescent sensing platform for multiple DNA detection with a detection limit as low as 30 pM and a high selectivity down to single-base mismatch. The DNA detection is accomplished by the following two steps: (1 RCPN binds dye-labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA probe, which brings dye and RCPN into close proximity, leading to fluorescence quenching; (2 Specific hybridization of the probe with its target generates a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA which detaches from RCPN, leading to fluorescence recovery. It suggests that this sensing system can well discriminate complementary and mismatched DNA sequences. The exact mechanism of fluorescence quenching involved is elucidated experimentally and its use in a human blood serum system is also demonstrated successfully.

  10. Electrochemical DNA Sensors for Detection of DNA Damage

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    Ana Maria Oliveira Brett

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical devices have received particular attention due to their rapiddetection and great sensitivity for the evaluation of DNA-hazard compounds interactionmechanisms. Several types of bioanalytical method use nucleic acids probes to detect DNAdamage. This article reviews current directions and strategies in the development andapplications of electrochemical DNA sensors for the detection of DNA damage.

  11. Detection of Non-Amplified Genomic DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Corradini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    This book offers a state-of-the-art overview on non amplified DNA detection methods and provides chemists, biochemists, biotechnologists and material scientists with an introduction to these methods. In fact all these fields have dedicated resources to the problem of nucleic acid detection, each contributing with their own specific methods and concepts. This book will explain the basic principles of the different non amplified DNA detection methods available, highlighting their respective advantages and limitations. The importance of non-amplified DNA sequencing technologies will be also discussed. Non-amplified DNA detection can be achieved by adopting different techniques. Such techniques have allowed the commercialization of innovative platforms for DNA detection that are expected to break into the DNA diagnostics market. The enhanced sensitivity required for the detection of non amplified genomic DNA has prompted new strategies that can achieve ultrasensitivity by combining specific materials with specifi...

  12. ctDNA DLBCL Detection Lancet Oncology

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    Measurement of circulating tumor DNA in blood can be used to detect disease recurrence in patients with a curable form of cancer known as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). In most patients, measurement of ctDNA enabled detection of microscopic diseas

  13. Detection of HBV Covalently Closed Circular DNA

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    Xiaoling Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection affects approximately 240 million people worldwide and remains a serious public health concern because its complete cure is impossible with current treatments. Covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA in the nucleus of infected cells cannot be eliminated by present therapeutics and may result in persistence and relapse. Drug development targeting cccDNA formation and maintenance is hindered by the lack of efficient cccDNA models and reliable cccDNA detection methods. Southern blotting is regarded as the gold standard for quantitative cccDNA detection, but it is complicated and not suitable for high-throughput drug screening, so more sensitive and simple methods, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based methods, Invader assays, in situ hybridization and surrogates, have been developed for cccDNA detection. However, most methods are not reliable enough, and there are no unified standards for these approaches. This review will summarize available methods for cccDNA detection. It is hoped that more robust methods for cccDNA monitoring will be developed and that standard operation procedures for routine cccDNA detection in scientific research and clinical monitoring will be established.

  14. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

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    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  15. DNA Origami-Graphene Hybrid Nanopore for DNA Detection.

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    Barati Farimani, Amir; Dibaeinia, Payam; Aluru, Narayana R

    2017-01-11

    DNA origami nanostructures can be used to functionalize solid-state nanopores for single molecule studies. In this study, we characterized a nanopore in a DNA origami-graphene heterostructure for DNA detection. The DNA origami nanopore is functionalized with a specific nucleotide type at the edge of the pore. Using extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we computed and analyzed the ionic conductivity of nanopores in heterostructures carpeted with one or two layers of DNA origami on graphene. We demonstrate that a nanopore in DNA origami-graphene gives rise to distinguishable dwell times for the four DNA base types, whereas for a nanopore in bare graphene, the dwell time is almost the same for all types of bases. The specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between DNA origami and the translocating DNA strand yield different residence times and ionic currents. We also conclude that the speed of DNA translocation decreases due to the friction between the dangling bases at the pore mouth and the sequencing DNA strands.

  16. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

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    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  17. A NIR-remote controlled upconverting nanoparticle: an improved tool for living cell dye-labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Bin; Gong, Xiaoqun; Wang, Hanjie; Wang, Sheng; Chang, Jin; Wang, Huiquan; Li, Wei; Tan, Jian

    2015-01-01

    In living cells, due to the selective permeability and complicated cellular environment, the uptake efficiency and fluorescence decay of organic dyes during dye-labeling may be influenced, which may eventually result in poor fluorescent imaging. In this work, a protocol of UCNs@mSiO 2 -(FA and Azo) core–shell nanocarriers was designed and prepared successfully. The core–shell nanocarriers were assembled from two parts, including a mesoporous silica shell surface modified by folate (FA) and azobenzene (Azo), and an upconverting nanocrystal (UCN) core. The mesoporous silica shell is used for loading organic dyes and conjugating folate which helps to enhance the cellular uptake of nanocarriers. The UCN core works as a transducer to convert near infrared (NIR) light to local UV and visible light to activate a back-and-forth wagging motion of azobenzene molecules on the surface, while the azobenzene acts as a molecular impeller for propelling the release of organic dyes. The nanocarriers of loading organic dyes can maintain the stability of the fluorescent imaging effect better than free organic dyes. The experimental results show that with the help of the nanoparticle, cell uptake efficiency of the model dyes of rhodamine and 4′, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) was significantly improved. The release of dyes can only be triggered by NIR light exposure and their quantity is highly dependent on the duration of NIR light exposure, thus realizing NIR-regulated dye release spatiotemporally. Our work may open a novel avenue for precisely controlling UCN-based living cell imaging in biotechnology and diagnostics, as well as studying cell dynamics, cell–cell interactions, and tissue morphogenesis. (paper)

  18. Electrochemical DNA sensor-based strategy for sensitive detection of DNA demethylation and DNA demethylase activity.

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    Shen, Qingming; Fan, Mengxing; Yang, Yin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-08-31

    DNA demethylation and demethylase activity play important roles in DNA self-repair, and their detection is key to early diagnosis of fatal diseases. Herein, a facile electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensor was developed for the sensitive detection of DNA demethylation and demethylase activity based on an enzyme cleavage strategy. The thiol modified hemi-methylated hairpin probe DNA (pDNA) was self-assembled on a Au electrode surface through the formation of AuS bonds. The hemi-methylated pDNA served as the substrate of DNA demethylase (using methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) as an example). Following demethylation, the hairpin stem was then recognized and cleaved by BstUI endonuclease. The ferrocene carboxylic acid (FcA)-tagged pDNA strands were released into the buffer solution from the electrode surface, resulting in a significant decrease of electrochemical signal and providing a means to observe DNA demethylation. The activity of DNA demethylase was analyzed in the concentration ranging from 0.5 to 500 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection as low as 0.17 ng mL(-1). With high specificity and sensitivity, rapid response, and low cost, this simple E-DNA sensor provides a unique platform for the sensitive detection of DNA demethylation, DNA demethylase activity, and related molecular diagnostics and drug screening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultraviolet absorption detection of DNA in gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahon, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection and quantification of large fragments of unlabelled deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in agarose gels is presented. The technique is based on ultra-violet (UV) absorption by nucleotides. A deuterium lamp was used to illuminate regions of an electrophoresis gel. As DNA bands passed through the illuminated region of the gel the amount of UV light transmitted was reduced due to DNA absorption. Two detection systems were investigated. In the first system, synthetic chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond strip detectors were used to locate regions of DNA in the gels by detecting the transmitted light. CVD diamond has a high indirect band gap of 5.45 eV and is therefore sensitive to UV photons of wavelengths < 224 nm. A number of CVD diamond samples were characterised to investigate their suitability as detectors for this application. The detectors' quantum efficiency, UV response and time response were measured. DNA bands containing as little as 20 ng were detected by the diamond. In a second system, a deuterium lamp was used to illuminate individual sample lanes of an electrophoresis gel via an array of optical fibres. During electrophoresis the regions of DNA were detected with illumination at 260 nm, using a UV-sensitive charge coupled device (CCD). As the absorption coefficient of a DNA sample is approximately proportional to its mass, the technique is inherently quantitative. This system had a detection limit of 0.25 ng compared with 2-10 ng for the most popular conventional technique, ethidium bromide (EtBr) staining. Using this detection technique, the DNA sample remains in its native state. The removal of carcinogenic dyes from the detection procedure greatly reduces associated biological hazards. (author)

  20. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

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    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  1. Plasmonic SERS biosensing nanochips for DNA detection.

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    Ngo, Hoan T; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Fales, Andrew M; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2016-03-01

    The development of rapid, cost-effective DNA detection methods for molecular diagnostics at the point-of-care (POC) has been receiving increasing interest. This article reviews several DNA detection techniques based on plasmonic-active nanochip platforms developed in our laboratory over the last 5 years, including the molecular sentinel-on-chip (MSC), the multiplex MSC, and the inverse molecular sentinel-on-chip (iMS-on-Chip). DNA probes were used as the recognition elements, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used as the signal detection method. Sensing mechanisms were based on hybridization of target sequences and DNA probes, resulting in a distance change between SERS reporters and the nanochip's plasmonic-active surface. As the field intensity of the surface plasmon decays exponentially as a function of distance, the distance change in turn affects SERS signal intensity, thus indicating the presence and capture of the target sequences. Our techniques were single-step DNA detection techniques. Target sequences were detected by simple delivery of sample solutions onto DNA probe-functionalized nanochips and measuring the SERS signal after appropriate incubation times. Target sequence labeling or washing to remove unreacted components was not required, making the techniques simple, easy-to-use, and cost-effective. The usefulness of the nanochip platform-based techniques for medical diagnostics was illustrated by the detection of host genetic biomarkers for respiratory viral infection and of the dengue virus gene.

  2. Quantum Dot Molecular Beacons for DNA Detection

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    Cady, Nathaniel C.

    Molecular beacons have become an important fluorescent probe for sequence-specific DNA detection. To improve the sensitivity and robustness of molecular beacon assays, fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are now being used as the fluorescent moiety for molecular beacon synthesis. Multiple linkage strategies can be used for attaching molecular beacon DNA to QDs, and multiple quenchers, including gold particles, can be used for fluorescence quenching. Covalent attachment of QDs to DNA can be achieved through amide linkage, and affinity-based attachment can be achieved with streptavidin-biotin linkage. We have shown that these linkage strategies can be used to successfully create quantum dot molecular beacons that can be used in DNA detection assays with high specificity.

  3. Detection of Transgenes on DNA Fibers.

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    Shibata, Fukashi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was developed for detecting specific DNA sequences directly on mitotic or meiotic chromosomes. However, the resolution of FISH on chromosomes is limited by condensed structure of chromatin, and it is difficult to differentiate two target sites close to each other. To overcome this issue, the objects was changed to stretched DNA fibers, and this fiber FISH technique has now been used for revealing genome structure at molecular level. Hybridization and detection procedures of fiber FISH are common with FISH on chromosomes. Therefore, application of fiber FISH is not difficult for the researchers of some experience in ordinary FISH. DNA fibers can be released from nuclei fixed on glass slides using a detergent. The DNA fibers were shred in FISH procedure, and the resultant fragments became small bead-like shape. This makes FISH signals on DNA fibers a series of dots. The size of DNA in the dot is estimated to be approximately 1 kb, it corresponding to the resolution of fiber FISH. This makes it possible to analyze structures of transgenes on DNA fibers in detail.

  4. Tungsten disulfide nanosheet and exonuclease III co-assisted amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescence polarization detection of DNA glycosylase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jingjin; Ma, Yefei [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources of Education Ministry, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin, 541004 (China); Kong, Rongmei [The Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qufu Normal University, Qufu, Shandong 273165 (China); Zhang, Liangliang, E-mail: liangzhang319@163.com [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources of Education Ministry, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin, 541004 (China); Yang, Wen; Zhao, Shulin [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources of Education Ministry, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin, 541004 (China)

    2015-08-05

    Herein, we introduced a tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) nanosheet and exonuclease III (Exo III) co-assisted signal amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescent polarization (FP) assay of DNA glycosylase activity. Two DNA glycosylases, uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) and human 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), were tested. A hairpin-structured probe (HP) which contained damaged bases in the stem was used as the substrate. The removal of damaged bases from substrate by DNA glycosylase would lower the melting temperature of HP. The HP was then opened and hybridized with a FAM dye-labeled single strand DNA (DP), generating a duplex with a recessed 3′-terminal of DP. This design facilitated the Exo III-assisted amplification by repeating the hybridization and digestion of DP, liberating numerous FAM fluorophores which could not be adsorbed on WS{sub 2} nanosheet. Thus, the final system exhibited a small FP signal. However, in the absence of DNA glycosylases, no hybridization between DP and HP was occurred, hampering the hydrolysis of DP by Exo III. The intact DP was then adsorbed on the surface of WS{sub 2} nanosheet that greatly amplified the mass of the labeled-FAM fluorophore, resulting in a large FP value. With the co-assisted amplification strategy, the sensitivity was substantially improved. In addition, this method was applied to detect UDG activity in cell extracts. The study of the inhibition of UDG was also performed. Furthermore, this method is simple in design, easy in implementation, and selective, which holds potential applications in the DNA glycosylase related mechanism research and molecular diagnostics. - Highlights: • A fluorescence polarization strategy for DNA glycosylase activity detection was developed. • The present method was based on WS{sub 2} nanosheet and exonuclease III co-assisted signal amplification. • A high sensitivity and desirable selectivity were achieved. • This method provides a promising universal platform for DNA

  5. Ultrasensitive norovirus detection using DNA aptasensor technology.

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    Amanda Giamberardino

    Full Text Available DNA aptamers were developed against murine norovirus (MNV using SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment. Nine rounds of SELEX led to the discovery of AG3, a promising aptamer with very high affinity for MNV as well as for lab-synthesized capsids of a common human norovirus (HuNoV outbreak strain (GII.3. Using fluorescence anisotropy, AG3 was found to bind with MNV with affinity in the low picomolar range. The aptamer could cross-react with HuNoV though it was selected against MNV. As compared to a non-specific DNA control sequence, the norovirus-binding affinity of AG3 was about a million-fold higher. In further tests, the aptamer also showed nearly a million-fold higher affinity for the noroviruses than for the feline calicivirus (FCV, a virus similar in size and structure to noroviruses. AG3 was incorporated into a simple electrochemical sensor using a gold nanoparticle-modified screen-printed carbon electrode (GNPs-SPCE. The aptasensor could detect MNV with a limit of detection of approximately 180 virus particles, for possible on-site applications. The lead aptamer candidate and the aptasensor platform show promise for the rapid detection and identification of noroviruses in environmental and clinical samples.

  6. DNA & Protein detection based on microbead agglutination

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2012-06-06

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microparticles in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Agglutination-based tests are most often used to explore the antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for mode protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin two-component system, as well as a hybridization based two-component assay; however, as our work shows, two-component systems are prone to self-termination of the linking analyte and thus have a lower sensitivity. Three component systems have also been used with DNA hybridization, as in our work; however, their assay requires 48 hours for incubation, while our assay is performed in 5 minutes making it a real candidate for POC testing. We demonstrate three assays: a two-component biotin/streptavidin assay, a three-component hybridization assay using single stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules and a stepped three-component hybridization assay. The comparison of these three assays shows our simple stepped three-component agglutination assay to be rapid at room temperature and more sensitive than the two-component version by an order of magnitude. An agglutination assay was also performed in a PDMS microfluidic chip where agglutinated beads were trapped by filter columns for easy observation. We developed a rapid (5 minute) room temperature assay, which is based on microbead agglutination. Our three-component assay solves the linker self-termination issue allowing an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity over two–component assays. Our stepped version of the three-component assay solves the issue with probe site saturation thus enabling a wider range of detection. Detection of the agglutinated beads with the naked eye by trapping in microfluidic channels has been shown.

  7. DNA Microarray for Detection of Gastrointestinal Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Miguel A.; Soto-del Río, María de los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 103 virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  8. Direct detection of methylation in genomic DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bart, A.; van Passel, M. W. J.; van Amsterdam, K.; van der Ende, A.

    2005-01-01

    The identification of methylated sites on bacterial genomic DNA would be a useful tool to study the major roles of DNA methylation in prokaryotes: distinction of self and nonself DNA, direction of post-replicative mismatch repair, control of DNA replication and cell cycle, and regulation of gene

  9. C-terminal fluorescent labeling impairs functionality of DNA mismatch repair proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Brieger

    Full Text Available The human DNA mismatch repair (MMR process is crucial to maintain the integrity of the genome and requires many different proteins which interact perfectly and coordinated. Germline mutations in MMR genes are responsible for the development of the hereditary form of colorectal cancer called Lynch syndrome. Various mutations mainly in two MMR proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, have been identified so far, whereas 55% are detected within MLH1, the essential component of the heterodimer MutLα (MLH1 and PMS2. Most of those MLH1 variants are pathogenic but the relevance of missense mutations often remains unclear. Many different recombinant systems are applied to filter out disease-associated proteins whereby fluorescent tagged proteins are frequently used. However, dye labeling might have deleterious effects on MutLα's functionality. Therefore, we analyzed the consequences of N- and C-terminal fluorescent labeling on expression level, cellular localization and MMR activity of MutLα. Besides significant influence of GFP- or Red-fusion on protein expression we detected incorrect shuttling of single expressed C-terminal GFP-tagged PMS2 into the nucleus and found that C-terminal dye labeling impaired MMR function of MutLα. In contrast, N-terminal tagged MutLαs retained correct functionality and can be recommended both for the analysis of cellular localization and MMR efficiency.

  10. Effects of dopamine concentration on energy transfer between dendrimer-QD and dye-labeled antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Rahm [Department of Chemical and Bio Engineering, Kyungwon University, Bokjung-dong, Sujung-gu, Sungnam-shi, Gyunggi-do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ik-Joong, E-mail: ijkang@kyungwon.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Bio Engineering, Kyungwon University, Bokjung-dong, Sujung-gu, Sungnam-shi, Gyunggi-do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-15

    The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is currently used to assess Parkinson's disease, and is a key method for determining the progression of disease based on the gross findings of patients. However, this method cannot quantify the extent of disease of patients, which means the administration of drugs cannot be determined on a real-time basis. Thalamotomy also causes discomfort and pain to the patients, and adversely affects treatment as it is performed following the onset of symptoms. Accordingly, the dopamine concentration, which is one of the key factors in determining this disease, needs to be detected quantitatively at ordinary times. Hence, the development of a bio-kit or a bio-sensor is essential for effectively prescribing the correct dopamine concentration in a customizable manner. In this study, the effect of dopamine level on this phenomenon was observed using the Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) phenomenon generated between a donor and acceptor. By confirming the photoluminescence (PL) and lifetime data, it was demonstrated that the degree of energy transfer increased with increasing dopamine concentration. To apply this phenomenon to an optical sensor, a glass surface was modified with a quantum dot (QD)-encapsulated dendrimer, and analyzed using the contact angle and ATR-FTIR. The topology of surface was determined by an atomic force microscope (AFM).

  11. Nanopore detection of DNA molecules in magnesium chloride solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Liu, Lei; Sha, Jingjie; Ni, Zhonghua; Yi, Hong; Chen, Yunfei

    2013-05-01

    High translocation speed of a DNA strand through a nanopore is a major bottleneck for nanopore detection of DNA molecules. Here, we choose MgCl2 electrolyte as salt solution to control DNA mobility. Experimental results demonstrate that the duration time for straight state translocation events in 1 M MgCl2 solution is about 1.3 ms which is about three times longer than that for the same DNA in 1 M KCl solution. This is because Mg2+ ions can effectively reduce the surface charge density of the negative DNA strands and then lead to the decrease of the DNA electrophoretic speed. It is also found that the Mg2+ ions can induce the DNA molecules binding together and reduce the probability of straight DNA translocation events. The nanopore with small diameter can break off the bound DNA strands and increase the occurrence probability of straight DNA translocation events.

  12. Probe and method for DNA detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Werner, James Henry; Sharma, Jaswinder Kumar; Martinez, Jennifer Suzanne

    2013-07-02

    A hybridization probe containing two linear strands of DNA lights up upon hybridization to a target DNA using silver nanoclusters that have been templated onto one of the DNA strands. Hybridization induces proximity between the nanoclusters on one strand and an overhang on the other strand, which results in enhanced fluorescence emission from the nanoclusters.

  13. Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technology using digoxigenin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellen, Lisa S; Wall-Manning, Glenn M; Sissons, Chris H

    2007-01-01

    Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization (CKB) is a technique that provides a simultaneous quantitative analysis of 40 microbial species against up to 28 mixed microbiota samples on a single membrane; using digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled, whole-genome DNA probes. Developed initially to study the predominantly gram-negative dental plaque microorganisms involved in periodontitis, we modified the probe species composition to focus on putative pathogens involved in the development of dental caries. CKB analysis is applicable to species from other biodiverse ecosystems and to a large number of samples. The major limitations are that high-quality DNA is required for the preparation of DIG-labeled probes and standards, and that probe specificity requires careful evaluation. Overall, CKB analysis provides a powerful ecological fingerprint of highly biodiverse microbiota based on key cultivable bacteria.

  14. Environmental DNA (eDNA sampling improves occurrence and detection estimates of invasive burmese pythons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E Hunter

    Full Text Available Environmental DNA (eDNA methods are used to detect DNA that is shed into the aquatic environment by cryptic or low density species. Applied in eDNA studies, occupancy models can be used to estimate occurrence and detection probabilities and thereby account for imperfect detection. However, occupancy terminology has been applied inconsistently in eDNA studies, and many have calculated occurrence probabilities while not considering the effects of imperfect detection. Low detection of invasive giant constrictors using visual surveys and traps has hampered the estimation of occupancy and detection estimates needed for population management in southern Florida, USA. Giant constrictor snakes pose a threat to native species and the ecological restoration of the Florida Everglades. To assist with detection, we developed species-specific eDNA assays using quantitative PCR (qPCR for the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus, Northern African python (P. sebae, boa constrictor (Boa constrictor, and the green (Eunectes murinus and yellow anaconda (E. notaeus. Burmese pythons, Northern African pythons, and boa constrictors are established and reproducing, while the green and yellow anaconda have the potential to become established. We validated the python and boa constrictor assays using laboratory trials and tested all species in 21 field locations distributed in eight southern Florida regions. Burmese python eDNA was detected in 37 of 63 field sampling events; however, the other species were not detected. Although eDNA was heterogeneously distributed in the environment, occupancy models were able to provide the first estimates of detection probabilities, which were greater than 91%. Burmese python eDNA was detected along the leading northern edge of the known population boundary. The development of informative detection tools and eDNA occupancy models can improve conservation efforts in southern Florida and support more extensive studies of invasive

  15. Improved toluidine blue-DNA agar for detection of DNA hydrolysis by campylobacters.

    OpenAIRE

    Lior, H; Patel, A

    1987-01-01

    Our improved toluidine blue-DNA agar was compared with methyl green DNase test agar for the detection of DNA hydrolysis by campylobacters. The toluidine blue-DNA agar gave clear-cut positive and negative reactions with campylobacter strains belonging to several species.

  16. Rapid Detection and Identification of a Pathogen's DNA Using Phi29 DNA Polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Dunn, J.; Gao, S.; Bruno, J. F.; Luft, B. J.

    2008-10-31

    Zoonotic pathogens including those transmitted by insect vectors are some of the most deadly of all infectious diseases known to mankind. A number of these agents have been further weaponized and are widely recognized as being potentially significant biothreat agents. We describe a novel method based on multiply-primed rolling circle in vitro amplification for profiling genomic DNAs to permit rapid, cultivation-free differential detection and identification of circular plasmids in infectious agents. Using Phi29 DNA polymerase and a two-step priming reaction we could reproducibly detect and characterize by DNA sequencing circular DNA from Borrelia burgdorferi B31 in DNA samples containing as little as 25 pg of Borrelia DNA amongst a vast excess of human DNA. This simple technology can ultimately be adapted as a sensitive method to detect specific DNA from both known and unknown pathogens in a wide variety of complex environments.

  17. Detection of DNA damage by comet fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlörmann, Wiebke; Glei, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Comet fluorescence in situ hybridization (Comet-FISH) is a useful method to detect overall and region-specific DNA damage in individual cells. Two well-established methods are combined, the Comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The Comet assay is the method of choice for the detection of DNA damage. With the alkaline version the influence of specific substances such as water pollutants or ingredients of food on individual cells can be easily measured. The Comet assay involves the embedding of cells in agarose on microscopic slides, lysis of cells, and separation of DNA via electrophoresis. Damaged DNA migrates from the nucleus (head of the comet) forming a tail. The percentage of DNA in the tail correlates with the degree of DNA strand breaks (DNA damage). The combination of FISH with the Comet assay uses labeled probes which hybridize specifically to selected DNA sequences. This allows the detection of specific DNA damage or repair capacity in single cells. Here we present exemplarily the Comet-FISH method by detection of DNA damage using hydrogen peroxide as a genotoxic model substrate.

  18. Detection of DNA-RNA Hybrids In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rubio, María; Barroso, Sonia I; Aguilera, Andrés

    2018-01-01

    DNA-RNA hybrids form naturally during essential cellular functions such as transcription and replication. However, they may be an important source of genome instability, a hallmark of cancer and genetic diseases. Detection of DNA-RNA hybrids in cells is becoming crucial to understand an increasing number of molecular biology processes in genome dynamics and function and to identify new factors and mechanisms responsible for disease in biomedical research. Here, we describe two different procedures for the reliable detection of DNA-RNA hybrids in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in human cells: DNA-RNA Immunoprecipitation (DRIP) and Immunofluorescence.

  19. A Universal Fast Colorimetric Method for DNA Signal Detection with DNA Strand Displacement and Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA or gene signal detection is of great significance in many fields including medical examination, intracellular molecular monitoring, and gene disease signal diagnosis, but detection of DNA or gene signals in a low concentration with instant visual results remains a challenge. In this work, a universal fast and visual colorimetric detection method for DNA signals is proposed. Specifically, a DNA signal amplification “circuit” based on DNA strand displacement is firstly designed to amplify the target DNA signals, and then thiol modified hairpin DNA strands and gold nanoparticles are used to make signal detection results visualized in a colorimetric manner. If the target DNA signal exists, the gold nanoparticles aggregate and settle down with color changing from dark red to grey quickly; otherwise, the gold nanoparticles’ colloids remain stable in dark red. The proposed method provides a novel way to detect quickly DNA or gene signals in low concentrations with instant visual results. When applied in real-life, it may provide a universal colorimetric method for gene disease signal diagnosis.

  20. DNA/RNA Detection Using DNA-Templated Few-Atom Silver Nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chih Yeh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA-templated few-atom silver nanoclusters (DNA/Ag NCs are a new class of organic/inorganic composite nanomaterials whose fluorescence emission can be tuned throughout the visible and near-IR range by simply programming the template sequences. Compared to organic dyes, DNA/Ag NCs can be brighter and more photostable. Compared to quantum dots, DNA/Ag NCs are smaller, less prone to blinking on long timescales, and do not have a toxic core. The preparation of DNA/Ag NCs is simple and there is no need to remove excess precursors as these precursors are non-fluorescent. Our recent discovery of the fluorogenic and color switching properties of DNA/Ag NCs have led to the invention of new molecular probes, termed NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs, for DNA detection, with the capability to differentiate single-nucleotide polymorphisms by emission colors. NCBs are inexpensive, easy to prepare, and compatible with commercial DNA synthesizers. Many other groups have also explored and taken advantage of the environment sensitivities of DNA/Ag NCs in creating new tools for DNA/RNA detection and single-nucleotide polymorphism identification. In this review, we summarize the recent trends in the use of DNA/Ag NCs for developing DNA/RNA sensors.

  1. Environmental DNA for Detection of Endangered Grouper Species (Epinephelus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servet A. Doğdu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine ecosystems nestle species or populations known to be threatened due to human overexploitation. Reliable detection and monitoring of threatened organisms is crucial for data-driven conservation actions. Furthermore, misidentification of species represents a major problem. Here, we investigate the potential of using metabarcoding of environmental DNA (eDNA obtained directly from seawater samples to detect endangered grouper species (Epinephelus spp.. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI fragment of mtDNA was used to detect groupers species in the Mediterranean Coasts. We conducted eDNA sampling at sites by underwater diving across the range of the Grouper species habitats in Northeastern Mediterranean (Antalya-Kas Region and Iskenderun Bay. eDNA was isolated from 2 liter seawater samples which were vacuum-filtered onto 0.45-mm membrane filters. Filters were then folded inwards, placed in 2 ml tubes and stored at -20 oC until DNA extraction, which took place within 24 hours. DNA was extracted from the water sample filters using the DNeasy Blood and Tissue Kit (Qiagen, USA. Manufacturer’s protocols were used during all steps. PCR amplification of eDNA samples were done using selective primers of COI region of mitochondrial DNA, and next-generation DNA sequencing of PCR application was conducted. For the successfully obtained COI sequences, maximum matching rates were revealed as 80% for Epinephelus marginatus, 78,95% for Epinephelus aeneus, 73,48% for Epinephelus costae, 63,45% for Epinephelus caninus, 60,12% for Mycteroperca rubra and 57,12% for Hyporthodus haifensis. Despite the methodological challenges inherent in eDNA analysis, the results demonstrated that eDNA method may be proved to step towards a new beginning to detect and monitor endangered grouper species.

  2. DNA Infrared Absorbency Detection using Photopyroelectric Technique and FTIR Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ebu-TEİR, Musa; Abu-TAHA, Mohammad; Al-JAMAL, Atef; EİDEH, H.

    2008-01-01

    Absorbencies of different DNA samples were studied using the well known photopyroelectric (PPE) technique and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. In the fi rst method, wideband radiation absorbance from an infrared (IR) pulsed wideband source (PWBS) by DNA samples were detected and compared with FTIR spectrum. It was shown that the PPE technique results are useful and comparable to FTIR in distinguishing different DNA samples of biological interests

  3. DNA-based species detection capabilities using laser transmission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, A R; Barnes, M A; Li, F; Egan, S P; Tanner, C E; Ruggiero, S T; Feder, J L; Lodge, D M

    2013-01-06

    Early detection of invasive species is critical for effective biocontrol to mitigate potential ecological and economic damage. Laser transmission spectroscopy (LTS) is a powerful solution offering real-time, DNA-based species detection in the field. LTS can measure the size, shape and number of nanoparticles in a solution and was used here to detect size shifts resulting from hybridization of the polymerase chain reaction product to nanoparticles functionalized with species-specific oligonucleotide probes or with the species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone. We carried out a series of DNA detection experiments using the invasive freshwater quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis) to evaluate the capability of the LTS platform for invasive species detection. Specifically, we tested LTS sensitivity to (i) DNA concentrations of a single target species, (ii) the presence of a target species within a mixed sample of other closely related species, (iii) species-specific functionalized nanoparticles versus species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone, and (iv) amplified DNA fragments versus unamplified genomic DNA. We demonstrate that LTS is a highly sensitive technique for rapid target species detection, with detection limits in the picomolar range, capable of successful identification in multispecies samples containing target and non-target species DNA. These results indicate that the LTS DNA detection platform will be useful for field application of target species. Additionally, we find that LTS detection is effective with species-specific oligonucleotide tags alone or when they are attached to polystyrene nanobeads and with both amplified and unamplified DNA, indicating that the technique may also have versatility for broader applications.

  4. Sensitive Leptospira DNA Detection using Tapered Optical Fiber Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin, N H; Chee, H Y; Ahmad, M Z; Mahdi, M A; Abu Bakar, M H; Yaacob, M H

    2018-03-23

    This paper presents the development of tapered optical fiber sensor to detect a specific Leptospira bacteria DNA. The bacteria causes Leptospirosis, a deadly disease but with common early flu-like symptoms. Optical single mode fiber (SMF) of 125 μm diameter is tapered to produce 12 μm waist diameter and 15 cm length. The novel DNA-based optical fiber sensor is functionalised by incubating the tapered region with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), (3-Aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES) and glutaraldehyde. Probe DNA is immobilized onto the tapered region and subsequently hybridized by its complementary DNA. The transmission spectra of the DNA-based optical fiber sensor is measured in the 1500 - 1600 nm wavelength range. It is discovered that the shift of the wavelength in the SMF sensor is linearly proportional with the increase in the complementary DNA concentrations from 0.1 nM to 1.0 nM. The sensitivity of the sensor towards DNA is measured to be 1.2862 nm/nM and able to detect as low as 0.1 fM. The sensor indicates high specificity when only minimal shift is detected for non-complementary DNA testing. The developed sensor is able to distinguish between actual DNA of Leptospira serovars (Canicola and Copenhageni) against Clostridium difficile (control sample) at very low (femtomolar) target concentrations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of an electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor was developed by avidin-biotin interaction of a biotinylated probe and avidin-attached, poly(L-glutamic) acid coated pencil graphite electrode (PGA/PGE) for detection of specific Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA sequence. The discrimination of fully complementary hybridization and ...

  6. DNA based methods used for characterization and detection of food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-04

    May 4, 2009 ... and a DNA ligase enzyme to drive the reaction. Like. PCR, LCR requires a thermal circler to drive the reaction and each cycle results in a doubling of the target nucleic acid molecule. ..... Electric detection of DNA hybridization by nanoparticle nanoswitch. Curr. Appl. Phys. 6S1: e157-e160. Chinowsky TM ...

  7. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA analysis and sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Tang, K.; Allman, S.L.

    1995-03-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been considered as a potential new method for fast DNA sequencing. Our approach is to use matrix-assisted laser desorption to produce parent ions of DNA segments and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to identify the sizes of DNA segments. Thus, the approach is similar to gel electrophoresis sequencing using Sanger`s enzymatic method. However, gel, radioactive tagging, and dye labeling are not required. In addition, the sequencing process can possibly be finished within a few hundred microseconds instead of hours and days. In order to use mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing, the following three criteria need to be satisfied. They are (1) detection of large DNA segments, (2) sensitivity reaching the femtomole region, and (3) mass resolution good enough to separate DNA segments of a single nucleotide difference. It has been very difficult to detect large DNA segments by mass spectrometry before due to the fragile chemical properties of DNA and low detection sensitivity of DNA ions. We discovered several new matrices to increase the production of DNA ions. By innovative design of a mass spectrometer, we can increase the ion energy up to 45 KeV to enhance the detection sensitivity. Recently, we succeeded in detecting a DNA segment with 500 nucleotides. The sensitivity was 100 femtomole. Thus, we have fulfilled two key criteria for using mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing. The major effort in the near future is to improve the resolution. Different approaches are being pursued. When high resolution of mass spectrometry can be achieved and automation of sample preparation is developed, the sequencing speed to reach 500 megabases per year can be feasible.

  8. Electrochemical Detection of DNA Using Nanomaterials Based Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Sergio; Merkoçi, Arben

    The detection of non-amplified DNA sequences plays a crucial role in the rapid diagnosis of genetic-related diseases especially for early stage treatment. Among the various biosensors that have been used for DNA detection, electrochemical sensors show great promise because they present efficient signal transduction and are capable of precise DNA recognition at a relatively low cost in addition to the broad range of designs with interest to be applied in different kinds of samples. Advancements in micro- and nanotechnologies, specifically fabrication techniques and new nanomaterials, have enabled for the development of highly sensitive, highly specific electrochemical sensors making them attractive for the detection of small sequence variations. Furthermore, the integration of sensors with sample preparation and fluidic processes enables for rapid, multiplexed electrochemical DNA detection essential for point of care clinical diagnostics.

  9. DNA microarray technique for detecting food-borne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing GAO

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the application of DNA microarray technique for screening and identifying multiple food-borne pathogens. Methods The oligonucleotide probes were designed by Clustal X and Oligo 6.0 at the conserved regions of specific genes of multiple food-borne pathogens, and then were validated by bioinformatic analyses. The 5' end of each probe was modified by amino-group and 10 Poly-T, and the optimized probes were synthesized and spotted on aldehyde-coated slides. The bacteria DNA template incubated with Klenow enzyme was amplified by arbitrarily primed PCR, and PCR products incorporated into Aminoallyl-dUTP were coupled with fluorescent dye. After hybridization of the purified PCR products with DNA microarray, the hybridization image and fluorescence intensity analysis was acquired by ScanArray and GenePix Pro 5.1 software. A series of detection conditions such as arbitrarily primed PCR and microarray hybridization were optimized. The specificity of this approach was evaluated by 16 different bacteria DNA, and the sensitivity and reproducibility were verified by 4 food-borne pathogens DNA. The samples of multiple bacteria DNA and simulated water samples of Shigella dysenteriae were detected. Results Nine different food-borne bacteria were successfully discriminated under the same condition. The sensitivity of genomic DNA was 102 -103pg/ μl, and the coefficient of variation (CV of the reproducibility of assay was less than 15%. The corresponding specific hybridization maps of the multiple bacteria DNA samples were obtained, and the detection limit of simulated water sample of Shigella dysenteriae was 3.54×105cfu/ml. Conclusions The DNA microarray detection system based on arbitrarily primed PCR can be employed for effective detection of multiple food-borne pathogens, and this assay may offer a new method for high-throughput platform for detecting bacteria.

  10. RADIA: RNA and DNA integrated analysis for somatic mutation detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amie J Radenbaugh

    Full Text Available The detection of somatic single nucleotide variants is a crucial component to the characterization of the cancer genome. Mutation calling algorithms thus far have focused on comparing the normal and tumor genomes from the same individual. In recent years, it has become routine for projects like The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA to also sequence the tumor RNA. Here we present RADIA (RNA and DNA Integrated Analysis, a novel computational method combining the patient-matched normal and tumor DNA with the tumor RNA to detect somatic mutations. The inclusion of the RNA increases the power to detect somatic mutations, especially at low DNA allelic frequencies. By integrating an individual's DNA and RNA, we are able to detect mutations that would otherwise be missed by traditional algorithms that examine only the DNA. We demonstrate high sensitivity (84% and very high precision (98% and 99% for RADIA in patient data from endometrial carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from TCGA. Mutations with both high DNA and RNA read support have the highest validation rate of over 99%. We also introduce a simulation package that spikes in artificial mutations to patient data, rather than simulating sequencing data from a reference genome. We evaluate sensitivity on the simulation data and demonstrate our ability to rescue back mutations at low DNA allelic frequencies by including the RNA. Finally, we highlight mutations in important cancer genes that were rescued due to the incorporation of the RNA.

  11. Electrochemical detection of DNA triplet repeat expansion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojta, Miroslav; Havran, Luděk; Vojtíšková, Marie; Paleček, Emil

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 21 (2004), s. 6532-6533 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4004402; GA AV ČR IBS5004355; GA AV ČR KJB4004302; GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : DNA triplet repeat expansion * PCR amplification * neurodegenerative diseases Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.903, year: 2004

  12. High-speed detection of DNA translocation in nanopipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccari, Raquel L.; Ciccarella, Pietro; Bahrami, Azadeh; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Albrecht, Tim

    2016-03-01

    We present a high-speed electrical detection scheme based on a custom-designed CMOS amplifier which allows the analysis of DNA translocation in glass nanopipettes on a microsecond timescale. Translocation of different DNA lengths in KCl electrolyte provides a scaling factor of the DNA translocation time equal to p = 1.22, which is different from values observed previously with nanopipettes in LiCl electrolyte or with nanopores. Based on a theoretical model involving electrophoresis, hydrodynamics and surface friction, we show that the experimentally observed range of p-values may be the result of, or at least be affected by DNA adsorption and friction between the DNA and the substrate surface.We present a high-speed electrical detection scheme based on a custom-designed CMOS amplifier which allows the analysis of DNA translocation in glass nanopipettes on a microsecond timescale. Translocation of different DNA lengths in KCl electrolyte provides a scaling factor of the DNA translocation time equal to p = 1.22, which is different from values observed previously with nanopipettes in LiCl electrolyte or with nanopores. Based on a theoretical model involving electrophoresis, hydrodynamics and surface friction, we show that the experimentally observed range of p-values may be the result of, or at least be affected by DNA adsorption and friction between the DNA and the substrate surface. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Gel electrophoresis confirming lengths and purity of DNA samples, comparison between Axopatch 200B and custom-built setup, comprehensive low-noise amplifier characterization, representative I-V curves of nanopipettes used, typical scatter plots of τ vs. peak amplitude for the four LDNA's used, table of most probable τ values, a comparison between different fitting models for the DNA translocation time distribution, further details on the stochastic numerical simulation of the scaling statistics and the derivation of the extended

  13. DNA based methods used for characterization and detection of food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of food borne pathogen is of outmost importance in the food industries and related agencies. For the last few decades conventional methods were used to detect food borne pathogens based on phenotypic characters. At the advent of complementary base pairing and amplification of DNA, the diagnosis of food ...

  14. Dual-Specific Interaction to Detect DNA on Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Tobias Aveling Jenkins

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An approach to selectively and efficiently detect single strand DNA is developed by using streptavidin coated gold nanoparticles (StAuNPs as efficient quenchers. The central concept for the successful detection is the combination the of streptavidin-biotin interaction with specific probe-target DNA hybridization. Biotin labeled probe DNAs act as “bridges” to bring Cy5 labeled targets to the particle surface and the fluorophore dye can be rapidly and efficiently quenched by StAuPNs. By measuring the changes of photoluminescence intensity of Cy5, an efficient, selective, and reversed detection of DNA hybridization is realized. The methodology may pave a new way for simple and rapid detections of biomolecules.

  15. Optical Detection of Non-amplified Genomic DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di; Fan, Chunhai

    Nucleic acid sequences are unique to every living organisms including animals, plants and even bacteria and virus, which provide a practical molecular target for the identification and diagnosis of various diseases. DNA contains heterocyclic rings that has inherent optical absorbance at 260 nm, which is widely used to quantify single and double stranded DNA in biology. However, this simple quantification method could not differentiate sequences; therefore it is not suitable for sequence-specific analyte detection. In addition to a few exceptions such as chiral-related circular dichroism spectra, DNA hybridization does not produce significant changes in optical signals, thus an optical label is generally needed for sequence-specific DNA detection with optical means. During the last two decades, we have witnessed explosive progress in the area of optical DNA detection, especially with the help of simultaneously rapidly developed nanomaterials. In this chapter, we will summarize recent advances in optical DNA detection including colorimetric, fluorescent, luminescent, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and Raman scattering assays. Challenges and problems remained to be addressed are also discussed.

  16. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of DNA damage induced by hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájková, Andrea; Barek, Jiří; Vyskočil, Vlastimil

    2017-08-01

    A simple electrochemical DNA biosensor based on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was prepared by adsorbing double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) onto the GCE surface and subsequently used for the detection of dsDNA damage induced by hydroxyl radicals. Investigation of the mutual interaction between hydroxyl radicals and dsDNA was conducted using a combination of several electrochemical detection techniques: square-wave voltammetry for direct monitoring the oxidation of dsDNA bases, and cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as indirect electrochemical methods making use of the redox-active indicator [Fe(CN) 6 ] 4-/3- . Hydroxyl radicals were generated electrochemically on the surface of a boron-doped diamond electrode and chemically (via the Fenton's reaction or the auto-oxidation of Fe(II)). The extent of dsDNA damage by electrochemically generated hydroxyl radicals depended on the current density applied to the generating electrode: by applying 5, 10, and 50mAcm -2 , selected relative biosensor responses decreased after 3min incubation from 100% to 38%, 27%, and 3%, respectively. Chemically generated hydroxyl radicals caused less pronounced dsDNA damage, and their damaging activity depended on the form of Fe(II) ions: decreases to 49% (Fenton's reaction; Fe(II) complexed with EDTA) and 33% (auto-oxidation of Fe(II); Fe(II) complexed with dsDNA) were observed after 10min incubation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Constructing and detecting a cDNA library for mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Zhao, YaE; Cheng, Juan; Yang, YuanJun; Li, Chen; Lu, ZhaoHui

    2015-10-01

    RNA extraction and construction of complementary DNA (cDNA) library for mites have been quite challenging due to difficulties in acquiring tiny living mites and breaking their hard chitin. The present study is to explore a better method to construct cDNA library for mites that will lay the foundation on transcriptome and molecular pathogenesis research. We selected Psoroptes cuniculi as an experimental subject and took the following steps to construct and verify cDNA library. First, we combined liquid nitrogen grinding with TRIzol for total RNA extraction. Then, switching mechanism at 5' end of the RNA transcript (SMART) technique was used to construct full-length cDNA library. To evaluate the quality of cDNA library, the library titer and recombination rate were calculated. The reliability of cDNA library was detected by sequencing and analyzing positive clones and genes amplified by specific primers. The results showed that the RNA concentration was 836 ng/μl and the absorbance ratio at 260/280 nm was 1.82. The library titer was 5.31 × 10(5) plaque-forming unit (PFU)/ml and the recombination rate was 98.21%, indicating that the library was of good quality. In the 33 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of P. cuniculi, two clones of 1656 and 1658 bp were almost identical with only three variable sites detected, which had an identity of 99.63% with that of Psoroptes ovis, indicating that the cDNA library was reliable. Further detection by specific primers demonstrated that the 553-bp Pso c II gene sequences of P. cuniculi had an identity of 98.56% with those of P. ovis, confirming that the cDNA library was not only reliable but also feasible.

  18. Electrochemical DNA detection based on the polyhedral boron cluster label

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelen, František; Olejniczak, A.B.; Kouřilová, Alena; Lesnikowski, Z.J.; Paleček, Emil

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 2 (2009), s. 840-844 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100040602; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040804; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/07/0490 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA detection * DNA hybridization * polyhedral boron cluster Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.214, year: 2009

  19. Performance of mitochondrial DNA mutations detecting early stage cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakupciak, John P; Srivastava, Sudhir; Sidransky, David; O'Connell, Catherine D; Maragh, Samantha; Markowitz, Maura E; Greenberg, Alissa K; Hoque, Mohammad O; Maitra, Anirban; Barker, Peter E; Wagner, Paul D; Rom, William N

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) have been associated with cancer and many other disorders. These mutations can be point mutations or deletions, or admixtures (heteroplasmy). The detection of mtDNA mutations in body fluids using resequencing microarrays, which are more sensitive than other sequencing methods, could provide a strategy to measure mutation loads in remote anatomical sites. We determined the mtDNA mutation load in the entire mitochondrial genome of 26 individuals with different early stage cancers (lung, bladder, kidney) and 12 heavy smokers without cancer. MtDNA was sequenced from three matched specimens (blood, tumor and body fluid) from each cancer patient and two matched specimens (blood and sputum) from smokers without cancer. The inherited wildtype sequence in the blood was compared to the sequences present in the tumor and body fluid, detected using the Affymetrix Genechip ® Human Mitochondrial Resequencing Array 1.0 and supplemented by capillary sequencing for noncoding region. Using this high-throughput method, 75% of the tumors were found to contain mtDNA mutations, higher than in our previous studies, and 36% of the body fluids from these cancer patients contained mtDNA mutations. Most of the mutations detected were heteroplasmic. A statistically significantly higher heteroplasmy rate occurred in tumor specimens when compared to both body fluid of cancer patients and sputum of controls, and in patient blood compared to blood of controls. Only 2 of the 12 sputum specimens from heavy smokers without cancer (17%) contained mtDNA mutations. Although patient mutations were spread throughout the mtDNA genome in the lung, bladder and kidney series, a statistically significant elevation of tRNA and ND complex mutations was detected in tumors. Our findings indicate comprehensive mtDNA resequencing can be a high-throughput tool for detecting mutations in clinical samples with potential applications for cancer detection, but it is

  20. Performance of mitochondrial DNA mutations detecting early stage cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Paul D

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome have been associated with cancer and many other disorders. These mutations can be point mutations or deletions, or admixtures (heteroplasmy. The detection of mtDNA mutations in body fluids using resequencing microarrays, which are more sensitive than other sequencing methods, could provide a strategy to measure mutation loads in remote anatomical sites. Methods We determined the mtDNA mutation load in the entire mitochondrial genome of 26 individuals with different early stage cancers (lung, bladder, kidney and 12 heavy smokers without cancer. MtDNA was sequenced from three matched specimens (blood, tumor and body fluid from each cancer patient and two matched specimens (blood and sputum from smokers without cancer. The inherited wildtype sequence in the blood was compared to the sequences present in the tumor and body fluid, detected using the Affymetrix Genechip® Human Mitochondrial Resequencing Array 1.0 and supplemented by capillary sequencing for noncoding region. Results Using this high-throughput method, 75% of the tumors were found to contain mtDNA mutations, higher than in our previous studies, and 36% of the body fluids from these cancer patients contained mtDNA mutations. Most of the mutations detected were heteroplasmic. A statistically significantly higher heteroplasmy rate occurred in tumor specimens when compared to both body fluid of cancer patients and sputum of controls, and in patient blood compared to blood of controls. Only 2 of the 12 sputum specimens from heavy smokers without cancer (17% contained mtDNA mutations. Although patient mutations were spread throughout the mtDNA genome in the lung, bladder and kidney series, a statistically significant elevation of tRNA and ND complex mutations was detected in tumors. Conclusion Our findings indicate comprehensive mtDNA resequencing can be a high-throughput tool for detecting mutations in clinical samples with

  1. Facilitating the indirect detection of genomic DNA in an electrochemical DNA biosensor using magnetic nanoparticles and DNA ligase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Hushiarian

    2015-12-01

    This technique was found to be reliably repeatable. The indirect detection of genomic DNA using this method is significantly improved and showed high efficiency in small amounts of samples with the detection limit of 5.37 × 10−14 M.

  2. DNA probes for the detection of Fasciola hepatica in snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heussler, V; Kaufmann, H; Strahm, D; Liz, J; Dobbelaere, D

    1993-08-01

    Fasciola hepatica, also called the large liver fluke, is a trematode which can infect most mammals. Monitoring the infection rate of snails, which function as intermediate hosts and harbour larval stages of F. hepatica, is an important component of epidemiological studies on fascioliasis. For this purpose, DNA probes were generated which can be used for the detection of F. hepatica larvae in snails. Four highly repetitive DNA fragments were cloned in a plasmid vector and tested by Southern blot hybridization to the DNA of various trematodes for specificity and sensitivity. The probes Fhr-I, Fhr-II and Fhr-III hybridized only to F. hepatica DNA. Fhr-IV contained ribosomal RNA gene sequences and cross-hybridize with the DNA from various other trematode species. Squash blot analysis showed that the different probes were able to detect the parasite larvae in trematode-infected snails even as isolated single larvae. No signals were obtained in squash blots of uninfected snails. Probes Fhr-I, Fhr-II and Fhr-III are thus useful specific tools for studying the epidemiology of fascioliasis. The probe Fhr-IV, because of its broader spectrum, can be used to detect the larvae of a wide range of trematode species of waterbirds, which are the causative agents of swimmer's itch.

  3. Detection of circular telomeric DNA without 2D gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlaska, Margit; Anderl, Conrad; Eisterer, Wolfgang; Bechter, Oliver E

    2008-09-01

    The end of linear chromosomes forms a lasso-like structure called the t-loop. Such t-loops resemble a DNA recombination intermediate, where the single-stranded 3' overhang is arrested in a stretch of duplex DNA. Presumably, such a t-loop can also be deleted via a recombination process. This would result in the occurrence of circular extrachromosomal telomeric DNA (t-circles), which are known to be abundantly present in immortal cells engaging the recombination-based alternative lengthening of telomeres pathway (ALT pathway). Little is known about the basic mechanism of telomeric recombination in these cells and what ultimately causes the generation of such t-circles. Current standard procedures for detecting these molecules involve 2D gel electrophoresis or electron microscopy. However, both methods are labor intense and sophisticated to perform. Here, we present a simpler, faster, and equally sensitive method for detecting t-circles. Our approach is a telomere restriction fragment assay that involves the enzymatic preservation of circular DNA with Klenow enzyme followed by Bal31 degradation of the remaining linear DNA molecules. We show that with this approach t-circles can be detected in ALT cell lines, whereas no t-circles are present in telomerase-positive cell lines. We consider our approach a valid method in which t-circle generation is the experimental readout.

  4. Irradiation detection of food by DNA Comet Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Delincee, H.

    1999-01-01

    Microgel electrophoresis of single cells or nuclei (DNA Comet Assay) has been investigated to detect irradiation treatment of more than 50 food commodities e.g. meats, seafood, cereals, pulses, nuts, fruits and vegetables, and spices. The foodstuffs have been exposed to radiation doses covering the range of potential commercial irradiation for inactivation of pathogenic and spoilage micro-organisms, for insect disinfestation and for shelf-life extension. The Comet Assay is based on detection of DNA fragments presumptive to irradiation. For most of the food items investigated, the assay can be applied successfully for irradiation detection by working out different conditions of the assay. However, with some of the foods difficulties arose due to - lack of discrimination between the irradiated and unirradiated food samples due to the presence of the same kinds of comets in both cases and the total absence of the typical intact cells in unirradiated samples. - Sufficient DNA material was not available from some of the foods. - Insufficient lysis of the cell walls in case of some plant foods. In conclusion, the DNA Comet Assay can help to detect the irradiation treatment of several varieties of foods using low-cost equipment in a short time of analysis. (orig.)

  5. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 2. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ... Abstract. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) plays an important role in growth, reproduction, foetal development and cell proliferation. The present study was conducted to clone and sequence the ...

  6. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    THOMAS NAICY

    [Naicy T., Venkatachalapathy T., Aravindakshan T., Raghavan K. C., Mini M. and Shyama K. 2017 cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue expression profile of the IGF1 gene in Malabari and Attappady Black goats of India. J. Genet. 96, xx–xx]. Introduction. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), an important ...

  7. Synthesis of streptavidin-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for DNA detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Peijun, E-mail: skygpj@zjnu.cn; Peng Zheyang; Wang Yao; Qiao Ru; Mao Weixing; Qian Haisheng; Zhang Mengya; Li Congcong; Shi Shenyuan [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University (China)

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, we report a fabrication of streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles used for DNA detection. Initially, amino-functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with high saturation magnetization are prepared by a photopolymerization method using allylamine as monomer. It is followed by covalent immobilization of streptavidin onto the particle surface via a two-step reaction using glutaraldehyde as coupling agent. Streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles are characterized and further tested for their ability to capture DNA target after binding biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. The results show that the products ({approx}27.2 nm) have a maximum biotin-binding capacity of 0.71 nmol mg{sup -1} when the immobilization reaction is conducted with a mass ratio of streptavidin to magnetic carriers above 0.2 in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) for 24 h. In addition, highly negative {zeta}-potential and good magnetic susceptibility of the nanocomposites make them applicable for DNA collection and detection, which is verified by the results from the preliminary application of streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles in DNA detection. Therefore, the magnetic nanoparticles provide a promising approach for rapid collection and detection of gene.

  8. Synthesis of streptavidin-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for DNA detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peijun; Peng, Zheyang; Wang, Yao; Qiao, Ru; Mao, Weixing; Qian, Haisheng; Zhang, Mengya; Li, Congcong; Shi, Shenyuan

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we report a fabrication of streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles used for DNA detection. Initially, amino-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles with high saturation magnetization are prepared by a photopolymerization method using allylamine as monomer. It is followed by covalent immobilization of streptavidin onto the particle surface via a two-step reaction using glutaraldehyde as coupling agent. Streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles are characterized and further tested for their ability to capture DNA target after binding biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. The results show that the products ( 27.2 nm) have a maximum biotin-binding capacity of 0.71 nmol mg-1 when the immobilization reaction is conducted with a mass ratio of streptavidin to magnetic carriers above 0.2 in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) for 24 h. In addition, highly negative ζ-potential and good magnetic susceptibility of the nanocomposites make them applicable for DNA collection and detection, which is verified by the results from the preliminary application of streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles in DNA detection. Therefore, the magnetic nanoparticles provide a promising approach for rapid collection and detection of gene.

  9. DNA nanotechnology for nucleic acid analysis: multifunctional molecular DNA machine for RNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A J; Bengtson, H N; Rohde, K H; Kolpashchikov, D M

    2016-12-06

    The Nobel prize in chemistry in 2016 was awarded for 'the design and synthesis of molecular machines'. Here we designed and assembled a molecular machine for the detection of specific RNA molecules. An association of several DNA strands, named multifunctional DNA machine for RNA analysis (MDMR1), was designed to (i) unwind RNA with the help of RNA-binding arms, (ii) selectively recognize a targeted RNA fragment, (iii) attract a signal-producing substrate and (iv) amplify the fluorescent signal by catalysis. MDMR1 enabled detection of 16S rRNA at concentrations ∼24 times lower than that by a traditional deoxyribozyme probe.

  10. Label-free potentiometry for detecting DNA hybridization using peptide nucleic acid and DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-02-07

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry.

  11. Label-Free Potentiometry for Detecting DNA Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid and DNA Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry. PMID:23435052

  12. Plasma HPV DNA is detectable in oral leukoplakia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lígia Lavezo; Biasoli, Éder Ricardo; Bernabé, Daniel Galera; Nunes, Cáris Maroni; Miyahara, Glauco Issamu

    2017-07-01

    Oral leukoplakia is considered a potentially malignant lesion for the development of squamous cell carcinoma, and various risk factors may be related to its development and malignant transformation, including the human papillomavirus (HPV). The aim of this case-control study was to detect the presence of HPV in fresh tissue, plasma and saliva samples obtained from patients with and without oral leukoplakia, and verify the correlation of the presence of DNA of HPV between different sources of materials. In this study, 32 patients with oral leukoplakia and 24 patients selected in a case-control manner were included. DNA extraction from the samples was performed, and afterwards it was amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) for the detection of HPV (nPCR: MY09-MY11/GP05+-GP06+). The DNA of HPV was found in 68.75% of the fresh tissue samples; in 50% of plasma, and in 62.5% of saliva samples in the group of patients with leukoplakia; in comparison with 45.8%, 54%, and 45.8%, in the fresh tissue, plasma and saliva samples, respectively, in the control group. Based on the present study, there was no difference in the rate of HPV detection in patients with or without oral leukoplakia. However all sources tested in this study were considered suitable for HPV detection, especially plasma samples, which showed be an important non-invasive source of HPV detection in leukoplakia patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of sample storage time on detection of hybridization signals in Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Cássio; Muller, Katia; Sato, Sandra; Albuquerque Junior, Rubens Ferreira

    2012-04-01

    Long-term sample storage can affect the intensity of the hybridization signals provided by molecular diagnostic methods that use chemiluminescent detection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different storage times on the hybridization signals of 13 bacterial species detected by the Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method using whole-genomic DNA probes. Ninety-six subgingival biofilm samples were collected from 36 healthy subjects, and the intensity of hybridization signals was evaluated at 4 different time periods: (1) immediately after collecting (n = 24) and (2) after storage at -20 °C for 6 months (n = 24), (3) for 12 months (n = 24), and (4) for 24 months (n = 24). The intensity of hybridization signals obtained from groups 1 and 2 were significantly higher than in the other groups (p  0.05). The Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method was suitable to detect hybridization signals from all groups evaluated, and the intensity of signals decreased significantly after long periods of sample storage.

  14. Circulating tumor DNA detection (liquid biopsy: prospects in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Zhukov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern research techniques allows tumor studying in almost any level: protein expression, structural changes of DNA, RNA, epigenetic changes, activity of signaling pathways, microenvironment, interaction with the immune system, etc. However, tumor samples are obtained as 100 years ago – by tumor biopsy prior to treatment. Based on available data about intratumoral heterogeneity and tumor changes during treatment, it may be one of the factors braking to obtain required information of tumor biology. According to study, the analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA allows to hope to overcome the key limitations of routine biopsy. One of the key benefits of ctDNA analysis is the ability to a more comprehensive tumor investigation, while maintaining a high level of specificity, almost as well as a routine biopsy. Detection sensitivity of ctDNA continues to increase due to the development of new technology. The study of ctDNA may lead to breakthrough results in understanding of tumors molecular heterogeneity, development of resistance to anticancer therapy and ways to overcome it, screening and a number of other key areas of modern oncology.

  15. A fluorescence method for detection of DNA and DNA methylation based on graphene oxide and restriction endonuclease HpaII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Gao, Chunyan; Xiong, Yanxiang; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin; Pu, Yuepu

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in many biological events and is associated with various diseases. Most traditional methods for detection of DNA methylation are based on the complex and expensive bisulfite method. In this paper, we report a novel fluorescence method to detect DNA and DNA methylation based on graphene oxide (GO) and restriction endonuclease HpaII. The skillfully designed probe DNA labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and optimized GO concentration keep the probe/target DNA still adsorbed on the GO. After the cleavage action of HpaII the labeled FAM is released from the GO surface and its fluorescence recovers, which could be used to detect DNA in the linear range of 50 pM-50 nM with a detection limit of 43 pM. DNA methylation induced by transmethylase (Mtase) or other chemical reagents prevents HpaII from recognizing and cleaving the specific site; as a result, fluorescence cannot recover. The fluorescence recovery efficiency is closely related to the DNA methylation level, which can be used to detect DNA methylation by comparing it with the fluorescence in the presence of intact target DNA. The method for detection of DNA and DNA methylation is simple, reliable and accurate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Statistical guidelines for detecting past population shifts using ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Gilbert, Tom

    2012-01-01

    post-bottleneck recoveries. In contrast, nuclear SNPs can detect bottlenecks followed by rapid recovery, although bottlenecks involving reduction of less than half the population are generally detected with low power unless extensive genetic information from ancient individuals is available. Our...... results provide useful guidelines for scaling sampling schemes and for optimizing our ability to infer past population dynamics. In addition, our results suggest that many ancient DNA studies may face power issues in detecting moderate demographic collapses and/or highly dynamic demographic shifts when...

  17. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cun; Xu, Shichao; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Sun, Shuqing; Feng, Teilin; Zi, Yan; Liang, Chu; Luo, Hao

    2009-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a kind of microscopic parasite that may infect humans, and there are increasing concerns on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. This research highlights a new type of molecular beacon (MB) fluorescent probe for Toxoplasma DNA testing. We combined high-efficiency fluorescent inorganic core-shell quantum dots-CdTe/ZnS (as fluorescent energy donor) and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) to the single-strand DNA of Toxoplasma gondii, and a molecular beacon sensing system based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was achieved. Core-shell quantum dots CdTe/ZnS was firstly prepared in aqueous solution, and the influencing factor of its fluorescent properties, including CdTe/Na2S/Zn(CH3COO)2 (v/v), dependence of reaction time, temperature, and pH, is investigated systematically. The synthesized quantum dots and molecular beacon were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis), fluorescent spectrophotometer (FS), respectively. The TEM results showed that CdTe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots is ~11nm in size, and the quantum dots is water-soluble well. The sensing ability of target DNA of assembled MB was investigated, and results showed that the target Toxoplasma gonddi DNA can be successfully detected by measuring the change of fluorescence intensity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  18. DNA biosensor by self-assembly of carbon nanotubes and DNA to detect riboflavin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Jing [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Chongqing University, ChongQing, 400044 (China); Zhang Yunhuai, E-mail: xp2031@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Chongqing University, ChongQing, 400044 (China); Yang Tongyi [School of Life Science. NanJing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Zhang Huai [Liming Research Institute of Chemical Industry, LuoYang, 471001 (China); Yang Yixuan [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering. Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Xiao Peng [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2009-10-15

    The fabrication of biosensors via self-assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and DNA on a platinum electrode was presented in this paper. The carboxylic SWNTs were assembled on an amine-modified platinum electrode surface and followed by the assembly of NH{sub 2}-DNA with the carboxyl-amine coupling. The decorated surface was characterized by Field Emission Electron Microscopy (FEG-SEM) and electrochemical experiments, which showed that the reaction of DNA-SWNTs biosensor was quasi-reversible. The mechanism of DNA and riboflavin (VB{sub 2}) was studied by cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The fabricated SWNTs-reinforced biosensor exhibits high sensitivity and low detection limit for the tested VB{sub 2} compared to the reported methods.

  19. Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection with a magnetic molecular beacon probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma Gondii infection is widespread in humans worldwide and reported infection rates range from 3%-70%, depending on the populations or geographic areas, and it has been recognized as a potential food safety hazard in our daily life. A magnetic molecular beacon probe (mMBP), based on theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), was currently reported to detect Toxoplasma Gondii DNA. Nano-sized Fe3O4 were primarily prepared by coprecipitation method in aqueous phase with NaOH as precipitator, and was used as magnetic core. The qualified coreshell magnetic quantum dots (mQDs), i.e. CdTe(symbol)Fe3O4, were then achieved by layer-by-layer method when mol ratio of Fe3O4/CdTe is 1/3, pH at 6.0, 30 °C, and reactant solution was refluxed for 30 min, the size of mQDs were determined to be 12-15 nm via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Over 70% overlap between emission spectrum of mQDs and absorbance spectrum of BHQ-2 was observed, this result suggests the synthesized mQDs and BHQ-2 can be utilized as energy donor and energy acceptor, respectively. The sensing probe was fabricated and a stem-loop Toxoplasma Gondii DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with mQDs at the 5' end and BHQ-2 at 3' end, respectively. Target Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected under conditions of 37 °C, hybridization for 2h, at pH8.0 in Tris-HCl buffer. About 30% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed via fluorescence spectrum (FS) after the Toxoplasma gondii DNA was added, which suggested that the Toxoplasma Gondii DNA was successfully detected. Specificity investigation of the mMBP indicated that relative low recovery of fluorescence intensity was obtained when the target DNA with one-base pair mismatch was added, this result indicated the high specificity of the sensing probe. Our research simultaneously indicated that mMBP can be conveniently separated from the unhybridized stem-loop DNA and target DNA, which will be meaningful in DNA sensing and purification process.

  20. Effect of irradiation on the detection of bacterial DNA in contaminated food samples by DNA hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, T.F.; Towner, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    A membrane-based DNA hybridization technique was used in a model system to examine the effect of irradiation treatment on the detection of bacterial contamination in foodstuffs. Although hybridization signals were reduced compared with otherwise identical unirradiated food samples, artificial contamination levels in excess of 10 5 cfu per test could be distinguished in 12 of the 13 foods examined following the irradiation process. In no case were viable bacteria detected following irradiation treatment. (Author)

  1. DNA Microarray Detection of 18 Important Human Blood Protozoan Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Ai, Lin; Chen, Jun-Hu; Feng, Xin-Yu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Cai, Yu-Chun; Lu, Yan; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Chen, Jia-Xu; Hu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Accurate detection of blood protozoa from clinical samples is important for diagnosis, treatment and control of related diseases. In this preliminary study, a novel DNA microarray system was assessed for the detection of Plasmodium, Leishmania, Trypanosoma, Toxoplasma gondii and Babesia in humans, animals, and vectors, in comparison with microscopy and PCR data. Developing a rapid, simple, and convenient detection method for protozoan detection is an urgent need. The microarray assay simultaneously identified 18 species of common blood protozoa based on the differences in respective target genes. A total of 20 specific primer pairs and 107 microarray probes were selected according to conserved regions which were designed to identify 18 species in 5 blood protozoan genera. The positive detection rate of the microarray assay was 91.78% (402/438). Sensitivity and specificity for blood protozoan detection ranged from 82.4% (95%CI: 65.9% ~ 98.8%) to 100.0% and 95.1% (95%CI: 93.2% ~ 97.0%) to 100.0%, respectively. Positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) ranged from 20.0% (95%CI: 2.5% ~ 37.5%) to 100.0% and 96.8% (95%CI: 95.0% ~ 98.6%) to 100.0%, respectively. Youden index varied from 0.82 to 0.98. The detection limit of the DNA microarrays ranged from 200 to 500 copies/reaction, similar to PCR findings. The concordance rate between microarray data and DNA sequencing results was 100%. Overall, the newly developed microarray platform provides a convenient, highly accurate, and reliable clinical assay for the determination of blood protozoan species.

  2. DNA Microviscosity Characterization with Particle Diffusometry for Downstream DNA Detection Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Katherine N; Berglund, Gregory D; Linnes, Jacqueline C; Kinzer-Ursem, Tamara L; Wereley, Steven T

    2017-12-19

    Analytical characterization of DNA microviscosity provides critical biophysical insights into nuclear crowding, nucleic acid based pharmaceutical development, and nucleic acid based biosensor device design. However, most viscosity characterization methods require large sample volumes and destructive testing. In contrast, particle diffusometry permits in situ analysis of DNA microviscosity with short measurement times (8 s) using small volumes (<3 μL) which are compatible with DNA preparatory procedures. This unconventional biosensing approach involves measuring the change in sample viscosity using image processing and correlation-based algorithms. Particle diffusometry requires only a fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and is a nondestructive measurement method. We use particle diffusometry to characterize the effect of DNA topology, length, and concentration on solution viscosity. In addition, we use particle diffusometry to detect the amplification of DNA from Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae, two pathogens commonly related to neonatal sepsis. Successful characterization of pathogen amplification with particle diffusometry provides a new opportunity to apply viscosity characterization toward downstream applications in nucleic acid based pathogen detection.

  3. Environmental DNA (eDNA metabarcoding assays to detect invasive invertebrate species in the Great Lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy E Klymus

    Full Text Available Describing and monitoring biodiversity comprise integral parts of ecosystem management. Recent research coupling metabarcoding and environmental DNA (eDNA demonstrate that these methods can serve as important tools for surveying biodiversity, while significantly decreasing the time, expense and resources spent on traditional survey methods. The literature emphasizes the importance of genetic marker development, as the markers dictate the applicability, sensitivity and resolution ability of an eDNA assay. The present study developed two metabarcoding eDNA assays using the mtDNA 16S RNA gene with Illumina MiSeq platform to detect invertebrate fauna in the Laurentian Great Lakes and surrounding waterways, with a focus for use on invasive bivalve and gastropod species monitoring. We employed careful primer design and in vitro testing with mock communities to assess ability of the markers to amplify and sequence targeted species DNA, while retaining rank abundance information. In our mock communities, read abundances reflected the initial input abundance, with regressions having significant slopes (p<0.05 and high coefficients of determination (R2 for all comparisons. Tests on field environmental samples revealed similar ability of our markers to measure relative abundance. Due to the limited reference sequence data available for these invertebrate species, care must be taken when analyzing results and identifying sequence reads to species level. These markers extend eDNA metabarcoding research for molluscs and appear relevant to other invertebrate taxa, such as rotifers and bryozoans. Furthermore, the sphaeriid mussel assay is group-specific, exclusively amplifying bivalves in the Sphaeridae family and providing species-level identification. Our assays provide useful tools for managers and conservation scientists, facilitating early detection of invasive species as well as improving resolution of mollusc diversity.

  4. Dientamoeba fragilis DNA detection in Enterobius vermicularis eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ögren, Jessica; Dienus, Olaf; Löfgren, Sture; Iveroth, Peter; Matussek, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is an intestinal protozoan suspected of causing gastrointestinal symptoms, and its mode of transmission is unknown, although first described almost a century ago. A hypothesis is that Enterobius vermicularis is a vector for D. fragilis, and recently, D. fragilis DNA was detected within surface-sterilized eggs of E. vermicularis. Using real-time PCR, we detected D. fragilis DNA in 18 (85%) of 21 samples of E. vermicularis eggs collected from patients harbouring D. fragilis in faeces. This finding supports the hypothesis that E. vermicularis may have an important role in the transmission of D. fragilis. © 2013 The Authors. Pathogens and Disease published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  5. Detection of DNA fingerprints of cultivated rice by hybridization with a human minisatellite DNA probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallas, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    A human minisatellite DNA probe detects several restriction fragment length polymorphisms in cultivars of Asian and African rice. Certain fragments appear to be inherited in a Mendelian fashion and may represent unlinked loci. The hybridization patterns appear to be cultivar-specific and largely unchanged after the regeneration of plants from tissue culture. The results suggest that these regions of the rice genome may be used to generate cultivar-specific DNA fingerprints. The demonstration of similarity between a human minisatellite sequence and polymorphic regions in the rice genome suggests that such regions also occur in the genomes of many other plant species

  6. Understanding environmental DNA detection probabilities: A case study using a stream-dwelling char Salvelinus fontinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor M. Wilcox; Kevin S. McKelvey; Michael K. Young; Adam J. Sepulveda; Bradley B. Shepard; Stephen F. Jane; Andrew R. Whiteley; Winsor H. Lowe; Michael K. Schwartz

    2016-01-01

    Environmental DNA sampling (eDNA) has emerged as a powerful tool for detecting aquatic animals. Previous research suggests that eDNA methods are substantially more sensitive than traditional sampling. However, the factors influencing eDNA detection and the resulting sampling costs are still not well understood. Here we use multiple experiments to derive...

  7. The strategies of DNA immobilization and hybridization detection mechanism in the construction of electrochemical DNA sensor: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahwarhar Izuan Abdul Rashid

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, electrochemical deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sensor has recently emerged as promising alternative clinical diagnostic devices especially for infectious disease by exploiting DNA recognition events and converting them into an electrochemical signal. This is because the existing DNA diagnostic method possesses certain drawbacks such as time-consuming, expensive, laborious, low selectivity and sensitivity. DNA immobilization strategies and mechanism of electrochemical detection are two the most important aspects that should be considered before developing highly selective and sensitive electrochemical DNA sensor. Here, we focus on some recent strategies for DNA probes immobilization on the surface of electrochemical transducer such as adsorption, covalent bonding and Avidin/Streptavidin-Biotin interaction on the electrode surface for specific interaction with its complementary DNA target. A numerous approach for DNA hybridization detection based electrochemical technique that frequently used including direct DNA electrochemical detection and label based electrochemical (redox-active indicator, enzyme label and nanoparticles were also discussed in aiming to provide general guide for the design of electrochemical DNA sensor. We also discussed the challenges and suggestions to improve the application of electrochemical DNA sensor at point-care setting. Keywords: Electrochemical DNA sensor, DNA immobilization, DNA hybridization, Electrochemical mechanism

  8. Bioinspired optofluidic lasers for DNA and protein detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingwang; Chen, Qiushu; Ritt, Mike; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Fan, Xudong

    2013-02-01

    Optofluidic lasers combine the advantages of microfluidics and laser technology. Unlike traditional lasers, optofluidic lasers obtain the optical feedback from microfluidic channels with gain media (e.g., dyes) inside. Due to the small size of microfluidic channels, optofluidic lasers own the unique capabilities in terms of handling liquid of ρL~ μL volumes. Therefore, there is currently a great deal of interest in adapting optofluidic lasers for compact laser light sources and micro-total-analysis systems. Here, we use two examples to demonstrate the feasibility of using optofluidic lasers to sensitively detect DNA and protein. In the first example, the optofluidic laser is used to detect small conformational change in DNA Holliday junctions. The DNA Holliday junction has four branched double-helical arm structures, each of which is conjugated with Cy3 or Cy5 as the donor/acceptor pair. The conformational changes of the Holliday junction lead to the changes of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the donor and the acceptor. Using the optical feedback provided by the optofluidic laser, we are able to achieve nearly 100% wavelength switching. The FRET signal generated by the optofluidic laser is about 16 times more sensitive to DNA conformational changes than the conventional method. The second example is concerned with a fluorescent proteins laser. Green, yellow, and red optofluidic lasers based on fluorescent proteins are demonstrated, and the lasing threshold of 3 μΜ mCitrine is only 1 μJ/mm2. This work will potentially open a door to study protein-protein interactions via the sensitive intra-cavity laser detection method.

  9. CLINICAL-EVALUATION OF A MODIFIED ELISA, USING PHOTOBIOTINYLATED DNA, FOR THE DETECTION OF ANTI-DNA ANTIBODIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HYLKEMA, MN; HUYGEN, H; KRAMERS, C; VANDERWAL, TJ; DEJONG, J; VANBRUGGEN, MCJ; SWAAK, AJG; BERDEN, JHM; SMEENK, RJT; Hylkema, Machteld

    1994-01-01

    The measurement of anti-dsDNA antibodies is important for the diagnosis and the follow-up of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). For routine detection of anti-dsDNA, the Farr assay and the immunofluorescence technique (IFT) on Crithidia luciliae proved to be very useful. The anti-dsDNA

  10. Direct detection of chicken genomic DNA for gender determination by thymine-DNA glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, N; Bogdanov, K; Danielli, A; Arie, A; Samina, I; Hadani, A

    2011-02-01

    1. Birds, especially nestlings, are generally difficult to sex by morphology and early detection of chick gender in ovo in the hatchery would facilitate removal of unwanted chicks and diminish welfare objections regarding culling after hatch. 2. We describe a method to determine chicken gender without the need for PCR via use of Thymine-DNA Glycosylase (TDG). TDG restores thymine (T)/guanine (G) mismatches to cytosine (C)/G. We show here, that like DNA Polymerase, TDG can recognise, bind and function on a primer hybridised to chicken genomic DNA. 3. The primer contained a T to mismatch a G in a chicken genomic template and the T/G was cleaved with high fidelity by TDG. Thus, the chicken genomic DNA can be identified without PCR amplification via direct and linear detection. Sensitivity was increased using gender specific sequences from the chicken genome. 4. Currently, these are laboratory results, but we anticipate that further development will allow this method to be used in non-laboratory settings, where PCR cannot be employed.

  11. Colorimetric DNA detection of transgenic plants using gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourisaeid, Elham; Mousavi, Amir; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a DNA colorimetric detection system based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes was prepared and evaluated. We investigated the hybridization efficiency of the L-shaped probes and studied the effect of nanoparticle size and the L-shaped DNA probe length on the performance of the as-prepared system. Probes were attached to the surface of gold nanoparticles using an adenine sequence. An optimal sequence of 35S rRNA gene promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus, which is frequently used in the development of transgenic plants, and the two complementary ends of this gene were employed as model target strands and probe molecules, respectively. The spectrophotometric properties of the as-prepared systems indicated that the large NPs show better changes in the absorption spectrum and consequently present a better performance. The results of this study revealed that the probe/Au-NPs prepared using a vertical spacer containing 5 thymine oligonucleotides exhibited a stronger spectrophotometric response in comparison to that of larger probes. These results in general indicate the suitable performance of the L-shaped DNA probe-functionalized Au-NPs, and in particular emphasize the important role of the gold nanoparticle size and length of the DNA probes in enhancing the performance of such a system.

  12. Modeling the Sensitivity of Field Surveys for Detection of Environmental DNA (eDNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Martin T; Lance, Richard F

    2015-01-01

    The environmental DNA (eDNA) method is the practice of collecting environmental samples and analyzing them for the presence of a genetic marker specific to a target species. Little is known about the sensitivity of the eDNA method. Sensitivity is the probability that the target marker will be detected if it is present in the water body. Methods and tools are needed to assess the sensitivity of sampling protocols, design eDNA surveys, and interpret survey results. In this study, the sensitivity of the eDNA method is modeled as a function of ambient target marker concentration. The model accounts for five steps of sample collection and analysis, including: 1) collection of a filtered water sample from the source; 2) extraction of DNA from the filter and isolation in a purified elution; 3) removal of aliquots from the elution for use in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay; 4) PCR; and 5) genetic sequencing. The model is applicable to any target species. For demonstration purposes, the model is parameterized for bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) and silver carp (H. molitrix) assuming sampling protocols used in the Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS). Simulation results show that eDNA surveys have a high false negative rate at low concentrations of the genetic marker. This is attributed to processing of water samples and division of the extraction elution in preparation for the PCR assay. Increases in field survey sensitivity can be achieved by increasing sample volume, sample number, and PCR replicates. Increasing sample volume yields the greatest increase in sensitivity. It is recommended that investigators estimate and communicate the sensitivity of eDNA surveys to help facilitate interpretation of eDNA survey results. In the absence of such information, it is difficult to evaluate the results of surveys in which no water samples test positive for the target marker. It is also recommended that invasive species managers articulate concentration

  13. DNA methylation detection based on difference of base content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinobu; Ohtsuka, Keiichi; Honda, Satoshi; Sato, Yusuke; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2016-04-01

    Methylation frequently occurs in cytosines of CpG sites to regulate gene expression. The identification of aberrant methylation of certain genes is important for cancer marker analysis. The aim of this study was to determine the methylation frequency in DNA samples of unknown length and/or concentration. Unmethylated cytosine is known to be converted to thymine following bisulfite treatment and subsequent PCR. For this reason, the AT content in DNA increases with an increasing number of methylation sites. In this study, the fluorescein-carrying bis-acridinyl peptide (FKA) molecule was used for the detection of methylation frequency. FKA contains fluorescein and two acridine moieties, which together allow for the determination of the AT content of double-stranded DNA fragments. Methylated and unmethylated human genomes were subjected to bisulfide treatment and subsequent PCR using primers specific for the CFTR, CDH4, DBC1, and NPY genes. The AT content in the resulting PCR products was estimated by FKA, and AT content estimations were found to be in good agreement with those determined by DNA sequencing. This newly developed method may be useful for determining methylation frequencies of many PCR products by measuring the fluorescence in samples excited at two different wavelengths.

  14. Sensitive detection of DNA oxidation damage induced by nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Andrew; El Yamani, Naouale; Dusinska, Maria

    2017-06-01

    From a toxicological point of view, nanomaterials are of interest; because - on account of their great surface area relative to mass - they tend to be more reactive than the bulk chemicals from which they are derived. They might in some cases have the potential to damage DNA directly, or could act via the induction of oxidative stress. The comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) is widely used to measure DNA strand breaks and also oxidised bases, by including in the procedure digestion with lesion-specific enzymes such as formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (which converts oxidised purines to breaks) or endonuclease III (recognising oxidised pyrimidines). We summarise reports in which these enzymes have been used to study a variety of nanomaterials in diverse cell types. We also stress that it is important to carry out tests of cell viability alongside the genotoxicity assay, since cytotoxicity can lead to adventitious DNA damage. Different concentrations of nanomaterials should be investigated, concentrating on a non-cytotoxic range; and incubating for short and longer periods can give valuable information about the mode of damage induction. The use of lesion-specific enzymes can substantially enhance the sensitivity of the comet assay in detecting genotoxic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Detection of recombinant DNA from genetically modified papaya].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Y; Asano, T; Shibuya, M; Hino, A; Toyoda, M

    2001-08-01

    A method using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to detect the genetically modified (GM) papaya (55-1 line), of which the mandatory safety assessment has not been finished in Japan because of insufficient data. The papaya intrinsic papain gene was used as an internal control. The results of PCR amplification of the papain gene segment indicated that a commercial silica membrane type kit (QIAGEN DNeasy plant mini) was useful for extraction of DNA from papaya fruit, but not for extraction from canned papaya fruit. On the other hand, a commercial ion-exchange type kit (QIAGEN Genomic-tip) provided enough purified DNA for PCR from canned papaya fruit. Compared with the parental line and other commercial non-GM papayas, the DNA from GM papaya fruit provided specific amplification bands in PCR with five primer pairs (Nos. 2-6) including beta-glucuronidase and neomycin phosphotransferase II gene-specific ones. On the other hand, the primer pairs recognizing these genes showed false-positive results when we used DNAs from canned papaya. Therefore, we recommend that the primer pairs (Nos. 5 and 6) recognizing the sequences derived from two different species of organism should be used in order to detect specifically the GM papaya in canned fruits.

  16. Design and use of mouse control DNA for DNA biomarker extraction and PCR detection from urine: Application for transrenal Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, Hali; Ricks, Keersten M; Pask, Megan E; Russ, Patricia K; Solinas, Francesca; Baglia, Mark L; Short, Philip A; Nel, Andrew; Blackburn, Jonathan; Dheda, Keertan; Zamudio, Carlos; Cáceres, Tatiana; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R; Pettit, April C

    2017-05-01

    Urine samples are increasingly used for diagnosing infections including Escherichia coli, Ebola virus, and Zika virus. However, extraction and concentration of nucleic acid biomarkers from urine is necessary for many molecular detection strategies such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Since urine samples typically have large volumes with dilute biomarker concentrations making them prone to false negatives, another impediment for urine-based diagnostics is the establishment of appropriate controls particularly to rule out false negatives. In this study, a mouse glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) DNA target was added to retrospectively collected urine samples from tuberculosis (TB)-infected and TB-uninfected patients to indicate extraction of intact DNA and removal of PCR inhibitors from urine samples. We tested this design on surrogate urine samples, retrospective 1milliliter (mL) urine samples from patients in Lima, Peru and retrospective 5mL urine samples from patients in Cape Town, South Africa. Extraction/PCR control DNA was detectable in 97% of clinical samples with no statistically significant differences among groups. Despite the inclusion of this control, there was no difference in the amount of TB IS6110 Tr-DNA detected between TB-infected and TB-uninfected groups except for samples from known HIV-infected patients. We found an increase in TB IS6110 Tr-DNA between TB/HIV co-infected patients compared to TB-uninfected/HIV-infected patients (N=18, p=0.037). The inclusion of an extraction/PCR control DNA to indicate successful DNA extraction and removal of PCR inhibitors should be easily adaptable as a sample preparation control for other acellular sample types. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of DNA polymorphisms in Dendrobium Sonia White mutant lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affrida Abu Hassan; Putri Noor Faizah Megat Mohd Tahir; Zaiton Ahmad; Mohd Nazir Basiran

    2006-01-01

    Dendrobium Sonia white mutant lines were obtained through gamma ray induced mutation of purple flower Dendrobium Sonia at dosage 35 Gy. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) technique was used to compare genomic variations in these mutant lines with the control. Our objectives were to detect polymorphic fragments from these mutants to provide useful information on genes involving in flower colour expression. AFLP is a PCR based DNA fingerprinting technique. It involves digestion of DNA with restriction enzymes, ligation of adapter and selective amplification using primer with one (pre-amplification) and three (selective amplification) arbitrary nucleotides. A total number of 20 primer combinations have been tested and 7 produced clear fingerprint patterns. Of these, 13 polymorphic bands have been successfully isolate and cloned. (Author)

  18. Electrochemical DNA probe for Hg(2+) detection based on a triple-helix DNA and Multistage Signal Amplification Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Zhang, Yihe; Ma, Hongmin; Ren, Xiang; Wang, Yaoguang; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Qin

    2016-12-15

    In this work, an ultrasensitive electrochemical sensor was developed for detection of Hg(2+). Gold nanoparticles decorated bovine serum albumin reduction of graphene oxide (AuNP-BSA-rGO) were used as subsurface material for the immobilization of triple-helix DNA. The triple-helix DNA containing a thiol labelled single-stranded DNA (sDNA) and a thymine-rich DNA (T-rich DNA), which could be unwinded in the present of Hg(2+) to form more stable thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) complex. T-Hg(2+)-T complex was then removed and the sDNA was left on the electrode. At this time, gold nanoparticle carrying thiol labelled cytosine-rich complementary DNA (cDNA-AuNP) could bind with the free sDNA. Meanwhile, the other free cDNA on AuNP could bind with each other in the present of Ag(+) to form the stable cytosine-Ag(+)-cytosine (C-Ag(+)-C) complex and circle amplification. Plenty of C-Ag(+)-C could form silver nanoclusters by electrochemical reduction and the striping signal of Ag could be measured for purpose of the final electrochemical detection of Hg(2+). This sensor could detect Hg(2+) over a wide concentration range from 0.1 to 130nM with a detection limit of 0.03nM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Failure to detect circulating DNA-anti-DNA complexes by four radioimmunological methods in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izui, S.; Lambert, P.H.; Miescher, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    The presence of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was investigated by two new radioimmunoassays (RIA) developed for this purpose and by measuring the CLq and DNA binding activity of serum before and after treatment with DNAse. Two direct RIA developed in this study were based on the reactivity of [ 3 H]actinomycin D ([ 3 H]ACT-D) or solid-phase methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) with DNA-anti-DNA complexes. DNA-anti-DNA complexes prepared in vitro could be efficiently detected at various antigen-antibody ratios by these two RIA. Increased levels of circulating immune complexes as indicated by the CLq binding test were found in 52% of SLE sera. However, the frequency of specific DNA-anti-DNA complexes detected in SLE sera was very low. Only 6% of sera exhibited an increased value deviating by more than three s.d. from the normal mean when tested with the [ 3 H]ACT-D binding RIA or the solid-phase mBSA RIA. On the other hand, there was no significant difference in the serum CLq or DNA binding activity after treatment with DNAse. These results suggest that DNA-anti-DNA complexes do not occur frequently in circulating blood and represent only a very small portion of the immune complexes detected in serum from patients with SLE. (author)

  20. Detection of human DNA polymorphisms with a simplified denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technique.

    OpenAIRE

    Noll, W W; Collins, M

    1987-01-01

    Single base pair differences between otherwise identical DNA molecules can result in altered melting behavior detectable by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. We have developed a simplified procedure for using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to detect base pair changes in genomic DNA. Genomic DNA is digested with restriction enzymes and hybridized in solution to labeled single-stranded probe DNA. The excess probe is then hybridized to complementary phage M13 template DNA, and th...

  1. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Detecting molecules and their interactions lies at the heart of all biosensor devices, which have important applications in health, environmental monitoring and biomedicine. Achieving biosensing capability at the single molecule level is, moreover, a particularly important goal since single molecule biosensors would not only operate at the ultimate detection limit by resolving individual molecular interactions, but they could also monitor biomolecular properties which are otherwise obscured in ensemble measurements. For example, a single molecule biosensor could resolve the fleeting interaction kinetics between a molecule and its receptor, with immediate applications in clinical diagnostics. We have now developed a label-free biosensing platform that is capable of monitoring single DNA molecules and their interaction kinetics[1], hence achieving an unprecedented sensitivity in the optical domain, Figure 1. We resolve the specific contacts between complementary oligonucleotides, thereby detecting DNA strands with less than 2.4 kDa molecular weight. Furthermore we can discern strands with single nucleotide mismatches by monitoring their interaction kinetics. Our device utilizes small glass microspheres as optical transducers[1,2, 3], which are capable of increasing the number of interactions between a light beam and analyte molecules. A prism is used to couple the light beam into the microsphere. Ourr biosensing approach resolves the specific interaction kinetics between single DNA fragments. The optical transducer is assembled in a simple three-step protocol, and consists of a gold nanorod attached to a glass microsphere, where the surface of the nanorod is further modified with oligonucleotide receptors. The interaction kinetics of an oligonucleotide receptor with DNA fragments in the surrounding aqueous solution is monitored at the single molecule level[1]. The light remains confined inside the sphere where it is guided by total internal reflections along a

  2. Detection of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Eghtedari

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pseudoexfoliation syndrome is one of the mostcommon identifiable causes of open angle glaucoma. It hasunknown etiology and pathogenesis. Infection, possibly viral,is one of the proposed pathogenic mechanisms in this condition.In the present study the presence of herpes simplex virus(HSV in specimens of anterior lens capsule of patients withpseudoexfoliation syndrome has been assessed.Methods: The presence of HSV- DNA was searched by usingpolymerase chain reaction method in specimens of anteriorlens capsule (5 mm diameter of 50 patients with pseudoexfoliationsyndrome (study group and 50 age-matchedpatients without the disease (control group who underwentcataract or combined cataract and glaucoma surgery duringa one-year (2006-2007 period in Khalili Hospital, Shiraz,Iran. The results were compared statistically with Chisquaretest and independent samples t test using SPSS software(version 11.5.Results: HSV type I DNA was detected in 18% of the patientsin the study group compared with 2% in the control group (Chisquare test, P = 0.008. The difference between the ranges ofintraocular pressure in the two groups was not statistically significant.Conclusion: The presence of HSV type I DNA suggests thepossible relationship between the virus and pseudoexfoliationsyndrome. It may be a treatable etiology in this multi-factorialdisorder and may help to future management of patients; especiallyto prevent some of the complications in this syndrome.

  3. Detecting multiple DNA human profile from a mosquito blood meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabêlo, K C N; Albuquerque, C M R; Tavares, V B; Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Oliveira, T C; Moura, R R; Brandão, L A C; Crovella, S

    2016-08-26

    Criminal traces commonly found at crime scenes may present mixtures from two or more individuals. The scene of the crime is important for the collection of various types of traces in order to find the perpetrator of the crime. Thus, we propose that hematophagous mosquitoes found at crime scenes can be used to perform genetic testing of human blood and aid in suspect investigation. The aim of the study was to obtain a single Aedes aegypti mosquito profile from a human DNA mixture containing genetic materials of four individuals. We also determined the effect of blood acquisition time by setting time intervals of 24, 48, and 72 h after the blood meal. STR loci and amelogenin were analyzed, and the results showed that human DNA profiles could be obtained from hematophagous mosquitos at 24 h following the blood meal. It is possible that hematophagous mosquitoes can be used as biological remains at the scene of the crime, and can be used to detect human DNA profiles of up to four individuals.

  4. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takalkar, Sunitha; Baryeh, Kwaku; Liu, Guodong

    2017-12-15

    We report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle (FCN)-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle with a diameter of around 15nm was used as a tag to label a detection DNA probe, which was complementary with the part of target DNA. A capture DNA probe was immobilized on the test zone of the lateral flow biosensor. Sandwich-type hybridization reactions among the FCN-labeled DNA probe, target DNA and capture DNA probe were performed on the lateral flow biosensor. In the presence of target DNA, FCNs were captured on the test zone of the biosensor and the fluorescent intensity of the captured FCNs was measured with a portable fluorescent reader. After systematic optimizations of experimental parameters (the components of running buffers, the concentration of detection DNA probe used in the preparation of FCN-DNA conjugates, the amount of FCN-DNA dispensed on the conjugate pad and the dispensing cycles of the capture DNA probes on the test-zone), the biosensor could detect a minimum concentration of 0.4 fM DNA. This study provides a rapid and low-cost approach for DNA detection with high sensitivity, showing great promise for clinical application and biomedical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions by fluorescent DNA/Ag nanoclusters in guanine-rich DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Zhang, Xiu-Qing; Bai, Hui-Ping; Zheng, Liyan; Cao, Qiu-E; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2015-02-25

    In this work, we designed a new fluorescent oligonucleotides-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) probe for sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions. This probe contains two tailored DNA sequence. One is a signal probe contains a cytosine-rich sequence template for AgNCs synthesis and link sequence at both ends. The other is a guanine-rich sequence for signal enhancement and link sequence complementary to the link sequence of the signal probe. After hybridization, the fluorescence of hybridized double-strand DNA/AgNCs is 200-fold enhanced based on the fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA/AgNCs in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequence. The double-strand DNA/AgNCs probe is brighter and stable than that of single-strand DNA/AgNCs, and more importantly, can be used as novel fluorescent probes for detecting mercury and copper ions. Mercury and copper ions in the range of 6.0-160.0 and 6-240 nM, can be linearly detected with the detection limits of 2.1 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Our results indicated that the analytical parameters of the method for mercury and copper ions detection are much better than which using a single-strand DNA/AgNCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The detection of large deletions or duplications in genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A L; Barton, D E; Cockburn, D J; Taylor, G R

    2002-11-01

    While methods for the detection of point mutations and small insertions or deletions in genomic DNA are well established, the detection of larger (>100 bp) genomic duplications or deletions can be more difficult. Most mutation scanning methods use PCR as a first step, but the subsequent analyses are usually qualitative rather than quantitative. Gene dosage methods based on PCR need to be quantitative (i.e., they should report molar quantities of starting material) or semi-quantitative (i.e., they should report gene dosage relative to an internal standard). Without some sort of quantitation, heterozygous deletions and duplications may be overlooked and therefore be under-ascertained. Gene dosage methods provide the additional benefit of reporting allele drop-out in the PCR. This could impact on SNP surveys, where large-scale genotyping may miss null alleles. Here we review recent developments in techniques for the detection of this type of mutation and compare their relative strengths and weaknesses. We emphasize that comprehensive mutation analysis should include scanning for large insertions and deletions and duplications. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Nanopore-based assay for detection of methylation in double-stranded DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jiwook; Kim, Younghoon; Humphreys, Gwendolyn I; Nardulli, Ann M; Kosari, Farhad; Vasmatzis, George; Taylor, William R; Ahlquist, David A; Myong, Sua; Bashir, Rashid

    2015-01-27

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification of DNA in which methyl groups are added at the 5-carbon position of cytosine. Aberrant DNA methylation, which has been associated with carcinogenesis, can be assessed in various biological fluids and potentially can be used as markers for detection of cancer. Analytically sensitive and specific assays for methylation targeting low-abundance and fragmented DNA are needed for optimal clinical diagnosis and prognosis. We present a nanopore-based direct methylation detection assay that circumvents bisulfite conversion and polymerase chain reaction amplification. Building on our prior work, we used methyl-binding proteins (MBPs), which selectively label the methylated DNA. The nanopore-based assay selectively detects methylated DNA/MBP complexes through a 19 nm nanopore with significantly deeper and prolonged nanopore ionic current blocking, while unmethylated DNA molecules were not detectable due to their smaller diameter. Discrimination of hypermethylated and unmethylated DNA on 90, 60, and 30 bp DNA fragments was demonstrated using sub-10 nm nanopores. Hypermethylated DNA fragments fully bound with MBPs are differentiated from unmethylated DNA at 2.1- to 6.5-fold current blockades and 4.5- to 23.3-fold transport durations. Furthermore, these nanopore assays can detect the CpG dyad in DNA fragments and could someday profile the position of methylated CpG sites on DNA fragments.

  8. Development of an electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    long oligonucleotides related to DNA sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in optimal condition. Keywords. Poly(L-glutamic acid); DNA .... (TBS) (pH 7.0) containing 20 mM MDB.12,13 Then, the biosensors were immersed in washing ... signal when interacting with single strand DNA since this kind of DNA does not have ...

  9. An evaluation of the efficacy of using environmental DNA (eDNA) to detect giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wood, Dustin A.; Bowen, Lizabeth; Waters, Shannon C.; Vandergast, Amy G.; Ersan, Julia S.; Skalos, Shannon M.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2017-09-28

    Detecting populations of rare or cryptic species is essential for their conservation. For species like giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas), conventional survey methods can be expensive and inefficient. These sampling difficulties might be overcome by modern techniques that detect deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) shed by organisms into the environment (eDNA). We evaluated the efficacy of detecting giant gartersnake eDNA in water samples from the laboratory and at locations with known giant gartersnake populations in the Sacramento Valley of California, and failed to detect giant gartersnake DNA in most laboratory and all field samples. Aspects of giant gartersnake biology—such as highly keratinized skin and spending extensive time in the terrestrial environment, as well as hot, sunny, and turbid conditions in wetlands and canals of the Sacramento Valley—likely contributed to low detection probabilities. Although detection of eDNA shows promise under many conditions, further development is needed before sampling for eDNA is a viable option for detecting giant gartersnake populations.

  10. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on avidin-biotin conjugation for influenza virus (type A) detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Da-Jung; Kim, Ki-Chul; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2011-09-01

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor (E-DNA biosensor) was fabricated by avidin-biotin conjugation of a biotinylated probe DNA, 5'-biotin-ATG AGT CTT CTA ACC GAG GTC GAA-3', and an avidin-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to detect the influenza virus (type A). An avidin-modified GCE was prepared by the reaction of avidin and a carboxylic acid-modified GCE, which was synthesized by the electrochemical reduction of 4-carboxyphenyl diazonium salt. The current value of the E-DNA biosensor was evaluated after hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The current value decreased after the hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA. The DNA that was used follows: complementary target DNA, 5'-TTC GAC CTC GGT TAG AAG ACT CAT-3' and two-base mismatched DNA, 5'-TTC GAC AGC GGT TAT AAG ACT CAT-3'.

  11. Plant DNA detection from grasshopper guts: A step-by-step protocol, from tissue preparation to obtaining plant DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanesyan, Alina

    2014-02-01

    A PCR-based method of identifying ingested plant DNA in gut contents of Melanoplus grasshoppers was developed. Although previous investigations have focused on a variety of insects, there are no protocols available for plant DNA detection developed for grasshoppers, agricultural pests that significantly influence plant community composition. • The developed protocol successfully used the noncoding region of the chloroplast trnL (UAA) gene and was tested in several feeding experiments. Plant DNA was obtained at seven time points post-ingestion from whole guts and separate gut sections, and was detectable up to 12 h post-ingestion in nymphs and 22 h post-ingestion in adult grasshoppers. • The proposed protocol is an effective, relatively quick, and low-cost method of detecting plant DNA from the grasshopper gut and its different sections. This has important applications, from exploring plant "movement" during food consumption, to detecting plant-insect interactions.

  12. A DNA probe based on phosphorescent resonance energy transfer for detection of transgenic 35S promoter DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jinzhi; Miao, Yanming; Yang, Jiajia; Qin, Jin; Li, Dongxia; Yan, Guiqin

    2017-05-15

    A QDs-DNA nano-probe was made by combining Mn-doped ZnS room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) quantum dots (QDs) and DNA. Then an RTP sensor for quantitative detection of genetically-modified mark sequence cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (Ca MV 35S) DNA was built on basis of phosphorescent resonance energy transfer (PRET). The underlying principles were that a QDs-DNA water-soluble nano-probe was built by connecting single-strand DNA to the surfaces of QDs via a ligand exchange method. This probe had good RTP performance and could well identify Ca MV 35S. Thereby, the simple, rapid and efficient detection of genetically-modified organisms was realized. With the increase of target DNA sequence, the phosphorescent intensity of QDs was gradually reduced due to the energy transfer between QDs and the organic quencher BHQ 2 . This sensor had a detection limit of 4.03nM and a detection range of 12-300nM. Moreover, this sensor had high selectivity. This sensor could effectively detect the target DNA compared with mismatched and random sequences. Thus, this method is very promising for biological analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid, highly sensitive and highly specific gene detection by combining enzymatic amplification and DNA chip detection simultaneously

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hashimoto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel gene detection method based on the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP reaction and the DNA dissociation reaction on the same DNA chip surface to achieve a lower detection limit, broader dynamic range and faster detection time than are attainable with a conventional DNA chip. Both FAM- and thiol-labeled DNA probe bound to the complementary sequence accompanying Dabcyl was immobilized on the gold surface via Au/thiol bond. The LAMP reaction was carried out on the DNA probe fixed gold surface. At first, Dabcyl molecules quenched the FAM fluorescence. According to the LAMP reaction, the complementary sequence with Dabcyl was competitively reacted with the amplified targeted sequence. As a result, the FAM fluorescence increased owing to dissociation of the complementary sequence from the DNA probe. The simultaneous reaction of LAMP and DNA chip detection was achieved, and 103 copies of the targeted gene were detected within an hour by measuring fluorescence intensity of the DNA probe. Keywords: Biosensor, DNA chip, Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP, Fluorescence detection, Gold substrate, Au/thiol bond

  14. Simultaneous detection of DNA from ten food allergens by ligation-dependent probe amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Karl-Heinz; Demmel, Anja; Ehlert, Alexandra; Hupfer, Christine; Busch, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The simultaneous detection of DNA from different potentially allergenic food ingredients by a ligation-dependent probe amplification (LPA) system is described. The approach allows the detection of several targets in a one-tube assay. Synthetic oligonucleotides were designed to detect DNA from peanut, cashew nut, pecan nut, pistachio nut, hazelnut, sesame seeds, macadamia nut, almond, walnut and brazil nut. The specificity of the system was tested with DNA from more than 50...

  15. Detection of influenza A virus using carbon nanotubes field effect transistor based DNA sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thi Luyen; Nguyen, Thi Thuy; Huyen Tran, Thi Thu; Chu, Van Tuan; Thinh Tran, Quang; Tuan Mai, Anh

    2017-09-01

    The carbon nanotubes field effect transistor (CNTFET) based DNA sensor was developed, in this paper, for detection of influenza A virus DNA. Number of factors that influence the output signal and analytical results were investigated. The initial probe DNA, decides the available DNA strands on CNTs, was 10 μM. The hybridization time for defined single helix was 120 min. The hybridization temperature was set at 30 °C to get a net change in drain current of the DNA sensor without altering properties of any biological compounds. The response time of the DNA sensor was less than one minute with a high reproducibility. In addition, the DNA sensor has a wide linear detection range from 1 pM to 10 nM, and a very low detection limit of 1 pM. Finally, after 7-month storage in 7.4 pH buffer, the output signal of DNA sensor recovered 97%.

  16. Evaluation of Methylation Biomarkers for Detection of Circulating Tumor DNA and Application to Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Mitchell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumors shed DNA into circulation, and there is growing evidence that the detection of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA has broad clinical utility, including monitoring of disease, prognosis, response to chemotherapy and tracking tumor heterogeneity. The appearance of ctDNA in the circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA isolated from plasma or serum is commonly detected by identifying tumor-specific features such as insertions, deletions, mutations and/or aberrant methylation. Methylation is a normal cell regulatory event, and since the majority of ccfDNA is derived from white blood cells (WBC, it is important that tumour-specific DNA methylation markers show rare to no methylation events in WBC DNA. We have used a novel approach for assessment of low levels of DNA methylation in WBC DNA. DNA methylation in 29 previously identified regions (residing in 17 genes was analyzed in WBC DNA and eight differentially-methylated regions (DMRs were taken through to testing in clinical samples using methylation specific PCR assays. DMRs residing in four genes, BCAT1, GRASP, IKZF1 and IRF4, exhibited low positivity, 3.5% to 7%, in the plasma of colonoscopy-confirmed healthy subjects, with the sensitivity for detection of ctDNA in colonoscopy-confirmed patients with colorectal cancer being 65%, 54.5%, 67.6% and 59% respectively.

  17. Improved detection of small deletions in complex pools of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgley, Mark; D’Souza, Anil; Moulder, Gary; McKay, Sheldon; Shen, Bin; Gilchrist, Erin; Moerman, Donald; Barstead, Robert

    2002-01-01

    About 40% of the genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have homologs in humans. Based on the history of this model system, it is clear that the application of genetic methods to the study of this set of genes would provide important clues to their function in humans. To facilitate such genetic studies, we are engaged in a project to derive deletion alleles in every gene in this set. Our standard methods make use of nested PCR to hunt for animals in mutagenized populations that carry deletions at a given locus. The deletion bearing animals exist initially in mixed populations where the majority of the animals are wild type at the target. Therefore, the production of the PCR fragment representing the deletion allele competes with the production of the wild type fragment. The size of the deletion fragment relative to wild type determines whether it can compete to a level where it can be detected above the background. Using our standard conditions, we have found that when the deletion is 600 bp, they do not work well to detect mutants with smaller deletions. Here we report a new strategy to detect small deletion alleles in complex DNA pools. Our new strategy is a modification of our standard PCR based screens. In the first round of the nested PCR, we include a third PCR primer between the two external primers. The presence of this third primer leads to the production of three fragments from wild type DNA. We configure the system so that two of these three fragments cannot serve as a template in the second round of the nested PCR. The addition of this third primer, therefore, handicaps the amplification from wild type template. On the other hand, the amplification of mutant fragments where the binding site for the third primer is deleted is unabated. Overall, we see at least a 500-fold increase in the sensitivity for small deletion fragments using our new method. Using this new method, we report the recovery of new deletion alleles within 12 C.elegans genes. PMID

  18. Detecting the movement and spawning activity of bigheaded carps with environmental DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Richard A.; Rees, Christopher B.; Coulter, Alison A.; Merkes, Christopher; McCalla, S. Grace; Touzinsky, Katherine F; Walleser, Liza R.; Goforth, Reuben R.; Amberg, Jon J.

    2016-01-01

    Bigheaded carps are invasive fishes threatening to invade the Great Lakes basin and establish spawning populations, and have been monitored using environmental DNA (eDNA). Not only does eDNA hold potential for detecting the presence of species, but may also allow for quantitative comparisons like relative abundance of species across time or space. We examined the relationships among bigheaded carp movement, hydrography, spawning and eDNA on the Wabash River, IN, USA. We found positive relationships between eDNA and movement and eDNA and hydrography. We did not find a relationship between eDNA and spawning activity in the form of drifting eggs. Our first finding demonstrates how eDNA may be used to monitor species abundance, whereas our second finding illustrates the need for additional research into eDNA methodologies. Current applications of eDNA are widespread, but the relatively new technology requires further refinement.

  19. Detection of novel polymorphisms in the mitochondrial DNA D-Loop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the degree of variation characteristic of a fragment. FTA® Technology (FTA™ paper DNA extraction) was utilized to extract DNA. PCR products were purified by EZ-10 spin column then sequenced and detected by using the ABI 3730xL DNA Analyzer. Novel polymorphisms discovered at positions 16037, 16075, 16104 and ...

  20. Critical considerations for the application of environmental DNA methods to detect aquatic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Caren S.; Turner, Cameron R.; Deiner, Kristy; Klymus, Katy E.; Thomsen, Philip Francis; Murphy, Melanie A.; Spear, Stephen F.; McKee, Anna; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Cornman, Robert S.; Laramie, Matthew B.; Mahon, Andrew R.; Lance, Richard F.; Pilliod, David S.; Strickler, Katherine M.; Waits, Lisette P.; Fremier, Alexander K.; Takahara, Teruhiko; Herder, Jelger E.; Taberlet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Species detection using environmental DNA (eDNA) has tremendous potential for contributing to the understanding of the ecology and conservation of aquatic species. Detecting species using eDNA methods, rather than directly sampling the organisms, can reduce impacts on sensitive species and increase the power of field surveys for rare and elusive species. The sensitivity of eDNA methods, however, requires a heightened awareness and attention to quality assurance and quality control protocols. Additionally, the interpretation of eDNA data demands careful consideration of multiple factors. As eDNA methods have grown in application, diverse approaches have been implemented to address these issues. With interest in eDNA continuing to expand, supportive guidelines for undertaking eDNA studies are greatly needed.Environmental DNA researchers from around the world have collaborated to produce this set of guidelines and considerations for implementing eDNA methods to detect aquatic macroorganisms.Critical considerations for study design include preventing contamination in the field and the laboratory, choosing appropriate sample analysis methods, validating assays, testing for sample inhibition and following minimum reporting guidelines. Critical considerations for inference include temporal and spatial processes, limits of correlation of eDNA with abundance, uncertainty of positive and negative results, and potential sources of allochthonous DNA.We present a synthesis of knowledge at this stage for application of this new and powerful detection method.

  1. Enhanced DNA detection based on the amplification of gold nanoparticles using quartz crystal microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, L B; Yang, Y; Li, S; He, N Y

    2007-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were used as mass amplifiers to improve the frequency signal of QCM detection of DNA. Indirect labelling and direct labelling of DNA probes with gold nanoparticles was studied. Two-times amplification of gold nanoparticles was carried out to further improve the detection signal. It was suggested that the frequency shift of the indirect-labelling method was much more significant than that of the direct-labelling method. The detection limit of one-time amplification and two-times amplification detection of a 33-base oligonucleotide was 100 and 10 fM, respectively. Under corresponding sensitivity, the one-base mismatched DNA and complementary DNA could be distinguished clearly. As an example, the two-times amplification detection of 677TT gene type validated that the ratio of frequency shift for a complementary DNA: one-base-mismatched one was 2.1:1 under the detection limit of 10 fM

  2. [DNA microarrays and their application in detecting and identifying intestinal pathogens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Da-Zhi; Wen, Si-Yuan; Wang, Sheng-Qi

    2006-06-01

    DNA microarrays offer many advantages of high throughout, automation, rapid detection, and so on. Therefore, this technology had been used in many fields such as molecular epidemiology of bacteria, microbial gene identification, disease mechanism, gene mutation, gene expression identification, DNA sequencing and medicine screening etc. The assays for identifying pathogens using DNA microarrays reported aboard recently are introduced. The application of DNA microarrays in detecting and identifying intestinal pathogens mainly includes three aspects: the identification of toxin and characteristic genes of pathogens, the identification of bacterial DNA or RNA directly, the simultaneous detection of a large number of intestinal pathogens with the target - gene of ribosomal RNA. Because of its high efficiency, DNA microarrays is superior to other biological method. Obviously DNA microarrays technology may be useful in identifying intestinal pathogens and have a wide prospect.

  3. PCR-based detection of a rare linear DNA in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveliev Sergei V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The described method allows for detection of rare linear DNA fragments generated during genomic deletions. The predicted limit of the detection is one DNA molecule per 107 or more cells. The method is based on anchor PCR and involves gel separation of the linear DNA fragment and chromosomal DNA before amplification. The detailed chemical structure of the ends of the linear DNA can be defined with the use of additional PCR-based protocols. The method was applied to study the short-lived linear DNA generated during programmed genomic deletions in a ciliate. It can be useful in studies of spontaneous DNA deletions in cell culture or for tracking intracellular modifications at the ends of transfected DNA during gene therapy trials.

  4. Detection of human DNA polymorphisms with a simplified denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noll, W.W.; Collins, M.

    1987-01-01

    Single base pair differences between otherwise identical DNA molecules can result in altered melting behavior detectable by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The authors have developed a simplified procedure for using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to detect base pair changes in genomic DNA. Genomic DNA is digested with restriction enzymes and hybridized in solution to labeled single-stranded probe DNA. The excess probe is then hybridized to complementary phage M13 template DNA, and the reaction mixture is electrophoresed on a denaturing gradient gel. Only the genomic DNA probe hybrids migrate into the gel. Differences in hybrid mobility on the gel indicate base pair changes in the genomic DNA. They have used this technique to identify two polymorphic sites within a 1.2-kilobase region of human chromosome 20. This approach should greatly facilitate the identification of DNA polymorphisms useful for gene linkage studies and the diagnosis of genetic diseases

  5. Simplified detection of the hybridized DNA using a graphene field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Arun Kumar; Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Jayavel, Ramasamy; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Detection of disease-related gene expression by DNA hybridization is a useful diagnostic method. In this study a monolayer graphene field effect transistor (GFET) was fabricated for the detection of a particular single-stranded DNA (target DNA). The probe DNA, which is a single-stranded DNA with a complementary nucleotide sequence, was directly immobilized onto the graphene surface without any linker. The VDirac was shifted to the negative direction in the probe DNA immobilization. A further shift of VDirac in the negative direction was observed when the target DNA was applied to GFET, but no shift was observed upon the application of non-complementary mismatched DNA. Direct immobilization of double-stranded DNA onto the graphene surface also shifted the VDirac in the negative direction to the same extent as that of the shift induced by the immobilization of probe DNA and following target DNA application. These results suggest that the further shift of VDirac after application of the target DNA to the GFET was caused by the hybridization between the probe DNA and target DNA. PMID:28179957

  6. Detection of irradiation induced modifications in foodstuff DNA using 32p post-labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoey, B.M.; Swallow, A.J.; Margison, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    DNA post-labelling has been used successfully to detect damage to DNA caused by a range of damaging agents. The assay results in a fingerprint of changes induced in DNA which might, in principle, be useful as a test for the detection of the irradiation of foods. The authors present their DNA extraction and 32 p post-labelling methods from chicken or cooked prawn samples and their analysis method (High Performance liquid chromatography). It's hoped that these results could form the basis of a test to detect if foods have been irradiated

  7. Detection of a diverse marine fish fauna using environmental DNA from seawater samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis; Kielgast, Jos; Iversen, Lars Lønsmann

    2012-01-01

    eDNA from 15 different fish species, including both important consumption species, as well as species rarely or never recorded by conventional monitoring. We also detect eDNA from a rare vagrant species in the area; European pilchard (Sardina pilchardus). Additionally, we detect four bird species....... Records in national databases confirmed the occurrence of all detected species. To investigate the efficiency of the eDNA approach, we compared its performance with 9 methods conventionally used in marine fish surveys. Promisingly, eDNA covered the fish diversity better than or equal to any of the applied...

  8. DNA detection using plasmonic enhanced near-infrared photoluminescence of gallium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Longhua; Chun, Ik Su; Wang, Zidong; Li, Jinghong; Li, Xiuling; Lu, Yi

    2013-10-15

    Efficient near-infrared detection of specific DNA with single nucleotide polymorphism selectivity is important for diagnostics and biomedical research. Herein, we report the use of gallium arsenide (GaAs) as a sensing platform for probing DNA immobilization and targeting DNA hybridization, resulting in ∼8-fold enhanced GaAs photoluminescence (PL) at ∼875 nm. The new signal amplification strategy, further coupled with the plasmonic effect of Au nanoparticles, is capable of detecting DNA molecules with a detection limit of 0.8 pM and selectivity against single base mismatches. Such an ultrasensitive near-infrared sensor can find a wide range of biochemical and biomedical applications.

  9. Next-generation sequencing of cervical DNA detects human papillomavirus types not detected by commercial kits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiring, Tracy L; Salimo, Anna T; Coetzee, Beatrix; Maree, Hans J; Moodley, Jennifer; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Freeborough, Michael-John; Rybicki, Ed P; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2012-08-16

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the aetiological agent for cervical cancer and genital warts. Concurrent HPV and HIV infection in the South African population is high. HIV positive (+) women are often infected with multiple, rare and undetermined HPV types. Data on HPV incidence and genotype distribution are based on commercial HPV detection kits, but these kits may not detect all HPV types in HIV + women. The objectives of this study were to (i) identify the HPV types not detected by commercial genotyping kits present in a cervical specimen from an HIV positive South African woman using next generation sequencing, and (ii) determine if these types were prevalent in a cohort of HIV-infected South African women. Total DNA was isolated from 109 cervical specimens from South African HIV + women. A specimen within this cohort representing a complex multiple HPV infection, with 12 HPV genotypes detected by the Roche Linear Array HPV genotyping (LA) kit, was selected for next generation sequencing analysis. All HPV types present in this cervical specimen were identified by Illumina sequencing of the extracted DNA following rolling circle amplification. The prevalence of the HPV types identified by sequencing, but not included in the Roche LA, was then determined in the 109 HIV positive South African women by type-specific PCR. Illumina sequencing identified a total of 16 HPV genotypes in the selected specimen, with four genotypes (HPV-30, 74, 86 and 90) not included in the commercial kit. The prevalence's of HPV-30, 74, 86 and 90 in 109 HIV positive South African women were found to be 14.6%, 12.8%, 4.6% and 8.3% respectively. Our results indicate that there are HPV types, with substantial prevalence, in HIV positive women not being detected in molecular epidemiology studies using commercial kits. The significance of these types in relation to cervical disease remains to be investigated.

  10. DNA barcode detects high genetic structure within neotropical bird species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Sendra Tavares

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Towards lower latitudes the number of recognized species is not only higher, but also phylogeographic subdivision within species is more pronounced. Moreover, new genetically isolated populations are often described in recent phylogenies of Neotropical birds suggesting that the number of species in the region is underestimated. Previous COI barcoding of Argentinean bird species showed more complex patterns of regional divergence in the Neotropical than in the North American avifauna. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here we analyzed 1,431 samples from 561 different species to extend the Neotropical bird barcode survey to lower latitudes, and detected even higher geographic structure within species than reported previously. About 93% (520 of the species were identified correctly from their DNA barcodes. The remaining 41 species were not monophyletic in their COI sequences because they shared barcode sequences with closely related species (N = 21 or contained very divergent clusters suggestive of putative new species embedded within the gene tree (N = 20. Deep intraspecific divergences overlapping with among-species differences were detected in 48 species, often with samples from large geographic areas and several including multiple subspecies. This strong population genetic structure often coincided with breaks between different ecoregions or areas of endemism. CONCLUSIONS: The taxonomic uncertainty associated with the high incidence of non-monophyletic species and discovery of putative species obscures studies of historical patterns of species diversification in the Neotropical region. We showed that COI barcodes are a valuable tool to indicate which taxa would benefit from more extensive taxonomic revisions with multilocus approaches. Moreover, our results support hypotheses that the megadiversity of birds in the region is associated with multiple geographic processes starting well before the Quaternary and extending to more recent

  11. Fast, Background-Free DNA-PAINT Imaging Using FRET-Based Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Alexander; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Jungmann, Ralf

    2017-10-11

    DNA point accumulation in nanoscale topography (DNA-PAINT) enables super-resolution microscopy by harnessing the predictable, transient hybridization between short dye-labeled "imager" and complementary target-bound "docking" strands. DNA-PAINT microscopy allows sub-5 nm spatial resolution, spectrally unlimited multiplexing, and quantitative image analysis. However, these abilities come at the cost of nonfluorogenic imager strands, also emitting fluorescence when not bound to their docking strands. This has thus far prevented rapid image acquisition with DNA-PAINT, as the blinking rate of probes is limited by an upper-bound of imager strand concentrations, which in turn is dictated by the necessity to facilitate the detection of single-molecule binding events over the background of unbound, freely diffusing probes. To overcome this limitation and enable fast, background-free DNA-PAINT microscopy, we here introduce FRET-based imaging probes, alleviating the concentration-limit of imager strands and speeding up image acquisition by several orders of magnitude. We assay two approaches for FRET-based DNA-PAINT (or FRET-PAINT) using either fixed or transient acceptor dyes in combination with transiently binding donor-labeled DNA strands and achieve high-quality super-resolution imaging on DNA origami structures in a few tens of seconds. Finally, we also demonstrate the applicability of FRET-PAINT in a cellular environment by performing super-resolution imaging of microtubules in under 30 s. FRET-PAINT combines the advantages of conventional DNA-PAINT with fast image acquisition times, facilitating the potential study of dynamic processes.

  12. Immunological detection of modified DNA bases in irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.H.H.; Tyreman, A.L.; Deeble, D.J.; Jones, M.; Smith, C.J.; Christiansen, J.F.; Beaumont, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    Ionising radiation is fatal to all known life forms given sufficient exposure in terms of dose and duration. This property has been used beneficially to sterilise a range of materials, particularly medical products where the removal of all contaminating organisms is deemed essential. Irradiation has long been used to sterilise food for consumption by certain categories of patients. The method is attractive because all potentially contaminating organisms can be removed by one simple treatment. Irradiation also slows down or stops certain processes such as sprouting. There are, however, disadvantages to irradiating food. It is not only DNA that is affected as alterations in lipid and protein components of the food may lead to a loss of quality. Although irradiation will kill bacteria it will probably not affect any toxin produced by those bacteria prior to treatment. Irradiation achieves its effects by damaging molecules, particularly nucleic acids. Consequently, if any of the damage to nucleic acids could be shown to by by a process unique to irradiation, and the products of this unique process could be measured, then there is the basis for a detection system. Furthermore, if the damage could be shown to be proportional to the dose of radiation received then the dose could also be quantified. Legislation, therefore, requires that assays be developed for use in different countries, those which totally ban irradiated food, those which require irradiated food to be labelled and those which have selective laws relating to specific foods and specific levels of irradiation. (author)

  13. 21 CFR 864.7280 - Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....7280 Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. (a) Identification. Factor V Leiden... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. 864.7280 Section 864.7280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  14. Understanding environmental DNA detection probabilities: A case study using a stream-dwelling char Salvelinus fontinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Taylor M; Mckelvey, Kevin S.; Young, Michael K.; Sepulveda, Adam; Shepard, Bradley B.; Jane, Stephen F; Whiteley, Andrew R.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental DNA sampling (eDNA) has emerged as a powerful tool for detecting aquatic animals. Previous research suggests that eDNA methods are substantially more sensitive than traditional sampling. However, the factors influencing eDNA detection and the resulting sampling costs are still not well understood. Here we use multiple experiments to derive independent estimates of eDNA production rates and downstream persistence from brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in streams. We use these estimates to parameterize models comparing the false negative detection rates of eDNA sampling and traditional backpack electrofishing. We find that using the protocols in this study eDNA had reasonable detection probabilities at extremely low animal densities (e.g., probability of detection 0.18 at densities of one fish per stream kilometer) and very high detection probabilities at population-level densities (e.g., probability of detection > 0.99 at densities of ≥ 3 fish per 100 m). This is substantially more sensitive than traditional electrofishing for determining the presence of brook trout and may translate into important cost savings when animals are rare. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of literature showing that eDNA sampling is a powerful tool for the detection of aquatic species, particularly those that are rare and difficult to sample using traditional methods.

  15. An alkaline separation method for detection of small amount of DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Kazuo; Okada, Shigefumi

    1981-01-01

    An alkaline separation technique originally established by Ahnstroem is modified to detect small amount of DNA damage in X-irradiated mouse leukemic L5178Y cells. It is made quantitative by calibration with an alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation. The present method would make it possible to study DNA damage and its repair within a dose range of X-rays where cell survival and mutation are usually investigated. It is also useful for detecting DNA damage caused by chemicals. (author)

  16. Application of environmental DNA to detect an endangered marine skate species in the wild.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Weltz

    Full Text Available Environmental DNA (eDNA techniques have only recently been applied in the marine environment to detect the presence of marine species. Species-specific primers and probes were designed to detect the eDNA of the endangered Maugean skate (Zearaja maugeana from as little as 1 L of water collected at depth (10-15 m in Macquarie Harbour (MH, Tasmania. The identity of the eDNA was confirmed as Z. maugeana by sequencing the qPCR products and aligning these with the target sequence for a 100% match. This result has validated the use of this eDNA technique for detecting a rare species, Z. maugeana, in the wild. Being able to investigate the presence, and possibly the abundance, of Z. maugeana in MH and Bathurst harbour (BH, would be addressing a conservation imperative for the endangered Z. maugeana. For future application of this technique in the field, the rate of decay was determined for Z. maugeana eDNA under ambient dissolved oxygen (DO levels (55% saturation and lower DO (20% saturation levels, revealing that the eDNA can be detected for 4 and 16 hours respectively, after which eDNA concentration drops below the detection threshold of the assay. With the rate of decay being influenced by starting eDNA concentrations, it is recommended that samples be filtered as soon as possible after collection to minimize further loss of eDNA prior to and during sample processing.

  17. Application of environmental DNA to detect an endangered marine skate species in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltz, Kay; Lyle, Jeremy M; Ovenden, Jennifer; Morgan, Jessica A T; Moreno, David A; Semmens, Jayson M

    2017-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) techniques have only recently been applied in the marine environment to detect the presence of marine species. Species-specific primers and probes were designed to detect the eDNA of the endangered Maugean skate (Zearaja maugeana) from as little as 1 L of water collected at depth (10-15 m) in Macquarie Harbour (MH), Tasmania. The identity of the eDNA was confirmed as Z. maugeana by sequencing the qPCR products and aligning these with the target sequence for a 100% match. This result has validated the use of this eDNA technique for detecting a rare species, Z. maugeana, in the wild. Being able to investigate the presence, and possibly the abundance, of Z. maugeana in MH and Bathurst harbour (BH), would be addressing a conservation imperative for the endangered Z. maugeana. For future application of this technique in the field, the rate of decay was determined for Z. maugeana eDNA under ambient dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (55% saturation) and lower DO (20% saturation) levels, revealing that the eDNA can be detected for 4 and 16 hours respectively, after which eDNA concentration drops below the detection threshold of the assay. With the rate of decay being influenced by starting eDNA concentrations, it is recommended that samples be filtered as soon as possible after collection to minimize further loss of eDNA prior to and during sample processing.

  18. Bioelectronic DNA detection of human papillomaviruses using eSensor™: a model system for detection of multiple pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Donna L

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We used human papillomaviruses (HPV as a model system to evaluate the utility of a nucleic acid, hybridization-based bioelectronic DNA detection platform (eSensor™ in identifying multiple pathogens. Methods Two chips were spotted with capture probes consisting of DNA oligonucleotide sequences specific for HPV types. Electrically conductive signal probes were synthesized to be complementary to a distinct region of the amplified HPV target DNA. A portion of the HPV L1 region that was amplified by using consensus primers served as target DNA. The amplified target was mixed with a cocktail of signal probes and added to a cartridge containing a DNA chip to allow for hybridization with complementary capture probes. Results Two bioelectric chips were designed and successfully detected 86% of the HPV types contained in clinical samples. Conclusions This model system demonstrates the potential of the eSensor platform for rapid and integrated detection of multiple pathogens.

  19. Automation and integration of multiplexed on-line sample preparation with capillary electrophoresis for DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, H.

    1999-03-31

    The purpose of this research is to develop a multiplexed sample processing system in conjunction with multiplexed capillary electrophoresis for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The concept from DNA template to called bases was first demonstrated with a manually operated single capillary system. Later, an automated microfluidic system with 8 channels based on the same principle was successfully constructed. The instrument automatically processes 8 templates through reaction, purification, denaturation, pre-concentration, injection, separation and detection in a parallel fashion. A multiplexed freeze/thaw switching principle and a distribution network were implemented to manage flow direction and sample transportation. Dye-labeled terminator cycle-sequencing reactions are performed in an 8-capillary array in a hot air thermal cycler. Subsequently, the sequencing ladders are directly loaded into a corresponding size-exclusion chromatographic column operated at {approximately} 60 C for purification. On-line denaturation and stacking injection for capillary electrophoresis is simultaneously accomplished at a cross assembly set at {approximately} 70 C. Not only the separation capillary array but also the reaction capillary array and purification columns can be regenerated after every run. DNA sequencing data from this system allow base calling up to 460 bases with accuracy of 98%.

  20. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in sera samples of mice experimentally infected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Langoni

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Detection of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii DNA in blood can help to diagnose the disease in its acute phase; however, it must be considered that hemoglobin, present in blood, can inhibit polymerase activity, making impracticable the detection of DNA in samples. Mice were experimentally infected via oral route with ME49 and BTU2 strains cysts and RH strain tachyzoites; polymerase chain reaction was used to detect T. gondii DNA in mice sera 18, 24, 48, 96, and 192 hours post infection (PI. Toxoplama gondii DNA was detected in only one animal infected with BTU2 strain, genotype III (isolated from a dog with neurological signs 18 hours PI. The agent's DNA was not detected in any sample of the other experimental groups. New studies must be carried out to verify the technique sensitivity in researches on this agent's genetic material using sera samples of acute-phase toxoplasmosis patients, especially in cases of immunosuppression.

  1. Capacitive DNA sensor for rapid and sensitive detection of whole genome human herpesvirus-1 dsDNA in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng; Oueslati, Rania; Wu, Jayne; Chen, Jiangang; Eda, Shigetoshi

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a rapid, highly sensitive, low-cost, and specific capacitive DNA sensor for detection of whole genome human herpesvirus-1 DNA. This sensor is capable of direct DNA detection with a response time of 30 s, and it can be used to test standard buffer or serum samples. The sensing approach for DNA detection is based on alternating current (AC) electrokinetics. By applying an inhomogeneous AC electric field on sensor electrodes, positive dielectrophoresis is induced to accelerate DNA hybridization. The same applied AC signal also directly measures the hybridization of target with the probe on the sensor surface. Experiments are conducted to optimize the AC signal, as well as the buffers for probe immobilization and target DNA hybridization. The assay is highly sensitive and specific, with no response to human herpesvirus-2 DNA at 5 ng/mL and a LOD of 1.0 pg/mL (6.5 copies/μL or 10.7 aM) in standard buffer. When testing the double stranded (ds) DNA spiked in human serum samples, the sensor yields a LOD of 20.0 pg/mL (129.5 copies/μL or 0.21 femtomolar (fM)) in neat serum. In this work, the target is whole genome dsDNA, consequently the test can be performed without the use of enzyme or amplification, which considerably simplifies the sensor operation and is highly suitable for point of care disease diagnosis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. RNA detection in situ with FISH-STICs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnamon, John R; Czaplinski, Kevin

    2014-02-01

    The ability to detect RNA molecules in situ has long had important applications for molecular biological studies. Enzyme or dye-labeled antisense in vitro runoff transcripts and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) both have a proven track record of success, but each of these also has scientific and practical drawbacks and limitations to its use. We devised a means to use commercially synthesized oligonucleotides as RNA-FISH probes without further modification and show that such probes work well for detection of RNA in cultured cells. This approach can bind a high concentration of fluorescent ODN to a short stretch of an RNA using commercial DNA synthesis outlets available to any laboratory. We call this approach for creating in situ hybridization probes Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Sequential Tethered and Intertwined ODN Complexes (FISH-STICs). We demonstrate that one FISH-STIC probe can detect mRNA molecules in culture, and that probe detection can be improved by the addition of multiple probes that can be easily adapted for robust mRNA quantification. Using FISH-STICs, we demonstrate a nonoverlapping distribution for β-actin and γ-actin mRNA in cultured fibroblasts, and the detection of neuron-specific transcripts within cultured primary hippocampal neurons.

  3. Facile preparation of a DNA sensor for rapid herpes virus detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh, E-mail: tampd-hast@mail.hut.edu.vn [Hanoi Advanced School of Science and Technology, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam); Tuan, Mai Anh, E-mail: tuanma-itims@mail.hut.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam); Huy, Tran Quang [National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology (NIHE), 01 Yersin, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Le, Anh-Tuan [Hanoi Advanced School of Science and Technology, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam); Hieu, Nguyen Van, E-mail: hieu@itims.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam)

    2010-10-12

    In this paper, a simple DNA sensor platform was developed for rapid herpes virus detection in real samples. The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences of the herpes simplex virus (DNA probe) were directly immobilized on the surface of interdigitated electrodes by electrochemical polymerization along with pyrrole monomers. The potential was scanned from - 0.7 to + 0.6 V, and the scanning rate was 100 mV/s. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was employed to verify specific DNA sequence binding and the conducting polymer. The morphology of the conducting polymer doped with DNA strands was characterized using a field emission scanning electron microscope. As-obtained DNA sensor was used to detect the herpes virus DNA in the real samples. The results show that the current DNA sensors detected the lowest DNA concentration of 2 nM. This sensitivity appears to be better than that of the DNA sensors prepared by immobilization of the DNA probe on the 3-aminopropyl-triethoxy-silance (APTS) membrane.

  4. Facile preparation of a DNA sensor for rapid herpes virus detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh; Tuan, Mai Anh; Huy, Tran Quang; Le, Anh-Tuan; Hieu, Nguyen Van

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a simple DNA sensor platform was developed for rapid herpes virus detection in real samples. The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences of the herpes simplex virus (DNA probe) were directly immobilized on the surface of interdigitated electrodes by electrochemical polymerization along with pyrrole monomers. The potential was scanned from - 0.7 to + 0.6 V, and the scanning rate was 100 mV/s. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was employed to verify specific DNA sequence binding and the conducting polymer. The morphology of the conducting polymer doped with DNA strands was characterized using a field emission scanning electron microscope. As-obtained DNA sensor was used to detect the herpes virus DNA in the real samples. The results show that the current DNA sensors detected the lowest DNA concentration of 2 nM. This sensitivity appears to be better than that of the DNA sensors prepared by immobilization of the DNA probe on the 3-aminopropyl-triethoxy-silance (APTS) membrane.

  5. Environmental DNA (eDNA From the Wake of the Whales: Droplet Digital PCR for Detection and Species Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Scott Baker

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic sampling for identification of species, subspecies or stock of whales, dolphins and porpoises at sea remains challenging. Most samples have been collected with some form of a biopsy dart requiring a close approach of a vessel while the individual is at the surface. Here we have adopted droplet digital (ddPCR technology for detection and species identification of cetaceans using environmental (eDNA collected from seawater. We conducted a series of eDNA sampling experiments during 25 encounters with killer whales, Orcinus orca, in Puget Sound (the Salish Sea. The regular habits of killer whales in these inshore waters allowed us to locate pods and collect seawater, at an initial distance of 200 m and at 15-min intervals, for up to 2 h after the passage of the whales. To optimize detection, we designed a set of oligonucleotide primers and probes to target short fragments of the mitochondrial (mtDNA control region, with a focus on identification of known killer whale ecotypes. We confirmed the potential to detect eDNA in the wake of the whales for up to 2 h, despite movement of the water mass by several kilometers due to tidal currents. Re-amplification and sequencing of the eDNA barcode confirmed that the ddPCR detection included the “southern resident community” of killer whales, consistent with the calls from hydrophone recordings and visual observations.

  6. Factors influencing detection of eDNA from a stream-dwelling amphibian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilliod, David S.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Arkle, Robert S.; Waits, Lisette P.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods for detecting and estimating abundance of aquatic species are emerging rapidly, but little is known about how processes such as secretion rate, environmental degradation, and time since colonization or extirpation from a given site affect eDNA measurements. Using stream-dwelling salamanders and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis, we conducted three experiments to assess eDNA: (i) production rate; (ii) persistence time under different temperature and light conditions; and (iii) detectability and concentration through time following experimental introduction and removal of salamanders into previously unoccupied streams. We found that 44–50 g individuals held in aquaria produced 77 ng eDNA/h for 2 h, after which production either slowed considerably or began to equilibrate with degradation. eDNA in both full-sun and shaded treatments degraded exponentially to 2) and when samples were collected within 5 m of the animals. Concentrations of eDNA detected were very low and increased steadily from 6–24 h after introduction, reaching 0.0022 ng/L. Within 1 h of removing salamanders from the stream, eDNA was no longer detectable. These results suggest that eDNA detectability and concentration depend on production rates of individuals, environmental conditions, density of animals, and their residence time.

  7. Detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA in the Environment, Ivory Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Roger Bi Diangoné; Niamké, Sébastian; Tissot-Dupont, Hervé; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Ivory Coast is a West African country with the highest reported cases of Buruli ulcer, a disabling subcutaneous infection due to Mycobacterium ulcerans. However, the prevalence of environmental M. ulcerans is poorly known in this country. We collected 496 environmental specimens consisting of soil (n = 100), stagnant water (n = 200), plants (n = 100) and animal feces (n = 96) in Ivory Coast over five months in the dry and wet seasons in regions which are free of Buruli ulcer (control group A; 250 specimens) and in regions where the Buruli ulcer is endemic (group B; 246 specimens). After appropriate total DNA extraction incorporating an internal control, the M. ulcerans IS2404 and KR-B gene were amplified by real-time PCR in samples. In parallel, a calibration curve was done for M. ulcerans Agy99 IS2404 and KR-B gene. Of 460 samples free of PCR inhibition, a positive real-time PCR detection of insertion sequence IS2404 and KR-B gene was observed in 1/230 specimens in control group A versus 9/230 specimens in group B (P = 0.02; Fisher exact test). Positive specimens comprised seven stagnant water specimens, two feces specimens confirmed to be of Thryonomys swinderianus (agouti) origin by real-time PCR of the cytb gene; and one soil specimen. Extrapolation from the calibration curves indicated low inoculums ranging from 1 to 102 mycobacteria/mL. This study confirms the presence of M. ulcerans in the watery environment surrounding patients with Buruli ulcer in Ivory Coast. It suggests that the agouti, which is in close contacts with populations, could play a role in the environmental cycle of M. ulcerans, as previously suggested for the closely related possums in Australia.

  8. Clinical aspects of sperm DNA fragmentation detection and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Donald P; Wixon, Regina

    2006-03-15

    Over the past 25 years, various methods have been developed to measure sperm DNA strand breaks in situ. Currently, there are four major tests of sperm DNA fragmentation, including the Comet, Tunel, sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and the acridine orange test (AOT). The Comet assay is a light microscope technique where the sperm cells are mixed with melted agarose and then placed on a glass slide. The cells are lysed and then subjected to horizontal electrophoresis. The Tunel assay, another light microscope technique, transfers labeled nucleotide to the 3'OH group of a broken DNA strand with the use of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. The fluorescence intensity of each scored sperm is determined as a "yes" or "no" for sperm on a light microscope slide or by channels of fluorescent intensity in a flow cytometer. The light microscope-based AOT, uses the metachromatic properties of acridine orange to stain sperm cells. The SCSA treats sperm with low pH to denature DNA at the sites of DNA strand breaks, followed by acridine orange (AO) staining of green for native DNA and red for denatured DNA as measured by flow cytometry (FCM) as well as % sperm with high DNA stainability (HDS: immature sperm with intact DNA related to decreased fertilization rates). The SCSA method has defined a 27-30% DNA fragmentation index (DFI) as the point in which a man is placed into a statistical category of taking a longer time to in vivo pregnancy, intra uterine insemination (IUI) and more routine in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles or no pregnancy. Current data suggest that intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) may help overcome the diminished pregnancy prognosis with high DFI over the other ART or natural methods.

  9. A new method to extract dental pulp DNA: application to universal detection of bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Tran-Hung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dental pulp is used for PCR-based detection of DNA derived from host and bacteremic microorganims. Current protocols require odontology expertise for proper recovery of the dental pulp. Dental pulp specimen exposed to laboratory environment yields contaminants detected using universal 16S rDNA-based detection of bacteria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a new protocol by encasing decontaminated tooth into sterile resin, extracting DNA into the dental pulp chamber itself and decontaminating PCR reagents by filtration and double restriction enzyme digestion. Application to 16S rDNA-based detection of bacteria in 144 teeth collected in 86 healthy people yielded a unique sequence in only 14 teeth (9.7% from 12 individuals (14%. Each individual yielded a unique 16S rDNA sequence in 1-2 teeth per individual. Negative controls remained negative. Bacterial identifications were all confirmed by amplification and sequencing of specific rpoB sequence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The new protocol prevented laboratory contamination of the dental pulp. It allowed the detection of bacteria responsible for dental pulp colonization from blood and periodontal tissue. Only 10% such samples contained 16S rDNA. It provides a new tool for the retrospective diagnostic of bacteremia by allowing the universal detection of bacterial DNA in animal and human, contemporary or ancient tooth. It could be further applied to identification of host DNA in forensic medicine and anthropology.

  10. Is the detection of aquatic environmental DNA influenced by substrate type?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Buxton

    Full Text Available The use of environmental DNA (eDNA to assess the presence-absence of rare, cryptic or invasive species is hindered by a poor understanding of the factors that can remove DNA from the system. In aquatic systems, eDNA can be transported out either horizontally in water flows or vertically by incorporation into the sediment. Equally, eDNA may be broken down by various biotic and abiotic processes if the target organism leaves the system. We use occupancy modelling and a replicated mesocosm experiment to examine how detection probability of eDNA changes once the target species is no longer present. We hypothesise that detection probability falls faster with a sediment which has a large number of DNA binding sites such as topsoil or clay, over lower DNA binding capacity substrates such as sand. Water removed from ponds containing the target species (the great crested newt initially showed high detection probabilities, but these fell to between 40% and 60% over the first 10 days and to between 10% and 22% by day 15: eDNA remained detectable at very low levels until day 22. Very little difference in detection was observed between the control group (no substrate and the sand substrate. A small reduction in detection probability was observed between the control and clay substrates, but this was not significant. However, a highly significant reduction in detection probability was observed with a topsoil substrate. This result is likely to have stemmed from increased levels of PCR inhibition, suggesting that incorporation of DNA into the sentiment is of only limited importance. Surveys of aquatic species using eDNA clearly need to take account of substrate type as well as other environmental factors when collecting samples, analysing data and interpreting the results.

  11. The use of gold nanoparticle aggregation for DNA computing and logic-based biomolecular detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In-Hee; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Park, Ji-Yoon; Chai, Young Gyu; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    The use of DNA molecules as a physical computational material has attracted much interest, especially in the area of DNA computing. DNAs are also useful for logical control and analysis of biological systems if efficient visualization methods are available. Here we present a quick and simple visualization technique that displays the results of the DNA computing process based on a colorimetric change induced by gold nanoparticle aggregation, and we apply it to the logic-based detection of biomolecules. Our results demonstrate its effectiveness in both DNA-based logical computation and logic-based biomolecular detection

  12. Molecular scatology: how to improve prey DNA detection success in avian faeces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehm, Johannes; Juen, Anita; Nagiller, Karin; Neuhauser, Sigrid; Traugott, Michael

    2011-07-01

    The analysis of prey DNA in faeces is a non-invasive approach to examine the diet of birds. However, it is poorly known how gut transition time, environmental factors and laboratory treatments such as storage conditions or DNA extraction procedures affect the detection success of prey DNA. Here, we examined several of these factors using faeces from carrion crows fed with insect larvae. Faeces produced between 30 min and 4 h post-feeding tested positive for insect DNA, representing the gut transition time. Prey detection was not only possible in fresh but also in 5-day-old faeces. The type of surface the faeces were placed on for these 5 days, however, affected prey DNA detection success: samples placed on soil provided the lowest rate of positives compared to faeces left on leaves, on branches and within plastic tubes. Exposing faeces to sunlight and rain significantly lowered prey DNA detection rates (17% and 68% positives in exposed and protected samples, respectively). Storing faeces in ethanol or in the freezer did not affect molecular prey detection. Extracting DNA directly from larger pieces of faecal pellets resulted in significantly higher prey detection rates than when using small amounts of homogenized faeces. A cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide-based DNA extraction protocol yielded significantly higher DNA detection rates (60%) than three commercial kits, however, for small amounts of homogenized faeces only. Our results suggest that collecting faeces from smooth, clean and non-absorbing surfaces, protected from sunlight and rain, improves DNA detection success in avian faeces. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Detecting single DNA copy number variations in complex genomes using one nanogram of starting DNA and BAC-array CGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Valent, Alexander; Soularue, Pascal; Perot, Christine; Inda, Maria Mar; Receveur, Aline; Smaïli, Sadek; Roest Crollius, Hugues; Bénard, Jean; Bernheim, Alain; Gidrol, Xavier; Danglot, Gisèle

    2004-07-29

    Comparative genomic hybridization to bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-arrays (array-CGH) is a highly efficient technique, allowing the simultaneous measurement of genomic DNA copy number at hundreds or thousands of loci, and the reliable detection of local one-copy-level variations. We report a genome-wide amplification method allowing the same measurement sensitivity, using 1 ng of starting genomic DNA, instead of the classical 1 microg usually necessary. Using a discrete series of DNA fragments, we defined the parameters adapted to the most faithful ligation-mediated PCR amplification and the limits of the technique. The optimized protocol allows a 3000-fold DNA amplification, retaining the quantitative characteristics of the initial genome. Validation of the amplification procedure, using DNA from 10 tumour cell lines hybridized to BAC-arrays of 1500 spots, showed almost perfectly superimposed ratios for the non-amplified and amplified DNAs. Correlation coefficients of 0.96 and 0.99 were observed for regions of low-copy-level variations and all regions, respectively (including in vivo amplified oncogenes). Finally, labelling DNA using two nucleotides bearing the same fluorophore led to a significant increase in reproducibility and to the correct detection of one-copy gain or loss in >90% of the analysed data, even for pseudotriploid tumour genomes.

  14. Non-radioactive DNA probe and polymerase chain reaction procedures for the specific detection of Acanthamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, S; Asgari, M; Henney, H R

    1994-02-01

    Acanthamoebae are potential pathogens which can cause serious infections of humans. A non-radioactive rDNA probe and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification procedures which are specific, rapid, sensitive and safe for the detection of Acanthamoeba have been developed. A restriction fragment (126 bp; ArDNA-a) from a variable region of the cloned 26S rDNA unit of Acanthamoeba castellanii (from plasmid pAR2) was labelled by biotinylation. Cells and DNAs were incubated with the labelled rDNA probe to define conditions providing the highest hybridization specificity for Acanthamoeba by both colorimetric and chemiluminescent assays. Four recent isolates of Acanthamoeba, Acanthamoeba polyphaga, various bacteria, Herpes simplex virus, other eukaryotic amoebae and human cell lines, were sources of DNA for testing. The rDNA probe was found to be highly specific for Acanthamoeba and is capable of directly detecting about 250 cells without prior DNA purification. PCR primers for this unique ArDNA-a fragment have also been designed. Amplification of the targeted sequence by PCR using those primers yielded a single product which was specifically generated for Acanthamoeba template DNA and not DNA from the other control cells. This PCR procedure provided increased sensitivity with the direct detection of as few as 10 Acanthamoeba cells.

  15. Detection of Adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldwell, Kate E; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2008-09-01

    Limited sensitivity of existing assays has prevented investigation of whether Adriamycin-DNA adducts are involved in the anti-tumour potential of Adriamycin. Previous detection has achieved a sensitivity of a few Adriamycin-DNA adducts/10(4) bp DNA, but has required the use of supra-clinical drug concentrations. This work sought to measure Adriamycin-DNA adducts at sub-micromolar doses using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique with origins in geochemistry for radiocarbon dating. We have used conditions previously validated (by less sensitive decay counting) to extract [(14)C]Adriamycin-DNA adducts from cells and adapted the methodology to AMS detection. Here we show the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adducts at clinically-relevant Adriamycin concentrations. [(14)C]Adriamycin treatment (25 nM) resulted in 4.4 +/- 1.0 adducts/10(7) bp ( approximately 1300 adducts/cell) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, representing the best sensitivity and precision reported to date for the covalent binding of Adriamycin to DNA. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection and revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. This method has been shown to be highly reproducible for the measurement of Adriamycin-DNA adducts in tumour cells in culture and can now be applied to the detection of these adducts in human tissues.

  16. Optimised Pre-Analytical Methods Improve KRAS Mutation Detection in Circulating Tumour DNA (ctDNA) from Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James L.; Corcoran, Claire; Brown, Helen; Sharpe, Alan D.; Musilova, Milena; Kohlmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive mutation testing using circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is an attractive premise. This could enable patients without available tumour sample to access more treatment options. Materials & Methods Peripheral blood and matched tumours were analysed from 45 NSCLC patients. We investigated the impact of pre-analytical variables on DNA yield and/or KRAS mutation detection: sample collection tube type, incubation time, centrifugation steps, plasma input volume and DNA extraction kits. Results 2 hr incubation time and double plasma centrifugation (2000 x g) reduced overall DNA yield resulting in lowered levels of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA). Reduced “contamination” and increased KRAS mutation detection was observed using cell-free DNA Blood Collection Tubes (cfDNA BCT) (Streck), after 72 hrs following blood draw compared to EDTA tubes. Plasma input volume and use of different DNA extraction kits impacted DNA yield. Conclusion This study demonstrated that successful ctDNA recovery for mutation detection in NSCLC is dependent on pre-analytical steps. Development of standardised methods for the detection of KRAS mutations from ctDNA specimens is recommended to minimise the impact of pre-analytical steps on mutation detection rates. Where rapid sample processing is not possible the use of cfDNA BCT tubes would be advantageous. PMID:26918901

  17. Optimised Pre-Analytical Methods Improve KRAS Mutation Detection in Circulating Tumour DNA (ctDNA from Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Sherwood

    Full Text Available Non-invasive mutation testing using circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA is an attractive premise. This could enable patients without available tumour sample to access more treatment options.Peripheral blood and matched tumours were analysed from 45 NSCLC patients. We investigated the impact of pre-analytical variables on DNA yield and/or KRAS mutation detection: sample collection tube type, incubation time, centrifugation steps, plasma input volume and DNA extraction kits.2 hr incubation time and double plasma centrifugation (2000 x g reduced overall DNA yield resulting in lowered levels of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA. Reduced "contamination" and increased KRAS mutation detection was observed using cell-free DNA Blood Collection Tubes (cfDNA BCT (Streck, after 72 hrs following blood draw compared to EDTA tubes. Plasma input volume and use of different DNA extraction kits impacted DNA yield.This study demonstrated that successful ctDNA recovery for mutation detection in NSCLC is dependent on pre-analytical steps. Development of standardised methods for the detection of KRAS mutations from ctDNA specimens is recommended to minimise the impact of pre-analytical steps on mutation detection rates. Where rapid sample processing is not possible the use of cfDNA BCT tubes would be advantageous.

  18. Fluorescence quantitative PCR in detection of HBV DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zheng; Li Ming; Shen Xia

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the serum content of HBV-DNA and expression of serological markers with HBV infection patients. Methods: Serum samples from 375 hepatitis B patients with different clinical status and 70 normal persons were quantitated for HBV-DNA by FQ-PCR. Results: The average of HBV-DNA contents in the patient in the groups of HBsAg (+) and of HBeAg(+) were significantly higher than those in the group of HBsAg(-) and of HBeAg(-). Even in the group of HBeAg negative, high HBV-DNA contents might still be present in both the HBeAg(+) and HBeAg(-) groups. Conclusion: FQ-PCR can be used to monitor the real state of HBV infection, replication and the course of disease

  19. Detection of Different DNA Animal Species in Commercial Candy Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Colmenero, Marta; Martínez, Jose Luis; Roca, Agustín; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Candy products are consumed all across the world, but there is not much information about their composition. In this study we have used a DNA-based approach for determining the animal species occurring in 40 commercial candies of different types. We extracted DNA and performed PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing for obtaining species-informative DNA sequences. Eight species were identified including fish (hake and anchovy) in 22% of the products analyzed. Bovine and porcine were the most abundant appearing in 27 samples each one. Most products contained a mixture of species. Marshmallows (7), jelly-types, and gummies (20) contained a significantly higher number of species than hard candies (9). We demonstrated the presence of DNA animal species in candy product which allow consumers to make choices and prevent allergic reaction. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Comparison between Mt-DNA D-Loop and Cyt B primers for porcine DNA detection in meat products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Azhana; Mutalib, Sahilah Abd.; Babji, Abdul Salam

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to detect the presence of porcine DNA in meat products in the market using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and commercial PCR-southern hybridization analysis. Porcine DNA detection in meat products was tested due to some issues associated with the adulteration of food products in Malaysia. This is an important issue especially for Halal authentication which is required for some religious practices such as in Islam and Hinduisms. Many techniques have been developed for determining the Halal status of food products. In this paper, mt-DNA D-loop primer and cytochrome (cyt) b were used to detect the presence of porcine DNA in meat products. Positive and negative controls were always present for each batch of extraction. DNA of raw pork meat was used as a positive control while nucleus free water is used as negative control. A pair of oligonucleotide primer was used namely Pork1 and Pork2 which produced amplicon of 531 base pair (bp) in size. While, PCR-southern hybridization was conducted using primers readily supplied by commercial PCR-Southern hybridization and produced amplicon with 276 bp in size. In the present study, demonstrated that none of the samples were contaminated with porcine residuals but selected samples with pork meat were positive. The species-specific PCR amplification yielded excellent results for identification of pork derivatives in food products and it is a potentially reliable and suitable technique in routine food analysis for Halal certification.

  1. New applications of CRISPR/Cas9 system on mutant DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chenqiang; Huai, Cong; Ding, Jiaqi; Hu, Lingna; Su, Bo; Chen, Hongyan; Lu, Daru

    2018-01-30

    The detection of mutant DNA is critical for precision medicine, but low-frequency DNA mutation is very hard to be determined. CRISPR/Cas9 is a robust tool for in vivo gene editing, and shows the potential for precise in vitro DNA cleavage. Here we developed a DNA mutation detection system based on CRISPR/Cas9 that can detect gene mutation efficiently even in a low-frequency condition. The system of CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage in vitro showed a high accuracy similar to traditional T7 endonuclease I (T7E1) assay in estimating mutant DNA proportion in the condition of normal frequency. The technology was further used for low-frequency mutant DNA detection of EGFR and HBB somatic mutations. To the end, Cas9 was employed to cleave the wild-type (WT) DNA and to enrich the mutant DNA. Using amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis (AFLPA) and Sanger sequencing, we assessed the sensitivity of CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage-based PCR, in which mutations at 1%-10% could be enriched and detected. When combined with blocker PCR, its sensitivity reached up to 0.1%. Our results suggested that this new application of CRISPR/Cas9 system is a robust and potential method for heterogeneous specimens in the clinical diagnosis and treatment management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) shield for Arduino DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velders, Aldrik H; Schoen, Cor; Saggiomo, Vittorio

    2018-02-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of DNA is gaining relevance as a method to detect nucleic acids, as it is easier, faster, and more powerful than conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction. However, LAMP is still mostly used in laboratory settings, because of the lack of a cheap and easy, one-button device that can perform LAMP experiments. Here we show how to build and program an Arduino shield for a LAMP and detection of DNA. The here described Arduino Shield is cheap, easy to assemble, to program and use, it is battery operated and the detection of DNA is done by naked-eye so that it can be used in field.

  3. Hall effect biosensors with ultraclean graphene film for improved sensitivity of label-free DNA detection

    KAUST Repository

    Loan, Phan Thi Kim

    2017-07-19

    The quality of graphene strongly affects the performance of graphene-based biosensors which are highly demanded for the sensitive and selective detection of biomolecules, such as DNA. This work reported a novel transfer process for preparing a residue-free graphene film using a thin gold supporting layer. A Hall effect device made of this gold-transferred graphene was demonstrated to significantly enhance the sensitivity (≈ 5 times) for hybridization detection, with a linear detection range of 1 pM – 100nM for DNA target. Our findings provide an efficient method to boost the sensitivity of graphene-based biosensors for DNA recognition.

  4. Simultaneous elimination of carryover contamination and detection of DNA with uracil-DNA-glycosylase-supplemented loop-mediated isothermal amplification (UDG-LAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Kuangwen; Mage, Peter L; Csordas, Andrew T; Eisenstein, Michael; Soh, H Tom

    2014-04-11

    We report a one-pot, closed-vessel enzymatic assay that eliminates carryover contamination while preserving robust DNA amplification in loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), providing reliable and rapid detection of target DNA in contaminated samples.

  5. Dyes as bifunctional markers of DNA hybridization on surfaces and mutation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mendiola, Tania; Cerro, María Ramos; López-Moreno, José María; Pariente, Félix; Lorenzo, Encarnación

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of small molecules with DNA has found diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this work, we propose the use of two different dyes, in particular Azure A and Safranine, as bifunctional markers of on-surface DNA hybridization and potent tools for screening of specific gene mutations directly in real DNA PCR amplicons extracted from blood cells. By combining spectroscopic and electrochemical methods we demonstrate that both dyes can interact with single and double stranded DNA to a different extent, allowing reliable hybridization detection. From these data, we have also elucidated the nature of the interaction. We conclude that the binding mode is fundamentally intercalative with an electrostatic component. The dye fluorescence allows their use as nucleic acid stains for the detection of on-surfaces DNA hybridization. Its redox activity is exploited in the development of selective electrochemical DNA biosensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Gold-based optical biosensor for single-mismatched DNA detection using salt-induced hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Zongrui; Ma, Xingyi; Cao, Cuong

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a gold nanoparticle (Au-NP)-based detection method for sensitive and specific DNA-based diagnostic applications is described. A sandwich format consisting of Au-NPs/DNA/PMP (Streptavidin-coated MagnetSphere Para-Magnetic Particles) was fabricated. PMPs captured and separated target...... DNA while Au-NPs modified with oligonucleotide detection sequences played a role in recognition and signal production. Due to the much lower stability of mismatched DNA strands caused by unstable duplex structures in solutions of relatively low salt concentration, hybridization efficiency...... in the presence of different buffers was well investigated, and thus, the optimized salt concentration allowed for discrimination of single-mismatched DNA (MMT) from perfectly matched DNA (PMT). Therefore, quantitative information concerning the target analyte was translated into a colorimetric signal, which...

  7. Amplified Detection of the Aptamer–Vanillin Complex with the Use of Bsm DNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariia Andrianova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical detection of interactions between aptamers and low-molecular-weight targets often lacks sensitivity. Signal amplification improves the detection of the aptamer-analyte complex; Bsm DNA polymerase was used to amplify the signal from the interaction of vanillin and its aptamer named Van_74 on an ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET-based biosensor. The aptamer was immobilized on the ISFET sensitive surface. A short DNA probe was hybridized with the aptamer and dissociated from it upon vanillin addition. A free probe interacted with a special DNA molecular beacon initiated the Bsm DNA polymerase reaction that was detected by ISFET. A buffer solution suitable for both aptamer action and Bsm DNA polymerase activity was determined. The ISFET was shown to detect the Bsm DNA polymerase reaction under the selected conditions. Vanillin at different concentrations (1 × 10−6–1 × 10−8 M was detected using the biosensor with signal amplification. The developed detection system allowed for the determination of vanillin, starting at a 10−8 M concentration. Application of the Bsm DNA polymerase resulted in a 15.5 times lower LoD when compared to the biosensor without signal amplification (10.1007/s00604-017-2586-4.

  8. Amplified Detection of the Aptamer-Vanillin Complex with the Use of Bsm DNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianova, Mariia; Komarova, Natalia; Grudtsov, Vitaliy; Kuznetsov, Evgeniy; Kuznetsov, Alexander

    2017-12-26

    The electrochemical detection of interactions between aptamers and low-molecular-weight targets often lacks sensitivity. Signal amplification improves the detection of the aptamer-analyte complex; Bsm DNA polymerase was used to amplify the signal from the interaction of vanillin and its aptamer named Van_74 on an ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET)-based biosensor. The aptamer was immobilized on the ISFET sensitive surface. A short DNA probe was hybridized with the aptamer and dissociated from it upon vanillin addition. A free probe interacted with a special DNA molecular beacon initiated the Bsm DNA polymerase reaction that was detected by ISFET. A buffer solution suitable for both aptamer action and Bsm DNA polymerase activity was determined. The ISFET was shown to detect the Bsm DNA polymerase reaction under the selected conditions. Vanillin at different concentrations (1 × 10 -6 -1 × 10 -8 M) was detected using the biosensor with signal amplification. The developed detection system allowed for the determination of vanillin, starting at a 10 -8 M concentration. Application of the Bsm DNA polymerase resulted in a 15.5 times lower LoD when compared to the biosensor without signal amplification (10.1007/s00604-017-2586-4).

  9. eDNA Barcoding: Using Next-Generation Sequencing of Environmental DNA for Detection and Identification of Cetacean Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    mmi.oregonstate.edu/ccgl LONG - TERM GOALS We are developing next-generation sequencing and digital (d)PCR methodology for detection and species...ubiquitous DNA sequencing for surveys of biodiversity more efficient and affordable in the near future. RELATED PROJECTS None to date.

  10. Plant DNA Detection from Grasshopper Guts: A Step-by-Step Protocol, from Tissue Preparation to Obtaining Plant DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Avanesyan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: A PCR-based method of identifying ingested plant DNA in gut contents of Melanoplus grasshoppers was developed. Although previous investigations have focused on a variety of insects, there are no protocols available for plant DNA detection developed for grasshoppers, agricultural pests that significantly influence plant community composition. Methods and Results: The developed protocol successfully used the noncoding region of the chloroplast trnL (UAA gene and was tested in several feeding experiments. Plant DNA was obtained at seven time points post-ingestion from whole guts and separate gut sections, and was detectable up to 12 h post-ingestion in nymphs and 22 h post-ingestion in adult grasshoppers. Conclusions: The proposed protocol is an effective, relatively quick, and low-cost method of detecting plant DNA from the grasshopper gut and its different sections. This has important applications, from exploring plant “movement” during food consumption, to detecting plant–insect interactions.

  11. [Research Progress on the Detection Method of DNA Methylation and Its Application in Forensic Science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Y C; Yu, L J; Guan, H; Zhao, Y; Rong, H B; Jiang, B W; Zhang, T

    2017-06-01

    As an important part of epigenetic marker, DNA methylation involves in the gene regulation and attracts a wide spread attention in biological auxology, geratology and oncology fields. In forensic science, because of the relative stable, heritable, abundant, and age-related characteristics, DNA methylation is considered to be a useful complement to the classic genetic markers for age-prediction, tissue-identification, and monozygotic twins' discrimination. Various methods for DNA methylation detection have been validated based on methylation sensitive restriction endonuclease, bisulfite modification and methylation-CpG binding protein. In recent years, it is reported that the third generation sequencing method can be used to detect DNA methylation. This paper aims to make a review on the detection method of DNA methylation and its applications in forensic science. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine.

  12. An improved method for detecting genetic variation in DNA using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Norio; Hiyama, Keiko; Kodaira, Mieko; Satoh, Chiyoko.

    1990-05-01

    We have examined the feasibility of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of RNA:DNA duplexes to detect variations in genomic and cloned DNAs. The result has demonstrated that use of RNA:DNA duplexes makes DGGE much more practical for screening a large number of samples than use of DNA:DNA heteroduplexes, because preparation of RNA probes is easier than that of DNA probes. Three different 32 P-labeled RNA probes were produced. Genomic or cloned DNAs were digested with restriction enzymes and hybridized to labeled RNA probes, and resulting RNA:DNA duplexes were examined by DGGE. The presence of a mismatch(es) was detected as a difference in the mobility of bands on the gel. The experimental conditions were determined using DNA segments from cloned normal and three thalassemic human β-globin genes. The results from experiments on the cloned DNAs suggest that DGGE of RNA:DNA duplexes will detect nucleotide substitutions and deletions in DNA. In the course of these studies, a polymorphism due to a single-base substitution at position 666 of IVS2 (IVS2-666) of the human β-globin gene was directly identified using genomic DNA samples. A study of 59 unrelated Japanese from Hiroshima was undertaken in which the frequency of the allele with C at IVS2-666 was 0.48 and that of the allele with T was 0.52. This approach was found to be very effective for detecting heritable variation and should be a powerful tool for detecting fresh mutations in DNA, which occur outside the known restriction sites. (author)

  13. DNA methylation detection by a novel fluorimetric nanobiosensor for early cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadmehr, M; Hosseini, M; Hosseinkhani, S; Ganjali, M R; Khoobi, M; Behzadi, H; Hamedani, M; Sheikhnejad, R

    2014-10-15

    A very sensitive and convenient fluorescence nanobiosensor for rapid detection of DNA methylation based on Fe3O4/Au core/shell nanoparticles has been developed. Specific site of CpG islands of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), a well studied tumor suppressor gene, was used as the detection target DNA sequence. The characteristics of nanoparticles were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), UV-visible spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. Fe@Au nanoparticles functionalized by bounding of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe through sulfhydryl group at the 5' phosphate end. Then unmethylated and methylated complementary target ssDNA were hybridized with the immobilized ssDNA probe. Dipyridamole, a pharmaceutical agent used for the first time as a fluorescence probe which significantly interacted with hybridized unmethylated and methylated DNA. Upon the addition of the target unmethylated and methylated ssDNA, the fluorescence intensity increased in linear range by concentration of unmethylated ssDNA from 1.6 × 10(-15) to 6.6 × 10(-13)M with detection limit of 1.2 × 10(-16)M and on the other hand, fluorescence intensity declined linearly with concentration of 3.2 × 10(-15)-8.0 × 10(-13)M methylated DNA and detection limit was 3.1 × 10(-16)M. We have also shown that nanobiosensor could distinguish ratio of methylation in series of partially methylated DNA targets with identical sequences. A density functional theory (DFT) calculation was also performed to investigate the interaction between Dipyridamole with unmethylated and methylated cytosine. Finally real sample analysis suggested that nanobiosensor could have practical application for methylation detection in human plasma sample. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Microfabricated electrochemical sensor for the detection of radiation-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Rivas, G.; Ozsoz, M.; Grant, D.H.; Cai, X.; Parrado, C. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An electrochemical biosensor protocol for the detection of radiation-induced DNA damage is described. The procedure employs a dsDNA-coated screen-printed electrode and relies on changes in the guanine-DNA oxidation signal upon exposure to ultraviolet radiation. The decreased signal is ascribed primarily to conformational changes in the DNA and to the photoconversion of the guanine-DNA moiety to a nonelectroactive monomeric base product. Factors influencing the response of these microfabricated DNA sensors, such as irradiation time, wavelength, and distance, are explored, and future prospects are discussed. Similar results are given for the use of bare strip electrodes in connection with irradiated DNA solutions. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Electrochemical detection of benzo(a)pyrene and related DNA damage using DNA/hemin/nafion–graphene biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Yongnian, E-mail: ynni@ncu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang, Pingping; Song, Haiyan [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Lin, Xiaoyun [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Kokot, Serge, E-mail: s.kokot@qut.edu.au [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane 4001 (Australia)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel electrochemical biosensor, DNA/hemin/nafion–graphene/GCE, was constructed to quantitatively study the DNA damage induced by the metabolite of benzo(a)pyrene in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Construction of a novel DNA/hemin/nafion-graphene/GCE biosensor. • DNA damage induced by the benzo(a)pyrene metabolite was detected. • DPV analysis of benzo(a)pyrene provided a quantitative estimate of DNA damage. • Hemin/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system could mimic the cytochrome P450 to metabolize benzo(a)pyrene. - Abstract: A novel electrochemical biosensor, DNA/hemin/nafion–graphene/GCE, was constructed for the analysis of the benzo(a)pyrene PAH, which can produce DNA damage induced by a benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) enzyme-catalytic product. This biosensor was assembled layer-by-layer, and was characterized with the use of cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and atomic force microscopy. Ultimately, it was demonstrated that the hemin/nafion–graphene/GCE was a viable platform for the immobilization of DNA. This DNA biosensor was treated separately in benzo(a)pyrene, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and in their mixture, respectively, and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) analysis showed that an oxidation peak was apparent after the electrode was immersed in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Such experiments indicated that in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, hemin could mimic cytochrome P450 to metabolize benzo(a)pyrene, and a voltammogram of its metabolite was recorded. The DNA damage induced by this metabolite was also detected by electrochemical impedance and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Finally, a novel, indirect DPV analytical method for BaP in aqueous solution was developed based on the linear metabolite versus BaP concentration plot; this method provided a new, indirect, quantitative estimate of DNA damage.

  16. Nanoprobe-Initiated Enzymatic Polymerization for Highly Sensitive Electrochemical DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ying; Wang, Pengjuan; Su, Yan; Wang, Lihua; Pan, Dun; Aldalbahi, Ali; Yang, Shulin; Zuo, Xiaolei

    2015-11-25

    Electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensors have been greatly developed and play an important role in early diagnosis of different diseases. To determine the extremely low abundance of DNA biomarkers in clinical samples, scientists are making unremitting efforts toward achieving highly sensitive and selective E-DNA sensors. Here, a novel E-DNA sensor was developed taking advantage of the signal amplification efficiency of nanoprobe-initiated enzymatic polymerization (NIEP). In the NIEP based E-DNA sensor, the capture probe DNA was thiolated at its 3'-terminal to be immobilized onto gold electrode, and the nanoprobe was fabricated by 5'-thiol-terminated signal probe DNA conjugated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Both of the probes could simultaneously hybridize with the target DNA to form a "sandwich" structure followed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-catalyzed elongation of the free 3'-terminal of DNA on the nanoprobe. During the DNA elongation, biotin labels were incorporated into the NIEP-generated long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) tentacles, leading to specific binding of avidin modified horseradish peroxidase (Av-HRP). Since there are hundreds of DNA probes on the nanoprobe, one hybridization event would generate hundreds of long ssDNA tentacles, resulting in tens of thousands of HRP catalyzed reduction of hydrogen peroxide and sharply increasing electrochemical signals. By employing nanoprobe and TdT, it is demonstrated that the NIEP amplified E-DNA sensor has a detection limit of 10 fM and excellent differentiation ability for even single-base mismatch.

  17. Development of an Automated Microfluidic System for DNA Collection, Amplification, and Detection of Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, Bethany S.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2002-12-01

    This project was focused on developing and testing automated routines for a microfluidic Pathogen Detection System. The basic pathogen detection routine has three primary components; cell concentration, DNA amplification, and detection. In cell concentration, magnetic beads are held in a flow cell by an electromagnet. Sample liquid is passed through the flow cell and bacterial cells attach to the beads. These beads are then released into a small volume of fluid and delivered to the peltier device for cell lysis and DNA amplification. The cells are lysed during initial heating in the peltier device, and the released DNA is amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or strand displacement amplification (SDA). Once amplified, the DNA is then delivered to a laser induced fluorescence detection unit in which the sample is detected. These three components create a flexible platform that can be used for pathogen detection in liquid and sediment samples. Future developments of the system will include on-line DNA detection during DNA amplification and improved capture and release methods for the magnetic beads during cell concentration.

  18. Detection of bond formations by DNA-programmed chemical reactions and PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yizhou; Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Chi; Li, Xiaoyu

    2012-10-04

    A system capable of performing both DNA-templated chemical reactions and detection of bond formations is reported. Photocleavable DNA templates direct reactions. Products from bond-forming events re-ligate original templates, amplifiable by PCR, therefore distinguishing bond formation from background. This system provides a novel approach for discovering potential new chemical reactions.

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIAL DNA MARKERS FOR THE DETECTION OF HUMAN FECAL POLLUTION IN WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used genome fragment enrichment and bioinformatics to identify several microbial DNA sequences with high potential for use as markers in PCR assays for detection of human fecal contamination in water. Following competitive solution-phase hybridization of total DNA from human a...

  20. Repurposing environmental DNA samples: Detecting the western pearlshell (Margaritifera falcata) as a proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph C. Dysthe; Torrey Rodgers; Thomas W. Franklin; Kellie J. Carim; Michael K. Young; Kevin S. McKelvey; Karen E. Mock; Michael K. Schwartz

    2018-01-01

    Information on the distribution of multiple species in a common landscape is fundamental to effective conservation and management. However, distribution data are expensive to obtain and often limited to high-profile species in a system. A recently developed technique, environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling, has been shown to be more sensitive than traditional detection...

  1. Quantitative detection of residual E. coli host cell DNA by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hyuck; Bae, Jung Eun; Lee, Jung Hee; Shin, Jeong Sup; Kim, In Seop

    2010-10-01

    E. coli has been widely used as a host system to manufacture recombinant proteins for human therapeutic use. Among impurities to be eliminated during the downstream process, residual host cell DNA is a major interest for safety. Residual E. coli host cell DNA in the final products are usually determined using conventional slot blot hybridization assay or total DNA Threshold assay, although these methods are time consuming, expensive, and relatively insensitive. Therefore a sensitive real-time PCR assay for specific detection of residual E. coli DNA was developed and compared with slot blot hybridization assay and Threshold assay to validate the overall capability of these methods. Specific primer pair for amplification of the E. coli 16S rRNA gene was selected to improve the sensitivity, and E. coli host cell DNA was quantified by use of SYBR Green 1. The detection limit of real-time PCR assay in the optimized condition was calculated to be 0.042 pg genomic DNA, which is much higher than those of slot blot hybridization assay and Threshold assay of which detection limit were 2.42 and 3.73 pg genomic DNA, respectively. The real-time PCR assay was validated to be more reproducible, accurate, and precise than slot blot hybridization assay and Threshold assay. The real-time PCR assay may be a useful tool for quantitative detection and clearance validation of residual E. coli DNA during the manufacturing process for recombinant therapeutics.

  2. Detection of different developmental stages of malaria parasites by non-radioactive DNA in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, F. M.; van Amstel, P. J.; Janse, C. J.; Meis, J. F.; Mons, B.

    1991-01-01

    A highly sensitive non-radioactive DNA in situ hybridization procedure is described that enables detection and unequivocal identification of various developmental stages of human and rodent malaria parasites. Using biotinylated species-specific DNA probes, erythrocytic parasites can be specifically

  3. Detection of restriction enzyme-digested target DNA by PCR amplification using a stem-loop primer: application to the detection of hypomethylated fetal DNA in maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yu K; Chiu, Rossa W K; Leung, Tak Y; Ding, Chunming; Lau, Tze K; Leung, Tse N; Lo, Y M Dennis

    2007-11-01

    The discovery of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma has opened up new possibilities for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis and monitoring. Among the fetal markers that have been described, methylation markers are sex and polymorphism independent. Methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases are commonly used to digest hypomethylated DNA molecules, and the hypermethylated molecules remain intact for detection. The positive detection of the cleaved hypomethylated molecules would be useful for certain targets but has not been reported. The use of a stem-loop primer in microRNA detection has previously been described. In this study, DNA assays were designed and performed on maternal plasma, which contained the hypomethylated placental serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade B (ovalbumin), member 5 (SERPINB5; maspin) gene in an excess background of hypermethylated maternal SERPINB5. Detection of the enzyme-digested placenta-derived hypomethylated SERPINB5 molecules was achieved by performing stem-loop extension followed by real-time PCR on maternal plasma. The placental origin of the stem-loop-extended SERPINB5 molecules was confirmed by genotyping. From the real-time PCR results on maternal plasma, stem-loop-extended SERPINB5 promoter sequences were detectable in all 11 enzyme-digested predelivery maternal plasma samples. Postpartum clearance was demonstrated. In 9 cases in which the fetal and maternal SERPINB5 genotypes were distinguishable, the placental-specific genotypes were detected in all predelivery maternal plasma samples. Detection of restriction enzyme-digested hypomethylated placental DNA molecules in maternal plasma by the use of a stem-loop primer represents a novel approach in fetal epigenetic marker detection. The analytical approach may also be generally applicable to the detection of restriction enzyme-digested nucleic acid fragments.

  4. Detection of complex alleles by direct analysis of DNA heteroduplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, R; Iannicola, C; Costanzi, S; Chersi, A; Tosi, R

    1991-01-01

    DNA molecules derived from three alleles of the HLA-DRB3 locus and differing from each other at several nucleotide sites were denatured and cross-hybridized. Each allelic combination was found to generate a pair of heteroduplexes of different mobility. Their retardation as compared to homoduplexes was proportional to the number of mismatches. In each heteroduplexes pair the component possessing the highest number of Pyr-Pyr oppositions was the most retarded. The results are those predicted by a theoretical model implying a correlation between base-pair opening and bending of the DNA double helix. These observations introduce a new HLA typing method at the genomic level and indicate an experimental approach to the analysis of the superhelical DNA conformation as related to different types of base oppositions.

  5. Biomarker Validation for Aging: Lessons from mtDNA Heteroplasmy Analyses in Early Cancer Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Peter E; Murthy, Mahadev

    2009-11-27

    The anticipated biological and clinical utility of biomarkers has attracted significant interest recently. Aging and early cancer detection represent areas active in the search for predictive and prognostic biomarkers. While applications differ, overlapping biological features, analytical technologies and specific biomarker analytes bear comparison. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a biomarker in both biological models has been evaluated. However, it remains unclear whether mtDNA changes in aging and cancer represent biological relationships that are causal, incidental, or a combination of both. This article focuses on evaluation of mtDNA-based biomarkers, emerging strategies for quantitating mtDNA admixtures, and how current understanding of mtDNA in aging and cancer evolves with introduction of new technologies. Whether for cancer or aging, lessons from mtDNA based biomarker evaluations are several. Biological systems are inherently dynamic and heterogeneous. Detection limits for mtDNA sequencing technologies differ among methods for low-level DNA sequence admixtures in healthy and diseased states. Performance metrics of analytical mtDNA technology should be validated prior to application in heterogeneous biologically-based systems. Critical in evaluating biomarker performance is the ability to distinguish measurement system variance from inherent biological variance, because it is within the latter that background healthy variability as well as high-value, disease-specific information reside.

  6. Biomarker Validation for Aging: Lessons from mtDNA Heteroplasmy Analyses in Early Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. Barker

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The anticipated biological and clinical utility of biomarkers has attracted significant interest recently. Aging and early cancer detection represent areas active in the search for predictive and prognostic biomarkers. While applications differ, overlapping biological features, analytical technologies and specific biomarker analytes bear comparison. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA as a biomarker in both biological models has been evaluated. However, it remains unclear whether mtDNA changes in aging and cancer represent biological relationships that are causal, incidental, or a combination of both. This article focuses on evaluation of mtDNA-based biomarkers, emerging strategies for quantitating mtDNA admixtures, and how current understanding of mtDNA in aging and cancer evolves with introduction of new technologies. Whether for cancer or aging, lessons from mtDNA based biomarker evaluations are several. Biological systems are inherently dynamic and heterogeneous. Detection limits for mtDNA sequencing technologies differ among methods for low-level DNA sequence admixtures in healthy and diseased states. Performance metrics of analytical mtDNA technology should be validated prior to application in heterogeneous biologically-based systems. Critical in evaluating biomarker performance is the ability to distinguish measurement system variance from inherent biological variance, because it is within the latter that background healthy variability as well as high-value, disease-specific information reside.

  7. A high-throughput method for detection of DNA in chloroplasts using flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldenburg Delene J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of DNA in the chloroplasts of some plant species has been shown recently to decline dramatically during leaf development. A high-throughput method of DNA detection in chloroplasts is now needed in order to facilitate the further investigation of this process using large numbers of tissue samples. Results The DNA-binding fluorophores 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI, SYBR Green I (SG, SYTO 42, and SYTO 45 were assessed for their utility in flow cytometric analysis of DNA in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. Fluorescence microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR were used to validate flow cytometry data. We found neither DAPI nor SYTO 45 suitable for flow cytometric analysis of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA content, but did find changes in cpDNA content during development by flow cytometry using SG and SYTO 42. The latter dye provided more sensitive detection, and the results were similar to those from the fluorescence microscopic analysis. Differences in SYTO 42 fluorescence were found to correlate with differences in cpDNA content as determined by qPCR using three primer sets widely spaced across the chloroplast genome, suggesting that the whole genome undergoes copy number reduction during development, rather than selective reduction/degradation of subgenomic regions. Conclusion Flow cytometric analysis of chloroplasts stained with SYTO 42 is a high-throughput method suitable for determining changes in cpDNA content during development and for sorting chloroplasts on the basis of DNA content.

  8. In situ detection of tandem DNA repeat length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaar, R.; Szafranski, P.; Cantor, C.R.; Smith, C.L. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    A simple method for scoring short tandem DNA repeats is presented. An oligonucleotide target, containing tandem repeats embedded in a unique sequence, was hybridized to a set of complementary probes, containing tandem repeats of known lengths. Single-stranded loop structures formed on duplexes containing a mismatched (different) number of tandem repeats. No loop structure formed on duplexes containing a matched (identical) number of tandem repeats. The matched and mismatched loop structures were enzymatically distinguished and differentially labeled by treatment with S1 nuclease and the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Mislabelling of spanish commercial semipreserved anchovies detected by DNA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Velasco

    2014-06-01

    Although there are several studies presenting DNA methodologies for the identification of anchovies, this is one of the first studies aiming the evaluation of the level of mislabeling in this kind of products in Europe. Sixty three commercial semi preserved anchovy products were collected in different types of food markets in four Spanish cities to check their labelling. Species determination in these commercial products was performed by sequencing two different DNA fragments of mitochondrial cyt b. Results revealed that the level of mislabeling regarding species was higher than 16% in these products. The most frequent substitution found was Engraulis anchoita declared as Engraulis encrasicolus.

  10. Improving Probe Immobilization for Label-Free Capacitive Detection of DNA Hybridization on Microfabricated Gold Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Carrara

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative approaches to labeled optical detection for DNA arrays are actively investigated for low-cost point-of-care applications. In this domain, label-free capacitive detection is one of the most intensely studied techniques. It is based on the idea to detect the Helmholtz ion layer displacements when molecular recognition occurs at the electrodes/solution interface. The sensing layer is usually prepared by using thiols terminated DNA single-strength oligonucleotide probes on top of the sensor electrodes. However, published data shows evident time drift, which greatly complicates signal conditioning and processing and ultimately increases the uncertainty in DNA recognition sensing. The aim of this work is to show that newly developed ethylene-glycol functionalized alkanethiols greatly reduce time drift, thereby significantly improving capacitance based label-free detection of DNA.

  11. Carbon nanotube-based lateral flow biosensor for sensitive and rapid detection of DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wanwei; Xu, Hui; Takalkar, Sunitha; Gurung, Anant S; Liu, Bin; Zheng, Yafeng; Guo, Zebin; Baloda, Meenu; Baryeh, Kwaku; Liu, Guodong

    2015-02-15

    In this article, we describe a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based lateral flow biosensor (LFB) for rapid and sensitive detection of DNA sequence. Amine-modified DNA detection probe was covalently immobilized on the shortened multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) via diimide-activated amidation between the carboxyl groups on the CNT surface and amine groups on the detection DNA probes. Sandwich-type DNA hybridization reactions were performed on the LFB and the captured MWCNTs on test zone and control zone of LFB produced the characteristic black bands, enabling visual detection of DNA sequences. Combining the advantages of lateral flow chromatographic separation with unique physical properties of MWCNT (large surface area), the optimized LFB was capable of detecting of 0.1 nM target DNA without instrumentation. Quantitative detection could be realized by recording the intensity of the test line with the Image J software, and the detection limit of 40 pM was obtained. This detection limit is 12.5 times lower than that of gold nanoparticle (GNP)-based LFB (0.5 nM, Mao et al. Anal. Chem. 2009, 81, 1660-1668). Another important feature is that the preparation of MWCNT-DNA conjugates was robust and the use of MWCNT labels avoided the aggregation of conjugates and tedious preparation time, which were often met in the traditional GNP-based nucleic acid LFB. The applications of MWCNT-based LFB can be extended to visually detect protein biomarkers using MWCNT-antibody conjugates. The MWCNT-based LFB thus open a new door to prepare a new generation of LFB, and shows great promise for in-field and point-of-care diagnosis of genetic diseases and for the detection of infectious agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-11-24

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer.

  13. Selective detection of labeled DNA using an air-clad photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Bo Damm; Hoiby, P.E.; Pedersen, L.H.

    2004-01-01

    Demonstration of selective detection of fluorophore labeled DNA by hybridization inside the air holes of a photonic crystal fiber A laser exposes the fiber from the side and the emitted fluorescence tunnels into the core.......Demonstration of selective detection of fluorophore labeled DNA by hybridization inside the air holes of a photonic crystal fiber A laser exposes the fiber from the side and the emitted fluorescence tunnels into the core....

  14. Circulating tumor DNA outperforms circulating tumor cells for KRAS mutation detection in thoracic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidin, Maxim B; Freydina, Dasha V; Leung, Maria; Montero Fernandez, Angeles; Nicholson, Andrew G; Lim, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Circulating biomarkers, such as circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), are both considered for blood-based mutation detection, but limited studies have compared them in a head-to-head manner. Using KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog), we performed such a comparison in patients who underwent surgery for suspected lung cancer. We recruited 93 patients, including 82 with lung cancer and 11 with benign diseases of the lung. Mutations were detected in codons 12 and 13 of KRAS in DNA extracted from CTCs, plasma, and matched tumors or lung tissues with custom-designed coamplification at lower denaturation temperature (COLD)-PCR assays, high-resolution melt analysis (HRM), and commercial assays (Roche Cobas(®) KRAS mutation test and Qiagen Therascreen(®) pyrosequencing KRAS kit). With the Cobas mutation test, we identified KRAS mutations in 21.3% of tumors. Mutation analysis in matched CTC DNA and ctDNA samples by COLD-PCR/HRM assay revealed mutations in 30.5% (ctDNA) and 23.2% (CTC DNA) of patients with lung cancer. Combined results of different tests revealed KRAS-positive cases for 28% of tumors. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of KRAS mutation detection in tumors achieved with ctDNA was 0.96 (95% CI 0.81-1.00) and 0.95 (0.85-0.99), respectively. The diagnostic test performance was lower for CTC DNA, at 0.52 (0.34-0.73) and 0.88 (0.79-0.95). Our results support ctDNA as a preferential specimen type for mutation screening in thoracic malignancies vs CTC DNA, achieving greater mutation detection than either CTCs or limited amounts of tumor tissue alone. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  15. DNA probe functionalized QCM biosensor based on gold nanoparticle amplification for Bacillus anthracis detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Rong-Zhang; Song, Hong-Bin; Zuo, Guo-Min; Yang, Rui-Fu; Wei, Hong-Ping; Wang, Dian-Bing; Cui, Zong-Qiang; Zhang, ZhiPing; Cheng, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Xian-En

    2011-04-15

    The rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax disease, has gained much attention since the anthrax spore bioterrorism attacks in the United States in 2001. In this work, a DNA probe functionalized quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor was developed to detect B. anthracis based on the recognition of its specific DNA sequences, i.e., the 168 bp fragment of the Ba813 gene in chromosomes and the 340 bp fragment of the pag gene in plasmid pXO1. A thiol DNA probe was immobilized onto the QCM gold surface through self-assembly via Au-S bond formation to hybridize with the target ss-DNA sequence obtained by asymmetric PCR. Hybridization between the target DNA and the DNA probe resulted in an increase in mass and a decrease in the resonance frequency of the QCM biosensor. Moreover, to amplify the signal, a thiol-DNA fragment complementary to the other end of the target DNA was functionalized with gold nanoparticles. The results indicate that the DNA probe functionalized QCM biosensor could specifically recognize the target DNA fragment of B. anthracis from that of its closest species, such as Bacillus thuringiensis, and that the limit of detection (LOD) reached 3.5 × 10(2)CFU/ml of B. anthracis vegetative cells just after asymmetric PCR amplification, but without culture enrichment. The DNA probe functionalized QCM biosensor demonstrated stable, pollution-free, real-time sensing, and could find application in the rapid detection of B. anthracis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of Human Papillomavirus DNA by AffiProbe HPV-DNA Test Kit in Cervical Scrapes or Biopsies-Histopathologic Correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Nieminen, Pekka; Jalava, Tarja; Kallio, Arja; Ranki, Marjut; Paavonen, Jorma

    1994-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of punch biopsies and cervical scrapes in the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from the cervix and compare the results with the histopathologic diagnosis. Methods: The specimens were collected simultaneously, and HPV DNA was detected using a liquid hybridization test. Results: Biopsies and scrapes were equally efficient, but each detected only two-thirds of all HPV-DNA-positive patients. Thus, the positivity ...

  17. Impact of temperature and time storage on the microbial detection of oral samples by Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Cássio; dos Santos, Janine Navarro; Pedrazzi, Vinícius; Pita, Murillo Sucena; Monesi, Nadia; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; de Albuquerque, Rubens Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Molecular diagnosis methods have been largely used in epidemiological or clinical studies to detect and quantify microbial species that may colonize the oral cavity in healthy or disease. The preservation of genetic material from samples remains the major challenge to ensure the feasibility of these methodologies. Long-term storage may compromise the final result. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of temperature and time storage on the microbial detection of oral samples by Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Saliva and supragingival biofilm were taken from 10 healthy subjects, aliquoted (n=364) and processed according to proposed protocols: immediate processing and processed after 2 or 4 weeks, and 6 or 12 months of storage at 4°C, -20°C and -80°C. Either total or individual microbial counts were recorded in lower values for samples processed after 12 months of storage, irrespective of temperatures tested. Samples stored up to 6 months at cold temperatures showed similar counts to those immediately processed. The microbial incidence was also significantly reduced in samples stored during 12 months in all temperatures. Temperature and time of oral samples storage have relevant impact in the detection and quantification of bacterial and fungal species by Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method. Samples should be processed immediately after collection or up to 6 months if conserved at cold temperatures to avoid false-negative results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Detecting DNA damage with a silver solid amalgam electrode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuchaříková, Kateřina; Novotný, Ladislav; Josypčuk, Bohdan; Fojta, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 5 (2004), s. 410-414 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4004108; GA AV ČR IBS5004355 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : DNA damage * silver solid amalgam electrode * HMDE Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.038, year: 2004

  19. Development of 19F-NMR chemical shift detection of DNA B-Z equilibrium using 19F-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, S; Yang, H; Hirata, C; Kersaudy, F; Fujimoto, K

    2017-06-28

    Various DNA conformational changes are in correlation with biological events. In particular, DNA B-Z equilibrium showed a high correlation with translation and transcription. In this study, we developed a DNA probe containing 5-trifluoromethylcytidine or 5-trifluoromethylthymidine to detect DNA B-Z equilibrium using 19 F-NMR. Its probe enabled the quantitative detection of B-, Z-, and ss-DNA based on 19 F-NMR chemical shift change.

  20. Environmental DNA as a new method for early detection of New Zealand mudsnails (Potamopyrgus antipodarum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Caren S.; Sepulveda, Adam; Ray, Andrew; Baumgardt, Jeremy A.; Waits, Lisette P.

    2013-01-01

    Early detection of aquatic invasive species is a critical task for management of aquatic ecosystems. This task is hindered by the difficulty and cost of surveying aquatic systems thoroughly. The New Zealand mudsnail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) is a small, invasive parthenogenic mollusk that can reach very high population densities and severely affects ecosystem functioning. To assist in the early detection of this invasive species, we developed and validated a highly sensitive environmental deoxyribonucleic acid (eDNA) assay. We used a dose–response laboratory experiment to investigate the relationship between New Zealand mudsnail density and eDNA detected through time. We documented that as few as 1 individual in 1.5 L of water for 2 d could be detected with this method, and that eDNA from this species may remain detectable for 21 to 44 d after mudsnail removal. We used the eDNA method to confirm the presence of New Zealand mudsnail eDNA at densities as low as 11 to 144 snails/m2 in a eutrophic 5th-order river. Combined, these results demonstrate the high potential for eDNA surveys to assist with early detection of a widely distributed invasive aquatic invertebrate.

  1. Methodological considerations for detection of terrestrial small-body salamander eDNA and implications for biodiversity conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Donald M.; Leys, Jacob E.; Dunham, Kelly E.; Oliver, Joshua C.; Schiller, Emily E.; Stephenson, Kelsey S.; Kimrey, John T.; Wooten, Jessica; Rogers, Mark W.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) can be used as an assessment tool to detect populations of threatened species and provide fine-scale data required to make management decisions. The objectives of this project were to use quantitative PCR (qPCR) to: (i) detect spiked salamander DNA in soil, (ii) quantify eDNA degradation over time, (iii) determine detectability of salamander eDNA in a terrestrial environment using soil, faeces, and skin swabs, (iv) detect salamander eDNA in a mesocosm experiment. Salamander eDNA was positively detected in 100% of skin swabs and 66% of faecal samples and concentrations did not differ between the two sources. However, eDNA was not detected in soil samples collected from directly underneath wild-caught living salamanders. Salamander genomic DNA (gDNA) was detected in all qPCR reactions when spiked into soil at 10.0, 5.0, and 1.0 ng/g soil and spike concentration had a significant effect on detected concentrations. Only 33% of samples showed recoverable eDNA when spiked with 0.25 ng/g soil, which was the low end of eDNA detection. To determine the rate of eDNA degradation, gDNA (1 ng/g soil) was spiked into soil and quantified over seven days. Salamander eDNA concentrations decreased across days, but eDNA was still amplifiable at day 7. Salamander eDNA was detected in two of 182 mesocosm soil samples over 12 weeks (n = 52 control samples; n = 65 presence samples; n = 65 eviction samples). The discrepancy in detection success between experiments indicates the potential challenges for this method to be used as a monitoring technique for small-bodied wild terrestrial salamander populations.

  2. Magnetic Scanometric DNA Microarray Detection of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Degrading Bacteria for Environmental Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mei-Lin; Jaramillo, Gerardo; Hristova, Krassimira R.; Horsley, David A.

    2010-01-01

    A magnetoresistive biosensing platform based on a single magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) scanning probe and DNA microarrays labeled with magnetic particles has been developed to provide an inexpensive, sensitive and reliable detection of DNA. The biosensing platform was demonstrated on a DNA microarray assay for quantifying bacteria capable of degrading methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), where concentrations as low as 10 pM were detectable. Synthetic probe bacterial DNA was immobilized on a microarray glass slide surface, hybridized with the 48 base pair long biotinylated target DNA and subsequently incubated with streptavidin-coated 2.8 μm diameter magnetic particles. The biosensing platform then makes use of a micron-sized MTJ sensor that was raster scanned across a 3 mm by 5 mm glass slide area to capture the stray magnetic field from the tagged DNA and extract two dimensional magnetic field images of the microarray. The magnetic field output is then averaged over each 100 μm diameter DNA array spot to extract the magnetic spot intensity, analogous to the fluorescence spot intensity used in conventional optical scanners. The magnetic scanning result is compared with results from a commercial laser scanner and particle coverage optical counting to demonstrate the dynamic range and linear sensitivity of the biosensing platform as a potentially inexpensive, sensitive and portable alternative for DNA microarray detection for field applications. PMID:20889328

  3. Detection of antibodies to single-stranded DNA in naturally acquired and experimentally induced viral hepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, I.D.; Feinstone, S.M.; Purcell, R.H.; Alter, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive ''Farr'' assay, utilizing /sup 125/I-labelled DNA was developed for detecting antibody to single-stranded DNA (anti-ssDNA). The test was shown to be specific and as sensitive as assays using /sup 14/C-labelled DNA, for the detection of antibody in patients with connective tissue diseases. Groups of sera from patients with naturally acquired viral hepatitis and experimentally infected chimpanzees were tested for anti-ssDNA by the /sup 125/I assay and by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP). No consistent pattern was observed with either technique, indicating the elevated levels of this antibody are not as reliable markers of parenchymal liver damage as had been previously suggested.

  4. Social Fingerprinting: detection of spambot groups through DNA-inspired behavioral modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cresci, Stefano; Di Pietro, Roberto; Petrocchi, Marinella

    2017-01-01

    it with three state-of-the-art detection algorithms. Among the peculiarities of our approach is the possibility to apply off-the-shelf DNA analysis techniques to study online users behaviors and to efficiently rely on a limited number of lightweight account characteristics....... to go undetected even by current state-of-the-art algorithms. In this paper, we show that efficient spambots detection can be achieved via an in-depth analysis of their collective behaviors exploiting the digital DNA technique for modeling the behaviors of social network users. Inspired by its...... biological counterpart, in the digital DNA representation the behavioral lifetime of a digital account is encoded in a sequence of characters. Then, we define a similarity measure for such digital DNA sequences. We build upon digital DNA and the similarity between groups of users to characterize both genuine...

  5. Colorimetric detection of DNA damage by using hemin-graphene nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W.; Zhang, D. M.; Yin, L. H.; Pu, Y. P.; Liu, S. Q.

    2013-04-01

    A colorimetric method for detection of DNA damage was developed by using hemin-graphene nanosheets (H-GNs). H-GNs were skillfully synthesized by adsorping of hemin on graphene through π-π interactions. The as-prepared H-GNs possessed both the ability of graphene to differentiate the damage DNA from intact DNA and the catalytic action of hemin. The damaged DNA made H-GNs coagulated to different degrees from the intact DNA because there were different amount of negative charge exposed on their surface, which made a great impact on the solubility of H-GNs. As a result, the corresponding centrifugal supernatant of H-GNs solution showed different color in the presence of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and H2O2, which could be discriminated by naked eyes or by ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrometer. Based on this, the damaged effects of styrene oxide (SO), NaAsO2 and UV radiation on DNA were studied. Results showed that SO exerted most serious damage effect on DNA although all of them damaged DNA seriously. The new method for detection of DNA damage showed good prospect in the evaluation of genotoxicity of new compounds, the maximum limit of pesticide residue, food additives, and so on, which is important in the fields of food science, pharmaceutical science and pesticide science.

  6. Development of a recombinant DNA assay system for the detection of genetic change in astronauts' cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchley, S.V.; Chen, D.J.C.; Strniste, G.F.; Walters, R.A.; Moyzis, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    We are developing a new recombinant DNA system for the detection and measurement of genetic change in humans caused by exposure to low level ionizing radiation. A unique feature of the method is the use of cloned repetitive DNA probes to assay human DNA for structural changes during or after irradiation. Repetitive sequences exist in different families. Collectively they constitute over 25% of the DNA in a human cell. Repeat families have between 10 and 500,000 members. We have constructed repetitive DNA sequence libraries using recombinant DNA techniques. From these libraries we have isolated and characterized individual repeats comprising 75 to 90% of the mass of human repetitive DNA. Repeats used in our assay system exist in tandem arrays in the genome. Perturbation of these sequences in a cell, followed by detection with a repeat probe, produces a new, multimeric ''ladder'' pattern on an autoradiogram. The repeat probe used in our initial study is complementary to 1% of human DNA. Therefore, the sensitivity of this method is several orders of magnitude better than existing assays. Preliminary evidence from human skin cells exposed to acute, low-dose x-ray treatments indicates that DNA is affected at a dose as low as 5R. The radiation doses used in this system are well within the range of doses received by astronauts during spaceflight missions. Due to its small material requirements, this technique could easily be adapted for use in space. 16 refs., 1 fig

  7. A direct detection of Escherichia coli genomic DNA using gold nanoprobes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavathy

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situation like diagnosis of clinical and forensic samples there exists a need for highly sensitive, rapid and specific DNA detection methods. Though conventional DNA amplification using PCR can provide fast results, it is not widely practised in diagnostic laboratories partially because it requires skilled personnel and expensive equipment. To overcome these limitations nanoparticles have been explored as signalling probes for ultrasensitive DNA detection that can be used in field applications. Among the nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have been extensively used mainly because of its optical property and ability to get functionalized with a variety of biomolecules. Results We report a protocol for the use of gold nanoparticles functionalized with single stranded oligonucleotide (AuNP- oligo probe as visual detection probes for rapid and specific detection of Escherichia coli. The AuNP- oligo probe on hybridization with target DNA containing complementary sequences remains red whereas test samples without complementary DNA sequences to the probe turns purple due to acid induced aggregation of AuNP- oligo probes. The color change of the solution is observed visually by naked eye demonstrating direct and rapid detection of the pathogenic Escherichia coli from its genomic DNA without the need for PCR amplification. The limit of detection was ~54 ng for unamplified genomic DNA. The method requires less than 30 minutes to complete after genomic DNA extraction. However, by using unamplified enzymatic digested genomic DNA, the detection limit of 11.4 ng was attained. Results of UV-Vis spectroscopic measurement and AFM imaging further support the hypothesis of aggregation based visual discrimination. To elucidate its utility in medical diagnostic, the assay was validated on clinical strains of pathogenic Escherichia coli obtained from local hospitals and spiked urine samples. It was found to be 100% sensitive and proves to

  8. Gold-silver-alloy nanoprobes for one-pot multiplex DNA detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, G; Larguinho, M; Dias, J T; Baptista, P V [Centro de Investigacao em Genetica Molecular Humana (CIGMH), Departamento de Ciencias da Vida, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Pereira, E [Rede de Quimica e Tecnologia (REQUIMTE), Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Franco, R, E-mail: pmvb@fct.unl.pt [Rede de Quimica e Tecnologia (REQUIMTE), Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2010-06-25

    A specific colorimetric DNA detection method based on oligonucleotide functionalized gold-silver-alloy nanoparticles (AuAg-alloy-nanoprobes) is presented. The AuAg-alloy-nanoprobes were then used for the specific detection of a DNA sequence from TP53-a gene involved in cancer development. The AuAg-alloy-nanoprobes were then used in combination with Au-nanoprobes for a one-pot dual-colour detection strategy that allowed for the simultaneous differential detection of two distinct target sequences. This system poses an unprecedented opportunity to explore the combined use of metal nanoparticles with different composition towards the development of a multiplex one-pot colorimetric assay for DNA detection.

  9. Simultaneous detection of DNA from 10 food allergens by ligation-dependent probe amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Alexandra; Demmel, Anja; Hupfer, Christine; Busch, Ulrich; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2009-04-01

    The simultaneous detection of DNA from different allergenic food ingredients by a ligation-dependent probe amplification (LPA) system is described. The approach allows detection of several targets in a one-tube assay. Synthetic oligonucleotides were designed to detect DNA from peanuts, cashews, pecans, pistachios, hazelnuts, sesame seeds, macadamia nuts, almonds, walnuts and brazil nuts. The specificity of the system was tested with DNA from more than 50 plant and animal species. The sensitivity of the method was suitable to detect allergenic ingredients in the low mg kg(-1) range. The limit of detection (LOD) for single allergens in different food matrices was 5 mg kg(-1). The novel analytical strategy represents a useful tool for the surveillance of established legislation on food allergens within the European Union.

  10. Gold-silver-alloy nanoprobes for one-pot multiplex DNA detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, G; Larguinho, M; Dias, J T; Baptista, P V; Pereira, E; Franco, R

    2010-01-01

    A specific colorimetric DNA detection method based on oligonucleotide functionalized gold-silver-alloy nanoparticles (AuAg-alloy-nanoprobes) is presented. The AuAg-alloy-nanoprobes were then used for the specific detection of a DNA sequence from TP53-a gene involved in cancer development. The AuAg-alloy-nanoprobes were then used in combination with Au-nanoprobes for a one-pot dual-colour detection strategy that allowed for the simultaneous differential detection of two distinct target sequences. This system poses an unprecedented opportunity to explore the combined use of metal nanoparticles with different composition towards the development of a multiplex one-pot colorimetric assay for DNA detection.

  11. Rolling circle amplification detection of RNA and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Allen T.; Pattee, Melissa S.; Attix, Cristina M.; Tucker, James D.

    2004-08-31

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) has been useful for detecting point mutations in isolated nucleic acids, but its application in cytological preparations has been problematic. By pretreating cells with a combination of restriction enzymes and exonucleases, we demonstrate RCA in solution and in situ to detect gene copy number and single base mutations. It can also detect and quantify transcribed RNA in individual cells, making it a versatile tool for cell-based assays.

  12. Alkaline gel electrophoresis assay to detect DNA strand breaks and repair mechanisms in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattos, Jose Carlos Pelielo de; Motta, Ellen Serri da; Oliveira, Marcia Betania Nunes de; Dantas, Flavio Jose da Silva; Araujo, Adriano Caldeira de

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can induce lesions in different cellular targets, including DNA. Stannous chloride (SnCl 2 ) is a ROS generator, leading to lethality in Escherichia coli (E. coli), with the base excision repair (BER) mechanism playing a role in this process. Many techniques have been developed to detect genotoxicity, as comet assay, in eukaryotic cells, and plasmid DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. In this study, an adaptation of the alkaline gel electrophoresis method was carried out to ascertain the induction of strand breaks by SnCl 2 in bacterial DNA, from E. coli BER mutants, and its repair pathway. Results obtained show that SnCl 2 was able to induce DNA strand breaks in all strains tested. Moreover, endonuclease IV and exonuclease III play a role in DNA repair. On the whole, data has shown that the alkaline gel electrophoresis assay could be used both for studying DNA strand breaks induction and for associated repair mechanisms. (author)

  13. Electrochemical direct immobilization of DNA sequences for label-free herpes virus detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phuong Dinh Tam; Mai Anh Tuan; Tran Trung; Nguyen Duc Chien

    2009-01-01

    DNA sequences/bio-macromolecules of herpes virus (5'-AT CAC CGA CCC GGA GAG GGA C-3') were directly immobilized into polypyrrole matrix by using the cyclic voltammetry method, and grafted onto arrays of interdigitated platinum microelectrodes. The morphology surface of the obtained PPy/DNA of herpes virus composite films was investigated by a FESEM Hitachi-S 4800. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the PPy/DNA film and to study the specific interactions that may exist between DNA biomacromolecules and PPy chains. Attempts are made to use these PPy/DNA composite films for label-free herpes virus detection revealed a response time of 60 s in solutions containing as low as 2 nM DNA concentration, and self life of six months when emerged in double distilled water and kept refrigerated.

  14. Electrochemical direct immobilization of DNA sequences for label-free herpes virus detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh; Trung, Tran; Tuan, Mai Anh; Chien, Nguyen Duc

    2009-09-01

    DNA sequences/bio-macromolecules of herpes virus (5'-AT CAC CGA CCC GGA GAG GGA C-3') were directly immobilized into polypyrrole matrix by using the cyclic voltammetry method, and grafted onto arrays of interdigitated platinum microelectrodes. The morphology surface of the obtained PPy/DNA of herpes virus composite films was investigated by a FESEM Hitachi-S 4800. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the PPy/DNA film and to study the specific interactions that may exist between DNA biomacromolecules and PPy chains. Attempts are made to use these PPy/DNA composite films for label-free herpes virus detection revealed a response time of 60 s in solutions containing as low as 2 nM DNA concentration, and self life of six months when immerged in double distilled water and kept refrigerated.

  15. Evaluation of DNA Extraction Methods Suitable for PCR-based Detection and Genotyping of Clostridium botulinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auricchio, Bruna; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fiore, Alfonsina

    2013-01-01

    Sufficient quality and quantity of extracted DNA is critical to detecting and performing genotyping of Clostridium botulinum by means of PCR-based methods. An ideal extraction method has to optimize DNA yield, minimize DNA degradation, allow multiple samples to be extracted, and be efficient...... in terms of cost, time, labor, and supplies. Eleven botulinum toxin–producing clostridia strains and 25 samples (10 food, 13 clinical, and 2 environmental samples) naturally contaminated with botulinum toxin–producing clostridia were used to compare 4 DNA extraction procedures: Chelex® 100 matrix, Phenol......-Cloroform-Isoamyl alcohol, NucliSENS® magnetic extraction kit, and DNeasy® Blood & Tissue kit. Integrity, purity, and amount of amplifiable DNA were evaluated. The results show that the DNeasy® Blood & Tissue kit is the best extraction method evaluated because it provided the most pure, intact, and amplifiable DNA. However...

  16. Nick translation detection in situ of cellular DNA strand break induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maehara, Y.; Anai, H.; Kusumoto, T.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Sugimachi, K.

    1989-01-01

    DNA strand break in HeLa cells induced by radiation was detected using the in situ nick translation method. The cells were exposed to radiation of 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 Gy in Lab-Tek tissue culture chamber/slides and were fixed with ethanol/acetic acid on the slide glass. The break sites in DNA were translated artificially in the presence of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I and [ 3 H]-labeled dTTP. Autoradiographic observation was made of the level of break sites in the DNA. The DNA strand break appeared even with a 3 Gy exposure, increased 8.6 times at 24 Gy compared with the control cells, and this level correlated reciprocally to change in cell viability. This nick translation method provides a rapid in situ assay for determining radiation-induced DNA damage of cultured cells, in a semi-quantitative manner

  17. 2-Aminopurine hairpin probes for the detection of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Yazbi, Amira F.; Loppnow, Glen R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Molecular beacon with 2AP bases detects DNA damage in a simple mix-and-read assay. ► Molecular beacons with 2AP bases detect damage at a 17.2 nM limit of detection. ► The 2AP molecular beacon is linear over a 0–3.5 μM concentration range for damage. - Abstract: Nucleic acid exposure to radiation and chemical insults leads to damage and disease. Thus, detection and understanding DNA damage is important for elucidating molecular mechanisms of disease. However, current methods of DNA damage detection are either time-consuming, destroy the sample, or are too specific to be used for generic detection of damage. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence sensor of 2-aminopurine (2AP), a fluorescent analogue of adenine, incorporated in the loop of a hairpin probe for the quantification of ultraviolet (UV) C-induced nucleic acid damage. Our results show that the selectivity of the 2AP hairpin probe to UV-induced nucleic acid damage is comparable to molecular beacon (MB) probes of DNA damage. The calibration curve for the 2AP hairpin probe shows good linearity (R 2 = 0.98) with a limit of detection of 17.2 nM. This probe is a simple, fast and economic fluorescence sensor for the quantification of UV-induced damage in DNA.

  18. Spectroscopic Detection of DNA Quadruplexes by Vibrational Circular Dichroism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andrushchenko, Valery; Tsankov, D.; Krasteva, M.; Wieser, H.; Bouř, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 38 (2011), s. 15055-15064 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0559; GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200550902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : nucleic acids * VCD * DFT computations * DNA quadruplexes Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 9.907, year: 2011

  19. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    THOMAS NAICY

    E-mail: naicy@kvasu.ac.in. and conception rate ... transformed into DH5α strain of Escherichia coli and the clones harbouring ... Primer pairs for caprine IGF1 and GAPDH were designed using Primer3 software (table 1). RTq-PCR was conducted in a 25 μL reaction volume containing 50 ng of cDNA and 2× Max- ima SYBR ...

  20. cDNA sequencing improves the detection of P53 missense mutations in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szybka, Malgorzata; Kordek, Radzislaw; Zakrzewska, Magdalena; Rieske, Piotr; Pasz-Walczak, Grazyna; Kulczycka-Wojdala, Dominika; Zawlik, Izabela; Stawski, Robert; Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Liberski, Pawel P

    2009-01-01

    Recently published data showed discrepancies beteween P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing in glioblastomas. We hypothesised that similar discrepancies may be observed in other human cancers. To this end, we analyzed 23 colorectal cancers for P53 mutations and gene expression using both DNA and cDNA sequencing, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. We found P53 gene mutations in 16 cases (15 missense and 1 nonsense). Two of the 15 cases with missense mutations showed alterations based only on cDNA, and not DNA sequencing. Moreover, in 6 of the 15 cases with a cDNA mutation those mutations were difficult to detect in the DNA sequencing, so the results of DNA analysis alone could be misinterpreted if the cDNA sequencing results had not also been available. In all those 15 cases, we observed a higher ratio of the mutated to the wild type template by cDNA analysis, but not by the DNA analysis. Interestingly, a similar overexpression of P53 mRNA was present in samples with and without P53 mutations. In terms of colorectal cancer, those discrepancies might be explained under three conditions: 1, overexpression of mutated P53 mRNA in cancer cells as compared with normal cells; 2, a higher content of cells without P53 mutation (normal cells and cells showing K-RAS and/or APC but not P53 mutation) in samples presenting P53 mutation; 3, heterozygous or hemizygous mutations of P53 gene. Additionally, for heterozygous mutations unknown mechanism(s) causing selective overproduction of mutated allele should also be considered. Our data offer new clues for studying discrepancy in P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing analysis

  1. Nanowire-nanopore transistor sensor for DNA detection during translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ping; Xiong, Qihua; Fang, Ying; Qing, Quan; Lieber, Charles

    2011-03-01

    Nanopore sequencing, as a promising low cost, high throughput sequencing technique, has been proposed more than a decade ago. Due to the incompatibility between small ionic current signal and fast translocation speed and the technical difficulties on large scale integration of nanopore for direct ionic current sequencing, alternative methods rely on integrated DNA sensors have been proposed, such as using capacitive coupling or tunnelling current etc. But none of them have been experimentally demonstrated yet. Here we show that for the first time an amplified sensor signal has been experimentally recorded from a nanowire-nanopore field effect transistor sensor during DNA translocation. Independent multi-channel recording was also demonstrated for the first time. Our results suggest that the signal is from highly localized potential change caused by DNA translocation in none-balanced buffer condition. Given this method may produce larger signal for smaller nanopores, we hope our experiment can be a starting point for a new generation of nanopore sequencing devices with larger signal, higher bandwidth and large-scale multiplexing capability and finally realize the ultimate goal of low cost high throughput sequencing.

  2. Immobilization-free electrochemical DNA detection with anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongpeth, Jutatip; Jampasa, Sakda; Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Chailapakul, Orawon; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical detection provides a simple, rapid, sensitive and inexpensive method for DNA detection. In traditional electrochemical DNA biosensors, the probe is immobilized onto the electrode. Hybridization with the DNA target causes a change in electrochemical signal, either from the intrinsic signal of the probe/target or through a label or a redox indicator. The major drawback of this approach is the requirement for probe immobilization in a controlled fashion. In this research, we take the advantage of different electrostatic properties between PNA and DNA to develop an immobilization-free approach for highly sequence-specific electrochemical DNA sensing on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) using a square-wave voltammetric (SWV) technique. Anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (AQ-PNA) was employed as a probe together with an SPCE that was modified with a positively-charged polymer (poly quaternized-(dimethylamino-ethyl)methacrylate, PQDMAEMA). The electrostatic attraction between the negatively-charged PNA-DNA duplex and the positively-charged modified SPCE attributes to the higher signal of PNA-DNA duplex than that of the electrostatically neutral PNA probe, resulting in a signal change. The calibration curve of this proposed method exhibited a linear range between 0.35 and 50 nM of DNA target with a limit of detection of 0.13 nM (3SD(blank)/Slope). The sub-nanomolar detection limit together with a small sample volume required (20 μL) allowed detection of syndrome virus (WSSV) DNA was successfully demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enzymatic treatment of specimens before DNA extraction directly influences molecular detection of infectious agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Goldschmidt

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Biological samples, pharmaceuticals or food contain proteins, lipids, polymers, ammoniums and macromolecules that alter the detection of infectious agents by DNA amplification techniques (PCR. Moreover the targeted DNA has to be released from the complex cell walls and the compact nucleoprotein matrixes and cleared from potential inhibitors. The goal of the present work was to assess the efficiency of enzymatic pretreatments on infectious agents to make DNA available for further extraction and amplification. METHODS: Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mitis, Propionibacterium acnes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Fusarium solani were mixed with an internal control virus and treated with: 1 proteinase K; 2 lyticase and 3 lyticase followed by proteinase K. DNAs was manually extracted using the QIAmp DNA Mini kit or the MagNA Pure Compact automate. DNA extraction yields and the inhibitors were assessed with a phocid Herpesvirus. Bacterial detection was performed using TaqMan real-time PCR and yeasts and filamentous Fungi with HRM (real-time PCR followed by high-resolution melting analysis. RESULTS: Viral DNA was released, extracted and detected using manual and automatic methods without pre enzymatic treatments. Either the manual or the automatic DNA extraction systems did not meet the sensitivity expectations if enzymatic treatments were not performed before: lyticase for Fungi and Proteinase K for Bacteria. The addition of lyticase and proteinase K did not improve results. For Fungi the detection after lyticase was higher than for Proteinase K, for which melting analysis did not allow fungal specification. DISCUSSION: Columns and magnetic beads allowed collecting DNA and separate PCR inhibitors. Detection rates cannot be related to DNA-avidity of beads or to elution but to the lack of proteolysis.

  4. Rapid and label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting hepatitis A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Marisa; Viezzi, Sara; Mazerat, Sandra; Marks, Robert S; Vidic, Jasmina

    2018-02-15

    Diagnostic systems that can deliver highly specific and sensitive detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in food and water are of particular interest in many fields including food safety, biosecurity and control of outbreaks. Our aim was the development of an electrochemical method based on DNA hybridization to detect HAV. A ssDNA probe specific for HAV (capture probe) was designed and tested on DNAs from various viral and bacterial samples using Nested-Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (nRT-PCR). To develop the electrochemical device, a disposable gold electrode was functionalized with the specific capture probe and tested on complementary ssDNA and on HAV cDNA. The DNA hybridization on the electrode was measured through the monitoring of the oxidative peak potential of the indicator tripropylamine by cyclic voltammetry. To prevent non-specific binding the gold surface was treated with 3% BSA before detection. High resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirmed the efficiency of electrode functionalization and on-electrode hybridization. The proposed device showed a limit of detection of 0.65pM for the complementary ssDNA and 6.94fg/µL for viral cDNA. For a comparison, nRT-PCR quantified the target HAV cDNA with a limit of detection of 6.4fg/µL. The DNA-sensor developed can be adapted to a portable format to be adopted as an easy-to- use and low cost method for screening HAV in contaminated food and water. In addition, it can be useful for rapid control of HAV infections as it takes only a few minutes to provide the results. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Targeting 18S Ribosomal DNA for Rapid Detection of Acanthamoeba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hye-Won; Lee, Yu-Ran; Inoue, Noboru; Jha, Bijay Kumar; Danne, Dinzouna-Boutamba Sylvatrie; Kim, Hong-Kyun; Lee, Junhun; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Dong-Il

    2013-01-01

    Amoebic keratitis (AK) caused by Acanthamoeba is one of the most serious corneal infections. AK is frequently misdiagnosed initially as viral, bacterial, or fungal keratitis, thus ensuring treatment delays. Accordingly, the early detection of Acanthamoeba would contribute significantly to disease management and selection of an appropriate anti-amoebic therapy. Recently, the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method has been applied to the clinical diagnosis of a range of infectious diseases. Here, we describe a rapid and efficient LAMP-based method targeting Acanthamoeba 18S rDNA gene for the detection of Acanthamoeba using clinical ocular specimens in the diagnosis of AK. Acanthamoeba LAMP assays detected 11 different strains including all AK-associated species. The copy number detection limit for a positive signal was 10 DNA copies of 18S rDNA per reaction. No cross-reactivity with the DNA of fungi or other protozoa was observed. The sensitivity of LAMP assay was higher than those of Nelson primer PCR and JDP primer PCR. In the present study, LAMP assay based on directly heat-treated samples was found to be as efficient at detecting Acanthamoeba as DNA extracted using a commercial kit, whereas PCR was only effective when commercial kit-extracted DNA was used. This study showed that the devised Acanthamoeba LAMP assay could be used to diagnose AK in a simple, sensitive, and specific manner. PMID:23864737

  6. Photoelectrochemical Sensors for the Rapid Detection of DNA Damage Induced by Some Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamaluddin Ahmed

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Photoelectrochemcal sensors were developed for the rapid detection of oxidative DNA damage induced by titanium dioxide and polystyrene nanoparticles. Each sensor is a multilayer film prepared on a tin oxide nanoparticle electrode using layer- by-layer self assembly and is composed of separate layer of a photoelectrochemical indicator, DNA. The organic compound and heavy metals represent genotoxic chemicals leading two major damaging mechanisms, DNA adduct formation and DNA oxidation. The DNA damage is detected by monitoring the change of photocurrent of the indicator. In one sensor configuration, a DNA intercalator, Ru(bpy2 (dppz2+ [bpy=2, 2′ -bipyridine, dppz=dipyrido( 3, 2-a: 2′ 3′-c phenazine], was employed as the photoelectrochemical indicator. The damaged DNA on the sensor bound lesser Ru(bpy2 (dppz2+ than the intact DNA, resulting in a drop in photocurrent. In another configuration, ruthenium tris(bipyridine was used as the indicator and was immobilized on the electrode underneath the DNA layer. After oxidative damage, the DNA bases became more accessible to photoelectrochemical oxidation than the intact DNA, producing a rise in photocurrent. Both sensors displayed substantial photocurrent change after incubation in titanium dioxide / polystyrene solution in a time – dependent manner. According to the data, damage of the DNA film was completed in 1h in titanium dioxide / polystyrene solution. In addition, the titanium dioxide induced much more sever damage than polysterene. The results were verified independently by gel electrophoresis and UV-Vis absorbance experiments. The photoelectrochemical reaction can be employed as a new and inexpensive screening tool for the rapid assessment of the genotoxicity of existing and new chemicals.

  7. Photoelectrochemical sensors for the rapid detection of DNA damage Induced by some nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.J.; Zhang, B.T.; Guo, L.H.

    2010-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical sensors were developed for the rapid detection of oxidative DNA damage induced by titanium dioxide and polystyrene nanoparticles. Each sensor is a multilayer film prepared on a tin oxide nanoparticle electrode using layer- by-layer self assembly and is composed of separate layer of a photoelectrochemical indicator, DNA. The organic compound and heavy metals represent genotoxic chemicals leading two major damaging mechanisms, DNA adduct formation and DNA oxidation. The DNA damage is detected by monitoring the change of photocurrent of the indicator. In one sensor configuration, a DNA intercalator, Ru(bpy)2 (dppz)2+ [bpy=2, 2' -bipyridine, dppz=dipyrido (3, 2-a: 2' 3'-c) phenazine], was employed as the photoelectrochemical indicator. The damaged DNA on the sensor bound lesser Ru(bpy)2 (dppz)2+ than the intact DNA, resulting in a drop in photocurrent. In another configuration, ruthenium tris(bipyridine) was used as the indicator and was immobilized on the electrode underneath the DNA layer. After oxidative damage, the DNA bases became more accessible to photoelectrochemical oxidation than the intact DNA, producing a rise in photocurrent. Both sensors displayed substantial photocurrent change after incubation in titanium dioxide / polystyrene solution in a time . dependent manner. According to the data, damage of the DNA film was completed in 1h in titanium dioxide / polystyrene solution. In addition, the titanium dioxide induced much more sever damage than polystyrene. The results were verified independently by gel electrophoresis and UV-Vis absorbance experiments. The photoelectrochemical reaction can be employed as a new and inexpensive screening tool for the rapid assessment of the genotoxicity of existing and new chemicals. (author)

  8. Cell-free DNA as biomarker and source for mutation detection in primary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Aleksandra; Vlajnic, Marina; Ristanovic, Momcilo; Petrovic, Jelena; Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Krivokapic, Zoran; Radojkovic, Dragica

    2017-01-01

    To analyze if cell-free (cf)DNA levels and the presence of KRAS and BRAF mutations in serum could be used as diagnostic biomarkers in patients with primary colorectal cancer (CRC). This study included 92 individuals who were operated due to primary CRC (N=52;study group) and to hemorrhoids (N=40;control group). Serum cfDNA levels were measured with real-time PCR (RT-PCR) using PicoGreen dsDNA quantitation reagent. Colorectal tissue and related blood and serum samples taken at the time of surgery were subjected to DNA extraction and analysis of KRAS and BRAF mutations based on multiplex SNaPshot assay and DNA sequencing. The average cfDNA concentration was lower in patients of the study group (20±7 ng/μL) in comparison to controls (34±9 ng/μL) and this difference was statistically significant (pmutations in colorectal tumor tissue in 14 cases, but the presence of the mutation was not confirmed in cfDNA extracted from blood samples of these patients. The level of serum cfDNA in CRC is decreased in comparison to patients with hemorrhoids, which questions the usefulness of cfDNA as cancer biomarker. Also, cfDNA does not appear to be suitable as a source for mutation detection in this disease.

  9. Detection of short single-strand DNA homopolymers with ultrathin Si3N4 nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Qiu, Yinghua; Yuan, Zhishan; Zhang, Yin; Sha, Jingjie; Liu, Lei; Sun, Litao; Ni, Zhonghua; Yi, Hong; Li, Deyu; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-08-01

    A series of nanopores with diameters ranging from 2.5 to 63 nm are fabricated on a reduced Si3N4 membrane by focused ion beam and high energy electron beam. Through measuring the blocked ionic currents for DNA strands threading linearly through those solid-state nanopores, it is found that the blockade ionic current is proportional to the square of the hydrodynamic diameter of the DNA strand. With the nanopore diameter reduced to be comparable with that of DNA strands, the hydrodynamic diameter of the DNA becomes smaller, which is attributed to the size confinement effects. The duration time for the linear DNA translocation events increases monotonically with the nanopore length. By comparing the spatial configurations of DNA strands through nanopores with different diameters, it is found that the nanopore with large diameter has enough space to allow the DNA strand to translocate through with complex conformation. With the decrease of the nanopore diameter, the folded part of the DNA is prone to be straightened by the nanopore, which leads to the increase in the occurrence frequency of the linear DNA translocation events. Reducing the diameter of the nanopore to 2.5 nm allows the detection and discrimination of three nucleotide "G" and three nucleotide "T" homopolymer DNA strands based on differences in their physical dimensions.

  10. Evaluation of DNA extraction methods for the detection of Cytomegalovirus in dried blood spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, D.; Baecher, K.; Amin, M.; Nikolova, S.; Gallagher, M.; Dollard, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dried blood spots (DBS) are collected universally from newborns and may be valuable for the diagnosis of congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. The reported analytical sensitivity for DBS testing compared to urine or saliva varies greatly across CMV studies. The purpose of this study was to directly compare the performance of various DNA extraction methods for identification of CMV in DBS including those used most often in CMV studies. Study design Whatman® Grade 903 filter paper cards were spotted with blood samples from 25 organ transplant recipients who had confirmed CMV viremia. Six DNA extraction methods were compared for relative yield of viral and cellular DNA: 2 manual solution-based methods (Gentra Puregene, thermal shock), 2 manual silica column-based methods (QIAamp DNA Mini, QIAamp DNA Investigator), and 2 automated methods (M48 MagAttract Mini, QIAcube Investigator). DBS extractions were performed in triplicate followed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Results For extraction of both viral and cellular DNA, two methods (QIAamp DNA Investigator and thermal shock) consistently gave the highest yields, and two methods (M48 MagAttract Mini and QIAamp DNA Mini) consistently gave the lowest yields. There was an average 3-fold difference in DNA yield between the highest and lowest yield methods. Conclusion The choice of DNA extraction method is a major factor in the ability to detect low levels of CMV in DBS and can largely account for the wide range of DBS sensitivities reported in studies to date. PMID:25866346

  11. Detection of complex hemoglobinopathies: recommendations on screening and DNA testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baysal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The following recommendations should be taken into account during the evaluation and elucidation of the complex hemoglobinopathies: a in complex hemoglobinopathies performing DNA studies on all family members might be essential; b complex gene-gene interactions offer major diagnostic challenges both at the technical and clinical level; c hematological & DNA analyses must be run in parallel. Some cases may be straight forward but others may require indepth DNA work-up; d co-inheritance of a-thalassemia offers added challenge as it may affect phenotype significantly; e sickle cell anemia (SS, co-inherited with a-thal, can be a phenocopy of Sβ0-thal. The HbA2 increase can be mistaken for Sβ-thal. DNA Sequencing is imperative; f only a selected number of normal MCV, MCH, borderline HbA2 cases must be referred for DNA analysis. However, in certain cases, following hematological and family evaluation, the β and d genes may need to be sequenced; g DNA Sequencing will increasingly become the method of choice for screening and DNA mutation analysis. However, new methods like MLPA-which analyzes gene dosage- must be used more commonly to rule out deletion mutants to avoid false negative sequencing results; h these recommendations should be reviewed every 2-3 years reflecting new methods, new findings and new findings from ethnic groups. 诊断和说明复杂血红蛋白病时,建议考虑以下几点: a)针对复杂的血红蛋白病,有必要对所有家庭成员开展DNA研究;b 复杂的基因-基因交互作用可能使诊断在技术和临床层面上颇受挑战;c 血液和DNA分析须同时进行。 有些病例简单,但另外一些病例可能需要开展深层次的DNA检查;d 由于α型地中海贫血可能严重影响表型,α型地中海贫血的共同继承特征更具挑战;e 共同继承α型地中海贫血的镰状细胞贫血(SS),可以作为Sβ0型地中海贫血的显型。 HbA2增

  12. Inspecting Targeted Deep Sequencing of Whole Genome Amplified DNA Versus Fresh DNA for Somatic Mutation Detection: A Genetic Study in Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Laura; Fuster-Tormo, Francisco; Alvira, Daniel; Ademà, Vera; Armengol, María Pilar; Gómez-Marzo, Paula; de Haro, Nuri; Mallo, Mar; Xicoy, Blanca; Zamora, Lurdes; Solé, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Whole genome amplification (WGA) has become an invaluable method for preserving limited samples of precious stock material and has been used during the past years as an alternative tool to increase the amount of DNA before library preparation for next-generation sequencing. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by presenting somatic mutations in several myeloid-related genes. In this work, targeted deep sequencing has been performed on four paired fresh DNA and WGA DNA samples from bone marrow of MDS patients, to assess the feasibility of using WGA DNA for detecting somatic mutations. The results of this study highlighted that, in general, the sequencing and alignment statistics of fresh DNA and WGA DNA samples were similar. However, after variant calling and when considering variants detected at all frequencies, there was a high level of discordance between fresh DNA and WGA DNA (overall, a higher number of variants was detected in WGA DNA). After proper filtering, a total of three somatic mutations were detected in the cohort. All somatic mutations detected in fresh DNA were also identified in WGA DNA and validated by whole exome sequencing.

  13. Utility of KRAS mutation detection using circulating cell-free DNA from patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Iwai, Takuma; Takahashi, Goro; Kan, Hayato; Koizumi, Michihiro; Matsuda, Akihisa; Shinji, Seiichi; Yamagishi, Aya; Yokoyama, Yasuyuki; Tatsuguchi, Atsushi; Kawagoe, Tatsuro; Kitano, Shiro; Nakayama, Masato; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the clinical utility of detecting KRAS mutations in circulating cell-free (ccf)DNA of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. We prospectively recruited 94 metastatic colorectal cancer patients. Circulating cell-free DNA was extracted from plasma samples and analyzed for the presence of seven KRAS point mutations. Using the Invader Plus assay with peptide nucleic acid clamping method and digital PCR, KRAS mutations were detected in the ccfDNA in 35 of 39 patients previously determined to have primary tumors containing KRAS mutations using the Luminex method, and in 5 of 55 patients with tumors containing wild-type KRAS. Curative resection was undertaken in 7 of 34 patients with primary and ccfDNA KRAS mutations, resulting in the disappearance of the mutation from the cell-free DNA in five of seven patients. Three of these patients had tumor recurrence and KRAS mutations in their ccfDNA reappeared. Epidermal growth factor receptor blockade was administered to 24 of the KRAS tumor wild-type patients. Of the 24 patients with wild-type KRAS in their primary tumors, three patients had KRAS mutations in their ccfDNA and did not respond to treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) blockade. We also detected a new KRAS mutation in five patients during chemotherapy with EGFR blockade, before disease progression was detectable with imaging. The detection of KRAS mutations in ccfDNA is an attractive approach for predicting both treatment response and acquired resistance to EGFR blockade, and for detecting disease recurrence. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. Preparation of genosensor for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorato Castro, Ana C.; França, Erick G.; de Paula, Lucas F.; Soares, Marcia M. C. N.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Madurro, João M.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.

    2014-09-01

    An electrochemical genosensor was constructed for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus, based on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-aminophenol) and incorporating a specific oligonucleotide probe. The modified electrode containing the probe was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry, before and after incubation with the complementary oligonucleotide target. Detection was performed by monitoring oxidizable DNA bases (direct detection) or using ethidium bromide as indicator of the hybridization process (indirect detection). The device showed a detection limit for the oligonucleotide target of 2.61 nmol L-1. Indirect detection using ethidium bromide was promising in discriminating mismatches, which is a very desirable attribute for detection of disease-related point mutations. In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

  15. Innate Reverse Transcriptase Activity of DNA Polymerase for Isothermal RNA Direct Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Shen, Xiaotong; Niu, Shuyan; Ma, Cuiping

    2015-11-04

    RNA detection has become one of the most robust parts in molecular biology, medical diagnostics and drug discovery. Conventional RNA detection methods involve an extra reverse transcription step, which limits their further application for RNA rapid detection. We herein report a novel finding that Bst and Klenow DNA polymerases possess innate reverse transcriptase activities, so that the reverse transcription step and next amplification reaction can be combined to one step in isothermal RNA detection. We have demonstrated that Bst and Klenow DNA polymerases could be successfully used to reverse transcribe RNA within 125-nt length by real time RT-PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Our findings will spur the development of a myriad of simple and easy to use RNA detection technologies for isothermal RNA direct detection. This will just meet the future needs of bioanalysis and clinical diagnosis to RNA rapid detection in POC settings and inspection and quarantine.

  16. Voltammetry of osmium-modified DNA at a mercury film electrode application in detecting DNA hybridization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostečka, Pavel; Havran, Luděk; Pivoňková, Hana; Fojta, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 63, 1-2 (2004), s. 245-248 ISSN 1567-5394 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4004108; GA AV ČR KJB4004302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : osmium * DNA hybridization * mercury film electrode Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.261, year: 2004

  17. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Sensors for DNA Detection at the Point of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Kuangwen

    In the post-genomic era, ever-advancing capabilities in DNA detection and analysis have become vital to the detection of infectious diseases and the diagnosis of genetic abnormalities and inheritable diseases. The benefit of such capabilities, however, has yet to reach patients outside of centralized facilities. There thus exists an increasing need to decentralize DNA detection methods and to administer such diagnostics at the "point of care." Electrochemical-based DNA sensors present a compelling approach, but have yet to deliver satisfactory sensitivity, specificity, miniaturization, and real-time monitoring capability to meet the demand of point-of-care diagnostics. Motivated by their potential and their current limitations, in this dissertation, we present a series of strategies that we have undertaken in order to address the key shortcomings of electrochemical DNA sensors and advance them toward point-of-care applications. First, we report a single-step, single reagent, label-free, isothermal electrochemical DNA sensor based on the phenomenon of enzyme catalyzed target recycling amplification. Using this technique, we achieve improved detection limit in comparison to hybridization-based sensors without amplification. We also demonstrate greater than 16-fold amplification of signal at low target concentrations. Next, we present a novel electrochemical DNA sensor that detects single-nucleotide mismatched targets with unprecedented "polarity-switching" responses. This "bipolar" sensor employs a surface-bound and redox-modified (methylene blue) DNA probe architecture, and outputs a decreased Faradaic current when hybridized to a perfectly matched (PM) target, but conversely reports an increased Faradaic current when hybridized to a single-base mismatched (SM) target. Third, we describe the microfluidic electrochemical dynamic allele specific hybridization (microE-DASH) platform for versatile and rapid detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Implementing

  18. Using CdTe/ZnSe core/shell quantum dots to detect DNA and damage to DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulick A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Amitava Moulick,1,2 Vedran Milosavljevic,1,2 Jana Vlachova,1,2 Robert Podgajny,3 David Hynek,1,2 Pavel Kopel,1,2 Vojtech Adam1,2 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mendel University, 2Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Brno, Czech Republic; 3Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland Abstract: CdTe/ZnSe core/shell quantum dot (QD, one of the strongest and most highly luminescent nanoparticles, was directly synthesized in an aqueous medium to study its individual interactions with important nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine in detail. The results obtained from the optical analyses indicated that the interactions of the QDs with different nucleobases were different, which reflected in different fluorescent emission maxima and intensities. The difference in the interaction was found due to the different chemical behavior and different sizes of the formed nanoconjugates. An electrochemical study also confirmed that the purines and pyrimidines show different interactions with the core/shell QDs. Based on these phenomena, a novel QD-based method is developed to detect the presence of the DNA, damage to DNA, and mutation. The QDs were successfully applied very easily to detect any change in the sequence (mutation of DNA. The QDs also showed their ability to detect DNAs directly from the extracts of human cancer (PC3 and normal (PNT1A cells (detection limit of 500 pM of DNA, which indicates the possibilities to use this easy assay technique to confirm the presence of living organisms in extreme environments. Keywords: nanoparticles, nucleobases, biosensor, fluorescence, mutation

  19. A Novel Computational Method for Detecting DNA Methylation Sites with DNA Sequence Information and Physicochemical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaofeng Pan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an important biochemical process, and it has a close connection with many types of cancer. Research about DNA methylation can help us to understand the regulation mechanism and epigenetic reprogramming. Therefore, it becomes very important to recognize the methylation sites in the DNA sequence. In the past several decades, many computational methods—especially machine learning methods—have been developed since the high-throughout sequencing technology became widely used in research and industry. In order to accurately identify whether or not a nucleotide residue is methylated under the specific DNA sequence context, we propose a novel method that overcomes the shortcomings of previous methods for predicting methylation sites. We use k-gram, multivariate mutual information, discrete wavelet transform, and pseudo amino acid composition to extract features, and train a sparse Bayesian learning model to do DNA methylation prediction. Five criteria—area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC, Matthew’s correlation coefficient (MCC, accuracy (ACC, sensitivity (SN, and specificity—are used to evaluate the prediction results of our method. On the benchmark dataset, we could reach 0.8632 on AUC, 0.8017 on ACC, 0.5558 on MCC, and 0.7268 on SN. Additionally, the best results on two scBS-seq profiled mouse embryonic stem cells datasets were 0.8896 and 0.9511 by AUC, respectively. When compared with other outstanding methods, our method surpassed them on the accuracy of prediction. The improvement of AUC by our method compared to other methods was at least 0.0399 . For the convenience of other researchers, our code has been uploaded to a file hosting service, and can be downloaded from: https://figshare.com/s/0697b692d802861282d3.

  20. A Novel Computational Method for Detecting DNA Methylation Sites with DNA Sequence Information and Physicochemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Gaofeng; Jiang, Limin; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2018-02-08

    DNA methylation is an important biochemical process, and it has a close connection with many types of cancer. Research about DNA methylation can help us to understand the regulation mechanism and epigenetic reprogramming. Therefore, it becomes very important to recognize the methylation sites in the DNA sequence. In the past several decades, many computational methods-especially machine learning methods-have been developed since the high-throughout sequencing technology became widely used in research and industry. In order to accurately identify whether or not a nucleotide residue is methylated under the specific DNA sequence context, we propose a novel method that overcomes the shortcomings of previous methods for predicting methylation sites. We use k -gram, multivariate mutual information, discrete wavelet transform, and pseudo amino acid composition to extract features, and train a sparse Bayesian learning model to do DNA methylation prediction. Five criteria-area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC), accuracy (ACC), sensitivity (SN), and specificity-are used to evaluate the prediction results of our method. On the benchmark dataset, we could reach 0.8632 on AUC, 0.8017 on ACC, 0.5558 on MCC, and 0.7268 on SN. Additionally, the best results on two scBS-seq profiled mouse embryonic stem cells datasets were 0.8896 and 0.9511 by AUC, respectively. When compared with other outstanding methods, our method surpassed them on the accuracy of prediction. The improvement of AUC by our method compared to other methods was at least 0.0399 . For the convenience of other researchers, our code has been uploaded to a file hosting service, and can be downloaded from: https://figshare.com/s/0697b692d802861282d3.

  1. An eDNA assay for river otter detection: A tool for surveying a semi-aquatic mammal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticha M. Padgett-Stewart; Taylor M. Wilcox; Kellie J. Carim; Kevin S. McKelvey; Michael K. Young; Michael K. Schwartz

    2016-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is an effective tool for the detection of elusive or low-density aquatic organisms. However, it has infrequently been applied to mammalian species. North American river otters (Lontra canadensis) are both broad ranging and semi-aquatic, making them an ideal candidate for examining the uses of eDNA for detection of mammals. We developed...

  2. An environmental DNA marker for detecting nonnative brown trout (Salmo trutta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. J. Carim; T. M. Wilcox; M. Anderson; D. Lawrence; Michael Young; Kevin McKelvey; Michael Schwartz

    2016-01-01

    Brown trout (Salmo trutta) are widely introduced in western North America where their presence has led to declines of several native species. To assist conservation efforts aimed at early detection and eradication of this species, we developed a quantitative PCR marker to detect the presence of brown trout DNA in environmental samples. The marker strongly...

  3. Nucleobase modification as redox DNA labelling for electrochemical detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 12 (2011), s. 5802-5814 ISSN 0306-0012 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA MŠk LC512; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901; GA ČR GA203/09/0317 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : nucleotides * oligonucleotides * DNA * electrochemistry * redox labeling Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 28.760, year: 2011

  4. Sensitive detection of DNA based on the optical properties of core-shell gold nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Haowen, E-mail: hhwn09@163.com; Li Chunhui; Qu Caiting; Huang Shaowen; Liu Fang; Zeng Yunlong [Hunan University of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry and Molecular Simulation of Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2012-03-15

    In this article, a type of core-shell nanostructure, Au{sub 2}S/AuAgS/Ag{sub 3}AuS{sub 2}-coated gold nanorods (GNRs) with unique optical properties was used as a sensing platform to detect fish sperm DNA (fsDNA). The prepared core-shell nanorods are positively charged due to the adsorption of the positively charged cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) cations on their surface. fsDNA can form ternary fsDNA-CTAB-nanorod complexes together with CTAB and nanorod, which provides a useful platform to detect fsDNA through absorption spectra and resonance light scattering (RLS) spectroscopy. In this sensitive core-shell nanorod sensor, CTAB concentration and the nanoparticle dosage play important roles and have been investigated. Moreover, the fsDNA-CTAB-nanorod complexes induce a great enhancement of RLS intensity of the core-shell GNRs and directly proportional to the concentration of fsDNA, reaching a detection limit of about 10{sup -9} mg/mL. This study will be significant for as-prepared core-shell GNRs for future application in biological systems.

  5. A repetitive DNA probe for the sensitive detection of Fasciola hepatica infected snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, R M; Dame, J B; Reddy, G R; Courtney, C H

    1995-05-01

    Epizootiologic studies on F. hepatica frequently use microscopic techniques for the detection of infected snails, however, the poor efficiency, sensitivity, and specificity associated with these techniques limit their usefulness. A DNA-based test for the identification of snails infected with larval stages of F. hepatica would solve these problems and enable a level of detection accuracy previously unavailable. We have cloned and sequenced a 124 bp fragment of repetitive DNA from F. hepatica which hybridizes specifically with DNA of F. hepatica but not with DNA of its snail intermediate hosts Fossaria cubensis and Pseudosuccinea columella, or with DNA of Fascioloides magna and Paramphistomum liorchis, ruminant trematodes which share the same intermediate host and same enzootic range as F. hepatica. Using this 124 bp fragment as a probe, infection in snails was detected immediately following miracidial penetration, thus a sensitivity equivalent to the minimum biologic unit of the parasite was achieved. This 124 bp repeated sequence belongs to a large family of 124 bp repeats that share a high level of sequence identity and constitute approximately 15% of the F. hepatica genome. We also report here the development of a quick and inexpensive DNA extraction protocol for use in field-collected snails. Thus, we have developed both a highly sensitive and specific DNA probe and a means to use the probe in a large epizootiologic study of F. hepatica where thousands of field-collected snails need to be assayed for infection.

  6. Direct electrochemical stripping detection of cystic-fibrosis-related DNA linked through cadmium sulfide quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Sergio; Merkoçi, Arben

    2009-02-01

    Electrochemical detection of a cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs)-DNA complex connected to paramagnetic microbeads (MB) was performed without the need for chemical dissolving. The method is based on dropping 20 µl of CdS QD-DNA-MB suspension on the surface of a screen-printed electrode. It is followed by magnetic collection on the surface of the working electrode and electrochemical detection using square-wave voltammetry (SWV), giving a well-shaped and sensitive analytical signal. A cystic-fibrosis-related DNA sequence was sandwiched between the two DNA probes. One DNA probe is linked via biotin-streptavidin bonding with MB and the other one via thiol groups with the CdS QD used as tags. Nonspecific signals of DNA were minimized using a blocking agent and the results obtained were successfully employed in a model DNA sensor with an interest in future applications in the clinical field. The developed nanoparticle biosensing system may offer numerous opportunities in other fields where fast, low cost and efficient detection of small volume samples is required.

  7. Detection of hepatitis B virus DNA sequences in infected hepatocytes by in situ cytohybridisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowans, E.J.; Burrell, C.J.; Jilbert, A.R.; Marmion, B.P.

    1981-01-01

    Plasmid pHBV 114 DNA, which contains 73% of the genome of hepatitis B virus (HBV), was radiolabelled with tritium to 1-2 X 10(8) dpm/microgram by nick translation and used as a radioactive probe to detect HBV DNA present in sections of infected liver tissue by in situ hybridisation followed by autoradiography. Factors affecting the sensitivity of the reaction were examined, including different methods of fixation, hybridisation time, temperature, and buffers. The specificity of the reaction for detecting viral DNA was carefully established by the use of unrelated DNA probes, pretreatment of sections with DNAase, and comparing the stability of the binding of DNA probe at different temperatures, with the melting curve of double-stranded DNA in solution. In the one liver studied in detail, cells containing large amounts of viral DNA were distributed in foci corresponding to areas containing morphologically damaged hepatocytes. This observation suggested a relationship between active viral replication and cell damage. Viral DNA was found mainly in the cytoplasm, although a minority of nuclei in these foci were also positive

  8. Aquatic environmental DNA detects seasonal fish abundance and habitat preference in an urban estuary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Y Stoeckle

    Full Text Available The difficulty of censusing marine animal populations hampers effective ocean management. Analyzing water for DNA traces shed by organisms may aid assessment. Here we tested aquatic environmental DNA (eDNA as an indicator of fish presence in the lower Hudson River estuary. A checklist of local marine fish and their relative abundance was prepared by compiling 12 traditional surveys conducted between 1988-2015. To improve eDNA identification success, 31 specimens representing 18 marine fish species were sequenced for two mitochondrial gene regions, boosting coverage of the 12S eDNA target sequence to 80% of local taxa. We collected 76 one-liter shoreline surface water samples at two contrasting estuary locations over six months beginning in January 2016. eDNA was amplified with vertebrate-specific 12S primers. Bioinformatic analysis of amplified DNA, using a reference library of GenBank and our newly generated 12S sequences, detected most (81% locally abundant or common species and relatively few (23% uncommon taxa, and corresponded to seasonal presence and habitat preference as determined by traditional surveys. Approximately 2% of fish reads were commonly consumed species that are rare or absent in local waters, consistent with wastewater input. Freshwater species were rarely detected despite Hudson River inflow. These results support further exploration and suggest eDNA will facilitate fine-scale geographic and temporal mapping of marine fish populations at relatively low cost.

  9. Label-free detection of C-reactive protein using an electrochemical DNA immunoassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temsiri Songjaroen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A label-free electrochemical immunoassay that combines DNA-directed immobilization (DDI with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS on microwire sensors is reported for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP. CRP is an acute-phase protein that is strongly correlated with systemic inflammation. Since inflammation plays a role in pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, CRP can be used to predict the likelihood of coronary events. To demonstrate the new chemistry, 25-μm Au electrodes were modified with single strand DNA (ssDNA and exposed to a solution containing complementary ssDNA conjugated to monoclonal anti-CRP. The charge-transfer resistance of the [Fe(CN6]3−/4− redox couple was used to determine the CRP concentration after binding. A stepwise increase in the charge transfer resistance was observed using EIS for each modification step, ssDNA, ssDNA-anti-CRP hybridization and the final CRP capture. Cyclic voltammetry (CV was used to verify the EIS results, and showed an increase in peak potential splitting in a similar stepwise manner for each modification step. Finally, fluorescence microscopy was used to confirm the DNA hybridization and CRP binding. Standard addition of CRP revealed that EIS could be used to detect CRP at clinically relevant levels in serum samples. This new form of electrochemical DNA immunoassay (eDI has significant potential as a simple, label-free sensor for proteins in microfluidic devices.

  10. [Establishment of real time PCR for detecting plasma cell free DNA of rats and its significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi-cheng; Yin, Lang; Wang, Xiao-hui

    2015-03-01

    Overtraining is a serious problem in sports, assessed by comprehensive multi-index evaluation, but so far there is still no sensitive, specific monitoring indicator or simple evaluation method to evaluate it. This research established a method for detecting plasma cell free DNA (cfDNA) of rats by real time PCR and discuss edits significance: a new molecular marker of overtraining? Twelve male SD rats were randomly divided into control group and overtraining group. The overtraining group rats were undertaken overtraining on a motor-driven treadmill for 5 weeks, while the control group rats kept quiescent. All the rats were drawn blood at pre-and after-5 weeks to detect plasma levels of cfDNA, testosterone (T) and corticosterone (Cort) as well as peroxidation/antioxidation parameters (T-AOC, MDA, SOD, GSH-Px) and creatin kinase (CK). (1) Plasma cfDNA of rat was detected specifically by our real time PCR. (2) Compared with control group rats, the plasma cfDNA of overtraining rats increased obviously (about 5.43 fold). (3) Plasma cfDNA was related to plasma T, Cort, T/C ratio and MDA (correlation coefficent were -0.729, 0.854, -0.655 and 0.720, respectively) rather than plasma T-AOC, GSH-Px, SOD and CK. (1) A real time PCR method was established successfully to determine plasma cfDNA of rat. (2) A remarkable raises of plasma levels of cfDNA were found in overtraining rats which were associated with T, Cort and T/C, suggested that plasma cfDNA might be a new molecular marker of overtraining. (3) The increase of plasma cfDNA of overtraining rat might correlate with enhanced oxidative stress induced by overtraining instead of muscle damage.

  11. A combined HM-PCR/SNuPE method for high sensitive detection of rare DNA methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tierling Sascha

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation changes are widely used as early molecular markers in cancer detection. Sensitive detection and classification of rare methylation changes in DNA extracted from circulating body fluids or complex tissue samples is crucial for the understanding of tumor etiology, clinical diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, we describe a combined method to monitor the presence of methylated tumor DNA in an excess of unmethylated background DNA of non-tumorous cells. The method combines heavy methyl-PCR, which favors preferential amplification of methylated marker sequence from bisulfite-treated DNA with a methylation-specific single nucleotide primer extension monitored by ion-pair, reversed-phase, high-performance liquid chromatography separation. Results This combined method allows detection of 14 pg (that is, four to five genomic copies of methylated chromosomal DNA in a 2000-fold excess (that is, 50 ng of unmethylated chromosomal background, with an analytical sensitivity of > 90%. We outline a detailed protocol for the combined assay on two examples of known cancer markers (SEPT9 and TMEFF2 and discuss general aspects of assay design and data interpretation. Finally, we provide an application example for rapid testing on tumor methylation in plasma DNA derived from a small cohort of patients with colorectal cancer. Conclusion The method allows unambiguous detection of rare DNA methylation, for example in body fluid or DNA isolates from cells or tissues, with very high sensitivity and accuracy. The application combines standard technologies and can easily be adapted to any target region of interest. It does not require costly reagents and can be used for routine screening of many samples.

  12. Highly sensitive detection of DNA methylation levels by using a quantum dot-based FRET method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunfei; Zhang, Honglian; Liu, Fangming; Wu, Zhenhua; Lu, Shaohua; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Zhong, Xinhua; Mao, Hongju

    2015-10-01

    DNA methylation is the most frequently studied epigenetic modification that is strongly involved in genomic stability and cellular plasticity. Aberrant changes in DNA methylation status are ubiquitous in human cancer and the detection of these changes can be informative for cancer diagnosis. Herein, we reported a facile quantum dot-based (QD-based) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique for the detection of DNA methylation. The method relies on methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes for the differential digestion of genomic DNA based on its methylation status. Digested DNA is then subjected to PCR amplification for the incorporation of Alexa Fluor-647 (A647) fluorophores. DNA methylation levels can be detected qualitatively through gel analysis and quantitatively by the signal amplification from QDs to A647 during FRET. Furthermore, the methylation levels of three tumor suppressor genes, PCDHGB6, HOXA9 and RASSF1A, in 20 lung adenocarcinoma and 20 corresponding adjacent nontumorous tissue (NT) samples were measured to verify the feasibility of the QD-based FRET method and a high sensitivity for cancer detection (up to 90%) was achieved. Our QD-based FRET method is a convenient, continuous and high-throughput method, and is expected to be an alternative for detecting DNA methylation as a biomarker for certain human cancers.DNA methylation is the most frequently studied epigenetic modification that is strongly involved in genomic stability and cellular plasticity. Aberrant changes in DNA methylation status are ubiquitous in human cancer and the detection of these changes can be informative for cancer diagnosis. Herein, we reported a facile quantum dot-based (QD-based) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique for the detection of DNA methylation. The method relies on methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes for the differential digestion of genomic DNA based on its methylation status. Digested DNA is then subjected to PCR

  13. DNA-mediated strand displacement facilitates sensitive electronic detection of antibodies in human serums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Shi, Kai; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-09-15

    We describe here the development of a sensitive and convenient electronic sensor for the detection of antibodies in human serums. The sensor is constructed by self-assembly formation of a mixed monolayer containing the small molecule epitope conjugated double stranded DNA probes on gold electrode. The target antibody binds the epitope on the dsDNA probe and lowers the melting temperature of the duplex, which facilitates the displacement of the antibody-linked strand of the duplex probe by an invading methylene blue-tagged single stranded DNA (MB-ssDNA) through the strand displacement reaction and leads to the capture of many MB-ssDNA on the sensor surface. Subsequent electrochemical oxidation of the methylene blue labels results in amplified current response for sensitive monitoring of the antibodies. The antibody assay conditions are optimized and the sensor exhibits a linear range between 1.0 and 25.0nM with a detection limit of 0.67nM for the target antibody. The sensor is also selective and can be employed to detect the target antibodies in human serum samples. With the advantages of using small molecule epitope as the antibody recognition element over traditional antigen, the versatile manipulability of the DNA probes and the unique properties of the electrochemical transduction technique, the developed sensor thus hold great potential for simple and sensitive detection of different antibodies and other proteins in real samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The detection of great crested newts year round via environmental DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Helen C; Baker, Claire A; Gardner, David S; Maddison, Ben C; Gough, Kevin C

    2017-07-26

    Analysis of environmental DNA (eDNA) is a method that has been used for the detection of various species within water bodies. The great crested newt (Triturus cristatus) has a short eDNA survey season (mid-April to June). Here we investigate whether this season could be extended into other months using the current methodology as stipulated by Natural England. Here we present data to show that in monthly water samples taken from two ponds (March 2014-February 2015) we were able to detect great crested newt DNA in all months in at least one of the ponds. Similar levels of great crested newt eDNA (i.e. highly positive identification) were detected through the months of March-August, suggesting it may be possible to extend the current survey window. In order to determine how applicable these observations are for ponds throughout the rest of the UK, further work in multiple other ponds over multiple seasons is suggested. Nevertheless, the current work clearly demonstrates, in two ponds, the efficacy and reproducibility of eDNA detection for determining the presence of great crested newts.

  15. A set of 14 DIP-SNP markers to detect unbalanced DNA mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhizhen; Liu, Jinding; Wang, Jiaqi; Chen, Deqing; Liu, Zidong; Shi, Jie; Li, Zeqin; Li, Wenyan; Zhang, Gengqian; Du, Bing

    2018-03-04

    Unbalanced DNA mixture is still a difficult problem for forensic practice. DIP-STRs are useful markers for detection of minor DNA but they are not widespread in the human genome and having long amplicons. In this study, we proposed a novel type of genetic marker, termed DIP-SNP. DIP-SNP refers to the combination of INDEL and SNP in less than 300bp length of human genome. The multiplex PCR and SNaPshot assay were established for 14 DIP-SNP markers in a Chinese Han population from Shanxi, China. This novel compound marker allows detection of the minor DNA contributor with sensitivity from 1:50 to 1:1000 in a DNA mixture of any gender with 1 ng-10 ng DNA template. Most of the DIP-SNP markers had a relatively high probability of informative alleles with an average I value of 0.33. In all, we proposed DIP-SNP as a novel kind of genetic marker for detection of minor contributor from unbalanced DNA mixture and established the detection method by associating the multiplex PCR and SNaPshot assay. DIP-SNP polymorphisms are promising markers for forensic or clinical mixture examination because they are shorter, widespread and higher sensitive. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Scattering measurement of single particle for highly sensitive homogeneous detection of DNA in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang; Li, Guohua; He, Yonghong; Tan, Hui; Sun, Shuqing

    2018-02-01

    A highly sensitive homogeneous method for DNA detection has been developed. The system relies on two kinds of gold nanorod (AuNR) probes with complementary DNA sequences to the target DNA. In the presence of the target DNA, two kinds of AuNR probes are assembling into dimers or small aggregates. The target-induced AuNR aggregate has higher scattering intensity than that of a single AuNR because of the plasmonic coupling effect. Dark field microscopy was utilized to image the single particle and measure its scattering intensity. We wrote our own Matlab code and used it to extract the scattering signal of all particles. Difference in distribution of scattering intensity between the single AuNR and its aggregate provides a quantitative basis for the detection of target DNA. A linear dynamic range spanning from 0.1pM to 1nM and a detection limit of ~ 30fM were achieved for the detection of DNA in serum sample. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Modified DNA extraction for rapid PCR detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japoni, A.; Alborzi, A.; Rasouli, M.; Pourabbas, B.

    2004-01-01

    Nosocomial infection caused by methicillin-resistant staphylococci poses a serious problem in many countries. The aim of this study was to rapidly and reliably detect methicillin-resistant-staphylococci in order to suggest appropriate therapy. The presence or absence of the methicillin-resistance gene in 115 clinical isolates of staphylococcus aureus and 50 isolates of coagulase negative staphylococci was examined by normal PCR. DNA extraction for PCR performance was then modified by omission of achromopeptadiase and proteinase K digestion, phenol/chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. All isolates with Mic>8 μ g/ml showed positive PCR. No differences in PCR detection have been observed when normal and modified DNA extractions have been performed. Our modified DNA extraction can quickly detect methicillin-resistant staphylococci by PCR. The advantage of rapid DNA extraction extends to both reduction of time and cost of PCR performance. This modified DNA extraction is suitable for different PCR detection, when staphylococci are the subject of DNA analysis

  18. A CCD-based system for the detection of DNA in electrophoresis gels by UV absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahon, A.R.; MacDonald, J.H.; Mainwood, A.; Ott, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection and quantification of large fragments of unlabelled nucleic acids in agarose gels is presented. The technique is based on ultraviolet (UV) absorption by nucleotides. A deuterium source illuminates individual sample lanes of an electrophoresis gel via an array of optical fibres. As DNA bands pass through the illuminated region of the gel the amount of UV light transmitted is reduced because of absorption by the DNA. During electrophoresis the regions of DNA are detected on-line using a UV-sensitive charge coupled device (CCD). As the absorption coefficient is proportional to the mass of DNA the technique is inherently quantitative. The mass of DNA in a region of the gel is approximately proportional to the integrated signal in the corresponding section of the CCD image. This system currently has a detection limit of less than 1.25 ng compared with 2-10 ng for the most popular conventional technique, ethidium bromide (EtBr) staining. In addition the DNA sample remains in its native state. The removal of the carcinogenic dye from the detection procedure greatly reduces associated biological hazards. (author)

  19. Microfluidic Arrayed Lab-On-A-Chip for Electrochemical Capacitive Detection of DNA Hybridization Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Dykstra, Peter H; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    A microfluidic electrochemical lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device for DNA hybridization detection has been developed. The device comprises a 3 × 3 array of microelectrodes integrated with a dual layer microfluidic valved manipulation system that provides controlled and automated capabilities for high throughput analysis of microliter volume samples. The surface of the microelectrodes is functionalized with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes which enable specific detection of complementary ssDNA targets. These targets are detected by a capacitive technique which measures dielectric variation at the microelectrode-electrolyte interface due to DNA hybridization events. A quantitative analysis of the hybridization events is carried out based on a sensing modeling that includes detailed analysis of energy storage and dissipation components. By calculating these components during hybridization events the device is able to demonstrate specific and dose response sensing characteristics. The developed microfluidic LOC for DNA hybridization detection offers a technology for real-time and label-free assessment of genetic markers outside of laboratory settings, such as at the point-of-care or in-field environmental monitoring.

  20. Cluster analysis for DNA methylation profiles having a detection threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegmund Kimberly D

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation, a molecular feature used to investigate tumor heterogeneity, can be measured on many genomic regions using the MethyLight technology. Due to the combination of the underlying biology of DNA methylation and the MethyLight technology, the measurements, while being generated on a continuous scale, have a large number of 0 values. This suggests that conventional clustering methodology may not perform well on this data. Results We compare performance of existing methodology (such as k-means with two novel methods that explicitly allow for the preponderance of values at 0. We also consider how the ability to successfully cluster such data depends upon the number of informative genes for which methylation is measured and the correlation structure of the methylation values for those genes. We show that when data is collected for a sufficient number of genes, our models do improve clustering performance compared to methods, such as k-means, that do not explicitly respect the supposed biological realities of the situation. Conclusion The performance of analysis methods depends upon how well the assumptions of those methods reflect the properties of the data being analyzed. Differing technologies will lead to data with differing properties, and should therefore be analyzed differently. Consequently, it is prudent to give thought to what the properties of the data are likely to be, and which analysis method might therefore be likely to best capture those properties.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA as a potential tool for early cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parr Ryan L

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The recent surge in mitochondrial research has been driven by the identification of mitochondria-associated diseases and the role of mitochondria in apoptosis. Both of these aspects have identified mitochondrial analysis as a vital component of medical research. Moreover, mitochondria have been implicated in the process of carcinogenesis because of their vital role in energy production, nuclear-cytoplasmic signal integration and control of metabolic pathways. Interestingly, at some point during neoplastic transformation, there is an increase in reactive oxygen species, which damage the mitochondrial genome. This accelerates the somatic mutation rate of mitochondrial DNA. It has been proposed that these mutations may serve as an early indication of potential cancer development and may represent a means for tracking tumour progression. The purpose of this review is to explore the potential utility that these mutations may afford for the identification and monitoring of neoplasia and malignant transformation where appropriate body fluids or non-invasive tissue access is available for mitochondrial DNA recovery. Specifically, prostate, breast, colorectal, skin and lung cancers are discussed.

  2. Enzyme-free and label-free ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and adenosine triphosphate by dendritic DNA concatamer-based signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shufeng; Lin, Ying; Liu, Tao; Cheng, Chuanbin; Wei, Wenji; Wang, Li; Li, Feng

    2014-06-15

    Hybridization chain reaction (HCR) strategy has been well developed for the fabrication of various biosensing platforms for signal amplification. Herein, a novel enzyme-free and label-free ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensing platform for the detection of target DNA and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was firstly proposed, in which three auxiliary DNA probes were ingeniously designed to construct the dendritic DNA concatamer via HCR strategy and used as hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex) carrier for signal amplification. With the developed dendritic DNA concatamer-based signal amplification strategy, the DNA biosensor could achieve an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and ATP with a superior detection limit as low as 5 aM and 20 fM, respectively, and also demonstrate a high selectivity for DNA and ATP detection. The currently proposed dendritic DNA concatamer opens a promising direction to construct ultrasensitive DNA biosensing platform for biomolecular detection in bioanalysis and clinical biomedicine, which offers the distinct advantages of simplicity and cost efficiency owing to no need of any kind of enzyme, chemical modification or labeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Behavior and season affect crayfish detection and density inference using environmental DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Nicholas; Priestley, Victoria; Herraiz, Alba; Arnold, Richard; Savolainen, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    Although the presence/absence of aquatic invertebrates using environmental DNA (eDNA) has been established for several species, inferring population densities has remained problematic. The invasive American signal crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus (Dana), is the leading cause of decline in the UK's only native crayfish species, Austropotamobius pallipes (Lereboullet). Methods to detect species at low abundances offer the opportunity for the early detection, and potential eradication, of P. leniusculus before population densities reach threatening levels in areas occupied by A. pallipes . Using a factorial experimental design with aquaria, we investigated the impacts of biomass, sex ratio, and fighting behavior on the amount of eDNA released by P. leniusculus , with the aim to infer density per aquarium depending on treatments. The amount of target eDNA in water samples from each aquarium was measured using the quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction. We show that the presence of eggs significantly increases the concentration of crayfish eDNA per unit of mass, and that there is a significant relationship between eDNA concentration and biomass when females are egg-bearing. However, the relationship between crayfish biomass and eDNA concentration is lost in aquaria without ovigerous females. Female-specific tanks had significantly higher eDNA concentrations than male-specific tanks, and the prevention of fighting did not impact the amount of eDNA in the water. These results indicate that detection and estimate of crayfish abundance using eDNA may be more effective while females are ovigerous. This information should guide further research for an accurate estimation of crayfish biomass in the field depending on the season. Our results indicate that detection and quantification of egg-laying aquatic invertebrate species using eDNA could be most successful during periods when eggs are developing in the water. We recommend that practitioners consider the reproductive

  4. DNA-damage foci to detect and characterize DNA repair alterations in children treated for pediatric malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schuler

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: In children diagnosed with cancer, we evaluated the DNA damage foci approach to identify patients with double-strand break (DSB repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging radio- and chemotherapy. In one patient with Fanconi anemia (FA suffering relapsing squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity we also characterized the repair defect in biopsies of skin, mucosa and tumor. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In children with histologically confirmed tumors or leukemias and healthy control-children DSB repair was investigated by counting γH2AX-, 53BP1- and pATM-foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after ex-vivo irradiation. This DSB repair capacity was correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses. For the FA patient the defective repair was also characterized in tissue biopsies by analyzing DNA damage response proteins by light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: Between tumor-children and healthy control-children we observed significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DNA repair. Only 1 out of 4 patients with grade-4 normal-tissue toxicities revealed an impaired DSB repair capacity. The defective DNA repair in FA patient was verified in irradiated blood lymphocytes as well as in non-irradiated mucosa and skin biopsies leading to an excessive accumulation of heterochromatin-associated DSBs in rapidly cycling cells. CONCLUSIONS: Analyzing human tissues we show that DSB repair alterations predispose to cancer formation at younger ages and affect the susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. DNA damage foci analysis of blood and tissue samples allows one to detect and characterize DSB repair deficiencies and enables identification of patients at risk for high-grade toxicities. However, not all treatment-associated normal-tissue toxicities can be explained by DSB repair deficiencies.

  5. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Michael T; Landon, Preston B; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-06-28

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine.

  6. Detection of Methylated Circulating DNA as Noninvasive Biomarkers for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk, Isabella Wai Yin; Shin, Vivian Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Internationally, breast cancer is the most common female cancer, and is induced by a combination of environmental, genetic, and epigenetic risk factors. Despite the advancement of imaging techniques, invasive sampling of breast epithelial cells is the only definitive diagnostic procedure for patients with breast cancer. To date, molecular biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity for the screening and early detection of breast cancer are lacking. Recent evidence suggests that the detection of methylated circulating cell-free DNA in the peripheral blood of patients with cancer may be a promising quantitative and noninvasive method for cancer diagnosis. Methylation detection based on a multi-gene panel, rather than on the methylation status of a single gene, may be used to increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast cancer screening. In this review, the results of 14 relevant studies, investigating the efficacy of cell-free DNA methylation screening for breast cancer diagnosis, have been summarized. The genetic risk factors for breast cancer, the methods used for breast cancer detection, and the techniques and limitations related to the detection of cell-free DNA methylation status, have also been reviewed and discussed. From this review, we conclude that the analysis of peripheral blood or other samples to detect differentially methylated cell-free DNA is a promising technique for use in clinical settings, and may improve the sensitivity of screening for both, early detection and disease relapse, and thus improve the future prognosis of patients with breast cancer. PMID:28382090

  7. Gold nanoparticle-based probes for the colorimetric detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganareal, Thenor Aristotile Charles S; Balbin, Michelle M; Monserate, Juvy J; Salazar, Joel R; Mingala, Claro N

    2018-02-12

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) is considered to be the most stable metal nanoparticle having the ability to be functionalized with biomolecules. Recently, AuNP-based DNA detection methods captured the interest of researchers worldwide. Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease, a chronic gastroenteritis in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), was found to have negative effect in the livestock industry. In this study, AuNP-based probes were evaluated for the specific and sensitive detection of MAP DNA. AuNP-based probe was produced by functionalization of AuNPs with thiol-modified oligonucleotide and was confirmed by Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. UV-Vis spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize AuNPs. DNA detection was done by hybridization of 10 μL of DNA with 5 μL of probe at 63 °C for 10 min and addition of 3 μL salt solution. The method was specific to MAP with detection limit of 103 ng. UV-Vis and SEM showed dispersion and aggregation of the AuNPs for the positive and negative results, respectively, with no observed particle growth. This study therefore reports an AuNP-based probes which can be used for the specific and sensitive detection of MAP DNA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Emergent Landscape of Detecting EGFR Mutations Using Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lun Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in targeted therapies for lung cancer are based on the evaluation of specific gene mutations especially the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. The assays largely depend on the acquisition of tumor tissue via biopsy before the initiation of therapy or after the onset of acquired resistance. However, the limitations of tissue biopsy including tumor heterogeneity and insufficient tissues for molecular testing are impotent clinical obstacles for mutation analysis and lung cancer treatment. Due to the invasive procedure of tissue biopsy and the progressive development of drug-resistant EGFR mutations, the effective initial detection and continuous monitoring of EGFR mutations are still unmet requirements. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA detection is a promising biomarker for noninvasive assessment of cancer burden. Recent advancement of sensitive techniques in detecting EGFR mutations using ctDNA enables a broad range of clinical applications, including early detection of disease, prediction of treatment responses, and disease progression. This review not only introduces the biology and clinical implementations of ctDNA but also includes the updating information of recent advancement of techniques for detecting EGFR mutation using ctDNA in lung cancer.

  9. Non-invasive prenatal detection of achondroplasia using circulating fetal DNA in maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ji Hyae; Kim, Mee Jin; Kim, Shin Young; Kim, Hye Ok; Song, Mee Jin; Kim, Min Hyoung; Park, So Yeon; Yang, Jae Hyug; Ryu, Hyun Mee

    2011-02-01

    To perform a reliable non-invasive detection of the fetal achondroplasia using maternal plasma. We developed a quantitative fluorescent-polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) method suitable for detection of the FGFR3 mutation (G1138A) causing achondroplasia. This method was applied in a non-invasive detection of the fetal achondroplasia using circulating fetal-DNA (cf-DNA) in maternal plasma. Maternal plasmas were obtained at 27 weeks of gestational age from women carrying an achondroplasia fetus or a normal fetus. Two percent or less achondroplasia DNA was reliably detected by QF-PCR. In a woman carrying a normal fetus, analysis of cf-DNA showed only one peak of the wild-type G allele. In a woman expected an achondroplasia fetus, analysis of cf-DNA showed the two peaks of wild-type G allele and mutant-type A allele and accurately detected the fetal achondroplasia. The non-invasive method using maternal plasma and QF-PCR may be useful for diagnosis of the fetal achondroplasia.

  10. How to evaluate PCR assays for the detection of low-level DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Frederik Banch; Urhammer, Emil; Rieneck, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    are needed and how many of these should be positive or what amount of template should be used? We developed a mathematical model to obtain a simple tool for quick PCR assay evaluation before laboratory optimization and validation procedures. The model was based on the Poisson distribution and the Binomial...... not significantly different from experimental data generated by testing of cell-free foetal DNA. Also, the simplified formula was applicable for fast and accurate assay evaluation. In conclusion, the model can be applied for evaluation of sensitivity of real-time PCR-based detection of low-level DNA, and may also...... distribution describing parameters for singleplex real-time PCR-based detection of low-level DNA. The model was tested against experimental data of diluted cell-free foetal DNA. Also, the model was compared with a simplified formula to enable easy predictions. The model predicted outcomes that were...

  11. Detection of Pneumocystis carinii DNA by filtration of air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, M; Sukura, A; Lindberg, L A; Linder, E

    1996-01-01

    The high incidence of pneumonia caused by Pneumocystis carinii in immunosuppressed patients makes it the most important parasite in non-tropical geographical regions. It has recently been shown to be a fungus, but several aspects of this organism are still poorly understood. A major question of clinical relevance is the nature of transmission and, thereby, the related problem of prevention. The mode of P. carinii transmission is thought to be air, but this is based on circumstantial evidence, the transmissive stage has not been identified. We attempted to capture P. carinii by filtration of air in the vicinity of cages containing P. carinii infected Wistar rats. Using nested polymerase chain reaction amplification of the thymidylate synthase gene to demonstrate P. carinii we were able to demonstrate P. carinii DNA on such filters. This strongly supports the suggested mechanism of transmission of Pneumocystis by means of airborne spores and suggests an approach to their isolation and characterization.

  12. Nanometer-Scale Pores: Potential Applications for Analyte Detection and DNA Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Kasianowicz

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Several classes of transmembrane protein ion channels function in vivo as sensitive and selective detection elements for analytes. Recent studies on single channels reconstituted into planar lipid bilayer membranes suggest that nanometer-scale pores can be used to detect, quantitate and characterize a wide range of analytes that includes small ions and single stranded DNA. We briefly review here these studies and identify leaps in technology that, if realized, might lead to innovations for the early detection of cancer.

  13. Detection of DNA hybridization by various spectroscopic methods using the copper tetraphenylporphyrin complex as a probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, H.; Cai, C.; Ma, Y.; Chen, X.

    2012-01-01

    We are presenting new and highly sensitive hybridization assays. They are based on various spectroscopic methods including resonance light scattering, circular dichroism, ultraviolet spectra and fluorescence spectra, as well as atomic force microscopy, and relies on the interaction of the Cu(II), Ni(II), Mg(II), Co(II), Cd(II), and Zn(II) complexes, respectively, of tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) with double-strand DNA (dsDNA) and single strand DNA (ssDNA). The interaction results in amplified resonance light scattering (RLS) signals and enables the detection of hybridization without the need for labeling DNA. The RLS signals are strongest in case of the Cu (II)-TPP complex which therefore was selected as the probe. The technique is simple, robust, accurate, and can be completed in less than one hour. (author)

  14. Detection of DNA strand breaks in mammalian cells using the radioresistant bacterium PprA protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Katsuya; Wada, Seiichi; Narumi, Issay; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-01

    We have previously found that the PprA protein from Deinococcus radiodurans possesses ability to recognize DNA carrying strand breaks. In the present study, we attempted to visualize radiation-induced DNA strand breaks with PprA protein using immunofluorescence technique to elucidate the DNA damage response mechanism in mammalian cultured cells. As a result, colocalization of Cy2 and DAPI fluorescent signals was observed. This observation suggests that DNA strand breaks in the nucleus of CHO-K1 cells were effectively detected using the PprA protein. The amount of DNA strand breaks (integrated density of Cy2 fluorescent signals) was increased with the increase in the radiation dose. (author)

  15. Potential utility of environmental DNA for early detection of Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Jeremy; Sepulveda, Adam; Sylvester, K; Thum, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Considering the harmful and irreversible consequences of many biological invasions, early detection of an invasive species is an important step toward protecting ecosystems (Sepulveda et al. 2012). Early detection increases the probability that suppression or eradication efforts will be successful because invasive populations are small and localized (Vander Zanden et al. 2010). However, most invasive species are not detected early because current tools have low detection probabilities when target species are rare and the sampling effort required to achieve acceptable detection capabilities with current tools is seldom tractable (Jerde et al. 2011). As a result, many invasive species go undetected until they are abundant and suppression efforts become costly. Novel DNA-based surveillance tools have recently revolutionized early detection abilities using environmental DNA (eDNA) present in the water (Darling and Mahon 2011, Bohmann et al. 2014). In brief, eDNA monitoring enables the identification of organisms from DNA present and collected in water samples. Aquatic and semiaquatic organisms release DNA contained in sloughed, damaged, or partially decomposed tissue and waste products into the water and molecular techniques allow this eDNA in the water column to be identified from simple and easy-tocollect water samples (Darling and Mahon 2011). Despite limited understanding of the production, persistence, and spread of DNA in water (Barnes et al. 2014), eDNA monitoring has been applied not only to invasive species (Jerde et al. 2011), but also to species that are rare, endangered, or highly elusive (Spear et al. 2014). However, most eDNA research and monitoring has focused on detection of invertebrates and vertebrates and less attentionhas been given to developing eDNA techniques for detecting aquatic invasive plants. Eurasian watermilfoil (EWM; Myriophyllum spicatum L.) is an invasive species for which improved early detection would be particularly helpful. Advanced

  16. A probe-based quantitative PCR assay for detecting Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae in fish tissue and environmental DNA water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Patrick; Sepulveda, Adam; Martin, Renee; Hopper, Lacey

    2017-01-01

    A probe-based quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed to detect Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae, which causes proliferative kidney disease in salmonid fish, in kidney tissue and environmental DNA (eDNA) water samples. The limits of detection and quantification were 7 and 100 DNA copies for calibration standards and T. bryosalmonae was reliably detected down to 100 copies in tissue and eDNA samples. The assay presented here is a highly sensitive and quantitative tool for detecting T. bryosalmonae with potential applications for tissue diagnostics and environmental detection.

  17. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    THOMAS NAICY

    IGF1 gene might play important roles in almost all body functions especially growth, reproduction and meat quality traits in goats. Further studies are required to establish the role of the detected SNP in the IGF1 gene expression and association with economic traits in goats. The results of the present study suggests that IGF1 ...

  18. Rapid on-site detection of Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli by gold-labeled DNA strip sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenjun; Lu, Jie; Ma, Wenwei; Xu, Chuanlai; Kuang, Hua; Zhu, Shuifang

    2011-06-15

    Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (AAC) is one of the most harmful diseases in cucurbit production. A rapid and sensitive DNA strip sensor was constructed based on gold nanoparticle-labeled oligonucleotide probes for the detection of AAC. Both the qualitative and semi-quantitative detections of target DNA were successfully achieved using the developed DNA strip sensor. The qualitative limit of detection (LOD) of the strip sensor was determined as 4 nM. The LOD for the semi-quantitative detection was calculated to be 0.48 nM in the range of 0-10 nM. The genomic DNA was detected directly using the DNA strip sensor without any further treatment. This DNA strip sensor is a potentially useful tool for rapid on-site DNA screening. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Selective detection of Mg2+ ions via enhanced fluorescence emission using Au–DNA nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanushree Basu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The biophysical properties of DNA-modified Au nanoparticles (AuNPs have attracted a great deal of research interest for various applications in biosensing. AuNPs have strong binding capability to the phosphate and sugar groups in DNA, rendering unique physicochemical properties for detection of metal ions. The formation of Au–DNA nanocomposites is evident from the observed changes in the optical absorption, plasmon band, zeta potential, DLS particle size distribution, as well as TEM and AFM surface morphology analysis. Circular dichroism studies also revealed that DNA-functionalized AuNP binding caused a conformational change in the DNA structure. Due to the size and shape dependent plasmonic interactions of AuNPs (33–78 nm with DNA, the resultant Au–DNA nanocomposites (NCs exhibit superior fluorescence emission due to chemical binding with Ca2+, Fe2+ and Mg2+ ions. A significant increase in fluorescence emission (λex = 260 nm of Au–DNA NCs was observed after selectively binding with Mg2+ ions (20–800 ppm in an aqueous solution where a minimum of 100 ppm Mg2+ ions was detected based on the linearity of concentration versus fluorescence intensity curve (λem = 400 nm. The effectiveness of Au–DNA nanocomposites was further verified by comparing the known concentration (50–120 ppm of Mg2+ ions in synthetic tap water and a real life sample of Gelusil (300–360 ppm Mg2+, a widely used antacid medicine. Therefore, this method could be a sensitive tool for the estimation of water hardness after careful preparation of a suitably designed Au–DNA nanostructure.

  20. DNA-Inspired Online Behavioral Modeling and Its Application to Spambot Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cresci, Stefano; Di Pietro, Roberto; Petrocchi, Marinella

    2016-01-01

    A novel, simple, and effective approach to modeling online user behavior extracts and analyzes digital DNA sequences from user online actions and uses Twitter as a benchmark to test the proposal. Specifically, the model obtains an incisive and compact DNA-inspired characterization of user actions....... Then, standard DNA analysis techniques discriminate between genuine and spambot accounts on Twitter. An experimental campaign supports the proposal, showing its effectiveness and viability. Although Twitter spambot detection is a specific use case on a specific social media platform, the proposed...... methodology is platform and technology agnostic, paving the way for diverse behavioral characterization tasks....

  1. Voltammetric Detection of Antioxidative Properties of Flavonoids Using Electrically Heated DNA Modified Carbon Paste Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gründler

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple electrochemical sensor consisting of electrically heated carbon paste electrode with the surface modified by dsDNA is used to characterize voltammetric behaviour and antioxidative activity of four selected flavonoids. Quercetin, rutin, catechin and epigallocatechin gallate accumulate within the DNA layer. A positive effect of the electrode temperature within the range of 20 to 38 ºC on the detection of a deep DNA degradation by a copper(II/H2O2/ascorbic acid cleavage mixture as well as an antioxidative effect of flavonoids was evaluated.

  2. [Electron-cytochemical method of DNA detection with the aid of ammonia silver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erenpreis, Ia G; Zirne, R A

    1979-01-01

    Three prescriptions for the detection of aldehyde groups of deoxyribose with ammoniac silver are proposed. The reaction can be carried out on tissue blocks or imprints; it is useful for DNA identification in the light and electron microscope, gives high contrast and allows to reveal DNA in structures with a relatively low content of DNA, for instance, in nucleoi. The disadvantages of the method include a possibility of nonspecific reduction of silver if the reaction is performed on a plastic-embedded material and damage of ultrastructures if the reaction is done prior to embedding.

  3. Selection and application of ssDNA aptamers to detect active TB from sputum samples

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rotherham, LS

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available and Application of ssDNA Aptamers to Detect Active TB from Sputum Samples Lia S. Rotherham1,2, Charlotte Maserumule1,3, Keertan Dheda3, Jacques Theron2, Makobetsa Khati1,3* 1 Emerging Health Technologies Platform, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research...?50 times less than those for producing antibodies [25]. Aptamers have been raised against a wide variety of targets, from small human molecules and viral proteins to whole microorganisms [26]. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers are usually used...

  4. Circulating free DNA as biomarker and source for mutation detection in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Karen Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Brandslund, Ivan; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma has shown potential as biomarker in various cancers and could become an importance source for tumour mutation detection. The objectives of our study were to establish a normal range of cfDNA in a cohort of healthy individuals and to compare this with four cohorts of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. We also investigated the prognostic value of cfDNA and analysed the tumour-specific KRAS mutations in the plasma. The study was a prospective biomarker evaluation in four consecutive Phase II trials, including 229 patients with chemotherapy refractory mCRC and 100 healthy individuals. Plasma was obtained from an EDTA blood-sample, and the total number of DNA alleles and KRAS mutated alleles were assessed using an in-house ARMS-qPCR as previously described. Median cfDNA levels were higher in mCRC compared to controls (p mutations in plasma and tissue was high (85%). These data confirm the prognostic value of cfDNA measurement in plasma and utility for mutation detection with the method presented.

  5. Detection of the irradiation treatment of foods using micro gel electrophoresis of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delincee, H.

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has profound effects on nucleic acids, reflected by e.g. base damage and strandbreaks. These effects of radiation contribute to the aim of food irradiation: undesirable microorganisms are inactivated, insect infestation eliminated, sprouting inhibited or ripening delayed. It is, therefore, conceivable that methods of detection of a radiation treatment could be based on changes in DNA, either in microbes or insects or in the food itself. A promising method of detecting DNA fragments in irradiated food is the microelectrophoresis of single cells. Advantages of the method are its simplicity and its speed, the electrophoretic separation only requiring 2.5-5 minutes. The principle is based on migration of DNA in an agarose gel exposed to an electric field. Single cells or nuclei are embedded in the agarose and after lysis intact DNA will practically not move upon electrophoresis, due to the gel strains, whereas if DNA fragmentation has occurred, the DNA is able to migrate and ''comets'' following the cells or nuclei become visible after staining. This paper describes our experience obtained by analyzing chicken, beef and pork meat, shrimps and mushrooms. The method therefore has its limitations, although good results both from frozen and fresh meats, fresh fish, onions and potatoes have been reported. Also strawberries have been identified using this technique. Further experience may strengthen the evidence that this simple and cheap technique may have its place among the battery of tests to detect the radiation treatment of foods. (orig./vhe)

  6. Detection of DNA hybridization based on SnO2 nanomaterial enhanced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Cuiping; Huang Jiarui; Ni Ning; Li Minqiang; Liu Jinhuai

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, enhanced fluorescence emissions were firstly investigated based on SnO 2 nanomaterial, and its application in the detection of DNA hybridization was also demonstrated. The microarray of SnO 2 nanomaterial was fabricated by the vapour phase transport method catalyzed by patterned Au nanoparticles on a silicon substrate. A probe DNA was immobilized on the substrate with patterned SnO 2 nanomaterial, respectively, by covalent and non-covalent linking schemes. When a fluorophore labelled target DNA was hybridized with a probe DNA on the substrate, fluorescence emissions were only observed on the surface of SnO 2 nanomaterial, which indicated the property of enhancing fluorescence signals from the SnO 2 nanomaterial. By comparing the different fluorescence images from covalent and non-covalent linking schemes, the covalent method was confirmed to be more effective for immobilizing a probe DNA. With the combined use of SnO 2 nanomaterial and the covalent linking scheme, the target DNA could be detected at a very low concentration of 10 fM. And the stability of SnO 2 nanomaterial under the experimental conditions was also compared with silicon nanowires. The findings strongly suggested that SnO 2 nanomaterial could be extensively applied in detections of biological samples with enhancing fluorescence property and high stability

  7. Method for detecting point mutations in DNA utilizing fluorescence energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Parkhurst, Kay M.; Middendorf, Lyle

    2001-01-01

    A method for detecting point mutations in DNA using a fluorescently labeled oligomeric probe and Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is disclosed. The selected probe is initially labeled at each end with a fluorescence dye, which act together as a donor/acceptor pair for FRET. The fluorescence emission from the dyes changes dramatically from the duplex stage, wherein the probe is hybridized to the complementary strand of DNA, to the single strand stage, when the probe is melted to become detached from the DNA. The change in fluorescence is caused by the dyes coming into closer proximity after melting occurs and the probe becomes detached from the DNA strand. The change in fluorescence emission as a function of temperature is used to calculate the melting temperature of the complex or T.sub.m. In the case where there is a base mismatch between the probe and the DNA strand, indicating a point mutation, the T.sub.m has been found to be significantly lower than the T.sub.m for a perfectly match probelstand duplex. The present invention allows for the detection of the existence and magnitude of T.sub.m, which allows for the quick and accurate detection of a point mutation in the DNA strand and, in some applications, the determination of the approximate location of the mutation within the sequence.

  8. Easy and fast detection and genotyping of high-risk human papillomavirus by dedicated DNA microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Valérie; Chevallier, Anne; Magnone, Virginie; Barbry, Pascal; Vandenbos, Fanny; Bongain, André; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2006-11-01

    Persistent cervical high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is correlated with an increased risk of developing a high-grade cervical intraepithelial lesion. A two-step method was developed for detection and genotyping of high-risk HPV. DNA was firstly amplified by asymmetrical PCR in the presence of Cy3-labelled primers and dUTP. Labelled DNA was then genotyped using DNA microarray hybridization. The current study evaluated the technical efficacy of laboratory-designed HPV DNA microarrays for high-risk HPV genotyping on 57 malignant and non-malignant cervical smears. The approach was evaluated for a broad range of cytological samples: high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and atypical squamous cells of high-grade (ASC-H). High-risk HPV was also detected in six atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) samples; among them only one cervical specimen was found uninfected, associated with no histological lesion. The HPV oligonucleotide DNA microarray genotyping detected 36 infections with a single high-risk HPV type and 5 multiple infections with several high-risk types. Taken together, these results demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the HPV DNA microarray approach. This approach could improve clinical management of patients with cervical cytological abnormalities.

  9. Label-free, electrochemical detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus DNA with reduced graphene oxide-modified electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhijuan

    2011-05-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-modified glassy carbon electrode is used to detect the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) DNA by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Our experiments confirm that ssDNA, before and after hybridization with target DNA, are successfully anchored on the rGO surface. After the probe DNA, pre-adsorbed on rGO electrode, hybridizes with target DNA, the measured impedance increases dramatically. It provides a new method to detect DNA with high sensitivity (10-13M, i.e., 100 fM) and selectivity. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. DNA detection and single nucleotide mutation identification using SERS for molecular diagnostics and global health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Hoan T.; Gandra, Naveen; Fales, Andrew M.; Taylor, Steve M.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2017-02-01

    Nucleic acid-based molecular diagnostics at the point-of-care (POC) and in resource-limited settings is still a challenge. We present a sensitive yet simple DNA detection method with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification capability. The detection scheme involves sandwich hybridization of magnetic beads conjugated with capture probes, target sequences, and ultrabright surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) nanorattles conjugated with reporter probes. Upon hybridization, the sandwich probes are concentrated at the detection focus controlled by a magnetic system for SERS measurements. The ultrabright SERS nanorattles, consisting of a core and a shell with resonance Raman reporters loaded in the gap space between the core and the shell, serve as SERS tags for ultrasensitive signal detection. Specific DNA sequences of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and dengue virus 1 (DENV1) were used as the model marker system. Detection limit of approximately 100 attomoles was achieved. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination of wild type malaria DNA and mutant malaria DNA, which confers resistance to artemisinin drugs, was also demonstrated. The results demonstrate the molecular diagnostic potential of the nanorattle-based method to both detect and genotype infectious pathogens. The method's simplicity makes it a suitable candidate for molecular diagnosis at the POC and in resource-limited settings.

  11. Detection of fusion gene in cell-free DNA of a gastric synovial sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Shinpei; Konishi, Hirotaka; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Hamada, Junichi; Shoda, Katsutoshi; Arita, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Shuhei; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Yamazaki, Sanae; Yasukawa, Satoru; Konishi, Eiichi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2018-02-28

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is genetically characterized by chromosomal translocation, which generates SYT-SSX fusion transcripts. Although SS can occur in any body part, primary gastric SS is substantially rare. Here we describe a detection of the fusion gene sequence of gastric SS in plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA). A gastric submucosal tumor was detected in the stomach of a 27-year-old woman and diagnosed as SS. Candidate intronic primers were designed to detect the intronic fusion breakpoint and this fusion sequence was confirmed in intron 10 of SYT and intron 5 of SSX2 by genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing. A locked nucleic acid (LNA) probe specific to the fusion sequence was designed for detecting the fusion sequence in plasma and the fusion sequence was detected in preoperative plasma cfDNA, while not detected in postoperative plasma cfDNA. This technique will be useful for monitoring translocation-derived diseases such as SS.

  12. Detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs using isothermal amplification of target DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Mura Maurizio

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most common method of GMO detection is based upon the amplification of GMO-specific DNA amplicons using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Here we have applied the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP method to amplify GMO-related DNA sequences, 'internal' commonly-used motifs for controlling transgene expression and event-specific (plant-transgene junctions. Results We have tested the specificity and sensitivity of the technique for use in GMO studies. Results show that detection of 0.01% GMO in equivalent background DNA was possible and dilutions of template suggest that detection from single copies of the template may be possible using LAMP. Conclusion This work shows that GMO detection can be carried out using LAMP for routine screening as well as for specific events detection. Moreover, the sensitivity and ability to amplify targets, even with a high background of DNA, here demonstrated, highlights the advantages of this isothermal amplification when applied for GMO detection.

  13. A SERS-based lateral flow assay biosensor for highly sensitive detection of HIV-1 DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiuli; Cheng, Ziyi; Yu, Jimin; Choo, Priscilla; Chen, Lingxin; Choo, Jaebum

    2016-04-15

    User-friendly lateral flow (LF) strips have been extensively used for point-of-care (POC) self-diagnostics, but they have some limitations in their detection sensitivity and quantitative analysis because they only identify the high cut-off value of a biomarker by utilizing color changes that are detected with the naked eye. To resolve these problems associated with LF strips, we developed a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based LF assay for the quantitative analysis of a specific biomarker in the low concentration range. Herein, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA was chosen as the specific biomarker. Raman reporter-labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were employed as SERS nano tags for targeting and detecting the HIV-1 DNA marker, as opposed to using bare AuNPs in LF strips. It was possible to quantitatively analyze HIV-1 DNA with high sensitivity by monitoring the characteristic Raman peak intensity of the DNA-conjugated AuNPs. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit of our SERS-based lateral flow assay was 0.24 pg/mL, which was at least 1000 times more sensitive compared to colorimetric or fluorescent detection methods. These results demonstrate the potential feasibility of the proposed SERS-based lateral flow assay to quantitatively detect a broad range of genetic diseases with high sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Enzyme-Free Detection of Mutations in Cancer DNA Using Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probes and Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miotke, Laura; Maity, Arindam; Ji, Hanlee

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rapid reliable diagnostics of DNA mutations are highly desirable in research and clinical assays. Current development in this field goes simultaneously in two directions: 1) high-throughput methods, and 2) portable assays. Non-enzymatic approaches are attractive for both types......) and finally, detection by fluorescence microscopy. The LNA containing probes display high binding affinity and specificity to DNA containing mutations, which allows for the detection of mutation abundance with an intercalating EvaGreen dye. We used a second probe, which increases the overall number of base...... pairs in order to produce a higher fluorescence signal by incorporating more dye molecules. Indeed we show here that using EvaGreen dye and LNA probes, genomic DNA containing BRAF V600E mutation could be detected by fluorescence microscopy at low femtomolar concentrations. Notably, this was at least...

  15. Electronic hybridization detection in microarray format and DNA genotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blin, Antoine; Cissé, Ismaïl; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    We describe an approach to substituting a fluorescence microarray with a surface made of an arrangement of electrolyte-gated field effect transistors. This was achieved using a dedicated blocking of non-specific interactions and comparing threshold voltage shifts of transistors exhibiting probe molecules of different base sequence. We apply the approach to detection of the 35delG mutation, which is related to non-syndromic deafness and is one of the most frequent mutations in humans. The process involves barcode sequences that are generated by Tas-PCR, a newly developed replication reaction using polymerase blocking. The barcodes are recognized by hybridization to surface attached probes and are directly detected by the semiconductor device. PMID:24569823

  16. Highly sensitive surface plasmon resonance biosensor for the detection of HIV-related DNA based on dynamic and structural DNA nanodevices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Wei; Tang, Min; Ding, Shijia; Li, Xinmin; Cheng, Wenbin; Mo, Fei; Yan, Xiaoyu; Ma, Hongmin; Yan, Yurong

    2018-02-15

    Early detection, diagnosis and treatment of human immune deficiency virus (HIV) infection is the key to reduce acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) mortality. In our research, an innovative surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing strategy has been developed for highly sensitive detection of HIV-related DNA based on entropy-driven strand displacement reactions (ESDRs) and double-layer DNA tetrahedrons (DDTs). ESDRs as enzyme-free and label-free signal amplification circuit can be specifically triggered by target DNA, leading to the cyclic utilization of target DNA and the formation of plentiful double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) products. Subsequently, the dsDNA products bind to the immobilized hairpin capture probes and further combine with DDTs nanostructures. Due to the high efficiency of ESDRs and large molecular weight of DDTs, the SPR response signal was enhanced dramatically. The proposed SPR biosensor could detect target DNA sensitively and specifically in a linear range from 1pM to 150nM with a detection limit of 48fM. In addition, the whole detecting process can be accomplished in 60min with high accuracy and duplicability. In particular, the developed SPR biosensor was successfully used to analyze target DNA in complex biological sample, indicating that the developed strategy is promising for rapid and early clinical diagnosis of HIV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Extraction and detection of baculoviral DNA from lake water, detritus and forest litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, L S; Trevors, J T; Holmes, S B

    2001-04-01

    This paper describes a quick, reproducible, sensitive method for baculoviral DNA extraction, purification and detection from freshwater and forest litter environments. The extraction protocol utilizes enzymatic and chemical lysis and physical disruption. To assess the efficiency of the extraction and purification protocol, PCR was used to detect a 530 bp DNA fragment from the genome of a genetically-modified baculovirus, Choristoneura fumiferana NPVegt-/lacZ+. The detection limit of PCR amplification was routinely about 4.1 x 102 occlusion bodies (OBs) 450 microl-1 lake water. Template DNA from the detritus and forest litter samples required 100-fold dilutions before use in PCR reactions. The detection limits for detritus and forest litter samples were routinely about 7.41 x 103 and 2.08 x 104 OBs 0.5 g-1 dry weight, respectively. The DNA extraction and purification methodology is reproducible, sensitive and can be used in lieu of, or in conjunction with, insect bioassays. The DNA extraction and purification protocol described in this paper will facilitate risk assessment and ecological studies of both wild-type and genetically-modified baculoviruses.

  18. AFFINITY BIOSENSOR BASED ON SCREEN-PRINTED ELECTRODE MODIFIED WITH DNA FOR GENOTOXIC COMPOUNDS DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Kuswandi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical method for the detection of the genotoxic compounds using a DNA-modified electrode was developed. This electrode was successfully used for the electrochemical detection of genotoxic compounds in water samples. The electrochemical results clearly demonstrated that, the development is related to the molecular interaction between the surface-linked DNA obtained from calf thymus and the target compounds, such as pollutants, in order to develop a simple device for rapid screening of genotoxic compounds in environmental samples. The detection of such compounds was measured by their effect on the oxidation signal of the guanine peak of the DNA immobilised on the surface of carbon based Screen-Printed Electrode (SPE in disposable mode, and monitored by square-wave voltametric analysis. The DNA biosensor is able to detect known intercalating and groove-binding genotoxic compounds such as Dioxin, Bisphenol A, PCBs, and Phtalates. Application to real water samples is discussed and reported.   Keywords: electrochemical, screen-printed electrode, DNA biosensor, genotoxic compounds

  19. DNA extraction methods for panbacterial and panfungal PCR detection in intraocular fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazoteras, Paloma; Bispo, Paulo José Martins; Höfling-Lima, Ana Luisa; Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P

    2015-07-01

    Three different methods of DNA extraction from intraocular fluids were compared with subsequent detection for bacterial and fungal DNA by universal PCR amplification. Three DNA extraction methods, from aqueous and vitreous humors, were evaluated to compare their relative efficiency. Bacterial (Gram positive and negative) and fungal strains were used in this study: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans. The quality, quantification, and detection limit for DNA extraction and PCR amplification were analyzed. Validation procedures for 13 aqueous humor and 14 vitreous samples, from 20 patients with clinically suspected endophthalmitis were carried out. The column-based extraction method was the most time-effective, achieving DNA detection limits ≥10(2) and 10(3 )CFU/100 µL for bacteria and fungi, respectively. PCR amplification detected 100 fg, 1 pg and 10 pg of genomic DNA of E. coli, S. epidermidis and C. albicans respectively. PCR detected 90.0% of the causative agents from 27 intraocular samples collected from 20 patients with clinically suspected endophthalmitis, while standard microbiological techniques could detect only 60.0%. The most frequently found organisms were Streptococcus spp. in 38.9% (n = 7) of patients and Staphylococcus spp. found in 22.2% (n = 4). The column-based extraction method for very small inocula in small volume samples (50-100 µL) of aqueous and/or vitreous humors allowed PCR amplification in all samples with sufficient quality for subsequent sequencing and identification of the microorganism in the majority of them.

  20. Thermodynamic framework to assess low abundance DNA mutation detection by hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Hanny; Jacobs, An; Hadiwikarta, Wahyu Wijaya; Venken, Tom; Valkenborg, Dirk; Van Roy, Nadine; Vandesompele, Jo; Hooyberghs, Jef

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of genomic DNA variations in patient samples has a high and increasing value for human diagnostics in its broadest sense. Although many methods and sensors to detect or quantify these variations are available or under development, the number of underlying physico-chemical detection principles is limited. One of these principles is the hybridization of sample target DNA versus nucleic acid probes. We introduce a novel thermodynamics approach and develop a framework to exploit the specific detection capabilities of nucleic acid hybridization, using generic principles applicable to any platform. As a case study, we detect point mutations in the KRAS oncogene on a microarray platform. For the given platform and hybridization conditions, we demonstrate the multiplex detection capability of hybridization and assess the detection limit using thermodynamic considerations; DNA containing point mutations in a background of wild type sequences can be identified down to at least 1% relative concentration. In order to show the clinical relevance, the detection capabilities are confirmed on challenging formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical tumor samples. This enzyme-free detection framework contains the accuracy and efficiency to screen for hundreds of mutations in a single run with many potential applications in molecular diagnostics and the field of personalised medicine. PMID:28542229

  1. Thermodynamic framework to assess low abundance DNA mutation detection by hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanny Willems

    Full Text Available The knowledge of genomic DNA variations in patient samples has a high and increasing value for human diagnostics in its broadest sense. Although many methods and sensors to detect or quantify these variations are available or under development, the number of underlying physico-chemical detection principles is limited. One of these principles is the hybridization of sample target DNA versus nucleic acid probes. We introduce a novel thermodynamics approach and develop a framework to exploit the specific detection capabilities of nucleic acid hybridization, using generic principles applicable to any platform. As a case study, we detect point mutations in the KRAS oncogene on a microarray platform. For the given platform and hybridization conditions, we demonstrate the multiplex detection capability of hybridization and assess the detection limit using thermodynamic considerations; DNA containing point mutations in a background of wild type sequences can be identified down to at least 1% relative concentration. In order to show the clinical relevance, the detection capabilities are confirmed on challenging formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical tumor samples. This enzyme-free detection framework contains the accuracy and efficiency to screen for hundreds of mutations in a single run with many potential applications in molecular diagnostics and the field of personalised medicine.

  2. Cloud-based MOTIFSIM: Detecting Similarity in Large DNA Motif Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2017-05-01

    We developed the cloud-based MOTIFSIM on Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud. The tool is an extended version from our web-based tool version 2.0, which was developed based on a novel algorithm for detecting similarity in multiple DNA motif data sets. This cloud-based version further allows researchers to exploit the computing resources available from AWS to detect similarity in multiple large-scale DNA motif data sets resulting from the next-generation sequencing technology. The tool is highly scalable with expandable AWS.

  3. Computational optimisation of targeted DNA sequencing for cancer detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Pierre; McGranahan, Nicholas; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent progress thanks to next-generation sequencing technologies, personalised cancer medicine is still hampered by intra-tumour heterogeneity and drug resistance. As most patients with advanced metastatic disease face poor survival, there is need to improve early diagnosis. Analysing...... detection. Dividing 4,467 samples into one discovery and two independent validation cohorts, we show that up to 76% of 10 cancer types harbour at least one mutation in a panel of only 25 genes, with high sensitivity across most tumour types. Our analyses demonstrate that targeting "hotspot" regions would...

  4. Attomolar detection of proteins via cascade strand-displacement amplification and polystyrene nanoparticle enhancement in fluorescence polarization aptasensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Liu, Xiaoqian; Huang, Huakui; Qin, Jian; Zhang, Liangliang; Zhao, Shulin; Chen, Zhen-Feng; Liang, Hong

    2015-08-18

    Extremely sensitive and accurate measurements of protein markers for early detection and monitoring of diseases pose a formidable challenge. Herein, we develop a new type of amplified fluorescence polarization (FP) aptasensor based on allostery-triggered cascade strand-displacement amplification (CSDA) and polystyrene nanoparticle (PS NP) enhancement for ultrasensitive detection of proteins. The assay system consists of a fluorescent dye-labeled aptamer hairpin probe and a PS NP-modified DNA duplex (assistant DNA/trigger DNA duplex) probe with a single-stranded part and DNA polymerase. Two probes coexist stably in the absence of target, and the dye exhibits relatively low FP background. Upon recognition and binding with a target protein, the stem of the aptamer hairpin probe is opened, after which the opened hairpin probe hybridizes with the single-stranded part in the PS NP-modified DNA duplex probe and triggers the CSDA reaction through the polymerase-catalyzed recycling of both target protein and trigger DNA. Throughout this CSDA process, numerous massive dyes are assembled onto PS NPs, which results in a substantial FP increase that provides a readout signal for the amplified sensing process. Our newly proposed amplified FP aptasensor enables the quantitative measurement of proteins with the detection limit in attomolar range, which is about 6 orders of magnitude lower than that of traditional homogeneous aptasensors. Moreover, this sensing method also exhibits high specificity for target proteins and can be performed in homogeneous solutions. In addition, the suitability of this method for the quantification of target protein in biological samples has also been shown. Considering these distinct advantages, the proposed sensing method can be expected to provide an ultrasensitive platform for the analysis of various types of target molecules.

  5. Detection of tyrosine hydroxylase in dopaminergic neuron cell using gold nanoparticles-based barcode DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jeung Hee; Oh, Byung-Keun; Choi, Jeong Woo

    2013-04-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme of catecholamine biosysthesis, is predominantly expressed in several cell groups within the brain, including the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. We evaluated the efficacy of this protein-detection method in detecting tyrosine hydroxylase in normal and oxidative stress damaged dopaminergic cells. In this study, a coupling of DNA barcode and bead-based immnunoassay for detecting tyrosine hydroxylaser with PCR-like sensitivity is reported. The method relies on magnetic nanoparticles with antibodies and nanoparticles that are encoded with DNA and antibodies that can sandwich the target protein captured by the nanoparticle-bound antibodies. The aggregate sandwich structures are magnetically separated from solution, and treated to remove the conjugated barcode DNA. The DNA barcodes were identified by PCR analysis. The concentration of tyrosine hydroxylase in dopaminergic cell can be easily and rapidly detected using bio-barcode assay. The bio-barcode assay is a rapid and high-throughput screening tool to detect of neurotransmitter such as dopamine.

  6. Detection of Candida albicans DNA from blood samples using a novel electrochemical assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Alastair; Forrest, Gordon; Clarkson, John; Wheals, Alan

    2011-04-01

    The genus Candida contains a number of yeast species which are opportunistic pathogens and are associated with life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals. Provision of appropriate therapy relies on the rapid identification of the infecting species, and existing methods of identifying Candida species in clinical samples are time and resource intensive and are not always specific enough to differentiate between drug-susceptible and drug-resistant species. We have previously developed a system for the rapid detection of yeast pathogens in clinical samples using PCR followed by hybridization with a suite of five species-specific, electrochemically labelled DNA probes. The limit of detection of the assay was shown to be 37 fg (∼1 genome) per reaction using extracted genomic DNA. We carried out a study to test the limit of detection of one of the probes, CA PR3, using blood samples from a healthy donor that were spiked with genomic DNA or with C. albicans cells. Our results demonstrated a limit of detection of 37 fg (ml blood)(-1) (∼1 genome ml(-1)) using extracted DNA or 10 c.f.u. (ml blood)(-1) using C. albicans cells, indicating that the assay is capable of detecting C. albicans nucleic acid at levels that are encountered in clinical samples.

  7. Environmental DNA detection of rare and invasive fish species in two Great Lakes tributaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasingham, Katherine D; Walter, Ryan P; Mandrak, Nicholas E; Heath, Daniel D

    2018-01-01

    The extraction and characterization of DNA from aquatic environmental samples offers an alternative, noninvasive approach for the detection of rare species. Environmental DNA, coupled with PCR and next-generation sequencing ("metabarcoding"), has proven to be very sensitive for the detection of rare aquatic species. Our study used a custom-designed group-specific primer set and next-generation sequencing for the detection of three species at risk (Eastern Sand Darter, Ammocrypta pellucida; Northern Madtom, Noturus stigmosus; and Silver Shiner, Notropis photogenis), one invasive species (Round Goby, Neogobius melanostomus) and an additional 78 native species from two large Great Lakes tributary rivers in southern Ontario, Canada: the Grand River and the Sydenham River. Of 82 fish species detected in both rivers using capture-based and eDNA methods, our eDNA method detected 86.2% and 72.0% of the fish species in the Grand River and the Sydenham River, respectively, which included our four target species. Our analyses also identified significant positive and negative species co-occurrence patterns between our target species and other identified species. Our results demonstrate that eDNA metabarcoding that targets the fish community as well as individual species of interest provides a better understanding of factors affecting the target species spatial distribution in an ecosystem than possible with only target species data. Additionally, eDNA is easily implemented as an initial survey tool, or alongside capture-based methods, for improved mapping of species distribution patterns. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. PIK3CA mutation detection in metastatic biliary cancer using cell-free DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Tae; Lira, Maruja; Deng, Shibing; Lee, Sujin; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Mao, Mao; Heo, Jin Seok; Kwon, Wooil; Jang, Kee-Taek; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Joon Oh

    2015-11-24

    PIK3CA mutation is considered a good candidate for targeted therapies in cancers, especially biliary tract cancer (BTC). We evaluated the utility of cell free DNA (cfDNA) from serum by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) as an alternative source for PIK3CA mutation analysis. To identify matching archival tumour specimens from serum samples of advanced BTC patients, mutation detection using ddPCR with Bio-Rad's PrimePCR mutation and wild type assays were performed for PIK3CA p.E542K, p.E545K, and p.H1047R. Thirty-eight patients with metastatic BTC were enrolled. Only one (BTC 29T) sample (n = 38) was positive for PIK3CA p.E542K and another (BTC 27T) for p.H1047R mutation; none was positive for PIK3CA p.E545K. Matched serum sample (BTC 29P) was positive for PIK3CA p.E542K with 28 mutant copies detected, corresponding to 48 copies/ml of serum and an allelic prevalence of 0.3%. Another matched serum sample (BTC 27P) was positive for PIK3CA p.H1047R with 10 mutant copies detected, i.e. 18 copies/ml and an allelic frequency of 0.2%. High correlation was noted in the PIK3CA mutation status between tumour gDNA and serum cfDNA. Low-level PIK3CA mutations were detectable in the serum indicating the utility of cfDNA as a DNA source to detect cancer-derived mutations in metastatic biliary cancers.

  9. Subfemtomolar electrochemical detection of target DNA by catalytic enlargement of the hybridized gold nanoparticle labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelet-Dequaire, Murielle; Limoges, Benoît; Brossier, Pierre

    2006-08-01

    After showing the failure of conventional gold-enhancement procedures to amplify the gold nanoparticle-based electrochemical transduction of DNA hybridization in polystyrene microwells, a new efficient protocol was developed and evaluated for the sensitive quantification of a 35 base-pair human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid target (tDNA). In this assay, the hybridization of the target adsorbed on the bottom of microwells with an oligonucleotide-modified Au nanoparticle detection probe (pDNA-Au) was monitored by the anodic stripping detection of the chemically oxidized gold label at a screen-printed microband electrode (SPMBE). Thanks to the combination of the sensitive Au(III) determination at a SPMBE with the large amount of Au(III) released from each pDNA-Au, picomolar detection limits of tDNA can be achieved. Further enhancement of the hybridization signal based on the autocatalytic reductive deposition of ionic gold (Au(III)) on the surface of the gold nanoparticle labels anchored on the hybrids was first envisaged by incubating the commonly used mixture of Au(III) and hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH). However, due to a considerable nonspecific current response of poor reproducibility it was not possible to significantly improve the analytical performances of the method under these conditions. Complementary transmission electronic microscopy experiments indicated the loss of most of the grown gold labels during the post-enlargement rinsing step. To circumvent this drawback, a polymeric solute containing polyethyleneglycol and sodium chloride was introduced in the growth media to act as an aggregating agent during the catalytic process and thus retain the enlarged labels on the bottom of the microwell. This strategy, which led to an efficient increase of the hybridization response, allowed detection of tDNA concentrations as low as 600 aM (i.e., 10(4) lower than without amplification), and thus offers great promise for ultrasensitive detection of other hybridization

  10. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Xing, Na; Wang, Zengguo; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Du, Qian; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR) that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus) and PCV2 (DNA virus) from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29%) and TGEV (11.7%) preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility.

  11. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Huang

    Full Text Available Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus and PCV2 (DNA virus from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29% and TGEV (11.7% preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility.

  12. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zengguo; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Du, Qian; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR) that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus) and PCV2 (DNA virus) from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29%) and TGEV (11.7%) preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility. PMID:26544710

  13. Evaluation of Global Genomic DNA Methylation in Human Whole Blood by Capillary Electrophoresis UV Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Zinellu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in global DNA methylation are implicated in various pathophysiological processes. The development of simple and quick, yet robust, methods to assess DNA methylation is required to facilitate its measurement and interpretation in clinical practice. We describe a highly sensitive and reproducible capillary electrophoresis method with UV detection for the separation and detection of cytosine and methylcytosine, after formic acid hydrolysis of DNA extracted from human whole blood. Hydrolysed samples were dried and resuspended with water and directly injected into the capillary without sample derivatization procedures. The use of a run buffer containing 50 mmol/L BIS-TRIS propane (BTP phosphate buffer at pH 3.25 and 60 mmol/L sodium acetate buffer at pH 3.60 (4 : 1, v/v allowed full analyte identification within 11 min. Precision tests indicated an elevated reproducibility with an interassay CV of 1.98% when starting from 2 μg of the extracted DNA. The method was successfully tested by measuring the DNA methylation degree both in healthy volunteers and in reference calf thymus DNA.

  14. Detection of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus DNA in Serum Samples of Healthy Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Mazzoni

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV has been detected in 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCC. In the host, the MCPyV reservoir remains elusive. MCPyV DNA sequences were revealed in blood donor buffy coats. In this study, MCPyV DNA sequences were investigated in the sera (n = 190 of healthy blood donors. Two MCPyV DNA sequences, coding for the viral oncoprotein large T antigen (LT, were investigated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR methods and DNA sequencing. Circulating MCPyV sequences were detected in sera with a prevalence of 2.6% (5/190, at low-DNA viral load, which is in the range of 1–4 and 1–5 copies/μl by real-time PCR and droplet digital PCR, respectively. DNA sequencing carried out in the five MCPyV-positive samples indicated that the two MCPyV LT sequences which were analyzed belong to the MKL-1 strain. Circulating MCPyV LT sequences are present in blood donor sera. MCPyV-positive samples from blood donors could represent a potential vehicle for MCPyV infection in receivers, whereas an increase in viral load may occur with multiple blood transfusions. In certain patient conditions, such as immune-depression/suppression, additional disease or old age, transfusion of MCPyV-positive samples could be an additional risk factor for MCC onset.

  15. [Detection of borrelia DNA from patients with neuroborreliosis and erythema migrans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravcová, Lenka; Pícha, Dusan; Vanousová, Daniela; Hercogová, Jana

    2009-10-01

    Assessment of PCR procedure for proving of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato DNA in nerve and skin forms of Lyme borreliosis. DNA from plasma, urine and CSF was isolated by QIAamp DNA mini kit. PCR was designed as two-step amplification (nested-PCR). Each sample was tested in PCR for five target sequences: two were specific for plasmide genes encoding OspA and OspC proteins and three correlated with genes for 16SrDNA, flagellin and p66 protein. Borrelial DNA was proved in 41 patients suffering from neuroborreliosis out of 56 (77.4 %), among 48 patients with erythema migrans (EM) were found 26 positive (54.2 %). After treatment the specific DNA was detected in 22 patients with neuroborreliosis (41.5 %) and 16 patients with EM (38.1 %). Three months after the treatment 23 patients were positive in both of groups (28.7 %) and next 3 months later the specific DNA was found in 6 (9.5 %). The highest rate of positive results was manifested by 16SrDNA target, lower and comparable results were obtained by OspA, C and flagellin primers, the lowest rate was in p66 system. The tested PCR proved specific DNA in all tested biological fluids in both of the clinical forms of Lyme borreliosis with a relatively high sensitivity. The proving of DNA can not be used for the assessment of the effect of treatment due to the long persistence of PCR positivity after antibiotic treatment. To achieve a sufficient diagnostic sensitivity of PCR it is desirable to use minimally two amplification systems in parallel.

  16. Preparation of genosensor for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honorato Castro, Ana C.; França, Erick G. [Institute of Genetics and Biochemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil); Paula, Lucas F. de [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil); Soares, Marcia M.C.N. [Adolfo Lutz Institute, Regional Laboratory in São José do Rio Preto (Brazil); Goulart, Luiz R. [Institute of Genetics and Biochemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil); Madurro, João M. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil); Brito-Madurro, Ana G., E-mail: agbrito@iqufu.ufu.br [Institute of Genetics and Biochemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil)

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Specific oligonucleotide detection for hepatitis B based on poly-4-aminophenol matrix. • Electrochemical detection of the gene specific using ethidium bromide as indicator. • The detection limit was 2.61 nmol L{sup −1}, with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 (n = 3). • The system discriminates three-base mismatches and non-complementary target. - Abstract: An electrochemical genosensor was constructed for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus, based on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-aminophenol) and incorporating a specific oligonucleotide probe. The modified electrode containing the probe was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry, before and after incubation with the complementary oligonucleotide target. Detection was performed by monitoring oxidizable DNA bases (direct detection) or using ethidium bromide as indicator of the hybridization process (indirect detection). The device showed a detection limit for the oligonucleotide target of 2.61 nmol L{sup −1}. Indirect detection using ethidium bromide was promising in discriminating mismatches, which is a very desirable attribute for detection of disease-related point mutations. In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

  17. One-pot synthesis of strongly fluorescent DNA-CuInS2 quantum dots for label-free and ultrasensitive detection of anthrax lethal factor DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ziping; Su, Xingguang

    2016-01-01

    Herein, high quality DNA-CuInS 2 QDs are facilely synthesized through a one-pot hydrothermal method with fluorescence quantum yield as high as 23.4%, and the strongly fluorescent DNA-CuInS 2 QDs have been utilized as a novel fluorescent biosensor for label-free and ultrasensitive detection of anthrax lethal factor DNA. L-Cysteine (L-Cys) and a specific-sequence DNA are used as co-ligands to stabilize the CuInS 2 QDs. The specific-sequence DNA consists of two domains: phosphorothiolates domain (sulfur-containing variants of the usual phosphodiester backbone) controls the nanocrystal passivation and serves as a ligand, and the functional domain (non-phosphorothioates) controls the biorecognition. The as-prepared DNA-CuInS 2 QDs have high stability, good water-solubility and low toxicity. Under the optimized conditions, a linear correlation was established between the fluorescence intensity ratio I/I 0 (I 0 is the original fluorescence intensity of DNA-CuInS 2 QDs, and I is the fluorescence intensity of DNA-CuInS 2 QDs/GO with the addition of various concentrations of anthrax lethal factor DNA) and the concentration of anthrax lethal factor DNA in the range of 0.029–0.733 nmol L −1 with a detection limit of 0.013 nmol L −1 . The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of anthrax lethal factor DNA sequence in human serum samples with satisfactory results. Because of low toxicity and fine biocompatibility, DNA-CuInS 2 QDs also hold potential applications in bioimaging. - Highlights: • Strongly fluorescent DNA-QDs were successfully prepared by a one-pot hydrothermal method with quantum yield up to 23.4%. • A biosensor for label-free detection of anthrax lethal factor DNA was established based on the as-prepared DNA-QDs. • The DNA sensor took advantage of the feature that ssDNA binds to GO with significantly higher affinity than dsDNA. • Good sensitivity and selectivity were obtained. • This method was utilized to detect

  18. Detecting the somatic mutations spectrum of Chinese lung cancer by analyzing the whole mitochondrial DNA genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu; Huang, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Jun; Qiao, Fei; Chen, Hua-Mei; Hong, Zhi-Peng

    2015-02-01

    To detect the somatic mutations and character its spectrum in Chinese lung cancer patients. In this study, we sequenced the whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes for 10 lung cancer patients including the primary cancerous, matched paracancerous normal and distant normal tissues. By analyzing the 30 whole mtDNA genomes, eight somatic mutations were identified from five patients investigated, which were confirmed with the cloning and sequencing of the somatic mutations. Five of the somatic mutations were detected among control region and the rests were found at the coding region. Heterogeneity was the main character of the somatic mutations in Chinese lung cancer patients. Further potential disease-related screening showed that, except the C deletion at position 309 showed AD-weakly associated, most of them were not disease-related. Although the role of aforementioned somatic mutations was unknown, however, considering the relative higher frequency of somatic mutations among the whole mtDNA genomes, it hints that detecting the somatic mutation(s) from the whole mtDNA genomes can serve as a useful tool for the Chinese lung cancer diagnostic to some extent.

  19. Hybrid detection of target sequence DNA based on phosphorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yanming; Lv, Jinzhi; Yan, Guiqin

    2017-08-15

    The severe background fluorescence and scattering light of real biological samples or environmental samples largely reduce the sensitivity and accuracy of fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors based on fluorescent quantum dots (QDs). To solve this problem, we designed a novel target sequence DNA biosensor based on phosphorescent resonance energy transfer (PRET). This sensor relied on Mn-doped ZnS (Mn-ZnS) room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) QDs/poly-(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) nanocomposite (QDs + ) as the energy donor and the single-strand DNA-ROX as the energy receptor. Thereby, an RTP biosensor was built and used to quantitatively detect target sequence DNA. This biosensor had a detection limit of 0.16nM and a linear range of 0.5-20nM for target sequence DNA. The dependence on RTP of QDs effectively avoided the interference from background fluorescence and scattering light in biological samples. Moreover, this sensor did not need sample pretreatment. Thus, this sensor compared with FRET is more feasible for quantitative detection of target sequence DNA in biological samples. Interestingly, the QDs + nanocomposite prolonged the phosphorescence lifetime of Mn-ZnS QDs by 2.6 times to 4.94ms, which was 5-6 magnitude-order larger than that of fluorescent QDs. Thus, this sensor largely improves the optical properties of QDs and permits chemical reactions at a long enough time scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA of Dientamoeba fragilis detected within surface-sterilized eggs of Enterobius vermicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röser, Dennis; Nejsum, Peter; Carlsgart, Anne Josefine; Nielsen, Henrik Vedel; Stensvold, Christen Rune

    2013-01-01

    With no evidence of a cyst stage, the mode of transmission of Dientamoeba fragilis, an intestinal protozoon of common occurrence and suggested pathogenicity, is incompletely known. Numerous studies have suggested that eggs of intestinal nematodes, primarily Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm), can serve as vectors for D. fragilis, although attempts to culture D. fragilis from pinworm eggs have been unsuccessful and data from epidemiological studies on D. fragilis/pinworm co-infection have been conflicting. The aim of this study was to investigate whether we could detect D. fragilis DNA from pinworm eggs collected from routine diagnostic samples (cellophane tape) and surface-sterilised by hypochlorite. DNA was extracted from individual eggs and tested by PCR using D. fragilis- and E. vermicularis-specific primers; amplicons were sequenced for confirmation. In cellophane tape samples from 64 patients with unknown D. fragilis status we detected D. fragilis DNA in 12/238 (5%) eggs, and in a patient known to harbour D. fragilis we detected D. fragilis DNA in 39/99 (39%) eggs. The finding of D. fragilis DNA within eggs of E. vermicularis strongly supports the hypothesis of D. fragilis-transmission by pinworm and has implications for antimicrobial intervention as well as control and public health measures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of anthrax lef with DNA-based photonic crystal sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bailin; Dallo, Shatha; Peterson, Ralph; Hussain, Syed; Weitao, Tao; Ye, Jing Yong

    2011-12-01

    Bacillus anthracis has posed a threat of becoming biological weapons of mass destruction due to its virulence factors encoded by the plasmid-borne genes, such as lef for lethal factor. We report the development of a fast and sensitive anthrax DNA biosensor based on a photonic crystal structure used in a total-internal-reflection configuration. For the detection of the lef gene, a single-stranded DNA lef probe was biotinylated and immobilized onto the sensor via biotin-streptavidin interactions. A positive control, lef-com, was the complementary strand of the probe, while a negative control was an unrelated single-stranded DNA fragment from the 16S rRNA gene of Acinetobacter baumannii. After addition of the biotinylated lef probe onto the sensor, significant changes in the resonance wavelength of the sensor were observed, resulting from binding of the probe to streptavidin on the sensor. The addition of lef-com led to another significant increase as a result of hybridization between the two DNA strands. The detection sensitivity for the target DNA reached as low as 0.1 nM. In contrast, adding the unrelated DNAs did not cause an obvious shift in the resonant wavelength. These results demonstrate that detection of the anthrax lef by the photonic crystal structure in a total-internal-reflection sensor is highly specific and sensitive.

  2. A simple DNA coprecipitation method for the detection of diatoms in heart blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yasuhisa; Sato, Shingo; Kuroki, Kohji; Kishida, Tetsuko

    2013-10-10

    We developed a method for detecting and enumerating diatoms in the heart blood of drowning victims and evaluate its utility for diagnosing death by drowning. For purification of diatoms from blood, the DNA binding ability of the diatom frustule in the presence of a chaotropic agent was utilized. The procedure is basically the same as the commonly used method for DNA purification from blood using Proteinase K treatment and denaturation by a chaotropic agent. DNA adsorbed to the diatom (DNA/diatom complex) is recovered by ethanol precipitation, and the DNA is subsequently digested using DNase. Purified diatoms could be clearly observed under a microscope. Diatoms spiked in the blood of non-drowned cadavers (n=15) were well recovered, and were detected in heart blood from all drowning victims (n=22). The mean number of diatoms found in 5 ml of blood from drowning victims was 7.8±5.8 (mean±SD), and the number of diatoms detected in the blood of the left ventricle (6.1±5.8) was approximately two times higher than that of the right ventricle (3.0±2.7, p<0.05). These results suggest that this simple and safe method can become an effective tool for diagnosing the cause of death as drowning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent advances in DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for heavy metal ion detection: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidur, M R; Aziz, A R Abdul; Basirun, W J

    2017-04-15

    The presence of heavy metal in food chains due to the rapid industrialization poses a serious threat on the environment. Therefore, detection and monitoring of heavy metals contamination are gaining more attention nowadays. However, the current analytical methods (based on spectroscopy) for the detection of heavy metal contamination are often very expensive, tedious and can only be handled by trained personnel. DNA biosensors, which are based on electrochemical transduction, is a sensitive but inexpensive method of detection. The principles, sensitivity, selectivity and challenges of electrochemical biosensors are discussed in this review. This review also highlights the major advances of DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for the detection of heavy metal ions such as Hg 2+ , Ag + , Cu 2+ and Pb 2+ . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of copy number alterations in cell-free tumor DNA from plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østrup, Olga; Ahlborn, Lise Barlebo; Lassen, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    purposes, however specify and reliability of methods have to be tested. METHODS: SNP microarrays (Affymetrix) were used to generate whole-genome copy number profiles from plasma ccfDNA (OncoScan) and paired tumor biopsies (CytoScan) from ten patients with metastatic cancers. Numerical, segmental and focal......BACKGROUND: Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) occurring in tumors can provide information about tumor classification, patient's outcome or treatment targets. Liquid biopsies, incl. plasma samples containing circulating cell-free tumor DNA (ccfDNA) can be used to assess SCNAs for clinical...... of SCNAs changes during the treatment course of one patient also indicated that apoptosis/necrosis of non-cancerous cells presumably induced by treatment can influence ccfDNA composition and introduce false-negative findings into the analysis of liquid biopsies. CONCLUSIONS: Genomic alterations detected...

  5. Circulating free DNA as biomarker and source for mutation detection in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund

    2015-01-01

    this with four cohorts of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. We also investigated the prognostic value of cfDNA and analysed the tumour-specific KRAS mutations in the plasma. METHODS: The study was a prospective biomarker evaluation in four consecutive Phase II trials, including 229 patients.......6-5.9) months, respectively, HR 1.78, p = 0.0006). Multivariate analysis confirmed an independent prognostic value of cfDNA (HR 1.5 (95% CI 1.3-1.7) for each increase in the cfDNA quartile). The overall concordance of KRAS mutations in plasma and tissue was high (85%). CONCLUSIONS: These data confirm...... the prognostic value of cfDNA measurement in plasma and utility for mutation detection with the method presented....

  6. Mutations in DNA polymerase eta are not detected in squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Eitan; White, Lisa M; Elliott, Nathan A; Berg, Daniel; Kiviat, Nancy B; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2006-11-01

    The major etiological agent in skin cancer is exposure to UV-irradiation and the concomitant DNA damage. UV-induced DNA lesions, such as thymine dimers, block DNA synthesis by the major DNA polymerases and inhibit the progression of DNA replication. Bypass of thymine dimers and related lesions is dependent on the translesion polymerase DNA polymerase eta (Poleta). In the inherited disorder, xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV), inactivation of Poleta results in extreme sensitivity to UV light and a marked increase in the incidence of skin cancer. Here, we tested the hypothesis that somatic mutations and/or polymorphisms in the POLH gene that encodes Poleta are associated with the induction of UV-dependent skin cancers. We sequenced the exonic regions of the Poleta open reading frame in DNA from 17 paired samples of squamous cell skin carcinoma and adjacent histologically normal tissue. We analyzed approximately 120,000 nucleotides and detected no mutations in POLH in the tumors. However, we identified 6 different single-nucleotide polymorphisms, 3 of them previously undocumented, which were present in both the tumor and paired normal tissue. We conclude that neither mutations nor polymorphisms in the coding regions of POLH are required for the generation of human skin squamous cell carcinoma.

  7. Nanoparticle-based DNA biosensor for visual detection of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogianni, Despina P; Koraki, Theodora; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Ioannou, Penelope C

    2006-01-15

    Although screening of raw ingredients and food products for genetically modified organisms (GMO) may be accomplished by detecting either the exogenous DNA or the novel protein, DNA is the preferred analyte because of its superior stability during food processing. The development of DNA biosensors is of increasing importance due to the growing demand for rapid and reliable methods for GMO detection. We report the first DNA biosensor in a dry-reagent dipstick configuration for visual detection and confirmation of GMO-related sequences by hybridization within minutes. The sensor is disposable and does not require special instrumentation. It detects the 35S promoter and nopaline synthase (NOS) terminator sequences that are present in the majority of transgenic plants. The target sequences are amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and hybridized (7min) with probes bearing oligo(dA) tail. The biotinylated product is applied to the sensor followed by immersion in the appropriate buffer. Migration of the buffer rehydrates gold nanoparticles conjugated to oligo(dT), which hybridize with the oligo(dA) tails. The hybrids are captured by immobilized streptavidin at the test zone of the sensor giving a characteristic red line due to the accumulation of the nanoparticles. The excess of nanoparticle conjugates are captured at the control zone by immobilized oligo(dA) strands. Amplified 35S or NOS DNA is detectable at 0.16nM. Soybean powder certified reference material with 0.1% GMO content is clearly detectable after 35 and 40 amplification cycles for 35S and NOS sequence, respectively. The sensor was also applied to real samples from various sources.

  8. Immunological detection and quantification of DNA components structurally modified by alkylating carcinogens, mutagens and chemotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajewsky, M.F.

    1983-01-01

    The detection and quantification of defined reaction products of chemical mutagens and carcinogens (and of many cancer chemotherapeutic agents) with DNA require highly sensitive analytical techniques. The exceptional capability of immunoglobulins to recognize subtle alterations of molecular structure (especially when monoclonal antibodies are used to maximize specificity), outstanding sensitivity of immunoanalysis by high-affinity antibodies, and the fact that radioactively-labelled agents are not required suggest the utility of a radioimmunoassay to recognize and quantitate alkylated DNA products. We have recently developed a set of high-affinity monoclonal antibodies (secreted by mouse x mouse as well as by rat x rat hybridomas; antibody affinity constants, 10 9 to > 10 10 lmol) specifically directed against several DNA alkylation products with possible relevance in relation to both mutagenesis and malignant transformation of mammalian cells. These alkylation products include 0 6 -N-butyldeoxyguanosine, and 0 4 -ethyldeoxythymidine. When used in a radioimmunassay, an antibody specific for 0 6 -ethyldeoxyguanosine, for example, will detect this product at an 0 6 -ethyldeoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine molar ratio of approx. 3 x 10 -7 in a hydrolysate of 100 ug of DNA. The limit of detection can be lowered further if the respective alkyldeoxynucleosides are separated by HPLC from the DNA hydrolysate prior to the RIA. The anti-alkyldeoxynucleoside monoclonal antibodies can also be used to visualize, by immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy combined with electronic image intensification, specific alkylation products in the nuclear DNA of individual cells, and to localize structurally modified bases in double-stranded DNA molecules by transmission electron microscopy

  9. Detection of Adulteration in Italian Mozzarella Cheese Using Mitochondrial DNA Templates as Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bonizzi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of monitoring adulterations of genuine cheeses in the dairy industry, a polymerase chain reaction–based method was developed to detect bovine- specific mitochondrial DNA sequence in Italian water buffalo Mozzarella cheese. DNA was isolated from cheese matrix and governing liquid by organic extractions and kit purifications. Amplifications of a 134-bp fragment were performed with a bovine–specific set of primers designed on the sequence alignment of bovine and buffalo mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I. The specificity of the primers was tested using DNA from the blood of two species (water buffalo and bovine, which are present together in adulterated Italian Mozzarella cheese. This method reliably detected a content of 0.5 % of bovin milk, making it suitable for routine fraud monitoring.

  10. Multi-scale magnetic nanoparticle based optomagnetic bioassay for sensitive DNA and bacteria detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Bo; Zardán Gómez De La Torre, Teresa; Donolato, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Benefiting from their rapid readout, highly flexible devices and low-cost portable systems, optomagnetic biosensors have drawn increased attention in recent years as bioassay technologies for small molecules, biomarkers, DNA, and bacteria. Herein, an optomagnetic bioassay strategy suitable...... for point-of-care diagnostics, utilizing functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (100 nm) with Brownian relaxation behavior is optimized in order to obtain higher detection sensitivity for DNA molecules and bacteria. Presence of target DNA sequences or bacteria changes the dynamic behavior of the magnetic...... nanoparticles (binding to the target) and thus the optomagnetic response of the sample, which is measured by an optomagnetic setup including a 405 nm laser and a photodetector. The limit of detection is mainly set by the lowest measurable concentration of magnetic nanoparticles. Herein, as new results compared...

  11. Development of SCAR Markers for the DNA-Based Detection of the Asian Long-Horned Beetle; Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodar R. Kethidi; David B. Roden; Tim R. Ladd; Peter J. Krell; Arthur Ratnakaran; Qili Feng

    2003-01-01

    DNA markers were identified for the molecular detection of the Asian long-horned beetle (ALB), Anoplophora glabripennis (Mot.), based on sequence charaterized amplified regions (SCARS) derived from random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fragments. A 2,740-bp DNA fragment that was present only in ALB and not in other Cerambycids was identified after...

  12. Detection of multiple viral DNA species in synovial tissue and fluid of patients with early arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stahl, H. D.; Hubner, B.; Seidl, B.; Liebert, U. G.; van der Heijden, I. M.; Wilbrink, B.; Kraan, M. C.; Emmrich, F.; Tak, P. P.

    2000-01-01

    Viruses have a role in the pathogenesis of various forms of arthritis. This study aimed at determining whether viral DNA can be detected in joint samples in the early stages of idiopathic arthritides. Synovial fluid (SF) and synovial tissue (ST) samples were obtained from 73 patients, with

  13. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) shield for Arduino DNA detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velders, Aldrik H.; Schoen, Cor; Saggiomo, Vittorio

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of DNA is gaining relevance as a method to detect nucleic acids, as it is easier, faster, and more powerful than conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction. However, LAMP is still mostly used in laboratory settings, because of the lack of a cheap

  14. DNA, Drugs, and Detectives: An Interdisciplinary Special Topics Course for Undergraduate Students in Forensic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coticone, Sulekha Rao; Van Houten, Lora Bailey

    2015-01-01

    A special topics course combining two relevant and contemporary themes (forensic DNA analysis and illicit drug detection) was developed to stimulate student enthusiasm and enhance understanding of forensic science. Building on the interest of popular television shows such as "CSI" and "Breaking Bad," this course connects…

  15. Gold Nanoparticles-Coated SU-8 for Sensitive Fluorescence-Based Detections of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Cuong; Birtwell, Sam W.; Høgberg, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    that use fluorescence as the predominant detection workhorse. Here, we show that deposition of a thin gold nanoparticles layer onto the SU-8 surface significantly reduces the autofluorescence of the coated SU-8 surface by as much as 81% compared to bare SU-8. Furthermore, DNA probes can easily...

  16. Early detection of non-native fishes using next-generation DNA sequencing of fish larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to evaluate the use of fish larvae for early detection of non-native fishes, comparing traditional and molecular taxonomy based on next-generation DNA sequencing to investigate potential efficiencies. Our approach was to intensively sample a Great Lakes non-nati...

  17. Colorectal cancer detection by measuring DNA from exfoliated colonocytes obtained by direct contact with rectal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktionov, Alexandre; Bandaletova, Tatiana; Llewelyn, Andrew H; Dion, Carine; Lywood, Hugo G G; Lywood, Rupert C G; Rockall, Tim A; Stebbing, John F; Broughton, Mary; Caffarey, Sue; Marks, Christopher G

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the potential of direct exfoliated colonocyte collection from human rectal mucosa for colorectal cancer screening. A special device was designed for standardized collection of exfoliated cells from the surface of human rectal mucosa. Material was collected from 120 outpatients selected for colonoscopy and 36 patients with confirmed diagnosis of colorectal cancer or large polyps. Determination of total DNA amounts in the collected samples (DNA scores) by PicoGreen assay and real-time PCR was employed alongside cytological assessment. Well preserved cells with cytological patterns characteristic for different colorectal conditions (cancer, inflammatory bowel disease) were detected in the collected material. In the outpatient group DNA scores were higher in patients with cancer and inflammatory bowel disease compared to those with no abnormalities detected, diverticular disease and small polyps (Pcut-off point 3.0 microg/ml) for detecting serious colorectal conditions were 1.00 and 0.74, respectively. In the group with confirmed tumours, the PicoGreen assay performed better for distal colorectal cancer (sensitivity 0.83; specificity 0.76) compared with proximal colon malignancies (sensitivity 0.57; specificity 0.76). It can be concluded that the proposed technique of direct collection of exfoliated cells from the surface of human rectal mucosa provides abundant cellular material suitable for diagnostic and research applications. Further refinement of the quantitative DNA test may lead to a new approach for colorectal cancer early detection and screening.

  18. Detection of reverse transcriptase termination sites using cDNA ligation and massive parallel sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielpinski, Lukasz J; Boyd, Mette; Sandelin, Albin

    2013-01-01

    of these methods can be increased by applying massive parallel sequencing technologies.Here, we describe a versatile method for detection of reverse transcriptase termination sites based on ligation of an adapter to the 3' end of cDNA with bacteriophage TS2126 RNA ligase (CircLigase™). In the following PCR...

  19. Solid-state devices for detection of DNA, protein biomarkers and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Waseem

    Nanobiotechnology and BioMEMS have had tremendous impact on biosensing in the areas of cancer cell detection and therapeutics, disease diagnostics, proteomics and DNA analysis. Diseases are expressed on all levels including DNA, protein, cell and tissue. Therefore it is very critical to develop biosensors at each level. The power of the nanotechnology lies in the fact that we can fabricate devices on all scales from micro to nano. This dissertation focuses on four areas: 1) Development of nanopore sensors for DNA analysis; 2) Development of micropore sensors for early detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood; 3) Synthesis of nano-textured substrates for cancer isolation and tissue culture applications; 4) Fabrication of nanoscale break-junctions. All of these sensors are fabricated using standard silicon processing techniques. Pulsed plasma polymer deposition is also utilized to control the density of the biosensor surface charges. These devices are then used for efficient detection of DNA, proteins and cells, and can be potentially used in point-of-care systems. Overall, our designed biosensing platforms offer improved selectivity, yield and reliability. Novel approaches to nanopore shrinking are simple, reliable and do not change the material composition around the pore boundary. The micropores provide a direct interface to distinguish CTCs from normal cell without requiring fluorescent dyes and surface functionalization. Nano-textured surfaces and break-junctions can be used for enhanced adhesion of cells and selective detection of proteins respectively.

  20. A neocentromere on human chromosome 3 without detectable alpha-satellite DNA forms morphologically normal kinetochores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, A; Tranebjaerg, L; Tommerup, Niels

    1998-01-01

    A neocentromere at 3q26 was observed in a father and his daughter on a chromosome 3 with deleted centromeric region. No alpha-satellite DNA was detectable at the 3q26 neocentromere, but it was weakly positive with anticentromere (CREST) antibodies. Electron microscopy showed that the neocentromere...

  1. Ternary monolayers as DNA recognition interfaces for direct and sensitive electrochemical detection in untreated clinical samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Campuzano, S.; Kuralay, F.; Lobo-Castanón, M.J.; Bartošík, Martin; Vyavahare, K.; Paleček, Emil; Haake, D.A.; Wang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 8 (2011), s. 3577-3583 ISSN 0956-5663 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME09038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : electrochemical detection * DNA hybridization * self-assembled monolayer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.602, year: 2011

  2. Detection of Orientia sp. DNA in rodents from Asia, West Africa and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosson, Jean François; Galan, Maxime; Bard, Emilie; Razzauti, Maria; Bernard, Maria; Morand, Serge; Brouat, Carine; Dalecky, Ambroise; Bâ, Khalilou; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel

    2015-03-21

    Orientia bacterium is the agent of the scrub typhus, a seriously neglected life-threatening disease in Asia. Here, we report the detection of DNA of Orientia in rodents from Europe and Africa. These findings have important implications for public health. Surveillance outside Asia, where the disease is not expected by sanitary services, needs to be improved.

  3. DNA Detection by Flow Cytometry using PNA‐Modified Metal–Organic Framework Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mejia-Ariza, Raquel; Rosselli, Jessica; Breukers, Christian; Manicardi, Alex; Terstappen, Leon; Corradini, Roberto; Huskens, J.

    2017-01-01

    A DNA-sensing platform is developed by exploiting the easy surface functionalization of metal–organic framework (MOF) particles and their highly parallelized fluorescence detection by flow cytometry. Two strategies were employed to functionalize the surface of MIL-88A, using either covalent or

  4. Screening DNA chip and event-specific multiplex PCR detection methods for biotech crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Hun

    2014-11-01

    There are about 80 biotech crop events that have been approved by safety assessment in Korea. They have been controlled by genetically modified organism (GMO) and living modified organism (LMO) labeling systems. The DNA-based detection method has been used as an efficient scientific management tool. Recently, the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA chip have been developed as simultaneous detection methods for several biotech crops' events. The event-specific multiplex PCR method was developed to detect five biotech maize events: MIR604, Event 3272, LY 038, MON 88017 and DAS-59122-7. The specificity was confirmed and the sensitivity was 0.5%. The screening DNA chip was developed from four endogenous genes of soybean, maize, cotton and canola respectively along with two regulatory elements and seven genes: P35S, tNOS, pat, bar, epsps1, epsps2, pmi, cry1Ac and cry3B. The specificity was confirmed and the sensitivity was 0.5% for four crops' 12 events: one soybean, six maize, three cotton and two canola events. The multiplex PCR and DNA chip can be available for screening, gene-specific and event-specific analysis of biotech crops as efficient detection methods by saving on workload and time. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. An environmental DNA assay for detecting Arctic grayling in the upper Missouri River basin, North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. J. Carim; J. C. S. Dysthe; Michael Young; Kevin McKelvey; Michael Schwartz

    2016-01-01

    The upper Missouri River basin in the northwestern US contains disjunct Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) populations of conservation concern. To assist efforts aimed at understanding Artic grayling distribution, we developed a quantitative PCR assay to detect the presence of Arctic grayling DNA in environmental samples. The assay amplified low...

  6. Ultrasensitive, rapid and inexpensive detection of DNA using paper based lateral flow assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauset-Rubio, Miriam; Svobodová, Markéta; Mairal, Teresa; McNeil, Calum; Keegan, Neil; Saeed, Ayman; Abbas, Mohammad Nooredeen; El-Shahawi, Mohammad S.; Bashammakh, Abdulaziz S.; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O.; O´Sullivan, Ciara K.

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive, specific, rapid, inexpensive and easy-to-use nucleic acid tests for use at the point-of-need are critical for the emerging field of personalised medicine for which companion diagnostics are essential, as well as for application in low resource settings. Here we report on the development of a point-of-care nucleic acid lateral flow test for the direct detection of isothermally amplified DNA. The recombinase polymerase amplification method is modified slightly to use tailed primers, resulting in an amplicon with a duplex flanked by two single stranded DNA tails. This tailed amplicon facilitates detection via hybridisation to a surface immobilised oligonucleotide capture probe and a gold nanoparticle labelled reporter probe. A detection limit of 1 × 10−11 M (190 amol), equivalent to 8.67 × 105 copies of DNA was achieved, with the entire assay, both amplification and detection, being completed in less than 15 minutes at a constant temperature of 37 °C. The use of the tailed primers obviates the need for hapten labelling and consequent use of capture and reporter antibodies, whilst also avoiding the need for any post-amplification processing for the generation of single stranded DNA, thus presenting an assay that can facilely find application at the point of need. PMID:27886248

  7. Detection of Cytomegalovirus DNA in Serum Correlates with Clinical Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in AIDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.K.; Ricksten, A.; Hofmann, B.

    1994-01-01

    The high sensitivity of nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) offers the possibility of rapid detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in serum. Five consecutive serum samples were examined from 52 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive patients (19 of whom had clinically presumed diagnosis...

  8. Single molecule sequencing of free DNA from maternal plasma for noninvasive trisomy 21 detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Oever, Jessica M. E.; Balkassmi, Sahila; Verweij, E. Joanne; van Iterson, Maarten; van Scheltema, Phebe N. Adama; Oepkes, Dick; van Lith, Jan M. M.; Hoffer, Mariëtte J. V.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Bakker, Egbert; Boon, Elles M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Noninvasive fetal aneuploidy detection by use of free DNA from maternal plasma has recently been shown to be achievable by whole genome shotgun sequencing. The high-throughput next-generation sequencing platforms previously tested use a PCR step during sample preparation, which results in

  9. Development of a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET-Based DNA Biosensor for Detection of Synthetic Oligonucleotide of Ganoderma boninense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noremylia Mohd Bakhori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An optical DNA biosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET utilizing synthesized quantum dot (QD has been developed for the detection of specific-sequence of DNA for Ganoderma boninense, an oil palm pathogen. Modified QD that contained carboxylic groups was conjugated with a single-stranded DNA probe (ssDNA via amide-linkage. Hybridization of the target DNA with conjugated QD-ssDNA and reporter probe labeled with Cy5 allows for the detection of related synthetic DNA sequence of Ganoderma boninense gene based on FRET signals. Detection of FRET emission before and after hybridization was confirmed through the capability of the system to produce FRET at 680 nm for hybridized sandwich with complementary target DNA. No FRET emission was observed for non-complementary system. Hybridization time, temperature and effect of different concentration of target DNA were studied in order to optimize the developed system. The developed biosensor has shown high sensitivity with detection limit of 3.55 × 10−9 M. TEM results show that the particle size of QD varies in the range between 5 to 8 nm after ligand modification and conjugation with ssDNA. This approach is capable of providing a simple, rapid and sensitive method for detection of related synthetic DNA sequence of Ganoderma boninense.

  10. 2-Aminopurine-modified DNA homopolymers for robust and sensitive detection of mercury and silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenhu; Ding, Jinsong; Liu, Juewen

    2017-01-15

    Heavy metal detection is a key topic in analytical chemistry. DNA-based metal recognition has advanced significantly producing many specific metal ligands, such as thymine for Hg 2+ and cytosine for Ag + . For practical applications, however, robust sensors that can work in a diverse range of salt concentrations need to be developed, while most current sensing strategies cannot meet this requirement. In this work, 2-aminopurine (2AP) is used as a fluorescence label embedded in the middle of four 10-mer DNA homopolymers. 2AP can be quenched up to 98% in these DNA without an external quencher. The interaction between 2AP and all common metal ions is studied systematically for both free 2AP base and 2AP embedded DNA homopolymers. With such low background, Hg 2+ induces up to 14-fold signal enhancement for the poly-T DNA, and Ag + enhances up to 10-fold for the poly-C DNA. A detection limit of 3nM is achieved for both metals. With these four probes, silver and mercury can be readily discriminated from the rest. A comparison with other signaling methods was made using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, graphene oxide, and SYBR Green I staining, respectively, confirming the robustness of the 2AP label. Detection of Hg 2+ in Lake Huron water was also achieved with a similar sensitivity. This work has provided a comprehensive fundamental understanding of using 2AP as a label for metal detection, and has achieved the highest fluorescence enhancement for non-protein targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving molecular detection of Candida DNA in whole blood: comparison of seven fungal DNA extraction protocols using real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwally, L; Fairley, D J; Coyle, P V; Hay, R J; Hedderwick, S; McCloskey, B; O'Neill, H J; Webb, C H; Elbaz, W; McMullan, R

    2008-03-01

    The limitations of classical diagnostic methods for invasive Candida infections have led to the development of molecular techniques such as real-time PCR to improve diagnosis. However, the detection of low titres of Candida DNA in blood from patients with candidaemia requires the use of extraction methods that efficiently lyse yeast cells and recover small amounts of DNA suitable for amplification. In this study, a Candida-specific real-time PCR assay was used to detect Candida albicans DNA in inoculated whole blood specimens extracted using seven different extraction protocols. The yield and quality of total nucleic acids were estimated using UV absorbance, and specific recovery of C. albicans genomic DNA was estimated quantitatively in comparison with a reference (Qiagen kit/lyticase) method currently in use in our laboratory. The extraction protocols were also compared with respect to sensitivity, cost and time required for completion. The TaqMan PCR assay used to amplify the DNA extracts achieved high levels of specificity, sensitivity and reproducibility. Of the seven extraction protocols evaluated, only the MasterPure yeast DNA extraction reagent kit gave significantly higher total nucleic acid yields than the reference method, although nucleic acid purity was highest using either the reference or YeaStar genomic DNA kit methods. More importantly, the YeaStar method enabled C. albicans DNA to be detected with highest sensitivity over the entire range of copy numbers evaluated, and appears to be an optimal method for extracting Candida DNA from whole blood.

  12. Rapid detection of DNA-interstrand and DNA-protein cross-links in mammalian cells by gravity-flow alkaline elution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hincks, J.R.; Coulombe, R.A. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Alkaline elution is a sensitive and commonly used technique to detect cellular DNA damage in the form of DNA strand breaks and DNA cross-links. Conventional alkaline elution procedures have extensive equipment requirements and are tedious to perform. Our laboratory recently presented a rapid, simplified, and sensitive modification of the alkaline elution technique to detect carcinogen-induced DNA strand breaks. In the present study, we have further modified this technique to enable the rapid characterization of chemically induced DNA-interstrand and DNA-protein associated cross-links in cultured epithelial cells. Cells were exposed to three known DNA cross-linking agents, nitrogen mustard (HN 2 ), mitomycin C (MMC), or ultraviolet irradiation (UV). One hour exposures of HN 2 at 0.25, 1.0, and 4.0 microM or of MMC at 20, 40, and 60 microM produced a dose-dependent induction of total DNA cross-links by these agents. Digestion with proteinase K revealed that HN 2 and MMC induced both DNA-protein cross-links and DNA-interstrand cross-links. Ultraviolet irradiation induced both DNA cross-links and DNA strand breaks, the latter of which were either protein and nonprotein associated. The results demonstrate that gravity-flow alkaline elution is a sensitive and accurate method to characterize the molecular events of DNA cross-linking. Using this procedure, elution of DNA from treated cells is completed in 1 hr, and only three fractions per sample are analyzed. This method may be useful as a rapid screening assay for genotoxicity and/or as an adjunct to other predictive assays for potential mutagenic or carcinogenic agents

  13. Diagnosis and quantitative detection of HSV DNA in samples from patients with suspected herpes simplex encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazyar Ziyaeyan

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is based on the detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV DNA in patients' CSF samples. HSV DNA quantitation has the potential for estimating the effects of antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to diagnose HSV DNA in HSE suspected patients and the quantitative analysis of its genome using real-time PCR to assess the value of the viral load in the course of antiviral treatment. The CSF samples were collected from 236 consecutive HSE suspected patients from November 2004 to May 2008. Upon DNA extraction, the samples were analyzed by Real-Time PCR assay. A set of primers amplified a common sequence of HSV glycoprotein B gene. The copy numbers of unknown samples were expressed via a standard curve drawn with a known amount of amplified cloned plasmid. Of the 236 samples, 137 (58% came from males and 99 (42% from females. The HSV genome was detected in 22 (9.3% patients by PCR, 13 males/ 9 females. Serial CSF samples were available from 10 of the 22 patients. The range of the HSV DNA copy numbers in the clinical samples ranged from 2.5 × 10² to 1.7 × 10(6 copies/mL of CSF. Quantitative PCR results can be helpful in evaluating the efficacy of antiviral therapy in the above-mentioned patients. There is an association between the initial viral load and the duration of treatment course.

  14. Comparison of filtering methods, filter processing and DNA extraction kits for detection of mycobacteria in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Kaevska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective. Mycobacteria have been isolated from almost all types of natural waters, as well as from man-made water distribution systems. Detection of mycobacteria using PCR has been described in different types of water; however, currently, there is no standardised protocol for the processing of large volumes of water. Material and Methods. In the present study, different filtering methods are tested and optimised for tap or river water filtration up to 10 L, as well as filter processing and DNA isolation using four commercially available kits. Results. The PowerWater DNA isolation kit (MoBio, USA, together with a kit used for soil and other environmental samples (PowerSoil DNA isolation kit, MoBio, had the highest efficiency. Filtration of 10 L of water and elution of the filter in PBS with the addition of 0.05% of Tween 80 is suggested. Conclusions. The described protocol for filter elution is recommended, and the use of the PowerWater DNA isolation kit for the highest mycobacterial DNA yield from water samples. The described protocol is suitable for parallel detection of mycobacteria using cultivation.

  15. The detection of HBV DNA with gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle gene probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Dong; Luo Xiaoping; Lu Qianghua; Yao Kailun; Liu Zuli; Ning Qin

    2008-01-01

    Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA probes were prepared, and their application for HBV DNA measurement was studied. Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by the citrate reduction of tetra-chloroauric acid in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles which were added as seeds. With a fluorescence-based method, the maximal surface coverage of hexaethiol 30-mer oligonucleotides and the maximal percentage of hybridization strands on gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were (120 ± 8) oligonucleotides per nanoparticle, and (14 ± 2%), respectively, which were comparable with those of (132 ± 10) and (22 ± 3%) in Au nanoparticle groups. Large network aggregates were formed when gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probe was applied to detect HBV DNA molecules as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and the high specificity was verified by blot hybridization. Our results further suggested that detecting DNA with iron oxide nanoparticles and magnetic separator was feasible and might be an alternative effective method

  16. Amplified protein detection and identification through DNA-conjugated M13 bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Hun; Domaille, Dylan W; Cha, Jennifer N

    2012-06-26

    Sensitive protein detection and accurate identification continues to be in great demand for disease screening in clinical and laboratory settings. For these diagnostics to be of clinical value, it is necessary to develop sensors that have high sensitivity but favorable cost-to-benefit ratios. However, many of these sensing platforms are thermally unstable or require significant materials synthesis, engineering, or fabrication. Recently, we demonstrated that naturally occurring M13 bacteriophage can serve as biological scaffolds for engineering protein diagnostics. These viruses have five copies of the pIII protein, which can bind specifically to target antigens, and thousands of pVIII coat proteins, which can be genetically or chemically modified to react with signal-producing materials, such as plasmon-shifting gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). In this report, we show that DNA-conjugated M13 bacteriophage can act as inexpensive protein sensors that can rapidly induce a color change in the presence of a target protein yet also offer the ability to identify the detected antigen in a separate step. Many copies of a specific DNA oligonucleotide were appended to each virus to create phage-DNA conjugates that can hybridize with DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles. In the case of a colorimetric positive result, the identity of the antigen can also be easily determined by using a DNA microarray. This saves precious resources by establishing a rapid, quantitative method to first screen for the presence of antigen followed by a highly specific typing assay if necessary.

  17. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA injury and damage detection in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto, E-mail: arojasmtz@gmail.com, E-mail: augusto.rojasm@uanl.mx [Departamento de Bioquímica y Medicina Molecular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Radiotherapy is frequently used in patients with breast cancer, but some patients may be more susceptible to ionizing radiation, and increased exposure to radiation sources may be associated to radiation adverse events. This susceptibility may be related to deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms that are activated after cell-radiation, which causes DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks. Some of these genetic susceptibilities in DNA-repair mechanisms are implicated in the etiology of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (pathologic mutations in the BRCA 1 and 2 genes), but other less penetrant variants in genes involved in sporadic breast cancer have been described. These same genetic susceptibilities may be involved in negative radiotherapeutic outcomes. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement methods for detecting patients who are susceptible to radiotherapy-related adverse events. This review discusses mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, genes related to these functions, and the diagnosis methods designed and under research for detection of breast cancer patients with increased radiosensitivity. (author)

  18. Simultaneous Detection of Ricin and Abrin DNA by Real-Time PCR (qPCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Eva; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Lange, Mirko; Wölfel, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Ricin and abrin are two of the most potent plant toxins known and may be easily obtained in high yield from the seeds using rather simple technology. As a result, both toxins are potent and available toxins for criminal or terrorist acts. However, as the production of highly purified ricin or abrin requires sophisticated equipment and knowledge, it may be more likely that crude extracts would be used by non-governmental perpetrators. Remaining plant-specific nucleic acids in these extracts allow the application of a real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection and identification of abrin or ricin genomic material. Therefore, we have developed a duplex real-time PCR assays for simultaneous detection of ricin and abrin DNA based on the OmniMix HS bead PCR reagent mixture. Novel primers and hybridization probes were designed for detection on a SmartCycler instrument by using 5′-nuclease technology. The assay was thoroughly optimized and validated in terms of analytical sensitivity. Evaluation of the assay sensitivity by probit analysis demonstrated a 95% probability of detection at 3 genomes per reaction for ricin DNA and 1.2 genomes per reaction for abrin DNA. The suitability of the assays was exemplified by detection of ricin and abrin contaminations in a food matrix. PMID:23105972

  19. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts on Fresh Produce Using DNA Aptamers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Iqbal

    Full Text Available There are currently no standard methods for the detection of Cryptosporidium spp., or other protozoan parasites, in foods, and existing methods are often inadequate, with low and variable recovery efficiencies. Food testing is difficult due to the low concentrations of parasites, the difficulty in eluting parasites from some foods, the lack of enrichment methods, and the presence of PCR inhibitors. The main objectives of the present study were to obtain DNA aptamers binding to the oocyst wall of C. parvum, and to use the aptamers to detect the presence of this parasite in foods. DNA aptamers were selected against C. parvum oocysts using SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment. Ten rounds of selection led to the discovery of 14 aptamer clones with high affinities for C. parvum oocysts. For detecting parasite-bound aptamers, a simple electrochemical sensor was employed, which used a gold nanoparticle-modified screen-printed carbon electrode. This aptasensor was fabricated by self-assembling a hybrid of a thiolated ssDNA primer and the anti- C. parvum aptamer. Square wave voltammetry was employed to quantitate C. parvum in the range of 150 to 800 oocysts, with a detection limit of approximately 100 oocysts. The high sensitivity and specificity of the developed aptasensor suggests that this novel method is very promising for the detection and identification of C. parvum oocysts on spiked fresh fruits, as compared to conventional methods such as microscopy and PCR.

  20. Nanopore arrays in a silicon membrane for parallel single-molecule detection: DNA translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Schmidt, Torsten; Jemt, Anders; Sahlén, Pelin; Sychugov, Ilya; Lundeberg, Joakim; Linnros, Jan

    2015-08-07

    Optical nanopore sensing offers great potential in single-molecule detection, genotyping, or DNA sequencing for high-throughput applications. However, one of the bottle-necks for fluorophore-based biomolecule sensing is the lack of an optically optimized membrane with a large array of nanopores, which has large pore-to-pore distance, small variation in pore size and low background photoluminescence (PL). Here, we demonstrate parallel detection of single-fluorophore-labeled DNA strands (450 bps) translocating through an array of silicon nanopores that fulfills the above-mentioned requirements for optical sensing. The nanopore array was fabricated using electron beam lithography and anisotropic etching followed by electrochemical etching resulting in pore diameters down to ∼7 nm. The DNA translocation measurements were performed in a conventional wide-field microscope tailored for effective background PL control. The individual nanopore diameter was found to have a substantial effect on the translocation velocity, where smaller openings slow the translocation enough for the event to be clearly detectable in the fluorescence. Our results demonstrate that a uniform silicon nanopore array combined with wide-field optical detection is a promising alternative with which to realize massively-parallel single-molecule detection.

  1. Simultaneous Detection of Ricin and Abrin DNA by Real-Time PCR (qPCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Wölfel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ricin and abrin are two of the most potent plant toxins known and may be easily obtained in high yield from the seeds using rather simple technology. As a result, both toxins are potent and available toxins for criminal or terrorist acts. However, as the production of highly purified ricin or abrin requires sophisticated equipment and knowledge, it may be more likely that crude extracts would be used by non-governmental perpetrators. Remaining plant-specific nucleic acids in these extracts allow the application of a real-time PCR (qPCR assay for the detection and identification of abrin or ricin genomic material. Therefore, we have developed a duplex real-time PCR assays for simultaneous detection of ricin and abrin DNA based on the OmniMix HS bead PCR reagent mixture. Novel primers and hybridization probes were designed for detection on a SmartCycler instrument by using 5′-nuclease technology. The assay was thoroughly optimized and validated in terms of analytical sensitivity. Evaluation of the assay sensitivity by probit analysis demonstrated a 95% probability of detection at 3 genomes per reaction for ricin DNA and 1.2 genomes per reaction for abrin DNA. The suitability of the assays was exemplified by detection of ricin and abrin contaminations in a food matrix.

  2. DNA Sequence Signatures for Rapid Detection of Six Target Bacterial Pathogens Using PCR Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenjiro Nagamine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Streptococcus pyogenes as a model, we previously established a stepwise computational workflow to effectively identify species-specific DNA signatures that could be used as PCR primer sets to detect target bacteria with high specificity and sensitivity. In this study, we extended the workflow for the rapid development of PCR assays targeting Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium tetani , and Staphylococcus aureus , which are of safety concern for human tissue intended for transplantation. Twenty-one primer sets that had sensitivity of detecting 5–50 fg DNA from target bacteria with high specificity were selected. These selected primer sets can be used in a PCR array for detecting target bacteria with high sensitivity and specificity. The workflow could be widely applicable for the rapid development of PCR-based assays for a wide range of target bacteria, including those of biothreat agents.

  3. Label-free detection of DNA using novel organic-based electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-Wu; Kekuda, Dhananjay; Chu, Chih-Wei

    2010-08-15

    In this study, we have constructed the first organic field effect sensor based on an electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor structure (OEIS) and applied this novel device to pH and DNA sensing. Variations in the insulator-electrolyte surface potential, which originate from either the change of the ionization states of the insulator surface groups or the binding of charged molecules to the insulator surface, modify the flat band voltage (V(FB)) of the OEIS sensor. The pH sensing experiments of OEIS sensor showed that the output signal linearly depended on pH solution in the range from pH 2 to pH 12, and an average sensitivity of 44.1 mV/pH was obtained. In the biosensing experiments, the absorption of positively charged poly-L-lysine on the insulator surface resulted in the reduction of the V(FB) value, whereas the subsequent binding of negatively charged single-stranded DNA probe (ssDNA) via electrostatic interaction increased the V(FB) value. Furthermore, the ssDNA-immobilized OEIS device was successfully used for the detection of DNA hybridization. The detection limit of complementary DNA was as low as 1 microM, and the output signal of OEIS biosensor linearly increased with the logarithm of complementary DNA concentration in the range from 5x10(-5) to 10(-7) M. The easy and inexpensive fabrication of the OEIS device allows to be served as a potentially disposable and sensitive biosensor. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis-DNA in synovial fluid: evaluation of the sensitivity of different DNA extraction methods and amplification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freise, Julia; Bernau, Iris; Meier, Sabine; Zeidler, Henning; Kuipers, Jens G

    2009-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and ligase chain reaction (LCR) are used in research for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (C. tr.) in synovial fluid (SF). However there is no standardized system for diagnostic use in clinical practice, therefore this study aimed at determining the molecular biology method best suited to detect C. tr. from SF. SF samples were spiked with C. tr. elementary bodies (EB) and human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMo) persistently infected with C. tr. in vitro to evaluate the sensitivity of different molecular biology methods and assays. Five different DNA-extraction methods were tested: 1) Alkaline lysis, 2) QIAex II Gel Extraction Kit+ CTAB, 3) Chelex-extraction, 4) QIAmp Tissue Kit and 5) QIAmp DNA Stool Kit. All DNA extracts were subjected to 5 different DNA amplification systems to detect C. tr.- DNA in the spiked SF samples: two C. tr. -omp1-- directed PCR, one C. tr.-plasmid-PCR, one C. tr. -16s RNA directed PCR, and one commercially available LCR (LCX), Abbott laboratories). In SF samples spiked with C. tr.-EB and with C. tr.-PBMo, alkaline lysis, detecting 1 C. tr.-EB/ml SF, 0,1 C. tr.-PBMo/ml SF and QIAmp gel extraction kit+ CTAB detecting 0,1 C. tr. -EB/ml SF, 1 C. tr.-PBMo/ml, respectively, allowed most sensitive detection of the organism in combination with the C. tr.- omp1-(152 bp) PCR. Sensitivity decreased in all methods after storage of the DNA of C. tr.- dilution series at -20 degrees C for 4 months by at least one log phase. The sensitivity to detect C. tr.- DNA from SF is highly dependent on the DNA extraction method and the detection system applied. Alkaline lysis as well as the QIAmp Gel extraction kit + CTAB in combination with C. tr.- omp1 - (152 bp) PCR evolved as the most sensitive methods to identify C. tr. in serial dilutions.

  5. Application of the DNA ''comet assay'' to detect irradiation treatment of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delincee, H.

    1996-01-01

    Since treatment with ionising radiation causes DNA fragmentation, microgel electrophoresis of single cells (''comet assay'') offers a simple and rapid tool for identification of irradiated foods. The principle is based on migration of DNA in an agarose gel exposed to an electric field. Single cells or nuclei are embedded in the agarose and after lysis, intact DNA will virtually not move out of the cell upon electrophoresis, whereas if DNA has been fragmented, the fragments are able to migrate and ''comets'' following the cells become visible after staining. The advantages of this test, however, for foods not exposed to heat are its speed and simplicity, as the electrophoretic separation only requires a few minutes. DNA is visualised by silver staining, avoiding the need for a fluorescence microscope. Thus the method requires only relatively cheap equipment - in contrast to other methods for identification of irradiated food such as electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy or gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The DNA ''comet assay'' , therefore, seems suitable as a pre-screening test to detect whether food has been radiation processed. Suspected samples may subsequently be analysed by established, but more expensive techniques. (author)

  6. Different Levels of DNA Methylation Detected in Human Sperms after Morphological Selection Using High Magnification Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Guy Cassuto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze DNA methylation levels between two groups of spermatozoa taken from the same sample, following morphological selection by high magnification (HM at 6100x microscopy. A prospective study was conducted and studied 876 spermatozoa from 10 randomly selected men. Sperm morphology was characterized at HM according to criteria previously established. High-scoring Score 6 and low-scoring Score 0 sperm were selected. Sperm DNA methylation level was assessed using an immunoassay method targeting 5-methylcytosine residues by fluorescence microscopy with imaging analysis system to detect DNA methylation in single spermatozoon. Results. In total, 448 S6 spermatozoa and 428 S0 spermatozoa were analyzed. A strong relationship was found between sperm DNA methylation levels and sperm morphology observed at HM. Sperm DNA methylation level in the S6 group was significantly lower compared with that in the S0 group (p<10-6, OR = 2.4; and p<0.001, as determined using the Wilcoxon test. Conclusion. Differences in DNA methylation levels are associated with sperm morphology variations as observed at HM, which allows spermatozoa with abnormal levels to be discarded and ultimately decrease birth defects, malformations, and epigenetic diseases that may be transmitted from sperm to offspring in ICSI.

  7. Different Levels of DNA Methylation Detected in Human Sperms after Morphological Selection Using High Magnification Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassuto, Nino Guy; Montjean, Debbie; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Bouret, Dominique; Marzouk, Flora; Copin, Henri; Benkhalifa, Moncef

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To analyze DNA methylation levels between two groups of spermatozoa taken from the same sample, following morphological selection by high magnification (HM) at 6100x microscopy. A prospective study was conducted and studied 876 spermatozoa from 10 randomly selected men. Sperm morphology was characterized at HM according to criteria previously established. High-scoring Score 6 and low-scoring Score 0 sperm were selected. Sperm DNA methylation level was assessed using an immunoassay method targeting 5-methylcytosine residues by fluorescence microscopy with imaging analysis system to detect DNA methylation in single spermatozoon. Results. In total, 448 S6 spermatozoa and 428 S0 spermatozoa were analyzed. A strong relationship was found between sperm DNA methylation levels and sperm morphology observed at HM. Sperm DNA methylation level in the S6 group was significantly lower compared with that in the S0 group (p < 10−6), OR = 2.4; and p < 0.001, as determined using the Wilcoxon test. Conclusion. Differences in DNA methylation levels are associated with sperm morphology variations as observed at HM, which allows spermatozoa with abnormal levels to be discarded and ultimately decrease birth defects, malformations, and epigenetic diseases that may be transmitted from sperm to offspring in ICSI. PMID:27148551

  8. Detection of Colorectal Cancer by a Quantitative Fluorescence Determination of DNA Amplification in Stool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Calistri

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA amplification of exfoliated cells in stool repre sents an inexpensive and rapid test, but has only 50% to 60% sensitivity. A new quantitative method, calle( fluorescence long DNA, was developed and validate( in our laboratory on stool obtained from 86 patient., with primary colorectal cancer and from 62 health individuals. It consists of the amplification of stoo DNA with fluorescence primers and the quantification of the amplification using a standard curve. Results are arbitrarily expressed in nanograms. The potential of thi new method compared to the conventional approact was analyzed in a subgroup of 94 individuals (51 patients and 38 healthy volunteers. In the presen series, DNA amplification analysis showed a specific ity of 97% and a sensitivity of only 50%. Conversely fluorescence DNA evaluation, using the best cutoff o 25 ng, showed a sensitivity of about 76% and a spec ificity of 93%. Similar sensitivity was observed regard less of Dukes stage, tumor location, and size, thu., also permitting the detection of early-stage tumors The present study seems to indicate that quantitative fluorescence DNA determination in stool successfully identifies colorectal cancer patients with a sensitivity comparable, if not superior, to that of multiple gene analysis but at a lower cost and in a shorter time.

  9. Alkaline gel electrophoresis assay to detect DNA strand breaks and repair mechanisms in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Jose Carlos Pelielo de; Motta, Ellen Serri da; Oliveira, Marcia Betania Nunes de; Dantas, Flavio Jose da Silva; Araujo, Adriano Caldeira de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria. Lab. de Radio e Fotobiologia]. E-mail: jcmattos@uerj.br

    2008-12-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can induce lesions in different cellular targets, including DNA. Stannous chloride (SnCl{sub 2}) is a ROS generator, leading to lethality in Escherichia coli (E. coli), with the base excision repair (BER) mechanism playing a role in this process. Many techniques have been developed to detect genotoxicity, as comet assay, in eukaryotic cells, and plasmid DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. In this study, an adaptation of the alkaline gel electrophoresis method was carried out to ascertain the induction of strand breaks by SnCl{sub 2} in bacterial DNA, from E. coli BER mutants, and its repair pathway. Results obtained show that SnCl{sub 2} was able to induce DNA strand breaks in all strains tested. Moreover, endonuclease IV and exonuclease III play a role in DNA repair. On the whole, data has shown that the alkaline gel electrophoresis assay could be used both for studying DNA strand breaks induction and for associated repair mechanisms. (author)

  10. Detection of bovine herpesvirus 4 glycoprotein B and thymidine kinase DNA by PCR assays in bovine milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, G.J.; Verstraten, E.; Belak, S.; Verschuren, S.B.E.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Peshev, R.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    2001-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect bovine herpesvirus 4 (BHV4) glycoprotein B (gB) DNA, and a nested-PCR assay was modified for the detection of BHV4 thymidine kinase (TK) DNA in bovine milk samples. To identify false-negative PCR results, internal control templates were

  11. Detection of low-level DNA mutation by ARMS-blocker-Tm PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shoufang; Liu, Licheng; Gan, Shuzhen; Feng, Huahua; Zhao, Jingyin; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Qi; Gao, Shangxiang; Chen, Weijun; Wang, Mengzhao; Jiang, Yongqiang; Huang, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Low-level DNA mutations play important roles in cancer prognosis and treatment. However, most existing methods for the detection of low-level DNA mutations are insufficient for clinical applications because of the high background of wild-type DNA. In this study, a novel assay based on Tm-dependent inhibition of wild type template amplification was developed. The defining characteristic of this assay is an additional annealing step was introduced into the ARMS-blocker PCR. The temperature of this additional annealing step is equal to the Tm of the blocker. Due to this additional annealing step, the blocker can preferentially and specifically bind the wild-type DNA. Thus, the inhibition of wild type template is realized and the mutant DNA is enriched. The sensitivity of this assay was between 10(-4) and 10(-5), which is approximately 5 to 10 times greater than the sensitivity of the assay without the additional annealing step. To evaluate the performance of this assay in detecting K-ras mutation, we analyzed 100 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens from colorectal cancer patients using this new assay and Sanger sequencing. Of the clinical samples, 27 samples were positive for K-ras mutation by both methods. Our results indicated that this new assay is a highly selective, convenient, and economical method for detecting rare mutations in the presence of higher concentrations of wild-type DNA. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bienzymatic-based electrochemical DNA biosensors: a way to lower the detection limit of hybridization assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelet-Dequaire, Murielle; Djellouli, Naïma; Limoges, Benoît; Brossier, Pierre

    2009-02-01

    The use of the alkaline phosphatase (AP) as an enzyme label and the amplification of its analytical response with a diaphorase (DI) secondary enzyme were investigated in an electrochemical hybridization assay involving arrays of carbon screen-printed DNA biosensors for the sensitive quantification of an amplified 406-base pair human cytomegalovirus DNA sequence (HCMV DNA). For this purpose, PCR-amplified biotinylated HCMV DNA targets were simultaneously bound to a monolayer of neutravidin irreversibly adsorbed on the surface of the electrodes and hybridized to complementary digoxigenin-labeled detection probes. The amount of hybrids immobilized on the electrode surface was labeled with an anti-digoxigenin AP conjugate and quantified electrochemically by measuring the activity of the AP label through the hydrolysis of the electroinactive p-aminophenylphosphate (PAPP) substrate into the p-aminophenol (PAP) product. The intensity of the cyclic voltammetric anodic peak current resulting from the oxidation of PAP into p-quinoneimine (PQI) was related to the number of viral amplified DNA targets present in the sample, and a detection limit of 10 pM was thus achieved. The electrochemical response of the AP label product was further enhanced by adding the diaphorase enzymatic amplifier in the solution. In the presence of the auxiliary enzyme DI, the PQI was reduced back to PAP and the resulting oxidized form of DI was finally regenerated in its reduced native state by its natural substrate, NADH. Such a bienzymatic amplification scheme enabled a 100-fold lowering of the HCMV DNA detection limit obtained with the monoenzymatic system.

  13. Second generation sequencing allows for mtDNA mixture deconvolution and high resolution detection of heteroplasmy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Mitchell M; McQuillan, Megan R; O'Hanlon, Katherine A

    2011-06-01

    To use parallel array pyrosequencing to deconvolute mixtures of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence and provide high resolution analysis of mtDNA heteroplasmy. The hypervariable segment 1 (HV1) of the mtDNA control region was analyzed from 30 individuals using the 454 GS Junior instrument. Mock mixtures were used to evaluate the system's ability to deconvolute mixtures and to reliably detect heteroplasmy, including heteroplasmic differences between 5 family members of the same maternal lineage. Amplicon sequencing was performed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products generated with primers that included multiplex identifiers (MID) and adaptors for pyrosequencing. Data analysis was performed using NextGENe® software. The analysis of an autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) locus (D18S51) and a Y-STR locus (DYS389 I/II) was performed simultaneously with a portion of HV1 to illustrate that multiplexing can encompass different markers of forensic interest. Mixtures, including heteroplasmic variants, can be detected routinely down to a component ratio of 1:250 (20 minor variant copies with a coverage rate of 5000 sequences) and can be readily detected down to 1:1000 (0.1%) with expanded coverage. Amplicon sequences from D18S51, DYS389 I/II, and the second half of HV1 were successfully partitioned and analyzed. The ability to routinely deconvolute mtDNA mixtures down to a level of 1:250 allows for high resolution analysis of mtDNA heteroplasmy, and for differentiation of individuals from the same maternal lineage. The pyrosequencing approach results in poor resolution of homopolymeric sequences, and PCR/sequencing artifacts require a filtering mechanism similar to that for STR stutter and spectral bleed through. In addition, chimeric sequences from jumping PCR must be addressed to make the method operational.

  14. Detection, characterization and measure of a new radiation-induced damage in isolated and cellular DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulus, P.

    2006-10-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contains the genetic information and chemical injury to this macromolecule may have severe biological consequences. We report here the detection of 4 new radiation-induced DNA lesions by using a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) approach. For that purpose, the characteristic fragmentation of most 2'-deoxy-ribo nucleosides, the loss of 116 Da corresponding to the loss of the 2-deoxyribose moiety, was used in the so-called neutral loss mode of the HPLC-MS/MS. One of the newly detected lesions, named dCyd341 because it is a 2'-deoxycytidine modification exhibiting a molecular weight of 341 Da, was also detected in cellular DNA. Characterization of this modified nucleoside was performed using NMR and exact mass determination of the product obtained by chemical synthesis. A mechanism of formation was then proposed, in which the first event is the H-abstraction at the C4 position of a 2-deoxyribose moiety. Then, the sugar modification produced exhibits a reactive aldehyde that, through reaction with a vicinal cytosine base, gives rise to dCyd341. dCyd341 could be considered as a complex damage since its formation involves a DNA strand break and a cross-link between a damaged sugar residue and a vicinal cytosine base located most probably on the complementary DNA strand. In addition to its characterization, preliminary biological studies revealed that cells are able to remove the lesion from DNA. Repair studies have revealed the ability of cells to excise the lesion. Identification of the repair systems involved could represent an interesting challenge. (author)

  15. Femtomolar detection of single mismatches by discriminant analysis of DNA hybridization events using gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingyi; Sim, Sang Jun

    2013-03-21

    Even though DNA-based nanosensors have been demonstrated for quantitative detection of analytes and diseases, hybridization events have never been numerically investigated for further understanding of DNA mediated interactions. Here, we developed a nanoscale platform with well-designed capture and detection gold nanoprobes to precisely evaluate the hybridization events. The capture gold nanoprobes were mono-laid on glass and the detection probes were fabricated via a novel competitive conjugation method. The two kinds of probes combined in a suitable orientation following the hybridization with the target. We found that hybridization efficiency was markedly dependent on electrostatic interactions between DNA strands, which can be tailored by adjusting the salt concentration of the incubation solution. Due to the much lower stability of the double helix formed by mismatches, the hybridization efficiencies of single mismatched (MMT) and perfectly matched DNA (PMT) were different. Therefore, we obtained an optimized salt concentration that allowed for discrimination of MMT from PMT without stringent control of temperature or pH. The results indicated this to be an ultrasensitive and precise nanosensor for the diagnosis of genetic diseases.

  16. The application of estrogen receptor-1 mutations' detection through circulating tumor dna in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binliang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Endocrine therapy is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer. Unfortunately, although most patients initially respond to endocrine treatment, they will eventually acquire resistance to endocrine therapy. The mechanisms of endocrine resistance are complicated. In particular, the estrogen receptor-1 (ESR1 mutation has been recognized as an important topic in recent years. Mutation of ESR1 leads to complete aromatase inhibitor resistance and partial resistance to estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists. Therefore, during clinical treatment, it is of great importance to continuously monitor ESR1 mutations before and after endocrine therapy. Conventional tissue biopsies have unavoidable disadvantages, and therefore, the use of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA has become more prevalent because it is noninvasive and convenient, has excellent sensitivity, and can quickly assess the overall situation of the tumor. The current methods for detecting ctDNA ESR1 mutations mainly include droplet digital polymerase chain reaction and next-generation sequencing techniques. Based on their advantages and disadvantages, we can establish an initial ESR1 mutation monitoring system. However, developing robust methods to monitor ESR1 mutation, detecting endocrine drug resistance, and evaluating prognoses for guiding clinical treatment strategies require long-term exploration. In this review, we will summarize recent concepts and advancements regarding ESR1 mutation monitoring, ctDNA detection technology, and their application in endocrine therapy of breast cancer.

  17. Attomole DNA electrochemical sensor for the detection of Escherichia coli O157.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Ching; Ho, Ja-An Annie

    2009-04-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157, a verocytotoxin (VT1/2)-producing pathogen, can be deadly because it can induce acute or chronic renal failure. To speed up the clinical diagnosis of related syndromes caused by E. coli O157, there is an urgent need for rapid, simple, and reliable analytical tools for its quantitation. In this study, we developed a novel electrochemical competitive genosensor, featuring gold-electrodeposited screen-printed electrodes (nanoAu/SPE) modified with a self-assembled monolayer of thiol-capped single-stranded DNA (capture probe), for the detection of the rfbE gene, which is specific to E. coli O157. This assay functions based on competition between the target gene (complementary to the capture probe DNA) and reporter DNA-tagged, hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride-encapsulated liposomes. The current signal of the released liposomal Ru(NH(3))(6)(3+) was measured using square wave voltammetry, yielding a sigmoidally shaped dose-response curve whose linear portion was over the range from 1 to 10(6) fmol. This liposomal competitive assay provides an amplification route for the detection of the rfbE gene at ultratrace levels; indeed, we could detect as little as 0.75 amol of the target rfbE DNA (equivalent to the amount present in 5 microL of a 0.15 pM solution).

  18. Detection of Balamuthia mandrillaris DNA by real-time PCR targeting the RNase P gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Astrid

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The free-living amoeba Balamuthia mandrillaris may cause fatal encephalitis both in immunocompromised and in – apparently – immunocompetent humans and other mammalian species. Rapid, specific, sensitive, and reliable detection requiring little pathogen-specific expertise is an absolute prerequisite for a successful therapy and a welcome tool for both experimental and epidemiological research. Results A real-time polymerase chain reaction assay using TaqMan® probes (real-time PCR was established specifically targeting the RNase P gene of B. mandrillaris amoebae. The assay detected at least 2 (down to 0.5 genomes of B. mandrillaris grown in axenic culture. It did not react with DNA from closely related Acanthamoeba (3 species, nor with DNA from Toxoplasma gondii, Leishmania major, Pneumocystis murina, Mycobacterium bovis (BCG, human brain, various mouse organs, or from human and murine cell lines. The assay efficiently detected B. mandrillaris DNA in spiked cell cultures, spiked murine organ homogenates, B. mandrillaris-infected mice, and CNS tissue-DNA preparations from 2 patients with proven cerebral balamuthiasis. This novel primer set was successfully combined with a published set that targets the B. mandrillaris 18S rRNA gene in a duplex real-time PCR assay to ensure maximum specificity and as a precaution against false negative results. Conclusion A real-time PCR assay for B. mandrillaris amoebae is presented, that is highly specific, sensitive, and reliable and thus suited both for diagnosis and for research.

  19. Detection of murine cytomegalovirus DNA in circulating leukocytes harvested during acute infection of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bale, J.F. Jr.; O'Neil, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    The authors used virus assay and in situ hybridization with a cloned fragment of the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) genome to study MCMV infection of circulating leukocytes harvested from 3-week-old BALB/c, C57BL/6, and C3H mice infected with MCMV intraperitoneally. Infectious virus or MCMV DNA was detected in leukocytes on days 1 through 21 of infection in BALB/c mice and on days 3 through 7 in C57BL/6 mice. On days 5 and 7, MCMV DNA or infectious virus was detected in the leukocytes of 17 (94%) of 18 BALB/c mice and 10 (59%) of 17 C57BL/6 mice. In both strains infection peaked on days 5 and 7, when as many as 0.01 to 0.1% of the circulating leukocytes contained MCMV DNA. In C3H mice, however, infectious virus was rarely recovered from leukocyte fractions and MCMV DNA was detected in the circulating leukocytes of only one animal. Circulating leukocytes may have an important role in the dissemination of CMV infections in susceptible hosts

  20. Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Fish Pathogens Using a Naked-Eye Readable DNA Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King-Jung Lin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We coupled 16S rDNA PCR and DNA hybridization technology to construct a microarray for simultaneous detection and discrimination of eight fish pathogens (Aeromonas hydrophila, Edwardsiella tarda, Flavobacterium columnare, Lactococcus garvieae, Photobacterium damselae, Pseudomonas anguilliseptica, Streptococcus iniae and Vibrio anguillarum commonly encountered in aquaculture. The array comprised short oligonucleotide probes (30 mer complementary to the polymorphic regions of 16S rRNA genes for the target pathogens. Targets annealed to the microarray probes were reacted with streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase and nitro blue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3′-indolylphosphate, p-toluidine salt (NBT/BCIP, resulting in blue spots that are easily visualized by the naked eye. Testing was performed against a total of 168 bacterial strains, i.e., 26 representative collection strains, 81 isolates of target fish pathogens, and 61 ecologically or phylogenetically related strains. The results showed that each probe consistently identified its corresponding target strain with 100% specificity. The detection limit of the microarray was estimated to be in the range of 1 pg for genomic DNA and 103 CFU/mL for pure pathogen cultures. These high specificity and sensitivity results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNA microarrays in the diagnostic detection of fish pathogens.

  1. Detection of mitochondrial DNA deletions in human cells induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qing-Jie; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Lu, Xue; Li, Yu-Wen; Chen, De-Qing

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To screen the novel mitochondrial DNA (mt DNA) deletions induced by ionizing radiation, and analyze the several kinds of mt DNA deletions, known as 3895 bp, 889 bp, 7436 bp or 4934 bp deletions. Methods: Long-range PCR with two pairs of primers, which could amplify the whole human mitochondrial genome, was used to analyze the lymphoblastoid cell line before and after exposed to 10 Gy 60 Co γ-rays. The limited condition PCR was used to certify the possible mt DNA deletion showed by long-range PCR. The PCR products were purified, cloned, sequenced and the sequence result were BLASTed. Regular PCR or nest-PCR were used to analyze the 3895 bp, 889 bp, 7436 bp or 4934 bp deletions before and after radiation exposure. The final PCR products were purified, sequenced and BALSTed on standard human mitochondrial genome sequence database. Results: (1) The predicted bands of mt DNA were observed on the control cell lines, and the possible mt DNA deletions were also detected on the irradiated cell lines. The deletions were certified by the limited condition PCR. The sequence BLAST results of the cloned PCR products showed that two kinds of deletions, 7455 bp deletion (nt 475-7929 in heavy strand) and 9225 bp deletion (nt 7714-369 in heavy strand), which were between two 8 bp direct repeats. Further bioinformatics analysis showed that the two deletions were novel deletions. (2) The 889 bp and 3895 bp deletion were not detected for the cell line samples not exposed to 60 Co γ-rays. The 889 bp and 3895 bp deletions were detected on samples exposed to 10 Gy 60 Co γ-rays. The BALST results showed that the 889 bp and 3895 deletions flanked nt 11688 bp-12576, nt 548 bp-4443, respectively. The 7436 bp deletion levels were not changed much before and after irradiation. (3) The 4934 bp deletions had the same pattern as 7436 bp deletion, but it could induced by radiation. Conclusions: Ionizing radiation could induce the human lymphoblastoid two novel mt DNA

  2. A method for detection of small radiaton damage in the DNA of eucariotic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weniger, P.

    1978-10-01

    A technique of neutral sucrose gradients, developed in the last years, was modified to avoid some often occuring sources of error. The method is based on a mild lysis of the cells with a nonionic detergent in high salt concentration and subsequent centrifugation in a neutral sucrose - etidiumbromide - gradient. The position of the DNA can be seen without fractionating the gradiant because of the fluorescence of the DNA-EtBr complex. In this way it is possible to detect clearly the radiation damage of 100 rad γ-irradiation. (author)

  3. The first detection of Neospora caninum DNA in brains of calves in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Wisniewski M.; Cabaj W.; Moskwa B.; Wedrychowicz H.

    2002-01-01

    The recognition of prevalence ofNeospora caninum infections in Poland is very poor. Vertical transmission of N. caninum has been shown to be a major route of infection in cattle. In the present study we examined the utility of PCR methods in detecting Neospora caninum DNA in brains of calves born from mothers with a high liter of anti-Neospora antibodies. Conventional and nested PCR reactions were performed on DNA extracted from brain tissue of Neospora-suspected calves using primers compleme...

  4. Detecting an elusive invasive species: a diagnostic PCR to detect Burmese python in Florida waters and an assessment of persistence of environmental DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaggio, Antoinette J; Engeman, Richard M; Hopken, Matthew W; Humphrey, John S; Keacher, Kandy L; Bruce, William E; Avery, Michael L

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that detection of environmental DNA (eDNA) from aquatic vertebrates in water bodies is possible. The Burmese python, Python bivittatus, is a semi-aquatic, invasive species in Florida where its elusive nature and cryptic coloration make its detection difficult. Our goal was to develop a diagnostic PCR to detect P. bivittatus from water-borne eDNA, which could assist managers in monitoring this invasive species. First, we used captive P. bivittatus to determine whether reptilian DNA could be isolated and amplified from water samples. We also evaluated the efficacy of two DNA isolation methods and two DNA extraction kits commonly used in eDNA preparation. A fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene from P. bivittatus was detected in all water samples isolated with the sodium acetate precipitate and the QIAamp DNA Micro Kit. Next, we designed P. bivittatus-specific primers and assessed the degradation rate of eDNA in water. Our primers did not amplify DNA from closely related species, and we found that P. bivittatus DNA was consistently detectable up to 96 h. Finally, we sampled water from six field sites in south Florida. Samples from five sites, where P. bivittatus has been observed, tested positive for eDNA. The final site was negative and had no prior documented evidence of P. bivittatus. This study shows P. bivittatus eDNA can be isolated from water samples; thus, this method is a new and promising technique for the management of invasive reptiles. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Detection of plant DNA in the bronchoalveolar lavage of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Bousbia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hospital-acquired infections such as nosocomial pneumonia are a serious cause of mortality for hospitalized patients, especially for those admitted to intensive care units (ICUs. Despite the number of the studies reported to date, the causative agents of pneumonia are not completely known. Herein, we found by molecular technique that vegetable and tobacco DNA may be detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage from patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we studied bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL from patients admitted to ICUs with ventilator-associated pneumonia. BAL fluids were assessed with molecular tests, culture and blood culture. We successfully identified plant DNA in six patients out of 106 (6% with ventilator-associated pneumonia. Inhalation was confirmed in four cases and suspected in the other two cases. Inhalation was significantly frequent in patients with plant DNA (four out of six patients than those without plant DNA (three out of 100 patients (P<0.001. Nicotiana tabacum chloroplast DNA was identified in three patients who were smokers (cases 2, 3 and 6. Cucurbita pepo, Morus bombycis and Triticum aestivum DNA were identified in cases 1, 4 and 5 respectively. Twenty-three different bacterial species, two viruses and five fungal species were identified from among these six patients by using molecular and culture techniques. Several of the pathogenic microorganisms identified are reported to be food-borne or tobacco plant-associated pathogens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study shows that plants DNA may be identified in the BAL fluid of pneumonia patients, especially when exploring aspiration pneumonia, but the significance of the presence of plant DNA and its role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia is unknown and remains to be investigated. However, the identification of these plants may be a potential marker of aspiration in patients with pneumonia.

  6. Electrical DNA biosensor using aluminium interdigitated electrode for E.Coli O157:H7 detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasha, N. Z.; Rajapaksha, R. D. A. A.; Uda, M. N. A.; Hashim, U.

    2017-09-01

    Escherichia Coli (E.Coli) O157:H7 is the one of the most dangerous foodborne pathogens based diseases that presence in our daily life that causes illness and death increase every year. Aluminum Interdigitated Electrode (Al IDE) biosensor was introduced to detect E.Coli O157:H7 in earlier stage. In this paper we investigated ssDNA of E.Coli O157:H7 bacteria detection through electrical behavior of Al IDE sensor. The physical properties of Al IDE biosensor has been characterized using Low Power Microscope (LPM), High Power Microscope (HPM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 3D Nano Profiler. The bare Al IDE was electrical characterized by using I-V measurement. The surface modification was accomplished by salinization using APTES and immobilization using Carboxylic Probe E.Coli which was the first step in preparing Al IDE biosensor. Geared up prepared biosensor was hybridized with complementary, non-complementary and single based mismatch ssDNA to confirmed specificity detection of E Coli O157:H7 ssDNA target. The Current - Voltage was performed for each step such as bare Al IDE, surface modification, immobilization and hybridization. Sensitivity measurement was accomplished using different concentration of complementary ssDNA target from 1 fM - 10 µM. Selectivity measurements was achieved using same concentration which was 10 µM concentration for complement, non-complement and mismatch E.Coli O157:H7 ssDNA target. It's totally proved that the Al IDE able to detect specific and small current down to Femtomolar concentration.

  7. Identifying DNA Methylation Biomarkers for Non-Endoscopic Detection of Barrett’s Esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinova, Helen R.; LaFramboise, Thomas; Lutterbaugh, James D.; Chandar, Apoorva Krishna; Dumot, John; Faulx, Ashley; Brock, Wendy; De la Cruz Cabrera, Omar; Guda, Kishore; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Iyer, Prasad G.; Canto, Marcia I.; Wang, Jean S.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Thota, Prashanti N.; Willis, Joseph E.; Chak, Amitabh; Markowitz, Sanford D.

    2018-01-01

    We report a biomarker-based non-endoscopic method for detecting Barrett’s esophagus (BE), based on detecting methylated DNAs retrieved via a swallowable balloon-based esophageal sampling device. BE is the precursor of, and a major recognized risk factor for, developing esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Endoscopy, the current standard for BE detection, is not cost-effective for population screening. We performed genome-wide screening to ascertain regions targeted for recurrent aberrant cytosine methylation in BE, identifying high-frequency methylation within the CCNA1 locus. We tested CCNA1 DNA methylation as a BE biomarker in cytology brushings of the distal esophagus from 173 individuals with or without BE. CCNA1 DNA methylation demonstrated an area under the curve (AUC)=0.95 for discriminating BE-related metaplasia and neoplasia cases versus normal individuals, performing identically to methylation of VIM DNA, an established BE biomarker. When combined, the resulting two biomarker panel was 95% sensitive and 91% specific. These results were replicated in an independent validation cohort of 149 individuals, who were assayed using the same cutoff values for test positivity established in the training population. To progress toward non-endoscopic esophageal screening, we engineered a well-tolerated, swallowable, encapsulated balloon device able to selectively sample the distal esophagus within 5 minutes. In balloon samples from 86 individuals, tests of CCNA1 plus VIM DNA methylation detected BE metaplasia with 90.3% sensitivity and 91.7% specificity. Combining the balloon sampling device with molecular assays of CCNA1 plus VIM DNA methylation enables an efficient, well-tolerated, sensitive, and specific method of screening at-risk populations for BE. PMID:29343623

  8. A facile, sensitive, and highly specific trinitrophenol assay based on target-induced synergetic effects of acid induction and electron transfer towards DNA-templated copper nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyin; Chang, Jiafu; Hou, Ting; Ge, Lei; Li, Feng

    2016-11-01

    Reliable, selective and sensitive approaches for trinitrophenol (TNP) detection are highly desirable with respect to national security and environmental protection. Herein, a simple and novel fluorescent strategy for highly sensitive and specific TNP assay has been successfully developed, which is based on the quenching of the fluorescent poly(thymine)-templated copper nanoclusters (DNA-CuNCs), through the synergetic effects of acid induction and electron transfer. Upon the addition of TNP, donor-acceptor complexes between the electron-deficient nitro-groups in TNP and the electron-donating DNA templates are formed, resulting in the close proximity between TNP and CuNCs. Moreover, the acidity of TNP contributes to the pH decrease of the system. These factors combine to dramatically quench the fluorescence of DNA-CuNCs, providing a "signal-off" strategy for TNP sensing. The as-proposed strategy demonstrates high sensitivity for TNP assay, and a detection limit of 0.03μM is obtained, which is lower than those reported by using organic fluorescent materials. More significantly, this approach shows outstanding selectivity over a number of TNP analogues, such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), 3-nitrophenol (NP), nitrobenzene (NB), phenol (BP), and toluene (BT). Compared with previous studies, this method does not need complex DNA sequence design, fluorescent dye labeling, or sophisticated organic reactions, rendering the strategy with additional advantages of simplicity and cost-effectiveness. In addition, the as-proposed strategy has been adopted for the detection of TNP in natural water samples, indicating its great potential to be applied in the fields of public safety and environmental monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Replication Errors Made During Oogenesis Lead to Detectable De Novo mtDNA Mutations in Zebrafish Oocytes with a Low mtDNA Copy Number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Auke B C; Stassen, Alphons P M; Adriaens, Michiel; Gerards, Mike; Dohmen, Richard G J; Timmer, Adriana J; Vanherle, Sabina J V; Kamps, Rick; Boesten, Iris B W; Vanoevelen, Jo M; Muller, Marc; Smeets, Hubert J M

    2016-12-01

    Of all pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in humans, ∼25% is de novo, although the occurrence in oocytes has never been directly assessed. We used next-generation sequencing to detect point mutations directly in the mtDNA of 3-15 individual mature oocytes and three somatic tissues from eight zebrafish females. Various statistical and biological filters allowed reliable detection of de novo variants with heteroplasmy ≥1.5%. In total, we detected 38 de novo base substitutions, but no insertions or deletions. These 38 de novo mutations were present in 19 of 103 mature oocytes, indicating that ∼20% of the mature oocytes carry at least one de novo mutation with heteroplasmy ≥1.5%. This frequency of de novo mutations is close to that deducted from the reported error rate of polymerase gamma, the mitochondrial replication enzyme, implying that mtDNA replication errors made during oogenesis are a likely explanation. Substantial variation in the mutation prevalence among mature oocytes can be explained by the highly variable mtDNA copy number, since we previously reported that ∼20% of the primordial germ cells have a mtDNA copy number of ≤73 and would lead to detectable mutation loads. In conclusion, replication errors made during oogenesis are an important source of de novo mtDNA base substitutions and their location and heteroplasmy level determine their significance. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Novel rolling circle amplification and DNA origami-based DNA belt-involved signal amplification assay for highly sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Juan; Hu, Chongya; Wang, Ping; Liu, Rui; Zuo, Xiaolei; Liu, Xunwei; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; He, Dannong; Sun, Gang

    2014-11-26

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is one of the most important biomarkers for the early diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. Although many efforts have been made to achieve significant progress for the detection of PSA, challenges including relative low sensitivity, complicated operation, sophisticated instruments, and high cost remain unsolved. Here, we have developed a strategy combining rolling circle amplification (RCA)-based DNA belts and magnetic bead-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the highly sensitive and specific detection of PSA. At first, a 96-base circular DNA template was designed and prepared for the following RCA. Single stranded DNA (ssDNA) products from RCA were used as scaffold strand for DNA origami, which was hybridized with three staple strands of DNA. The resulting DNA belts were conjugated with multiple enzymes for signal amplification and then employed to magnetic bead based ELISA for PSA detection. Through our strategy, as low as 50 aM of PSA can be detected with excellent specificity.

  11. DETECTION OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS DNA SEQUENCES IN ORAL LESIONS USING POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Zarei

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available "nThe purpose of the present study was to estimate the frequency of HPV DNA in four groups of oral lesions, including oral squamous cell carcinoma. Sixty paraffin-embedded oral tissue samples were examined for the presence of HPV DNAs using the PCR technique. These specimens were obtained from patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, leukoplakia, oral lichen planus (OLP, and pyogenic granuloma (PG. Consensus primers for L1 region (MY09 and MY11 and specific primers were used for detection of HPV DNA sequences in this study. we detected HPV DNA in 60% (9 out of 15 of OSCCs, 26.7% (4 out of 15 of leukoplakia, 13.3% (2 out of 15 of OLPs, and 6.7% (1 out of 15 of PGs. Statistical analysis showed that the prevalence of HPV in OSCC was significantly higher than other groups (P < 0.05. The frequency of HPV-16 and 18 detection in OSCC samples were 40% and 20%, respectively. The prevalence of these high risk HPVs was significantly higher in OSCC group (P < 0.05. The results of the present study show a successive increase of detection rate of HPV-16 and 18 DNAs from low level in samples of pyogenic granuloma and non-premalignant or questionably premalignant lesions of OLP to premalignant leukoplakia and to OSCC."n "n "n "n "n 

  12. Using Synthetic Nanopores for Single-Molecule Analyses: Detecting SNPs, Trapping DNA Molecules, and the Prospects for Sequencing DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Valentin V.

    2009-01-01

    This work focuses on studying properties of DNA molecules and DNA-protein interactions using synthetic nanopores, and it examines the prospects of sequencing DNA using synthetic nanopores. We have developed a method for discriminating between alleles that uses a synthetic nanopore to measure the binding of a restriction enzyme to DNA. There exists…

  13. Cultivated single stranded DNA phages that infect marine Bacteroidetes prove difficult to detect with DNA binding stains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmfeldt, Karin; Odic, Dusko; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first description of cultivated icosahedral single stranded DNA (ssDNA) phages isolated on heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton and with Bacteroidetes hosts. None of the 8 phages stained well with DNA binding stains, suggesting that in situ abundances of ssDNA phages are drastically...

  14. Application of DNA comet assay for detection of radiation treatment of grams and pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Hasan M; Khan, Ashfaq A; Khan, Sanaullah

    2011-12-01

    Several types of whole pulses (green lentils, red lentils, yellow lentils, chickpeas, green peas, cowpeas and yellow peas) and grams (black grams, red grams and white grams) have been investigated for the identification of radiation treatment using microgel electrophoresis of single cells (DNA comet assay). Pulses and grams were exposed to the radiation doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 5 kGy covering the legalized commercial dose range for protection from insect/pest infestations. All irradiated samples showed comet like stretching of fragmented DNA toward anode, which is expected for irradiated samples. Unirradiated samples showed many intact cells/nuclei in form of round stains or with short faint tails, which is typical for unirradiated food samples. The study shows that DNA comet assay can be used as a rapid, inexpensive and highly effective screening test for the detection of radiation treatment of foods, like pulses and grams.

  15. New Detection Modality for Label-Free Quantification of DNA in Biological Samples via Superparamagnetic Bead Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Daniel C.; Li, Jingyi; Strachan, Briony C.; Begley, Matthew R.; Finkler, David; Bazydlo, Lindsay L.; Barker, N. Scott; Haverstick, Doris; Utz, Marcel; Landers, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Combining DNA and superparamagnetic beads in a rotating magnetic field produces multiparticle aggregates that are visually striking, and enables label-free optical detection and quantification of DNA at levels in the picogram per microliter range. DNA in biological samples can be quantified directly by simple analysis of optical images of microfluidic wells placed on a magnetic stirrer without DNA purification. Aggregation results from DNA/bead interactions driven either by the presence of a chaotrope (a nonspecific trigger for aggregation) or by hybridization with oligonucleotides on functionalized beads (sequence-specific). This paper demonstrates quantification of DNA with sensitivity comparable to that of the best currently available fluorometric assays. The robustness and sensitivity of the method enable a wide range of applications, illustrated here by counting eukaryotic cells. Using widely available and inexpensive benchtop hardware, the approach provides a highly accessible low-tech microscale alternative to more expensive DNA detection and cell counting techniques. PMID:22423674

  16. Complexities due to single-stranded RNA during antibody detection of genomic rna:dna hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng Z; Pannunzio, Nicholas R; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R

    2015-04-08

    Long genomic R-loops in eukaryotes were first described at the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus switch regions using bisulfite sequencing and functional studies. A mouse monoclonal antibody called S9.6 has been used for immunoprecipitation (IP) to identify R-loops, based on the assumption that it is specific for RNA:DNA over other nucleic acid duplexes. However, recent work has demonstrated that a variable domain of S9.6 binds AU-rich RNA:RNA duplexes with a KD that is only 5.6-fold weaker than for RNA:DNA duplexes. Most IP protocols do not pre-clear the genomic nucleic acid with RNase A to remove free RNA. Fold back of ssRNA can readily generate RNA:RNA duplexes that may bind the S9.6 antibody, and adventitious binding of RNA may also create short RNA:DNA regions. Here we investigate whether RNase A is needed to obtain reliable IP with S9.6. As our test locus, we chose the most well-documented site for kilobase-long mammalian genomic R-loops, the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus (IgH) class switch regions. The R-loops at this locus can be induced by using cytokines to stimulate transcription from germline transcript promoters. We tested IP using S9.6 with and without various RNase treatments. The RNase treatments included RNase H to destroy the RNA in an RNA:DNA duplex and RNase A to destroy single-stranded (ss) RNA to prevent it from binding S9.6 directly (as duplex RNA) and to prevent the ssRNA from annealing to the genome, resulting in adventitious RNA:DNA hybrids. We find that optimal detection of RNA:DNA duplexes requires removal of ssRNA using RNase A. Without RNase A treatment, known regions of R-loop formation containing RNA:DNA duplexes can not be reliably detected. With RNase A treatment, a signal can be detected over background, but only within a limited 2 or 3-fold range, even with a stable kilobase-long genomic R-loop. Any use of the S9.6 antibody must be preceded by RNase A treatment to remove free ssRNA that may compete for the S9.6 binding by

  17. Rapid Salmonella detection using an acoustic wave device combined with the RCA isothermal DNA amplification method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonis Kordas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a major foodborne pathogen that causes Salmonellosis, posing a serious threat for public health and economy; thus, the development of fast and sensitive methods is of paramount importance for food quality control and safety management. In the current work, we are presenting a new approach where an isothermal amplification method is combined with an acoustic wave device for the development of a label free assay for bacteria detection. Specifically, our method utilizes a Love wave biosensor based on a Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW device combined with the isothermal Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA method; various protocols were tested regarding the DNA amplification and detection, including off-chip amplification at two different temperatures (30 °C and room temperature followed by acoustic detection and on-chip amplification and detection at room temperature, with the current detection limit being as little as 100 Bacteria Cell Equivalents (BCE/sample. Our acoustic results showed that the acoustic ratio, i.e., the amplitude over phase change observed during DNA binding, provided the only sensitive means for product detection while the measurement of amplitude or phase alone could not discriminate positive from negative samples. The method's fast analysis time together with other inherent advantages i.e., portability, potential for multi-analysis, lower sample volumes and reduced power consumption, hold great promise for employing the developed assay in a Lab on Chip (LoC platform for the integrated analysis of Salmonella in food samples. Keywords: Foodborne pathogen detection, Salmonella analysis, Rolling Circle Amplification, DNA biosensor, Lab-on-a-chip

  18. Electrochemical detection of methylated DNA on a microfluidic chip with nanoelectrokinetic pre-concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung A; Kim, Yong-June; Kim, Sung Jae; Yang, Sung

    2018-06-01

    DNA methylation is considered to be a promising marker for the early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. However, direct detection of the methylated DNAs in clinically relevant samples is still challenging because of its extremely low concentration (~fM). Here, an integrated microfluidic chip is reported, which is capable of pre-concentrating the methylated DNAs using ion concentration polarization (ICP) and electrochemically detecting the pre-concentrated DNAs on a single chip. The proposed chip is the first demonstration of an electrochemical detection of both level and concentration of the methylated DNAs by integrating a DNA pre-concentration unit without gene amplification. Using the proposed chip, 500 fM to 500 nM of methylated DNAs is pre-concentrated by almost 100-fold in 10 min, resulting in a drastic improvement of the electrochemical detection threshold down to the fM level. The proposed chip is able to measure not only the DNA concentration, but also the level of methylation using human urine sample by performing a consecutive electrochemical sensing on a chip. For clinical application, the level as well as the concentration of methylation of glutathione-S transferase-P1 (GSTP1) and EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1), which are known to be closely associated with prostate cancer diagnosis, are electrochemically detected in human urine spiked with these genes. The developed chip shows a limit of detection (LoD) of 7.9 pM for GSTP1 and 11.8 pM for EFEMP1 and is able to detect the level of methylation in a wide range from 10% to 100% with the concentration variation from 50 pM to 500 nM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection limits of quantitative and digital PCR assays and their influence in presence-absence surveys of environmental DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Margaret; Dorazio, Robert M.; Butterfield, John S.; Meigs-Friend, Gaia; Nico, Leo; Ferrante, Jason A.

    2017-01-01

    A set of universal guidelines is needed to determine the limit of detection (LOD) in PCR-based analyses of low concentration DNA. In particular, environmental DNA (eDNA) studies require sensitive and reliable methods to detect rare and cryptic species through shed genetic material in environmental samples. Current strategies for assessing detection limits of eDNA are either too stringent or subjective, possibly resulting in biased estimates of species’ presence. Here, a conservative LOD analysis grounded in analytical chemistry is proposed to correct for overestimated DNA concentrations predominantly caused by the concentration plateau, a nonlinear relationship between expected and measured DNA concentrations. We have used statistical criteria to establish formal mathematical models for both quantitative and droplet digital PCR. To assess the method, a new Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) TaqMan assay was developed and tested on both PCR platforms using eDNA in water samples. The LOD adjustment reduced Grass Carp occupancy and detection estimates while increasing uncertainty – indicating that caution needs to be applied to eDNA data without LOD correction. Compared to quantitative PCR, digital PCR had higher occurrence estimates due to increased sensitivity and dilution of inhibitors at low concentrations. Without accurate LOD correction, species occurrence and detection probabilities based on eDNA estimates are prone to a source of bias that cannot be reduced by an increase in sample size or PCR replicates. Other applications also could benefit from a standardized LOD such as GMO food analysis, and forensic and clinical diagnostics.

  20. Quartz crystal microbalance detection of DNA single-base mutation based on monobase-coded cadmium tellurium nanoprobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqin; Lin, Fanbo; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Haitao; Zeng, Yue; Tang, Hao; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2011-01-01

    A new method for the detection of point mutation in DNA based on the monobase-coded cadmium tellurium nanoprobes and the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique was reported. A point mutation (single-base, adenine, thymine, cytosine, and guanine, namely, A, T, C and G, mutation in DNA strand, respectively) DNA QCM sensor was fabricated by immobilizing single-base mutation DNA modified magnetic beads onto the electrode surface with an external magnetic field near the electrode. The DNA-modified magnetic beads were obtained from the biotin-avidin affinity reaction of biotinylated DNA and streptavidin-functionalized core/shell Fe(3)O(4)/Au magnetic nanoparticles, followed by a DNA hybridization reaction. Single-base coded CdTe nanoprobes (A-CdTe, T-CdTe, C-CdTe and G-CdTe, respectively) were used as the detection probes. The mutation site in DNA was distinguished by detecting the decreases of the resonance frequency of the piezoelectric quartz crystal when the coded nanoprobe was added to the test system. This proposed detection strategy for point mutation in DNA is proved to be sensitive, simple, repeatable and low-cost, consequently, it has a great potential for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection. 2011 © The Japan Society for Analytical Chemistry

  1. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus M204I Mutation by Quantum Dot-Labeled DNA Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are semiconductor nanoparticles with a diameter of less than 10 nm, which have been widely used as fluorescent probes in biochemical analysis and vivo imaging because of their excellent optical properties. Sensitive and convenient detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV gene mutations is important in clinical diagnosis. Therefore, we developed a sensitive, low-cost and convenient QDs-mediated fluorescent method for the detection of HBV gene mutations in real serum samples from chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients who had received lamivudine or telbivudine antiviral therapy. We also evaluated the efficiency of this method for the detection of drug-resistant mutations compared with direct sequencing. In CHB, HBV DNA from the serum samples of patients with poor response or virological breakthrough can be hybridized to probes containing the M204I mutation to visualize fluorescence under fluorescence microscopy, where fluorescence intensity is related to the virus load, in our method. At present, the limits of the method used to detect HBV genetic variations by fluorescence quantum dots is 103 IU/mL. These results show that QDs can be used as fluorescent probes to detect viral HBV DNA polymerase gene variation, and is a simple readout system without complex and expensive instruments, which provides an attractive platform for the detection of HBV M204I mutation.

  2. Advanced DNA-Based Point-of-Care Diagnostic Methods for Plant Diseases Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Yih Lau

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic technologies for the detection of plant pathogens with point-of-care capability and high multiplexing ability are an essential tool in the fight to reduce the large agricultural production losses caused by plant diseases. The main desirable characteristics for such diagnostic assays are high specificity, sensitivity, reproducibility, quickness, cost efficiency and high-throughput multiplex detection capability. This article describes and discusses various DNA-based point-of care diagnostic methods for applications in plant disease detection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR is the most common DNA amplification technology used for detecting various plant and animal pathogens. However, subsequent to PCR based assays, several types of nucleic acid amplification technologies have been developed to achieve higher sensitivity, rapid detection as well as suitable for field applications such as loop-mediated isothermal amplification, helicase-dependent amplification, rolling circle amplification, recombinase polymerase amplification, and molecular inversion probe. The principle behind these technologies has been thoroughly discussed in several review papers; herein we emphasize the application of these technologies to detect plant pathogens by outlining the advantages and disadvantages of each technology in detail.

  3. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U; Mustafa, S; Che Man, Y B; Yusop, M H M; Bari, M F; Islam, Kh N; Hasan, M F

    2011-01-01

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 0 C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 μg ml -1 swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  4. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INNE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Lot 104-108, Tingkat 1, Block A, Taman Pertiwi Indah, Jalan Kangar-Alor Star, Seriab, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Mustafa, S; Che Man, Y B; Yusop, M H M [Halal Products Research Institute, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Bari, M F [School of Materials Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, Seriab 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Islam, Kh N [Department of Preclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Hasan, M F, E-mail: uda@unimap.edu.my [Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-05-13

    We used 40 {+-} 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 {sup 0}C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 {mu}g ml{sup -1} swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  5. Detection of radiation treatment of meat by novel techniques of DNA comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Khan, H.M.

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of food to ionizing radiation is being progressively used in many countries to inactivate food pathogens, to eradicate pests and to extend shelf life; thereby contributing to safer and more plentiful food supply. Food control agencies throughout the world need some reliable, simple and rapid methods for detection of irradiated foods to ensure free choice of consumer and to enforce labeling. The DNA comet assay offers great potential as a rapid tool to screen irradiated and unirradiated samples of several kinds of foods. In the present study, frozen beef has been investigated for detection of irradiation treatment. The samples were subjected to radiation doses of 0,4,5 and 7.0 kGy and were stored in freezer before analysis. The cells were extracted into cold PBS solutions, embedded into the agarose gel on microscope slides, lysed and electrophoressed at a voltage of 2v/cm for 2 min. The fragmented DNA as a result of irradiation treatment was stretched in the gel producing the dose dependent comets. These comets were visible using a simple transmission microscope after silver staining. The controlled and irradiated samples of meat were clearly distinguishable on the basis of the stained patterns of DNA in form of round or conical intact cells for unirradiated samples or in form of comets for irradiated samples. It is therefore, concluded that 'DNA Comet Assay' offers a potential to screen unirradiated and irradiated meat samples. (author)

  6. Photonic crystals on copolymer film for label-free detection of DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Han; Cheng, Xin R; Endo, Tatsuro; Kerman, Kagan

    2018-04-30

    The presence of a single-nucleotide polymorphism in Apolipoprotein E4 gene is implicated with the increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, detection of AD-related DNA oligonucleotide sequence associated with Apolipoprotein E4 gene sequence was achieved using localized-surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) on 2D-Photonic crystal (2D-PC) and Au-coated 2D-PC surfaces. 2D-PC surfaces were fabricated on a flexible copolymer film using nano-imprint lithography (NIL). The film surface was then coated with a dual-functionalized polymer to react with surface immobilized DNA probe. DNA hybridization was detected by monitoring the optical responses of either a Fresnel decrease in reflectance on 2D-PC surfaces or an increase in LSPR on Au-coated 2D-PC surfaces. The change in response due to DNA hybridization on the modified surfaces was also investigated using mismatched and non-complementary oligonucleotides sequences. The proof-of-concept results are promising towards the development of 2D-PC on copolymer film surfaces as miniaturized and wearable biosensors for various diagnostic and defense applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of base pair mismatches in duplex DNA and RNA oligonucleotides using electrospray mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffey, Richard H.; Greig, Michael J.

    1997-05-01

    The identify and location of base pair mismatches in non- covalent DNA:RNA duplexes are established using MS and MS-MS on a quadruple ion trap with electrospray ionization (ESI). MS-MS experiments on a 14mer duplex (D) with a single C:A base pair mismatch using lower activation energy results in selective cleavage of the mismatched A nucleobase, even in the presence of the wild-type duplex. The location of the mismatch base pair can be discerned via presence of the wild-type duplex. The location of the mismatch base pair can be discerned via selection of the (D-5H)5- ion and fragmentation of the backbone at that location in a n additional MS-MS experiment. Selective fragmentation is observed for C in a C-C mismatched base pair, which is very difficult to detect using chemical cleavage or E. coli mismatch binding protein. In an RNA:DNA duplex with a single base pair mismatch, the DNA base is removed without fragmentation of the RNA strand, greatly simplifying the interpretation of the resulting MS spectrum. A method is presented for detecting two DNA strands, for example a point mutation which generates an oncogenic phenotype, and the wild-type message. The results suggest that ESI-MS-MS may provide a rapid and selective method to identify and locate genetic mutations without the need for chemical degradation or protein binding followed by gel electrophoresis.

  8. Nanoparticle-labeled DNA capture elements for detection and identification of biological agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Johnathan L.; Holwitt, Eric A.; Parker, Jill E.; Vivekananda, Jeevalatha; Franz, Veronica

    2004-12-01

    Aptamers, synthetic DNA capture elements (DCEs), can be made chemically or in genetically engineered bacteria. DNA capture elements are artificial DNA sequences, from a random pool of sequences, selected for their specific binding to potential biological warfare or terrorism agents. These sequences were selected by an affinity method using filters to which the target agent was attached and the DNA isolated and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in an iterative, increasingly stringent, process. The probes can then be conjugated to Quantum Dots and super paramagnetic nanoparticles. The former provide intense, bleach-resistant fluorescent detection of bioagent and the latter provide a means to collect the bioagents with a magnet. The fluorescence can be detected in a flow cytometer, in a fluorescence plate reader, or with a fluorescence microscope. To date, we have made DCEs to Bacillus anthracis spores, Shiga toxin, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis (VEE) virus, and Francisella tularensis. DCEs can easily distinguish Bacillus anthracis from its nearest relatives, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. Development of a high through-put process is currently being investigated.

  9. SYBR green-based detection of Leishmania infantum DNA using peripheral blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemian, Mehrdad; Gharavi, Mohammad Javad; Akhlaghi, Lame; Mohebali, Mehdi; Meamar, Ahmad Reza; Aryan, Ehsan; Oormazdi, Hormozd; Ghayour, Zahra

    2016-03-01

    Parasitological methods for the diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) require invasive sampling procedures. The aim of this study was to detect Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) DNA by real time-PCR method in peripheral blood of symptomatic VL patient and compared its performance with nested PCR, an established molecular method with very high diagnostic indices. 47 parasitologically confirmed VL patients diagnosed by direct agglutination test (DAT > 3200), bone marrow aspiration and presented characteristic clinical features (fever, hepatosplenomegaly, and anemia) and 40 controls (non-endemic healthy control-30, Malaria-2, Toxoplasma gondii-2, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-2, HBV-1, HCV-1, HSV-1 and CMV-1) were enrolled in this study. SYBR-green based real time-PCR and nested PCR was performed to amplify the Kinetoplast DNA minicircle gene using the DNA extracted from Buffy coat. From among 47 patients, 45 (95.7 %) were positive by both nested-PCR and real time-PCR. These results indicate that real time-PCR was not only as sensitive as a nested-PCR assay for detection of Leishmania kDNA in clinical sample, but also more rapid. The advantage of real time-PCR based methods over nested-PCR is simple to perform, more faster in which nested-PCR requires post-PCR processing and reducing contamination risk.

  10. Detection of biochemical reaction and DNA hybridization using a planar Bragg grating sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, M.; Belle, S.; Hellmann, R.

    2011-05-01

    We report on the application of a silica on silicon based planar Bragg grating (PBG) evanescent field sensor as a refractive index biosensor. Our results demonstrate that typical biochemical reactions such as the binding between Biotin (vitamin H) and Streptavidin can be traced in real time on the sensor surface. For the detection of Streptavidin, Biotin was attached to the silanized surface of the planar Bragg grating sensor followed by the immobilization of Streptavidin with a concentration of 7.5nM, 15nM and 30nM, respectively. Real time monitoring capability is highlighted by interrupting the biochemical reaction by applying PBS solution and restarting the reaction several times showing a quasi instantaneous spectral response of the PBG sensor. In addition, applying the same bio-functionalized sensor we have investigated the detection of DNA hybridization. For this purpose, biotinylated single stranded DNA was linked to the sensor surface via Streptavidin. Using this functionalized PBG sensor surface, the DNA hybridization of unlabeled complementary single stranded DNA with a concentration of 5μM can be observed.

  11. Development of SCAR primers based on a repetitive DNA fingerprint for Escherichia coli detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangdee, Aphidech; Natphosuk, Sitakan; Srisathan, Adunwit; Sangdee, Kusavadee

    2013-02-01

    The present study aimed to use enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) fingerprints to design SCAR primers for the detection of Escherichia coli. The E. coli strains were isolated from various water sources. The primary presumptive identification of E. coli was achieved using MacConkey agar. Nineteen isolates were selected and confirmed to be E. coli strains based on seven biochemical characteristics. ERIC-PCR with ERIC 1R and ERIC 2 primers were used to generate DNA fingerprints. ERIC-PCR DNA profiles showed variant DNA profiles among the tested E. coli strains and distinguished all E. coli strains from the other tested bacterial strains. A 350 bp band that predominated in five E. coli strains was used for the development of the species-specific SCAR primers EC-F1 and EC-R1. The primers showed good specificity for E. coli, with the exception of a single false positive reaction with Sh. flexneri DMST 4423. The primers were able to detect 50 pg and 10(0) CFU/ml of genomic DNA and cells of E. coli, respectively.

  12. Different grain grinding methods affect detection of Fusarium graminearum DNA and mycotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapani YLI-MATTILA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is the most important deoxynivalenol (DON producing species in northern Europe and Asia. The highest DON levels in Finland have been found in oat grain, and DNA levels of F. graminearum are in agreement with DON levels, when DON is measured by accredited GC-MS. In addition to DON, 3ADON is present in Finnish grain samples. Large variations in DON content and amounts of F. graminearum DNA, and poor coefficient of determination (R2 between these, have been detected in oat grain when the RIDA®QUICK SCAN kit results for DON content have been used. This study confirmed that the coefficient of determination was usually less when DNA or DON were extracted from oat flour, which was not ground with 0.8 mm or 1 mm sieves. DON levels obtained with the Rida®Quick method were usually higher than those obtained with accredited GC-MS in Finnish oat, barley and wheat samples. The homogenization of the oat flour by sieving is therefore likely to be connected to the variations in DON detection. Amounts of F. graminearum DNA and DON close to legislative limits should be reconfirmed with accredited quantitative analyses.

  13. Optimization of separation and detection schemes for DNA with pulsed field slab gel and capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, David A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of the Human Genome Project is outlined followed by a discussion of electrophoresis in slab gels and capillaries and its application to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Techniques used to modify electroosmotic flow in capillaries are addressed. Several separation and detection schemes for DNA via gel and capillary electrophoresis are described. Emphasis is placed on the elucidation of DNA fragment size in real time and shortening separation times to approximate real time monitoring. The migration of DNA fragment bands through a slab gel can be monitored by UV absorption at 254 nm and imaged by a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Background correction and immediate viewing of band positions to interactively change the field program in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis are possible throughout the separation. The use of absorption removes the need for staining or radioisotope labeling thereby simplifying sample preparation and reducing hazardous waste generation. This leaves the DNA in its native state and further analysis can be performed without de-staining. The optimization of several parameters considerably reduces total analysis time. DNA from 2 kb to 850 kb can be separated in 3 hours on a 7 cm gel with interactive control of the pulse time, which is 10 times faster than the use of a constant field program. The separation of ΦX174RF DNA-HaeIII fragments is studied in a 0.5% methyl cellulose polymer solution as a function of temperature and applied voltage. The migration times decreased with both increasing temperature and increasing field strength, as expected. The relative migration rates of the fragments do not change with temperature but are affected by the applied field. Conditions were established for the separation of the 271/281 bp fragments, even without the addition of intercalating agents. At 700 V/cm and 20°C, all fragments are separated in less than 4 minutes with an average plate number of 2.5 million per meter.

  14. Artifactual mutations resulting from DNA lesions limit detection levels in ultrasensitive sequencing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeithuber, Barbara; Makova, Kateryna D.; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2016-01-01

    The need in cancer research or evolutionary biology to detect rare mutations or variants present at very low frequencies (DNA lesions introduce important error sources in ultrasensitive technologies such as single molecule PCR (smPCR) applications (e.g. droplet-digital PCR), or next-generation sequencing (NGS) based methods. Using templates with known amplifiable lesions (8-oxoguanine, deaminated 5-methylcytosine, uracil, and DNA heteroduplexes), we assessed with smPCR and duplex sequencing that templates with these lesions were amplified very efficiently by proofreading polymerases (except uracil), leading to G->T, and to a lesser extent, to unreported G->C substitutions at 8-oxoguanine lesions, and C->T transitions in amplified uracil containing templates. Long heat incubations common in many DNA extraction protocols significantly increased the number of G->T substitutions. Moreover, in ∼50-80% smPCR reactions we observed the random amplification preference of only one of both DNA strands explaining the known ‘PCR jackpot effect’, with the result that a lesion became indistinguishable from a true mutation or variant. Finally, we showed that artifactual mutations derived from uracil and 8-oxoguanine could be significantly reduced by DNA repair enzymes. PMID:27477585

  15. Techniques of DNA hybridization detect small numbers of mycobacteria with no cross-hybridization with non-mycobacterial respiratory organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoemaker, S.A.; Fisher, J.H.; Scoggin, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    The traditional methods used in identifying mycobacteria, such as acid-fast bacillus stains and culture, are often time-consuming, insensitive, and nonspecific. As part of an ongoing program to improve diagnosis and characterization of mycobacteria, the authors have found that deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization techniques using isotopically labeled, single-stranded, total DNA can be used to detect as little as 10(-4) micrograms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) DNA. This amount of DNA represents approximately 2 X 10(4) genomes. They have also shown the MTb DNA is sufficiently different from the DNA of non-mycobacterial microorganisms such that cross-hybridization with MTb DNA does not occur under the hybridization conditions employed. The authors speculate that DNA hybridization techniques may allow the rapid, sensitive, and specific identification of mycobacteria

  16. A feasibility study of the use of DNA fragmentation as a method for detecting irradiation of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.L.; Bulford, B.B.

    1990-07-01

    The main conclusions of the study are: 1. Gamma-irradiation at doses of 1-10 kGy, as recommended for use in food irradiation, causes extensive fragmentation of DNA molecules. The degree of fragmentation increases with increasing doses of irradiation treatment. 2. Irradiation-induced DNA fragments can be rapidly separated from intact DNA using a simple ultra-filtration method. 3. The separated DNA fragments can be detected/quantified rapidly using the simple Invitrogen DNA DipStick procedure. Dot-blot assays based on probes to widely conserved genes (e.g. histone genes) may also prove of value, but will require further development. 4. As DNA is present in a wide range of foods, DNA fragmentation offers a potentially useful marker for the irradiation treatment of foods. The assay now requires assessment with DNA extracts of a variety of foods. (author)

  17. Quantitative detection of DNA by autocatalytic enlargement of hybridized gold nanoprobes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Zongrui; Cao, Cuong; Sim, Sang Jun

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative detection of specific viral DNA has become a pressing issue for the earlier clinical diagnosis of viral infectious diseases. Therefore, in this paper, we report a simple, sensitive, and inexpensive quantitative approach for DNA detection based on the autocatalytic Au deposition of gold...... nanoprobes via the surface reduction of AuCl4− to Au0 on their surface in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). On this basis, signal enhancements in the absorbance intensity and kinetic behavior of gold enlargement in the aqueous phase have been well investigated...... and explained for the selection of analytical parameters. To achieve high sensitivity, magnetic particles conjugated with capture probes (PMPs) were employed for the collection of gold nanoprobes. After denaturated by ion a pH 11 solution, the amplified signals of gold nanoprobes, which is proportional...

  18. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; de Lourdes Muñoz, María; Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Altuzar, Victor; Burgueño, Juan; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G.; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P.; Cisneros, Alejandro; Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Sanchez-Sinencio, Feliciano

    2014-01-01

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples. PMID:24776933

  19. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Díaz-Badillo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples.

  20. Detection and identification of phytoplasma DNA in symptomatic mushrooms of the genus Ramaria (O. Gomphales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín, María P.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Using polymerase chain reaction assays with specific primers for amplifying phytoplasma 16S rDNA, the presence of phytoplasmas in Ramaria basidiomes with abnormal development has been detected for the first time in fungi. Phytoplasmas have not been detected in asymptomatic basidiomes. Sequence analyses based on parsimony and maximum likelihood place the phytoplasma in the Stolbur group.Mediante la reacci6n en cadena de la polimerasa y el uso de iniciadores específicos para la regidn 16S rDNA de fitoplasmas, se ha detectado por primera vez en hongos la presencia de estos organismos en basidiomas de Ramaria que presentaban un desarrollo anormal. El analisis filogen&ico de las secuencias por los criterios de parsimonia y de maxima verosimilitud confirman a este fitoplasma como del grupo "Stolbur".

  1. The first detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in environmental fruits and vegetables samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, A; Pietkiewicz, H; Szostakowska, B; Myjak, P

    2012-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infections are prevalent in humans and animals all over the world. The aim of the study was to estimate the occurrence of T. gondii oocysts in fruits and vegetables and determine the genotype of the parasites. A total number of 216 fruits and vegetables samples were taken from shops and home gardens located in the area of northern Poland. Oocysts were recovered with the flocculation method. Then, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the B1 gene was used for specific T. gondii detection and quantification. Toxoplasma DNA was found in 21 samples. Genotyping at the SAG2 locus showed SAG2 type I and SAG2 type II. This is the first investigation describing T. gondii DNA identification in a large number of fruits and vegetables samples with rapid molecular detection methods. The results showed that fruits and vegetables contaminated with T. gondii may play a role in the prevalence of toxoplasmosis in Poland.

  2. Use of Culture, PCR Analysis, and DNA Microarrays for Detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from Chicken Feces

    OpenAIRE

    Keramas, Georgios; Bang, Dang Duong; Lund, Marianne; Madsen, Mogens; Bunkenborg, Henrik; Telleman, Pieter; Christensen, Claus Bo Vöge

    2004-01-01

    A DNA microarray for detection of Campylobacter spp. was recently developed and applied to detect Campylobacter spp. directly from chicken feces. Sixty-five pooled chicken cloacal swab samples from 650 individual broiler chickens were included in the study. The results of Campylobacter sp. detection obtained with DNA microarrays were compared to those obtained by conventional culture and gel electrophoresis. By conventional culture, 60% of the samples were positive for either Campylobacter je...

  3. Detection of Treponema pallidum Sp. Pallidum DNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) by Two PCR Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Rita; Águas, Maria João; Batista, Teresa; Araújo, Carlos; Mansinho, Kamal; Pereira, Filomena da Luz Martins

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory diagnosis of neurosyphilis is complicated especially when it is asymptomatic, no single laboratory test result being appropriate to diagnose central nervous system infectivity caused by Treponema pallidum. Our objective was to evaluate two polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques for the detection of T. pallidum DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with syphilis. One hundred twenty-four CSF samples from patients with reactive blood tests for syphilis were obtained. Two PCR techniques (47-PCR, polA-PCR) were used to detect T. pallidum DNA. The laboratory criteria used for the diagnosis of neurosyphilis to which the PCR techniques were compared were those recommended by the IUSTI: 2008 European guidelines on the management of syphilis. Treponema pallidum DNA was detected amplified in 37 of 124 (29.8%) and 30 of 124 (24.2%) samples with the 47-PCR and polA-PCR, respectively. Sensitivities were 75.8% and 69.7% and specificities 86.8% and 92.3%, respectively, for 47-PCR and polA-PCR techniques, respectively. The three CSF samples of patients with primary syphilis did not fulfill the criteria of neurosyphilis and DNA was only detected in one by the 47-PCR. In samples from secondary syphilis and neurosyphilis, three of nine and nine of nine respectively, results were coincident for the two PCR techniques and neurosyphilis criteria. Major discrepancies between the two PCR techniques and neurosyphilis diagnostic criteria were observed in latent syphilis. Beyond some limitations of the study, which are discussed here, both PCR techniques seem to be useful for the diagnosis of neurosyphilis, although 47-PCR presents a higher sensitivity and polA-PCR a higher specificity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Clinical patterns associated with the concurrent detection of anti-HBs and HBV DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Olympia E; Widera, Marek; Korth, Johannes; Kefalakes, Helenie; Katsounas, Antonios; Hilgard, Gudrun; Gerken, Guido; Canbay, Ali; Ciesek, Sandra; Verheyen, Jens

    2018-02-01

    Simultaneous detection of anti-HBs and HBV DNA is a rare serological combination and has been described in acute and chronic HBV infection. To scrutinize viral and clinical patterns associated with concurrent detection of anti-HBs and HBV DNA. Simultaneous detection of anti-HBs and HBV DNA was observed in 64/1444 (4.4%) patients treated for HBV infection at the University Hospital of Essen from 2006 to 2016 (8 with acute, 20 with reactivated, and 36 chronic HBV infection). Clinical data and laboratory parameters were analyzed. Regions of the small hepatitis B surface antigen (SHB) and the reverse transcriptase (RT) were sequenced using next generation sequencing (NGS). Among the 64 patients with detectable HBV DNA and anti-HBs, 17 were HBsAg negative (HBsAg[-]), and two had acute liver failure. Patients with acute HBV infection had fewer genotype specific amino acid substitutions in the SHB region than patients with reactivated HBV infection (4 [4.5] vs 9 [16.25], P = 0.043). However, we could observe a significantly higher number of mutations in the a-determinant region when comparing chronically infected patients to patients with acute infection (0 [1] vs 1 [1], P = 0.044). The ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous mutations (Ka/Ks) was on average >1 for the SHB region and 1) in the SHB region indicates that anti-HBs might have exerted selection pressure on the HBsAg. In three cases the diagnosis of acute HBV infection would have been at least delayed by only focusing on HBsAg testing. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Dyes designed for high sensitivity detection of double-stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1994-01-01

    Novel fluorescent dyes are provided, characterized by having a fluorophore joined to a polycationic chain of at least two positive charges. The dyes are found to provide for high enhancement upon binding to nucleic acid and have strong binding affinities to the nucleic acid, as compared to the fluorophore without the polycationic chain. The dyes find use in detection of dsDNA in gel electrophoresis and solution at substantially higher sensitivities using substantially less dye.

  6. GANN: Genetic algorithm neural networks for the detection of conserved combinations of features in DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beiko Robert G

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multitude of motif detection algorithms developed to date have largely focused on the detection of patterns in primary sequence. Since sequence-dependent DNA structure and flexibility may also play a role in protein-DNA interactions, the simultaneous exploration of sequence- and structure-based hypotheses about the composition of binding sites and the ordering of features in a regulatory region should be considered as well. The consideration of structural features requires the development of new detection tools that can deal with data types other than primary sequence. Results GANN (available at http://bioinformatics.org.au/gann is a machine learning tool for the detection of conserved features in DNA. The software suite contains programs to extract different regions of genomic DNA from flat files and convert these sequences to indices that reflect sequence and structural composition or the presence of specific protein binding sites. The machine learning component allows the classification of different types of sequences based on subsamples of these indices, and can identify the best combinations of indices and machine learning architecture for sequence discrimination. Another key feature of GANN is the replicated splitting of data into training and test sets, and the implementation of negative controls. In validation experiments, GANN successfully merged important sequence and structural features to yield good predictive models for synthetic and real regulatory regions. Conclusion GANN is a flexible tool that can search through large sets of sequence and structural feature combinations to identify those that best characterize a set of sequences.

  7. Label-free detection of C-reactive protein using an electrochemical DNA immunoassay

    OpenAIRE

    Songjaroen, Temsiri; Feeny, Rachel M.; Mensack, Meghan M.; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida; Henry, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    A label-free electrochemical immunoassay that combines DNA-directed immobilization (DDI) with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) on microwire sensors is reported for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is an acute-phase protein that is strongly correlated with systemic inflammation. Since inflammation plays a role in pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, CRP can be used to predict the likelihood of coronary events. To demonstrate the new chemistry, 25-μm Au electrodes ...

  8. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols to detect Mycobacterium bovis in bovine tissue by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Yumi Ikuta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The current scenario of international beef trading has increased the pressure for better and faster diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis. Although traditional culture remains the gold standard method to confirm Mycobacterium bovis infection, it is exceedingly time consuming, and demands viable mycobacteria. Molecular methods overcome the flaws of the bacteriological methods with faster detection and identification. However, mycobacterial features like a complex cell wall and pathogen–host interaction make the molecular detection a challenge. Three protocols for DNA extraction (A, B and C from bovine tissues were tested to verify the most suitable technique for routine diagnostic assessment of their specificity and sensitivity. Thirty culture-positive and thirty culture-negative granulomatous lesions were included in the trial. From each sample, three tissue suspensions at different dilutions (10-1, 10-2 and 10-3 were prepared and submitted to DNA extraction. PCR procedures targeting IS6110 were performed, employing two volumes of DNA: 5 µL of all three dilutions, and 2.5 µL of the 10-1 dilution. Protocol A was able to detect members of the M. tuberculosis complex in most samples. The sensitivity of the test decreased with increase in tissue-suspension dilution. Although Protocol A presented the highest sensitivity followed by C and B, it showed the lowest specificity, which can be due to a failure in primary isolation caused by the lack of viable organisms or incubation time. Regardless classical bacteriological methods are still recommended by OIE, after evaluating the sensitivity of DNA extraction protocols and PCR procedures, we conclude that the best strategy for M. bovis detection is to follow Protocol A on concentrated tissue suspensions.

  9. Gold Nanoparticles for the Detection of DNA Adducts as Biomarkers of Exposure to Acrylamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larguinho, Miguel Angelo Rodrigues

    The main objective of this thesis was the development of a gold nanoparticle-based methodology for detection of DNA adducts as biomarkers, to try and overcome existing drawbacks in currently employed techniques. For this objective to be achieved, the experimental work was divided in three components: sample preparation, method of detection and development of a model for exposure to acrylamide. Different techniques were employed and combined for de-complexation and purification of DNA samples (including ultrasonic energy, nuclease digestion and chromatography), resulting in a complete protocol for sample treatment, prior to detection. The detection of alkylated nucleotides using gold nanoparticles was performed by two distinct methodologies: mass spectrometry and colorimetric detection. In mass spectrometry, gold nanoparticles were employed for laser desorption/ionisation instead of the organic matrix. Identification of nucleotides was possible by fingerprint, however no specific mass signals were denoted when using gold nanoparticles to analyse biological samples. An alternate method using the colorimetric properties of gold nanoparticles was employed for detection. This method inspired in the non-cross-linking assay allowed the identification of glycidamide-guanine adducts and DNA adducts generated in vitro. For the development of a model of exposure, two different aquatic organisms were studies: a goldfish and a mussel. Organisms were exposed to waterborne acrylamide, after which mortality was recorded and effect concentrations were estimated. In goldfish, both genotoxicity and metabolic alterations were assessed and revealed dose-effect relationships of acrylamide. Histopathological alterations were verified primarily in pancreatic cells, but also in hepatocytes. Mussels showed higher effect concentrations than goldfish. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, biotransformation and neurotoxicity were analysed after prolonged exposure, showing mild oxidative stress in

  10. Application of the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction for the detection of DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atienzar, F.; Evenden, A.; Jha, A.; Depledge, M.; Savva, D.; Walker, C.

    1998-01-01

    The technique of arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) shows potential as a selective and sensitive assay for the detection of xenobiotic-induced DNA damage. Problems, however, may occur in AP-PCR, diminishing its discriminative abilities. These problems include the presence of spurious amplification products in non-template-containing negative control reactions, and a lack of reproducibility amongst amplification patterns. Experiments designed to remove contaminated nucleic acids by ultraviolet (UV) treatment indicated that spurious bands are the result of aberrant primer-induced polymerisation, an event shown to be influenced by the concentration of deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTP) present in the reaction mixtures. Optimisation of dNTP concentration from 0.22 to 0.33 MM resulted in clear negative controls and highly reproducible amplification patterns with all DNA templates. As an example of the application of the method, in the present study, the macroalga Palmaria palmata (Rhodophyta) was exposed to UV A and B radiations. The study shows that the AP-PCR method can detect DNA damage and may be useful in detecting such damage following exposure of cells to xenobiotics. (author)

  11. Application of the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction for the detection of DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atienzar, F.; Evenden, A.; Jha, A.; Depledge, M. [University of Plymouth (United Kingdom). Environmental Research Centre; Child, P. [ADAS Boxworth (United Kingdom); Savva, D.; Walker, C. [University of Reading (United Kingdom). School of Animal and Microbial Sciences

    1998-07-01

    The technique of arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) shows potential as a selective and sensitive assay for the detection of xenobiotic-induced DNA damage. Problems, however, may occur in AP-PCR, diminishing its discriminative abilities. These problems include the presence of spurious amplification products in non-template-containing negative control reactions, and a lack of reproducibility amongst amplification patterns. Experiments designed to remove contaminated nucleic acids by ultraviolet (UV) treatment indicated that spurious bands are the result of aberrant primer-induced polymerisation, an event shown to be influenced by the concentration of deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTP) present in the reaction mixtures. Optimisation of dNTP concentration from 0.22 to 0.33 MM resulted in clear negative controls and highly reproducible amplification patterns with all DNA templates. As an example of the application of the method, in the present study, the macroalga Palmaria palmata (Rhodophyta) was exposed to UV A and B radiations. The study shows that the AP-PCR method can detect DNA damage and may be useful in detecting such damage following exposure of cells to xenobiotics. (author)

  12. A novel method using edge detection for signal extraction from cDNA microarray image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Kim, H Y; Lee, Y S

    2001-06-30

    Gene expression analyses by probes of hybridization from mRNA to cDNA targets arrayed on membranes or activated glass surfaces have revolutionized the way of profiling mega level gene expression. The main remaining problems however are sensitivity of detection, reproducibility and data processing. During processing of microarray images, especially irregularities of spot position and shape could generate significant errors: small regions of signal spots can be mis-included into background area and vice versa. Here we report a novel method to eliminate such obstacles by sensing their edges. Application of edge detection technology on separating spots from the background decreases the probability of the errors and gives more accurate information about the states of spots such as the pixel number, degree of fragmentation, width and height of spot, and circumference of spot. Such information can be used for the quality control of cDNA microarray experiments and filtering of low quality spots. We analyzed the cDNA microarray image that contains 10,368 genes using edge detection and compared the result with that of conventional method which draws circle around the spot.

  13. Primer effect in the detection of mitochondrial DNA point heteroplasmy by automated sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatayud, Marta; Ramos, Amanda; Santos, Cristina; Aluja, Maria Pilar

    2013-06-01

    The correct detection of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy by automated sequencing presents methodological constraints. The main goals of this study are to investigate the effect of sense and distance of primers in heteroplasmy detection and to test if there are differences in the accurate determination of heteroplasmy involving transitions or transversions. A gradient of the heteroplasmy levels was generated for mtDNA positions 9477 (transition G/A) and 15,452 (transversion C/A). Amplification and subsequent sequencing with forward and reverse primers, situated at 550 and 150 bp from the heteroplasmic positions, were performed. Our data provide evidence that there is a significant difference between the use of forward and reverse primers. The forward primer is the primer that seems to give a better approximation to the real proportion of the variants. No significant differences were found concerning the distance at which the sequencing primers were placed neither between the analysis of transitions and transversions. The data collected in this study are a starting point that allows to glimpse the importance of the sequencing primers in the accurate detection of point heteroplasmy, providing additional insight into the overall automated sequencing strategy.

  14. Nanobiosensor for Detection and Quantification of DNA Sequences in Degraded Mixed Meats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Ali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel class of nanobiosensor was developed by integrating a 27-nucleotide AluI fragment of swine cytochrome b (cytb gene to a 3-nm diameter citrate-tannate coated gold nanoparticle (GNP. The biosensor detected 0.5% and 1% pork in raw and 2.5-h autoclaved pork-beef binary admixtures in a single step without any separation or washing. The hybridization kinetics of the hybrid sensor was studied with synthetic and AluI digested real pork targets from moderate to extreme target concentrations and a sigmoidal relationship was found. Using the kinetic curve, a convenient method for quantifying and counting target DNA copy number was developed. The accuracy of the method was over 90% and 80% for raw and autoclaved pork-beef binary admixtures in the range of 5–100% pork adulteration. The biosensor probe identified a target DNA sequence that was several-folds shorter than a typical PCR-template. This offered the detection and quantitation of potential targets in highly processed or degraded samples where PCR amplification was not possible due to template crisis. The assay was a viable alternative approach of qPCR for detecting, quantifying and counting copy number of shorter size DNA sequences to address a wide ranging biological problem in food industry, diagnostic laboratories and forensic medicine.

  15. Improved single-cell gel electrophoresis assay for detecting DNA damage in Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marzio, Walter D; Saenz, María E; Lemière, Sebastien; Vasseur, Paule

    2005-12-01

    The earthworm (Eisenia foetida) is an attractive sentinel species for detecting genotoxicity in soil. In this study, an improved single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay was developed for detecting DNA damage in the coelomocytes (lymphocytes) of earthworms. Coelomocytes were obtained from the coelomic fluid using a modified extrusion medium that did not include the mucolytic agent guaiacol. The extruded coelomocytes contained at least three types of cells: eleocytes (75% of the total), amoebocytes, and granulocytes. The DNA migration parameters were determined for untreated cells of each type in order that the assay could be performed with minimum inter- and intra-individual variation. In addition, lysis time was reduced to 10 min, and only one neutralization step was used. DNA damage was detected in isolated eleocytes treated with hydrogen peroxide and cadmium, and in eleocytes from earthworms exposed for up to 21 days to soil containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The SCGE assay using earthworm eleocytes appears to be a sensitive biomarker for evaluating exposure to genotoxic compounds.

  16. An effective method for detection and analysis of DNA damage induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Y.; Saito, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Matsuyama, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Ryuto, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Abe, T.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an efficient system to detect and analyze DNA mutations induced by heavy-ion beams in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this system, a stable transgenic Arabidopsis line that constitutively expresses a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) by a single-copy gene at a genomic locus was constructed and irradiated with heavy-ion beams. The YFP gene is a target of mutagenesis, and its loss of function or expression can easily be detected by the disappearance of YFP signals in planta under microscopy. With this system, a sup(12)Csup(6+)- induced mutant with single deletion and multiple base changes was isolated

  17. Lanthanide mixed ligand chelates for DNA profiling and latent fingerprint detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, E. R.; Allred, Clay

    1997-02-01

    It is our aim to develop a universally applicable latent fingerprint detection method using lanthanide (rare-earth) complexes as a source of luminescence. Use of these lanthanide complexes offers advantages on several fronts, including benefits from large Stokes shifts, long luminescence lifetimes, narrow emissions, ability of sequential assembly of complexes, and chemical variability of the ligands. Proper exploitation of these advantages would lead to a latent fingerprint detection method superior to any currently available. These same characteristics also lend themselves to many of the problems associated with DNA processing in the forensic science context.

  18. SDR-ELISA: Ultrasensitive and high-throughput nucleic acid detection based on antibody-like DNA nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Junlin; Chen, Junhua; Zhuang, Li; Zhou, Shungui

    2017-04-15

    An ultrasensitive and high-throughput nucleic acid detection system, termed as strand displacement reaction-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (SDR-ELISA), has been developed on the basis of antibody-like DNA nanostructures. Three digoxigenin or biotin modified hairpin probes are utilized to construct antibody-like DNA nanostructures that feature affinity toward streptavidin and anti-digoxigenin antibody via isothermal target-triggered SDR amplification. These antibody-like nanostructures have been employed to conjugate horseradish-peroxidase-labeled anti-digoxigenin antibody with streptavidin that is immobilized on microliter plate wells for enzyme-linked colorimetric assay. The resulting SDR-ELISA system is ultrasensitive for target DNA with a low detection limit of 5 fM. Moreover, the SDR-ELISA system is capable of discriminating DNA sequences with single base mutations, and do so in a high-throughput manner by detection and quantification of up to 96 or 384 DNA samples in a single shot. This detection system is further applied to detect other DNA targets such as Shewanella oneidensis specific DNA sequence, which indicates the generality of proposed SDR-ELISA system. The integration of SDR amplification and convenient ELISA technique advances an intelligent strategy for ultrasensitive and high-throughput nucleic acid detection, which may be amenable for direct visual detection and quantification using an accompanying quantitative color chart. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of commercial DNA preparation kits for the detection of Brucellae in tissue using quantitative real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straube Eberhard

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of Brucellae in tissue specimens using PCR assays is difficult because the amount of bacteria is usually low. Therefore, optimised DNA extraction methods are critical. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of commercial kits for the extraction of Brucella DNA. Methods Five kits were evaluated using clinical specimens: QIAamp™ DNA Mini Kit (QIAGEN, peqGold™ Tissue DNA Mini Kit (PeqLab, UltraClean™ Tissue and Cells DNA Isolation Kit (MoBio, DNA Isolation Kit for Cells and Tissues (Roche, and NucleoSpin™ Tissue (Macherey-Nagel. DNA yield was determined using a quantitative real-time PCR assay targeting IS711 that included an internal amplification control. Results Kits of QIAGEN and Roche provided the highest amount of DNA, Macherey-Nagel and Peqlab products were intermediate whereas MoBio yielded the lowest amount of DNA. Differences were significant (p Conclusions We observed differences in DNA yield as high as two orders of magnitude for some samples between the best and the worst DNA extraction kits and inhibition was observed occasionally. This indicates that DNA purification may be more relevant than expected when the amount of DNA in tissue is very low.

  20. The first detection of Babesia species DNA from Japanese black bears (Ursus thibetanus japonicus) in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, Kazuhito; Aoki, Mikiko; Ichikawa, Madoka; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we tried to detect protozoan blood parasites from the liver or blood of 156 Japanese black bears (Ursus thibetanus japonicus) in Iwate Prefecture of Japan by polymerase chain reaction. Two amplicons (approximately 540 bp and 480 bp) were detected by amplification for V4 hyper-variable regions of the 18S rRNA gene. Approximately 540-bp products were obtained in 119 samples (76.3%) and were considered to be DNA of Hepatozoon ursi. Approximately 480-bp products were obtained in 22 samples (14.1%) and were considered to be DNA of Babesia species. The nucleotide sequences (1635 bp) of the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia sp. were very similar (99.3%) to those (AY190123, AY190124) of Babesia sp. detected previously from Ixodes ovatus. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Babesia sp. detected in this study closely related to Babesia sp. derived from raccoons in Japan and the U.S.A. This is the first report of Babesia species detected from Japanese black bears. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Graphene oxide and DNA aptamer based sub-nanomolar potassium detecting optical nanosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Debopam; Sarkar, Ketaki; Mukherjee, Souvik; Meshik, Xenia; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    2017-08-01

    Quantum-dot (QD) based nanosensors are frequently used by researchers to detect small molecules, ions and different biomolecules. In this article, we present a sensor complex/system comprised of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) aptamer, gold nanoparticle and semiconductor QD, attached to a graphene oxide (GO) flake for detection of potassium. As reported herein, it is demonstrated that QD-aptamer-quencher nanosensor functions even when tethered to GO, opening the way to future applications where sensing can be accomplished simultaneously with other previously demonstrated applications of GO such as serving as a nanocarrier for drug delivery. Herein, it is demonstrated that the DNA based thrombin binding aptamer used in this study undergoes the conformational change needed for sensing even when the nanosensor complex is anchored to the GO. Analysis with the Hill equation indicates the interaction between aptamer and potassium follows sigmoidal Hill kinetics. It is found that the quenching efficiency of the optical sensor is linear with the logarithm of concentration from 1 pM to 100 nM and decreases for higher concentration due to unavailability of aptamer binding sites. Such a simple and sensitive optical aptasensor with minimum detection capability of 1.96 pM for potassium ion can also be employed in-vitro detection of different physiological ions, pathogens and disease detection methods.

  2. [Detection of Candida DNA in simulated blood samples by polymerase chain reaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Sinem; Yücesoy, Mine

    2007-07-01

    Although blood culture method is accepted as gold standard in the laboratory diagnosis of invasive candidiasis seen in immunocompromised patients, cultivation of blood is considered as not a reliable and rapid method for the diagnosis of candidemia, since it may be negative in approximately half of the patients, slow growth rate of Candida in routine culture media and requirement of large amounts of blood for the isolation. The aim of this study was to detect Candida DNA in simulated blood samples by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Simulated samples were prepared by using blood samples of healthy volunteers. These samples were inoculated into tubes with EDTA and BACTEC 9240 blood culture bottles in which no growth was detected and with standard strains of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus together with the clinical isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus, C. kefyr, C. glabrata, C. lusitaniae, C. guilliermondii and Rhodotorula sp. Additionally, blood culture samples of 23 cases whose blood culture bottles signaled as positive and revealed growth of Candida in agar plates were examined. DNA extraction of all samples were performed according to the standard procedure proposed by the MN Nucleospin Tissue Kit (Macherey-Nagel, Germany) for tissue samples; following the pre-treatment with erythrocyte, leukocyte and fungus cell wall lysis buffers. DNAs were amplified with PCR, using primers specific for the 5S rDNA region (PCon 1 and PCon 2 primers) and PCR products were obtained by electrophoresis in 2% agarose gel. Presence of a 105 base pair (bp) product was considered as positive. The lowest detection limit of PCR has been determined as 10(2)-10(3) cfu/ml Candida for our simulated samples. The presence of a 105 bp band has been observed in samples prepared with all Candida strains included in the study. Blood samples spiked with E. coli, S. aureus, A. fumigatus and Rhodotorula sp. and negative blood

  3. Enhanced sensing of dengue virus DNA detection using O2plasma treated-silicon nanowire based electrical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, S F A; Yusof, N A; Hashim, U; Hushiarian, R; M N, M Nuzaihan; Hamidon, M N; Zawawi, R M; Fathil, M F M

    2016-10-26

    Dengue Virus (DENV) has become one of the most serious arthropod-borne viral diseases, causing death globally. The existing methods for DENV detection suffer from the late stage treatment due to antibodies-based detection which is feasible only after five days following the onset of the illness. Here, we demonstrated the highly effective molecular electronic based detection utilizing silicon nanowire (SiNW) integrated with standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process as a sensing device for detecting deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) related to DENV in an early stage diagnosis. To transform the fabricated devices as a functional sensing element, three-step procedure consist of SiNW surface modification, DNA immobilization and DNA hybridization were employed. The detection principle works by detecting the changes in current of SiNW which bridge the source and drain terminal to sense the immobilization of probe DNA and their hybridization with target DNA. The oxygen (O 2 ) plasma was proposed as an effective strategy for increasing the binding amounts of target DNA by modified the SiNW surface. It was found that the detection limit of the optimized O 2 plasma treated-SiNW device could be reduced to 1.985 × 10 -14  M with a linear detection range of the sequence-specific DNA from 1.0 × 10 -9  M to 1.0 × 10 -13  M. In addition, the developed biosensor device was able to discriminate between complementary, single mismatch and non-complementary DNA sequences. This highly sensitive assay was then applied to the detection of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) product of DENV-DNA, making it as a potential method for disease diagnosis through electrical biosensor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) to detect the genotoxic effect of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enan, Mohamed R

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the influence of lead, copper, manganese and cadmium on DNA integrity in plant cells. Plants, as biological indicators, can measure the potential effects of pollutants when they are used to measure effects of heavy metals. The genotoxicity of heavy metals in kidney-bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seedlings was subjected to RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) analysis. An RAPD 'fingerprinting' technique was used to detect DNA damage in the kidney-bean seedlings treated with two selected heavy metals at concentrations of 150 and 350 mg x l(-1). Polymorphisms became evident as the presence and/or absence of DNA fragments in treated samples compared with the untreated one. At 350 mg x l(-1), a high number of both missing bands and new amplified fragment were observed. Results suggested that a qualitative measure reflecting changes in RAPD profiles were significantly affected at higher concentrations (350 mg x l(-1)) of the tested heavy metals. A total of 467 RAPD fragments in RAPD profiles were detected by using six random primers (decamers) and 224 of these fragments showed polymorphism. There was a distinct distance between the band patterns of treated plants and the control samples when the cluster method was applied. In addition, the result derived from numerical analysis revealed a considerable distance between the band pattern of the plant samples treated with 350 mg x l(-1) heavy metals and the control sample. Finally, a comparison between untreated and treated genomes shows that RAPD analysis can be used to evaluate how the environmental pollutants modify the structure of DNA in living organisms.

  5. Sensitive detection of colorectal cancer in peripheral blood by septin 9 DNA methylation assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Grützmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer deaths despite the fact that detection of this cancer in early stages results in over 90% survival rate. Currently less than 45% of at-risk individuals in the US are screened regularly, exposing a need for better screening tests. We performed two case-control studies to validate a blood-based test that identifies methylated DNA in plasma from all stages of CRC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a PCR assay for analysis of Septin 9 (SEPT9 hypermethylation in DNA extracted from plasma, clinical performance was optimized on 354 samples (252 CRC, 102 controls and validated in a blinded, independent study of 309 samples (126 CRC, 183 controls. 168 polyps and 411 additional disease controls were also evaluated. Based on the training study SEPT9-based classification detected 120/252 CRCs (48% and 7/102 controls (7%. In the test study 73/126 CRCs (58% and 18/183 control samples (10% were positive for SEPT9 validating the training set results. Inclusion of an additional measurement replicate increased the sensitivity of the assay in the testing set to 72% (90/125 CRCs detected while maintaining 90% specificity (19/183 for controls. Positive rates for plasmas from the other cancers (11/96 and non-cancerous conditions (41/315 were low. The rate of polyp detection (>1 cm was approximately 20%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Analysis of SEPT9 DNA methylation in plasma represents a straightforward, minimally invasive method to detect all stages of CRC with potential to satisfy unmet needs for increased compliance in the screening population. Further clinical testing is warranted.

  6. Rapid colorimetric assay for detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food samples using LAMP formation of DNA concatemers and gold nanoparticle-DNA probe complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachiralurpan, Sirirat; Sriyapai, Thayat; Areekit, Supatra; Sriyapai, Pichapak; Augkarawaritsawong, Suphitcha; Santiwatanakul, Somchai; Chansiri, Kosum

    2018-04-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes is a major foodborne pathogen of global health concern. Herein, the rapid diagnosis of L. monocytogenes has been achieved using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) based on the phosphatidylcholine-phospholipase C gene (plcB). Colorimetric detection was then performed through the formation of DNA concatemers and a gold nanoparticle/DNA probe complex (GNP/DNA probe). The overall detection process was accomplished within approximately 1 h with no need for complicated equipment. The limits of detection for L. monocytogenes in the forms of purified genomic DNA and pure culture were 800 fg and 2.82 CFU mL-1, respectively. No cross reactions were observed from closely related bacteria species. The LAMP-GNP/DNA probe assay was applied to the detection of 200 raw chicken meat samples and compared to routine standard methods. The data revealed that the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy were 100%, 90.20% and 97.50%, respectively. The present assay was 100% in conformity with LAMP-agarose gel electrophoresis assay. Five samples that were negative by both assays appeared to have the pathogen at below the level of detection. The assay can be applied as a rapid direct screening method for L. monocytogenes.

  7. Detecting frogs as prey in the diets of introduced mammals: a comparison between morphological and DNA-based diet analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeter, Bastian; Bishop, Phillip J; Robertson, Bruce C

    2015-03-01

    Amphibians are currently the most threatened group of vertebrates worldwide, and introduced fauna play a major role in their decline. The control of introduced predators to protect endangered species is often based on predation rates derived from diet studies of predators, but prey detection probabilities using different techniques are variable. We measured the detectability of frogs as prey, using morphological and DNA-based diet analyses, in the stomachs and faeces of four mammal species that have been introduced to many areas of the world. Frogs (Litoria raniformis) were fed to rats (Rattus norvegicus and R. rattus), mice (Mus musculus) and hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus). DNA-based analysis outperformed morphological analysis, increasing the prey detection rate from 2% to 70% in stomachs and from 0% to 53% in faeces. In most cases, utilizing either stomachs or faeces did not affect the success of prey DNA detection; however, using faeces extended the detectability half-life from 7 to 21 h. This study is the first to measure prey DNA detection periods in mammalian stomachs, and the first to compare prey DNA detection periods in the stomachs and faeces of vertebrates. The results indicate that DNA-based diet analysis provides a more reliable approach for detecting amphibians as prey and has the potential to be used to estimate the rate of predation by introduced mammals on endangered amphibians. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. High frequency of M. leprae DNA detection in asymptomatic household contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Rafael Silva; Gomides, Thalisson Artur Ribeiro; Gama, Chaiana Fróes Magalhães; Moreira, Suelen Justo Maria; de Neves Manta, Fernanda Saloum; de Oliveira, Lorena Bruna P; Marçal, Pedro Henrique Ferreira; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Garcia, Raúl Marcel González; de Oliveira Fraga, Lucia Alves

    2018-04-02

    Characterization of the Mycobacterium leprae genome has made possible the development of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) systems that can amplify different genomic regions. Increased reliability and technical efficiency of quantitative PCR (qPCR) makes it a promising tool for early diagnosis of leprosy. Index cases that are multibacillary spread the bacillus silently, even before they are clinically diagnosed. Early detection and treatment could prevent transmission in endemic areas. In this study, the qPCR technique is used to detect DNA of M. leprae in samples of slit skin smears (SSS) of the ear lobe and blood of leprosy patients and their asymptomatic household contacts residing in Governador Valadares, MG, Brazil, a hyperendemic area for leprosy. A total of 164 subjects participated in the study: 43 index cases, 113 household contacts, and, as negative controls, 8 individuals who reported no contact with patients nor history of leprosy in the family. The qPCR was performed to amplify 16S rRNA fragments and was specifically designed for M. leprae. Of asymptomatic household contacts, 23.89% showed bacillary DNA by qPCR in samples of SSS and blood. Also, 48.84% of patients diagnosed with leprosy were positive for qPCR while the bacillary load was positive in only 30.23% of patients. It is important to note that most patients were already receiving treatment when the collection of biological material for qPCR was performed. The level of bacillary DNA from household contacts was similar to the DNA levels detected in the group of paucibacillary patients. Considering that household contacts comprise a recognizable group of individuals with a high risk of disease, as they live in close proximity to a source of infection, qPCR can be used to estimate the risk of progress towards leprosy among household contacts and as a routine screening method for a chemoprophylactic protocol.

  9. Usefulness of in-house PCR methods for hepatitis B virus DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portilho, Moyra Machado; Baptista, Marcia Leite; da Silva, Messias; de Sousa, Paulo Sérgio Fonseca; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Villar, Livia Melo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of three in-house PCR techniques for HBV DNA detection and compare it with commercial quantitative methods to evaluate the usefulness of in-house methods for HBV diagnosis. Three panels of HBsAg reactive sera samples were evaluated: (i) 50 samples were examined using three methods for in-house qualitative PCR and the Cobas Amplicor HBV Monitor Assay; (ii) 87 samples were assayed using in-house semi-nested PCR and the Cobas TaqMan HBV test; (iii) 11 serial samples obtained from 2 HBV-infected individuals were assayed using the Cobas Amplicor HBV test and semi-nested PCR. In panel I, HBV DNA was detected in 44 samples using the Cobas Amplicor HBV test, 42 samples using semi-nested PCR (90% concordance with Cobas Amplicor), 22 samples using PCR for the core gene (63.6% concordance) and 29 samples using single-round PCR for the pre-S/S gene (75% concordance). In panel II, HBV DNA was quantified in 78 of the 87 HBsAg reactive samples using Cobas TaqMan but 52 samples using semi-nested PCR (67.8% concordance). HBV DNA was detected in serial samples until the 17th and 26th week after first donation using in-house semi-nested PCR and the Cobas Amplicor HBV test, respectively. In-house semi-nested PCR presented adequate concordance with commercial methods as an alternative method for HBV molecular diagnosis in low-resource settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Plant DNA detection from grasshopper guts: A step-by-step protocol, from tissue preparation to obtaining plant DNA sequences 1

    OpenAIRE

    Avanesyan, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Premise of the study: A PCR-based method of identifying ingested plant DNA in gut contents of Melanoplus grasshoppers was developed. Although previous investigations have focused on a variety of insects, there are no protocols available for plant DNA detection developed for grasshoppers, agricultural pests that significantly influence plant community composition. Methods and Results: The developed protocol successfully used the noncoding region of the chloroplast trnL (UAA) gene and was te...

  11. Detection of mtDNA deletion in Pearson syndrome by two independent PCR assays from Guthrie card.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, T; Bókay, J; Szönyi, L; Nagy, B; Papp, Z

    1998-03-01

    Pearson syndrome is a multisystem juvenile condition associated with deletions in the mitochondrial genome. The most common 4977 bp deletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can mainly be detected in the patients' peripheral blood. Here we report a child with a clinically unclarified diagnosis where molecular genetic results proved Pearson syndrome from stored dried blood sample 6 months after the patient's death. PCR amplification around the breakpoint of the most common mtDNA deletion could detect the presence of mutated mtDNA. Another polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay indicated the low level of wild type mtDNA in patients' blood. We believe that this case shows the importance of storing Guthrie card and the availability of detection of Pearson syndrome from dried blood sample.

  12. Direct Detection of Unnatural DNA Nucleotides dNaM and d5SICS using the MspA Nanopore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Craig

    Full Text Available Malyshev et al. showed that the four-letter genetic code within a living organism could be expanded to include the unnatural DNA bases dNaM and d5SICS. However, verification and detection of these unnatural bases in DNA requires new sequencing techniques. Here we provide proof of concept detection of dNaM and d5SICS in DNA oligomers via nanopore sequencing using the nanopore MspA. We find that both phi29 DNA polymerase and Hel308 helicase are capable of controlling the motion of DNA containing dNaM and d5SICS through the pore and that single reads are sufficient to detect the presence and location of dNaM and d5SICS within single molecules.

  13. Enzyme-free colorimetric detection systems based on the DNA strand displacement competition reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhao; Birkedal, Victoria; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2016-01-01

    The strand displacement competition assay is based on the dynamic equilibrium of the competitive hybridization of two oligonucleotides (A and B) to a third oligonucleotide (S). In the presence of an analyte that binds to a specific affinity-moiety conjugated to strand B, the equilibrium shifts, w...... G-quadruplex DNAzyme for colorimetric readout of the detection of streptavidin by the naked eye. Finally, we integrate the whole G-quadruplex DNAzyme system in a single DNA strand and show that it is applicable to colorimetric detection......., which can be detected by a shift in the fluorescence resonance energy transfer signal between dyes attached to the DNA strands. In the present study we have integrated an ATP aptamer in the strand B and demonstrated the optical detection of ATP. Furthermore we explore a new readout method using a split......The strand displacement competition assay is based on the dynamic equilibrium of the competitive hybridization of two oligonucleotides (A and B) to a third oligonucleotide (S). In the presence of an analyte that binds to a specific affinity-moiety conjugated to strand B, the equilibrium shifts...

  14. Simple system for isothermal DNA amplification coupled to lateral flow detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Roskos

    Full Text Available Infectious disease diagnosis in point-of-care settings can be greatly improved through integrated, automated nucleic acid testing devices. We have developed an early prototype for a low-cost system which executes isothermal DNA amplification coupled to nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF detection in a mesofluidic cartridge attached to a portable instrument. Fluid handling inside the cartridge is facilitated through one-way passive valves, flexible pouches, and electrolysis-driven pumps, which promotes a compact and inexpensive instrument design. The closed-system disposable prevents workspace amplicon contamination. The cartridge design is based on standard scalable manufacturing techniques such as injection molding. Nucleic acid amplification occurs in a two-layer pouch that enables efficient heat transfer. We have demonstrated as proof of principle the amplification and detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb genomic DNA in the cartridge, using either Loop Mediated Amplification (LAMP or the Exponential Amplification Reaction (EXPAR, both coupled to NALF detection. We envision that a refined version of this cartridge, including upstream sample preparation coupled to amplification and detection, will enable fully-automated sample-in to answer-out infectious disease diagnosis in primary care settings of low-resource countries with high disease burden.

  15. Simple System for Isothermal DNA Amplification Coupled to Lateral Flow Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskos, Kristina; Hickerson, Anna I.; Lu, Hsiang-Wei; Ferguson, Tanya M.; Shinde, Deepali N.; Klaue, Yvonne; Niemz, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    Infectious disease diagnosis in point-of-care settings can be greatly improved through integrated, automated nucleic acid testing devices. We have developed an early prototype for a low-cost system which executes isothermal DNA amplification coupled to nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF) detection in a mesofluidic cartridge attached to a portable instrument. Fluid handling inside the cartridge is facilitated through one-way passive valves, flexible pouches, and electrolysis-driven pumps, which promotes a compact and inexpensive instrument design. The closed-system disposable prevents workspace amplicon contamination. The cartridge design is based on standard scalable manufacturing techniques such as injection molding. Nucleic acid amplification occurs in a two-layer pouch that enables efficient heat transfer. We have demonstrated as proof of principle the amplification and detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) genomic DNA in the cartridge, using either Loop Mediated Amplification (LAMP) or the Exponential Amplification Reaction (EXPAR), both coupled to NALF detection. We envision that a refined version of this cartridge, including upstream sample preparation coupled to amplification and detection, will enable fully-automated sample-in to answer-out infectious disease diagnosis in primary care settings of low-resource countries with high disease burden. PMID:23922706

  16. Electrochemical detection of specific DNA and respiratory activity of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Ikeuchi, Tomohiko; Saito, Masato; Nagatani, Naoki; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2012-01-01

    We present two rapid and simplified detection methods for Escherichia coli involving the use of a hand-held potentiostat and a disposable screen-printed carbon electrode. E. coli is one of the indicator organisms used to access for food safety. Commonly, microbiological culture techniques take more than one day to yield results and therefore, a simple, cost-effective, in situ detection system is required for testing food safety. This report describes two complementary techniques for high- and low-sensitivity detection of E. coli. High-sensitivity detection relies upon quantification of DNA amplification by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), while the simplified, low-sensitivity detection can be obtained through measurement of oxygen consumption due to respiration; importantly, both techniques utilize the same type of electrode. The former entails mixing the PCR mixture with Hoechst, an electro-active DNA intercalator, and then, measuring the oxidation current. Binding of Hoechst molecules to the amplified DNA causes the peak current to decrease because of the slow diffusion of the Hoechst-amplified DNA complex to the electrode surface. The results showed that the oxidation peak current of Hoechst decreased depending on the number of E. coli cells added to the PCR mixture as the template for amplification, and the sensitivity of the method was as low as a single bacterium. Oxygen consumption was detected by direct measurement of the cell-containing culture medium. This method required only 10 μL to be applied on the screen-printed electrode, and the reduction in oxygen current was clearly observed within 30 min when a minimum of 1 × 10 5 cells were present. These results were obtained without purifying the culture, and the samples were applied onto the electrode without any surface modifications. The techniques describes in this report are versatile, because they require the same type of electrode, have simplistic nature, use a hand-held potentiostat, and have

  17. Somatic mutation detection using various targeted detection assays in paired samples of circulating tumor DNA, primary tumor and metastases from patients undergoing resection of colorectal liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beije, Nick; Helmijr, Jean C; Weerts, Marjolein J A; Beaufort, Corine M; Wiggin, Matthew; Marziali, Andre; Verhoef, Cornelis; Sleijfer, Stefan; Jansen, Maurice P H M; Martens, John W M

    2016-12-01

    Assessing circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is a promising method to evaluate somatic mutations from solid tumors in a minimally-invasive way. In a group of twelve metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients undergoing liver metastasectomy, from each patient DNA from cell-free DNA (cfDNA), the primary tumor, metastatic liver tissue, normal tumor-adjacent colon or liver tissue, and whole blood were obtained. Investigated was the feasibility of a targeted NGS approach to identify somatic mutations in ctDNA. This targeted NGS approach was also compared with NGS preceded by mutant allele enrichment using synchronous coefficient of drag alteration technology embodied in the OnTarget assay, and for selected mutations with digital PCR (dPCR). All tissue and cfDNA samples underwent IonPGM sequencing for a CRC-specific 21-gene panel, which was analyzed using a standard and a modified calling pipeline. In addition, cfDNA, whole blood and normal tissue DNA were analyzed with the OnTarget assay and with dPCR for specific mutations in cfDNA as detected in the corresponding primary and/or metastatic tumor tissue. NGS with modified calling was superior to standard calling and detected ctDNA in the cfDNA of 10 patients harboring mutations in APC, ATM, CREBBP, FBXW7, KRAS, KMT2D, PIK3CA and TP53. Using this approach, variant allele frequencies in plasma ranged predominantly from 1 to 10%, resulting in limited concordance between ctDNA and the primary tumor (39%) and the metastases (55%). Concordance between ctDNA and tissue markedly improved when ctDNA was evaluated for KRAS, PIK3CA and TP53 mutations by the OnTarget assay (80%) and digital PCR (93%). Additionally, using these techniques mutations were observed in tumor-adjacent tissue with normal morphology in the majority of patients, which were not observed in whole blood. In conclusion, in these mCRC patients with oligometastatic disease NGS on cfDNA was feasible, but had limited sensitivity to detect all somatic mutations present

  18. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for bovine papillomavirus detection using polymeric film on screen-printed electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Gustavo A; Souza, Elaine V M; Campos-Ferreira, Danielly S; Arruda, Mariana S; Castelletti, Carlos H M; Wanderley, Marcela S O; Ekert, Marek H F; Bruneska, Danyelly; Lima-Filho, José L

    2012-01-01

    A new electrochemical DNA biosensor for bovine papillomavirus (BPV) detection that was based on screen-printed electrodes was comprehensively studied by electrochemical methods of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). A BPV probe was immobilised on a working electrode (gold) modified with a polymeric film of poly-L-lysine (PLL) and chitosan. The experimental design was carried out to evaluate the influence of polymers, probe concentration (BPV probe) and immobilisation time on the electrochemical reduction of methylene blue (MB). The polymer poly-L-lysine (PLL), a probe concentration of 1 μM and an immobilisation time of 60 min showed the best result for the BPV probe immobilisation. With the hybridisation of a complementary target sequence (BPV target), the electrochemical signal decreased compared to a BPV probe immobilised on the modified PLL-gold electrode. Viral DNA that was extracted from cattle with papillomatosis also showed a decrease in the MB electrochemical reduction, which suggested that the decreased electrochemical signal corresponded to a bovine papillomavirus infection. The hybridisation specificity experiments further indicated that the biosensor could discriminate the complementary sequence from the non-complementary sequence. Thus, the results showed that the development of analytical devices, such as a biosensor, could assist in the rapid and efficient detection of bovine papillomavirus DNA and help in the prevention and treatment of papillomatosis in cattle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Two color DNA barcode detection in photoluminescence suppressed silicon nitride nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assad, Ossama N; Di Fiori, Nicolas; Squires, Allison H; Meller, Amit

    2015-01-14

    Optical sensing of solid-state nanopores is a relatively new approach that can enable high-throughput, multicolor readout from a collection of nanopores. It is therefore highly attractive for applications such as nanopore-based DNA sequencing and genotyping using DNA barcodes. However, to date optical readout has been plagued by the need to achieve sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for single fluorophore sensing, while still maintaining millisecond resolution. One of the main factors degrading the optical SNR in solid-state nanopores is the high photoluminescence (PL) background emanating from the silicon nitride (SiNx) membrane in which pores are commonly fabricated. Focusing on the optical properties of SiNx nanopores we show that the local membrane PL intensity is substantially reduced, and its spectrum is shifted toward shorter wavelengths with increasing e-beam dose. This phenomenon, which is correlated with a marked photocurrent enhancement in these nanopores, is utilized to perform for the first time single molecule fluorescence detection using both green and red laser excitations. Specifically, the reduction in PL and the concurrent measurement of the nanopore photocurrent enhancement allow us to maximize the background suppression and to detect a dual color, five-unit DNA barcode with high SNR levels.

  20. First detection of Leishmania major DNA in Sergentomyia (Spelaeomyia) darlingi from cutaneous leishmaniasis foci in Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdjane-Brouk, Zohra; Koné, Abdoulaye K; Djimdé, Abdoulaye A; Charrel, Rémi N; Ravel, Christophe; Delaunay, Pascal; del Giudice, Pascal; Diarra, Adama Z; Doumbo, Siala; Goita, Siaka; Thera, Mahamadou A; Depaquit, Jérôme; Marty, Pierre; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Izri, Arezki

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania major complex is the main causative agent of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in the Old World. Phlebotomus papatasi and Phlebotomus duboscqi are recognized vectors of L. major complex in Northern and Southern Sahara, respectively. In Mali, ZCL due to L. major is an emerging public health problem, with several cases reported from different parts of the country. The main objective of the present study was to identify the vectors of Leishmania major in the Bandiagara area, in Mali. An entomological survey was carried out in the ZCL foci of Bandiagara area. Sandflies were collected using CDC miniature light traps and sticky papers. In the field, live female Phlebotomine sandflies were identified and examined for the presence of promastigotes. The remaining sandflies were identified morphologically and tested for Leishmania by PCR in the ITS2 gene. The source of blood meal of the engorged females was determined using the cyt-b sequence. Out of the 3,259 collected sandflies, 1,324 were identified morphologically, and consisted of 20 species, of which four belonged to the genus Phlebotomus and 16 to the genus Sergentomyia. Leishmania major DNA was detected by PCR in 7 of the 446 females (1.6%), specifically 2 out of 115 Phlebotomus duboscqi specimens, and 5 from 198 Sergentomyia darlingi specimens. Human DNA was detected in one blood-fed female S. darlingi positive for L. major DNA. Our data suggest the possible involvement of P. duboscqi and potentially S. darlingi in the transmission of ZCL in Mali.

  1. [Real-time quantification to analyze historical Colombian samples detecting a short fragment of hypervariable region II of mitochondrial DNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Luz Adriana; Rodríguez, Freddy; Langebaek, Carl Henrik; Groot, Helena

    2016-09-01

    Unlike other molecular biology studies, the analysis of ancient DNA (aDNA) requires special infrastructure and methodological conditions to guarantee the quality of the results. One of the main authenticity criteria is DNA quantification, where quantitative real-time PCR is often used given its sensitivity and specificity. Nevertheless, the implementation of these conditions and methodologies to fulfill authenticity criteria imply higher costs. Objective: To develop a simple and less costly method for mitochondrial DNA quantification suitable for highly degraded samples. Materials and methods: The proposed method is based on the use of mini-primers for the specific amplification of short fragments of mitochondrial DNA. The subsequent purification of these amplified fragments allows a standard curve to be constructed with concentrations in accordance to the state of degradation of the samples. Results: The proposed method successfully detected DNA from ancient samples including bone remains and mummified tissue. DNA inhibitory substances were also detected. Conclusion: The proposed method represents a simpler and cost-effective way to detect low amounts of aDNA, and a tool to differentiate DNA-free samples from samples with inhibitory substances.

  2. Target-responsive DNA hydrogel for non-enzymatic and visual detection of glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanli; Mao, Yu; An, Yuan; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Huimin; Yan, Jinmao; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2018-03-26

    We have successfully developed a target-responsive aptamer cross-linked hydrogel for the visual detection of glucose, an important biomedical analyte. In this work, the glucose-responsive hydrogel was prepared using the target aptamer and its two short complementary DNA strands grafted onto a linear polyacrylamide chain as cross-linkers. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified with thiol-PEG were encapsulated in the gel and used as the output signal for visible detection. The complex of glucose and its ligand of boronic acid derivatives (Shinkai's receptor) can bind with the aptamer to disrupt the hydrogel, leading to the release of AuNPs with a distinct red colour in the supernatant. By this method glucose can be detected with the naked eye, and the sensor has a detection limit of 0.44 mM in buffer with the help of UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Furthermore, glucose spiked in 50% urine and 30% serum could also be detected respectively with the naked eye, and glucose was quantitatively detected in 50% urine. The hydrogel system provides a non-enzymatic and visual method for glucose detection, and offers promising applications in biotechnology and biomedicine.

  3. COBAS AMPLICOR: fully automated RNA and DNA amplification and detection system for routine diagnostic PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDomenico, N; Link, H; Knobel, R; Caratsch, T; Weschler, W; Loewy, Z G; Rosenstraus, M

    1996-12-01

    The COBAS AMPLICOR system automates amplification and detection of target nucleic acids, making diagnostic PCR routine for a variety of infectious diseases. The system contains a single thermal cycler with two independently regulated heating/cooling blocks, an incubator, a magnetic particle washer, a pipettor, and a photometer. Amplified products are captured on oligonucleotide-coated paramagnetic microparticles and detected with use of an avidin-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugate. Concentrated solutions of amplicon or HRP were pipetted without detectable carryover. Amplified DNA was detected with an intraassay CV of < 4.5%; the combined intraassay CV for amplification and detection was < 15%. No cross-reactivity was observed when three different target nucleic acids were amplified in a single reaction and detected with three target-specific capture probes. The initial COBAS AMPLICOR menu includes qualitative tests for diagnosing infections with Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and hepatitis C virus. All tests include an optional Internal Control to provide assurance that specimens are successfully amplified and detected.

  4. Enhanced sensing of dengue virus DNA detection using O2 plasma treated-silicon nanowire based electrical biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.F.A.; Yusof, N.A.; Hashim, U.; Hushiarian, R.; Nuzaihan, M.N.M.; Hamidon, M.N.; Zawawi, R.M.; Fathil, M.F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue Virus (DENV) has become one of the most serious arthropod-borne viral diseases, causing death globally. The existing methods for DENV detection suffer from the late stage treatment due to antibodies-based detection which is feasible only after five days following the onset of the illness. Here, we demonstrated the highly effective molecular electronic based detection utilizing silicon nanowire (SiNW) integrated with standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process as a sensing device for detecting deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) related to DENV in an early stage diagnosis. To transform the fabricated devices as a functional sensing element, three-step procedure consist of SiNW surface modification, DNA immobilization and DNA hybridization were employed. The detection principle works by detecting the changes in current of SiNW which bridge the source and drain terminal to sense the immobilization of probe DNA and their hybridization with target DNA. The oxygen (O 2 ) plasma was proposed as an effective strategy for increasing the binding amounts of target DNA by modified the SiNW surface. It was found that the detection limit of the optimized O 2 plasma treated-SiNW device could be reduced to 1.985 × 10 −14  M with a linear detection range of the sequence-specific DNA from 1.0 × 10 −9  M to 1.0 × 10 −13  M. In addition, the developed biosensor device was able to discriminate between complementary, single mismatch and non-complementary DNA sequences. This highly sensitive assay was then applied to the detection of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) product of DENV-DNA, making it as a potential method for disease diagnosis through electrical biosensor. - Highlights: • Molecular electronic detection of Dengue Virus (DENV) DNA using SiNW biosensor is presented. • Oxygen plasma surface treatment as an enhancer technique for device sensitivity is highlighted. • The limit of detection (LoD) as low as 1.985

  5. Enhanced sensing of dengue virus DNA detection using O{sub 2} plasma treated-silicon nanowire based electrical biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, S.F.A., E-mail: siti_fatimah0410@yahoo.com [Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yusof, N.A., E-mail: azahy@upm.edu.my [Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Hashim, U. [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Hushiarian, R. [La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Victoria, 3086 (Australia); Nuzaihan, M.N.M. [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Hamidon, M.N. [Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Zawawi, R.M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Fathil, M.F.M. [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2016-10-26

    Dengue Virus (DENV) has become one of the most serious arthropod-borne viral diseases, causing death globally. The existing methods for DENV detection suffer from the late stage treatment due to antibodies-based detection which is feasible only after five days following the onset of the illness. Here, we demonstrated the highly effective molecular electronic based detection utilizing silicon nanowire (SiNW) integrated with standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process as a sensing device for detecting deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) related to DENV in an early stage diagnosis. To transform the fabricated devices as a functional sensing element, three-step procedure consist of SiNW surface modification, DNA immobilization and DNA hybridization were employed. The detection principle works by detecting the changes in current of SiNW which bridge the source and drain terminal to sense the immobilization of probe DNA and their hybridization with target DNA. The oxygen (O{sub 2}) plasma was proposed as an effective strategy for increasing the binding amounts of target DNA by modified the SiNW surface. It was found that the detection limit of the optimized O{sub 2} plasma treated-SiNW device could be reduced to 1.985 × 10{sup −14} M with a linear detection range of the sequence-specific DNA from 1.0 × 10{sup −9} M to 1.0 × 10{sup −13} M. In addition, the developed biosensor device was able to discriminate between complementary, single mismatch and non-complementary DNA sequences. This highly sensitive assay was then applied to the detection of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) product of DENV-DNA, making it as a potential method for disease diagnosis through electrical biosensor. - Highlights: • Molecular electronic detection of Dengue Virus (DENV) DNA using SiNW biosensor is presented. • Oxygen plasma surface treatment as an enhancer technique for device sensitivity is highlighted. • The limit of detection (Lo

  6. Extraction of DNA from orange juice, and detection of bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jinhe; Baldwin, Elizabeth; Liao, Hui-Ling; Zhao, Wei; Kostenyuk, Igor; Burns, Jacqueline; Irey, Mike

    2013-10-02

    Orange juice processed from Huanglongbing (HLB) affected fruit is often associated with bitter taste and/or off-flavor. HLB disease in Florida is associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), a phloem-limited bacterium. The current standard to confirm CLas for citrus trees is to take samples from midribs of leaves, which are rich in phloem tissues, and use a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) test to detect the 16S rDNA gene of CLas. It is extremely difficult to detect CLas in orange juice because of the low CLas population, high sugar and pectin concentration, low pH, and possible existence of an inhibitor to DNA amplification. The objective of this research was to improve extraction of DNA from orange juice and detection of CLas by qPCR. Homogenization using a sonicator increased DNA yield by 86% in comparison to mortar and pestle extraction. It is difficult to separate DNA from pectin; however, DNA was successfully extracted by treating the juice with pectinase. Application of an elution column successfully removed the unidentified inhibitor to DNA amplification. This work provided a protocol to extract DNA from whole orange juice and detect CLas in HLB-affected fruit.

  7. DNA isolation protocols affect the detection limit of PCR approaches of bacteria in samples from the human gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoetendal, E.G.; Ben-Amor, K.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Abee, T.; Vos, de W.M.

    2001-01-01

    A major concern in molecular ecological studies is the lysis efficiency of different bacteria in a complex ecosystem. We used a PCR-based 16S rDNA approach to determine the effect of two DNA isolation protocols (i.e. the bead beating and Triton-X100 method) on the detection limit of seven

  8. Simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets by integrating dual-color graphene quantum dot nanoprobes and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhaosheng; Shan, Xiaoyue; Chai, Lujing; Chen, Jianrong; Feng, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets was achieved based on a biocompatible graphene quantum dots (GQDs)